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Sample records for infarct size estimated

  1. Metoprolol in acute myocardial infarction. Enzymatic estimation of infarct size. The MIAMI Trial Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-22

    The maximum serum activity for aspartate aminotransferase (s-ASAT) during the first 3 days was recorded in 5,507 patients with suspected or definite acute myocardial infarction. The s-ASAT activity was corrected for the normal range from each center. The median s-ASAT activity was 4.9 arbitrary units in the placebo group versus 4.6 arbitrary units in the metoprolol group (p = 0.072). Univariate analyses indicated that the delay time between onset of symptoms and randomization and sympathetic activity at entry significantly influenced the effect of metoprolol. A similar decrease in serum enzyme activity after metoprolol treatment was observed independent of signs of infarct localization on the entry electrocardiogram.

  2. Comparison of ASAT, CK, CK-MB, and LD for the estimation of acute myocardial infarct size in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, P; Christiansen, C; Alstrup, K

    1983-03-14

    The purpose of this study was to set up a simple and reliable procedure for estimating acute myocardial infarct (AMI) size by measuring serum enzymes in a few daily blood samples. Peak enzyme values and estimated infarct size from one, two, or three daily samples of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), creatine kinase (CK), CK-MB, and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) were compared with the extent of myocardial necrosis measured at autopsy in 22 patients who died from AMI. The correlation between the extent of the necrosis measured and peak serum enzymes from one daily blood sample was highest for CK-MB (r = 0.78) and LD (r = 0.73) compared to CK (r = 0.68) and ASAT (r = 0.67). To obtain a significant correlation, however, two patients had to be excluded from the ASAT and LD analyses. No significant improvement was obtained by more frequent blood sampling. Estimation of infarct size did not improve the correlation significantly for any enzyme, although the coefficient of correlation for CK-MB increased slightly (r = 0.83). Serum CK-MB determination provides a semiquantitative estimate of infarct size, but the other enzymes may give erroneous estimates owing to lesser cardiospecificity.

  3. Estimation of infarct size by three-dimensional surface display method of myocardial single photon emission CT with /sup 201/Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Masahiro; Tsuda, Takatoshi; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo; Hosoba, Minoru; Ban, Ryuichi; Hirano, Takako

    1987-11-01

    To estimate infarct size, we devised three-dimensional (3D) surface display method of /sup 201/Tl myocardial single photon emission CT (SPECT). The method was performed with maximum-count circumferential profiles (CPs) of short axis views of /sup 201/Tl myocardial SPECT. The counts of maximum-count CP were put into a pixel line with the calculated left ventricular circumferential length on each short axis slice. A 3D-surface display map was created by arrangement of these pixel lines from apex to base of left ventricle in order. The sizes of defects in myocardial phantom were calculated by this method. There was a high correlation between the real defect sizes and the calculated defect sizes. In 6 patients with anterior myocardial infarction, the infarct sizes were calculated by this method. The extent of abnormality was identified by automatic computer comparison of each patient's profiles with corresponding lower limits of normal profiles. The infarct sizes calculated by 3D-surface display method were closely correlated not only with the infarct sizes calculated by summation of defect sizes in short axis views, but also with left ventricular ejection fractions. We concluded that the 3D-surface display method of /sup 201/Tl myocardial SPECT is effective for noninvasive assessment of the extent of myocardial infarction.

  4. A mismatch index based on the difference between measured left ventricular ejection fraction and that estimated by infarct size at three months following reperfused acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Esben A; Bang, Lia E; Lønborg, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a result of infarcted myocardium and may involve dysfunctional but viable myocardium. An index that may quantitatively determine whether LVEF is reduced b...

  5. Measurement of infarct size and percentage myocardium infarcted in a dog preparation with single photon-emission computed tomography, thallium-201, and indium 111-monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Lerrick, K.S.; Coromilas, J.; Seldin, D.W.; Esser, P.D.; Zimmerman, J.M.; Keller, A.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Bigger, J.T. Jr.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-07-01

    Single photon-emission tomography (SPECT) and indium 111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab fragments were used to measure myocardial infarct size in 12 dogs, six subjected to balloon catheter-induced coronary artery occlusion for 6 hr (late reperfusion) and six subjected to occlusion with reperfusion at 2 hr (early reperfusion). Tomographic imaging was performed 24 hr after the intravenous injection of labeled Fab fragments with the use of a dual-head SPECT camera with medium-energy collimators. Immediately after the first tomographic scan, thallium-201 was injected into nine of 12 dogs and imaging was repeated. Estimated infarct size in grams was calculated from transaxially reconstructed, normalized, and background-corrected indium SPECT images with the use of a threshold technique for edge detection. Estimated noninfarcted myocardium in grams was calculated from obliquely reconstructed thallium SPECT images by a similar method. The animals were killed and infarct size in grams and true infarct size as a percentage of total left ventricular myocardial volume were measured by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. Estimated infarct size from indium SPECT images showed an excellent correlation with true infarct size (r = .95, SEE = 4.1 g). Estimated percentage myocardium infarcted was calculated by dividing estimated infarct size from indium images by the sum of estimated infarct size plus estimated noninfarcted myocardium obtained from thallium images. Correlation between the estimated percentage of myocardium infarcted and true percentage of myocardium infarcted was excellent.

  6. Early association of electrocardiogram alteration with infarct size and cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶则伟; 黄元伟; 夏强; 傅军; 赵志宏; 陆贤; BRUCEI.C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective:Myocardial infarction (MI) is the main cause of heart failure, but the relationship between the extent of MI and cardiac function has not been clearly determined.The present study was undertaken to investigate early changes in the electrocardiogram associated with infarct size and cardiac function after MI. Methods: MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats. Electrocardiograms, echocardiographs and hemodynamic parameters were assessed and myocardial infarct size was measured from mid-transverse sections stained with Masson's trichrome. Results:The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes was strongly correlated with myocardial infarct size (r=0.920, P<0.0001), left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.868, P<0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r=0.835, P<0.0004).Furthermore, there was close relationship between MI size and cardiac function as assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.913, P<0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r=0.893, P<0.0001).Conclusion: The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes after MI can be used to estimate the extent of MI as well as cardiac function.

  7. Early association of electrocardiogram alteration with infarct size and cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Ze-wei (陶则伟); HUANG Yuan-wei (黄元伟); XIA Qiang (夏强); FU Jun (傅军); ZHAO Zhi-hong (赵志宏); LU Xian (陆贤); BRUCE I.C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Myocardial infarction (MI) is the main cause of heart failure, but the relationship between the extent of MI and cardiac function has not been clearly determined. The present study was undertaken to investigate early changes in the electrocardiogram associated with infarct size and cardiac function after MI. Methods: MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats. Electrocardiograms, echocardiographs and hemodynamic parameters were assessed and myocardial infarct size was measured from mid-transverse sections stained with Masson's trichrome. Results: The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes was strongly correlated with myocardial infarct size (r = 0.920, P < 0.0001), left ventricular ejection fraction (r = (0.868, P < 0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r = 0.835, P < 0.0004). Furthermore, there was close relationship between MI size and cardiac function as assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction (r = (0.913, P < 0.0001) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (r = 0.893, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The sum of pathological Q wave amplitudes after MI can be used to estimate the extent of MI as well as cardiac function.

  8. Performance of two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography for the assessment of infarct size and left ventricular function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, E; Kanashiro, R M; Murad, N; Carvalho, A C C; Cravo, S L D; Campos, O; Tucci, P J F; Moises, V A

    2006-05-01

    Although echocardiography has been used in rats, few studies have determined its efficacy for estimating myocardial infarct size. Our objective was to estimate the myocardial infarct size, and to evaluate anatomic and functional variables of the left ventricle. Myocardial infarction was produced in 43 female Wistar rats by ligature of the left coronary artery. Echocardiography was performed 5 weeks later to measure left ventricular diameter and transverse area (mean of 3 transverse planes), infarct size (percentage of the arc with infarct on 3 transverse planes), systolic function by the change in fractional area, and diastolic function by mitral inflow parameters. The histologic measurement of myocardial infarction size was similar to the echocardiographic method. Myocardial infarct size ranged from 4.8 to 66.6% when determined by histology and from 5 to 69.8% when determined by echocardiography, with good correlation (r = 0.88; P echocardiography (r = -0.87; P rats.

  9. Performance of two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography for the assessment of infarct size and left ventricular function in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozawa E.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although echocardiography has been used in rats, few studies have determined its efficacy for estimating myocardial infarct size. Our objective was to estimate the myocardial infarct size, and to evaluate anatomic and functional variables of the left ventricle. Myocardial infarction was produced in 43 female Wistar rats by ligature of the left coronary artery. Echocardiography was performed 5 weeks later to measure left ventricular diameter and transverse area (mean of 3 transverse planes, infarct size (percentage of the arc with infarct on 3 transverse planes, systolic function by the change in fractional area, and diastolic function by mitral inflow parameters. The histologic measurement of myocardial infarction size was similar to the echocardiographic method. Myocardial infarct size ranged from 4.8 to 66.6% when determined by histology and from 5 to 69.8% when determined by echocardiography, with good correlation (r = 0.88; P < 0.05; Pearson correlation coefficient. Left ventricular diameter and mean diastolic transverse area correlated with myocardial infarct size by histology (r = 0.57 and r = 0.78; P < 0.0005. The fractional area change ranged from 28.5 ± 5.6 (large-size myocardial infarction to 53.1 ± 1.5% (control and correlated with myocardial infarct size by echocardiography (r = -0.87; P < 0.00001 and histology (r = -0.78; P < 00001. The E/A wave ratio of mitral inflow velocity for animals with large-size myocardial infarction (5.6 ± 2.7 was significantly higher than for all others (control: 1.9 ± 0.1; small-size myocardial infarction: 1.9 ± 0.4; moderate-size myocardial infarction: 2.8 ± 2.3. There was good agreement between echocardiographic and histologic estimates of myocardial infarct size in rats.

  10. Comparison of visual scoring and quantitative planimetry methods for estimation of global infarct size on delayed enhanced cardiac MRI and validation with myocardial enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewton, Nathan, E-mail: nmewton@gmail.com [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN (Centre de Recherche et d' Applications en Traitement de l' Image et du Signal), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5220, U 630 INSERM (France); Revel, Didier [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN (Centre de Recherche et d' Applications en Traitement de l' Image et du Signal), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5220, U 630 INSERM (France); Bonnefoy, Eric [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Ovize, Michel [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); INSERM Unite 886 (France); Croisille, Pierre [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN (Centre de Recherche et d' Applications en Traitement de l' Image et du Signal), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5220, U 630 INSERM (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Although delayed enhanced CMR has become a reference method for infarct size quantification, there is no ideal method to quantify total infarct size in a routine clinical practice. In a prospective study we compared the performance and post-processing time of a global visual scoring method to standard quantitative planimetry and we compared both methods to the peak values of myocardial biomarkers. Materials and methods: This study had local ethics committee approval; all patients gave written informed consent. One hundred and three patients admitted with reperfused AMI to our intensive care unit had a complete CMR study with gadolinium-contrast injection 4 {+-} 2 days after admission. A global visual score was defined on a 17-segment model and compared with the quantitative planimetric evaluation of hyperenhancement. The peak values of serum Troponin I (TnI) and creatine kinase (CK) release were measured in each patient. Results: The mean percentage of total left ventricular myocardium with hyperenhancement determined by the quantitative planimetry method was (20.1 {+-} 14.6) with a range of 1-68%. There was an excellent correlation between quantitative planimetry and visual global scoring for the hyperenhancement extent's measurement (r = 0.94; y = 1.093x + 0.87; SEE = 1.2; P < 0.001) The Bland-Altman plot showed a good concordance between the two approaches (mean of the differences = 1.9% with a standard deviation of 4.7). Mean post-processing time for quantitative planimetry was significantly longer than visual scoring post-processing time (23.7 {+-} 5.7 min vs 5.0 {+-} 1.1 min respectively, P < 0.001). Correlation between peak CK and quantitative planimetry was r = 0.82 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.83 (P < 0.001) with visual global scoring. Correlation between peak Troponin I and quantitative planimetry was r = 0.86 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.85 (P < 0.001) with visual global scoring. Conclusion: A visual approach based on a 17-segment model allows a rapid

  11. Performance of two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography for the assessment of infarct size and left ventricular function in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa E.; Kanashiro R.M.; Murad N.; Carvalho A.C.C.; Cravo S.L.D.; Campos O.; Tucci P.J.F.; Moises V.A.

    2006-01-01

    Although echocardiography has been used in rats, few studies have determined its efficacy for estimating myocardial infarct size. Our objective was to estimate the myocardial infarct size, and to evaluate anatomic and functional variables of the left ventricle. Myocardial infarction was produced in 43 female Wistar rats by ligature of the left coronary artery. Echocardiography was performed 5 weeks later to measure left ventricular diameter and transverse area (mean of 3 transverse planes), i...

  12. Comparison of infarct size changes with delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and electrocardiogram QRS scoring during the 6 months after acutely reperfused myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, L.E.; Ripa, R.S.; Grande, P.

    2008-01-01

    that has infarcted. There are no comparison of serial changes on ECG and DE-MRI measuring infarct size. AIM: The general aim of this study was to describe the acute, healing, and chronic phases of the changes in infarct size estimated by the ECG and DE-MRI. The specific aim was to compare estimates......INTRODUCTION: Magnetic resonance imaging using the delayed contrast-enhanced (DE-MRI) method can be used for characterizing and quantifying myocardial infarction (MI). Electrocardiogram (ECG) score after the acute phase of MI can be used to estimate the portion of left ventricular myocardium...... of the Selvester QRS scoring system and DE-MRI to identify the difference between the extent of left ventricle occupied by infarction in the acute and chronic phases. METHODS: In 31 patients (26 men, age 56 +/- 9) with reperfused ST-elevation MI (11 anterior, 20 inferior), standard 12-lead ECG and DE-MRI were...

  13. Treatment with the gap junction modifier rotigaptide (ZP123) reduces infarct size in rats with chronic myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugan, Ketil; Marcussen, Niels; Kjølbye, Anne Louise;

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with non-selective drugs (eg, long-chain alcohols, halothane) that reduce gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is associated with reduced infarct size after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, it has been suggested that gap junction intercellular communication stimulating ...

  14. Multiscale Characterization of Impact of Infarct Size on Myocardial Remodeling in an Ovine Infarct Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Li, Tielou; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-01-01

    The surviving myocardium initially compensates the loss of injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) and gradually becomes progressively dysfunctional. There have been limited studies on the effect of infarct size on temporal and spatial alterations in the myocardium during progressive myocardial remodeling. MI with three infarct sizes, i.e. 15, 25 and 35% of the left ventricular (LV) wall, was created in an ovine infarction model. The progressive LV remodeling over a 12-week period was studied. Echocardiography, sonomicrometry, and histological and molecular analyses were carried out to evaluate cardiac function, regional tissue contractile function, structural remodeling and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and calcium handling proteins. Twelve weeks after MI, the 15, 25 and 35% MI groups had normalized LV end diastole volumes of 1.4 ± 0.2, 1.7 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg, normalized end systole volumes of 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.0 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.3 ml/kg and LV ejection fractions of 43 ± 3, 42 ± 6 and 34 ± 4%, respectively. They all differed from the sham group (p strain), larger cardiomyocyte size and altered expression of calcium handing proteins in the adjacent myocardium compared to the remote counterpart from the infarct. A significant correlation was found between cardiomyocyte size and remodeling strain in the adjacent zone. A comparative analysis among the three MI groups showed that a larger infarct size (35 vs. 15% MI) was associated with larger remodeling strain, more serious impairment in the cellular structure and composition, and regional contractile function at regional tissue level and LV function at organ level.

  15. MIQuant--semi-automation of infarct size assessment in models of cardiac ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Nascimento

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (r(midline length = 0.981; r(area = 0.970 and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis, free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies.

  16. MIQuant – Semi-Automation of Infarct Size Assessment in Models of Cardiac Ischemic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Tiago; de Pina, Maria de Fátima; Guedes, Joana G.; Freire, Ana; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua

    2011-01-01

    Background The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (rmidline length = 0.981; rarea = 0.970 ) and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis), free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. Conclusions We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies. PMID:21980376

  17. MIQuant--semi-automation of infarct size assessment in models of cardiac ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Diana S; Valente, Mariana; Esteves, Tiago; de Pina, Maria de Fátima; Guedes, Joana G; Freire, Ana; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua

    2011-01-01

    The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (r(midline length) = 0.981; r(area) = 0.970 ) and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis), free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies.

  18. Treatment with the gap junction modifier rotigaptide (ZP123) reduces infarct size in rats with chronic myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Ketil; Marcussen, Niels; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Hennan, James K; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg

    2006-02-01

    Treatment with non-selective drugs (eg, long-chain alcohols, halothane) that reduce gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is associated with reduced infarct size after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, it has been suggested that gap junction intercellular communication stimulating compounds may increase infarct size. The antiarrhythmic peptide analogue rotigaptide (ZP123) increases cardiac gap junction intercellular communication and the purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of rotigaptide treatment on infarct size. Myocardial infarction was induced in male rats by ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Rats (n = 156) were treated with rotigaptide at three dose levels or vehicle from the onset of ischemia and for 3 weeks following LAD occlusion. Infarct size was determined using histomorphometry after 3 weeks treatment. Rotigaptide treatment producing steady state plasma levels of 0.8 +/- 0.1, 5.5 +/- 0.5, and 86 +/- 8 nmol/L had no effect on mortality, but reduced infarct size to 90 +/- 10% (P = 0.41), 67 +/- 7% (P = 0.005), and 82 +/- 7% (P = 0.13), respectively relative to vehicle-treated myocardial infarction rats (100 +/- 12%). In contrast to what was predicted, our data demonstrates that rotigaptide treatment was associated with a significant infarct size reduction. We conclude that whereas treatment with non-selective inhibitors of gap junction intercellular communication cause a reduction in infarct size, this information cannot be extrapolated to the effects of compounds that selectively increase gap junction intercellular communication.

  19. Acute myocardial infarction and infarct size: do circadian variations play a role?

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    Ibáñez B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aída Suárez-Barrientos,1 Borja Ibáñez1,21Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, 2Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The circadian rhythm influences cardiovascular system physiology, inducing diurnal variations in blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, endothelial functions, platelet aggregation, and coronary arterial flow, among other physiological parameters. Indeed, an internal circadian network modulates cardiovascular physiology by regulating heart rate, metabolism, and even myocyte growth and repair ability. Consequently, cardiovascular pathology is also controlled by circadian oscillations, with increased morning incidence of cardiovascular events. The potential circadian influence on the human tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion has not been systematically scrutinized until recently. It has since been proven, in both animals and humans, that infarct size varies during the day depending on the symptom onset time, while circadian fluctuations in spontaneous cardioprotection in humans with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI have also been demonstrated. Furthermore, several studies have proposed that the time of day at which revascularization occurs in patients with STEMI may also influence infarct size and reperfusion outcomes. The potential association of the circadian clock with infarct size advocates the acknowledgment of time of day as a new prognostic factor in patients suffering acute myocardial infarction, which would open up a new field for chronotherapeutic targets and lead to the inclusion of time of day as a variable in clinical trials that test novel cardioprotective strategies.Keywords: cardioprotection, circadian rhythm, reperfusion injury, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

  20. Anti-CCL21 Antibody Attenuates Infarct Size and Improves Cardiac Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

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    Yi Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Over-activation of cellular inflammatory effectors adversely affects myocardial function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The CC-chemokine CCL21 is, via its receptor CCR7, one of the key regulators of inflammation and immune cell recruitment, participates in various inflammatory disorders, including cardiovascular ones. This study explored the therapeutic effect of an anti-CCL21 antibody in cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Methods and Results: An animal model of AMI generated by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in C57BL/6 mice resulted in higher levels of circulating CCL21 and cardiac CCR7. Neutralization of CCL21 by intravenous injection of anti-CCL21 monoclonal antibody reduced infarct size after AMI, decreased serum levels of neutrophil and monocyte chemo attractants post AMI, diminished neutrophil and macrophage recruitment in infarcted myocardium, and suppressed MMP-9 and total collagen content in myocardium. Anti-CCL21 treatment also limited cardiac enlargement and improved left ventricular function. Conclusions: Our study indicated that CCL21 was involved in cardiac remodeling post infarction and anti-CCL21 strategies might be useful in the treatment of AMI.

  1. Reliability of Two Diameters Method in Determining Acute Infarct Size. Validation as New Imaging Biomarker.

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    Jochen B Fiebach

    Full Text Available In order to select patients most likely to benefit for thrombolysis and to predict patient outcome in acute ischemic stroke, the volumetric assessment of the infarcted tissue is used. However, infarct volume estimation on Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI has moderate interrater variability despite the excellent contrast between ischemic lesion and healthy tissue. In this study, we compared volumetric measurements of DWI hyperintensity to a simple maximum orthogonal diameter approach to identify thresholds indicating infarct size >70 ml and >100 ml.Patients presenting with ischemic stroke with an NIHSS of ≥ 8 were examined with stroke MRI within 24 h after symptom onset. For assessment of the orthogonal DWI lesion diameters (od-values the image with the largest lesion appearance was chosen. The maximal diameter of the lesion was determined and a second diameter was measured perpendicular. Both diameters were multiplied. Od-values were compared to volumetric measurement and od-value thresholds identifying a lesion size of > 70 ml and > 100 ml were determined. In a selected dataset with an even distribution of lesion sizes we compared the results of the od value thresholds with results of the ABC/2 and estimations of lesion volumes made by two resident physicians.For 108 included patients (53 female, mean age 71.36 years with a median infarct volume of 13.4 ml we found an excellent correlation between volumetric measures and od-values (r2 = 0.951. Infarct volume >100 ml corresponds to an od-value cut off of 42; > 70 ml corresponds to an od-value of 32. In the compiled dataset (n = 50 od-value thresholds identified infarcts > 100 ml / > 70 ml with a sensitivity of 90%/ 93% and with a specificity of 98%/ 89%. The od-value offered a higher accuracy in identifying large infarctions compared to both visual estimations and the ABC/2 method.The simple od-value enables identification of large DWI lesions in acute stroke. The cutoff of 42 is useful to

  2.   Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) reduces infarct size and improves porcine heart function after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bune, Laurids Touborg; Larsen, Jens Kjærgaard Rolighed; Thaning, Pia;

    2013-01-01

    (UTP) are both released during myocardial ischemia, influencing hemodynamics. Both mediate the release of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), which can reduce infarct size (IS). The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous ADP and UTP administration during reperfusion could reduce......Acute myocardial infarction continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Timely reperfusion can substantially improve outcomes and the administration of cardioprotective substances during reperfusion is therefore highly attractive. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and uridine-5-triphoshate...... myocardial IS and whether this correlated to t-PA release or improvements in hemodynamic responses. Hemodynamic variables and t-PA were measured in 22 pigs before, during, and after 45 min of left anterior coronary artery occlusion. During reperfusion, the pigs were randomized to 240 min of intracoronary...

  3. Human cord blood cells and myocardial infarction: effect of dose and route of administration on infarct size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Robert J; Burgos, Jose D; Vasko, Mark; Alvarado, Felipe; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Morgan, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal dose of stem cells or the optimal route of administration for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Bone marrow cells, containing hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, in doses of 0.5 x 10(6) to >30 x 10(6) have been directly injected into the myocardium or into coronary arteries or infused intravenously in subjects with myocardial infarctions to reduce infarct size and improve heart function. Therefore, we determined the specific effects of different doses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, on infarct size. In order to determine the optimal technique for stem cell administration, HUCBC were injected directly into the myocardium (IM), or into the LV cavity with the ascending aorta transiently clamped to facilitate coronary artery perfusion (IA), or injected intravenously (IV) in rats 1-2 h after the left anterior coronary artery was permanently ligated. Immune suppressive therapy was not given to any rat. One month later, the infarct size in control rat hearts treated with only Isolyte averaged 23.7 +/- 1.7% of the LV muscle area. Intramyocardial injection of HUCBC reduced the infarct size by 71% with 0.5 x 10(6) HUCBC and by 93% with 4 x 10(6) HUCBC in comparison with the controls (p p p p < 0.05). Nevertheless, IM, IA, and IV HUCBC all produced significant reductions in infarct size in comparison with Isolyte-treated infarcted hearts without requirements for host immune suppression. The present experiments demonstrate that the optimal dose of HUCBC for reduction of infarct size in the rat is 4 x 10(6) IM, 4 x 10(6) IA, and 16 x 10(6) IV, and that the IM injection of HUCBC is the most effective technique for reduction in infarct size.

  4. Effect of Metformin on Metabolites and Relation With Myocardial Infarct Size and Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction After Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, Ruben N; Kofink, Daniel; Dullaart, Robin P F; Dalmeijer, Geertje W; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Horst, Iwan C C; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van der Harst, Pim

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size (ISZ) are key predictors of long-term survival after myocardial infarction (MI). However, little is known about the biochemical pathways driving LV dysfunction after MI. To identify novel biomarkers predicting post-MI LVEF and IS

  5. Quantitative assessment of the infarct size with the unfolded map method of sup 201 Tl myocardial SPECT in patient with acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Masahiro (Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-03-01

    The unfolded map method of {sup 201}Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was evaluated as to the ability to quantify and the clinical reliability in estimation of infarct size. The following results were obtained from basic experiments using a thoracic phantom. The defect area estimated by the unfolded map method was well correlated with the real defect area, in spite of overestimation of the defect area, when the defect area was determined by an isocount method (below 80% of maximum count) (y=1.941 + 2.292x, r=0.971). The defect volume estimated by short-axis images of {sup 201}Tl SPECT was closely correlated with real defect volume in spite of overestimation of defect volume (y=0.762 + 2.156x, r=0.982). When the defect area was estimated by division of the defect volume by the mean myocardial compartment thickness, it was closely correlated with real defect area (y=0.946 + 1.232x, r=0.990). When the volume was calculated from the summation of voxels in the regions districted by isocount threshold level at each section of the {sup 99m}Tc SPECT, the optimal isocount threshold level (percentage to maximum count) was 55%. Then, the clinical reliability of the unfolded map method as infarct sizing was evaluated in 26 patients with acute myocardial infarction by comparing it with enzymatic method, Bull's eye method, and {sup 99m}Tc pyrophosphate (PYP) SPECT method. In 14 first attack patients without right ventricular infarction, infarct area (IA) of the unfolded map method correlated most closely with the accumulated creatine kinase MB isoenzyme release (CK-MBr) (r=0.897), compared with the extent score (ES) (r=0.853) and the severity score (SS) (r=0.871) of Bull's eye method and the infarct volume (IV) (r=0.595) of {sup 99m}Tc PYP SPECT. In conclusion, although the unfolded map method of {sup 201}Tl SPECT has the tendency for overestimating infarct size, it is accurate and clinically reliable in estimating infarct size. (author).

  6. Effect of early metoprolol on infarct size in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: the Effect of Metoprolol in Cardioprotection During an Acute Myocardial Infarction (METOCARD-CNIC) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Borja; Macaya, Carlos; Sánchez-Brunete, Vicente; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Mateos, Alonso; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; García-Ruiz, José M; García-Álvarez, Ana; Iñiguez, Andrés; Jiménez-Borreguero, Jesús; López-Romero, Pedro; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Goicolea, Javier; Ruiz-Mateos, Borja; Bastante, Teresa; Arias, Mercedes; Iglesias-Vázquez, José A; Rodriguez, Maite D; Escalera, Noemí; Acebal, Carlos; Cabrera, José A; Valenciano, Juan; Pérez de Prado, Armando; Fernández-Campos, María J; Casado, Isabel; García-Rubira, Juan C; García-Prieto, Jaime; Sanz-Rosa, David; Cuellas, Carlos; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; Albarrán, Agustín; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de la Torre-Hernández, José M; Pocock, Stuart; Sanz, Ginés; Fuster, Valentin

    2013-10-01

    The effect of β-blockers on infarct size when used in conjunction with primary percutaneous coronary intervention is unknown. We hypothesize that metoprolol reduces infarct size when administered early (intravenously before reperfusion). Patients with Killip class II or less anterior ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 6 hours of symptoms onset were randomized to receive intravenous metoprolol (n=131) or not (control, n=139) before reperfusion. All patients without contraindications received oral metoprolol within 24 hours. The predefined primary end point was infarct size on magnetic resonance imaging performed 5 to 7 days after STEMI. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 220 patients (81%). Mean ± SD infarct size by magnetic resonance imaging was smaller after intravenous metoprolol compared with control (25.6 ± 15.3 versus 32.0 ± 22.2 g; adjusted difference, -6.52; 95% confidence interval, -11.39 to -1.78; P=0.012). In patients with pre-percutaneous coronary intervention Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction grade 0 to 1 flow, the adjusted treatment difference in infarct size was -8.13 (95% confidence interval, -13.10 to -3.16; P=0.0024). Infarct size estimated by peak and area under the curve creatine kinase release was measured in all study populations and was significantly reduced by intravenous metoprolol. Left ventricular ejection fraction was higher in the intravenous metoprolol group (adjusted difference, 2.67%; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-5.21; P=0.045). The composite of death, malignant ventricular arrhythmia, cardiogenic shock, atrioventricular block, and reinfarction at 24 hours in the intravenous metoprolol and control groups was 7.1% and 12.3%, respectively (P=0.21). In patients with anterior Killip class II or less ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, early intravenous metoprolol before reperfusion reduced

  7. Systematic review of survival time in experimental mouse stroke with impact on reliability of infarct estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Carina Kirstine; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster; Hasseldam, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide. Only one treatment for acute ischemic stroke is currently available, thrombolysis with rt-PA, but it is limited in its use. Many efforts have been invested in order to find additive treatments, without success.A multitude...... of reasons for the translational problems from mouse experimental stroke to clinical trials probably exists, including infarct size estimations around the peak time of edema formation. Furthermore, edema is a more prominent feature of stroke in mice than in humans, because of the tendency to produce larger...... infarcts with more substantial edema. Purpose: This paper will give an overview of previous studies of experimental mouse stroke, and correlate survival time to peak time of edema formation. Furthermore, investigations of whether the included studies corrected the infarct measurements for edema...

  8. Infarct size and recurrence of ventricular arrhythmias after defibrillator implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, J. de; Tavernier, R.; Kazmierckzak, J.; Buyzere, M. de; Clement, D.L. [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Wiele, C. van de; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Jordaens, L. [Thoraxcenter, University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Infarct size as determined by perfusion imaging is an independent predictor of mortality after implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias (VA). However, its value as a predictor of VA recurrence and hospitalisation after ICD implantation is unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate whether infarct size as determined by perfusion imaging can help to identify patients who are at high risk for recurrence of VA and hospitalisation after ICD implantation. We studied 56 patients with CAD and life-threatening VA. Before ICD implantation, all patients underwent a uniform study protocol including a thallium-201 stress-redistribution perfusion study. A defect score as a measurement of infarct size was calculated using a 17-segment 5-point scoring system. Study endpoints during follow-up were documented episodes of appropriate anti-tachycardia pacing and/or shocks for VA and cardiac hospitalisation for electrical storm (defined as three or more appropriate ICD interventions within 24 h), heart failure or angina. After a mean follow-up of 470{+-}308 days, 22 patients (39%) had recurrences of VA. In univariate analysis, predictors for recurrence were: (a) ventricular tachycardia (VT) as the initial presenting arrhythmia (86% vs 59% for patients without ICD therapy, P=0.04), (b) treatment with {beta}-blockers (36% vs 68%, P=0.03) and (c) a defect score (DS) {>=}20 (64% vs 32%, P=0.03). In multivariate analysis, VT as the presenting arrhythmia ({chi}2=5.51, P=0.02) and a DS {>=}20 ({chi}2=4.22, P=0.04) remained independent predictors. Cardiac hospitalisation was more frequent in patients with a DS {>=}20 (44% vs 13% for patients with DS <20, P=0.015) and this was particularly due to more frequent hospitalisations for electrical storm (24% vs 3% for patients with DS<20, P=0.037). The extent of scarring determined by perfusion imaging can separate

  9. 磁共振延迟成像时间对急性心肌梗死测定的影响%Effect of imaging time on infarct size estimation after acute myocardial infarction using delayed contrast-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马剑英; 张峰; 王克强; 曾蒙苏; 邹云增; 钱菊英; 葛均波; 杨姗; 葛雷; 刘学波; 金航; 林瑾仪; 胡昕婴

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether timing of image acquisition influenced infarct size estimation using delayed CeMRI,and the association of left ventricular ejection fraction between magnetic resol3anee imaging and left ventrieulography Was also studied.Method From Junary 2005 to April 2006,27 first,onset AMI patients [23 male,mean age(54.3±10.5)years]were enrolledinthistudr.Allpatients receivedleft ventrictdographyas well as coronary angiography.The average checking time was(13.2±5.2)clays after the onset of AMI.MR imaging was performed with a 1.5-T magnet(SIMENS).After breath-hold eine images were acquired,patients re.ceived afI intravenous bolus of 0.05 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA at a rate of 5 ml/8.A first-pass perfusion scan was ac.qllired.Then a second bolus of 0.15 mmoVkg Gd-DTPA was give.at a rate of 2 mE/Is.After the hyperenhancement localized,the typical short axis slice with hyperenhancement WaS chosen to repeat imaging for IlleasuriIin.farct size every5minutesfrom5minutes after secondinjection ofcontrast until 20minutes.Results Twexty-seren patients showed hyperenhancement at the delayed CeMRI and hypoenhancement at the first pass enhancement(FPE).The average infarct size estimated by CeMRI WaS(17.9士9.8)%of LV nlass.Myocardial enhancement at a repesentative short-axis slice WIllS(7.2±6.2)%of LV Imss at 5 minutes,(8.5±7.4)%at 10 minutes,(7.3±6.3)%at 15 minutes and(6.9-t-6.4)%at 20 minutes respectively.There WltlS significant difference be-tween lmfninmes and 20-minutes enhancement size(P<0.05).Correlations of EF obtained by cineventriculo-grapIIy and MR irr,lg were significant(r=0.867,P<0.01).There were also correlations between infarction size and pe.k CK(r:O.819,Pinfarct size quantification using delayed CeMRI when TI Was kept constant.%目的 本研究探讨不同磁共振延迟成像(comrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging,CeM-砌)时间是

  10. The 'silence' of silent brain infarctions may be related to chronic ischemic preconditioning and nonstrategic locations rather than to a small infarction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Bai, Xue; Xu, Yu; Hua, Ting; Liu, Xue-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Silent brain infarctions are the silent cerebrovascular events that are distinguished from symptomatic lacunar infarctions by their 'silence'; the origin of these infarctions is still unclear. This study analyzed the characteristics of silent and symptomatic lacunar infarctions and sought to explore the mechanism of this 'silence'. In total, 156 patients with only silent brain infarctions, 90 with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions, 160 with both silent and symptomatic lacunar infarctions, and 115 without any infarctions were recruited. Vascular risk factors, leukoaraiosis, and vascular assessment results were compared. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were compared between patients with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions and patients with two types of infarctions. The locations of all of the infarctions were evaluated. The evolution of the two types of infarctions was retrospectively studied by comparing the infarcts on the magnetic resonance images of 63 patients obtained at different times. The main risk factors for silent brain infarctions were hypertension, age, and advanced leukoaraiosis; the main factors for symptomatic lacunar infarctions were hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and atherosclerosis of relevant arteries. The neurological deficits of patients with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions were more severe than those of patients with both types of infarctions. More silent brain infarctions were located in the corona radiata and basal ganglia; these locations were different from those of the symptomatic lacunar infarctions. The initial sizes of the symptomatic lacunar infarctions were larger than the silent brain infarctions, whereas the final sizes were almost equal between the two groups. Chronic ischemic preconditioning and nonstrategic locations may be the main reasons for the 'silence' of silent brain infarctions.

  11. The 'silence' of silent brain infarctions may be related to chronic ischemic preconditioning and nonstrategic locations rather than to a small infarction size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Silent brain infarctions are the silent cerebrovascular events that are distinguished from symptomatic lacunar infarctions by their 'silence'; the origin of these infarctions is still unclear. This study analyzed the characteristics of silent and symptomatic lacunar infarctions and sought to explore the mechanism of this 'silence'. METHODS: In total, 156 patients with only silent brain infarctions, 90 with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions, 160 with both silent and symptomatic lacunar infarctions, and 115 without any infarctions were recruited. Vascular risk factors, leukoaraiosis, and vascular assessment results were compared. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were compared between patients with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions and patients with two types of infarctions. The locations of all of the infarctions were evaluated. The evolution of the two types of infarctions was retrospectively studied by comparing the infarcts on the magnetic resonance images of 63 patients obtained at different times. RESULTS: The main risk factors for silent brain infarctions were hypertension, age, and advanced leukoaraiosis; the main factors for symptomatic lacunar infarctions were hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and atherosclerosis of relevant arteries. The neurological deficits of patients with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions were more severe than those of patients with both types of infarctions. More silent brain infarctions were located in the corona radiata and basal ganglia; these locations were different from those of the symptomatic lacunar infarctions. The initial sizes of the symptomatic lacunar infarctions were larger than the silent brain infarctions, whereas the final sizes were almost equal between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic ischemic preconditioning and nonstrategic locations may be the main reasons for the 'silence' of silent brain infarctions.

  12. Determination of myocardial infarction size in rats by echocardiography and tetrazolium staining: correlation, agreements, and simplifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, L; Mello, A F S; Antonio, E L; Tucci, P J F

    2008-03-01

    Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and echocardiography (ECHO) are methods used to determine experimental myocardial infarction (MI) size, whose practical applicability should be expanded. Our objectives were to analyze the accuracy of ECHO in determining infarction size in rats during the first days following coronary occlusion and to test whether a simplified single measurement by TTC correctly indicates MI size, as determined by the average value for multiple slices. Infarction was induced in female Wistar rats by coronary artery occlusion and MI size analysis was performed after the acute (7th day) and chronic periods (after 4 weeks) by ECHO matched with TTC. ECHO and TTC showed similar values of MI size (% of left ventricle perimeter) in acute (ECHO: 33 +/- 11, TTC: 35 +/- 14) and chronic (ECHO: 38 +/- 14, TTC: 39 +/- 13 periods), and also presented an excellent correlation (r = 0.92, P < 0.001). Although measurements from different heart planes showed discrepancies, a single measurement acquired from the mid-ventricular level by TTC was a good estimate of MI size calculated by the average of multiple planes, with minimal disagreement (Bland-Altman test with mean ratio bias of 0.99 +/- 0.07) and close to an ideal correlation (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). In the present study, ECHO was confirmed as a useful method for the determination of MI size even in the acute phase. Also, the single measure of a mid-ventricular section proposed as a simplification of the TTC method is a satisfactory prediction of average MI extension.

  13. Size Estimates in Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Cristo, Michele

    2014-01-06

    Detection of inclusions or obstacles inside a body by boundary measurements is an inverse problems very useful in practical applications. When only finite numbers of measurements are available, we try to detect some information on the embedded object such as its size. In this talk we review some recent results on several inverse problems. The idea is to provide constructive upper and lower estimates of the area/volume of the unknown defect in terms of a quantity related to the work that can be expressed with the available boundary data.

  14. Reduced infarct size in neuroglobin-null mice after experimental stroke in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Zindy; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Kelsen, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    , then permanent cerebral ischemia would lead to larger infarct volumes in neuroglobin-null mice than in wild-type mice. METHODS: Using neuroglobin-null mice, we estimated the infarct volume 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion using Cavalieri's Principle, and compared the infarct volume...... in neuroglobin-null and wild-type mice. Neuroglobin antibody staining was used to examine neuroglobin expression in the infarct area of wild-type mice. RESULTS: Infarct volumes 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were significantly smaller in neuroglobin-null mice than in wild-types (p 

  15. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to infarct size and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); Scheijmans, F.E.V. (Féline E.V.); T. van Seeters (Tom); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Y. B W E M); L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Greve, D. (Droogh-de); H.P. Bienfait; M.A. van Walderveen (M.); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (W.); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); Bot, J.; M.C. Visser (Marieke); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); van Seeters, T.; A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute

  16. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to infarct size and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); Scheijmans, F.E.V. (Féline E.V.); T. van Seeters (Tom); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Yvo); L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Greve, D. (Droogh-de); H.P. Bienfait; M.A. van Walderveen (M.); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (W.); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); Bot, J.; M.C. Visser (Marieke); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); van Seeters, T.; A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute

  17. Chronic Metformin Treatment is Associated with Reduced Myocardial Infarct Size in Diabetic Patients with ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lexis, Chris P. H.; Wieringa, Wouter G.; Hiemstra, Bart; van Deursen, Vincent M.; Lipsic, Erik; van der Harst, Pim; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.

    2014-01-01

    Increased myocardial infarct (MI) size is associated with higher risk of developing left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure and mortality. Experimental studies have suggested that metformin treatment reduces MI size after induced ischaemia but human data is lacking. We aimed to investigate the e

  18. Failure of intravenous metoprolol to limit acute myocardial infarct size in a nonreperfused porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K B; Hilwig, R W; Warner, A; Basnight, M; Ewy, G A

    1995-04-01

    The usefulness of intravenous beta-adrenergic receptor blockade in limiting infarct size when neither reperfusion nor collateral flow occurs is unknown. The effect of intravenous metoprolol on limiting myocardial infarct size was therefore examined in a nonreperfused porcine model. Closed-chest techniques were used to occlude the left anterior descending coronary artery, after which animals were randomized at 20 minutes to receive intravenous metoprolol, 0.75 mg/kg, or placebo. Infarct size examined at 5 hours with Evans blue and triphenyltetrazolium staining techniques was expressed as a percentage of total ventricular myocardium at ischemic risk. This percentage was not significantly different between the groups (84% +/- 5% with metoprolol vs 90% +/- 4% with placebo; p = 0.4). Myocardial infarct size was not significantly decreased at 5 hours by early administration of intravenous metoprolol when the infarct artery remained occluded and collateral flow was minimal.

  19. Novel, selective EPO receptor ligands lacking erythropoietic activity reduce infarct size in acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Krisztina; Csonka, Csaba; Pálóczi, János; Pipis, Judit; Görbe, Anikó; Kocsis, Gabriella F; Murlasits, Zsolt; Sárközy, Márta; Szűcs, Gergő; Holmes, Christopher P; Pan, Yijun; Bhandari, Ashok; Csont, Tamás; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Woodburn, Kathryn W; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bencsik, Péter

    2016-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to protect the heart against acute myocardial infarction in pre-clinical studies, however, EPO failed to reduce infarct size in clinical trials and showed significant safety problems. Here, we investigated cardioprotective effects of two selective non-erythropoietic EPO receptor ligand dimeric peptides (AF41676 and AF43136) lacking erythropoietic activity, EPO, and the prolonged half-life EPO analogue, darbepoetin in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in rats. In a pilot study, EPO at 100U/mL significantly decreased cell death compared to vehicle (33.8±2.3% vs. 40.3±1.5%, pEPO reduced infarct size significantly compared to vehicle (45.3±4.8% vs. 59.8±4.5%, pEPO receptor ligand dimeric peptides AF41676 and AF43136 administered before reperfusion are able to reduce infarct size in a rat model of AMI. Therefore, non-erythropoietic EPO receptor peptide ligands may be promising cardioprotective agents.

  20. Effects of lisinopril on experimental ischemia in rats. Influence of infarct size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo A. M. Zornoff

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs have gained importance in preventing or attenuating the process of ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. The significance of infarct size in regard to the response to ACEIs, however, is controversial. This study aimed to analyze the effects of lisinopril on mortality rate, cardiac function, degree of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in rats with different infarct sizes. METHODS - Lisinopril (20 mg/kg/day dissolved in drinking water was administered to rats immediately after coronary artery occlusion. After being sacrificed, the infarcted animals were divided into two groups: one group of animals with small infarcts ( 40% of the left ventricle. RESULTS - The mortality rate was 31.7% in treated rats and 47% in the untreated rats. There was no statistical difference between the groups with small and large infarcts in regard to myocardial concentration of hydroxyproline. In small infarcts, the treatment attenuated the heart dysfunction characterized by lower levels of blood pressure and lower values of the first derivative of pressure and of the negative derivative of pressure. The degree of hypertrophy was also attenuated in small infarcts. In regard to large infarcts, no differences between the groups were observed. CONCLUSION - Treatment with the ACEIs had no effect on mortality rate and on the amount of fibrosis. The protective effect of lisinopril on heart function and on the degree of hypertrophy could only be detected in small infarcts

  1. Estimating infarct severity from the ECG using a realistic heart model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Van Dam (Jan Willem); W. Arnold Dijk; N.H.J.J. van der Putten (Niek); A.C. Maan (Arie); M.J.J. De Jongste (Mike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe early phase of myocardial infarction is accompanied by changes in the ST segment of the ECG. This makes the ST segment the clinical marker for the detection of acute myocardial infarction. The determination of the infarct severity, location and size of the myocardial tissue at risk

  2. Impact of the timing of metoprolol administration during STEMI on infarct size and ventricular function

    OpenAIRE

    García Ruiz, José María; Fernández Jiménez, Rodrigo; García Álvarez, Ana; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Galán Arriola, Carlos; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Mateos, Alonso; Nuño Ayala, Mario; Agüero, Jaume; Sánchez González, Javier; García Prieto, Jaime; López Melgar, Beatriz; Martínez Tenorio, Pedro; López Martín, Gonzalo J.; Macías, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Pre-reperfusion administration of intravenous (IV) metoprolol reduces infarct size in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This study sought to determine how this cardioprotective effect is influenced by the timing of metoprolol therapy having either a long or short metoprolol bolus-to-reperfusion interval. We performed a post hoc analysis of the METOCARD-CNIC (effect of METOprolol of CARDioproteCtioN during an acute myocardial InfarCtion) trial, which randomized anterior STEMI...

  3. Assessment of infarct size by positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose: a new absolute threshold technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareonthaitawee, P.; Iozzo, Patricia [MRC, Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Schaefers, K.; Stegger, L. [MRC, Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Baker, C.S.R.; Camici, Paolo G.; Rimoldi, Ornella [MRC, Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); National Heart and Lung Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College School of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Turkheimer, F. [MRC, Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Imaging Research Solutions Limited, Cyclotron Building, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Banner, N.R.; Yacoub, Magdi [National Heart and Lung Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College School of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Bonser, Robert S. [Department of Cardiopulmonary Transplantation, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-02-01

    Along with hibernating myocardium, infarct size is a critical term in the progression of left ventricular remodelling and congestive heart failure. Both infarcted and hibernating myocardium determine changes in remote non-ischaemic tissue. This study was designed to test the accuracy of a new technique to quantify infarct size using positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Studies were carried out in (a) nine pigs with acute myocardial infarction (two sham-operated), produced by a 90-min occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery followed by a 4-h reperfusion, and (b) humans (six patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy awaiting cardiac transplantation and five normal volunteers). In both animals and patients, myocardial FDG uptake was measured by PET during hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Infarct size was quantified by an absolute threshold of tracer uptake obtained from the parametric (voxel-by-voxel) image of the metabolic rate of FDG. PET infarct size estimates were compared with independent ex vivo planimetric measurements of the explanted swine and patient hearts (at transplantation) after staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There was good agreement between the planimetric and PET infarct size estimates both in pigs (n=9; r=0.96, y=0.94x +0.64, SEE=0.10, P<0.0001) and in humans (n=11; r=0.94, y=0.72x +2.93, SEE=0.09, P<0.0001). This study demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of this PET method in estimating infarct size both in a model of reperfused acute myocardial infarction and in chronic ischaemic cardiomyopathy, although larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. (orig.)

  4. Effects of Bradykinin B2 Receptor Blockade on Infarct Size and Hemodynamics after Myocardial Infarction in Enalapril-treated Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haizhu Zhang; Changcong Cui; Kexin Du; Jian Liu

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor blockade on infarct size and hemodynamics after myocardial infarction (MI) in rats with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition therapy.Methods MI was produced by ligating the left coronary artery.The effects of enalapril(500μg/kg·day),enalapril(500μg/kg·day) with BK B2 receptor antagonist Hoe-140(500μg/kg·day),angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) type 1(AT1) receptor antagonist losartan (3 mg/kg·day) on infarct size,left ventricular systolic pressure(LVSP),cardiac output index (CI) and stroke volume index (SVI) were observed in rats after MI.Treatments were started on the 2nd day after MI and continued for another 6 weeks.Results Enalapril reduced infarct size and improved CI and SVI compared with the untreated MI group (P<0.05 ),and these effects of enalapril were significantly blunted by concomitant treatment with Hoe-140 (P<0.05).Losartan was less effective than enalapril.LVSP were unchanged in the three treatment groups.Conclusions BK can reduce infract size and improve hemodynamics in rats following MI.The cardioprotective effects of ACEI partly result from the action of BK exerted through the B2 receptor.

  5. Comparison of Selvester QRS score with magnetic resonance imaging measured infarct size in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Esben A; Bang, Lia E; Ahtarovski, Kiril A;

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Selvester QRS score is significantly correlated with delayed enhancement-magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) measured myocardial infarct (MI) size in reperfused ST elevation MI (STEMI). This study further tests the hypothesis that Selvester QRS score correlates ...

  6. Infarct size in primary angioplasty without on-site cardiac surgical backup versus transferal to a tertiary center: a single photon emission computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaapen, Paul; Rossum, Albert C. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mulder, Maarten de; Peels, Hans O.; Cornel, Jan H.; Umans, Victor A.W.M. [Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Cardiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Zant, Friso M. van der [Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Twisk, Jos W.R. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed in large community hospitals without cardiac surgery back-up facilities (off-site) reduces door-to-balloon time compared with emergency transferal to tertiary interventional centers (on-site). The present study was performed to explore whether off-site PCI for acute myocardial infarction results in reduced infarct size. One hundred twenty-eight patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were randomly assigned to undergo primary PCI at the off-site center (n = 68) or to transferal to an on-site center (n = 60). Three days after PCI, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT was performed to estimate infarct size. Off-site PCI significantly reduced door-to-balloon time compared with on-site PCI (94 {+-} 54 versus 125 {+-} 59 min, respectively, p < 0.01), although symptoms-to-treatment time was only insignificantly reduced (257 {+-} 211 versus 286 {+-} 146 min, respectively, p = 0.39). Infarct size was comparable between treatment centers (16 {+-} 15 versus 14 {+-} 12%, respectively p = 0.35). Multivariate analysis revealed that TIMI 0/1 flow grade at initial coronary angiography (OR 3.125, 95% CI 1.17-8.33, p = 0.023), anterior wall localization of the myocardial infarction (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.38-8.55, p < 0.01), and development of pathological Q-waves (OR 5.07, 95% CI 2.10-12.25, p < 0.01) were independent predictors of an infarct size > 12%. Off-site PCI reduces door-to-balloon time compared with transferal to a remote on-site interventional center but does not reduce infarct size. Instead, pre-PCI TIMI 0/1 flow, anterior wall infarct localization, and development of Q-waves are more important predictors of infarct size. (orig.)

  7. Soluble TNF receptors are associated with infarct size and ventricular dysfunction in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Nilsson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate circulating markers of apoptosis in relation to infarct size, left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI population undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. BACKGROUND: Immediate re-opening of the acutely occluded infarct-related artery via primary PCI is the treatment of choice in STEMI to limit ischemia injury. However, the sudden re-initiation of blood flow can lead to a local acute inflammatory response with further endothelial and myocardial damage, so-called reperfusion injury. Apoptosis is suggested to be a key event in ischemia-reperfusion injury, resulting in LV-dysfunction, remodeling and heart failure. METHODS: The present study is a prespecified substudy of the F.I.R.E. trial. We included 48 patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Blood samples were collected prior to PCI and after 24 hours. Plasma was separated for later analysis of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR 1, sTNFR2, sFas and sFas ligand (sFasL by ELISA. Infarct size, left ventricular (LV dysfunction and remodeling were assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at five days and four months after STEMI. RESULTS: The levels of sTNFR1 at 24 h as well as the relative increases in sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 over 24 h showed consistent and significant correlations with infarct size and LV-dysfunction at four months. Moreover, both sTNFRs correlated strongly with Troponin I and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 measurements. Soluble Fas and sFasL did not overall correlate with measures of infarct size or LV-dysfunction. None of the apoptosis markers correlated significantly with measures of remodeling. CONCLUSIONS: In STEMI patients, circulating levels of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with infarct size and LV dysfunction. This provides further evidence for the role of apoptosis in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  8. Riociguat reduces infarct size and post-infarct heart failure in mouse hearts: insights from MRI/PET imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Methner

    Full Text Available AIM: Stimulation of the nitric oxide (NO--soluble guanylate (sGC--protein kinase G (PKG pathway confers protection against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury, but more chronic effects in reducing post-myocardial infarction (MI heart failure are less defined. The aim of this study was to not only determine whether the sGC stimulator riociguat reduces infarct size but also whether it protects against the development of post-MI heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice were subjected to 30 min ischaemia via ligation of the left main coronary artery to induce MI and either placebo or riociguat (1.2 µmol/l were given as a bolus 5 min before and 5 min after onset of reperfusion. After 24 hours, both, late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI and (18F-FDG-positron emission tomography (PET were performed to determine infarct size. In the riociguat-treated mice, the resulting infarct size was smaller (8.5 ± 2.5% of total LV mass vs. 21.8% ± 1.7%. in controls, p = 0.005 and LV systolic function analysed by MRI was better preserved (60.1% ± 3.4% of preischaemic vs. 44.2% ± 3.1% in controls, p = 0.005. After 28 days, LV systolic function by echocardiography treated group was still better preserved (63.5% ± 3.2% vs. 48.2% ± 2.2% in control, p = 0.004. CONCLUSION: Taken together, mice treated acutely at the onset of reperfusion with the sGC stimulator riociguat have smaller infarct size and better long-term preservation of LV systolic function. These findings suggest that sGC stimulation during reperfusion therapy may be a powerful therapeutic treatment strategy for preventing post-MI heart failure.

  9. Influence of ST-segment recovery on infarct size and ejection fraction in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallén, Jonas; Ripa, Maria Sejersten; Johanson, Per;

    2010-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with fibrinolytics, electrocardiogram-derived measures of ST-segment recovery guide therapy decisions and predict infarct size. The comprehension of these relationships in patients undergoing mechanical reperfusion is limited. We...... studied 144 patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. We aimed to define the association between infarct size as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and different metrics of ST-segment recovery. Electrocardiograms were assessed at baseline and 90 minutes after primary.......781). In conclusion, an electrocardiogram obtained early after primary percutaneous coronary intervention analyzed by a simple algorithm provided prognostic information on the final infarct size and cardiac function....

  10. Utility of peak creatine kinase-MB measurements in predicting myocardial infarct size, left ventricular dysfunction, and outcome after first anterior wall acute myocardial infarction (from the INFUSE-AMI trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Tomotaka; Maehara, Akiko; Brener, Sorin J; Généreux, Philippe; Gershlick, Anthony H; Mehran, Roxana; Gibson, C Michael; Mintz, Gary S; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-03-01

    Infarct size after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is associated with long-term clinical outcomes. However, there is insufficient information correlating creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) or troponin levels to infarct size and infarct location in first-time occurrence of STEMI. We, therefore, assessed the utility of CK-MB measurements after primary percutaneous coronary intervention of a first anterior STEMI using bivalirudin anticoagulation in patients who were randomized to intralesion abciximab versus no abciximab and to manual thrombus aspiration versus no aspiration. Infarct size (as a percentage of total left ventricular [LV] mass) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) were evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 30 days and correlated to peak CK-MB. Peak CK-MB (median 240 IU/L; interquartile range 126 to 414) was significantly associated with infarct size and with LVEF (r = 0.67, p MB tertile group than in the other tertiles (87.6% vs 49.5% vs 9.1%, p MB of at least 300 IU/L predicted with moderate accuracy both a large infarct size (area under the curve 0.88) and an LVEF ≤40% (area under the curve 0.78). Furthermore, CK-MB was an independent predictor of 1-year major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio 1.42 per each additional 100 IU/L [1.20 to 1.67], p MB measurement is useful in estimating infarct size and LVEF and in predicting 1-year clinical outcomes after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for first anterior STEMI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Time of symptom onset and value of myocardial blush and infarct size on prognosis in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Wouter G; Lexis, Chris P H; Mahmoud, Karim D; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Pundziute, Gabija; van 't Hof, Arnoud W J; van Gilst, Wiek H; Lipsic, Erik

    2014-07-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the time of onset of ischemia has been associated with myocardial infarction (MI) size. Myocardial blush grade (MBG) reflects myocardial response to ischemia/reperfusion injury, which may differ according to time of the day. The aim of our study was to explore the 24-hour variation in MBG and MI size in relation to outcomes in STEMI patients. A retrospective multicenter analysis of 6970 STEMI patients was performed. Time of onset of STEMI was divided into four 6-hour periods. STEMI patients have a significant 24-hour pattern in onset of symptoms, with peak onset around 09:00 hour. Ischemic time was longest and MI size, estimated by peak creatine kinase concentration, was largest in patients with STEMI onset between 00:00 and 06:00 hours. Both MBG and MI size were independently associated with mortality. Time of onset of STEMI was not independently associated with mortality when corrected for baseline and procedural factors. Interestingly, patients presenting with low MBG between 00:00 and 06:00 hours had a better prognosis compared to other groups. In conclusion, patients with symptom onset between 00:00 and 06:00 hours have longer ischemic time and consequently larger MI size. However, this does not translate into a higher mortality in this group. In addition, patients with failed reperfusion presenting in the early morning hours have better prognosis, suggesting a 24-hour pattern in myocardial protection.

  12. Coronary flow of the infarct artery assessed by transthoracic Doppler after primary percutaneous coronary intervention predicts final infarct size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovic, Danijela; Sobic-Saranovic, Dragana; Beleslin, Branko; Stankovic, Sanja; Marinkovic, Jelena; Orlic, Dejan; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Petrovic, Milan; Nedeljkovic, Ivana; Banovic, Marko; Djukanovic, Nina; Petrovic, Olga; Petrovic, Marija; Stepanovic, Jelena; Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Tesic, Milorad; Ostojic, Miodrag

    2014-12-01

    Coronary microcirculatory function after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) in patients with acute myocardial infarction is important determinant of infarct size (IS). Our aim was to investigate the utility of coronary flow reserve (CFR) and diastolic deceleration time (DDT) of the infarct artery (IRA) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography after pPCI for final IS prediction. In 59 patients, on the 2nd day after pPCI for acute anterior myocardial infarction, transthoracic Doppler analysis of IRA blood flow was done including measurements of CFR, baseline DDT and DDT during adenosine infusion (DDT adeno). Killip class, myocardial blush grade, resolution of ST segment elevation, peak creatine kinase-myocardial band and conventional echocardiographic parameters were determined. Single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging was done 6 weeks later to define final IS (percentage of myocardium with fixed perfusion abnormality). IS significantly correlated with CFR (r = -0.686, p 20 %), the best cut-off for CFR was <1.73 (sensitivity 65 %, specificity 96 %) and for DDT adeno ≤720 ms (sensitivity 81 %, specificity 96 %). CFR and DDT during adenosine are independent and powerful early predictors of final IS offering incremental prognostic information over conventional parameters of myocardial and microvascular damage and tissue reperfusion.

  13. Impact of the Timing of Metoprolol Administration During STEMI on Infarct Size and Ventricular Function.

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos Rodríguez, Alonso

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pre-reperfusion administration of intravenous (IV) metoprolol reduces infarct size in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine how this cardioprotective effect is influenced by the timing of metoprolol therapy having either a long or short metoprolol bolus-to-reperfusion interval. METHODS We performed a post hoc analysis of the METOCARD-CNIC (effect of METOprolol of CARDioproteCtioN during an acute myocardial Inf...

  14. Test-retest repeatability of myocardial blood flow and infarct size using {sup 11}C-acetate micro-PET imaging in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; McDonald, Matthew; Klein, Ran; DaSilva, Jean N.; Beanlands, Rob S.B.; DeKemp, Robert A. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, National Cardiac PET Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Global and regional responses of absolute myocardial blood flow index (iMBF) are used as surrogate markers to assess response to therapies in coronary artery disease. In this study, we assessed the test-retest repeatability of iMBF imaging, and the accuracy of infarct sizing in mice using {sup 11}C-acetate PET. {sup 11}C-Acetate cardiac PET images were acquired in healthy controls, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout transgenic mice, and mice after myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate global and regional iMBF, and myocardial infarct size compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET and ex-vivo histology results. Global test-retest iMBF values had good coefficients of repeatability (CR) in healthy mice, eNOS knockout mice and normally perfused regions in MI mice (CR = 1.6, 2.0 and 1.5 mL/min/g, respectively). Infarct size measured on {sup 11}C-acetate iMBF images was also repeatable (CR = 17 %) and showed a good correlation with the infarct sizes found on {sup 18}F-FDG PET and histopathology (r{sup 2} > 0.77; p < 0.05). {sup 11}C-Acetate micro-PET assessment of iMBF and infarct size is repeatable and suitable for serial investigation of coronary artery disease progression and therapy. (orig.)

  15. Preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on lysosomal dysfunction and myocardial infarct size in experimentally induced myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Roy, Abhro; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2013-01-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on lysosomal dysfunction and myocardial infarct size in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with p-coumaric acid (8 mg/kg body weight) daily for a period of 7 days after which isoproterenol (100mg/kg body weight) was injected subcutaneously into rats twice at an interval of 24h (8th and 9th day).The activity/levels of serum cardiac diagnostic markers, heart lysosomal lipid peroxidation products and the activities of lysosomal enzymes (β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and cathepsin-D) were significantly (Plysosomal fraction. The pretreatment with p-coumaric acid significantly (Plysosomal lipid peroxidation products and the activities of lysosomal enzymes. In addition, p-coumaric acid greatly reduced myocardial infarct size. p-Coumaric acid pretreatment (8 mg/kg body weight) to normal rats did not show any significant effect. Thus, this study showed that p-coumaric acid prevents lysosomal dysfunction against cardiac damage induced by isoproterenol and brings back the levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of lysosomal enzymes to near normal levels. The in vitro study also revealed the free radical scavenging activity of p-coumaric acid. Thus, the observed effects are due to p-coumaric acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties.

  16. Quantification of infarct size on focal cerebral ischemia model of rats using a simple and economical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Shuaib, A; Li, Q

    1998-10-01

    Quantification of infarct size is a very useful index to assess models of focal cerebral ischemia and effects of new therapies. Currently-used image analysis systems to carry out this task usually involve dedicated and expensive equipment. We present a low-cost and simple method to perform the image acquisition and analysis. Twelve Wistar rats were subject to focal cerebral ischemia and scarified 24 h after the insult. 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) stain was used as a conventional method to differentiate ischemic damage from healthy brain tissue. Digital images were captured from the stained coronal sections using a flatbed color scanner and analyzed with a commercial image processing software. To evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of this method, the data obtained with the current procedure was correlated with those from a dedicated standard image analysis system and intra-observor correlation coefficient was estimated. Also the sensitivity of this method in quantification of infarct volume was tested in two different experimental settings. There was close correlation in the outcome of infarct size measurement between the current method and the standard system (r = 0.93, p < 0.001). A high agreement of measurement of the percentage of infarct volume between two different examiners with the same source of samples (r = 0.98, p < 0.001). We demonstrated that this method was sensitive in detection of difference of infarct sizes when placebo-treated animals (n = 6) were compared to the group treated with a neuroprotective agent (n = 6). Our data demonstrated that ischemic lesion of focal cerebral ischemia in rat can be accurately and reproducibly quantified using this method. The low-cost and simplicity of this method may facilitate the application in determination of ischemic damage.

  17. Evaluation and simplified measurement of infarct size by myocardial contrast echocardiography in a rat model of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianghui; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Lin, Huanbing; Lao, Yi; Zhou, Biying; Liang, Feixue; Zha, Daogang; Bin, Jianping; Liu, Yili

    2009-10-01

    To test the feasibility and accuracy of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) for predicting infarct size (IS) in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI) and to compare a simplified single plane-based measurement of IS with the conventional three plane-based approach. Fifty male SD rats underwent left anterior descending artery ligation and were evaluated by MCE 8 h post MI. IS was calculated by the single and three plane-based approaches, compared to that determined by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining method. Simplified single plane-based MCE approach and TTC method showed similar IS values (38.48 +/- 16.80% vs. 35.72 +/- 15.33%, P > 0.05) and presented a favorable positive correlation (r = 0.851, P rats with MI. A single measurement at the mid-papillary muscle level may become a simple, efficient and reliable approach for in vivo IS assessment.

  18. Timing of ischemic onset estimated from the electrocardiogram is better than historical timing for predicting outcome after reperfusion therapy for acute anterior myocardial infarction: a DANish trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction 2 (DANAMI-2) substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersten, Maria; Ripa, Rasmus S; Grande, Peer

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute treatment strategy and subsequently prognosis are influenced by the duration of ischemia in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, timing of ischemia may be difficult to access by patient history (historical timing) alone. We hypothesized...... that an electrocardiographic acuteness score is better than historical timing for predicting myocardial salvage and prognosis in patients with anterior AMI treated with fibrinolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention. METHODS: One hundred seventy-five patients with anterior infarct without electrocardiogram (ECG...... the Aldrich score to determine the initially predicted myocardial infarct size and the Selvester score to determine the final QRS-estimated myocardial infarct size. RESULTS: The mean amount of myocardium salvage depended on ECG timing (43% [+/-38%] for "early" vs 1% [+/-56%] for "late"; P

  19. Estimating Search Engine Index Size Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; De Kunder, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    method of estimating the size of a Web search engine’s index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing’s indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006...... until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find......One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel...

  20. Measurement of acute Q-wave myocardial infarct size with single photon emission computed tomography imaging of indium-111 antimyosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, M.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Wall, R.M.; Johnson, L.L.

    1989-04-01

    Myocardial infarct size was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) following injection of indium-111 antimyosin in 27 patients (18 male and 9 female; mean age 57.4 +/- 10.5 years, range 37 to 75) who had acute transmural myocardial infarction (MI). These 27 patients represent 27 of 35 (77%) consecutive patients with acute Q-wave infarctions who were injected with indium-111 antimyosin. In the remaining 8 patients either tracer uptake was too faint or the scans were technically inadequate to permit infarct sizing from SPECT reconstructions. In the 27 patients studied, infarct location by electrocardiogram was anterior in 15 and inferoposterior in 12. Nine patients had a history of prior infarction. Each patient received 2 mCi of indium-111 antimyosin followed by SPECT imaging 48 hours later. Infarct mass was determined from coronal slices using a threshold value obtained from a human torso/cardiac phantom. Infarct size ranged from 11 to 87 g mean (48.5 +/- 24). Anterior infarcts were significantly (p less than 0.01) larger (60 +/- 20 g) than inferoposterior infarcts (34 +/- 21 g). For patients without prior MI, there were significant inverse correlations between infarct size and ejection fraction (r = 0.71, p less than 0.01) and wall motion score (r = 0.58, p less than 0.01) obtained from predischarge gated blood pool scans. Peak creatine kinase-MB correlated significantly with infarct size for patients without either reperfusion or right ventricular infarction (r = 0.66). Seven patients without prior infarcts had additional simultaneous indium-111/thallium-201 SPECT studies using dual energy windows.

  1. Minimizing infarct size. Annual scientific report, 1 Jul 1975--15 Apr 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunwald, E.

    1976-04-15

    Several goals were achieved during this period of 9 months, both in the experimental laboratory and in patients with acute myocardial infarction. (1) A study of the effects of aprotinin administration on myocardial ischemic injury, subsequent necrosis and collateral blood flow following acute coronary artery occlusion was carried out to completion. (2) A study of the effect of cobra venom factor on myocardial necrosis was completed and the factors responsible for its action were examined. (3) A comparison was made of the effects of nitroglycerin and nitroprusside on ischemic injury and regional myocardial blood flow in patients with acute myocardial infarction and in dogs with coronary occlusions. (4) A method of direct measurement of infarct size in the rat was developed. It consists of occlusion of the main left coronary artery and the histologic quantification of the infarct at 48 hours and 3 weeks later by serial histologic sections or alternatively by measuring total left ventricular myocardial creative phosphokinase activity. (5) New electrocardiographic methods have been developed in order to evaluate atraumatically the extent of myocardial infarction in patients. (6) Intravenous injection of (113)mIn-ENTMP and (99m)TcENTMP in dogs following coronary artery occlusion permitted a sequential double labeling of the damaged myocardium. (7) Since hyaluronidase is a very effective drug in reducing myocardial damage both in the experimental animal and in patients with acute myocardial infarction, a study was carried out to ascertain its effects on collateral flow.

  2. Reduced infarct size in neuroglobin-null mice after experimental stroke in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raida Zindy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroglobin is considered to be a novel important pharmacological target in combating stroke and neurodegenerative disorders, although the mechanism by which this protection is accomplished remains an enigma. We hypothesized that if neuroglobin is directly involved in neuroprotection, then permanent cerebral ischemia would lead to larger infarct volumes in neuroglobin-null mice than in wild-type mice. Methods Using neuroglobin-null mice, we estimated the infarct volume 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion using Cavalieri’s Principle, and compared the infarct volume in neuroglobin-null and wild-type mice. Neuroglobin antibody staining was used to examine neuroglobin expression in the infarct area of wild-type mice. Results Infarct volumes 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were significantly smaller in neuroglobin-null mice than in wild-types (p  Conclusions Neuroglobin-deficiency resulted in reduced tissue infarction, suggesting that, at least at endogenous expression levels, neuroglobin in itself is non-protective against ischemic injury.

  3. Combination of electrocardiographic and angiographic markers of reperfusion in the prediction of infarct size in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing successful primary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, Giuseppe; Suryapranata, Harry; de Boer, Menko-Jan; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Hoorntje, Jan C. A.; Gosselink, A. T. Marcel; Dambrink, Jan-Henk; Ernst, Nicolette; van't Hof, Arnoud W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Optimal epicardial recanalization does not guarantee optimal myocardial perfusion. The aim of the current study was to evaluate angiographic and electrocardiographic markers of reperfusion in the prediction of infarct size in patients with STEMI undergoing successful primary angioplasty.

  4. Particle Size Estimation Based on Edge Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-xing

    2005-01-01

    Given image sequences of closely packed particles, the underlying aim is to estimate diameters without explicit segmentation. In a way, this is similar to the task of counting objects without directly counting them. Such calculations may, for example, be useful fast estimation of particle size in different application areas. The topic is that of estimating average size (=average diameter) of packed particles, from formulas involving edge density, and the edges from moment-based thresholding are used. An average shape factor is involved in the calculations, obtained for some frames from crude partial segmentation. Measurement results from about 80 frames have been analyzed.

  5. Validation of infarct size and location from the ECG by inverse body surface mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Arnold Dijk; J.W. Van Dam (Jan Willem); N.H.J.J. van der Putten (Niek); A.C. Maan (Arie); M.J.J. De Jongste (Mike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes the incorporation of body surface mapping algorithms to detect the position and size of acute myocardial infarctions using standard 12 lead ECG recording. The results are compared with the results from cardiac MRI scan analysis. In case patient specific volume

  6. Influence of ST-segment recovery on infarct size and ejection fraction in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallén, Jonas; Ripa, Maria Sejersten; Johanson, Per;

    2010-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with fibrinolytics, electrocardiogram-derived measures of ST-segment recovery guide therapy decisions and predict infarct size. The comprehension of these relationships in patients undergoing mechanical reperfusion is limited. We...... studied 144 patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. We aimed to define the association between infarct size as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and different metrics of ST-segment recovery. Electrocardiograms were assessed at baseline and 90 minutes after primary...... percutaneous coronary intervention. Three methods for calculating and categorizing ST-segment recovery were used: (1) summed ST-segment deviation (STD) resolution analyzed in 3 categories (> or = 70%, > or = 30% to or = 2 mm). Infarct size and ejection fraction were assessed at 4 months by cardiac magnetic...

  7. Final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction predicts long-term clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove; Kelbæk, Henning Skov

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Tailored heart failure treatment and risk assessment in patients following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is mainly based on the assessment of the left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF). Assessment of the final infarct size in addition to the LVEF may improve...... the prognostic evaluation. To evaluate the prognostic importance of the final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with STEMI. METHODS AND RESULTS: In an observational study the final infarct size was measured by late gadolinium enhancement CMR 3 months after initial...... admission in 309 patients with STEMI. The clinical endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality and admission for heart failure. During the follow-up period of median 807 days (IQR: 669-1117) 35 events (5 non-cardiac deaths, 3 cardiac deaths, and 27 admissions for heart failure) were recorded. Patients...

  8. Cyclosporin variably and inconsistently reduces infarct size in experimental models of reperfused myocardial infarction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, W Y; Messow, C M; Berry, C

    2012-04-01

    Cyclosporin is an immunosuppressant that has recently been proposed as a treatment to prevent reperfusion injury in acute myocardial infarction (MI). We aimed to determine the overall efficacy of cyclosporin in experimental studies of acute reperfused MI. We conducted a systematic review and stratified meta-analysis of published studies describing the efficacy of cyclosporin in experimental models of acute reperfused MI. We included all in vivo publications of cyclosporin where infarct size was measured. A literature search identified 29 potential studies of which 20 fulfilled the eligibility criteria. In these studies (involving four species of animals), cyclosporin reduced myocardial infarct size by a standardized mean (95% confidence interval) difference of -1.60 (-2.17, -1.03) compared with controls. Cyclosporin failed to demonstrate a convincing benefit in studies involving pigs. Despite this observation, the overall efficacy of cyclosporin did not differ across species (P= 0.358). The dose of cyclosporin given did not affect final infarct size (P= 0.203). Funnel plots of these data suggested heterogeneity among the studies. Cyclosporin had variable effects on infarct size compared with placebo. Cyclosporin had no effect on myocardial infarct size in swine, raising a question over the potential cardioprotective effects of cyclosporin in man. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Software Size Estimation Using Activity Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densumite, S.; Muenchaisri, P.

    2017-03-01

    Software size is widely recognized as an important parameter for effort and cost estimation. Currently there are many methods for measuring software size including Source Line of Code (SLOC), Function Points (FP), Netherlands Software Metrics Users Association (NESMA), Common Software Measurement International Consortium (COSMIC), and Use Case Points (UCP). SLOC is physically counted after the software is developed. Other methods compute size from functional, technical, and/or environment aspects at early phase of software development. In this research, activity point approach is proposed to be another software size estimation method. Activity point is computed using activity diagram and adjusted with technical complexity factors (TCF), environment complexity factors (ECF), and people risk factors (PRF). An evaluation of the approach is present.

  10. Relationship between treatment delay and final infarct size in STEMI patients treated with abciximab and primary PCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tödt Tim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on the impact of time to treatment on myocardial infarct size have yielded conflicting results. In this study of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, we set out to investigate the relationship between the time from First Medical Contact (FMC to the demonstration of an open infarct related artery (IRA and final scar size. Between February 2006 and September 2007, 89 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI were studied with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (ceMRI 4 to 8 weeks after the infarction. Spearman correlation was computed for health care delay time (defined as time from FMC to PCI and myocardial injury. Multiple linear regression was used to determine covariates independently associated with infarct size. Results An occluded artery (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction, TIMI flow 0-1 at initial angiogram was seen in 56 patients (63%. The median FMC-to-patent artery was 89 minutes. There was a weak correlation between time from FMC-to-patent IRA and infarct size, r = 0.27, p = 0.01. In multiple regression analyses, LAD as the IRA, smoking and an occluded vessel at the first angiogram, but not delay time, correlated with infarct size. Conclusions In patients with STEMI treated with primary PCI we found a weak correlation between health care delay time and infarct size. Other factors like anterior infarction, a patent artery pre-PCI and effects of reperfusion injury may have had greater influence on infarct size than time-to-treatment per se.

  11. Basic Statistical Concepts for Sample Size Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithal K Dhulkhed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For grant proposals the investigator has to include an estimation of sample size .The size of the sample should be adequate enough so that there is sufficient data to reliably answer the research question being addressed by the study. At the very planning stage of the study the investigator has to involve the statistician. To have meaningful dialogue with the statistician every research worker should be familiar with the basic concepts of statistics. This paper is concerned with simple principles of sample size calculation. Concepts are explained based on logic rather than rigorous mathematical calculations to help him assimilate the fundamentals.

  12. Longitudinal strain is a marker of microvascular obstruction and infarct size in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Bière

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We assessed the value of speckle tracking imaging performed early after a first ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in order to predict infarct size and functional recovery at 3-month follow-up. METHODS: 44 patients with STEMI who underwent revascularization within 12 h of symptom onset were prospectively enrolled. Echocardiography was performed 3.9 ± 1.2 days after myocardial reperfusion, assessing circumferential (CGS, radial (RGS, and longitudinal global (GLS strains. Late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic imaging (CMR, for assessing cardiac function, infarct size, and microvascular obstruction (MVO, was conducted 5.6 ± 2.5 days and 99.4 ± 4.6 days after myocardial reperfusion. RESULTS: GLS was evaluable in 97% of the patients, while CGS and RGS could be assessed in 85%. Infarct size significantly correlated with GLS (R = 0.601, p-6.0% within the infarcted area exhibited 96% specificity and 61% sensitivity for predicting the persistence of akinesia (≥ 3 segments at 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Speckle-tracking strain imaging performed early after a STEMI is easy-to-use as a marker for persistent akinetic territories at 3 months. In addition, GLS correlated significantly with MVO and final infarct size, both parameters being relevant post-MI prognostic factors, usually obtained via CMR.

  13. Effect of dichloracetate on infarct size in a primate model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandy M

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a major contributing factor towards spread of the ischaemic focus in the brain. Drugs that increase pyruvate dehydrogenase activity could decrease the formation of lactic acidosis. The sodium salt of dichloracetic acid (DCA has been found to be effective in reducing lactate. This study was undertaken to study the efficacy of DCA in reducing infarct size in experimental focal ischaemia in monkeys. Macaca radiata monkeys in the treatment group were given 35 mg per kilogram of dichloracetate intravenously immediately before occluding and interrupting the middle cerebral artery, and the control group was given saline as placebo under similar conditions. Mean infarct size expressed as a percentage of the size of the hemisphere in all the three brain slices was 35.38 in the control group as against l2.06 in the treated group (p=0. 0008.

  14. S-nitrosylated pegylated hemoglobin reduces the size of cerebral infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akira T; Nakai, Kunihiko; Fukumoto, Dai; Yamano, Mariko; Haida, Munetaka; Tsukada, Hideo

    2009-02-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers have well-documented safety and efficacy problems such as nitric oxide (NO) scavenging and extravasation that preclude clinical use. To counteract these effects, we developed S-nitrosylated pegylated hemoglobin (SNO-PEG-Hb, P(50) = 12 mm Hg) and tested it in a brain ischemia and reperfusion model. Neurological function and extent of cerebral infarction was determined 24 h after photochemically induced thrombosis of the middle cerebral artery in the rat. Infarction extent was determined from the integrated area in the cortex and basal ganglia detected by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining in rats receiving various doses of SNO-PEG-Hb (2, 0.4, and 0.08 mL/kg) and compared with rats receiving pegylated hemoglobin without S-nitrosylation (PEG-Hb) or saline of the same dosage. Results indicated that successive dilution revealed SNO-PEG-Hb but not PEG-Hb to be effective in reducing the size of cortical infarction but not neurological function at a dose of 0.4 mL/kg. In conclusion, SNO-PEG-Hb in a dose of 0.4 mL/kg (Hb 24 mg/kg) showed to be most effective in reducing the size of cortical infarction, however, without functional improvement.

  15. Myocardial infarct size and mortality depend on the time of day-a large multicenter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Fournier

    Full Text Available Different studies have shown circadian variation of ischemic burden among patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI, but with controversial results. The aim of this study was to analyze circadian variation of myocardial infarction size and in-hospital mortality in a large multicenter registry.This retrospective, registry-based study was based on data from AMIS Plus, a large multicenter Swiss registry of patients who suffered myocardial infarction between 1999 and 2013. Peak creatine kinase (CK was used as a proxy measure for myocardial infarction size. Associations between peak CK, in-hospital mortality, and the time of day at symptom onset were modelled using polynomial-harmonic regression methods.6,223 STEMI patients were admitted to 82 acute-care hospitals in Switzerland and treated with primary angioplasty within six hours of symptom onset. Only the 24-hour harmonic was significantly associated with peak CK (p = 0.0001. The maximum average peak CK value (2,315 U/L was for patients with symptom onset at 23:00, whereas the minimum average (2,017 U/L was for onset at 11:00. The amplitude of variation was 298 U/L. In addition, no correlation was observed between ischemic time and circadian peak CK variation. Of the 6,223 patients, 223 (3.58% died during index hospitalization. Remarkably, only the 24-hour harmonic was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. The risk of death from STEMI was highest for patients with symptom onset at 00:00 and lowest for those with onset at 12:00.As a part of this first large study of STEMI patients treated with primary angioplasty in Swiss hospitals, investigations confirmed a circadian pattern to both peak CK and in-hospital mortality which were independent of total ischemic time. Accordingly, this study proposes that symptom onset time be incorporated as a prognosis factor in patients with myocardial infarction.

  16. Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin reduces the size of cerebral infarction in rats: effect of oxygen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Dai; Kawaguchi, Akira T; Haida, Munetaka; Yamano, Mariko; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Tsukada, Hideo

    2009-02-01

    Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) with a low oxygen affinity (l-LEH, P(50) = 45 mm Hg) was found to be protective in the rodent and primate models of ischemic stroke. This study investigated the role of LEH with a high O(2) affinity (h-LEH, P(50) = 10 mm Hg) in its protective effect on brain ischemia. The extent of cerebral infarction was determined 24 h after photochemically induced thrombosis of the middle cerebral artery from the integrated area of infarction detected by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining in rats receiving various doses of h-LEH as well as l-LEH. Both h-LEH and l-LEH significantly reduced the extent of cortical infarction. h-LEH remained protective at a lower concentration (minimal effective dose [MED]: 0.08 mL/kg) than l-LEH (MED: 2 mL/kg) in the cortex. h-LEH reduced the infarction extent in basal ganglia as well (MED: 0.4 mL/kg), whereas l-LEH provided no significant protection. h-LEH provided better protection than l-LEH. The protective effect of both high- and low-affinity LEH may suggest the importance of its small particle size (230 nm) as compared to red blood cells. The superiority of h-LEH over l-LEH supports an optimal O(2) delivery to the ischemic penumbra as the mechanism of action in protecting against brain ischemia and reperfusion.

  17. Reduction of infarct size by gentle reperfusion without activation of reperfusion injury salvage kinases in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiolik, Judith; van Caster, Patrick; Skyschally, Andreas; Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Schulz, Rainer; Heusch, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Reperfusion is mandatory to salvage ischaemic myocardium from infarction, but also induces additional reperfusion injury and contributes to infarct size (IS). Gentle reperfusion (GR) has been proposed to attenuate reperfusion injury, but this remains contentious. We now investigated whether (i) GR reduces IS and (ii) GR is associated with the activation of reperfusion injury salvage kinases (RISK). Anaesthetized pigs were subjected to 90 min left anterior descending coronary artery hypoperfusion and 120 min reperfusion. GR was induced by slowly increasing coronary inflow back to baseline over 30 min, using an exponential algorithm [F(t) = F(i)+e(-(0.1)(t)((min)-3)).(F(b)-F(i)); F(b), coronary inflow at baseline; F(i), coronary inflow during ischaemia; n = 12]. Pigs subjected to immediate full reperfusion (IFR; n = 13) served as controls. IS was determined by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. The expression level of phosphorylated RISK proteins was determined by western blot analysis in myocardial biopsies taken at baseline, after 80-85 min ischaemia and at 10, 30, and 120 min reperfusion. In additional experiments with IFR (n = 3) and GR (n = 3), the PI3-AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathways were pharmacologically blocked (BL). IS was 37 +/- 2% (mean +/- SEM) of the area at risk with IFR and 29 +/- 1% (P < 0.05) with GR. RISK phosphorylation was similar between GR and IFR at baseline and 85 min ischaemia. At 10 min reperfusion, RISK phosphorylation was increased with IFR, but not with GR. At 30 and 120 min reperfusion, RISK phosphorylation was still greater with IFR than GR. RISK blockade did not abolish the IS reduction by GR (BL-IFR: 27 +/- 4% of the area at risk; BL-GR: 42 +/- 5%; P < 0.05). Gentle reperfusion reduces infarct size in pigs, but RISK activation is not causally involved in this infarct size reduction.

  18. Infarct size limitation after early intervention with metoprolol in the MIAMI Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlitz, J; Waldenström, J; Hjalmarson, A

    1988-01-01

    One of the secondary objectives of the MIAMI Trial which evaluated the role of the beta-1-selective blocker metoprolol in suspected acute myocardial infarction was to further assess whether early intervention with beta-blockade can limit infarct size. A total of 5,778 patients from 104 worldwide centres were randomized into the trial. Various enzymes such as aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), creatine kinase (CK), CK MB, CK B, lactate dehydrogenase (LD) and LD isoenzyme I were analysed. All enzymes were used according to the clinical routine of the respective hospital, except ASAT which was analysed once daily for 3 days in the majority of cases and LD I which was analysed every 12 h for 72 h in a subsample. A consistent observation was the lower serum enzyme activity among patients receiving metoprolol and randomized early after onset of symptoms, whereas no difference between metoprolol and placebo was observed in patients treated later in the course. The results of the MIAMI Trial support previous observations that early institution of metoprolol therapy limits infarct size, as indicated by the maximum serum enzyme activity.

  19. Genome size estimation: a new methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Gallardo-Escárate, Crisitian; Kober, Vitaly; López-Bonilla, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Recently, within the cytogenetic analysis, the evolutionary relations implied in the content of nuclear DNA in plants and animals have received a great attention. The first detailed measurements of the nuclear DNA content were made in the early 40's, several years before Watson and Crick proposed the molecular structure of the DNA. In the following years Hewson Swift developed the concept of "C-value" in reference to the haploid phase of DNA in plants. Later Mirsky and Ris carried out the first systematic study of genomic size in animals, including representatives of the five super classes of vertebrates as well as of some invertebrates. From these preliminary results it became evident that the DNA content varies enormously between the species and that this variation does not bear relation to the intuitive notion from the complexity of the organism. Later, this observation was reaffirmed in the following years as the studies increased on genomic size, thus denominating to this characteristic of the organisms like the "Paradox of the C-value". Few years later along with the no-codification discovery of DNA the paradox was solved, nevertheless, numerous questions remain until nowadays unfinished, taking to denominate this type of studies like the "C-value enigma". In this study, we reported a new method for genome size estimation by quantification of fluorescence fading. We measured the fluorescence intensity each 1600 milliseconds in DAPI-stained nuclei. The estimation of the area under the graph (integral fading) during fading period was related with the genome size.

  20. Improvement of regional myocardial blood flow and function and reduction of infarct size with ivabradine: protection beyond heart rate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Skyschally, Andreas; Gres, Petra; van Caster, Patrick; Schilawa, Dustin; Schulz, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    Effects of the bradycardic agent ivabradine on regional blood flow, contractile function, and infarct size were studied in a pig model of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion. Heart rate reduction by beta-blockade is associated with negative inotropism and unmasked alpha-adrenergic coronary vasoconstriction. Ivabradine is the only available bradycardic agent for clinical use. Anaesthetized pigs were subjected to 90 min controlled left anterior descending coronary artery hypoperfusion and 120 min reperfusion. Regional blood flow was measured with microspheres, regional function with sonomicrometry, and infarct size with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. Pigs received placebo or ivabradine (0.6 mg/kg i.v.) before or during ischaemia or before reperfusion, respectively. Pre-treatment with ivabradine reduced infarct size from 35 +/- 4 (SEM) to 19 +/- 4% of area at risk (AAR). Ivabradine 15-20 min after the onset of ischaemia increased regional myocardial blood flow from 2.12 +/- 0.31 to 3.55 +/- 0.56 microL/beat/g and systolic wall thickening from 6.7 +/- 1.0 to 16.3 +/- 3.0%; infarct size was reduced from 12 +/- 4 to 2 +/- 1% of AAR. Ivabradine 5 min before reperfusion still reduced infarct size from 36 +/- 4 to 21 +/- 5% of AAR. The benefit of ivabradine on flow and function was eliminated by atrial pacing, but part of the reduction of infarct size by ivabradine was not. Ivabradine's protection goes beyond heart rate reduction.

  1. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...

  2. Methotrexate carried in lipid core nanoparticles reduces myocardial infarction size and improves cardiac function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Raul C; Guido, Maria C; de Lima, Aline D; Tavares, Elaine R; Marques, Alyne F; Tavares de Melo, Marcelo D; Nicolau, Jose C; Salemi, Vera Mc; Kalil-Filho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is accompanied by myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, and ventricular remodeling that, when excessive or not properly regulated, may lead to heart failure. Previously, lipid core nanoparticles (LDE) used as carriers of the anti-inflammatory drug methotrexate (MTX) produced an 80-fold increase in the cell uptake of MTX. LDE-MTX treatment reduced vessel inflammation and atheromatous lesions induced in rabbits by cholesterol feeding. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of LDE-MTX on rats with MI, compared with commercial MTX treatment. Thirty-eight Wistar rats underwent left coronary artery ligation and were treated with LDE-MTX, or with MTX (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally, once/week, starting 24 hours after surgery) or with LDE without drug (MI-controls). A sham-surgery group (n=12) was also included. Echocardiography was performed 24 hours and 6 weeks after surgery. The animals were euthanized and their hearts were analyzed for morphometry, protein expression, and confocal microscopy. LDE-MTX treatment achieved a 40% improvement in left ventricular (LV) systolic function and reduced cardiac dilation and LV mass, as shown by echocardiography. LDE-MTX reduced the infarction size, myocyte hypertrophy and necrosis, number of inflammatory cells, and myocardial fibrosis, as shown by morphometric analysis. LDE-MTX increased antioxidant enzymes; decreased apoptosis, macrophages, reactive oxygen species production; and tissue hypoxia in non-infarcted myocardium. LDE-MTX increased adenosine bioavailability in the LV by increasing adenosine receptors and modulating adenosine catabolic enzymes. LDE-MTX increased the expression of myocardial vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) associated with adenosine release; this correlated not only with an increase in angiogenesis, but also with other parameters improved by LDE-MTX, suggesting that VEGF increase played an important role in the beneficial effects of LDE-MTX. Overall effects of

  3. [Emoxipin in reperfusion of ischemic myocardium in dogs: effects on infarct size and plasma creatine kinase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konorev, E A; Polumiskov, V Iu; Avilova, O A; Golikova, A P

    1990-09-01

    The effects of synthetic antioxidant emoxypine on infarct size and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was studied on open-chest anesthetized dogs with 180-min myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion. Emoxypine (10 and 40 mg/kg) was injected intravenously, beginning since 120th min of coronary artery occlusion. Emoxypine (10 mg/kg) resulted in infarct size limitation and reduction in plasma CK activity. An increase in dose of emoxypine to 40 mg/kg largely attenuated its protective effect on infarct size. CK activity during post-ischemic reperfusion was even higher in emoxypine (40 mg/kg) group compared with control. Augmented CK leakage from irreversibly injured myocardium to plasma under these experimental conditions may be owing to preservation of microvascular integrity and improving of drainage of infarcted tissue exerted by emoxypine.

  4. Impact of system delay on infarct size, myocardial salvage index, and left ventricular function in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Kelbæk, Henning Skov;

    2012-01-01

    The association between reperfusion delay and myocardial damage has previously been assessed by evaluation of the duration from symptom onset to invasive treatment, but results have been conflicting. System delay defined as the duration from first medical contact to first balloon dilatation is le...... prone to bias and is also modifiable. The purpose was to evaluate the impact of system delay on myocardial salvage index (MSI) and infarct size in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)....

  5. Measurement of myocardial perfusion and infarction size using computer-aided diagnosis system for myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guo-Qing; Xue, Jing-Yi; Guo, Yanhui; Chen, Shuang; Du, Pei; Wu, Yan; Wang, Yu-Hang; Zong, Li-Qiu; Tian, Jia-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Proper evaluation of myocardial microvascular perfusion and assessment of infarct size is critical for clinicians. We have developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) approach for myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) to measure myocardial perfusion and infarct size. Rabbits underwent 15 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group I, n = 15) or 60 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group II, n = 15). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed before and 7 d after ischemia/reperfusion, and images were analyzed with the CAD system on the basis of eliminating particle swarm optimization clustering analysis. The myocardium was quickly and accurately detected using contrast-enhanced images, myocardial perfusion was quantitatively calibrated and a color-coded map calibrated by contrast intensity and automatically produced by the CAD system was used to outline the infarction region. Calibrated contrast intensity was significantly lower in infarct regions than in non-infarct regions, allowing differentiation of abnormal and normal myocardial perfusion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis documented that -54-pixel contrast intensity was an optimal cutoff point for the identification of infarcted myocardium with a sensitivity of 95.45% and specificity of 87.50%. Infarct sizes obtained using myocardial perfusion defect analysis of original contrast images and the contrast intensity-based color-coded map in computerized images were compared with infarct sizes measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Use of the proposed CAD approach provided observers with more information. The infarct sizes obtained with myocardial perfusion defect analysis, the contrast intensity-based color-coded map and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were 23.72 ± 8.41%, 21.77 ± 7.8% and 18.21 ± 4.40% (% left ventricle) respectively (p > 0.05), indicating that computerized myocardial contrast echocardiography can

  6. Acute myocardial infarction: estimation of at-risk and salvaged myocardium at myocardial perfusion SPECT 1 month after infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Farina, Guillermo; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; Candell-Riera, Jaume; Pizzi, M Nazarena; Pineda, Victor; Figueras, Jaume; Cuberas, Gemma; de León, Gustavo; Castell-Conesa, Joan; García-Dorado, David

    2013-11-01

    To estimate at-risk and salvaged myocardium by using gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The study was approved by the hospital's Ethical Committee on Clinical Trials (trial register number, PR(HG)36/2000), and all patients gave informed consent. Forty patients (mean age, 61.78 years; eight women) with a first AMI underwent two gated SPECT examinations--one before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and one 4-5 weeks after PCI. Myocardium at risk was estimated by assessing the perfusion defect at the first gated SPECT examination, and salvaged myocardium was estimated by assessing the risk area minus necrosis at the second examination. Myocardium at risk was estimated by determining the discordance between the areas of left ventricular (LV) wall motion and perfusion at the second examination. Concordance between tests was analyzed by means of linear regression analysis, the Pearson correlation, the intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman analysis. An improvement in perfusion, wall motion, wall thickening, and LV ejection fraction (P Myocardial perfusion gated SPECT performed 1 month after early PCI in a first AMI provides potentially useful information on at-risk and salvaged myocardium. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13122324/-/DC1. RSNA, 2013

  7. Myocardial Infarct Size by CMR in Clinical Cardioprotection Studies: Insights From Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Hammond-Haley, Matthew; Weinmann, Shane; Martinez-Macias, Roberto; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) to assess myocardial infarct (MI) size in reperfused patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There is limited guidance on the use of CMR in clinical cardioprotection RCTs in patients with STEMI treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention. All RCTs in which CMR was used to quantify MI size in patients with STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention were identified and reviewed. Sixty-two RCTs (10,570 patients, January 2006 to November 2016) were included. One-third did not report CMR vendor or scanner strength, the contrast agent and dose used, and the MI size quantification technique. Gadopentetate dimeglumine was most commonly used, followed by gadoterate meglumine and gadobutrol at 0.20 mmol/kg each, with late gadolinium enhancement acquired at 10 min; in most RCTs, MI size was quantified manually, followed by the 5 standard deviation threshold; dropout rates were 9% for acute CMR only and 16% for paired acute and follow-up scans. Weighted mean acute and chronic MI sizes (≤12 h, initial TIMI [Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction] flow grade 0 to 3) from the control arms were 21 ± 14% and 15 ± 11% of the left ventricle, respectively, and could be used for future sample-size calculations. Pre-selecting patients most likely to benefit from the cardioprotective therapy (≤6 h, initial TIMI flow grade 0 or 1) reduced sample size by one-third. Other suggested recommendations for standardizing CMR in future RCTs included gadobutrol at 0.15 mmol/kg with late gadolinium enhancement at 15 min, manual or 6-SD threshold for MI quantification, performing acute CMR at 3 to 5 days and follow-up CMR at 6 months, and adequate reporting of the acquisition and analysis of CMR. There is significant heterogeneity in RCT design using CMR in patients with STEMI. The authors provide recommendations for standardizing

  8. High-intensity training reduces intermittent hypoxia-induced ER stress and myocardial infarct size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, Guillaume; Flore, Patrice; Sanchez, Hervé; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Belaidi, Elise; Arnaud, Claire

    2016-01-15

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) is described as the major detrimental factor leading to cardiovascular morbimortality in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. OSA patients exhibit increased infarct size after a myocardial event, and previous animal studies have shown that chronic IH could be the main mechanism. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. High-intensity training (HIT) exerts beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Thus, we hypothesized that HIT could prevent IH-induced ER stress and the increase in infarct size. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 21 days of IH (21-5% fraction of inspired O2, 60-s cycle, 8 h/day) or normoxia. After 1 wk of IH alone, rats were submitted daily to both IH and HIT (2 × 24 min, 15-30m/min). Rat hearts were either rapidly frozen to evaluate ER stress by Western blot analysis or submitted to an ischemia-reperfusion protocol ex vivo (30 min of global ischemia/120 min of reperfusion). IH induced cardiac proapoptotic ER stress, characterized by increased expression of glucose-regulated protein kinase 78, phosphorylated protein kinase-like ER kinase, activating transcription factor 4, and C/EBP homologous protein. IH-induced myocardial apoptosis was confirmed by increased expression of cleaved caspase-3. These IH-associated proapoptotic alterations were associated with a significant increase in infarct size (35.4 ± 3.2% vs. 22.7 ± 1.7% of ventricles in IH + sedenary and normoxia + sedentary groups, respectively, P < 0.05). HIT prevented both the IH-induced proapoptotic ER stress and increased myocardial infarct size (28.8 ± 3.9% and 21.0 ± 5.1% in IH + HIT and normoxia + HIT groups, respectively, P = 0.28). In conclusion, these findings suggest that HIT could represent a preventive strategy to limit IH-induced myocardial ischemia-reperfusion damages in OSA patients. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Dietary red palm oil supplementation reduces myocardial infarct size in an isolated perfused rat heart model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterhuyse Adriaan J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims Recent studies have shown that dietary red palm oil (RPO supplementation improves functional recovery following ischaemia/reperfusion in isolated hearts. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary RPO supplementation on myocardial infarct size after ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The effects of dietary RPO supplementation on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2 activation and PKB/Akt phosphorylation were also investigated. Materials and methods Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups and fed a standard rat chow diet (SRC, a SRC supplemented with RPO, or a SRC supplemented with sunflower oil (SFO, for a five week period, respectively. After the feeding period, hearts were excised and perfused on a Langendorff perfusion apparatus. Hearts were subjected to thirty minutes of normothermic global ischaemia and two hours of reperfusion. Infarct size was determined by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Coronary effluent was collected for the first ten minutes of reperfusion in order to measure MMP2 activity by gelatin zymography. Results Dietary RPO-supplementation decreased myocardial infarct size significantly when compared to the SRC-group and the SFO-supplemented group (9.1 ± 1.0% versus 30.2 ± 3.9% and 27.1 ± 2.4% respectively. Both dietary RPO- and SFO-supplementation were able to decrease MMP2 activity when compared to the SRC fed group. PKB/Akt phosphorylation (Thr 308 was found to be significantly higher in the dietary RPO supplemented group when compared to the SFO supplemented group at 10 minutes into reperfusion. There was, however, no significant changes observed in ERK phosphorylation. Conclusions Dietary RPO-supplementation was found to be more effective than SFO-supplementation in reducing myocardial infarct size after ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Both dietary RPO and SFO were able to reduce MMP2 activity, which suggests that MMP2 activity does not play a major role in

  10. The number of circulating CD14+ cells is related to infarct size and postinfarct volumes in ST segment elevation myocardial infarction but not non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Séronde, Marie France; Chopard, Romain; Schiele, François; Jehl, Jérome; Bassand, Jean Pierre; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Meneveau, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between the number of CD14+ cells, myocardial infarct (MI) size and left ventricular (LV) volumes in ST segment elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) patients. METHODS: A total of 62 patients with STEMI (n=34) or NSTEMI (n=28) were enrolled. The number of CD14+ cells was assessed at admission. Infarct size, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and LV volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging five days after MI and six months after MI. Results: In STEMI patients, the number of CD14+ cells was positively and significantly correlated with infarct size at day 5 (r=0.40; P=0.016) and after six months (r=0.34; P=0.047), negatively correlated with LVEF at day 5 (r=−0.50; P=0.002) and after six months (r=−0.46; P=0.005) and positively correlated with end-diastolic (r=0.38; P=0.02) and end-systolic (r=0.49; P=0.002) volumes after six months. In NSTEMI patients, no significant correlation was found between the number of CD14+ cells and infarct size, LVEF or LV volumes at day 5 or after six months. CONCLUSIONS: The number of CD14+ cells at admission was associated with infarct size and LV remodelling in STEMI patients with large infarct size, whereas in NSTEMI patients, no relationship was observed between numbers of CD14+ cells and LV remodelling. PMID:23620701

  11. Value of adenosine infusion for infarct size determination using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Luz Protásio

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial contrast echocardiography has been used for determination of infarct size (IS in experimental models. However, with intermittent harmonic imaging, IS seems to be underestimated immediately after reperfusion due to areas with preserved, yet dysfunctional, microvasculature. The use of exogenous vasodilators showed to be useful to unmask these infarcted areas with depressed coronary flow reserve. This study was undertaken to assess the value of adenosine for IS determination in an open-chest canine model of coronary occlusion and reperfusion, using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (RTMCE. Methods Nine dogs underwent 180 minutes of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion. PESDA (Perfluorocarbon-Exposed Sonicated Dextrose Albumin was used as contrast agent. IS was determined by RTMCE before and during adenosine infusion at a rate of 140 mcg·Kg-1·min-1. Post-mortem necrotic area was determined by triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC staining. Results IS determined by RTMCE was 1.98 ± 1.30 cm2 and increased to 2.58 ± 1.53 cm2 during adenosine infusion (p = 0.004, with good correlation between measurements (r = 0.91; p 2 and showed no significant difference with IS determined by RTMCE before or during hyperemia. A slight better correlation between RTMCE and TTC measurements was observed during adenosine (r = 0.99; p Conclusion RTMCE can accurately determine IS in immediate period after acute myocardial infarction. Adenosine infusion results in a slight better detection of actual size of myocardial damage.

  12. How many people have had a myocardial infarction? Prevalence estimated using historical hospital data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuseputro Peter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health administrative data are increasingly used to examine disease occurrence. However, health administrative data are typically available for a limited number of years – posing challenges for estimating disease prevalence and incidence. The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of people previously hospitalized with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI using 17 years of hospital data and to create a registry of people with myocardial infarction. Methods Myocardial infarction prevalence in Ontario 2004 was estimated using four methods: 1 observed hospital admissions from 1988 to 2004; 2 observed (1988 to 2004 and extrapolated unobserved events (prior to 1988 using a "back tracing" method using Poisson models; 3 DisMod incidence-prevalence-mortality model; 4 self-reported heart disease from the population-based Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS in 2000/2001. Individual respondents of the CCHS were individually linked to hospital discharge records to examine the agreement between self-report and hospital AMI admission. Results 170,061 Ontario residents who were alive on March 31, 2004, and over age 20 years survived an AMI hospital admission between 1988 to 2004 (cumulative incidence 1.8%. This estimate increased to 2.03% (95% CI 2.01 to 2.05 after adding extrapolated cases that likely occurred before 1988. The estimated prevalence appeared stable with 5 to 10 years of historic hospital data. All 17 years of data were needed to create a reasonably complete registry (90% of estimated prevalent cases. The estimated prevalence using both DisMod and self-reported "heart attack" was higher (2.5% and 2.7% respectively. There was poor agreement between self-reported "heart attack" and the likelihood of having an observed AMI admission (sensitivity = 63.5%, positive predictive value = 54.3%. Conclusion Estimating myocardial infarction prevalence using a limited number of years of hospital data is feasible, and

  13. Impact of Chronic Total Occlusions on Markers of Reperfusion, Infarct Size, and Long-Term Mortality : A Substudy from the TAPAS-Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lexis, Chris P. H.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Rahel, Braim M.; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Gu, Youlan L.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Zijlstra, Felix; Lexis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the impact of a chronic total occlusion (CTO) in a non-infarct related coronary artery (IRA) on markers of reperfusion, infarct size, and long-term cardiac mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEM!). Background: A concurrent CTO in STEMI pa

  14. Impact of Chronic Total Occlusions on Markers of Reperfusion, Infarct Size, and Long-Term Mortality : A Substudy from the TAPAS-Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lexis, Chris P. H.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Rahel, Braim M.; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Gu, Youlan L.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Zijlstra, Felix; Lexis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the impact of a chronic total occlusion (CTO) in a non-infarct related coronary artery (IRA) on markers of reperfusion, infarct size, and long-term cardiac mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEM!). Background: A concurrent CTO in STEMI pa

  15. Exenatide reduces final infarct size in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and short-duration of ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Kelbæk, Henning Skov; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove

    2012-01-01

    Exenatide has been demonstrated to be cardioprotective as an adjunct to primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of the post hoc analysis study was to evaluate the effect of exenatide in relation to system delay, defin...

  16. Infarct Size, Shock, and Heart Failure: Does Reperfusion Strategy Matter in Early Presenting Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavadia, Jay; Zheng, Yinggan; Dianati Maleki, Neda; Huber, Kurt; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Goldstein, Patrick; Gershlick, Anthony H; Wilcox, Robert; Van de Werf, Frans; Armstrong, Paul W

    2015-08-24

    A pharmacoinvasive (PI) strategy for early presenting ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction nominally reduced 30-day cardiogenic shock and congestive heart failure compared with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). We evaluated whether infarct size (IS) was related to this finding. Using the peak cardiac biomarker in patients randomized to PI versus PPCI within the Strategic Reperfusion Early After Myocardial Infarction (STREAM) trial, IS was divided into 3 groups: small (≤2 times the upper limit normal [ULN]), medium (>2 to ≤5 times the upper limit normal) and large (>5 times the upper limit normal). The association between IS and 30-day shock and congestive heart failure was subsequently examined. Data on 1701 of 1892 (89.9%) patients randomized to PI (n=853, 50.1%) versus PPCI (n=848, 49.9%) within STREAM were evaluated. A higher proportion of PPCI patients had a large IS (PI versus PPCI: small, 49.8% versus 50.2%; medium, 56.9% versus 43.1%; large, 48.4% versus 51.6%; P=0.035), despite comparable intergroup ischemic times for each reperfusion strategy. As IS increased, a parallel increment in shock and congestive heart failure occurred in both treatment arms, except for the small IS group. The difference in shock and congestive heart failure in the small IS group (4.4% versus 11.6%, P=0.026) in favor of PI likely relates to higher rates of aborted myocardial infarction with the PI strategy (72.7% versus 54.3%, P=0.005). After adjustment, a trend favoring PI persisted in this subgroup (relative risk 0.40, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.06, P=0.064); no difference in treatment-related outcomes was evident in the other 2 groups. A PI strategy appears to alter the pattern of IS after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, resulting in more medium and fewer large infarcts compared with PPCI. Despite a comparable number of small infarcts, PI patients in this group had more aborted myocardial infarctions and less 30-day shock and congestive heart failure

  17. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohner, Christoph A; Richardson, Anthony J; Prebble, Clare E M; Marshall, Andrea D; Bennett, Michael B; Weeks, Scarla J; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Pierce, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    .... We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters...

  18. The size does not matter – The presence of microvascular obstruction but not its extent corresponds to larger infarct size in reperfused STEMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Małek, Łukasz A., E-mail: lmalek@ikard.pl [Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Śpiewak, Mateusz, E-mail: mspiewak@ikard.pl [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Kłopotowski, Mariusz, E-mail: mklopotowski@hotmail.com [Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Miśko, Jolanta, E-mail: jmisko@wp.pl [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Rużyłło, Witold, E-mail: wruzyllo@ikard.pl [Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Witkowski, Adam, E-mail: witkowski@hbz.pl [Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    Background: Microvascular obstruction (MVO) is a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) marker of no-reflow in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). It remains unresolved whether the infarct size corresponds only to the presence of MVO or also to its extent. Methods: The study included 53 patients with first STEMI (median age 61.5 years, 77% male) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) who underwent CMR after median 5 days from PCI. Small MVO was defined as patchy, non-confluent spots of dark areas of absent contrast surrounded by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Large MVO was defined as confluent areas of MVO comprising a large amount of the infarct zone. Results: Microvascular obstruction was observed in 32 patients (60%) including 18 patients with small MVO (36%) and 14 patients with large MVO (24%). Patients with MVO were more likely to have TIMI 0/1 grade flow on initial angiogram, higher levels of necrotic markers, larger infarct size, larger left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume and lower ejection fraction in comparison to patients without MVO. These differences were not observed between patients with large and small MVO. Conclusions: The presence of MVO but not its extent corresponds to larger infarct size in STEMI.

  19. Determination of location, size, and transmurality of chronic myocardial infarction without exogenous contrast media by using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Avinash; Cokic, Ivan; Tang, Richard L Q; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Sharif, Behzad; Marbán, Eduardo; Li, Debiao; Berman, Daniel S; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2014-05-01

    Late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) cardiac MRI (CMR) is a powerful method for characterizing myocardial infarction (MI), but the requisite gadolinium infusion is estimated to be contraindicated in ≈20% of patients with MI because of end-stage chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether T1 CMR obtained without contrast agents at 3 T could be an alternative to LGE CMR for characterizing chronic MIs using a canine model of MI. Canines (n=29) underwent CMR at 7 days (acute MI [AMI]) and 4 months (chronic MI [CMI]) after MI. Infarct location, size, and transmurality measured by using native T1 maps and LGE images at 1.5 T and 3 T were compared. Resolution of edema between AMI and CMI was examined with T2 maps. T1 maps overestimated infarct size and transmurality relative to LGE images in AMI (P=0.016 and P=0.007, respectively), which was not observed in CMI (P=0.49 and P=0.81, respectively) at 3 T. T1 maps underestimated infarct size and transmurality relative to LGE images in AMI and CMI (P0.20) at both field strengths. Histology showed extensive replacement fibrosis within the CMI territories. CMI detection sensitivity and specificity of T1 CMR at 3 T were 95% and 97%, respectively. Native T1 maps at 3 T can determine the location, size, and transmurality of CMI with high diagnostic accuracy. Patient studies are necessary for clinical translation. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. A gate size estimation algorithm for data association filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG MingHui; WAN Qun; YOU ZhiSheng

    2008-01-01

    The problem of forming validation regions or gates for new sensor measurements obtained when tracking targets in clutter is considered. Since the gate size is an integral part of the data association filter, this paper is intended to describe a way of estimating the gate size via the performance of the data association filter. That is, the gate size can be estimated by looking for the optimal performance of the data association filter. Simulations show that this estimation method of the gate size offers advantages over the common and classical estimation methods of the gate size, especially in a heavy clutter and/or false alarm environment.

  1. Soluble epoxide hydrolase gene deletion improves blood flow and reduces infarct size after cerebral ischemia in reproductively senescent female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L Zuloaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, a key enzyme in the metabolism of vasodilatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs, is sexually dimorphic, suppressed by estrogen, and contributes to underlying sex differences in cerebral blood flow and injury after cerebral ischemia. We tested the hypothesis that sEH inhibition or gene deletion in reproductively senescent (RS female mice would increase cerebral perfusion and decrease infarct size following stroke. RS (15-18 month old and young (3-4 month old female sEH knockout (sEHKO mice and wild type (WT mice were subjected to 45 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO with laser Doppler perfusion monitoring. WT mice were treated with vehicle or a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB at the time of reperfusion and every 24hrs thereafter for 3 days. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were measured in vivo using optical microangiography. Infarct size was measured 3 days after reperfusion. Infarct size and cerebral perfusion 24h after MCAO were not altered by age. Both sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition increased cortical perfusion 24h after MCAO. Neither sEH gene deletion nor sEH inhibition reduced infarct size in young mice. However, sEH gene deletion, but not sEH inhibition of the hydrolase domain of the enzyme, decreased infarct size in RS mice. Results of these studies show that sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition enhance cortical perfusion following MCAO and sEH gene deletion reduces damage after ischemia in RS female mice; however this neuroprotection in absent is young mice.

  2. Effects of Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Cardiac Arrhythmias and Infarct Size in Ischemic-Reperfused Isolated Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslem Najafi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine whether acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC was able to reduce cardiac arrhythmias and infarct size in the ischemic-reperfused isolated rat heart.Materials and MethodsThe isolated hearts were mounted on a Langendorff apparatus then perfused by a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution during 30 min regional ischemia and 120 min reperfusion (control or by enriched Krebs solution with 0.375, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 mM of ALC (treatment groups. The ECGs were recorded and analyzed to determine cardiac arrhythmias. The infarct size was determined by using a computerized planimetry package.ResultsDuring ischemia, all used concentrations of ALC decreased number and duration of ventricular tachycardia (VT, total number of ventricular ectopic beats (VEBs (P<0.01, incidence of total ventricular fibrillation (VF and the time spent for reversible VF (P<0.05. At the reperfusion phase, duration of VT, incidence of total VF and reversible VF were significantly lowered by ALC (P<0.05. In addition, infarct size significantly was decreased in all treated groups. In the control group, the infarct size was 23±3.1%, however, ALC (0.375, 0.75 and 3 mM reduced it to 8.7±2.3, 5.3±1.4, and 8±2.9%, respectively (P<0.01. ConclusionConsidering the results, it may be concluded that ALC has protective effects against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injuries by reduction of infarct size and arrhythmias in isolated rat heart. Among the potential cardioprotective mechanisms for ALC, increase in glucose oxidation and resulting reduced lactate production, reduction of toxic fatty acid metabolites and removing free radicals from the myocytes are more relevant.

  3. Better Size Estimation for Sparse Matrix Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amossen, Rasmus Resen; Campagna, Andrea; Pagh, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of doing fast and reliable estimation of the number of non-zero entries in a sparse Boolean matrix product. Let n denote the total number of non-zero entries in the input matrices. We show how to compute a 1 ± ε approximation (with small probability of error) in expected...

  4. Free radical scavenger, edaravone, reduces the lesion size of lacunar infarction in human brain ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Although free radicals have been reported to play a role in the expansion of ischemic brain lesions, the effect of free radical scavengers is still under debate. In this study, the temporal profile of ischemic stroke lesion sizes was assessed for more than one year to evaluate the effect of edaravone which might reduce ischemic damage. Methods We sequentially enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients, who admitted between April 2003 and March 2004, into the edaravone(-) group (n = 83) and, who admitted between April 2004 and March 2005, into the edaravone(+) group (n = 93). Because, edaravone has been used as the standard treatment after April 2004 in our hospital. To assess the temporal profile of the stroke lesion size, the ratio of the area [T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (T2WI)/iffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI)] were calculated. Observations on T2WI were continued beyond one year, and observational times were classified into subacute (1-2 months after the onset), early chronic (3-6 month), late chronic (7-12 months) and old (≥13 months) stages. Neurological deficits were assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale upon admission and at discharge and by the modified Rankin Scale at 1 year following stroke onset. Results Stroke lesion size was significantly attenuated in the edaravone(+) group compared with the edaravone(-) group in the period of early and late chronic observational stages. However, this reduction in lesion size was significant within a year and only for the small-vessel occlusion stroke patients treated with edaravone. Moreover, patients with small-vessel occlusion strokes that were treated with edaravone showed significant neurological improvement during their hospital stay, although there were no significant differences in outcome one year after the stroke. Conclusion Edaravone treatment reduced the volume of the infarct and improved neurological deficits during the subacute period, especially

  5. Infarct size, left ventricular function, and prognosis in women compared to men after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: results from an individual patient-level pooled analysis of 10 randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Redfors, Björn; Selker, Harry P; Thiele, Holger; Patel, Manesh R; Udelson, James E; Magnus Ohman, E; Eitel, Ingo; Granger, Christopher B; Maehara, Akiko; Kirtane, Ajay; Généreux, Philippe; Jenkins, Paul L; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Mintz, Gary S; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-06-01

    Studies have reported less favourable outcomes in women compared with men after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Whether sex-specific differences in the magnitude or prognostic impact of infarct size or post-infarction cardiac function explain this finding is unknown. We pooled patient-level data from 10 randomized primary PCI trials in which infarct size was measured within 1 month (median 4 days) by either cardiac magnetic resonance imaging or technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography. We assessed the association between sex, infarct size, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and the composite rate of death or heart failure (HF) hospitalization within 1 year. Of 2632 patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI, 587 (22.3%) were women. Women were older than men and had a longer delay between symptom onset and reperfusion. Infarct size did not significantly differ between women and men, and women had higher LVEF. Nonetheless, women had a higher 1-year rate of death or HF hospitalization compared to men, and while infarct size was a strong independent predictor of 1-year death or HF hospitalization (P size or LVEF on the risk of death or HF hospitalization. In this large-scale, individual patient-level pooled analysis of patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI, women had a higher 1-year rate of death or HF hospitalization compared to men, a finding not explained by sex-specific differences in the magnitude or prognostic impact of infarct size or by differences in post-infarction cardiac function.

  6. Software Size Estimation Using Expert Estimation: A Fuzzy Logic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    For decades software managers have been using formal methodologies such as the Constructive Cost Model and Function Points to estimate the effort of software projects during the early stages of project development. While some research shows these methodologies to be effective, many software managers feel that they are overly complicated to use and…

  7. Software Size Estimation Using Expert Estimation: A Fuzzy Logic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    For decades software managers have been using formal methodologies such as the Constructive Cost Model and Function Points to estimate the effort of software projects during the early stages of project development. While some research shows these methodologies to be effective, many software managers feel that they are overly complicated to use and…

  8. Pharmacological reduction of infarct size : in search for a drug that mimics ischemic preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Rohmann

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the late 1960s, when the high mortality of myocardial infarction had caused a high level of public awareuess, the National Institutes of Health, USA, decided to fund projects directly related to the experimental treatment of infarcts, to develop animal models best suited to study infa

  9. Pharmacological reduction of infarct size : in search for a drug that mimics ischemic preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Rohmann

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the late 1960s, when the high mortality of myocardial infarction had caused a high level of public awareuess, the National Institutes of Health, USA, decided to fund projects directly related to the experimental treatment of infarcts, to develop animal models best suited to study infa

  10. Autologous cardiomyotissue implantation promotes myocardial regeneration, decreases infarct size, and improves left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Wykrzykowska (Joanna); A. Rosinberg (Audrey); S.U. Lee (Seung); P. Voisine (Pierre); G. Wu (Guanming); E. Appelbaum (Evan); M. Boodhwani (Munir); F.W. Sellke (Frank); R.J. Laham (Roger)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground-: Cell therapy for myocardial infarction (MI) may be limited by poor cell survival and lack of transdifferentiation. We report a novel technique of implanting whole autologous myocardial tissue from preserved myocardial regions into infarcted regions. Methods and results-: Fou

  11. Estimating the size of Huffman code preambles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Palmatier, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Data compression via block-adaptive Huffman coding is considered. The compressor consecutively processes blocks of N data symbols, estimates source statistics by computing the relative frequencies of each source symbol in the block, and then synthesizes a Huffman code based on these estimates. In order to let the decompressor know which Huffman code is being used, the compressor must begin the transmission of each compressed block with a short preamble or header file. This file is an encoding of the list n = (n(sub 1), n(sub 2)....,n(sub m)), where n(sub i) is the length of the Hufffman codeword associated with the ith source symbol. A simple method of doing this encoding is to individually encode each n(sub i) into a fixed-length binary word of length log(sub 2)l, where l is an a priori upper bound on the codeword length. This method produces a maximum preamble length of mlog(sub 2)l bits. The object is to show that, in most cases, no substantially shorter header of any kind is possible.

  12. Myocardial strain estimation from CT: towards computer-aided diagnosis on infarction identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ken C. L.; Tee, Michael; Chen, Marcus; Bluemke, David A.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Regional myocardial strains have the potential for early quantification and detection of cardiac dysfunctions. Although image modalities such as tagged and strain-encoded MRI can provide motion information of the myocardium, they are uncommon in clinical routine. In contrary, cardiac CT images are usually available, but they only provide motion information at salient features such as the cardiac boundaries. To estimate myocardial strains from a CT image sequence, we adopted a cardiac biomechanical model with hyperelastic material properties to relate the motion on the cardiac boundaries to the myocardial deformation. The frame-to-frame displacements of the cardiac boundaries are obtained using B-spline deformable image registration based on mutual information, which are enforced as boundary conditions to the biomechanical model. The system equation is solved by the finite element method to provide the dense displacement field of the myocardium, and the regional values of the three principal strains and the six strains in cylindrical coordinates are computed in terms of the American Heart Association nomenclature. To study the potential of the estimated regional strains on identifying myocardial infarction, experiments were performed on cardiac CT image sequences of ten canines with artificially induced myocardial infarctions. The leave-one-subject-out cross validations show that, by using the optimal strain magnitude thresholds computed from ROC curves, the radial strain and the first principal strain have the best performance.

  13. High-sensitivity troponin T for prediction of left ventricular function and infarct size one year following ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstadler, Sebastian Johannes; Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Klug, Gert; Mair, Johannes; Tu, Alexander Minh-Duc; Kofler, Markus; Henninger, Benjamin; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Data relating high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) to long-term myocardial function and infarct size in patients after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are lacking. We aimed to evaluate the use of early hs-cTnT concentrations for prediction of myocardial function and infarct size assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) one year following STEMI. Sixty-six patients, revascularized by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for first-time STEMI, were enrolled in this observational study. Serial hs-cTnT, creatine kinase (CK), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were measured on admission, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h post-PCI. Patients underwent CMR within the first week and 12months thereafter. Except for admission hs-cTnT, all single time point and peak hs-cTnT concentrations showed significant correlations with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF: r=-0.404 to -0.517, all ps8%) at 12months. The combination of all four biomarkers resulted in an AUC of 0.82 and 0.92 for the prediction of reduced LVEF and large IS at 12months, respectively (both ps>0.05). In stable STEMI patients successfully revascularized by primary PCI, serial and peak concentrations of hs-cTnT are closely correlated to long-term LVEF and IS. Combination of hs-cTnT with CK, hs-CRP, or LDH did not add any significant prognostic value as compared with hs-cTnT alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of serum calcium levels with infarct size in acute ischemic stroke: Observations from Northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna Borah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium is known to be major mediator in ischemic neuronal cell death. Recent studies have shown that elevated serum calcium levels at admission in patients with stroke have been associated with less severe clinical deficits and with better outcomes. Aim: The aim of this to determine the correlation between serum calcium (total, corrected, and ionized and infarct size (IS in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 61 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke from May 2015 to April 2016 at a tertiary care institute in Northeast India. Only patients aged ≥40 years and diagnosed as having acute ischemic cerebrovascular stroke with clinical examination and confirmed by a computed tomography scan were included in the study. Serum calcium levels (total, albumin corrected, and ionized were collapsed into quartiles, and these quartile versions were used for calculating correlation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for comparing calcium levels with IS. Results: Total calcium, albumin-corrected calcium, and ionized calcium had a statistically significant negative correlation with IS with r = −0.578, −0.5396, and −0.5335, respectively. Total and ionized calcium showed a significant negative correlation with IS across all four quartiles. Albumin-corrected calcium levels showed a significant negative correlation with IS only across the lowest and highest quartiles. Conclusion: The findings in our study suggest that serum calcium can be used as a prognostic indicator in ischemic stroke as its levels directly correlates with the IS.

  15. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  16. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  17. Comparison of quantitative estimation of intracerebral hemorrhage and infarct volumes after thromboembolism in an embolic stroke model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Nina; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    . AIMS: We evaluated different methods for estimating the volume of infarcts, hemorrhages, after embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion with or without thrombolysis. METHODS: An experimental thromboembolytic rat model was used in this study. The rats underwent surgery and were placed in two groups...... of the infarct and intracerebral hemorrhage. RESULTS: No differences were observed in the infarct volume or amount of bleeding when comparing the three methods of volume estimation. Although semiautomated computer estimation and manual erythrocyte counting provided similar results as the stereological...... measurements, the stereological method was the most efficient and advantageous. CONCLUSIONS: We found that stereology was the superior method for quantification of hemorrhagic volume, especially for rodent petechial bleeding, which is otherwise difficult to measure. Our results suggest the possibility...

  18. Mitral regurgitation in myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction, or both: prognostic significance and relation to ventricular size and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amigoni, Maria; Meris, Alessandra; Thune, Jens Jakob

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Mitral regurgitation (MR) confers independent risk in patients with acute myocardial infarction. We utilized data from the VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion echo study to relate baseline MR to left ventricular (LV) size, shape, and function, and to assess the relationship between bas...

  19. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis.

  20. Excess salt increases infarct size produced by photothrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yao

    Full Text Available Cerebral circulation is known to be vulnerable to high salt loading. However, no study has investigated the effects of excess salt on focal ischemic brain injury. After 14 days of salt loading (0.9% saline or water, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY were subjected to photothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, and infarct volume was determined at 48 h after MCAO: albumin and hemoglobin contents in discrete brain regions were also determined in SHR. Salt loading did not affect blood pressure levels in SHR and WKY. After MCAO, regional cerebral blood flow (CBF, determined with two ways of laser-Doppler flowmetry (one-point measurement or manual scanning, was more steeply decreased in the salt-loaded group than in the control group. In SHR/Izm, infarct volume in the salt-loaded group was 112±27 mm3, which was significantly larger than 77±12 mm3 in the control group (p = 0.002, while the extents of blood-brain barrier disruption (brain albumin and hemoglobin levels were not affected by excess salt. In WKY, salt loading did not significantly increase infarct size. These results show the detrimental effects of salt loading on intra-ischemic CBF and subsequent brain infarction produced by phototrhombotic MCAO in hypertensive rats.

  1. Estimating hidden population size using Respondent-Driven Sampling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handcock, Mark S; Gile, Krista J; Mar, Corinne M

    Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS) is n approach to sampling design and inference in hard-to-reach human populations. It is often used in situations where the target population is rare and/or stigmatized in the larger population, so that it is prohibitively expensive to contact them through the available frames. Common examples include injecting drug users, men who have sex with men, and female sex workers. Most analysis of RDS data has focused on estimating aggregate characteristics, such as disease prevalence. However, RDS is often conducted in settings where the population size is unknown and of great independent interest. This paper presents an approach to estimating the size of a target population based on data collected through RDS. The proposed approach uses a successive sampling approximation to RDS to leverage information in the ordered sequence of observed personal network sizes. The inference uses the Bayesian framework, allowing for the incorporation of prior knowledge. A flexible class of priors for the population size is used that aids elicitation. An extensive simulation study provides insight into the performance of the method for estimating population size under a broad range of conditions. A further study shows the approach also improves estimation of aggregate characteristics. Finally, the method demonstrates sensible results when used to estimate the size of known networked populations from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and when used to estimate the size of a hard-to-reach population at high risk for HIV.

  2. Three hours continuous injection of adenosine improved left ventricular function and infarct size in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hang; TIAN Nai-liang; HU Zuo-ying; WANG Feng; CHEN Liang; ZHANG Yao-jun; CHEN Shao-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background The definitive treatment for myocardial ischemia is reperfusion.However,reperfusion injury has the potential to cause additional reversible and irreversible damage to the myocardium.One likely candidate for a cardioprotection is adenosine.The present study aimed at investigating the effect of intravenous adenosine on clinical outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Methods Patients with STEMI within 12 hours from the onset of symptoms were randomized by 1:1:1 ratio to receive either adenosine 50 μg·kg-1·min-1 (low-dose group,n=31),or 70 μgkg-1·min-1 (high-dose group,n=32),or saline 1 ml/min (control group,n=27) for three hours.Drugs were given to the patients immediately after the guide wire crossed the culprit lesion.Recurrence of no-reflow,TIMI flow grade (TFG) and TIMI myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG),and collateral circulation were recorded.The postoperative and preoperative ST segment elevation sum of 18-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and their ratio (STsum-post/STsum-pre) were recorded,as well as the peak time and peak value of CK-MB enzyme.Serial cardiac echo and myocardial perfusion imaging were performed at 24 hours and 6 months post-stenting.The primary endpoint was left ventricular function,and infarct size.The secondary end-point was the occurrence of cardiac and non-cardiac death,non-fatal myocardial infarction,and heart failure.Results A total of 90 STEMI patients were studied.No-reflow immediately after stent procedure was seen in 11 (35.5%)patients in the control group,significantly different from 6.3% in the low-dose group or 3.7% in the high-dose group (both P=0.001).STsum-post/STsum-pre in the low-dose and high-dose groups was significantly different from the control group (low-dose group vs.control group,P=0.003 and high-dose group vs.control group,P=0.001),without a dose-dependent pattern (P=0.238).The peak value of CK-MB enzyme

  3. Sample Size Requirements for Estimating Pearson, Spearman and Kendall Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Douglas G.; Wright, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews interval estimates of the Pearson, Kendall tau-alpha, and Spearman correlates and proposes an improved standard error for the Spearman correlation. Examines the sample size required to yield a confidence interval having the desired width. Findings show accurate results from a two-stage approximation to the sample size. (SLD)

  4. Estimation of Nanoparticle Size Distributions by Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Rune; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the nanoparticle size distribution is important for the interpretation of experimental results in many studies of nanoparticle properties. An automated method is needed for accurate and robust estimation of particle size distribution from nanoparticle images with thousands of particl...

  5. A Practical Method of Policy Analysis by Estimating Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The previous articles on class size and other productivity research paint a complex and confusing picture of the relationship between policy variables and student achievement. Missing is a conceptual scheme capable of combining the seemingly unrelated research and dissimilar estimates of effect size into a unified structure for policy analysis and…

  6. Increased hemorrhagic transformation and altered infarct size and localization after experimental stroke in a rat model type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Switzer Jeffrey A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interruption of flow through of cerebral blood vessels results in acute ischemic stroke. Subsequent breakdown of the blood brain barrier increases cerebral injury by the development of vasogenic edema and secondary hemorrhage known as hemorrhagic transformation (HT. Diabetes is a risk factor for stroke as well as poor outcome of stroke. The current study tested the hypothesis that diabetes-induced changes in the cerebral vasculature increase the risk of HT and augment ischemic injury. Methods Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK or control rats underwent 3 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion and 21 h reperfusion followed by evaluation of infarct size, hemorrhage and neurological outcome. Results Infarct size was significantly smaller in GK rats (10 ± 2 vs 30 ± 4%, p Conclusion These findings provide evidence that there is cerebrovascular remodeling in diabetes. While diabetes-induced remodeling appears to prevent infarct expansion, these changes in blood vessels increase the risk for HT possibly exacerbating neurovascular damage due to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in diabetes.

  7. Mild focal cerebral ischemia in the rat. The effect of local temperature on infarct size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt-Eriksen, Elisabeth S; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    We aimed at investigating a new model of mild focal cerebral ischemia in rats with repeated, noninvasive magnetic resonance scanning combined with histology. Magnetic resonance imaging yielded information about infarct development enabling us to test the putative growth of the infarct over time....... The effect of local temperature at the occlusion site in this model was furthermore tested. Thirty-three Wistar rats were subjected to 30 min of simultaneous common carotid artery and distal middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham treatment. Animals were magnetic resonance-scanned repeatedly between day one...... and day 14 after surgery, then sacrificed, and paraffin brain sections stained. All animals scanned 24 h after reperfusion showed an area of edema in the affected cortex, which later was identified as an infarct. Animals with a temperature of 33.9 +/- 1.5 degrees C at the MCA site (hypothermic) showed...

  8. Noncontrast Computed Tomography versus Computed Tomography Angiography Source Images for Predicting Final Infarct Size in Anterior Circulation Acute Ischemic Stroke: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Amritendu; Muthusami, Prakash; Mohimen, Aneesh; K, Srinivasan; B, Babunath; Pn, Sylaja; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2017-02-01

    There has been a recent debate regarding the superiority of computed tomography angiography source images (CTASIs) over noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) to predict the final infarct size in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We hypothesized that the parenchymal abnormality on CTASI in faster scanners would overestimate ischemic core. This prospective study assessed the correlation of Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on NCCT, CTASI, and computed tomography perfusion (CTP) with final infarct size in patients within 8 hours of AIS. Follow-up with NCCT or diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 24 hours. Correlations of NCCT and CTASI with final infarct size and with CTP parameters were assessed. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients who underwent intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Inter-rater reliability was tested using Spearman's rank correlation. A P value less than .05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 105 patients were included in the final analysis. NCCT had a stronger correlation with the final infarct size than did CTASI (Spearman's ρ = .85 versus .78, P = .13). We found an overestimation of the final infarct size by CTASI in 47.6% of the cases, whereas NCCT underestimated infarct size in 60% of the patients. NCCT correlated most strongly with CBV (ρ = .93), whereas CTASI correlated most strongly with CBF (ρ = .87). Subgroup analysis showed less correlation of CTASI with final infarct size in the group that received thrombolysis versus the group that did not (ρ = .70 versus .88, P = .01). In a 256-slice scanner, the CTASI parenchymal abnormality includes ischemic penumbra and thus overestimates final infarct size-this could result in inappropriate exclusion of patients from thrombolysis or thrombectomy. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  9. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Rohner, Christoph A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Prebble, Clare E.M.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Bennett, Michael B.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Geremy Cliff; Wintner, Sabine P.; Pierce, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 11...

  10. The predictive value of cumulative lactate dehydrogenase release within the first 72 h of acute myocardial infarction in patients treated with primary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsman, Peter; Zijlstra, F.; Miedema, Kor; Hoorntje, J.C.; Dikkeschei, L.D.; Slingerland, R.J.; Reiffers, S.; de Boer, M.J.; Suryapranata, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In patients with acute myocardial infarction, estimation of infarct size by cumulative lactate dehydrogenase release at 72 h (LDHQ72) is a simple and widely used method. Our objective was to study the value of estimating infarct size, by the cumulative release of LDH over 72, 60, 48 and

  11. The relationship between serum enzyme activity, infarct site, and cardiac complications after a first myocardial infarction. A follow-up study in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H T; Nielsen, F E; Klausen, I B

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to relate the clinical course in patients after a first acute myocardial infarction with the site and size of infarct, estimated from standard enzyme measurements. One hundred and eight consecutive patients who suffered an acute myocardial infarction for the first...

  12. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distributions of structured populations are usually estimated by fitting abundance surfaces for each stage and at each point of time separately, ignoring correlations that emerge from growth of individuals. Here, we present a statistical model that combines spatio-temporal correlations...... with simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering...... of individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...

  13. Enhanced reduction of myocardial infarct size by combined ACE inhibition and AT1-receptor antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbach, Roland; Schulz, Rainer; Gres, Petra; Behrends, Matthias; Post, Heiner; Heusch, Gerd

    2000-01-01

    The effects of the angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) ramiprilat, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist (AT1A) candesartan, and the combination of both drugs on infarct size (IS) resulting from regional myocardial ischaemia were studied in pigs. Both ACEI and AT1A reduce myocardial IS by a bradykinin-mediated process. It is unclear, however, whether the combination of ACEI and AT1A produces a more pronounced IS reduction than each of these drugs alone. Forty-six enflurane-anaesthetized pigs underwent 90 min low-flow ischaemia and 120 min reperfusion. Systemic haemodynamics (micromanometer), subendocardial blood flow (ENDO, microspheres) and IS (TTC-staining) were determined. The decreases in left ventricular peak pressure by ACEI (by 9±2 (s.e.mean) mmHg), AT1A (by 11±2 mmHg) or their combination (by 18±3 mmHg, P<0.05 vs ACEI and AT1A, respectively) were readjusted by aortic constriction prior to ischaemia. With placebo (n=10), IS averaged 20.0±3.3% of the area at risk. IS was reduced to 9.8±2.6% with ramiprilat (n=10) and 10.6±3.1% with candesartan (n=10). Combined ramiprilat and candesartan (n=10) reduced IS to 6.7±2.1%. Blockade of the bradykinin-B2-receptor with icatibant prior to ACEI and AT1A completely abolished the reduction of IS (n=6, 22.8±6.1%). The relationship between IS and ischaemic ENDO with placebo was shifted downwards by each ACEI and AT1A and further shifted downwards with their combination (P<0.05 vs all groups); icatibant again abolished such downward shift. The combination of ACEI and AT1A enhances the reduction of IS following ischaemia/reperfusion compared to a monotherapy by either drug alone; this effect is mediated by bradykinin. PMID:10960080

  14. Cutoff sample size estimation for survival data: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates the possible cutoff sample size point that balances goodness of es-timation and study expenditure by a practical cancer case. As it is crucial to determine the sample size in designing an experiment, researchers attempt to find the suitable sample size that achieves desired power and budget efficiency at the same time. The thesis shows how simulation can be used for sample size and precision calculations with survival data. The pre-sentation concentrates on the simula...

  15. Association diastolic function by echo and infarct size by magnetic resonance imaging after STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Lønborg, Jacob; Andersen, Mads J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality; however, little is known about diastolic function and the degree of myocardial damage after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim was to assess the association between diastolic dysfunction ...

  16. Conditioned Medium From Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Limits Infarct Size and Enhances Angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Cluffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The paracrine properties of human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) have not been fully elucidated. The goal of the present study was to elucidate whether hAMCs can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts, in particular through cardioprotection and angiog

  17. Methodology significantly affects genome size estimates: quantitative evidence using bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainard, Jillian D; Fazekas, Aron J; Newmaster, Steven G

    2010-08-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is commonly used to determine plant genome size estimates. Methodology has improved and changed during the past three decades, and researchers are encouraged to optimize protocols for their specific application. However, this step is typically omitted or undescribed in the current plant genome size literature, and this omission could have serious consequences for the genome size estimates obtained. Using four bryophyte species (Brachythecium velutinum, Fissidens taxifolius, Hedwigia ciliata, and Thuidium minutulum), three methodological approaches to the use of FCM in plant genome size estimation were tested. These included nine different buffers (Baranyi's, de Laat's, Galbraith's, General Purpose, LB01, MgSO(4), Otto's, Tris.MgCl(2), and Woody Plant), seven propidium iodide (PI) staining periods (5, 10, 15, 20, 45, 60, and 120 min), and six PI concentrations (10, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 microg ml(-1)). Buffer, staining period and staining concentration all had a statistically significant effect (P = 0.05) on the genome size estimates obtained for all four species. Buffer choice and PI concentration had the greatest effect, altering the 1C-values by as much as 8% and 14%, respectively. As well, the quality of the data varied with the different methodology used. Using the methodology determined to be the most accurate in this study (LB01 buffer and PI staining for 20 min at 150 microg ml(-1)), three new genome size estimates were obtained: B. velutinum: 0.46 pg, H. ciliata: 0.30 pg, and T. minutulum: 0.46 pg. While the peak quality of flow cytometry histograms is important, researchers must consider that changes in methodology can also affect the relative peak positions and therefore the genome size estimates obtained for plants using FCM.

  18. The contemporary value of peak creatine kinase-MB after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction above other clinical and angiographic characteristics in predicting infarct size, left ventricular ejection fraction, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Minke H T; Eppinga, Ruben N; Vlaar, Pieter J J; Lexis, Chris P H; Lipsic, Erik; Haeck, Joost D E; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Horst, Iwan C C; van der Harst, Pim

    2017-05-01

    Complex multimarker approaches to predict outcome after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have only considered a single baseline sample, while neglecting easily obtainable peak creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) values during hospitalization. We studied 476 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for STEMI and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) at 4-6 months after STEMI. We determined the association with cardiac biomarkers (peak CK-MB, peak troponin T, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide), clinical and angiographic characteristics with infarct size, and LVEF, followed by association with mortality in 1120 STEMI patients. Peak CK-MB was the strongest predictor for infarct size (PMB cutpoints, for differentiation among small (MB measured during hospitalization for STEMI was superior to other clinical and angiographic characteristics in predicting CMRI-defined infarct size and LVEF, and should be included and validated in future multimarker studies. Peak CK-MB cutpoints differentiated among infarct size categories and were associated with increased 90-day mortality risk. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mannose-binding lectin deficiency is associated with smaller infarction size and favorable outcome in ischemic stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Osthoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mannose-binding lectin (MBL pathway of complement plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury after experimental ischemic stroke. As comparable data in human ischemic stroke are limited, we investigated in more detail the association of MBL deficiency with infarction volume and functional outcome in a large cohort of patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis or conservative treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a post hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study, admission MBL concentrations were determined in 353 consecutive patients with an acute ischemic stroke of whom 287 and 66 patients received conservative and thrombolytic treatment, respectively. Stroke severity, infarction volume, and functional outcome were studied in relation to MBL concentrations at presentation to the emergency department. MBL levels on admission were not influenced by the time from symptom onset to presentation (p = 0.53. In the conservative treatment group patients with mild strokes at presentation, small infarction volumes or favorable outcomes after three months demonstrated 1.5 to 2.6-fold lower median MBL levels (p = 0.025, p = 0.0027 and p = 0.046, respectively compared to patients with more severe strokes. Moreover, MBL deficient patients (<100 ng/ml were subject to a considerably decreased risk of an unfavorable outcome three months after ischemic stroke (adjusted odds ratio 0.38, p<0.05 and showed smaller lesion volumes (mean size 0.6 vs. 18.4 ml, p = 0.0025. In contrast, no association of MBL concentration with infarction volume or functional outcome was found in the thrombolysis group. However, the small sample size limits the significance of this observation. CONCLUSIONS: MBL deficiency is associated with smaller cerebral infarcts and favorable outcome in patients receiving conservative treatment. Our data suggest an important role of the lectin pathway in the pathophysiology

  20. Distribution Theory for Glass's Estimator of Effect Size and Related Estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Larry V.

    1981-01-01

    Glass's estimator of effect size, the sample mean difference divided by the sample standard deviation, is studied in the context of an explicit statistical model. The exact distribution of Glass's estimator is obtained and the estimator is shown to have a small sample bias. Alternatives are proposed and discussed. (Author/JKS)

  1. SIGNIFICANCE OF LIPID PROFILE ESTIMATION IN PATIENT WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar .N

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction is one of the important reasons of death and unhealthiness in the world. The present study was undertaken to investigate the changes in serum lipids and lipoproteins in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The levels of lipid profile were significantly changed in the acute myocardial infarction patients. Acute myocardial infarction patients had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, TG, Lipoprotein and lower level of HDL-cholesterol, as compared to the control subjects. We found a significant association of lipid profiles with acute myocardial infarction. Reduced serum HDL-cholesterol and increased Serum LDL, Serum TG, Lipoprotein (a, in our study subjects may be the effective reasonable lipid disorders in AMI patients.

  2. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  3. Estimating the size of the homeless population in Budapest, Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, B; Snijders, TAB

    2002-01-01

    In this study we try to estimate the size of the homeless population in Budapest by using two - non-standard - sampling methods: snowball sampling and capture-recapture method. Using two methods and three different data sets we are able to compare the methods as well as the results, and we also sugg

  4. Estimating the size of the homeless population in Budapest, Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, B; Snijders, TAB

    In this study we try to estimate the size of the homeless population in Budapest by using two - non-standard - sampling methods: snowball sampling and capture-recapture method. Using two methods and three different data sets we are able to compare the methods as well as the results, and we also

  5. Consideration of QRS complex in addition to ST-segment abnormalities in the estimation of the "risk region" during acute anterior or inferior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaat, F E; Bouwmeester, S; van Hellemond, I E G; Wagner, G S; Gorgels, A P M

    2014-01-01

    The myocardial area at risk (MaR) is an important aspect in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). It represents the myocardium at the onset of the STEMI that is ischemic and could become infarcted if no reperfusion occurs. The MaR, therefore, has clinical value because it gives an indication of the amount of myocardium that could potentially be salvaged by rapid reperfusion therapy. The most validated method for measuring the MaR is (99m)Tc-sestamibi SPECT, but this technique is not easily applied in the clinical setting. Another method that can be used for measuring the MaR is the standard ECG-based scoring system, Aldrich ST score, which is more easily applied. This ECG-based scoring system can be used to estimate the extent of acute ischemia for anterior or inferior left ventricular locations, by considering quantitative changes in the ST-segment. Deviations in the ST-segment baseline that occur following an acute coronary occlusion represent the ischemic changes in the transmurally ischemic myocardium. In most instances however, the ECG is not available at the very first moments of STEMI and as times passes the ischemic myocardium becomes necrotic with regression of the ST-segment deviation along with progressive changes of the QRS complex. Thus over the time course of the acute event, the Aldrich ST score would be expected to progressively underestimate the MaR, as was seen in studies with SPECT as gold standard; anterior STEMI (r=0.21, p=0.32) and inferior STEMI (r=0.17, p=0.36). Another standard ECG-based scoring system is the Selvester QRS score, which can be used to estimate the final infarct size by considering the quantitative changes in the QRS complex. Therefore, additional consideration of the Selvester QRS score in the acute phase could potentially provide the "component" of infarcted myocardium that is missing when the Aldrich ST score alone is used to determine the MaR in the acute phase, as was seen in studies with SPECT as gold

  6. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  7. Estimation of the bottleneck size in Florida panthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, M.; Hedrick, P.W.; Murphy, K.; O'Brien, S.; Hornocker, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    We have estimated the extent of genetic variation in museum (1890s) and contemporary (1980s) samples of Florida panthers Puma concolor coryi for both nuclear loci and mtDNA. The microsatellite heterozygosity in the contemporary sample was only 0.325 that in the museum samples although our sample size and number of loci are limited. Support for this estimate is provided by a sample of 84 microsatellite loci in contemporary Florida panthers and Idaho pumas Puma concolor hippolestes in which the contemporary Florida panther sample had only 0.442 the heterozygosity of Idaho pumas. The estimated diversities in mtDNA in the museum and contemporary samples were 0.600 and 0.000, respectively. Using a population genetics approach, we have estimated that to reduce either the microsatellite heterozygosity or the mtDNA diversity this much (in a period of c. 80years during the 20th century when the numbers were thought to be low) that a very small bottleneck size of c. 2 for several generations and a small effective population size in other generations is necessary. Using demographic data from Yellowstone pumas, we estimated the ratio of effective to census population size to be 0.315. Using this ratio, the census population size in the Florida panthers necessary to explain the loss of microsatellite variation was c .41 for the non-bottleneck generations and 6.2 for the two bottleneck generations. These low bottleneck population sizes and the concomitant reduced effectiveness of selection are probably responsible for the high frequency of several detrimental traits in Florida panthers, namely undescended testicles and poor sperm quality. The recent intensive monitoring both before and after the introduction of Texas pumas in 1995 will make the recovery and genetic restoration of Florida panthers a classic study of an endangered species. Our estimates of the bottleneck size responsible for the loss of genetic variation in the Florida panther completes an unknown aspect of this

  8. Subpixel target size estimation for remotely sensed imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chein-I.; Ren, Hsuan; D'Amico, Francis M.; Jensen, James O.

    2003-09-01

    One of challenges in remote sensing image processing is subpixel detection where the target size is smaller than the ground sampling distance. In this case, targets of interest have their sizes less than the pixel resolution, therefore, embedded in a single pixel. Under such a circumstance, these targets can be only detected spectrally at subpixel level, not spatially as ordinarily conducted by classical image processing techniques. This paper investigates a more challenging issue than subpixel detection, which is subpixel target size estimation. More specifically, when a single pixel-embedded target is detected, we would like to know what is the size of this particular target within the pixel. Our proposed approach is fully constrained linear spectral unmixing (FCLSU), which allows us to estimate the abundance fraction of the target present in the pixel that determines the size of the target. In order to evaluate the proposed FCLSU, two sets of experiments are conducted, computer simulations and real HYDICE data, where computer simulations are used to plant targets to validate our approach and real data are used to demonstrate the utility of the FCLSU in practical applications.

  9. Estimation of individual reference intervals in small sample sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ase Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

    2007-01-01

    of that order of magnitude for all topics in question. Therefore, new methods to estimate reference intervals for small sample sizes are needed. We present an alternative method based on variance component models. The models are based on data from 37 men and 84 women taking into account biological variation...... presented in this study. The presented method enables occupational health researchers to calculate reference intervals for specific groups, i.e. smokers versus non-smokers, etc. In conclusion, the variance component models provide an appropriate tool to estimate reference intervals based on small sample...

  10. Bit Serial Architecture for Variable Block Size Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kaveri Devarinti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available H.264/AVC is the latest video coding standard adopting variable block size, quarter-pixel accuracy and motion vector prediction and multi-reference frames for motion estimations. These new features result in higher computation requirements than that for previous coding standards.The computational complexity of motion estimation is about 60% in the H.264/AVC encoder. In this paper most significant bit (MSB first arithmetic based bit serial Variable Block Size Motion Estimation (VBSME hardware architecture is proposed. MSB first bit serial architecture main feature is, its early termination SAD computation compared to normal bit serial architectures. With this early termination technique, number computations are reduced drastically. Hence power consumption is also less compared to parallel architectures. An efficient bit serial processing element is proposed and developed 2D architecture for processing of 4x4 block in parallel .Inter connect structure is developed in such way that data reusability is achieved between PEs. Two types of adder trees are employed for variable block size SAD calculation with less number of adders. The proposed architecture can generate up to 41 motion vectors (MVs for each macroblock. The inter connection complexity between PEs reduced drastically compared to parallel architectures. The architecture supports processing of SDTV (640x480 with 30fps at 172.8 MHz for search range [+8, -7]. We could reduce 14% of computations by using early termination technique.

  11. Prey size selection and distance estimation in foraging adult dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olberg, R M; Worthington, A H; Fox, J L; Bessette, C E; Loosemore, M P

    2005-09-01

    To determine whether perching dragonflies visually assess the distance to potential prey items, we presented artificial prey, glass beads suspended from fine wires, to perching dragonflies in the field. We videotaped the responses of freely foraging dragonflies (Libellula luctuosa and Sympetrum vicinum-Odonata, suborder Anisoptera) to beads ranging from 0.5 mm to 8 mm in diameter, recording whether or not the dragonflies took off after the beads, and if so, at what distance. Our results indicated that dragonflies were highly selective for bead size. Furthermore, the smaller Sympetrum preferred beads of smaller size and the larger Libellula preferred larger beads. Each species rejected beads as large or larger than their heads, even when the beads subtended the same visual angles as the smaller, attractive beads. Since bead size cannot be determined without reference to distance, we conclude that dragonflies are able to estimate the distance to potential prey items. The range over which they estimate distance is about 1 m for the larger Libellula and 70 cm for the smaller Sympetrum. The mechanism of distance estimation is unknown, but it probably includes both stereopsis and the motion parallax produced by head movements.

  12. Evaluation of myocardial infarction size with three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography: a comparison with single photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushuang; Zhang, Chunhong; Huang, Dangsheng; Zhang, Liwei; Yang, Feifei; An, Xiuzhi; Ouyang, Qiaohong; Zhang, Meiqing; Wang, Shuhua; Guo, Jiarui; Ji, Dongdong

    2015-12-01

    To assess whether global and regional myocardial strains from three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) correlate with myocardial infarction size (MIS) detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Fifty-seven patients with a history of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) within 3-6 months were enrolled, alongside 24 healthy volunteers. Left ventricular (LV) global area strain, global longitudinal strain (GLS), global radial strain, global circumferential strain, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and wall motion score index (WMSI) were measured and compared with the corresponding SPECT-detected MISs. Patients were sub-grouped into massive MIS group (MIS ≥ 12%) and small MIS group (MIS Myocardial strains of all the LV segments were compared with the corresponding MIS. Global myocardial strain parameters, LVEF and WMSI of the patients were significantly different from the control group (all P myocardial strain parameters were found between the massive and small MIS groups (all P myocardial strain parameters were observed between segments with and without transmural MIs (P myocardial strain parameters evaluated LV global MIS, 3D GLS had the highest diagnostic value. It also preliminarily gauged the degree of ischemia and necrosis of regional myocardial segments.

  13. Estimation of LOCA break size using cascaded Fuzzy neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geon Pil; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Back, Ju Hyun; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Operators of nuclear power plants may not be equipped with sufficient information during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), which can be fatal, or they may not have sufficient time to analyze the information they do have, even if this information is adequate. It is not easy to predict the progression of LOCAs in nuclear power plants. Therefore, accurate information on the LOCA break position and size should be provided to efficiently manage the accident. In this paper, the LOCA break size is predicted using a cascaded fuzzy neural network (CFNN) model. The input data of the CFNN model are the time-integrated values of each measurement signal for an initial short-time interval after a reactor scram. The training of the CFNN model is accomplished by a hybrid method combined with a genetic algorithm and a least squares method. As a result, LOCA break size is estimated exactly by the proposed CFNN model.

  14. Estimation of coal particle size distribution by image segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zelin; Yang Jianguo; Ding Lihua; Zhao Yuemin

    2012-01-01

    Several industrial coal processes are largely determined by the distribution of particle sizes in their feed.Currently these parameters are measured by manual sampling,which is time consuming and cannot provide real time feedback for automatic control purposes.In this paper,an approach using image segmentation on images of overlapped coal particles is described.The estimation of the particle size distribution by number is also described.The particle overlap problem was solved using image enhancement algorithms that converted those image parts representing material in lower layers to black.Exponential high-pass filter (EHPF) algorithms were used to remove the texture from particles on the surface.Finally,the edges of the surface particles were identified by morphological edge detection.These algorithms are described in detail as is the method of extracting the coal particle size.Tests indicate that using more coal images gives a higher accuracy estimate.The positive absolute error of 50 random tests was consistently less than 2.5% and the errors were reduced as the size of the fraction increased.

  15. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  16. Estimating sizes of faint, distant galaxies in the submillimetre regime

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, L; Fan, L; Conway, J; Coppin, K; Decarli, R; Drouart, G; Hodge, J A; Karim, A; Simpson, J M; Wardlow, J

    2016-01-01

    We measure the sizes of redshift ~2 star-forming galaxies by stacking data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use a uv-stacking algorithm in combination with model fitting in the uv-domain and show that this allows for robust measures of the sizes of marginally resolved sources. The analysis is primarily based on the 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations centred on 88 sub-millimeter galaxies in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (ALESS). We study several samples of galaxies at z~2 with $M_* \\sim{} 5\\times{}10^{10} $ M$_\\odot$ , selected using near-infrared photometry (distant red galaxies, extremely red objects, sBzK-galaxies, and galaxies selected on photometric redshift). We find that the typical sizes of these galaxies are ~0.6 arcsec which corresponds to ~5 kpc at z~2, this agrees well with the median sizes measured in the near-infrared z-band (~0.6 arcsec). We find errors on our size estimates of ~0.1-0.2 arcsec, which agree well with the expected errors for model fitting a...

  17. Measures to reduce infarct size in treatment of acute myocardial infarction%急性心肌梗死治疗中缩小梗死范围的措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋运发

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze and summarize the measures to reduce infarct size in treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Methods:120 patients with acute myocardial infarction were selected from 2011 to 2014.They were randomly divided into the control group and the observation group with 60 cases in each group.The control group was treated with routine method,and the observation group was treated by metoprolol on the basis of the control group,before discharge,QRS scoring system was used to calculate the last 1 ECG score.We compared infarct size and hospital mortality of two groups of patients,and summarized the measures to reduce the infarct size in acute myocardial infarction treatment.Results:After 4 weeks of treatment,in the observation group,the infarct size was significantly lower than that of control group.In the control group,the mortality rate was 23.33%,the observation group was 3.33%,the mortality rate of the observation group was significantly lower than the control group.Conclusion:On the basis of conventional therapy,plus beta blockers for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction can reduce infarct area, reduce the mortality rate;after acute myocardial infarction.We should strengthen the nursing,increase myocardial oxygen supply and myocardial energy supply,reduce myocardial oxygen consumption,protect ischemic myocardium,and we also can use external counterpulsation surgery or thrombolytic therapy for the treatment,in order to reduce infarct range.%目的:分析并总结急性心肌梗死治疗中缩小梗死范围的措施。方法:2011-2014年收治急性心肌梗死患者120例,随机分为对照组和观察组,各60例。对照组采用常规方法治疗,观察组在此基础上加用美托洛尔治疗,于出院前使用QRS计分系统计算最后1次心电图记分,比较两组患者的梗死范围及住院期间病死率,并总结急性心肌梗死治疗中缩小梗死范围的措施。结果:经4周治疗后,观察组的梗

  18. Comparison of Estimation Methods for Creating Small Area Rates of Acute Myocardial Infarction Among Medicare Beneficiaries in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Creating local population health measures from administrative data would be useful for health policy and public health monitoring purposes. While a wide range of options – from simple spatial smoothers to model-based methods – for estimating such rates exists, there are relatively few side-by-side comparisons, especially not with real-world data. In this paper, we compare methods for creating local estimates of acute myocardial infarction rates from Medicare claims data. A Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain estimator that incorporated spatial and local random effects performed best, followed by a method-of-moments spatial Empirical Bayes estimator. As the former is more complicated and time-consuming, spatial linear Empirical Bayes methods may represent a good alternative for non-specialist investigators. PMID:26291680

  19. The normal renal size of Korean children. Radiologic estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Tae; Hyun, Jae Suk; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Kyung Do [Chungang University College of Medicine, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    A nephropathy following urinary tract infection is usually referred to as renal scarring. The main radiologic features are an overall reduction in the size of the kidney, with coarse scar, deformity of calyxes and indentation of the surface. If adequately treated, the progressive renal scarring by urinary tract infection could be prevented. Therefore, the early radiologic detection of renal damage following urinary tract infection or vesicoureteral reflux is great importance for the evaluation of the pathogenesis of renal scarring and for the planning of the therapy. To evaluate the renal damage, we must have the normal data of the kidneys. Many reports discussed the renal size in normal children, but there are no reports in the Korean children. We estimate the renal length, width, several focal parenchymal thicknesses for renal size evaluation and segmental lumbar vertebral length at the intravenous paleography in the normal Korean children. And the linear equations are obtained by the regression analysis between the various renal parameters and segmental vertebral length. Thereafter we make out the nomogram by the obtained equations. The renal length and width are highly correlated to the segmental lumbar vertebral length than various renal parenchymal thicknesses. These results suggest that the renal length and width are reliable parameters for normal renal size evaluation in growing kidney. And then the obtained equations and nomograms might be useful in the diagnosis of parenchymal loss in early scarring and follow-up. (author)

  20. Estimating Functions of Distributions Defined over Spaces of Unknown Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wolpert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider Bayesian estimation of information-theoretic quantities from data, using a Dirichlet prior. Acknowledging the uncertainty of the event space size m and the Dirichlet prior’s concentration parameter c, we treat both as random variables set by a hyperprior. We show that the associated hyperprior, P(c, m, obeys a simple “Irrelevance of Unseen Variables” (IUV desideratum iff P(c, m = P(cP(m. Thus, requiring IUV greatly reduces the number of degrees of freedom of the hyperprior. Some information-theoretic quantities can be expressed multiple ways, in terms of different event spaces, e.g., mutual information. With all hyperpriors (implicitly used in earlier work, different choices of this event space lead to different posterior expected values of these information-theoretic quantities. We show that there is no such dependence on the choice of event space for a hyperprior that obeys IUV. We also derive a result that allows us to exploit IUV to greatly simplify calculations, like the posterior expected mutual information or posterior expected multi-information. We also use computer experiments to favorably compare an IUV-based estimator of entropy to three alternative methods in common use. We end by discussing how seemingly innocuous changes to the formalization of an estimation problem can substantially affect the resultant estimates of posterior expectations.

  1. Facing the estimation of effective population size based on molecular markers: comparison of estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Mena, Belen; Verrier, Etienne; Hospital, Frederic

    We performed a simulation study of several estimators of the effective population size (Ne): NeH = estimator based on the rate of decrease in heterozygosity; NeT = estimator based on the temporal method; NeLD = linkage disequilibrium-based method. We first focused on NeH, which presented...... under scenarios of 3 and 20 bi-allelic loci. Increasing the number of loci largely improved the performance of NeT and NeLD. We highlight the value of NeT and NeLD when large numbers of bi-allelic loci are available, which is nowadays the case for SNPs markers....

  2. Variance component estimates for alternative litter size traits in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, A M; Tiezzi, F; Maltecca, C; Gray, K A; Knauer, M T

    2015-11-01

    Litter size at d 5 (LS5) has been shown to be an effective trait to increase total number born (TNB) while simultaneously decreasing preweaning mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal litter size day for selection (i.e., other than d 5). Traits included TNB, number born alive (NBA), litter size at d 2, 5, 10, 30 (LS2, LS5, LS10, LS30, respectively), litter size at weaning (LSW), number weaned (NW), piglet mortality at d 30 (MortD30), and average piglet birth weight (BirthWt). Litter size traits were assigned to biological litters and treated as a trait of the sow. In contrast, NW was the number of piglets weaned by the nurse dam. Bivariate animal models included farm, year-season, and parity as fixed effects. Number born alive was fit as a covariate for BirthWt. Random effects included additive genetics and the permanent environment of the sow. Variance components were plotted for TNB, NBA, and LS2 to LS30 using univariate animal models to determine how variances changed over time. Additive genetic variance was minimized at d 7 in Large White and at d 14 in Landrace pigs. Total phenotypic variance for litter size traits decreased over the first 10 d and then stabilized. Heritability estimates increased between TNB and LS30. Genetic correlations between TNB, NBA, and LS2 to LS29 with LS30 plateaued within the first 10 d. A genetic correlation with LS30 of 0.95 was reached at d 4 for Large White and at d 8 for Landrace pigs. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.07 to 0.13 for litter size traits and MortD30. Birth weight had an h of 0.24 and 0.26 for Large White and Landrace pigs, respectively. Genetic correlations among LS30, LSW, and NW ranged from 0.97 to 1.00. In the Large White breed, genetic correlations between MortD30 with TNB and LS30 were 0.23 and -0.64, respectively. These correlations were 0.10 and -0.61 in the Landrace breed. A high genetic correlation of 0.98 and 0.97 was observed between LS10 and NW for Large White and

  3. Reduction of myocardial infarct size with ischemic "conditioning": physiologic and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyklenk, Karin

    2013-10-01

    A wealth of evidence has revealed that the heart can be "conditioned" and rendered less vulnerable to ischemia-reperfusion injury via the upregulation of endogenous protective signaling pathways. Three distinct conditioning strategies have been identified: (1) preconditioning, the phenomenon where brief episodes of myocardial ischemia (too brief to cause cardiomyocyte death) limit necrosis caused by a subsequent sustained ischemic insult; (2) postconditioning, the concept that relief of myocardial ischemia in a staged or stuttered manner attenuates lethal ischemia-reperfusion injury; and (3) remote conditioning, or upregulation of a cardioprotective phenotype initiated by ischemia in a remote organ or tissue and "transported" to the heart. Progress has been made in defining the technical requirements and limitations of each of the 3 ischemic conditioning models (including the timing and severity of the protective stimulus), as well as elucidating the molecular mechanisms (in particular, the receptor-mediated signaling pathways) responsible for conditioning-induced myocardial protection. Moreover, phase III clinical trials are in progress, seeking to capitalize on the protection that can be achieved by postconditioning and remote conditioning, and applying these strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery or angioplasty for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. There is, however, a potentially important caveat to the clinical translation of myocardial conditioning: emerging data suggest that the efficacy of ischemic conditioning is compromised in aging, diabetic, and hypertensive cohorts, the specific populations in which myocardial protection is most relevant. Successful clinical application of myocardial conditioning will therefore require an understanding of the potential confounding consequences of these comorbidities on the "conditioned" phenotype.

  4. Did clinical trials in which erythropoietin failed to reduce acute myocardial infarct size miss a narrow therapeutic window?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I Talan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To test a hypothesis that in negative clinical trials of erythropoietin in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI the erythropoietin (rhEPO could be administered outside narrow therapeutic window. Despite overwhelming evidence of cardioprotective properties of rhEPO in animal studies, the outcomes of recently concluded phase II clinical trials have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of rhEPO in patients with acute MI. However, the time between symptoms onset and rhEPO administration in negative clinical trials was much longer that in successful animal experiments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MI was induced in rats either by a permanent ligation of a descending coronary artery or by a 2-hr occlusion followed by a reperfusion. rhEPO, 3000 IU/kg, was administered intraperitoneally at the time of reperfusion, 4 hrs after beginning of reperfusion, or 6 hrs after permanent occlusion. MI size was measured histologically 24 hrs after coronary occlusion. The area of myocardium at risk was similar among groups. The MI size in untreated rats averaged ~42% of area at risk, or ~24% of left ventricle, and was reduced by more than 50% (p<0.001 in rats treated with rhEPO at the time of reperfusion. The MI size was not affected by treatment administered 4 hrs after reperfusion or 6 hrs after permanent coronary occlusion. Therefore, our study in a rat experimental model of MI demonstrates that rhEPO administered within 2 hrs of a coronary occlusion effectively reduces MI size, but when rhEPO was administered following a delay similar to that encountered in clinical trials, it had no effect on MI size. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clinical trials that failed to demonstrate rhEPO efficacy in patients with MI may have missed a narrow therapeutic window defined in animal experiments.

  5. Rapid initial reduction of hyperenhanced myocardium after reperfused first myocardial infarction suggests recovery of the peri-infarction zone: one-year follow-up by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engblom, Henrik; Hedström, Erik; Heiberg, Einar; Wagner, Galen S; Pahlm, Olle; Arheden, Håkan

    2009-01-01

    The time course and magnitude of infarct involution, functional recovery, and normalization of infarct-related electrocardiographic (ECG) changes after acute myocardial infarction (MI) are not completely known in humans. We sought to explore these processes early after MI and during infarct-healing using cardiac MRI. Twenty-two patients with reperfused first-time MI were examined by MRI and ECG at 1, 7, 42, 182, and 365 days after infarction. Global left ventricular function and regional wall thickening were assessed by cine MRI, and injured myocardium was depicted by delayed contrast-enhanced MRI. Infarct size by ECG was estimated by QRS scoring. The reduction of hyperenhanced myocardium occurred predominantly during the first week after infarction (64% of the 1-year reduction). Furthermore, during the first week the amount of nonhyperenhanced myocardium increased significantly (Pinfarction. Also, the time course and magnitude for reduction of hyperenhanced myocardium were associated with normalization of infarct-related ECG changes.

  6. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Anthony J.; Prebble, Clare E.M.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Bennett, Michael B.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P.; Pierce, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420–990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347–1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm) whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species. PMID:25870776

  7. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Rohner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122 in southern Mozambique and from 420–990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46 in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347–1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania, the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania. The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species.

  8. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Christoph A; Richardson, Anthony J; Prebble, Clare E M; Marshall, Andrea D; Bennett, Michael B; Weeks, Scarla J; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Pierce, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432-917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420-990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347-1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm) whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species.

  9. The relationship between ECG signs of atrial infarction and the development of supraventricular arrhythmias in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F E; Andersen, H H; Gram-Hansen, P

    1992-01-01

    ECGs obtained on arrival at the hospital from 277 patients with acute myocardial infarction were analyzed retrospectively for PR displacements, which were classified as major or minor criteria for atrial infarction and related to the later occurrence of supraventricular arrhythmia in the hospital...... arrhythmias, giving odds ratios of 9.9 and 3.7, respectively. Enzyme-estimated infarct size, the occurrence of heart failure, and mortality rates did not differ in patients with or without major criteria for atrial infarction. We conclude that the occurrence of PR segment displacements on the admission ECG...

  10. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir S.; Milutinović, Svetlana; Marinov, Irina; Cabré, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth system models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing methods to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 µm in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 µm) and microphytoplankton (20-50 µm). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global text">SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e., oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have high biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global climatological, spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield ˜ 0.25 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms and several state-of-the-art Earth system models. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm. Uncertainty budget analyses indicate that absolute carbon concentration uncertainties are driven by the PSD parameter No which determines particle number concentration to first order, while uncertainties in PFTs' fractional contributions to total C biomass are mostly due to the

  11. Passive acoustic inversion to estimate bedload size distribution in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Teodor; Geay, Thomas; Belleudy, Philippe; Gervaise, Cédric

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of sediment transport rate in rivers is related to issues like changes in channel forms, inundation risks and river's ecological functions. The passive acoustic method introduced here measures the bedload processes by recording the noise generated by the inter-particle collisions. In this research, an acoustic inversion is proposed to estimate the size distribution of mobile particles. The theoretical framework of Hertz's impact between two solids rigid is used to model the sediment-generated noise. This model combined with the acoustical power spectrum density gives the information on the particle sizes. The sensitivity of the method is performed and finally the experimental validation is done through a series of tests in the laboratory as well in a natural stream. The limitations of the proposed inversion method are drawn assuming the wave propagation effects in the channel. It is stated that propagation effects limit the applicability of the method to large rivers, like fluvial channels, in the detriment of mountain torrents.

  12. Raindrop size distribution variability estimated using ensemble statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Williams

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Before radar estimates of the raindrop size distribution (DSD can be assimilated into numerical weather prediction models, the DSD estimate must also include an uncertainty estimate. Ensemble statistics are based on using the same observations as inputs into several different models with the spread in the outputs providing an uncertainty estimate. In this study, Doppler velocity spectra from collocated vertically pointing profiling radars operating at 50 and 920 MHz were the input data for 42 different DSD retrieval models. The DSD retrieval models were perturbations of seven different DSD models (including exponential and gamma functions, two different inverse modeling methodologies (convolution or deconvolution, and three different cost functions (two spectral and one moment cost functions.

    Two rain events near Darwin, Australia, were analyzed in this study producing 26 725 independent ensembles of mass-weighted mean raindrop diameter Dm and rain rate R. The mean and the standard deviation (indicated by the symbols <x> and σx of Dm and R were estimated for each ensemble. For small ranges of <Dm> or <R>, histograms of σDm and σR were found to be asymmetric, which prevented Gaussian statistics from being used to describe the uncertainties. Therefore, 10, 50, and 90 percentiles of σDm and σR were used to describe the uncertainties for small intervals of <Dm> or <R>. The smallest Dm uncertainty occurred for <Dm> between 0.8 and 1.8 mm with the 90th and 50th percentiles being less than 0.15 and 0.11 mm, which correspond to relative errors of less than 20% and 15%, respectively. The uncertainty increased for smaller and larger <Dm> values. The uncertainty of R increased with <R>. While the 90th percentile

  13. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd BenDor

    Full Text Available Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1 in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business linkages and increased household spending.

  14. Meta-basic estimates the size of druggable human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2009-06-01

    We present here the estimation of the upper limit of the number of molecular targets in the human genome that represent an opportunity for further therapeutic treatment. We select around approximately 6300 human proteins that are similar to sequences of known protein targets collected from DrugBank database. Our bioinformatics study estimates the size of 'druggable' human genome to be around 20% of human proteome, i.e. the number of the possible protein targets for small-molecule drug design in medicinal chemistry. We do not take into account any toxicity prediction, the three-dimensional characteristics of the active site in the predicted 'druggable' protein families, or detailed chemical analysis of known inhibitors/drugs. Instead we rely on remote homology detection method Meta-BASIC, which is based on sequence and structural similarity. The prepared dataset of all predicted protein targets from human genome presents the unique opportunity for developing and benchmarking various in silico chemo/bio-informatics methods in the context of the virtual high throughput screening.

  15. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Lester, T William; Livengood, Avery; Davis, Adam; Yonavjak, Logan

    2015-01-01

    Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1) in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

  16. Estimating the size of the solution space of metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulet Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular metabolism is one of the most investigated system of biological interactions. While the topological nature of individual reactions and pathways in the network is quite well understood there is still a lack of comprehension regarding the global functional behavior of the system. In the last few years flux-balance analysis (FBA has been the most successful and widely used technique for studying metabolism at system level. This method strongly relies on the hypothesis that the organism maximizes an objective function. However only under very specific biological conditions (e.g. maximization of biomass for E. coli in reach nutrient medium the cell seems to obey such optimization law. A more refined analysis not assuming extremization remains an elusive task for large metabolic systems due to algorithmic limitations. Results In this work we propose a novel algorithmic strategy that provides an efficient characterization of the whole set of stable fluxes compatible with the metabolic constraints. Using a technique derived from the fields of statistical physics and information theory we designed a message-passing algorithm to estimate the size of the affine space containing all possible steady-state flux distributions of metabolic networks. The algorithm, based on the well known Bethe approximation, can be used to approximately compute the volume of a non full-dimensional convex polytope in high dimensions. We first compare the accuracy of the predictions with an exact algorithm on small random metabolic networks. We also verify that the predictions of the algorithm match closely those of Monte Carlo based methods in the case of the Red Blood Cell metabolic network. Then we test the effect of gene knock-outs on the size of the solution space in the case of E. coli central metabolism. Finally we analyze the statistical properties of the average fluxes of the reactions in the E. coli metabolic network. Conclusion We propose a

  17. First genome size estimations for some eudicot families and genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia, S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome size diversity in angiosperms varies roughly 2400-fold, although approximately 45% of angiosperm families lack a single genome size estimation, and therefore, this range could be enlarged. To contribute completing family and genera representation, DNA C-Values are here provided for 19 species from 16 eudicot families, including first values for 6 families, 14 genera and 17 species. The sample of species studied is very diverse, including herbs, weeds, vines, shrubs and trees. Data are discussed regarding previous genome size estimates of closely related species or genera, if any, their chromosome number, growth form or invasive behaviour. The present research contributes approximately 1.5% new values for previously unreported angiosperm families, being the current coverage around 55% of angiosperm families, according to the Plant DNA C-Values Database.

    La diversidad del tamaño del genoma en angiospermas es muy amplia, siendo el valor más elevado aproximadamente unas 2400 veces superior al más pequeño. Sin embargo, cerca del 45% de las familias no presentan ni una sola estimación, por lo que el rango real podría ser ampliado. Para contribuir a completar la representación de familias y géneros de angiospermas, este estudio contribuye con valores C para 19 especies de 16 familias de eudicoticotiledóneas, incluyendo los primeros valores para 6 familias, 14 géneros y 17 especies. La muestra estudiada es muy diversa, e incluye hierbas, malezas, enredaderas, arbustos y árboles. Se discuten los resultados en función de estimaciones previas del tamaño del genoma de especies o géneros estrechamente relacionados, del número de cromosomas, la forma de crecimiento o el comportamiento invasor de las especies analizadas. El presente estudio contribuye aproximadamente en un 1,5% de nuevos valores para familias de angiospermas no estudiadas previamente, de las que actualmente existe información para el 55%, según la base de datos

  18. The coefficient of error of optical fractionator population size estimates: a computer simulation comparing three estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, E M; Wilson, P D

    1998-11-01

    The optical fractionator is a design-based two-stage systematic sampling method that is used to estimate the number of cells in a specified region of an organ when the population is too large to count exhaustively. The fractionator counts the cells found in optical disectors that have been systematically sampled in serial sections. Heretofore, evaluations of optical fractionator performance have been made by performing tests on actual tissue sections, but it is difficult to evaluate the coefficient of error (CE), i.e. the precision of a population size estimate, by using biological tissue samples because they do not permit a comparison of an estimated CE with the true CE. However, computer simulation does permit making such comparisons while avoiding the observational biases inherent in working with biological tissue. This study is the first instance in which computer simulation has been applied to population size estimation by the optical fractionator. We used computer simulation to evaluate the performance of three CE estimators. The estimated CEs were evaluated in tests of three types of non-random cell population distribution and one random cell population distribution. The non-random population distributions varied by differences in 'intensity', i.e. the expected cell counts per disector, according to both section and disector location within the section. Two distributions were sinusoidal and one was linearly increasing; in all three there was a six-fold difference between the high and low intensities. The sinusoidal distributions produced either a peak or a depression of cell intensity at the centre of the simulated region. The linear cell intensity gradually increased from the beginning to the end of the region that contained the cells. The random population distribution had a constant intensity over the region. A 'test condition' was defined by its population distribution, the period between consecutive sampled sections and the spacing between consecutive

  19. Sample Size Calculations for Population Size Estimation Studies Using Multiplier Methods With Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Elizabeth; Chabata, Sungai T; Thompson, Jennifer A; Cowan, Frances M; Hargreaves, James R

    2017-09-14

    While guidance exists for obtaining population size estimates using multiplier methods with respondent-driven sampling surveys, we lack specific guidance for making sample size decisions. To guide the design of multiplier method population size estimation studies using respondent-driven sampling surveys to reduce the random error around the estimate obtained. The population size estimate is obtained by dividing the number of individuals receiving a service or the number of unique objects distributed (M) by the proportion of individuals in a representative survey who report receipt of the service or object (P). We have developed an approach to sample size calculation, interpreting methods to estimate the variance around estimates obtained using multiplier methods in conjunction with research into design effects and respondent-driven sampling. We describe an application to estimate the number of female sex workers in Harare, Zimbabwe. There is high variance in estimates. Random error around the size estimate reflects uncertainty from M and P, particularly when the estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey is low. As expected, sample size requirements are higher when the design effect of the survey is assumed to be greater. We suggest a method for investigating the effects of sample size on the precision of a population size estimate obtained using multipler methods and respondent-driven sampling. Uncertainty in the size estimate is high, particularly when P is small, so balancing against other potential sources of bias, we advise researchers to consider longer service attendance reference periods and to distribute more unique objects, which is likely to result in a higher estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey.

  20. The flavonoid fisetin attenuates postischemic immune cell infiltration, activation and infarct size after transient cerebral middle artery occlusion in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Leypoldt, Frank; Lewerenz, Jan; Birkenmayer, Gabriel; Orozco, Denise; Ludewig, Peter; Thundyil, John; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Gerloff, Christian; Tolosa, Eva; Maher, Pamela; Magnus, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The development of the brain tissue damage in ischemic stroke is composed of an immediate component followed by an inflammatory response with secondary tissue damage after reperfusion. Fisetin, a flavonoid, has multiple biological effects, including neuroprotective and antiinflammatory properties. We analyzed the effects of fisetin on infarct size and the inflammatory response in a mouse model of stroke, temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion, and on the activation of immune cells, murine primary and N9 microglial and Raw264.7 macrophage cells and human macrophages, in an in vitro model of inflammatory immune cell activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fisetin not only protected brain tissue against ischemic reperfusion injury when given before ischemia but also when applied 3 hours after ischemia. Fisetin also prominently inhibited the infiltration of macrophages and dendritic cells into the ischemic hemisphere and suppressed the intracerebral immune cell activation as measured by intracellular tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production. Fisetin also inhibited LPS-induced TNFα production and neurotoxicity of macrophages and microglia in vitro by suppressing nuclear factor κB activation and JNK/Jun phosphorylation. Our findings strongly suggest that the fisetin-mediated inhibition of the inflammatory response after stroke is part of the mechanism through which fisetin is neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia. PMID:22234339

  1. Overexpression of SDF-1α enhanced migration and engraftment of cardiac stem cells and reduced infarcted size via CXCR4/PI3K pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Wang

    Full Text Available Cardiac stem cells (CSCs can home to the infarcted area and regenerate myocardium. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis is pivotal in inducing CSCs migration. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. This study set out to detect if SDF-1α promotes migration and engraftment of CSCs through the CXCR4/PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. In the in vitro experiment, c-kit+ cells were isolated from neonatal mouse heart fragment culture by magnetic cell sorting. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting results demonstrated that a few c-kit+ cells expressed CD45 (4.54% and Sca-1 (2.58%, the hematopoietic stem cell marker. Conditioned culture could induce c-kit+ cells multipotent differentiation, which was confirmed by cardiac troponin I (cTn-I, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, and von Willebrand factor (vWF staining. In vitro chemotaxis assays were performed using Transwell cell chambers to detect CSCs migration. The results showed that the cardiomyocytes infected with rAAV1-SDF-1α-eGFP significantly increased SDF-1α concentration, 5-fold more in supernatant than that in the control group, and subsequently attracted more CSCs migration. This effect was diminished by administration of AMD3100 (10 µg/ml, CXCR4 antagonist or LY294002 (20 µmol/L, PI3K inhibitor. In myocardial infarction mice, overexpression of SDF-1α in the infarcted area by rAAV1-SDF-1α-eGFP infection resulted in more CSCs retention to the infarcted myocardium, a higher percentage of proliferation, and reduced infarcted area which was attenuated by AMD3100 or ly294002 pretreatment. These results indicated that overexpression of SDF-1α enhanced CSCs migration in vitro and engraftment of transplanted CSCs and reduced infarcted size via CXCR4/PI3K pathway.

  2. In-ambulance abciximab administration in STEMI patients prior to primary PCI is associated with smaller infarct size, improved LV function and lower incidence of heart failure: results from the Leiden MISSION! acute myocardial infarction treatment optimization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayman K M; Liem, Su San; van der Kley, Frank; Bergheanu, Sandrin C; Wolterbeek, Ron; Bosch, Jan; Bootsma, Marianne; Zeppenfeld, Katja; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Atsma, Douwe E; Jukema, J Wouter; Schalij, Martin J

    2009-08-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the effects of early abciximab administration in the ambulance on immediate, short, and long term outcomes. Early abciximab administration before primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is recommended in practice guidelines. However, optimal timing of administration remains indistinct. Within a fixed protocol for PPCI, December 2006 was the cut-off point for this prospective study. A total of 179 consecutive patients with STEMI were enrolled, 90 patients received abciximab bolus in the hospital (in-hospital group), and 89 patients received abciximab bolus in the ambulance (in-ambulance group). The two groups were comparable for baseline and angiographic characteristics. The in-ambulance group received abciximab within the golden period (median 63 min). The infarct related artery (IRA) patency at onset of the PCI was four times higher in the in-ambulance group compared to in-hospital group (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.4-10.1). Enzymatic infarct size was smaller in the in-ambulance group (cumulative 48-h CK release 8011 vs. 11267 U/L, P = 0.004). This was associated with higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at 90 days post-PPCI measured by myocardial scintigraphy (59% vs. 54%, P = 0.01), and lower incidence of heart failure through a median of 210 days of clinical follow-up (3% vs.11%, P = 0.04). Early abciximab administration in the ambulance significantly improves early reperfusion in STEMI patients treated with PPCI. Moreover this is associated with a smaller infarct size, improved LV function and a lower risk of heart failure on clinical follow-up. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  4. Accuracy of estimations of body-frame size as a function of sex and actual frame size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearns, J F; Broida, J P; Gayton, W F

    1988-02-01

    Body-frame size is an important factor in determining an optimal body weight for a given height. Previous studies have indicated that many individuals incorrectly estimate their body-frame size, and, as a result, incorrectly assess their ideal weight. The present study investigated the accuracy of estimation of body-frame size as a function of sex and actual frame size. The subjects were 66 men and 52 women participating in a community adult fitness program. Data indicated that medium-framed individuals were the most accurate in their estimations of body-frame size. Also, women were twice as likely to be accurate as were men. These results are interpreted to mean that most people assume they are medium-framed and that there is a sex difference in the way body-frame size is estimated.

  5. Software Functional Size: For Cost Estimation and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Baris; Turetken, Oktay; Demirors, Onur

    Determining software characteristics that will effectively support project planning, execution, monitoring and closure remains to be one of the prevalent challenges software project managers face. Functional size measures were introduced to quantify one of the primary characteristics of software. Although functional size measurement methods have not been without criticisms, they have significant promises for software project management. In this paper, we explore the contributions of functional size measurement to project management. We identified diverse uses of functional size by performing a literature survey and investigating how functional size measurement can be incorporated into project management practices by mapping the uses of functional size to the knowledge areas defined in project management body of knowledge (PMBOK).

  6. Infarct healing is a dynamic process following acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokorney Sean D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of infarct size on left ventricular (LV remodeling in heart failure after an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is well recognized. Infarct size, as determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, decreases over time. The amount, rate, and duration of infarct healing are unknown. Methods A total of 66 patients were prospectively enrolled after reperfusion for an acute STEMI. Patients underwent a CMR evaluation within 1 week, 4 months, and 14 months after STEMI. Results Mean infarct sizes for the 66 patients at baseline (acute necrosis, early follow-up (early scar, and late follow-up (late scar were 25 ± 17 g, 17 ± 12 g, and 15 ± 11 g, respectively. Patients were stratified in tertiles, based on infarct size, with the largest infarcts having the greatest absolute decrease in mass at early and late scar. The percent reduction of infarct mass was independent of initial infarct size. There was an 8 g or 32% decrease in infarct mass between acute necrosis and early scar (p  Conclusions Infarct healing is a continuous process after reperfusion for STEMI, with greatest reduction in infarct size in the first few months. The dynamic nature of infarct healing through the first year after STEMI indicates that decisions based on infarct size, and interventions to reduce infarct size, must take into consideration the time frame of measurement.

  7. Cornel iridoid glycoside reduces infarct size measured by magnetic resonance imaging and improves neurological function after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui-Cui; Li, Lin; Zheng, Sha-Sha; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Li; Li, Ya-Li; Zhang, Lan

    2015-08-11

    To investigate the effect of cornel iridoid glycoside (CIG), an ingredient extracted from traditional Chinese herb Cornus offificinalis, on neurological function and infarct size in rats as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after ischemic stroke. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three group: control (n=11), model (n=20) and CIG (n=16) groups. Rats in the model and CIG groups underwent 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion. Their neurological defect was measured by using a modified neurological severity score (mNSS). T2-weighted MRI (T2-MRI) of the brain was performed in vivo from 2 to 28 days after MCAO. The infarct volume in the brain was also measured using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining 28 days after stroke. CIG, 60 mg/(kg day), administered by oral gavage starting from 6 h after the onset of MCAO improved neurological function at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post occlusion (PCIG-treated group compared with the model group at 7, 14 and 28 days after MCAO (PCIG-treated group than that in the model group (PCIG treatment, starting from 6 h after MCAO, reduced infarct size in the brain as measured by MRI and improved neurological function 2-28 days after focal cerebral ischemia in rats, suggesting that CIG could be a clinical application in improving stroke treatment.

  8. Evaluation of design flood estimates with respect to sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobierska, Florian; Engeland, Kolbjorn

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of design floods forms the basis for hazard management related to flood risk and is a legal obligation when building infrastructure such as dams, bridges and roads close to water bodies. Flood inundation maps used for land use planning are also produced based on design flood estimates. In Norway, the current guidelines for design flood estimates give recommendations on which data, probability distribution, and method to use dependent on length of the local record. If less than 30 years of local data is available, an index flood approach is recommended where the local observations are used for estimating the index flood and regional data are used for estimating the growth curve. For 30-50 years of data, a 2 parameter distribution is recommended, and for more than 50 years of data, a 3 parameter distribution should be used. Many countries have national guidelines for flood frequency estimation, and recommended distributions include the log Pearson II, generalized logistic and generalized extreme value distributions. For estimating distribution parameters, ordinary and linear moments, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods are used. The aim of this study is to r-evaluate the guidelines for local flood frequency estimation. In particular, we wanted to answer the following questions: (i) Which distribution gives the best fit to the data? (ii) Which estimation method provides the best fit to the data? (iii) Does the answer to (i) and (ii) depend on local data availability? To answer these questions we set up a test bench for local flood frequency analysis using data based cross-validation methods. The criteria were based on indices describing stability and reliability of design flood estimates. Stability is used as a criterion since design flood estimates should not excessively depend on the data sample. The reliability indices describe to which degree design flood predictions can be trusted.

  9. Brain size at birth throughout human evolution: a new method for estimating neonatal brain size in hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, Jeremy M; Lesnik, Julie J

    2008-12-01

    An increase in brain size is a hallmark of human evolution. Questions regarding the evolution of brain development and obstetric constraints in the human lineage can be addressed with accurate estimates of the size of the brain at birth in hominins. Previous estimates of brain size at birth in fossil hominins have been calculated from regressions of neonatal body or brain mass to adult body mass, but this approach is problematic for two reasons: modern humans are outliers for these regressions, and hominin adult body masses are difficult to estimate. To accurately estimate the brain size at birth in extinct human ancestors, an equation is needed for which modern humans fit the anthropoid regression and one in which the hominin variable entered into the regression equation has limited error. Using phylogenetically sensitive statistics, a resampling approach, and brain-mass data from the literature and from National Primate Research Centers on 362 neonates and 2802 adults from eight different anthropoid species, we found that the size of the adult brain can strongly predict the size of the neonatal brain (r2=0.97). This regression predicts human brain size, indicating that humans have precisely the brain size expected as an adult given the size of the brain at birth. We estimated the size of the neonatal brain in fossil hominins from a reduced major axis regression equation using published cranial capacities of 89 adult fossil crania. We suggest that australopiths gave birth to infants with cranial capacities that were on average 180cc (95% CI: 158-205cc), slightly larger than the average neonatal brain size of chimpanzees. Neonatal brain size increased in early Homo to 225cc (95% CI: 198-257cc) and in Homo erectus to approximately 270cc (95% CI: 237-310cc). These results have implications for interpreting the evolution of the birth process and brain development in all hominins from the australopiths and early Homo, through H. erectus, to Homo sapiens.

  10. Range and Size Estimation Based on a Coordinate Transformation Model for Driving Assistance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing-Fei; Lin, Chuan-Tsai; Chen, Yen-Lin

    This paper presents new approaches for the estimation of range between the preceding vehicle and the experimental vehicle, estimation of vehicle size and its projective size, and dynamic camera calibration. First, our proposed approaches adopt a camera model to transform coordinates from the ground plane onto the image plane to estimate the relative position between the detected vehicle and the camera. Then, to estimate the actual and projective size of the preceding vehicle, we propose a new estimation method. This method can estimate the range from a preceding vehicle to the camera based on contact points between its tires and the ground and then estimate the actual size of the vehicle according to the positions of its vertexes in the image. Because the projective size of a vehicle varies with respect to its distance to the camera, we also present a simple and rapid method of estimating a vehicle's projective height, which allows a reduction in computational time for size estimation in real-time systems. Errors caused by the application of different camera parameters are also estimated and analyzed in this study. The estimation results are used to determine suitable parameters during camera installation to suppress estimation errors. Finally, to guarantee robustness of the detection system, a new efficient approach to dynamic calibration is presented to obtain accurate camera parameters, even when they are changed by camera vibration owing to on-road driving. Experimental results demonstrate that our approaches can provide accurate and robust estimation results of range and size of target vehicles.

  11. Hypercoagulation Assessed by Thromboelastography is Neither Related to Infarct Size nor to Clinical Outcome After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dridi, Nadia Paarup; Lønborg, Jacob T; Radu, Maria D;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship between coagulation assessed by thromboelastography (TEG) and myocardial damage in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHODS: We measured platelet activity with TEG-maximum amplitude (TEG-MA) in 233 patients undergoing urgent percutan...

  12. Filtrate of Phellinus linteus Broth Culture Reduces Infarct Size Significantly in a Rat Model of Permanent Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sakiko; Kawamata, Takakazu; Okada, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2011-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a natural growing mushroom, has been known to exhibit anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-oxidant effects. Aiming to exploit the neuroprotective effects of P. linteus, we evaluated its effects on infarct volume reduction in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion. Filtrate of P. linteus broth culture (various doses), fractionated filtrate (based on molecular weight) or control medium was administered intraperitoneally to rats before or after ischemia induction. Rats were killed at 24 h after the stroke surgery. Cortical and caudoputaminal infarct volumes were determined separately using an image analysis program following staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Significant cortical infarct volume reductions were found in the pre-treatment groups (30 and 60 minutes before onset of cerebral ischemia) compared with the control group, showing dose dependence. Posttreatment (30 minutes after ischemic onset) also significantly reduced cortical infarct volume. Furthermore, the higher molecular weight (≥12 000) fraction of the culture filtrate was more effective compared with the lower molecular weight fraction. The present findings suggest that P. linteus may be a new promising approach for the treatment of focal cerebral ischemia, with the additional benefit of a wide therapeutic time window since significant infarct volume reduction is obtained by administration even after the ischemic event. Our finding that the higher molecular weight fraction of the P. linteus culture filtrate demonstrated more prominent effect may provide a clue to identify the neuroprotective substances and mechanisms.

  13. Filtrate of Phellinus linteus Broth Culture Reduces Infarct Size Significantly in a Rat Model of Permanent Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phellinus linteus, a natural growing mushroom, has been known to exhibit anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-oxidant effects. Aiming to exploit the neuroprotective effects of P. linteus, we evaluated its effects on infarct volume reduction in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion. Filtrate of P. linteus broth culture (various doses, fractionated filtrate (based on molecular weight or control medium was administered intraperitoneally to rats before or after ischemia induction. Rats were killed at 24 h after the stroke surgery. Cortical and caudoputaminal infarct volumes were determined separately using an image analysis program following staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Significant cortical infarct volume reductions were found in the pre-treatment groups (30 and 60 minutes before onset of cerebral ischemia compared with the control group, showing dose dependence. Posttreatment (30 minutes after ischemic onset also significantly reduced cortical infarct volume. Furthermore, the higher molecular weight (≥12 000 fraction of the culture filtrate was more effective compared with the lower molecular weight fraction. The present findings suggest that P. linteus may be a new promising approach for the treatment of focal cerebral ischemia, with the additional benefit of a wide therapeutic time window since significant infarct volume reduction is obtained by administration even after the ischemic event. Our finding that the higher molecular weight fraction of the P. linteus culture filtrate demonstrated more prominent effect may provide a clue to identify the neuroprotective substances and mechanisms.

  14. Estimating population size of Pygoscelid Penguins from TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Charles E., Jr.; Schwaller, Mathew R.; Dahmer, Paul A.

    1987-01-01

    An estimate was made toward a continent wide population of penguins. The results indicate that Thematic Mapper data can be used to identify penguin rookeries due to the unique reflectance properties of guano. Strong correlations exist between nesting populations and rookery area occupied by the birds. These correlations allow estimation of the number of nesting pairs in colonies. The success of remote sensing and biometric analyses leads one to believe that a continent wide estimate of penguin populations is possible based on a timely sample employing ground based and remote sensing techniques. Satellite remote sensing along the coastline may well locate previously undiscovered penguin nesting sites, or locate rookeries which have been assumed to exist for over a half century, but never located. Observations which found that penguins are one of the most sensitive elements in the complex of Southern Ocean ecosystems motivated this study.

  15. Rapid assessment of myocardial infarct size in rodents using multi-slice inversion recovery late gadolinium enhancement CMR at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausenloy Derek J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial infarction (MI can be readily assessed using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Inversion recovery (IR sequences provide the highest contrast between enhanced infarct areas and healthy myocardium. Applying such methods to small animals is challenging due to rapid respiratory and cardiac rates relative to T1 relaxation. Methods Here we present a fast and robust protocol for assessing LGE in small animals using a multi-slice IR gradient echo sequence for efficient assessment of LGE. An additional Look-Locker sequence was used to assess the optimum inversion point on an individual basis and to determine most appropriate gating points for both rat and mouse. The technique was applied to two preclinical scenarios: i an acute (2 hour reperfused model of MI in rats and ii mice 2 days following non-reperfused MI. Results LGE images from all animals revealed clear areas of enhancement allowing for easy volume segmentation. Typical inversion times required to null healthy myocardium in rats were between 300-450 ms equivalent to 2-3 R-waves and ~330 ms in mice, typically 3 R-waves following inversion. Data from rats was also validated against triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and revealed close agreement for infarct size. Conclusion The LGE protocol presented provides a reliable method for acquiring images of high contrast and quality without excessive scan times, enabling higher throughput in experimental studies requiring reliable assessment of MI.

  16. Size Estimation of Non-Cooperative Data Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelghati, Mohammadreza; Hiemstra, Djoerd; van Keulen, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing amount of data in deep web sources (hidden from general search engines behind web forms), ac- cessing this data has gained more attention. In the algo- rithms applied for this purpose, it is the knowledge of a data source size that enables the algorithms to make accurate de-

  17. Size Estimation of Non-Cooperative Data Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelghati, Mohammadreza; Hiemstra, Djoerd; van Keulen, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing amount of data in deep web sources (hidden from general search engines behind web forms), ac- cessing this data has gained more attention. In the algo- rithms applied for this purpose, it is the knowledge of a data source size that enables the algorithms to make accurate de- cisi

  18. Extinction can be estimated from moderately sized molecular phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; O'Meara, Brian C

    2015-04-01

    Hundreds of studies have been dedicated to estimating speciation and extinction from phylogenies of extant species. Although it has long been known that estimates of extinction rates using trees of extant organisms are often uncertain, an influential paper by Rabosky (2010) suggested that when birth rates vary continuously across the tree, estimates of the extinction fraction (i.e., extinction rate/speciation rate) will appear strongly bimodal, with a peak suggesting no extinction and a peak implying speciation and extinction rates are approaching equality. On the basis of these results, and the realistic nature of this form of rate variation, it is now generally assumed by many practitioners that extinction cannot be understood from molecular phylogenies alone. Here, we reevaluated and extended the analyses of Rabosky (2010) and come to the opposite conclusion-namely, that it is possible to estimate extinction from molecular phylogenies, even with model violations due to heritable variation in diversification rate. Note that while it may be tempting to interpret our study as advocating the application of simple birth-death models, our goal here is to show how a particular model violation does not necessitate the abandonment of an entire field: use prudent caution, but do not abandon all hope. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Reliability of different mark-recapture methods for population size estimation tested against reference population sizes constructed from field data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret Grimm

    Full Text Available Reliable estimates of population size are fundamental in many ecological studies and biodiversity conservation. Selecting appropriate methods to estimate abundance is often very difficult, especially if data are scarce. Most studies concerning the reliability of different estimators used simulation data based on assumptions about capture variability that do not necessarily reflect conditions in natural populations. Here, we used data from an intensively studied closed population of the arboreal gecko Gehyra variegata to construct reference population sizes for assessing twelve different population size estimators in terms of bias, precision, accuracy, and their 95%-confidence intervals. Two of the reference populations reflect natural biological entities, whereas the other reference populations reflect artificial subsets of the population. Since individual heterogeneity was assumed, we tested modifications of the Lincoln-Petersen estimator, a set of models in programs MARK and CARE-2, and a truncated geometric distribution. Ranking of methods was similar across criteria. Models accounting for individual heterogeneity performed best in all assessment criteria. For populations from heterogeneous habitats without obvious covariates explaining individual heterogeneity, we recommend using the moment estimator or the interpolated jackknife estimator (both implemented in CAPTURE/MARK. If data for capture frequencies are substantial, we recommend the sample coverage or the estimating equation (both models implemented in CARE-2. Depending on the distribution of catchabilities, our proposed multiple Lincoln-Petersen and a truncated geometric distribution obtained comparably good results. The former usually resulted in a minimum population size and the latter can be recommended when there is a long tail of low capture probabilities. Models with covariates and mixture models performed poorly. Our approach identified suitable methods and extended options to

  20. The stability of myocardial area at risk estimated electrocardiographically in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Esben A; Hassell, Mariëlla E C J; van Hellemond, Irene E G

    2014-01-01

    in a decrease in ST segment elevation and QRS complex distortion. Recently it has been shown that combining the electrocardiographic (ECG) Aldrich ST and Selvester QRS scores result in a more accurate estimate of MaR than using either method alone. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combined Aldrich...... reperfusion (ECG2). The combined Aldrich and Selvester score was considered stable if the difference between ECG1 and ECG2 was inferior ST elevation in 4...

  1. Ab initio estimates of the size of the observable universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-183 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 Canada (Canada)

    2011-09-01

    When one combines multiverse predictions by Bousso, Hall, and Nomura for the observed age and size of the universe in terms of the proton and electron charge and masses with anthropic predictions of Carter, Carr, and Rees for these masses in terms of the charge, one gets that the age of the universe should be roughly the inverse 64th power, and the cosmological constant should be around the 128th power, of the proton charge. Combining these with a further renormalization group argument gives a single approximate equation for the proton charge, with no continuous adjustable or observed parameters, and with a solution that is within 8% of the observed value. Using this solution gives large logarithms for the age and size of the universe and for the cosmological constant that agree with the observed values within 17%.

  2. Sample Size Calculations for Precise Interval Estimation of the Eta-Squared Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of variance is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, and special attention has been paid to the selection and use of an appropriate effect size measure of association in analysis of variance. This article presents the sample size procedures for precise interval estimation…

  3. Estimation of udder cistern size in dairy ewes by ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Makovick

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the size of mammary cistern in ewes of 9 genotypes (purebred Improved Valachian (IV, purebred Tsigai (T, purebred Lacaune (LC and their crosses with genetic proportion of specialized dairy breeds Lacaune and East Friesian (EF - (25 %, 50 % and 75 % were evaluated. Dana were evaluated using REML methodology and MIXED procedure (SAS/STAT. The effect of genotype showed the highest influence (P<0.001 on the length and area of the left and right udder cisterns measurements. In purebred IV ewes, the average areas of the left and right udder cisterns sizes were obtained by using the side method were (1519.39±77.212 mm2 and 1558.45±74.480 mm2. In purebred T ewes, the average areas of the left and right udder cisterns were (1438.70±70.43 mm2 and 1418.68±67.952 mm2. These were significantly smaller than in purebred LC (2694.44±71.95 mm2 and 2693.48±69.340 mm2. The udder cistern areas were significantly higher in crosses with 25 %, 50 % and 75 % genetic proportion of specialized dairy breeds LC and EF, than in purebred IV and T ewes. The analyses showed that crossbreeding of IV with LC and EF and T with LC and EF considerably increases ewe‘s cistern size.

  4. Space Heating Load Estimation Procedure for CHP Systems sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocale, P.; Pagliarini, G.; Rainieri, S.

    2015-11-01

    Due to its environmental and energy benefits, the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) represents certainly an important measure to improve energy efficiency of buildings. Since the energy performance of the CHP systems strongly depends on the fraction of the useful cogenerated heat (i.e. the cogenerated heat that is actually used to meet building thermal demand), in building applications of CHP, it is necessary to know the space heating and cooling loads profile to optimise the system efficiency. When the heating load profile is unknown or difficult to calculate with a sufficient accuracy, as may occur for existing buildings, it can be estimated from the cumulated energy uses by adopting the loads estimation procedure (h-LEP). With the aim to evaluate the useful fraction of the cogenerated heat for different operating conditions in terms of buildings characteristics, weather data and system capacity, the h-LEP is here implemented with a single climate variable: the hourly average dry- bulb temperature. The proposed procedure have been validated resorting to the TRNSYS simulation tool. The results, obtained by considering a building for hospital use, reveal that the useful fraction of the cogenerated heat can be estimated with an average accuracy of ± 3%, within the range of operative conditions considered in the present study.

  5. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  6. Parametric Estimation of the Ultimate Size of Hypercomputers

    CERN Document Server

    Zinoviev, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the emerging petaflops-scale supercomputers of the nearest future (hypercomputers) will be governed not only by the clock frequency of the processing nodes or by the width of the system bus, but also by such factors as the overall power consumption and the geometric size. In this paper, we study the influence of such parameters on one of the most important characteristics of a general purpose computer - on the degree of multithreading that must be present in an application to make the use of the hypercomputer justifiable. Our major finding is that for the class of applications with purely random memory access patterns "super-fast computing" and "high-performance computing" are essentially synonyms for "massively-parallel computing."

  7. Estimation of Effect Size from a Series of Experiments Involving Paired Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Robert D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A distribution theory is derived for a G. V. Glass-type (1976) estimator of effect size from studies involving paired comparisons. The possibility of combining effect sizes from studies involving a mixture of related and unrelated samples is also explored. Resulting estimates are illustrated using data from previous psychiatric research. (SLD)

  8. Psychosocial Work Environment and Myocardial Infarction: Improving Risk Estimation by Combining Two Complementary Job Stress Models in the SHEEP Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. Peter; J. Siegrist; J. Hallqvist; C. Reuterwall; T. Theorell; The SHEEP Study Group

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Associations between two alternative formulations of job stress derived from the effort-reward imbalance and the job strain model and first non-fatal acute myocardial infarction were studied...

  9. Perfusion-weighted imaging and dynamic 4D angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in lacunar infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Alex; Mürle, Bettina; Böhme, Johannes; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U; Wenz, Holger; Groden, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Although lacunar infarction accounts for approximately 25% of ischemic strokes, collateral blood flow through anastomoses is not well evaluated in lacunar infarction. In 111 lacunar infarction patients, we analyzed diffusion-weighted images, perfusion-weighted images, and blood flow on dynamic four-dimensional angiograms generated by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software. Blood flow was classified as absent (type 1), from periphery to center (type 2), from center to periphery (type 3), and combination of type 2 and 3 (type 4). On diffusion-weighted images, lacunar infarction was found in the basal ganglia (11.7%), internal capsule (24.3%), corona radiata (30.6%), thalamus (24.3%), and brainstem (9.0%). In 58 (52.2%) patients, perfusion-weighted image showed a circumscribed hypoperfusion, in one (0.9%) a circumscribed hyperperfusion, whereas the remainder was normal. In 36 (62.1%) patients, a larger perfusion deficit (>7 mm) was observed. In these, blood flow was classified type 1 in four (11.1%), 2 in 17 (47.2%), 3 in 9 (25.0%), and 4 in six (16.7%) patients. Patients with lacunar infarction in the posterior circulation more often demonstrated blood flow type 2 and less often type 3 (p = 0.01). Detailed examination and graduation of blood flow in lacunar infarction by use of dynamic four-dimensional angiograms is feasible and may serve for a better characterization of this stroke subtype.

  10. Blinded sample size re-estimation in three-arm trials with 'gold standard' design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mütze, Tobias; Friede, Tim

    2017-10-15

    In this article, we study blinded sample size re-estimation in the 'gold standard' design with internal pilot study for normally distributed outcomes. The 'gold standard' design is a three-arm clinical trial design that includes an active and a placebo control in addition to an experimental treatment. We focus on the absolute margin approach to hypothesis testing in three-arm trials at which the non-inferiority of the experimental treatment and the assay sensitivity are assessed by pairwise comparisons. We compare several blinded sample size re-estimation procedures in a simulation study assessing operating characteristics including power and type I error. We find that sample size re-estimation based on the popular one-sample variance estimator results in overpowered trials. Moreover, sample size re-estimation based on unbiased variance estimators such as the Xing-Ganju variance estimator results in underpowered trials, as it is expected because an overestimation of the variance and thus the sample size is in general required for the re-estimation procedure to eventually meet the target power. To overcome this problem, we propose an inflation factor for the sample size re-estimation with the Xing-Ganju variance estimator and show that this approach results in adequately powered trials. Because of favorable features of the Xing-Ganju variance estimator such as unbiasedness and a distribution independent of the group means, the inflation factor does not depend on the nuisance parameter and, therefore, can be calculated prior to a trial. Moreover, we prove that the sample size re-estimation based on the Xing-Ganju variance estimator does not bias the effect estimate. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Selective activation of E-type prostanoid(3)-receptors reduces myocardial infarct size. A novel insight into the cardioprotective effects of prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemermann, C; Zacharowski, K

    2000-07-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and other eicosanoids are members of a large family of lipid mediators (autacoids). In 1978, Lefer and colleagues (Science 200, 52-55 [1978]) reported that prostacyclin reduces the myocardial tissue injury caused by coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion in the cat. Since this discovery, more than 50 papers have reported on the cardioprotective effects of vasodilator PGs, including prostacyclin. The cardioprotective effects of PGs are due in part to (1) a reduction in afterload, (2) an increase in coronary blood flow, (3) the inhibition of platelet function, and (4) the inhibition of the activation and extravasation of polymorphonuclear granulocytes. All of these effects are secondary to the activation of EP (E-type prostanoid)(2)-receptors, which activate G(s)-protein and, hence, adenylate cyclase. In addition, the protection of organs such as the heart by PGs has been attributed to a cytoprotective effect of these agents, the mechanism of which is largely unknown. We recently have discovered that certain E-type PGs, which do not activate EP(2)-receptors, also reduce myocardial infarct size, without causing a fall in blood pressure (EP(2)-receptor-mediated effects). Having provided a brief introduction into the role of eicosanoids in ischaemia-reperfusion injury of the heart, this review focuses on the recent discovery that selective agonists of EP(3)-receptors reduce myocardial infarct size, without causing haemodynamic side effects. The mechanisms of the cardioprotective effects of these agents are discussed, as are the therapeutic implications.

  12. Cost and size estimates for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshay, M.; Wright, L. O.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary capital cost and size estimates were made for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept for a redox-flow-cell system. Preliminary calculations showed that the redox-flow-cell system has great promise as a bulk energy storage system for power load leveling. The size of the system was estimated to be less than 2 percent of the size of a comparable pumped hydroelectric storage plant.

  13. Delayed treatment with intravenous basic fibroblast growth factor reduces infarct size following permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M; Meadows, M E; Do, T; Weise, J; Trubetskoy, V; Charette, M; Finklestein, S P

    1995-11-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a polypeptide that supports the survival of brain cells (including neurons, glia, and endothelia) and protects neurons against a number of toxins and insults in vitro. This factor is also a potent dilator of cerebral pial arterioles in vivo. In previous studies, we found that intraventricularly administered bFGF reduced infarct volume in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats. In the current study, bFGF (45 micrograms/kg/h) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was infused intravenously for 3 h, beginning at 30 min after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion by intraluminal suture in mature Sprague-Dawley rats. After 24 h, neurological deficit (as assessed by a 0- to 5-point scale, with 5 = most severe) was 2.6 +/- 1.0 in vehicle-treated and 1.5 +/- 1.3 in bFGF-treated rats (mean +/- SD; N = 12 vs. 11; p = 0.009). Infarct volume was 297 +/- 65 mm3 in vehicle- and 143 +/- 135 mm3 in bFGF-treated animals (p = 0.002). During infusion, there was a modest decrease in mean arterial blood pressure but no changes in arterial blood gases or core or brain temperature in bFGF-treated rats. Autoradiography following intravenous administration of 111In-labeled bFGF showed that labeled bFGF crossed the damaged blood-brain barrier to enter the ischemic (but not the nonischemic) hemisphere. Whether the infarct-reducing effects of bFGF depend on intraparenchymal or intravascular mechanisms requires further study.

  14. Why liquid displacement methods are sometimes wrong in estimating the pore-size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbertsen-Abrahamse, A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Padt, van der A.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid displacement method is a commonly used method to determine the pore size distribution of micro- and ultrafiltration membranes. One of the assumptions for the calculation of the pore sizes is that the pores are parallel and thus are not interconnected. To show that the estimated pore size

  15. PARTICLE SIZE ESTIMATION AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF LAUHA BHASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Neetu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is the science of life. It consists of medicaments prepared by materials obtained from nature, viz; plant products, animal products and metal/ mineral products. Converting the metals/minerals into acceptable form (i.e bhasma preparation for internal administration is done by following various pharmaceutical processing methods. These methods are extensively mentioned in Rasa Shastra (A branch of Ayurveda. Lauha (iron is one of the most important metals mentioned in Rasa Shastra for preparing Lauha bhasma. As iron supplementation is required for formation of hemoglobin of blood and is most essential component for maintaining physiological condition of the body system, in Ayurveda utmost importance is given for Lauha bhasma preparation and also Lauha bhasma were used for preparing many number of Ayurvedic dosage form. In ancient pharmaceutical science of Ayurveda to determine the quality of bhasma certain testing procedures have been mentioned such as varitar, rekhapurnata etc. but in present day scenario apart from these testing procedure there is a need of more sophisticated testing methods for determining quality of Lauha bhasma. In present study Lauha bhsma has been prepared by following Ayurvedic textual reference. After preparation of Lauha bhasma it is subjected to various testing procedures like AAS, EDAX, SEM and TEM. The details including results of these testing procedures with illustrated photographs, tables etc. are mentioned in the paper. SEM & TEM result confirms the formation of nanoparticles after 20th puta. Decrease in particle size after successive steps is observed. Whereas tests like AAS and EDAX show incorporation of trace elements in the finally prepared bhasma.

  16. Complexity in Animal Communication: Estimating the Size of N-Gram Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new techniques that allow conditional entropy to estimate the combinatorics of symbols are applied to animal communication studies to estimate the communication’s repertoire size. By using the conditional entropy estimates at multiple orders, the paper estimates the total repertoire sizes for animal communication across bottlenose dolphins, humpback whales and several species of birds for an N-gram length of one to three. In addition to discussing the impact of this method on studies of animal communication complexity, the reliability of these estimates is compared to other methods through simulation. While entropy does undercount the total repertoire size due to rare N-grams, it gives a more accurate picture of the most frequently used repertoire than just repertoire size alone.

  17. Complexity in Animal Communication: Estimating the Size of N-Gram Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Reginald

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, new techniques that allow conditional entropy to estimate the combinatorics of symbols are applied to animal communication studies to estimate the communication's repertoire size. By using the conditional entropy estimates at multiple orders, the paper estimates the total repertoire sizes for animal communication across bottlenose dolphins, humpback whales, and several species of birds for N-grams length one to three. In addition to discussing the impact of this method on studies of animal communication complexity, the reliability of these estimates is compared to other methods through simulation. While entropy does undercount the total repertoire size due to rare N-grams, it gives a more accurate picture of the most frequently used repertoire than just repertoire size alone.

  18. Influence of time to treatment and other risk factors on infarct size and transmurality in the case of ST-elevated myocardial infarction managed by primary angioplasty and assessed by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the association between time to treatment and to check the effect of various risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension (HTN, smoking, family history of coronary artery disease (CAD and obesity on infarct size (IS, transmurality and ST-segment resolution (STR with DE-MRI (delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging on 3-month follow-up in patients treated for ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI, with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI. Background: Early PPCI decreases IS and transmurality but increases STR. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with STEMI treated with reperfusion therapy in the form of PPCI and underwent cardiac MRI at 3-month interval follow-up. The primary endpoint is final IS and transmurality as assessed by DE-MRI at 3-month follow-up. Results: IS and transmurality increase and STR decreases with increase in duration to percutaneous coronary intervention from the onset of symptoms. Similarly, the effect of various confounding factors such as diabetes mellitus, HTN, smoking, family history of CAD and obesity on IS, transmurality and STR was assessed which did not affect immediate prognosis during treatment. Conclusion: Primary angioplasty is the treatment modality of choice in the case of STEMI when available. Time to treatment directly influences STR, final IS and transmurality, that is, the earlier the intervention done, more will be STR and lesser will be final IS and transmurality. There is no significant effect of confounding variables such as cardiac risk factors except family history of CAD on immediate prognosis during treatment.

  19. Inverse Probability Weighted Generalised Empirical Likelihood Estimators : Firm Size and R&D Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The inverse probability weighted Generalised Empirical Likelihood (IPW-GEL) estimator is proposed for the estimation of the parameters of a vector of possibly non-linear unconditional moment functions in the presence of conditionally independent sample selection or attrition.The estimator is applied to the estimation of the firm size elasticity of product and process R&D expenditures using a panel of German manufacturing firms, which is affected by attrition and selection into R&D activities....

  20. Making It Count: Improving Estimates of the Size of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-06-01

    An accurate estimate of the number of transgender and gender nonconforming people is essential to inform policy and funding priorities and decisions. Historical reports of population sizes of 1 in 4000 to 1 in 50,000 have been based on clinical populations and likely underestimate the size of the transgender population. More recent population-based studies have found a 10- to 100-fold increase in population size. Studies that estimate population size should be population based, employ the two-step method to allow for collection of both gender identity and sex assigned at birth, and include measures to capture the range of transgender people with nonbinary gender identities.

  1. Can rarefaction be used to estimate song repertoire size in birds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen R. PESHEK, Daniel T. BLUMSTEIN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Song repertoire size is the number of distinct syllables, phrases, or song types produced by an individual or population. Repertoire size estimation is particularly difficult for species that produce highly variable songs and those that produce many song types. Estimating repertoire size is important for ecological and evolutionary studies of speciation, studies of sexual selection, as well as studies of how species may adapt their songs to various acoustic environments. There are several methods to estimate repertoire size, however prior studies discovered that all but a full numerical count of song types might have substantial inaccuracies associated with them. We evaluated a somewhat novel approach to estimate repertoire size—rarefaction; a technique ecologists use to measure species diversity on individual and population levels. Using the syllables within American robins’ Turdus migratorius repertoire, we compared the most commonly used techniques of estimating repertoires to the results of a rarefaction analysis. American robins have elaborate and unique songs with few syllables shared between individuals, and there is no evidence that robins mimic their neighbors. Thus, they are an ideal system in which to compare techniques. We found that the rarefaction technique results resembled that of the numerical count, and were better than two alternative methods (behavioral accumulation curves, and capture-recapture to estimate syllable repertoire size. Future estimates of repertoire size, particularly in vocally complex species, may benefit from using rarefaction techniques when numerical counts are unable to be performed [Current Zoology 57 (3: 300–306, 2011].

  2. Splenic infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splenic infarction is the death of tissue (necrosis) in the spleen due to a blockage in blood flow. ... Common causes of splenic infarction include: Blood clots Blood diseases such as sickle cell anemia Infections such as endocarditis

  3. Estimating the size of non-observed economy in Croatia using the MIMIC approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Klarić

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a quick overview of the approaches that have been used in the research of shadow economy, starting with the definitions of the terms “shadow economy” and “non-observed economy”, with the accent on the ISTAT/Eurostat framework. Several methods for estimating the size of the shadow economy and the non-observed economy are then presented. The emphasis is placed on the MIMIC approach, one of the methods used to estimate the size of the nonobserved economy. After a glance at the theory behind it, the MIMIC model is then applied to the Croatian economy. Considering the described characteristics of different methods, a previous estimate of the size of the non-observed economy in Croatia is chosen to provide benchmark values for the MIMIC model. Using those, the estimates of the size of non-observed economy in Croatia during the period 1998-2009 are obtained.

  4. Estimation of gear tooth transverse crack size from vibration by fusing selected gear condition indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sukhwan; Li, C. James

    2006-09-01

    Gears are common power transmission elements and are frequently responsible for transmission failures. Since a tooth crack is not directly measurable while a gear is in operation, one has to develop an indirect method to estimate its size from some measurables. This study developed such a method to estimate the size of a tooth transverse crack for a spur gear in operation. Using gear vibrations measured from an actual gear accelerated test, this study examined existing gear condition indices to identify those correlated well to crack size and established their utility for crack size estimation through index fusion using a neural network. When tested with vibrations measured from another accelerated test, the method had an averaged estimation error of about 5%.

  5. Precision of recombination frequency estimates after random intermating with finite population sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Matthias; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2008-01-01

    Random intermating of F2 populations has been suggested for obtaining precise estimates of recombination frequencies between tightly linked loci. In a simulation study, sampling effects due to small population sizes in the intermating generations were found to abolish the advantages of random intermating that were reported in previous theoretical studies considering an infinite population size. We propose a mating scheme for intermating with planned crosses that yields more precise estimates than those under random intermating.

  6. ON ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING OF THE GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY THE SALTYKOV METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Gulbin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of validity of unfolding the grain size distribution with the back-substitution method. Due to the ill-conditioned nature of unfolding matrices, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation and to verify the possibility of expected grain size distribution testing on the basis of intersection size histogram data. In order to review these questions, the computer modeling was used to compare size distributions obtained stereologically with those possessed by three-dimensional model aggregates of grains with a specified shape and random size. Results of simulations are reported and ways of improving the conventional stereological techniques are suggested. It is shown that new improvements in estimating and testing procedures enable grain size distributions to be unfolded more efficiently.

  7. Improved particle size estimation in digital holography via sign matched filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiang; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Weidong

    2012-06-04

    A matched filter method is provided for obtaining improved particle size estimates from digital in-line holograms. This improvement is relative to conventional reconstruction and pixel counting methods for particle size estimation, which is greatly limited by the CCD camera pixel size. The proposed method is based on iterative application of a sign matched filter in the Fourier domain, with sign meaning the matched filter takes values of ±1 depending on the sign of the angular spectrum of the particle aperture function. Using simulated data the method is demonstrated to work for particle diameters several times the pixel size. Holograms of piezoelectrically generated water droplets taken in the laboratory show greatly improved particle size measurements. The method is robust to additive noise and can be applied to real holograms over a wide range of matched-filter particle sizes.

  8. How Many Words Do Children Know? A Corpus-Based Estimation of Children's Total Vocabulary Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segbers, Jutta; Schroeder, Sascha

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present a new method for estimating children's total vocabulary size based on a language corpus in German. We drew a virtual sample of different lexicon sizes from a corpus and let the virtual sample "take" a vocabulary test by comparing whether the items were included in the virtual lexicons or not. This enabled us to…

  9. Using Shocks to School Enrollment to Estimate the Effect of School Size on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemko, Ilyana

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of the connection between school enrollment size and student achievement use cross-sectional econometric models and thus do not account for unobserved heterogeneity across schools. To address this concern, I utilize school-level panel data, and generate first-differences estimates of the effect of school size on achievement.…

  10. Facing the estimation of effective population size based on molecular markers: comparison of estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Mena, Belen; Verrier, Etienne; Hospital, Frederic

    an increase in the variability of values over time. The distance from the mean and the median to the true Ne increased over time too. This was caused by the fixation of alleles through time due to genetic drift and the changes in the distribution of allele frequencies. We compared the three estimators of Ne...

  11. Effects of Sample Size, Estimation Methods, and Model Specification on Structural Equation Modeling Fit Indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xitao; Wang, Lin; Thompson, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation study investigated the effects on 10 structural equation modeling fit indexes of sample size, estimation method, and model specification. Some fit indexes did not appear to be comparable, and it was apparent that estimation method strongly influenced almost all fit indexes examined, especially for misspecified models. (SLD)

  12. Modeling grain-size dependent bias in estimating forest area: a regional application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    A better understanding of scaling-up effects on estimating important landscape characteristics (e.g. forest percentage) is critical for improving ecological applications over large areas. This study illustrated effects of changing grain sizes on regional forest estimates in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan of the USA using 30-m land-cover maps (1992 and 2001)...

  13. Conceptual and Practical Implications for Rehabilitation Research: Effect Size Estimates, Confidence Intervals, and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrin, James M.; Bishop, Malachy; Tansey, Timothy N.; Frain, Michael; Swett, Elizabeth A.; Lane, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    For a number of conceptually and practically important reasons, reporting of effect size estimates, confidence intervals, and power in parameter estimation is increasingly being recognized as the preferred approach in social science research. Unfortunately, this practice has not yet been widely adopted in the rehabilitation or general counseling…

  14. The efficient and unbiased estimation of nuclear size variability using the 'selector'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMillan, A M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1992-01-01

    The selector was used to make an unbiased estimation of nuclear size variability in one benign naevocellular skin tumour and one cutaneous malignant melanoma. The results showed that the estimates obtained using the selector were comparable to those obtained using the more time consuming Cavalieri...

  15. Assessing the accuracy of wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA) fire size and suppression cost estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Peter. Noordijk

    2005-01-01

    To determine the optimal suppression strategy for escaped wildfires, federal land managers are requiredto conduct a wildland fire situation analysis (WFSA). As part of the WFSA process, fire managers estimate final fire size and suppression costs. Estimates from 58 WFSAs conducted during the 2002 fire season are compared to actual outcomes. Results indicate that...

  16. Variability of raindrop size distributions in a squall line and implications for radar rainfall estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Steiner, M.; Smith, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The intrastorm variability of raindrop size distributions as a source of uncertainty in single-parameter and dual-parameter radar rainfall estimates is studied using time series analyses of disdrometer observations. Two rain-rate (R) estimators are considered: the traditional single-parameter

  17. Size-based estimation of the status of fish stocks: simulation analysis and comparison with age-based estimations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkalis, Alexandros; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Nielsen, Anders;

    which leads to the maximum sustainable yield. A simulation analysis was done to investigate the sensitivity of the estimation and its improvement when stock specific life history information is available. To evaluate our approach with real observations, data-rich fish stocks, like the North Sea cod......Estimation of the status of fish stocks is important for sustainable management. Data limitations and data quality hinder this task. The commonly used age-based approaches require information about individual age, which is costly and relatively inaccurate. In contrast, the size of organisms...... is linked to physiology more directly than is age, and can be measured easier with less cost. In this work we used a single-species size-based model to estimate the fishing mortality (F) and the status of the stock, quantified by the ratio F/Fmsy between actual fishing mortality and the fishing mortality...

  18. Combination of cyclosporine and erythropoietin improves brain infarct size and neurological function in rats after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Pei-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tested the superiority of combined cyclosporine A (CsA-erythropoietin (EPO therapy compared with either one in limiting brain infarction area (BIA and preserving neurological function in rat after ischemic stroke (IS. Methods Fifty adult-male SD rats were equally divided into sham control (group 1, IS plus intra-peritoneal physiological saline (at 0.5/24/48 h after IS (group 2, IS plus CsA (20.0 mg/kg at 0.5/24h, intra-peritoneal (group 3, IS plus EPO (5,000IU/kg at 0.5/24/48h, subcutaneous (group 4, combined CsA and EPO (same route and dosage as groups 3 and 4 treatment (group 5 after occlusion of distal left internal carotid artery. Results BIA on day 21 after acute IS was higher in group 2 than in other groups and lowest in group 5 (all p Conclusion combined treatment with CsA and EPO was superior to either one alone in protecting rat brain from ischemic damage after IS.

  19. Neurocognitive aspects of body size estimation - A study of contemporary dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Bizerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Dancers use multiple forms of body language when performing their functions in the contemporary dance scene. Some neurocognitive aspects are involved in dance, and we highlight the aspect of body image, in particular, the dimensional aspect of the body perception. The aim of this study is to analyze the perceptual aspect of body image (body size estimation and its possible association with the motor aspect (dynamic balance involved in the practice of dance, comparing contemporary dancers with physically active and inactive individuals. The sample consisted of 48 subjects divided into four groups: 1 Professional Group (PG; 2 Dance Student Group (SG; 3 Physically Active Group (AG; and 4 Physically Inactive Group (IG.Two tests were used: the Image Marking Procedure (body size estimation and the Star Excursion Balance Test (dynamic balance. Was observed that dancing and exercising contribute to a proper body size estimation, but cannot be considered the only determining factor. Although dancers have higher ability in the motor test (dynamic balance, no direct relation to the perception of body size was observed, leading us to conclude it is a skill task/dependent acquired by repeating and training. In this study, we found a statistical significant association between educational level and body size estimation. The study opens new horizons in relation to the understanding of factors involved in the construction of the body size estimation.

  20. Gluttonous predators: how to estimate prey size when there are too many prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS. Araújo

    Full Text Available Prey size is an important factor in food consumption. In studies of feeding ecology, prey items are usually measured individually using calipers or ocular micrometers. Among amphibians and reptiles, there are species that feed on large numbers of small prey items (e.g. ants, termites. This high intake makes it difficult to estimate prey size consumed by these animals. We addressed this problem by developing and evaluating a procedure for subsampling the stomach contents of such predators in order to estimate prey size. Specifically, we developed a protocol based on a bootstrap procedure to obtain a subsample with a precision error of at the most 5%, with a confidence level of at least 95%. This guideline should reduce the sampling effort and facilitate future studies on the feeding habits of amphibians and reptiles, and also provide a means of obtaining precise estimates of prey size.

  1. SOME IMPORTANT STATISTICAL PROPERTIES, INFORMATION MEASURES AND ESTIMATIONS OF SIZE BIASED GENERALIZED GAMMA DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Reshi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new class of Size-biased Generalized Gamma (SBGG distribution is defined. A Size-biased Generalized Gamma (SBGG distribution, a particular case of weighted Generalized Gamma distribution, taking the weights as the variate values has been defined. The important statistical properties including hazard functions, reverse hazard functions, mode, moment generating function, characteristic function, Shannon’s entropy, generalized entropy and Fisher’s information matrix of the new model have been derived and studied. Here, we also study SBGG entropy estimation, Akaike and Bayesian information criterion. A likelihood ratio test for size-biasedness is conducted. The estimation of parameters is obtained by employing the classical methods of estimation especially method of moments and maximum likelihood estimator.

  2. Scintigraphic evaluation of routine filterwire distal protection in percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Anne; Nielsen, Søren Steen; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Distal embolization during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) may result in reduced myocardial perfusion, infarct extension and impaired prognosis. In a prospective randomized trial, we assessed the effect of routine filterwire...... distal protection on scintigraphic estimated infarct size. METHODS AND RESULTS: The effect of routine filterwire distal protection was evaluated in 344 patients with STEMI ... by Sestamibi SPECT) were similar. Final infarct size was not statistically different in the distal protection and the control groups (median [IQR], 6% [1-19] and 5% [1-14], P = .23). Also, secondary endpoints were similar in the two treatment groups. CONCLUSION: Distal protection with a filterwire performed...

  3. Estimation of the variance effective population size in age structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Fredrik; Hössjer, Ola

    2015-05-01

    The variance effective population size for age structured populations is generally hard to estimate and the temporal method often gives biased estimates. Here, we give an explicit expression for a correction factor which, combined with estimates from the temporal method, yield approximately unbiased estimates. The calculation of the correction factor requires knowledge of the age specific offspring distribution and survival probabilities as well as possible correlation between survival and reproductive success. In order to relax these requirements, we show that only first order moments of these distributions need to be known if the time between samples is large, or individuals from all age classes which reproduce are sampled. A very explicit approximate expression for the asymptotic coefficient of standard deviation of the estimator is derived, and it can be used to construct confidence intervals and optimal ways of weighting information from different markers. The asymptotic coefficient of standard deviation can also be used to design studies and we show that in order to maximize the precision for a given sample size, individuals from older age classes should be sampled since their expected variance of allele frequency change is higher and easier to estimate. However, for populations with fluctuating age class sizes, the accuracy of the method is reduced when samples are taken from older age classes with high demographic variation. We also present a method for simultaneous estimation of the variance effective and census population size. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk website to measure accuracy of body size estimation and body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Rick M; Brown, Dana L; Boice, Russell

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated Amazon.com's website Mechanical Turk (MTurk) as a research tool for measuring body size estimation and dissatisfaction. 160 U.S. participants completed the BIAS-BD figural drawing scale and demographic questions posted on the MTurk website. The BIAS-BD consists of 17 drawings of various male and female body sizes based on anthropometric data corresponding to a range of 60% below to 140% above the average U.S. adult. Respondents selected a drawing that best reflected their current size and ideal size. Results revealed that respondents overestimated their body size by 6% and desired an ideal size 9.2% smaller than their perceived size. Findings are compared with three previous studies using the BIAS-BD scale. A general correspondence in findings between the four studies was found. We conclude that the MTurk can serve as a viable method for collecting data on the perceptual and attitudinal aspects of body image quickly and inexpensively.

  5. Body mass estimates of hominin fossils and the evolution of human body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mark; Hatala, Kevin G; Jungers, William L; Richmond, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Body size directly influences an animal's place in the natural world, including its energy requirements, home range size, relative brain size, locomotion, diet, life history, and behavior. Thus, an understanding of the biology of extinct organisms, including species in our own lineage, requires accurate estimates of body size. Since the last major review of hominin body size based on postcranial morphology over 20 years ago, new fossils have been discovered, species attributions have been clarified, and methods improved. Here, we present the most comprehensive and thoroughly vetted set of individual fossil hominin body mass predictions to date, and estimation equations based on a large (n = 220) sample of modern humans of known body masses. We also present species averages based exclusively on fossils with reliable taxonomic attributions, estimates of species averages by sex, and a metric for levels of sexual dimorphism. Finally, we identify individual traits that appear to be the most reliable for mass estimation for each fossil species, for use when only one measurement is available for a fossil. Our results show that many early hominins were generally smaller-bodied than previously thought, an outcome likely due to larger estimates in previous studies resulting from the use of large-bodied modern human reference samples. Current evidence indicates that modern human-like large size first appeared by at least 3-3.5 Ma in some Australopithecus afarensis individuals. Our results challenge an evolutionary model arguing that body size increased from Australopithecus to early Homo. Instead, we show that there is no reliable evidence that the body size of non-erectus early Homo differed from that of australopiths, and confirm that Homo erectus evolved larger average body size than earlier hominins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling the impact of intrinsic size and luminosity correlations on magnification estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlariello, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Spatial correlations of the observed sizes and luminosities of galaxies can be used to estimate the magnification that arises through weak gravitational lensing. However, the intrinsic prop- erties of galaxies can be similarly correlated through local physical effects, and these present a possible contamination to the weak lensing estimation. In an earlier paper (Ciarlariello et al. 2015) we modelled the intrinsic size correlations using the halo model, assuming the galaxy sizes reflect the mass in the associated halo. Here we extend this work to consider galaxy magnitudes and show that these may be even more affected by intrinsic correlations than galaxy sizes, making this a bigger systematic for measurements of the weak lensing signal. We also quantify how these intrinsic correlations are affected by sample selection criteria based on sizes and magnitudes.

  7. Improvement of the size estimation of 3D tracked droplets using digital in-line holography with joint estimation reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, N.; Grosjean, N.; Dib, E.; Méès, L.; Fournier, C.; Marié, J.-L.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holography is a valuable tool for three-dimensional information extraction. Among existing configurations, the originally proposed set-up (i.e. Gabor, or in-line holography), is reasonably immune to variations in the experimental environment making it a method of choice for studies of fluid dynamics. Nevertheless, standard hologram reconstruction techniques, based on numerical light back-propagation are prone to artifacts such as twin images or aliases that limit both the quality and quantity of information extracted from the acquired holograms. To get round this issue, the hologram reconstruction as a parametric inverse problem has been shown to accurately estimate 3D positions and the size of seeding particles directly from the hologram. To push the bounds of accuracy on size estimation still further, we propose to fully exploit the information redundancy of a hologram video sequence using joint estimation reconstruction. Applying this approach in a bench-top experiment, we show that it led to a relative precision of 0.13% (for a 60 μm diameter droplet) for droplet size estimation, and a tracking precision of {σx}× {σy}× {σz}=0.15× 0.15× 1~\\text{pixels} .

  8. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  9. Impact of early, late, and no ST-segment resolution measured by continuous ST Holter monitoring on left ventricular ejection fraction and infarct size as determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D.E. Haeck; N.J.W. Verouden; W.J. Kuijt; K.T. Koch; M. Majidi; A. Hirsch; J.G.P. Tijssen; M.W. Krucoff; R.J. de Winter

    2011-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to determine the predictive value of ST-segment resolution (STR) early after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), late STR, and no STR for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size (IS) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at follow-u

  10. Serial measurement of hFABP and high-sensitivity troponin I post-PCI in STEMI: How fast and accurate can myocardial infarct size and no-reflow be predicted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.B. Uitterdijk (André); S. Sneep (Stefan); R.W.B. van Duin (R. W B); I. Krabbendam-Peters (I.); C. Gorsse-Bakker (Charlotte); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim); H.M.M. van Beusekom (Heleen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to compare heart-specific fatty acid binding protein (hFABP) and highsensitivity troponin I (hsTnI) via serial measurements to identify early time points to accurately quantify infarct size and no-reflow in a preclinical swine model of ST-elevated myocardi

  11. Two-Dimensional Echo-cardiographic Estimation of the Size of the Mitral Valve Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu,Masaharu

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of the mitral annulus as measured on the long axis by two-dimensional echocardiogram was found to correlate well with the size of the sewing ring used to replace the mitral valve in 35 consecutive patients. The size of the prosthesis which was used could be predicted within 1 mm of error in 83% of the mitral stenosis (MS patients and in 76% of the mitral regurgitation (MR patients in the study. Preoperative echocardiographic estimation of the size of the mitral valve annulus and prediction of the sewing ring size of the prosthetic valve used could reduce the incidence of valve prosthesis-patient mismatch.

  12. Estimating survival rates in ecological studies with small unbalanced sample sizes: an alternative Bayesian point estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Damgaard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, the survival rates in experimental ecology are presented using odds ratios or log response ratios, but the use of ratio metrics has a problem when all the individuals have either died or survived in only one replicate. In the empirical ecological literature, the problem often has been ignored or circumvented by different, more or less ad hoc approaches. Here, it is argued that the best summary statistic for communicating ecological results of frequency data in studies with small unbalanced samples may be the mean of the posterior distribution of the survival rate. The developed approach may be particularly useful when effect size indexes, such as odds ratios, are needed to compare frequency data between treatments, sites or studies.

  13. Chronic emotional stress exposure increases infarct size in rats: the role of oxidative and nitrosative damage in response to sympathetic hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercanoglu, G; Safran, N; Uzun, H; Eroglu, L

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the level of sympathetic hyperactivity in response to stress exposure in an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model and the contribution of oxidative and nitrosative damage to this phenomenon. Stress was induced by 20-day administration of different emotional stress factors: daylight/darkness exposure, overcrowding, isolation, new hierarchy, tilting the cage and restriction of water or food. AMI was induced surgically. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) measurements were done before and after AMI. Oxidant parameters were measured in heart tissue and cortisol levels were measured in plasma specimens. Compared with the nonstressed group, stress-exposed rats showed sympathetic hyperactivity characterized by increased HR together with decreased HRV. In the stressed group serum corticosterone levels were high both before and after AMI. Mean infarct size in the stressed group was significantly larger (44.6+/-3.23% and 53.1+/-4.52%, respectively; P<0.05). Increased tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (0.63+/-0.59 and 1.60+/-0.31 nmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.05) and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) content were seen in stress-exposed rats. Likewise, heart peroxynitrite levels were also high in stress-exposed rats (141.8+/-18 nmol/g tissue vs. 164.2+/-21 nmol/g tissue). Chronic emotional stress is a deteriorating factor for the induction and prognosis of MI. Exaggerated sympathetic activity may be the major contributing factor. Oxidative and nitrosative damage in response to this sympathetic hyperactivity is the key mechanism.

  14. Rater reliability of fragile X mutation size estimates: A multilaboratory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, G.S. [Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY/Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Carpenter, N. [Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States); Maddalena, A. [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Notwithstanding the use of comparable molecular protocols, description and measurement of the fra(X) (fragile X) mutation may vary according to its appearance as a discrete band, smear, multiple bands, or mosaic. Estimation of mutation size may also differ from one laboratory to another. We report on the description of a mutation size estimate for a large sample of individuals tested for the fra(X) pre- or full mutation. Of 63 DNA samples evaluated, 45 were identified previously as fra(X) pre- or full mutations. DNA from 18 unaffected individuals was used as control. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, and DNA fragments from each of four laboratories were sent to a single center where Southern blots were prepared and hybridized with the pE5.1 probe. Photographs from autoradiographs were returned to each site, and raters blind to the identity of the specimens were asked to evaluate them. Raters` estimates of mutation size compared favorably with a reference test. Intrarater reliability was good to excellent. Variability in mutation size estimates was comparable across band types. Variability in estimates was moderate, and was significantly correlated with absolute mutation size and band type. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Estimation of the ancestral effective population sizes of African great apes under different selection regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-08-01

    Reliable estimates of ancestral effective population sizes are necessary to unveil the population-level phenomena that shaped the phylogeny and molecular evolution of the African great apes. Although several methods have previously been applied to infer ancestral effective population sizes, an analysis of the influence of the selective regime on the estimates of ancestral demography has not been thoroughly conducted. In this study, three independent data sets under different selective regimes were used were composed to tackle this issue. The results showed that selection had a significant impact on the estimates of ancestral effective population sizes of the African great apes. The inference of the ancestral demography of African great apes was affected by the selection regime. The effects, however, were not homogeneous along the ancestral populations of great apes. The effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was more impacted by the selection regime when compared to the same parameter in the ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Because the selection regime influenced the estimates of ancestral effective population size, it is reasonable to assume that a portion of the discrepancy found in previous studies that inferred the ancestral effective population size may be attributable to the differential action of selection on the genes sampled.

  16. Operating characteristics of sample size re-estimation with futility stopping based on conditional power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachin, John M

    2006-10-15

    Various methods have been described for re-estimating the final sample size in a clinical trial based on an interim assessment of the treatment effect. Many re-weight the observations after re-sizing so as to control the pursuant inflation in the type I error probability alpha. Lan and Trost (Estimation of parameters and sample size re-estimation. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association Biopharmaceutical Section 1997; 48-51) proposed a simple procedure based on conditional power calculated under the current trend in the data (CPT). The study is terminated for futility if CPT or = CU, or re-sized by a factor m to yield CPT = CU if CL stopping for futility can balance the inflation due to sample size re-estimation, thus permitting any form of final analysis with no re-weighting. Herein the statistical properties of this approach are described including an evaluation of the probabilities of stopping for futility or re-sizing, the distribution of the re-sizing factor m, and the unconditional type I and II error probabilities alpha and beta. Since futility stopping does not allow a type I error but commits a type II error, then as the probability of stopping for futility increases, alpha decreases and beta increases. An iterative procedure is described for choice of the critical test value and the futility stopping boundary so as to ensure that specified alpha and beta are obtained. However, inflation in beta is controlled by reducing the probability of futility stopping, that in turn dramatically increases the possible re-sizing factor m. The procedure is also generalized to limit the maximum sample size inflation factor, such as at m max = 4. However, doing so then allows for a non-trivial fraction of studies to be re-sized at this level that still have low conditional power. These properties also apply to other methods for sample size re-estimation with a provision for stopping for futility. Sample size re-estimation procedures should be used with caution

  17. A model to estimate the size of nanoparticle agglomerates in gas−solid fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Lilian de, E-mail: L.DeMartinMonton@tudelft.nl; Ommen, J. Ruud van [Delft University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    The estimation of nanoparticle agglomerates’ size in fluidized beds remains an open challenge, mainly due to the difficulty of characterizing the inter-agglomerate van der Waals force. The current approach is to describe micron-sized nanoparticle agglomerates as micron-sized particles with 0.1–0.2-μm asperities. This simplification does not capture the influence of the particle size on the van der Waals attraction between agglomerates. In this paper, we propose a new description where the agglomerates are micron-sized particles with nanoparticles on the surface, acting as asperities. As opposed to previous models, here the van der Waals force between agglomerates decreases with an increase in the particle size. We have also included an additional force due to the hydrogen bond formation between the surfaces of hydrophilic and dry nanoparticles. The average size of the fluidized agglomerates has been estimated equating the attractive force obtained from this method to the weight of the individual agglomerates. The results have been compared to 54 experimental values, most of them collected from the literature. Our model approximates without a systematic error the size of most of the nanopowders, both in conventional and centrifugal fluidized beds, outperforming current models. Although simple, the model is able to capture the influence of the nanoparticle size, particle density, and Hamaker coefficient on the inter-agglomerate forces.

  18. Role of collateral blood flow in the apparent disparity between the extent of abnormal wall thickening and perfusion defect size during acute myocardial infarction and demand ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Poi, Howard; Coggins, Matthew P; Sklenar, Jiri; Jayaweera, Ananda R; Wang, Xin-Qun; Kaul, Sanjiv

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of abnormal wall thickening (WT) and that of infarct size (IS) at rest or size of ischemic zone (IZ) during demand ischemia (DI) is principally due to the effects of collateral blood flow (CollBF). A disparity has been reported between the circumferential extent of abnormal WT and that of IS at rest or IZ size during DI. Wall thickening and CollBF were measured in 18 dogs: at 6 h after coronary occlusion (Group 1, n = 6), and during 40 microg x kg x min(-1) of dobutamine in the presence of either one-vessel (Group 2, n = 6) or two-vessel stenosis (Group 3, n = 6). The apparent overestimation of the IS by the circumferential extent of abnormal WT was due to intermediate levels of CollBF in border zones within the risk area that had escaped necrosis. Although reduced, WT in these regions was commensurate with the level of flow. Similarly, during DI, regions within the IZ exhibiting the worst WT in Group 2 and 3 dogs were those not supplied by CollBF. The regions supplied by CollBF had intermediate WT, which was also commensurate with the level of flow. Only in two Group 3 dogs was tethering seen in small, normally perfused regions that were interspersed between two large IZ. Excluding these few tethered regions, data from different myocardial regions (infarcted, ischemic, CollBF dependent, and normal) were described by a single relation: y = 57(1 - e([-0.72(x - 0.06)])) (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Myocardial regions at the margins of ischemic territories contribute to the apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of abnormal WT and IS or IZ during DI. In most circumstances, these regions are supplied by collaterals and their WT is commensurate with the degree of myocardial blood flow. The apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of WT and ischemia is rarely due to myocardial tethering, which is seen only in some instances of multi

  19. Estimation of Tree Size Diversity Using Object Oriented Texture Analysis and Aster Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ibrahim; Norton, David A; Ozkan, Ulas Yunus; Mert, Ahmet; Senturk, Ozdemir

    2008-08-11

    This study investigates the potential of object-based texture parameters extracted from 15m spatial resolution ASTER imagery for estimating tree size diversity in a Mediterranean forested landscape in Turkey. Tree size diversity based on tree basal area was determined using the Shannon index and Gini Coefficient at the sampling plot level. Image texture parameters were calculated based on the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) for various image segmentation levels. Analyses of relationships between tree size diversity and texture parameters found that relationships between the Gini Coefficient and the GLCM values were the most statistically significant, with the highest correlation (r=0.69) being with GLCM Homogeneity values. In contrast, Shannon Index values were weakly correlated with image derived texture parameters. The results suggest that 15m resolution Aster imagery has considerable potential in estimating tree size diversity based on the Gini Coefficient for heterogeneous Mediterranean forests.

  20. Cormorant catch concerns for fishers: estimating the size-selectivity of a piscivorous bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Troynikov

    Full Text Available Conflict arises in fisheries worldwide when piscivorous birds target fish species of commercial value. This paper presents a method for estimating size selectivity functions for piscivores and uses it to compare predation selectivities of Great Cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis L. 1758 with that of gill-net fishing on a European perch (Perca fluviatilis L. 1758 population in the Curonian Lagoon, Lithuania. Fishers often regard cormorants as an unwanted "satellite species", but the degree of direct competition and overlap in size-specific selectivity between fishers and cormorants is unknown. This study showed negligible overlap in selectivity between Great Cormorants and legal-sized commercial nets. The selectivity estimation method has general application potential for use in conjunction with population dynamics models to assess fish population responses to size-selective fishing from a wide range of piscivorous predators.

  1. Estimating Effect Sizes and Expected Replication Probabilities from GWAS Summary Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Dominic; Wang, Yunpeng; Thompson, Wesley K;

    2016-01-01

    for estimating the degree of polygenicity of the phenotype and predicting the proportion of chip heritability explainable by genome-wide significant SNPs in future studies with larger sample sizes. We apply the model to recent GWAS of schizophrenia (N = 82,315) and putamen volume (N = 12,596), with approximately...... based on linear-regression association coefficients. We estimate the polygenicity of schizophrenia to be 0.037 and the putamen to be 0.001, while the respective sample sizes required to approach fully explaining the chip heritability are 10(6) and 10(5). The model can be extended to incorporate prior...

  2. Two Algorithms for Network Size Estimation for Master/Slave Ad Hoc Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Redouane; Rio, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptation of two network size estimation methods: random tour and gossip-based aggregation to suit master/slave mobile ad hoc networks. We show that it is feasible to accurately estimate the size of ad hoc networks when topology changes due to mobility using both methods. The algorithms were modified to account for the specific constraints of master/slave ad hoc networks and the results show that the proposed modifications perform better on these networks than the original protocols. Each of the two algorithms presents strengths and weaknesses and these are outlined in this paper.

  3. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    OpenAIRE

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect ...

  4. Estimating the transmission potential of supercritical processes based on the final size distribution of minor outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Hiroshi; Yan, Ping; Sleeman, Candace K; Mode, Charles J

    2012-02-07

    Use of the final size distribution of minor outbreaks for the estimation of the reproduction numbers of supercritical epidemic processes has yet to be considered. We used a branching process model to derive the final size distribution of minor outbreaks, assuming a reproduction number above unity, and applying the method to final size data for pneumonic plague. Pneumonic plague is a rare disease with only one documented major epidemic in a spatially limited setting. Because the final size distribution of a minor outbreak needs to be normalized by the probability of extinction, we assume that the dispersion parameter (k) of the negative-binomial offspring distribution is known, and examine the sensitivity of the reproduction number to variation in dispersion. Assuming a geometric offspring distribution with k=1, the reproduction number was estimated at 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.97-1.38). When less dispersed with k=2, the maximum likelihood estimate of the reproduction number was 1.14. These estimates agreed with those published from transmission network analysis, indicating that the human-to-human transmission potential of the pneumonic plague is not very high. Given only minor outbreaks, transmission potential is not sufficiently assessed by directly counting the number of offspring. Since the absence of a major epidemic does not guarantee a subcritical process, the proposed method allows us to conservatively regard epidemic data from minor outbreaks as supercritical, and yield estimates of threshold values above unity.

  5. Identifying grain-size dependent errors on global forest area estimates and carbon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    Satellite-derived coarse-resolution data are typically used for conducting global analyses. But the forest areas estimated from coarse-resolution maps (e.g., 1 km) inevitably differ from a corresponding fine-resolution map (such as a 30-m map) that would be closer to ground truth. A better understanding of changes in grain size on area estimation will improve our...

  6. Estimating search engine index size variability: a 9-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; de Kunder, Maurice

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel method of estimating the size of a Web search engine's index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing's indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006 until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find that much, if not all of this variability can be explained by changes in the indexing and ranking infrastructure of Google and Bing. This casts further doubt on whether Web search engines can be used reliably for cross-sectional webometric studies.

  7. A simple method for estimating the size of nuclei on fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Determining the size of nuclei on complex surfaces remains a big challenge in aspects of biological, material and chemical engineering. Here the author reported a simple method to estimate the size of the nuclei in contact with complex (fractal) surfaces. The established approach was based on the assumptions of contact area proportionality for determining nucleation density and the scaling congruence between nuclei and surfaces for identifying contact regimes. It showed three different regimes governing the equations for estimating the nucleation site density. Nuclei in the size large enough could eliminate the effect of fractal structure. Nuclei in the size small enough could lead to the independence of nucleation site density on fractal parameters. Only when nuclei match the fractal scales, the nucleation site density is associated with the fractal parameters and the size of the nuclei in a coupling pattern. The method was validated by the experimental data reported in the literature. The method may provide an effective way to estimate the size of nuclei on fractal surfaces, through which a number of promising applications in relative fields can be envisioned.

  8. The effect of cluster size imbalance and covariates on the estimation performance of quadratic inference functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Philip M; Braun, Thomas M

    2012-09-10

    Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are commonly used for the analysis of correlated data. However, use of quadratic inference functions (QIFs) is becoming popular because it increases efficiency relative to GEE when the working covariance structure is misspecified. Although shown to be advantageous in the literature, the impacts of covariates and imbalanced cluster sizes on the estimation performance of the QIF method in finite samples have not been studied. This cluster size variation causes QIF's estimating equations and GEE to be in separate classes when an exchangeable correlation structure is implemented, causing QIF and GEE to be incomparable in terms of efficiency. When utilizing this structure and the number of clusters is not large, we discuss how covariates and cluster size imbalance can cause QIF, rather than GEE, to produce estimates with the larger variability. This occurrence is mainly due to the empirical nature of weighting QIF employs, rather than differences in estimating equations classes. We demonstrate QIF's lost estimation precision through simulation studies covering a variety of general cluster randomized trial scenarios and compare QIF and GEE in the analysis of data from a cluster randomized trial. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Gutenberg-Richter b-value maximum likelihood estimation and sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, F. A.; Márquez-Ramírez, V. H.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Ávila-Barrientos, L.; Quinteros, C. B.

    2017-01-01

    The Aki-Utsu maximum likelihood method is widely used for estimation of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value, but not all authors are conscious of the method's limitations and implicit requirements. The Aki/Utsu method requires a representative estimate of the population mean magnitude; a requirement seldom satisfied in b-value studies, particularly in those that use data from small geographic and/or time windows, such as b-mapping and b-vs-time studies. Monte Carlo simulation methods are used to determine how large a sample is necessary to achieve representativity, particularly for rounded magnitudes. The size of a representative sample weakly depends on the actual b-value. It is shown that, for commonly used precisions, small samples give meaningless estimations of b. Our results give estimates on the probabilities of getting correct estimates of b for a given desired precision for samples of different sizes. We submit that all published studies reporting b-value estimations should include information about the size of the samples used.

  10. Estimation of particle size variations for laser speckle rheology of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2015-03-01

    Laser speckle rheology (LSR) is an optical technique for assessing the viscoelastic properties of materials with several industrial, biological, and medical applications. In LSR, the viscoelastic modulus, G*(ω), of a material is quantified by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of speckle patterns. However, the size of scattering particles within the material also influences the rate of speckle fluctuations, independent of sample mechanical properties, and complicates the accurate estimation of G*(ω). Here, we demonstrate that the average particle size may be retrieved from the azimuth-angle dependence of time-averaged speckle intensities, permitting the accurate quantification of the viscoelastic moduli of materials with unknown particle size distribution using LSR.

  11. Estimating the sizes of populations at high risk for HIV: a comparison study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Jing

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Behavioral interventions are effective strategies for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. However, implementation of such strategies relies heavily on the accurate estimation of the high-risk population size. The multiplier method and generalized network scale-up method were recommended to estimate the population size of those at high risk for HIV by UNAIDS/WHO in 2003 and 2010, respectively. This study aims to assess and compare the two methods for estimating the size of populations at high risk for HIV, and to provide practical guidelines and suggestions for implementing the two methods. METHODS: Studies of the multiplier method used to estimate the population prevalence of men who have sex with men in China published between July 1, 2003 and July 1, 2013 were reviewed. The generalized network scale-up method was applied to estimate the population prevalence of men who have sex with men in the urban district of Taiyuan, China. RESULTS: The median of studies using the multiplier method to estimate the population prevalence of men who have sex with men in China was 4-8 times lower than the national level estimate. Meanwhile, the estimate of the generalized network scale-up method fell within the range of national level estimate. CONCLUSIONS: When high-quality existing data are not readily available, the multiplier method frequently yields underestimated results. We thus suggest that the generalized network scale-up method is preferred when sampling frames for the general population and accurate demographic information are available.

  12. Sample size re-estimation in paired comparative diagnostic accuracy studies with a binary response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, Gareth P J; Titman, Andrew C; Ghaneh, Paula; Lancaster, Gillian A

    2017-07-14

    The sample size required to power a study to a nominal level in a paired comparative diagnostic accuracy study, i.e. studies in which the diagnostic accuracy of two testing procedures is compared relative to a gold standard, depends on the conditional dependence between the two tests - the lower the dependence the greater the sample size required. A priori, we usually do not know the dependence between the two tests and thus cannot determine the exact sample size required. One option is to use the implied sample size for the maximal negative dependence, giving the largest possible sample size. However, this is potentially wasteful of resources and unnecessarily burdensome on study participants as the study is likely to be overpowered. A more accurate estimate of the sample size can be determined at a planned interim analysis point where the sample size is re-estimated. This paper discusses a sample size estimation and re-estimation method based on the maximum likelihood estimates, under an implied multinomial model, of the observed values of conditional dependence between the two tests and, if required, prevalence, at a planned interim. The method is illustrated by comparing the accuracy of two procedures for the detection of pancreatic cancer, one procedure using the standard battery of tests, and the other using the standard battery with the addition of a PET/CT scan all relative to the gold standard of a cell biopsy. Simulation of the proposed method illustrates its robustness under various conditions. The results show that the type I error rate of the overall experiment is stable using our suggested method and that the type II error rate is close to or above nominal. Furthermore, the instances in which the type II error rate is above nominal are in the situations where the lowest sample size is required, meaning a lower impact on the actual number of participants recruited. We recommend multinomial model maximum likelihood estimation of the conditional

  13. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ming; Jia, Ya; Liu, Quan; Zhu, Chun-Lian; Yang, Li-Jian

    2007-07-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25Δ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  14. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Ming; JIA Ya; LIU Quan; ZHU Chun-Lian; YANG Li-Jian

    2007-01-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25△ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  15. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  16. Grid Size Selection for Nonlinear Least-Squares Optimization in Spectral Estimation and Array Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Jensen, Jesper Rindom;

    2016-01-01

    time. Additionally, we show via three common examples how the grid size depends on parameters such as the number of data points or the number of sensors in DOA estimation. We also demonstrate that the computation time can potentially be lowered by several orders of magnitude by combining a coarse grid......In many spectral estimation and array processing problems, the process of finding estimates of model parameters often involves the optimisation of a cost function containing multiple peaks and dips. Such non-convex problems are hard to solve using traditional optimisation algorithms developed...

  17. Estimating home-range size: when to include a third dimension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, Pedro; Sillero, Neftalí; Rosalino, Luís Miguel; Loureiro, Filipa; Alves, Paulo Célio

    2013-07-01

    Most studies dealing with home ranges consider the study areas as if they were totally flat, working only in two dimensions, when in reality they are irregular surfaces displayed in three dimensions. By disregarding the third dimension (i.e., topography), the size of home ranges underestimates the surface actually occupied by the animal, potentially leading to misinterpretations of the animals' ecological needs. We explored the influence of considering the third dimension in the estimation of home-range size by modeling the variation between the planimetric and topographic estimates at several spatial scales. Our results revealed that planimetric approaches underestimate home-range size estimations, which range from nearly zero up to 22%. The difference between planimetric and topographic estimates of home-ranges sizes produced highly robust models using the average slope as the sole independent factor. Moreover, our models suggest that planimetric estimates in areas with an average slope of 16.3° (±0.4) or more will incur in errors ≥5%. Alternatively, the altitudinal range can be used as an indicator of the need to include topography in home-range estimates. Our results confirmed that home-range estimates could be significantly biased when topography is disregarded. We suggest that study areas where home-range studies will be performed should firstly be scoped for its altitudinal range, which can serve as an indicator for the need for posterior use of average slope values to model the surface area used and/or available for the studied animals.

  18. Genome-wide estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size in the Spanish Holstein population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Teresa Rodríguez-Ramilo

    Full Text Available Estimates of effective population size in the Holstein cattle breed have usually been low despite the large number of animals that constitute this breed. Effective population size is inversely related to the rates at which coancestry and inbreeding increase and these rates have been high as a consequence of intense and accurate selection. Traditionally, coancestry and inbreeding coefficients have been calculated from pedigree data. However, the development of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms has increased the interest of calculating these coefficients from molecular data in order to improve their accuracy. In this study, genomic estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size were obtained in the Spanish Holstein population and then compared with pedigree-based estimates. A total of 11,135 animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip were available for the study. After applying filtering criteria, the final genomic dataset included 36,693 autosomal SNPs and 10,569 animals. Pedigree data from those genotyped animals included 31,203 animals. These individuals represented only the last five generations in order to homogenise the amount of pedigree information across animals. Genomic estimates of coancestry and inbreeding were obtained from identity by descent segments (coancestry or runs of homozygosity (inbreeding. The results indicate that the percentage of variance of pedigree-based coancestry estimates explained by genomic coancestry estimates was higher than that for inbreeding. Estimates of effective population size obtained from genome-wide and pedigree information were consistent and ranged from about 66 to 79. These low values emphasize the need of controlling the rate of increase of coancestry and inbreeding in Holstein selection programmes.

  19. Genome-wide estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size in the Spanish Holstein population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ramilo, Silvia Teresa; Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Delfino; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of effective population size in the Holstein cattle breed have usually been low despite the large number of animals that constitute this breed. Effective population size is inversely related to the rates at which coancestry and inbreeding increase and these rates have been high as a consequence of intense and accurate selection. Traditionally, coancestry and inbreeding coefficients have been calculated from pedigree data. However, the development of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms has increased the interest of calculating these coefficients from molecular data in order to improve their accuracy. In this study, genomic estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size were obtained in the Spanish Holstein population and then compared with pedigree-based estimates. A total of 11,135 animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip were available for the study. After applying filtering criteria, the final genomic dataset included 36,693 autosomal SNPs and 10,569 animals. Pedigree data from those genotyped animals included 31,203 animals. These individuals represented only the last five generations in order to homogenise the amount of pedigree information across animals. Genomic estimates of coancestry and inbreeding were obtained from identity by descent segments (coancestry) or runs of homozygosity (inbreeding). The results indicate that the percentage of variance of pedigree-based coancestry estimates explained by genomic coancestry estimates was higher than that for inbreeding. Estimates of effective population size obtained from genome-wide and pedigree information were consistent and ranged from about 66 to 79. These low values emphasize the need of controlling the rate of increase of coancestry and inbreeding in Holstein selection programmes.

  20. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ah Won [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size.

  1. Estimation of drug particle size in intact tablets by two dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Seema; Thakral, Naveen K; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2017-09-09

    The average grain size of a crystalline material can be determined from the γ-profile of Debye rings in two-dimensional X-ray diffraction (2D XRD) frames. Our objectives were to: (i) validate the method for organic powders and use it to determine the grain size in intact tablets, and (ii) demonstrate the pharmaceutical application of this technique by determining the grain size of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in marketed formulations. Six sieve fractions of sucrose were prepared and the particle size distribution was confirmed by laser diffraction. Their average grain size was determined from the 2D XRD frames by the γ-profile method. For particles size determined by the three methods were in good agreement. When these particles were compressed, there was no discernible change in the sucrose grain size in tablets. When the particles were > 250 μm, compression resulted in a mixture of large grains and fine powder. The grain size of acetaminophen in eleven marketed tablet formulations was determined to be either ∼ 35 μm or ∼ 80 μm. This non-destructive technique can therefore be potentially useful to estimate the grain size of crystalline formulation components in intact tablets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect densit

  3. Use Of Crop Canopy Size To Estimate Water Requirements Of Vegetable Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planting time, plant density, variety, and cultural practices vary widely for horticultural crops. It is difficult to estimate crop water requirements for crops with these variations. Canopy size, or factional ground cover, as an indicator of intercepted sunlight, is related to crop water use. We...

  4. Sample Size Calculation for Estimating or Testing a Nonzero Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, K.; Xia, Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The problems of hypothesis testing and interval estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient of a multivariate normal distribution are considered. It is shown that available one-sided tests are uniformly most powerful, and the one-sided confidence intervals are uniformly most accurate. An exact method of calculating sample size to…

  5. An Introduction to Confidence Intervals for Both Statistical Estimates and Effect Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Mary Margaret

    This paper summarizes methods of estimating confidence intervals, including classical intervals and intervals for effect sizes. The recent American Psychological Association (APA) Task Force on Statistical Inference report suggested that confidence intervals should always be reported, and the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual"…

  6. Sample Size Calculation for Estimating or Testing a Nonzero Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, K.; Xia, Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The problems of hypothesis testing and interval estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient of a multivariate normal distribution are considered. It is shown that available one-sided tests are uniformly most powerful, and the one-sided confidence intervals are uniformly most accurate. An exact method of calculating sample size to…

  7. Estimating the ratio of pond size to irrigated soybeans land in Mississippi: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although more on-farm storage ponds have been constructed in recent years to mitigate groundwater resources depletion in Mississippi, little effort has been devoted to estimating the ratio of pond size to irrigated crop land based on pond matric and its hydrological conditions. Knowledge of this ra...

  8. Estimating the ratio of pond size to irrigated soybean land in Mississippi: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; G. Feng; J. Read; T. D. Leininger; J. N. Jenkins

    2016-01-01

    Although more on-farm storage ponds have been constructed in recent years to mitigate groundwater resources depletion in Mississippi, little effort has been devoted to estimating the ratio of on-farm water storage pond size to irrigated crop land based on pond metric and its hydrogeological conditions.  In this study, two simulation scenarios were chosen to...

  9. Accounting for One-Group Clustering in Effect-Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citkowicz, Martyna; Hedges, Larry V.

    2013-01-01

    In some instances, intentionally or not, study designs are such that there is clustering in one group but not in the other. This paper describes methods for computing effect size estimates and their variances when there is clustering in only one group and the analysis has not taken that clustering into account. The authors provide the effect size…

  10. Estimating the size of the potential market for the Kyoto flexibility mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.X.

    2000-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol incorporates three flexibility mechanisms to help Annex I countries to meet their Kyoto targets at a lower overall cost. This paper aims to estimate the size of the potential market for all three mechanisms over the first commitment period. Based on the national communications

  11. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, M.; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect densit

  12. Limits to the reliability of size-based fishing status estimation for data-poor stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkalis, Alexandros; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Nielsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    in more than 60% of the cases, and almost always correctly assess whether a stock is subject to overfishing. Adding information about age, i.e., assuming that growth rate and asymptotic size are known, does not improve the estimation. Only knowledge of the ratio between mortality and growth led...

  13. B-graph sampling to estimate the size of a hidden population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreen, M.; Bogaerts, S.

    2015-01-01

    Link-tracing designs are often used to estimate the size of hidden populations by utilizing the relational links between their members. A major problem in studies of hidden populations is the lack of a convenient sampling frame. The most frequently applied design in studies of hidden populations is

  14. Bias Corrections for Standardized Effect Size Estimates Used with Single-Subject Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugille, Maaike; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A multilevel meta-analysis can combine the results of several single-subject experimental design studies. However, the estimated effects are biased if the effect sizes are standardized and the number of measurement occasions is small. In this study, the authors investigated 4 approaches to correct for this bias. First, the standardized effect…

  15. Estimating the size of the potential market for the Kyoto flexibility mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.X.

    2000-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol incorporates three flexibility mechanisms to help Annex I countries to meet their Kyoto targets at a lower overall cost. This paper aims to estimate the size of the potential market for all three mechanisms over the first commitment period. Based on the national communications fro

  16. Limits to the reliability of size-based fishing status estimation for data-poor stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkalis, Alexandros; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Nielsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    in more than 60% of the cases, and almost always correctly assess whether a stock is subject to overfishing. Adding information about age, i.e., assuming that growth rate and asymptotic size are known, does not improve the estimation. Only knowledge of the ratio between mortality and growth led...

  17. Estimate the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongMing Guo; NingLian Wang; XiaoBo Wu; HongBo Wu; YuWei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo is essential in obtaining the accurate albedo. In this paper, field measurement data, including snow grain size, snow depth and density was obtained. Black carbon samples were collected from the snow surface. A simultaneous observation using Analytical Spectral Devices was employed in the Qiyi Glacier located in the Qilian Mountain. Analytical Spectral Devices spectrum data were used to analyze spectral re-flectance of snow for different grain size and black carbon content. The measurements were compared with the results obtained from the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model, and the simulation was found to correlate well with the ob-served data. However, the simulated albedo was near to 0.98 times of the measured albedo, so the other factors were as-sumed to be constant using the corrected Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model to estimate the influence of measured snow grain size and black carbon on albedo. Field measurements were controlled to fit the relationship between the snow grain size and black carbon in order to estimate the influence of these factors on the snow albedo.

  18. Estimation of plot size for experiments with tissue culture in grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Ramalho de Morais

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of experimental techniques of in vitro culture may provide better identification and multiplication of most promising materials. The aim of this study was to estimate the plot size (explants numbers for in vitro micropropagation grape. 15 tests were conducted uniformity formed by combinations of three rootstock vine with five different culture media. Nodes segments were used with about 2.5 cm, were excised and inoculated. After 90 days of inoculation, the variables shoot number, shoot length, shoot fresh weight, and fresh weight of callus were evaluated. For each assay, was simulated plots of differents sizes , with each tube containing one explant was considered as a basic unit. For estimation the optimum plot size we used the modified maximum curvature method and the least significant difference between means was obtained by the method of Hatheway. The results showed that the estimates of the plot size ranged from five (5 to 12 explants (tubes in accordance with the variable used. For these variables, the optimal plot size should be formed by 12 explants.

  19. Sample Size Requirements for Estimation of Item Parameters in the Multidimensional Graded Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu eJiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Likert types of rating scales in which a respondent chooses a response from an ordered set of response options are used to measure a wide variety of psychological, educational, and medical outcome variables. The most appropriate item response theory model for analyzing and scoring these instruments when they provide scores on multiple scales is the multidimensional graded response model (MGRM. A simulation study was conducted to investigate the variables that might affect item parameter recovery for the MGRM. Data were generated based on different sample sizes, test lengths, and scale intercorrelations. Parameter estimates were obtained through the flexiMIRT software. The quality of parameter recovery was assessed by the correlation between true and estimated parameters as well as bias and root- mean-square-error. Results indicated that for the vast majority of cases studied a sample size of N = 500 provided accurate parameter estimates, except for tests with 240 items when 1,000 examinees were necessary to obtain accurate parameter estimates. Increasing sample size beyond N = 1,000 did not increase the accuracy of MGRM parameter estimates.

  20. Accuracy of effect size estimates from published psychological experiments involving multiple trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Andrew; Bradley, M T; Best, Lisa A; Stoica, George

    2011-01-01

    The reporting of exaggerated effect size estimates may occur either through researchers accepting statistically significant results when power is inadequate and/or from repeated measures approaches aggregating, averaging multiple items, or multiple trials. Monte-Carlo simulations with input of a small, medium, or large effect size were conducted on multiple items or trials that were either averaged or aggregated to create a single dependent measure. Alpha was set at the .05 level, and the trials were assessed over item or trial correlations ranging from 0 to 1. Simulations showed a large increase in observed effect size averages and the power to accept these estimates as statistically significant increased over numbers of trials or items. Overestimation effects were mitigated as correlations between trials increased but still remained substantial in some cases. The implications of these findings for meta-analyses and different research scenarios are discussed.

  1. Validation of a food quantification picture book and portion sizes estimation applying perception and memory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenczi-Cseh, J; Horváth, Zs; Ambrus, Á

    2017-04-03

    We tested the applicability of EPIC-SOFT food picture series used in the context of a Hungarian food consumption survey gathering data for exposure assessment, and investigated errors in food portion estimation resulted from the visual perception and conceptualisation-memory. Sixty-two participants in three age groups (10 to foods. The results were considered acceptable if the relative difference between average estimated and actual weight obtained through the perception method was ≤25%, and the relative standard deviation of the individual weight estimates was food items were rated acceptable. Small portion sizes were tended to be overestimated, large ones were tended to be underestimated. Portions of boiled potato and creamed spinach were all over- and underestimated, respectively. Recalling the portion sizes resulted in overestimation with larger differences (up to 60.7%).

  2. Estimating population size of a nocturnal burrow-nesting seabird using acoustic monitoring and habitat mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Oppel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Population size assessments for nocturnal burrow-nesting seabirds are logistically challenging because these species are active in colonies only during darkness and often nest on remote islands where manual inspections of breeding burrows are not feasible. Many seabird species are highly vocal, and recent technological innovations now make it possible to record and quantify vocal activity in seabird colonies. Here we test the hypothesis that remotely recorded vocal activity in Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris borealis breeding colonies in the North Atlantic increases with nest density, and combined this relationship with cliff habitat mapping to estimate the population size of Cory’s shearwaters on the island of Corvo (Azores. We deployed acoustic recording devices in 9 Cory’s shearwater colonies of known size to establish a relationship between vocal activity and local nest density (slope = 1.07, R2 = 0.86, p < 0.001. We used this relationship to predict the nest density in various cliff habitat types and produced a habitat map of breeding cliffs to extrapolate nest density around the island of Corvo. The mean predicted nest density on Corvo ranged from 6.6 (2.1–16.2 to 27.8 (19.5–36.4 nests/ha. Extrapolation of habitat-specific nest densities across the cliff area of Corvo resulted in an estimate of 6326 Cory’s shearwater nests (95% confidence interval: 3735–10,524. This population size estimate is similar to previous assessments, but is too imprecise to detect moderate changes in population size over time. While estimating absolute population size from acoustic recordings may not be sufficiently precise, the strong positive relationship that we found between local nest density and recorded calling rate indicates that passive acoustic monitoring may be useful to document relative changes in seabird populations over time.

  3. A simple method for estimating genetic diversity in large populations from finite sample sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajora Om P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sample size is one of the critical factors affecting the accuracy of the estimation of population genetic diversity parameters. Small sample sizes often lead to significant errors in determining the allelic richness, which is one of the most important and commonly used estimators of genetic diversity in populations. Correct estimation of allelic richness in natural populations is challenging since they often do not conform to model assumptions. Here, we introduce a simple and robust approach to estimate the genetic diversity in large natural populations based on the empirical data for finite sample sizes. Results We developed a non-linear regression model to infer genetic diversity estimates in large natural populations from finite sample sizes. The allelic richness values predicted by our model were in good agreement with those observed in the simulated data sets and the true allelic richness observed in the source populations. The model has been validated using simulated population genetic data sets with different evolutionary scenarios implied in the simulated populations, as well as large microsatellite and allozyme experimental data sets for four conifer species with contrasting patterns of inherent genetic diversity and mating systems. Our model was a better predictor for allelic richness in natural populations than the widely-used Ewens sampling formula, coalescent approach, and rarefaction algorithm. Conclusions Our regression model was capable of accurately estimating allelic richness in natural populations regardless of the species and marker system. This regression modeling approach is free from assumptions and can be widely used for population genetic and conservation applications.

  4. Co-administration of the flavanol (−)-epicatechin with doxycycline synergistically reduces infarct size in a model of ischemia reperfusion injury by inhibition of mitochondrial swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Vilchis, Pilar; Yamazaki, Katrina Go; Rubio-Gayosso, Ivan; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Calzada, Claudia; Romero-Perez, Diego; Ortiz, Alicia; Meaney, Eduardo; Taub, Pam; Villarreal, Francisco; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    (−)-Epicatechin (EPI) is cardioprotective in the setting of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury and doxycycline (DOX) is known to preserve cardiac structure/function after myocardial infarction (MI). The main objective of this study was to examine the effects of EPI and DOX co-administration on MI size after IR injury and to determine if cardioprotection may involve the mitigation of mitochondrial swelling. For this purpose, a rat model of IR was used. Animals were subjected to a temporary 45 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Treatment consisted of a single or double dose of EPI (10 mg/kg) combined with DOX (5 mg/kg). The first dose was given 15 min prior to reperfusion and the second 12 h post-MI. The effects of EPI +/− DOX on mitochondrial swelling (i.e. mPTP opening) were determined using isolated mitochondria exposed to calcium overload and data examined using isobolographic analysis. To ascertain for the specificity of EPI effects on mitochondrial swelling other flavonoids were also evaluated. Single dose treatment reduced MI size by ~46% at 48 h and 44% at three weeks. Double dosing evidenced a synergistic, 82% reduction at 3 weeks. EPI plus DOX also inhibited mitochondrial swelling in a synergic manner thus, possibly accounting for the cardioprotective effects whereas limited efficacy was observed with the other flavonoids. Given the apparent lack of toxicity in humans, the combination of EPI and DOX may have clinical potential for the treatment of myocardial IR injury. PMID:25281837

  5. New method to estimate the sample size for calculation of a proportion assuming binomial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Adriana; Muniesa, Ana; Ferreira, Chelo; de Blas, Ignacio

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays the formula to calculate the sample size for estimate a proportion (as prevalence) is based on the Normal distribution, however it would be based on a Binomial distribution which confidence interval was possible to be calculated using the Wilson Score method. By comparing the two formulae (Normal and Binomial distributions), the variation of the amplitude of the confidence intervals is relevant in the tails and the center of the curves. In order to calculate the needed sample size we have simulated an iterative sampling procedure, which shows an underestimation of the sample size for values of prevalence closed to 0 or 1, and also an overestimation for values closed to 0.5. Attending to these results we proposed an algorithm based on Wilson Score method that provides similar values for the sample size than empirically obtained by simulation.

  6. Genome size of Alexandrium catenella and Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis estimated by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingwei; Sui, Zhenghong; Chang, Lianpeng; Wei, Huihui; Liu, Yuan; Mi, Ping; Shang, Erlei; Zeeshan, Niaz; Que, Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) technique has been widely applied to estimating the genome size of various higher plants. However, there is few report about its application in algae. In this study, an optimized procedure of FCM was exploited to estimate the genome size of two eukaryotic algae. For analyzing Alexandrium catenella, an important red tide species, the whole cell instead of isolated nucleus was studied, and chicken erythrocytes were used as an internal reference. The genome size of A. catenella was estimated to be 56.48 ± 4.14 Gb (1C), approximately nineteen times larger than that of human genome. For analyzing Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, an important economical red alga, the purified nucleus was employed, and Arabidopsis thaliana and Chondrus crispus were used as internal references, respectively. The genome size of Gp. lemaneiformis was 97.35 ± 2.58 Mb (1C) and 112.73 ± 14.00 Mb (1C), respectively, depending on the different internal references. The results of this research will promote the related studies on the genomics and evolution of these two species.

  7. Estimate of exploitation rates and population size of skipjack tuna off the southeastern coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Jablonski

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Size compositions and total landings of skipjack tuna caught in the southeastern Brazilian waters by bait-boats are used as the basis of the assessment of the population for 1980-1983 period, employing the length cohort analysis and virtual population analysis. From monthly size frequency data it is suggested that there is constant immigration and emigration of different modal groups in the fishing area with an interval of two to three months. The exploitation rate was very low for length class between 35-45 cm FL, then increased gradually. The weighted mean exploitation rates were 0.060 and 0.448, respectively for length classes smaller and larger than 55 cmFL. The estimate of the average number of fish attaining a size of 43 cm FL (recruit was 11.0 x 10(6 fish for assumed values of M - 0.7 and K = 0.307. Increasing the fishing mortality rate by 30% and 50%, an estimated increment in yield is 8% and 12%, respectively. From virtual population analysis, we obtained the biomass estimate of skipjack population older than two years-old to be 70.3 thousand tonnes for assumed value of M = 0.7 and the estimated MSY was 24.6 thousand tonnes.

  8. Estimating the Size of a Large Network and its Communities from a Random Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Lin; Crawford, Forrest W

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world networks are too large to be measured or studied directly and there is substantial interest in estimating global network properties from smaller sub-samples. One of the most important global properties is the number of vertices/nodes in the network. Estimating the number of vertices in a large network is a major challenge in computer science, epidemiology, demography, and intelligence analysis. In this paper we consider a population random graph G = (V;E) from the stochastic block model (SBM) with K communities/blocks. A sample is obtained by randomly choosing a subset W and letting G(W) be the induced subgraph in G of the vertices in W. In addition to G(W), we observe the total degree of each sampled vertex and its block membership. Given this partial information, we propose an efficient PopULation Size Estimation algorithm, called PULSE, that correctly estimates the size of the whole population as well as the size of each community. To support our theoretical analysis, we perform an exhausti...

  9. Artificial Neural Network-Based Clutter Reduction Systems for Ship Size Estimation in Maritime Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicen-Bueno R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of clutter in maritime radars deteriorates the estimation of some physical parameters of the objects detected over the sea surface. For that reason, maritime radars should incorporate efficient clutter reduction techniques. Due to the intrinsic nonlinear dynamic of sea clutter, nonlinear signal processing is needed, what can be achieved by artificial neural networks (ANNs. In this paper, an estimation of the ship size using an ANN-based clutter reduction system followed by a fixed threshold is proposed. High clutter reduction rates are achieved using 1-dimensional (horizontal or vertical integration modes, although inaccurate ship width estimations are achieved. These estimations are improved using a 2-dimensional (rhombus integration mode. The proposed system is compared with a CA-CFAR system, denoting a great performance improvement and a great robustness against changes in sea clutter conditions and ship parameters, independently of the direction of movement of the ocean waves and ships.

  10. Estimating total population size for adult female sea turtles: Accounting for non-nesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, W.L.; Richardson, J.I.; Rees, Alan F.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of population size and changes therein is important to sea turtle management and population or life history research. Investigators might be interested in testing hypotheses about the effect of current population size or density (number of animals per unit resource) on future population processes. Decision makers might want to determine a level of allowable take of individual turtles of specified life stage. Nevertheless, monitoring most stages of sea turtle life histories is difficult, because obtaining access to individuals is difficult. Although in-water assessments are becoming more common, nesting females and their hatchlings remain the most accessible life stages. In some cases adult females of a given nesting population are sufficiently philopatric that the population itself can be well defined. If a well designed tagging study is conducted on this population, survival, breeding probability, and the size of the nesting population in a given year can be estimated. However, with published statistical methodology the size of the entire breeding population (including those females skipping nesting in that year) cannot be estimated without assuming that each adult female in this population has the same probability of nesting in a given year (even those that had just nested in the previous year). We present a method for estimating the total size of a breeding population (including nesters those skipping nesting) from a tagging study limited to the nesting population, allowing for the probability of nesting in a given year to depend on an individual's nesting status in the previous year (i.e., a Markov process). From this we further develop estimators for rate of growth from year to year in both nesting population and total breeding population, and the proportion of the breeding population that is breeding in a given year. We also discuss assumptions and apply these methods to a breeding population of hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) from

  11. Optimization of Correlation Kernel Size for Accurate Estimation of Myocardial Contraction and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    For noninvasive and quantitative measurements of global two-dimensional (2D) heart wall motion, speckle tracking methods have been developed and applied. In these conventional methods, the frame rate is limited to about 200 Hz, corresponding to the sampling period of 5 ms. However, myocardial function during short periods, as obtained by these conventional speckle tracking methods, remains unclear owing to low temporal and spatial resolutions of these methods. Moreover, an important parameter, the optimal kernel size, has not been thoroughly investigated. In our previous study, the optimal kernel size was determined in a phantom experiment under a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the determined optimal kernel size was applied to the in vivo measurement of 2D displacements of the heart wall by block matching using normalized cross-correlation between RF echoes at a high frame rate of 860 Hz, corresponding to a temporal resolution of 1.1 ms. However, estimations under low SNRs and the effects of the difference in echo characteristics, i.e., specular reflection and speckle-like echoes, have not been considered, and the evaluation of accuracy in the estimation of the strain rate is still insufficient. In this study, the optimal kernel sizes were determined in a phantom experiment under several SNRs and, then, the myocardial strain rate was estimated such that the myocardial function can be measured at a high frame rate. In a basic experiment, the optimal kernel sizes at depths of 20, 40, 60, and 80 mm yielded similar results: in particular, SNR was more than 15 dB. Moreover, it was found that the kernel size at the boundary must be set larger than that at the inside. The optimal sizes of the correlation kernel were seven times and four times the size of the point spread function around the boundary and inside the silicone rubber, respectively. To compare the optimal kernel sizes, which was determined in a phantom experiment, with other sizes, the radial strain

  12. Sample Size Estimation for Non-Inferiority Trials: Frequentist Approach versus Decision Theory Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A C Bouman

    Full Text Available Non-inferiority trials are performed when the main therapeutic effect of the new therapy is expected to be not unacceptably worse than that of the standard therapy, and the new therapy is expected to have advantages over the standard therapy in costs or other (health consequences. These advantages however are not included in the classic frequentist approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. In contrast, the decision theory approach of sample size calculation does include these factors. The objective of this study is to compare the conceptual and practical aspects of the frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials, thereby demonstrating that the decision theory approach is more appropriate for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials.The frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials are compared and applied to a case of a non-inferiority trial on individually tailored duration of elastic compression stocking therapy compared to two years elastic compression stocking therapy for the prevention of post thrombotic syndrome after deep vein thrombosis.The two approaches differ substantially in conceptual background, analytical approach, and input requirements. The sample size calculated according to the frequentist approach yielded 788 patients, using a power of 80% and a one-sided significance level of 5%. The decision theory approach indicated that the optimal sample size was 500 patients, with a net value of €92 million.This study demonstrates and explains the differences between the classic frequentist approach and the decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. We argue that the decision theory approach of sample size estimation is most suitable for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials.

  13. Sample Size Estimation for Non-Inferiority Trials: Frequentist Approach versus Decision Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, A C; ten Cate-Hoek, A J; Ramaekers, B L T; Joore, M A

    2015-01-01

    Non-inferiority trials are performed when the main therapeutic effect of the new therapy is expected to be not unacceptably worse than that of the standard therapy, and the new therapy is expected to have advantages over the standard therapy in costs or other (health) consequences. These advantages however are not included in the classic frequentist approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. In contrast, the decision theory approach of sample size calculation does include these factors. The objective of this study is to compare the conceptual and practical aspects of the frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials, thereby demonstrating that the decision theory approach is more appropriate for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials. The frequentist approach and decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials are compared and applied to a case of a non-inferiority trial on individually tailored duration of elastic compression stocking therapy compared to two years elastic compression stocking therapy for the prevention of post thrombotic syndrome after deep vein thrombosis. The two approaches differ substantially in conceptual background, analytical approach, and input requirements. The sample size calculated according to the frequentist approach yielded 788 patients, using a power of 80% and a one-sided significance level of 5%. The decision theory approach indicated that the optimal sample size was 500 patients, with a net value of €92 million. This study demonstrates and explains the differences between the classic frequentist approach and the decision theory approach of sample size calculation for non-inferiority trials. We argue that the decision theory approach of sample size estimation is most suitable for sample size calculation of non-inferiority trials.

  14. Estimation of grain size in asphalt samples using digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källén, Hanna; Heyden, Anders; Lindh, Per

    2014-09-01

    Asphalt is made of a mixture of stones of different sizes and a binder called bitumen, the size distribution of the stones is determined by the recipe of the asphalt. One quality check of asphalt is to see if the real size distribution of asphalt samples is consistent with the recipe. This is usually done by first extracting the binder using methylenchloride and the sieving the stones and see how much that pass every sieve size. Methylenchloride is highly toxic and it is desirable to find the size distribution in some other way. In this paper we find the size distribution by slicing up the asphalt sample and using image analysis techniques to analyze the cross-sections. First the stones are segmented from the background, bitumen, and then rectangles are fit to the detected stones. We then estimate the sizes of the stones by using the width of the rectangle. The result is compared with both the recipe for the asphalt and with the result from the standard analysis method, and our method shows good correlation with those.

  15. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect the outcome of the study. Important factors to consider for estimating the sample size include the size of the study population, confidence level, expected proportion of the outcome variable (for categorical variables/standard deviation of the outcome variable (for numerical variables, and the required precision (margin of accuracy from the study. The more the precision required, the greater is the required sample size. Sampling Techniques: The probability sampling techniques applied for health related research include simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, and multistage sampling. These are more recommended than the nonprobability sampling techniques, because the results of the study can be generalized to the target population.

  16. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task.

  17. A simple nomogram for sample size for estimating sensitivity and specificity of medical tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity and specificity measure inherent validity of a diagnostic test against a gold standard. Researchers develop new diagnostic methods to reduce the cost, risk, invasiveness, and time. Adequate sample size is a must to precisely estimate the validity of a diagnostic test. In practice, researchers generally decide about the sample size arbitrarily either at their convenience, or from the previous literature. We have devised a simple nomogram that yields statistically valid sample size for anticipated sensitivity or anticipated specificity. MS Excel version 2007 was used to derive the values required to plot the nomogram using varying absolute precision, known prevalence of disease, and 95% confidence level using the formula already available in the literature. The nomogram plot was obtained by suitably arranging the lines and distances to conform to this formula. This nomogram could be easily used to determine the sample size for estimating the sensitivity or specificity of a diagnostic test with required precision and 95% confidence level. Sample size at 90% and 99% confidence level, respectively, can also be obtained by just multiplying 0.70 and 1.75 with the number obtained for the 95% confidence level. A nomogram instantly provides the required number of subjects by just moving the ruler and can be repeatedly used without redoing the calculations. This can also be applied for reverse calculations. This nomogram is not applicable for testing of the hypothesis set-up and is applicable only when both diagnostic test and gold standard results have a dichotomous category.

  18. Body Image in Anorexia Nervosa: Body Size Estimation Utilising a Biological Motion Task and Eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan Lee; Gurvich, Caroline; Castle, David Jonathan; Troje, Nikolaus Friedrich; Abel, Larry Allen

    2016-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric condition characterised by a distortion of body image. However, whether individuals with AN can accurately perceive the size of other individuals' bodies is unclear. In the current study, 24 women with AN and 24 healthy control participants undertook two biological motion tasks while eyetracking was performed: to identify the gender and to indicate the walkers' body size. Anorexia nervosa participants tended to 'hyperscan' stimuli but did not demonstrate differences in how visual attention was directed to different body areas, relative to controls. Groups also did not differ in their estimation of body size. The hyperscanning behaviours suggest increased anxiety to disorder-relevant stimuli in AN. The lack of group difference in the estimation of body size suggests that the AN group was able to judge the body size of others accurately. The findings are discussed in terms of body image distortion specific to oneself in AN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  19. Breast cancer size estimation with MRI in BRCA mutation carriers and other high risk patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, R.M., E-mail: r.mann@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bult, P., E-mail: p.bult@path.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Laarhoven, H.W.M. van, E-mail: h.vanlaarhoven@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, P.N., E-mail: p.span@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schlooz, M., E-mail: m.schlooz@chir.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veltman, J., E-mail: j.veltman@zgt.nl [Hospital group Twente (ZGT), Department of Radiology, Almelo (Netherlands); Hoogerbrugge, N., E-mail: n.hoogerbrugge@gen.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: To assess the value of breast MRI in size assessment of breast cancers in high risk patients, including those with a BRCA 1 or 2 mutation. Guidelines recommend invariably breast MRI screening for these patients and therapy is thus based on these findings. However, the accuracy of breast MRI for staging purposes is only tested in sporadic cancers. Methods: We assessed concordance of radiologic staging using MRI with histopathology in 49 tumors in 46 high risk patients (23 BRCA1, 12 BRCA2 and 11 Non-BRCA patients). The size of the total tumor area (TTA) was compared to pathology. In invasive carcinomas (n = 45) the size of the largest focus (LF) was also addressed. Results: Correlation of MRI measurements with pathology was 0.862 for TTA and 0.793 for LF. TTA was underestimated in 8(16%), overestimated in 5(10%), and correctly measured in 36(73%) cases. LF was underestimated in 4(9%), overestimated in 5(11%), and correctly measured in 36(80%) cases. Impact of BRCA 1 or 2 mutations on the quality of size estimation was not observed. Conclusions: Tumor size estimation using breast MRI in high risk patients is comparable to its performance in sporadic cancers. Therefore, breast MRI can safely be used for treatment planning.

  20. Impact of acute hyperglycemia on myocardial infarct size, area at risk and salvage in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction and the association with exenatide treatment - results from a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove; Kelbæk, Henning Skov

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia upon hospital admission in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) occurs frequently and is associated with adverse outcomes. It is, however, unsettled as to whether an elevated blood glucose level is the cause or consequence of increased myocardial damage. ...

  1. Estimate of sizes of small asteroids (cosmic bodies) by the method of stroboscopic radiolocation

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, V D; Pak, O V

    2014-01-01

    Radiolocation methods of probing minor celestial bodies (asteroids) by the nanosecond pulses can be used for monitoring of near-Earth space with the purpose of identification of hazardous cosmic objects able to impact the Earth. Development of the methods that allow to improve accuracy of determining the asteroids size (i.e. whether it measures tens or hundreds meters in diameter) is important for correctly estimating the degree of damage which they can cause (either regional or global catastrophes, respectively). In this paper we suggest a novel method of estimating the sizes of the passive cosmic objects using the radiolocation probing by ultra-high-resolution nanosecond signals to obtain radar signatures. The modulation envelope of the reflected signal, which is a radar portrait of the cosmic object, is subjected to time scale transformation to carrier Doppler frequency by means of radioimpulse strobing. The shift of a strobe within the probing period will be performed by radial motion of the object which ...

  2. Bubble size estimation using interfacial morphological information for mineral flotation process monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chun-hua; XU Can-hui; MU Xue-min; ZHOU Kai-jun

    2009-01-01

    To relate froth structural information with mineral flotation performance, segmentation analysis was performed on froth images characterized by fully occupied convex bubbles with white spots effect. An improved valley edge detection method was proposed to extract structural features and overcome fake white spot edges seriously affecting the segmentation performance. After preprocessing, detection template was designed based on the local minimal intensity, and a binary image containing segmented boundaries was obtained by applying logical rules, thinning and filtering. Statistical features such as bubble size were estimated for control purpose. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method avoids over-segmentation or ill-segmentation caused by uneven illumination, and the industrial application reveals the reliability of bubble size estimation.

  3. Is enhanced MRI helpful in brainstem infarction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y. M.; Shin, G. H.; Choi, W. S. [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To determine the role of MR contrast enhancement in evaluating time course of brainstem infarction. MR imaging with IV administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine was retrospectively reviewed in 43 patients with clinically and radiologically documented brainstem infarctions. The pattern of infarction was classified into spotty and patchy. Presence of parenchymal enhancement in infarction was evaluated. By location, there were 34 pontine, 3 midbrain, 6 medullary infarctions. The age of the infarctions ranged from 1 day to 9 months, with 5 patients scanned within 3 days and 10 scanned within 2 weeks of clinical ictus. Abnormalities on T2-weighted images were encountered in every case, with spotty pattern in 14 cases and patchy pattern in 29 cases. Parenchymal contrast enhancement was seen in 9 cases(20%), primarily occurring between days 8 and 20. MR contrast enhancement in brainstem infarction was infrequent that it may not be useful in the estimation of the age of infarction.

  4. Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Resident Nonimmigrant Population in the United States: January 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the size and characteristics of the resident nonimmigrant population in the United States. The estimates are daily averages for the...

  5. Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Resident Nonimmigrant Population in the United States: January 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the size and characteristics of the resident nonimmigrant population in the United States. The estimates are daily averages for the...

  6. Estimation of pediatric skeletal age using geometric morphometrics and three-dimensional cranial size changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, José; Treil, Jacques

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating the skeletal age of children based on the centroid size of their face and their basicranium, derived from the three-dimensional coordinates of anatomical landmarks. The sample consists of computed tomography scans of 127 children (54 boys, 73 girls) of mixed origin living in the area of Toulouse (France), ranging in age from a few days to 18 years. The purpose of the present investigation was, first, to increase the variety of age-related structures theoretically available for pediatric skeletal age estimation and, second, to devise a method that can be applicable from early postnatal age to the end of adolescence with a satisfactory accuracy independent of age and even a better accuracy with greater age. We examined the relationship between the chronological age and the centroid size, calculated by using geometric morphometric methods and a linear model. With the aid of cross-validations, the statistical analysis indicates that the centroid size of the facial skeleton can be used an age-related variable without any loss of accuracy with increased age, contrary to most of the methods of pediatric age estimation. The standard error was always lower or equal to 2.1 years (at the 95% confidence level) and decreased in our sub-sample of older children represented by a larger number of individuals.

  7. Applicability of Fractal Models in Estimating Soil Water Retention Characteristics from Particle-Size Distribution Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Soil water retention characteristics are the key information required in hydrological modeling. Frac-tal models provide a practical alternative for indirectly estimating soil water retention characteristics fromparticle-size distribution data. Predictive capabilities of three fractal models, i.e, Tyler-Wheatcraft model,Rieu-Sposito model, and Brooks-Corey model, were fully evaluated in this work using experimental datafrom an international database and literature. Particle-size distribution data were firstly interpolated into20 classes using a van Genuchten-type equation. Fractal dimensions of the tortuous pore wall and the poresurface were then calculated from the detailed particle-size distribution and incorporated as a parameter infractal water retention models. Comparisons between measured and model-estimated water retention cha-racteristics indicated that these three models were applicable to relatively different soil textures and pressurehead ranges. Tyler-Wheatcraft and Brooks-Corey models led to reasonable agreements for both coarse- andmedium-textured soils, while the latter showed applicability to a broader texture range. In contrast, Rieu-Sposito model was more suitable for fine-textured soils. Fractal models produced a better estimation of watercontents at low pressure heads than at high pressure heads.

  8. Sample size planning for composite reliability coefficients: accuracy in parameter estimation via narrow confidence intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Leann; Kelley, Ken

    2012-11-01

    Composite measures play an important role in psychology and related disciplines. Composite measures almost always have error. Correspondingly, it is important to understand the reliability of the scores from any particular composite measure. However, the point estimates of the reliability of composite measures are fallible and thus all such point estimates should be accompanied by a confidence interval. When confidence intervals are wide, there is much uncertainty in the population value of the reliability coefficient. Given the importance of reporting confidence intervals for estimates of reliability, coupled with the undesirability of wide confidence intervals, we develop methods that allow researchers to plan sample size in order to obtain narrow confidence intervals for population reliability coefficients. We first discuss composite reliability coefficients and then provide a discussion on confidence interval formation for the corresponding population value. Using the accuracy in parameter estimation approach, we develop two methods to obtain accurate estimates of reliability by planning sample size. The first method provides a way to plan sample size so that the expected confidence interval width for the population reliability coefficient is sufficiently narrow. The second method ensures that the confidence interval width will be sufficiently narrow with some desired degree of assurance (e.g., 99% assurance that the 95% confidence interval for the population reliability coefficient will be less than W units wide). The effectiveness of our methods was verified with Monte Carlo simulation studies. We demonstrate how to easily implement the methods with easy-to-use and freely available software. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Migrainous infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, K; Artto, V; Bendtsen, L

    2011-01-01

    Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included......Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included...

  10. Information-based sample size re-estimation in group sequential design for longitudinal trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Adewale, Adeniyi; Shentu, Yue; Liu, Jiajun; Anderson, Keaven

    2014-09-28

    Group sequential design has become more popular in clinical trials because it allows for trials to stop early for futility or efficacy to save time and resources. However, this approach is less well-known for longitudinal analysis. We have observed repeated cases of studies with longitudinal data where there is an interest in early stopping for a lack of treatment effect or in adapting sample size to correct for inappropriate variance assumptions. We propose an information-based group sequential design as a method to deal with both of these issues. Updating the sample size at each interim analysis makes it possible to maintain the target power while controlling the type I error rate. We will illustrate our strategy with examples and simulations and compare the results with those obtained using fixed design and group sequential design without sample size re-estimation.

  11. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  12. Assortativity coefficient-based estimation of population patterns of sexual mixing when cluster size is informative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Siobhan K; Lyles, Robert H; Kupper, Lawrence L; Keys, Jessica R; Martin, Sandra L; Costenbader, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    Population sexual mixing patterns can be quantified using Newman's assortativity coefficient (r). Suggested methods for estimating the SE for r may lead to inappropriate statistical conclusions in situations where intracluster correlation is ignored and/or when cluster size is predictive of the response. We describe a computer-intensive, but highly accessible, within-cluster resampling approach for providing a valid large-sample estimated SE for r and an associated 95% CI. We introduce needed statistical notation and describe the within-cluster resampling approach. Sexual network data and a simulation study were employed to compare within-cluster resampling with standard methods when cluster size is informative. For the analysis of network data when cluster size is informative, the simulation study demonstrates that within-cluster resampling produces valid statistical inferences about Newman's assortativity coefficient, a popular statistic used to quantify the strength of mixing patterns. In contrast, commonly used methods are biased with attendant extremely poor CI coverage. Within-cluster resampling is recommended when cluster size is informative and/or when there is within-cluster response correlation. Within-cluster resampling is recommended for providing valid statistical inferences when applying Newman's assortativity coefficient r to network data. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Sample size planning for the coefficient of variation from the accuracy in parameter estimation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken

    2007-11-01

    The accuracy in parameter estimation approach to sample size planning is developed for the coefficient of variation, where the goal of the method is to obtain an accurate parameter estimate by achieving a sufficiently narrow confidence interval. The first method allows researchers to plan sample size so that the expected width of the confidence interval for the population coefficient of variation is sufficiently narrow. A modification allows a desired degree of assurance to be incorporated into the method, so that the obtained confidence interval will be sufficiently narrow with some specified probability (e.g., 85% assurance that the 95 confidence interval width will be no wider than to units). Tables of necessary sample size are provided for a variety of scenarios that may help researchers planning a study where the coefficient of variation is of interest plan an appropriate sample size in order to have a sufficiently narrow confidence interval, optionally with somespecified assurance of the confidence interval being sufficiently narrow. Freely available computer routines have been developed that allow researchers to easily implement all of the methods discussed in the article.

  14. Nanosecond pulse electric field activation of platelet-rich plasma reduces myocardial infarct size and improves left ventricular mechanical function in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Barbara; Li, Francis

    2012-12-01

    In the current study, we used the novel, nonchemical method of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) to investigate the efficiency of a protocol involving the in vivo treatment of the ischemic and reperfused heart and heart cells in culture with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Associated with the restoration of blood flow to the ischemic tissue is a phenomenon referred to as "ischemic reperfusion injury." Clinically a type of reperfusion injury occurs during coronary bypass surgery once blood perfusion to the heart is restarted. Although the restoration of oxygen to ischemic myocardial cells is critical for tissue survival, reperfusion causes myocardial oxidative stress, attributable in part to the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production is associated with mitochondrial damage. Adult female New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized and a left thoracotomy performed to expose the heart. The distal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 15 minutes and then released so reperfusion of the tissue could occur. PRP (.21 mg/heart) or saline was injected into the ischemic area of the myocardium. Mechanical function of the left ventricle was analyzed using a Millar catheter attached to a Micro-Med Analysis System. H9c2 cells in culture were treated with 1 mL of nsPEF activated PRP (1.05 mg/flask) for 24 hours before analysis for ROS production or mitochondrial depolarization damage). The left ventricle contracted and relaxed faster and infarct size was reduced in hearts treated with PRP compared with saline. ROS production and mitochondrial depolarization were reduced in H9c2 cells treated with PRP and stimulated with hydrogen peroxide. These results provide evidence that nsPEFs can successfully be used to prepare PRP and that the PRP is functional in heart protection possibly by reducing ROS generation and stabilizing the mitochondria of the ischemic/reperfused heart.

  15. Interpreting surveys to estimate the size of the monarch butterfly population: Pitfalls and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasants, John M.; Zalucki, Myron P.; Oberhauser, Karen S.; Brower, Lincoln P.; Taylor, Orley R.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the change in the size of the eastern North American monarch butterfly summer population, studies have used long-term data sets of counts of adult butterflies or eggs per milkweed stem. Despite the observed decline in the monarch population as measured at overwintering sites in Mexico, these studies found no decline in summer counts in the Midwest, the core of the summer breeding range, leading to a suggestion that the cause of the monarch population decline is not the loss of Midwest agricultural milkweeds but increased mortality during the fall migration. Using these counts to estimate population size, however, does not account for the shift of monarch activity from agricultural fields to non-agricultural sites over the past 20 years, as a result of the loss of agricultural milkweeds due to the near-ubiquitous use of glyphosate herbicides. We present the counter-hypotheses that the proportion of the monarch population present in non-agricultural habitats, where counts are made, has increased and that counts reflect both population size and the proportion of the population observed. We use data on the historical change in the proportion of milkweeds, and thus monarch activity, in agricultural fields and non-agricultural habitats to show why using counts can produce misleading conclusions about population size. We then separate out the shifting proportion effect from the counts to estimate the population size and show that these corrected summer monarch counts show a decline over time and are correlated with the size of the overwintering population. In addition, we present evidence against the hypothesis of increased mortality during migration. The milkweed limitation hypothesis for monarch decline remains supported and conservation efforts focusing on adding milkweeds to the landscape in the summer breeding region have a sound scientific basis.

  16. Application of the variability-size relationship to atmospheric aerosol studies: estimating aerosol lifetimes and ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol variability is examined as function of particle size for data collected over the Northern Indian Ocean in February 1999 as part of the INDOEX experiment. It was found that for particles believed to be of terrestrial or oceanic origin, the variability correlated with the average number concentration. For particles that are thought to be formed and grow in the atmosphere through coagulation and condensation an anticorrelation was observed, the minimum in variability coinciding with the maximum in the number concentration. Three altitude ranges were examined (0--1, 4--8 and 8--13 km and the minimum in variability was found to occur at lower particle sizes in the free troposphere (0.065 mm than in the boundary layer (0.165 mm. The observed variability has been compared to that generated by a numerical model in order to determine the relative importance of the physical processes. Modelled variability of 0.02 mm particles caused by nucleation was not observed in the measurements. A previously derived empirical relationship for aerosol residence time was compared with the measured variability as a function of bin size. The aerosol variability / residence time relationship was characterised by a coefficient (b at all altitudes and for both correlating and anticorrelating regimes. By combining the derived coefficient with the model predicted lifetime for 0.020 mm particles we estimated residence times and ages as a function of particle size and altitude. General agreement was found with previous estimates of aerosol residence time. In the upper atmosphere aerosols of 0.065 mm in size have residence times of approximately 1 month and can be transported on a hemispheric scale. The same size aerosol has a lifetime one order of magnitude less in the boundary layer and therefore will not be transported far from the source regions.

  17. Estimating variable effective population sizes from multiple genomes: a sequentially markov conditional sampling distribution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Sara; Harris, Kelley; Song, Yun S

    2013-07-01

    Throughout history, the population size of modern humans has varied considerably due to changes in environment, culture, and technology. More accurate estimates of population size changes, and when they occurred, should provide a clearer picture of human colonization history and help remove confounding effects from natural selection inference. Demography influences the pattern of genetic variation in a population, and thus genomic data of multiple individuals sampled from one or more present-day populations contain valuable information about the past demographic history. Recently, Li and Durbin developed a coalescent-based hidden Markov model, called the pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent (PSMC), for a pair of chromosomes (or one diploid individual) to estimate past population sizes. This is an efficient, useful approach, but its accuracy in the very recent past is hampered by the fact that, because of the small sample size, only few coalescence events occur in that period. Multiple genomes from the same population contain more information about the recent past, but are also more computationally challenging to study jointly in a coalescent framework. Here, we present a new coalescent-based method that can efficiently infer population size changes from multiple genomes, providing access to a new store of information about the recent past. Our work generalizes the recently developed sequentially Markov conditional sampling distribution framework, which provides an accurate approximation of the probability of observing a newly sampled haplotype given a set of previously sampled haplotypes. Simulation results demonstrate that we can accurately reconstruct the true population histories, with a significant improvement over the PSMC in the recent past. We apply our method, called diCal, to the genomes of multiple human individuals of European and African ancestry to obtain a detailed population size change history during recent times.

  18. Voxel size dependency, reproducibility and sensitivity of an in vivo bone loading estimation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Patrik; Schulte, Friederike A; Zwahlen, Alexander; van Rietbergen, Bert; Boutroy, Stephanie; Melton, L Joseph; Amin, Shreyasee; Khosla, Sundeep; Goldhahn, Jörg; Müller, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    A bone loading estimation algorithm was previously developed that provides in vivo loading conditions required for in vivo bone remodelling simulations. The algorithm derives a bone's loading history from its microstructure as assessed by high-resolution (HR) computed tomography (CT). This reverse engineering approach showed accurate and realistic results based on micro-CT and HR-peripheral quantitative CT images. However, its voxel size dependency, reproducibility and sensitivity still need to be investigated, which is the purpose of this study. Voxel size dependency was tested on cadaveric distal radii with micro-CT images scanned at 25 µm and downscaled to 50, 61, 75, 82, 100, 125 and 150 µm. Reproducibility was calculated with repeated in vitro as well as in vivo HR-pQCT measurements at 82 µm. Sensitivity was defined using HR-pQCT images from women with fracture versus non-fracture, and low versus high bone volume fraction, expecting similar and different loading histories, respectively. Our results indicate that the algorithm is voxel size independent within an average (maximum) error of 8.2% (32.9%) at 61 µm, but that the dependency increases considerably at voxel sizes bigger than 82 µm. In vitro and in vivo reproducibility are up to 4.5% and 10.2%, respectively, which is comparable to other in vitro studies and slightly higher than in other in vivo studies. Subjects with different bone volume fraction were clearly distinguished but not subjects with and without fracture. This is in agreement with bone adapting to customary loading but not to fall loads. We conclude that the in vivo bone loading estimation algorithm provides reproducible, sensitive and fairly voxel size independent results at up to 82 µm, but that smaller voxel sizes would be advantageous.

  19. Comparing methods for estimating R0 from the size distribution of subcritical transmission chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, S; Lloyd-Smith, J O

    2013-09-01

    Many diseases exhibit subcritical transmission (i.e. 0distribution that permits a variable degree of transmission heterogeneity, we present a unified analysis of existing R0 estimation methods. Simulation studies show that the degree of transmission heterogeneity, when improperly modeled, can significantly impact the bias of R0 estimation methods designed for imperfect observation. These studies also highlight the importance of isolated cases in assessing whether an estimation technique is consistent with observed data. Analysis of data from measles outbreaks shows that likelihood scores are highest for models that allow a flexible degree of transmission heterogeneity. Aggregating intermediate sized chains often has similar performance to analyzing a complete chain size distribution. However, truncating isolated cases is beneficial only when surveillance systems clearly favor full observation of large chains but not small chains. Meanwhile, if data on the type and proportion of cases that are unobserved were known, we demonstrate that maximum likelihood inference of R0 could be adjusted accordingly. This motivates the need for future empirical and theoretical work to quantify observation error and incorporate relevant mechanisms into stuttering chain models used to estimate transmission parameters.

  20. Estimating the population size for capture-recapture data with unequal catchability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, A

    1987-12-01

    A point estimator and its associated confidence interval for the size of a closed population are proposed under models that incorporate heterogeneity of capture probability. Real data sets provided in Edwards and Eberhardt (1967, Journal of Wildlife Management 31, 87-96) and Carothers (1973, Journal of Animal Ecology 42, 125-146) are used to illustrate this method and to compare it with other estimates. The performance of the proposed procedure is also investigated by means of Monte Carlo experiments. The method is especially useful when most of the captured individuals are caught once or twice in the sample, for which case the jackknife estimator usually does not work well. Numerical results also show that the proposed confidence interval performs satisfactorily in maintaining the nominal levels.

  1. Optimization of Macro Block Size for Adaptive Rood Pattern Search Block Matching Method in Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Nar Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In area of video compression, Motion Estimation is one of the most important modules and play an important role to design and implementation of any the video encoder. It consumes more than 85% of video encoding time due to searching of a candidate block in the search window of the reference frame. Various block matching methods have been developed to minimize the search time. In this context, Adaptive Rood Pattern Search is one of the less expensive block matching methods, which is widely acceptable for better Motion Estimation in video data processing. In this paper we have proposed to optimize the macro block size used in adaptive rood pattern search method for improvement in motion estimation.

  2. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C compared to the estimated glomerular filtration rate to predict risk in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Jeinsen, Beatrice; Kraus, Daniel; Palapies, Lars; Tzikas, Stergios; Zeller, Tanja; Schauer, Anne; Drechsler, Christiane; Bickel, Christoph; Baldus, Stephan; Lackner, Karl J; Münzel, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeiher, Andreas M; Keller, Till

    2017-10-15

    Impaired renal function, reflected by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or cystatin C, is a strong risk predictor in the presence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) is an early marker of acute kidney injury. uNGAL might also be a good predictor of outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of uNGAL compared to eGFR and cystatin C in patients with suspected AMI. 1818 patients were enrolled with suspected AMI. Follow-up information on the combined endpoint of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction was obtained 6months after enrolment and was available in 1804 patients. 63 events (3.5%) were registered. While cystatin C and eGFR were strong risk predictors for the primary endpoint even adjusted for several variables, uNGAL was not independently associated with outcome: When applied continuously uNGAL was associated with outcome but did not remain a statistically significant predictor after several adjustments (i.e. eGFR). By adding cystatin C or uNGAL to GRACE risk score variables, only cystatin C could improve the predictive value while uNGAL showed no improvement. We could show that cystatin C is an independent risk predictor in patients with suspected AMI and cystatin C can add improvement to the commonly used GRACE risk score. In contrast uNGAL is not independently associated with outcome and seems not to add further prognostic information to GRACE risk score. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Statistical Estimation of Orbital Debris Populations with a Spectrum of Object Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. -l; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J. -C; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.; Stokely, C. L.; Whitlock, D.

    2008-01-01

    Orbital debris is a real concern for the safe operations of satellites. In general, the hazard of debris impact is a function of the size and spatial distributions of the debris populations. To describe and characterize the debris environment as reliably as possible, the current NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2000) is being upgraded to a new version based on new and better quality data. The data-driven ORDEM model covers a wide range of object sizes from 10 microns to greater than 1 meter. This paper reviews the statistical process for the estimation of the debris populations in the new ORDEM upgrade, and discusses the representation of large-size (greater than or equal to 1 m and greater than or equal to 10 cm) populations by SSN catalog objects and the validation of the statistical approach. Also, it presents results for the populations with sizes of greater than or equal to 3.3 cm, greater than or equal to 1 cm, greater than or equal to 100 micrometers, and greater than or equal to 10 micrometers. The orbital debris populations used in the new version of ORDEM are inferred from data based upon appropriate reference (or benchmark) populations instead of the binning of the multi-dimensional orbital-element space. This paper describes all of the major steps used in the population-inference procedure for each size-range. Detailed discussions on data analysis, parameter definition, the correlation between parameters and data, and uncertainty assessment are included.

  4. Effect of voxel size when calculating patient specific radionuclide dosimetry estimates using direct Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Kevin J; O'Keefe, Graeme J

    2014-09-01

    The scalable XCAT voxelised phantom was used with the GATE Monte Carlo toolkit to investigate the effect of voxel size on dosimetry estimates of internally distributed radionuclide calculated using direct Monte Carlo simulation. A uniformly distributed Fluorine-18 source was simulated in the Kidneys of the XCAT phantom with the organ self dose (kidney ← kidney) and organ cross dose (liver ← kidney) being calculated for a number of organ and voxel sizes. Patient specific dose factors (DF) from a clinically acquired FDG PET/CT study have also been calculated for kidney self dose and liver ← kidney cross dose. Using the XCAT phantom it was found that significantly small voxel sizes are required to achieve accurate calculation of organ self dose. It has also been used to show that a voxel size of 2 mm or less is suitable for accurate calculations of organ cross dose. To compensate for insufficient voxel sampling a correction factor is proposed. This correction factor is applied to the patient specific dose factors calculated with the native voxel size of the PET/CT study.

  5. Estimating the settling velocity of bioclastic sediment using common grain-size analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Michael V. W.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Most techniques for estimating settling velocities of natural particles have been developed for siliciclastic sediments. Therefore, to understand how these techniques apply to bioclastic environments, measured settling velocities of bioclastic sedimentary deposits sampled from a nearshore fringing reef in Western Australia were compared with settling velocities calculated using results from several common grain-size analysis techniques (sieve, laser diffraction and image analysis) and established models. The effects of sediment density and shape were also examined using a range of density values and three different models of settling velocity. Sediment density was found to have a significant effect on calculated settling velocity, causing a range in normalized root-mean-square error of up to 28%, depending upon settling velocity model and grain-size method. Accounting for particle shape reduced errors in predicted settling velocity by 3% to 6% and removed any velocity-dependent bias, which is particularly important for the fastest settling fractions. When shape was accounted for and measured density was used, normalized root-mean-square errors were 4%, 10% and 18% for laser diffraction, sieve and image analysis, respectively. The results of this study show that established models of settling velocity that account for particle shape can be used to estimate settling velocity of irregularly shaped, sand-sized bioclastic sediments from sieve, laser diffraction, or image analysis-derived measures of grain size with a limited amount of error. Collectively, these findings will allow for grain-size data measured with different methods to be accurately converted to settling velocity for comparison. This will facilitate greater understanding of the hydraulic properties of bioclastic sediment which can help to increase our general knowledge of sediment dynamics in these environments.

  6. Subspace Leakage Analysis and Improved DOA Estimation With Small Sample Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaghaghi, Mahdi; Vorobyov, Sergiy A.

    2015-06-01

    Classical methods of DOA estimation such as the MUSIC algorithm are based on estimating the signal and noise subspaces from the sample covariance matrix. For a small number of samples, such methods are exposed to performance breakdown, as the sample covariance matrix can largely deviate from the true covariance matrix. In this paper, the problem of DOA estimation performance breakdown is investigated. We consider the structure of the sample covariance matrix and the dynamics of the root-MUSIC algorithm. The performance breakdown in the threshold region is associated with the subspace leakage where some portion of the true signal subspace resides in the estimated noise subspace. In this paper, the subspace leakage is theoretically derived. We also propose a two-step method which improves the performance by modifying the sample covariance matrix such that the amount of the subspace leakage is reduced. Furthermore, we introduce a phenomenon named as root-swap which occurs in the root-MUSIC algorithm in the low sample size region and degrades the performance of the DOA estimation. A new method is then proposed to alleviate this problem. Numerical examples and simulation results are given for uncorrelated and correlated sources to illustrate the improvement achieved by the proposed methods. Moreover, the proposed algorithms are combined with the pseudo-noise resampling method to further improve the performance.

  7. A Web-based Simulator for Sample Size and Power Estimation in Animal Carcinogenicity Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Moon

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A Web-based statistical tool for sample size and power estimation in animal carcinogenicity studies is presented in this paper. It can be used to provide a design with sufficient power for detecting a dose-related trend in the occurrence of a tumor of interest when competing risks are present. The tumors of interest typically are occult tumors for which the time to tumor onset is not directly observable. It is applicable to rodent tumorigenicity assays that have either a single terminal sacrifice or multiple (interval sacrifices. The design is achieved by varying sample size per group, number of sacrifices, number of sacrificed animals at each interval, if any, and scheduled time points for sacrifice. Monte Carlo simulation is carried out in this tool to simulate experiments of rodent bioassays because no closed-form solution is available. It takes design parameters for sample size and power estimation as inputs through the World Wide Web. The core program is written in C and executed in the background. It communicates with the Web front end via a Component Object Model interface passing an Extensible Markup Language string. The proposed statistical tool is illustrated with an animal study in lung cancer prevention research.

  8. Nautilus at risk--estimating population size and demography of Nautilus pompilius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Andrew; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Marshall, Justin

    2011-02-10

    The low fecundity, late maturity, long gestation and long life span of Nautilus suggest that this species is vulnerable to over-exploitation. Demand from the ornamental shell trade has contributed to their rapid decline in localized populations. More data from wild populations are needed to design management plans which ensure Nautilus persistence. We used a variety of techniques including capture-mark-recapture, baited remote underwater video systems, ultrasonic telemetry and remotely operated vehicles to estimate population size, growth rates, distribution and demographic characteristics of an unexploited Nautilus pompilius population at Osprey Reef (Coral Sea, Australia). We estimated a small and dispersed population of between 844 and 4467 individuals (14.6-77.4 km(-2)) dominated by males (83:17 male:female) and comprised of few juveniles (<10%).These results provide the first Nautilid population and density estimates which are essential elements for long-term management of populations via sustainable catch models. Results from baited remote underwater video systems provide confidence for their more widespread use to assess efficiently the size and density of exploited and unexploited Nautilus populations worldwide.

  9. Nautilus at risk--estimating population size and demography of Nautilus pompilius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dunstan

    Full Text Available The low fecundity, late maturity, long gestation and long life span of Nautilus suggest that this species is vulnerable to over-exploitation. Demand from the ornamental shell trade has contributed to their rapid decline in localized populations. More data from wild populations are needed to design management plans which ensure Nautilus persistence. We used a variety of techniques including capture-mark-recapture, baited remote underwater video systems, ultrasonic telemetry and remotely operated vehicles to estimate population size, growth rates, distribution and demographic characteristics of an unexploited Nautilus pompilius population at Osprey Reef (Coral Sea, Australia. We estimated a small and dispersed population of between 844 and 4467 individuals (14.6-77.4 km(-2 dominated by males (83:17 male:female and comprised of few juveniles (<10%.These results provide the first Nautilid population and density estimates which are essential elements for long-term management of populations via sustainable catch models. Results from baited remote underwater video systems provide confidence for their more widespread use to assess efficiently the size and density of exploited and unexploited Nautilus populations worldwide.

  10. Effects of word-evoked object size on covert numerosity estimations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda L. Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether the size and number of animals mentioned in digit-word expressions influenced participants' performance in covert numerosity estimations (i.e., property probability ratings. Participants read descriptions of big or small animals standing in short, medium, and long rows (e.g., There are 8 elephants/ants in a row and subsequently estimated the probability that a health statement about them was true (e.g., All elephants/ants are healthy. Statements about large animals scored lower than statements about small animals, confirming classical findings that humans perceive groups of large objects as being more numerous than groups of small objects (Binet 1890 and suggesting that object size effects in covert numerosity estimations are particularly robust. Also, statements about longer rows scored lower than statements about shorter rows (cf. Sears 1983 but no interaction between factors obtained, suggesting that quantity information is not fully retrieved in digit – word expressions or that their values are processed separately.

  11. An exercise in archaeological demography: estimating the population size of Late Neolithic settlements in the Central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Porčić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects on the methodology for estimating population size from settlement data. Archaeologists are faced with a static record of houses, which is the result of dynamic processes of population growth and house use. There is no simple relationship between the total number of houses and population size. In order to produce more realistic estimates of population size, a quantitative model is presented which takes into account population dynamics and the dynamics of house accumulation. The model is used to estimate the population size of three Late Neolithic settlements in Southeast Europe: Gomolava, Divostin and Uivar.

  12. Comparação de diferentes métodos para medida do tamanho do infarto experimental crônico em Ratos Comparison of different methods to measure experimental chronic infarction size in the rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Minicucci

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as diferenças entre três métodos para medida do infarto experimental em ratos, em relação ao método tradicional. MÉTODOS: A área infartada por histologia (AREA, o perímetro interno da cavidade infartada por histologia (PER e o perímetro interno por ecocardiograma (ECO foram comparados ao método tradicional (análise histológica das circunferências epicárdicas e endocárdicas da região infartada - CIR. Utilizaram-se ANOVA de medidas repetidas, complementada com o teste de comparações múltiplas de Dunn, o método de concordância de Bland & Altman e o teste de correlação de Spearman. A significância foi p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences between three methods for the measurement of experimental infarction in rats in comparison to the traditional method. METHODS: Histological analysis of the infarction area (AREA, histological analysis of the internal cavity perimeter (PER and echocardiogram analysis of the internal perimeter (ECHO were compared to the traditional method (histological analysis of the epicardial and endocardial circumferences of the infarction region - CIR. Repeated ANOVA measurements were used in conjunction with the Dunn multiple comparison test, the Bland and Altman concordance method and the Spearman correlation test. Significance was established as p < 0.05. RESULTS: The data of 122 animals were analyzed, 3 to 6 months after the infarction. Infarction size assessments revealed differences between CIR and the other three methods (p < 0.001: CIR = 42.4% (35.9-48.8, PER = 50.3% (39.1-57.0, AREA = 27.3% (20.2-34.3, ECHO = 46.1% (39.9-52.6. Therefore, measurement by area underestimated the infarct size by 15%, whereas the echocardiogram and histological internal perimeter measurements overestimated the infarct size by 4% and 5%, respectively. In relation to ECHO and PER, even though the difference between the methods was only 1.27%, the concordance interval ranged from 24.1% to -26

  13. Methods of creatine kinase-MB analysis to predict mortality in patients with myocardial infarction treated with reperfusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Renato D; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Hasselblad, Victor; Newby, Kristin L; Yow, Eric; Granger, Christopher B; Armstrong, Paul W; Hochman, Judith S; Mills, James S; Ruzyllo, Witold; Mahaffey, Kenneth W

    2013-05-02

    Larger infarct size measured by creatine kinase (CK)-MB release is associated with higher mortality and has been used as an important surrogate endpoint in the evaluation of new treatments for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Traditional approaches to quantify infarct size include the observed CK-MB peak and calculated CK-MB area under the curve (AUC). We evaluated alternative approaches to quantifying infarct size using CK-MB values, and the relationship between infarct size and clinical outcomes. Of 1,850 STEMI patients treated with reperfusion therapy in the COMplement inhibition in Myocardial infarction treated with Angioplasty (COMMA) (percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-treated) and the COMPlement inhibition in myocardial infarction treated with thromboLYtics (COMPLY) (fibrinolytic-treated) trials, 1,718 (92.9%) (COMMA, n = 868; COMPLY, n = 850) had at least five of nine protocol-required CK-MB measures. In addition to traditional methods, curve-fitting techniques were used to determine CK-MB AUC and estimated peak CK-MB. Cox proportional hazards modeling assessed the univariable associations between infarct size and mortality, and the composite of death, heart failure, shock and stroke at 90 days. In COMPLY, CK-MB measures by all methods were significantly associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio range per 1,000 units increase: 1.09 to 1.13; hazard ratio range per 1 standard deviation increase: 1.41 to 1.62; P MB measures were statistically significant in both the COMMA and COMPLY trials. Sophisticated curve modeling is an alternative to infarct-size quantification in STEMI patients, but it provides information similar to that of more traditional methods. Future studies will determine whether the same conclusion applies in circumstances other than STEMI, or to studies with different frequencies and patterns of CK-MB data collection.

  14. Modeling of magnetic fields on a cylindrical surface and associated parameter estimation for development of a size sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops analytical sensing principles for estimation of circumferential size of a cylindrical surface using magnetic sensors. An electromagnet and magnetic sensors are used on a wearable band for measurement of leg size. In order to enable robust size estimation during rough real-world use of the wearable band, three estimation algorithms are developed based on models of the magnetic field variation over a cylindrical surface. The magnetic field models developed include those for a dipole and for a uniformly magnetized cylinder. The estimation algorithms used include a linear regression equation, an extended Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. Experimental laboratory tests show that the size sensor in general performs accurately, yielding sub-millimeter estimation errors. The unscented Kalman filter yields the best performance that is robust to bias and misalignment errors. The size sensor developed herein can be used for monitoring swelling due to fluid accumulation in the lower leg and a number of other biomedical applications.

  15. Can high resolution 3D topographic surveys provide reliable grain size estimates in gravel bed rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E.; Smith, M. W.; Klaar, M. J.; Brown, L. E.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution topographic surveys such as those provided by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) contain a wealth of information that is not always exploited in the generation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In particular, several authors have related sub-metre scale topographic variability (or 'surface roughness') to sediment grain size by deriving empirical relationships between the two. In fluvial applications, such relationships permit rapid analysis of the spatial distribution of grain size over entire river reaches, providing improved data to drive three-dimensional hydraulic models, allowing rapid geomorphic monitoring of sub-reach river restoration projects, and enabling more robust characterisation of riverbed habitats. However, comparison of previously published roughness-grain-size relationships shows substantial variability between field sites. Using a combination of over 300 laboratory and field-based SfM surveys, we demonstrate the influence of inherent survey error, irregularity of natural gravels, particle shape, grain packing structure, sorting, and form roughness on roughness-grain-size relationships. Roughness analysis from SfM datasets can accurately predict the diameter of smooth hemispheres, though natural, irregular gravels result in a higher roughness value for a given diameter and different grain shapes yield different relationships. A suite of empirical relationships is presented as a decision tree which improves predictions of grain size. By accounting for differences in patch facies, large improvements in D50 prediction are possible. SfM is capable of providing accurate grain size estimates, although further refinement is needed for poorly sorted gravel patches, for which c-axis percentiles are better predicted than b-axis percentiles.

  16. Use of otoliths to estimate size at sexual maturity in fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sérgio Agostinho

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The viability of an alternative method for estimating the size at sexual maturity of females of Plagioscion squamosissimus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae was analyzed. This methodology was used to evaluate the size at sexual maturity in crabs, but has not yet been used for this purpose in fishes. Separation of young and adult fishes by this method is accomplished by iterative adjustment of straight-line segments to the data for length of the otolith and length of the fish. The agreement with the estimate previously obtained by another technique and the possibility of calculating the variance indicates that in some cases, the method analyzed can be used successfully to estimate size at sexual maturity in fish. However, additional studies are necessary to detect possible biases in the method.A viabilidade de uma metologia alternativa para a estimativa do tamanho de maturação sexual de fêmeas de Plagioscion squamosissimus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae foi analisada. Esta metodologia tem sido utilizada para avaliar o tamanho da maturação sexual em caranguejos mas ainda não havia sido utilizada em peixes com este objetivo. A separação dos peixes jovens e adultos por este método é feita pelo ajuste iterativo de segmentos de reta aos dados de comprimento do otólito e comprimento do peixe. A concordância com a estimativa obtida previamente utilizando outra técnica e a possibilidade do cálculo da variância indica que em alguns casos o método analisado pode ser utilizado com sucesso para estimar o tamanho de maturação sexual em peixes, mas outros estudos são necessários para se detectar possíveis bias do método.

  17. Sample size for estimating the mean concentration of organisms in ballast water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eliardo G; Lopes, Rubens M; Singer, Julio M

    2016-09-15

    We consider the computation of sample sizes for estimating the mean concentration of organisms in ballast water. Given the possible heterogeneity of their distribution in the tank, we adopt a negative binomial model to obtain confidence intervals for the mean concentration. We show that the results obtained by Chen and Chen (2012) in a different set-up hold for the proposed model and use them to develop algorithms to compute sample sizes both in cases where the mean concentration is known to lie in some bounded interval or where there is no information about its range. We also construct simple diagrams that may be easily employed to decide for compliance with the D-2 regulation of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CATCH ESTIMATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF BILLFISHES LANDED IN PORT OF BENOA, BALI

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    Bram Setyadji

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Billfishes are generally considered as by-product in tuna long line fisheries that have high economic value in the market. By far, the information about Indian Ocean billfish biology and fisheries especially in Indonesia is very limited. This research aimed to elucidate the estimation of production and size distribution of billfishes landed in port of Benoa during 2010 (February – December through daily observation at the processing plants. The result showed that the landings dominated by Swordfish (Xiphias gladius 54.9%, Blue marlin (Makaira mazara 17.8% and Black marlin (Makaira indica 13.0% respectively, followed by small amount of striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax, sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus, and shortbil spearfish (Tetrapturus Angustirostris. Generally the individual size of billfishes range between 68 and 206 cm (PFL, and showing negative allometric pattern except on swordfish that was isometric. Most of the billfish landed haven’t reached their first sexual maturity.

  19. Fixation patterns, not clinical diagnosis, predict body size over‐estimation in eating disordered women and healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Katri K.; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Hancock, Peter J. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A core feature of anorexia nervosa (AN) is an over‐estimation of body size. Women with AN have a different pattern of eye‐movements when judging bodies, but it is unclear whether this is specific to their diagnosis or whether it is found in anyone over‐estimating body size. Method To address this question, we compared the eye movement patterns from three participant groups while they carried out a body size estimation task: (i) 20 women with recovering/recovered anorexia (rAN) who had concerns about body shape and weight and who over‐estimated body size, (ii) 20 healthy controls who had normative levels of concern about body shape and who estimated body size accurately (iii) 20 healthy controls who had normative levels of concern about body shape but who did over‐estimate body size. Results Comparisons between the three groups showed that: (i) accurate body size estimators tended to look more in the waist region, and this was independent of clinical diagnosis; (ii) there is a pattern of looking at images of bodies, particularly viewing the upper parts of the torso and face, which is specific to participants with rAN but which is independent of accuracy in body size estimation. Discussion Since the over‐estimating controls did not share the same body image concerns that women with rAN report, their over‐estimation cannot be explained by attitudinal concerns about body shape and weight. These results suggest that a distributed fixation pattern is associated with over‐estimation of body size and should be addressed in treatment programs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:507–518). PMID:26996142

  20. Estimation of molar absorptivities and pigment sizes for eumelanin and pheomelanin using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletic, Ivan R.; Matthews, Thomas E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2009-11-01

    Fundamental optical and structural properties of melanins are not well understood due to their poor solubility characteristics and the chemical disorder present during biomolecular synthesis. We apply nonlinear transient absorption spectroscopy to quantify molar absorptivities for eumelanin and pheomelanin and thereby get an estimate for their average pigment sizes. We determine that pheomelanin exhibits a larger molar absorptivity at near IR wavelengths (750nm), which may be extended to shorter wavelengths. Using the molar absorptivities, we estimate that melanin pigments contain ˜46 and 28 monomer units for eumelanin and pheomelanin, respectively. This is considerably larger than the oligomeric species that have been recently proposed to account for the absorption spectrum of eumelanin and illustrates that larger pigments comprise a significant fraction of the pigment distribution.

  1. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  2. Regularization Methods for Fitting Linear Models with Small Sample Sizes: Fitting the Lasso Estimator Using R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Holmes Finch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and data analysts are sometimes faced with the problem of very small samples, where the number of variables approaches or exceeds the overall sample size; i.e. high dimensional data. In such cases, standard statistical models such as regression or analysis of variance cannot be used, either because the resulting parameter estimates exhibit very high variance and can therefore not be trusted, or because the statistical algorithm cannot converge on parameter estimates at all. There exist an alternative set of model estimation procedures, known collectively as regularization methods, which can be used in such circumstances, and which have been shown through simulation research to yield accurate parameter estimates. The purpose of this paper is to describe, for those unfamiliar with them, the most popular of these regularization methods, the lasso, and to demonstrate its use on an actual high dimensional dataset involving adults with autism, using the R software language. Results of analyses involving relating measures of executive functioning with a full scale intelligence test score are presented, and implications of using these models are discussed.

  3. Dose assessment in accordance with the measured position of size specific dose estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su [Dept. of Radio-technology, Health Welfare, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Wan [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated the size specific dose estimates of difference localizer on pediatric CT image. Seventy one cases of pediatric abdomen-pelvic CT (M:F=36:35) were included in this study. Anterior-posterior and lateral diameters were measured in axial CT images. Conversion factors from American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report 204 were obtained for effective diameter to determine size specific dose estimate (SSDE) from the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) recorded from the dose reports. For the localizer of mid-slice SSDE was 107.63% higher than CTDIvol and that of xiphoid-process slices SSDE was higher than 92.91%. The maximum error of iliac crest slices, xiphoid process slices and femur head slices between mid-slices were 7.48%, 17.81% and 14.04%. In conclusion, despite the SSDE of difference localizer has large number of errors, SSDE should be regarded as the primary evaluation tool of the patient radiation in pediatric CT for evaluation.

  4. Measuring size and composition of species pools: a comparison of dark diversity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bello, Francesco; Fibich, Pavel; Zelený, David; Kopecký, Martin; Mudrák, Ondřej; Chytrý, Milan; Pyšek, Petr; Wild, Jan; Michalcová, Dana; Sádlo, Jiří; Šmilauer, Petr; Lepš, Jan; Pärtel, Meelis

    2016-06-01

    Ecological theory and biodiversity conservation have traditionally relied on the number of species recorded at a site, but it is agreed that site richness represents only a portion of the species that can inhabit particular ecological conditions, that is, the habitat-specific species pool. Knowledge of the species pool at different sites enables meaningful comparisons of biodiversity and provides insights into processes of biodiversity formation. Empirical studies, however, are limited due to conceptual and methodological difficulties in determining both the size and composition of the absent part of species pools, the so-called dark diversity. We used >50,000 vegetation plots from 18 types of habitats throughout the Czech Republic, most of which served as a training dataset and 1083 as a subset of test sites. These data were used to compare predicted results from three quantitative methods with those of previously published expert estimates based on species habitat preferences: (1) species co-occurrence based on Beals' smoothing approach; (2) species ecological requirements, with envelopes around community mean Ellenberg values; and (3) species distribution models, using species environmental niches modeled by Biomod software. Dark diversity estimates were compared at both plot and habitat levels, and each method was applied in different configurations. While there were some differences in the results obtained by different methods, particularly at the plot level, there was a clear convergence, especially at the habitat level. The better convergence at the habitat level reflects less variation in local environmental conditions, whereas variation at the plot level is an effect of each particular method. The co-occurrence agreed closest the expert estimate, followed by the method based on species ecological requirements. We conclude that several analytical methods can estimate species pools of given habitats. However, the strengths and weaknesses of different methods

  5. 3D cardiac wall thickening assessment for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Chan, B. T.; Lim, E.; Liew, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the most severe form of coronary artery disease leading to localized myocardial injury and therefore irregularities in the cardiac wall contractility. Studies have found very limited differences in global indices (such as ejection fraction, myocardial mass and volume) between healthy subjects and AMI patients, and therefore suggested regional assessment. Regional index, specifically cardiac wall thickness (WT) and thickening is closely related to cardiac function and could reveal regional abnormality due to AMI. In this study, we developed a 3D wall thickening assessment method to identify regional wall contractility dysfunction due to localized myocardial injury from infarction. Wall thickness and thickening were assessed from 3D personalized cardiac models reconstructed from cine MRI images by fitting inscribed sphere between endocardial and epicardial wall. The thickening analysis was performed in 5 patients and 3 healthy subjects and the results were compared against the gold standard 2D late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images for infarct localization. The notable finding of this study is the highly accurate estimation and visual representation of the infarct size and location in 3D. This study provides clinicians with an intuitive way to visually and qualitatively assess regional cardiac wall dysfunction due to infarction in AMI patients.

  6. Flow cytometric analysis using SYBR Green I for genome size estimation in coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronildo Clarindo, Wellington; Roberto Carvalho, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    Plant genome size has been measured by flow cytometry using propidium iodide as a dye for nuclear DNA staining. However, some authors have reported the occurrence of genome size estimation errors, especially in plants rich in secondary metabolites, such as the coffee tree. In this context, we tested an alternative cytometric protocol using the SYBR Green I as a fluorochrome for stoichiometrically staining nuclear double-stranded DNA in Coffea canephora (2x) and Coffea arabica (4x). The results showed that the respective mean genome size measured from nuclei stained with SYBR Green I and propidium iodide was statistically identical. However, the G(0)/G(1) peaks of nuclei stained with SYBR Green I exhibited lower coefficient variations (1.57-2.85%) compared to those stained with propidium iodide (2.75-4.80%). Coefficient variation statistical data suggest that SYBR Green I is adequate for stoichiometric nuclei staining using this methodology. Our results provide evidence that SYBR Green I can be used in flow cytometry measurements of plants, with the advantages of minimizing errors in nuclear DNA content quantification, staining relatively quicker, with high affinity, and being less mutagenic than propidium iodide.

  7. Population size estimation of men who have sex with men through the network scale-up method in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ezoe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Men who have sex with men (MSM are one of the groups most at risk for HIV infection in Japan. However, size estimates of MSM populations have not been conducted with sufficient frequency and rigor because of the difficulty, high cost and stigma associated with reaching such populations. This study examined an innovative and simple method for estimating the size of the MSM population in Japan. We combined an internet survey with the network scale-up method, a social network method for estimating the size of hard-to-reach populations, for the first time in Japan. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An internet survey was conducted among 1,500 internet users who registered with a nationwide internet-research agency. The survey participants were asked how many members of particular groups with known population sizes (firepersons, police officers, and military personnel they knew as acquaintances. The participants were also asked to identify the number of their acquaintances whom they understood to be MSM. Using these survey results with the network scale-up method, the personal network size and MSM population size were estimated. The personal network size was estimated to be 363.5 regardless of the sex of the acquaintances and 174.0 for only male acquaintances. The estimated MSM prevalence among the total male population in Japan was 0.0402% without adjustment, and 2.87% after adjusting for the transmission error of MSM. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated personal network size and MSM prevalence seen in this study were comparable to those from previous survey results based on the direct-estimation method. Estimating population sizes through combining an internet survey with the network scale-up method appeared to be an effective method from the perspectives of rapidity, simplicity, and low cost as compared with more-conventional methods.

  8. Estimation of source parameters and scaling relations for moderate size earthquakes in North-West Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kumar, Dinesh; Chopra, Sumer

    2016-10-01

    The scaling relation and self similarity of earthquake process have been investigated by estimating the source parameters of 34 moderate size earthquakes (mb 3.4-5.8) occurred in the NW Himalaya. The spectral analysis of body waves of 217 accelerograms recorded at 48 sites have been carried out using in the present analysis. The Brune's ω-2 model has been adopted for this purpose. The average ratio of the P-wave corner frequency, fc(P), to the S-wave corner frequency, fc(S), has been found to be 1.39 with fc(P) > fc(S) for 90% of the events analyzed here. This implies the shift in the corner frequency in agreement with many other similar studies done for different regions. The static stress drop values for all the events analyzed here lie in the range 10-100 bars average stress drop value of the order of 43 ± 19 bars for the region. This suggests the likely estimate of the dynamic stress drop, which is 2-3 times the static stress drop, is in the range of about 80-120 bars. This suggests the relatively high seismic hazard in the NW Himalaya as high frequency strong ground motions are governed by the stress drop. The estimated values of stress drop do not show significant variation with seismic moment for the range 5 × 1014-2 × 1017 N m. This observation along with the cube root scaling of corner frequencies suggests the self similarity of the moderate size earthquakes in the region. The scaling relation between seismic moment and corner frequency Mo fc3 = 3.47 ×1016Nm /s3 estimated in the present study can be utilized to estimate the source dimension given the seismic moment of the earthquake for the hazard assessment. The present study puts the constrains on the important parameters stress drop and source dimension required for the synthesis of strong ground motion from the future expected earthquakes in the region. Therefore, the present study is useful for the seismic hazard and risk related studies for NW Himalaya.

  9. Estimating superpopulation size and annual probability of breeding for pond-breeding salamanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkead, K.E.; Otis, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    It has long been accepted that amphibians can skip breeding in any given year, and environmental conditions act as a cue for breeding. In this paper, we quantify temporary emigration or nonbreeding probability for mole and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma talpoideum and A. maculatum). We estimated that 70% of mole salamanders may skip breeding during an average rainfall year and 90% may skip during a drought year. Spotted salamanders may be more likely to breed, with only 17% avoiding the breeding pond during an average rainfall year. We illustrate how superpopulations can be estimated using temporary emigration probability estimates. The superpopulation is the total number of salamanders associated with a given breeding pond. Although most salamanders stay within a certain distance of a breeding pond for the majority of their life spans, it is difficult to determine true overall population sizes for a given site if animals are only captured during a brief time frame each year with some animals unavailable for capture at any time during a given year. ?? 2007 by The Herpetologists' League, Inc.

  10. A minimally invasive method for induction of myocardial infarction in an animal model using tungsten spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, Daniel; Laule, Michael; Kaufels, Nicola; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2009-06-01

    Most animal models use surgical thoracotomy with ligation of a coronary artery to induce myocardial infarction. Incision of the chest wall and myocardium affect remodeling after myocardial infarction. The aim of our study was to evaluate a new minimally invasive technique for inducing acute myocardial infarction in pigs. To this end, coronary angiography using a 6-F cardiac catheter was performed in 20 pigs. The cardiac catheter was advanced into the left circumflex artery (LCX) under electrocardiographic monitoring and small tungsten spirals were deployed in the vessel. LCX occlusion was verified by coronary angiography. Two days later, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to estimate the extent of infarction. Thereafter, all animals were euthanized and the hearts stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride for histologic measurement of infarct size. Tungsten spirals were successfully placed in the LCX in all 20 pigs. About 13 of the 20 animals survived until the end of the experiment. The mean infarct size in the area supplied by the LCX was 4.4 +/- 2.3 cm(3) at MRI and 4.3 +/- 2.2 cm(3) at histology (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). No other myocardial regions showed infarction in any of the 13 pigs. Five of nine pigs requiring defibrillation due to ventricular fibrillation died because defibrillation was unsuccessful. One animal each died from pericarditis and pneumonia. Our results show that the minimally invasive method presented here enables reliable induction of myocardial infarction in a fairly straightforward manner. The 25% mortality rate associated with induction of myocardial infarction in our study is comparable to that reported by other investigators.

  11. Prophylactic lidocaine for myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Anand, Vidhu; Bangdiwala, Shrikant

    2015-08-21

    /37) were conducted without an a priori sample size estimation. Ten trials were sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. Trials were conducted in 17 countries, and intravenous intervention was the most frequent route of administration.In trials involving participants with proven or non-proven acute myocardial infarction, lidocaine versus placebo or no intervention showed no significant differences regarding all-cause mortality (213/5879 (3.62%) vs 199/5848 (3.40%); RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.27; participants = 11727; studies = 18; I(2) = 15%); low-quality evidence), cardiac mortality (69/4184 (1.65%) vs 62/4093 (1.51%); RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.50; participants = 8277; studies = 12; I(2) = 12%; low-quality evidence) and prophylaxis of ventricular fibrillation (76/5128 (1.48%) vs 103/4987 (2.01%); RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.12; participants = 10115; studies = 16; I(2) = 18%; low-quality evidence). In terms of sinus bradycardia, lidocaine effect is imprecise compared with effects of placebo or no intervention (55/1346 (4.08%) vs 49/1203 (4.07%); RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.80; participants = 2549; studies = 8; I(2) = 21%; very low-quality evidence). In trials involving only participants with proven acute myocardial infarction, lidocaine versus placebo or no intervention showed no significant differences in all-cause mortality (148/2747 (5.39%) vs 135/2506 (5.39%); RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.30; participants = 5253; studies = 16; I(2) = 9%; low-quality evidence). No significant differences were noted between lidocaine and any other antiarrhythmic drug in terms of all-cause mortality and ventricular fibrillation. Data on overall survival 30 days after myocardial infarction were not reported. Lidocaine compared with placebo or no intervention increased risk of asystole (35/3393 (1.03%) vs 14/3443 (0.41%); RR 2.32, 95% CI 1.26 to 4.26; participants = 6826; studies = 4; I(2) = 0%; very low-quality evidence) and dizziness/drowsiness (74/1259 (5.88%) vs 16/1274 (1.26%); RR 3.85, 95% CI

  12. α-Lipoic acid reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in rat myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury through activation of PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The present study investigates the effects and mechanisms of α-Lipoic acid (LA on myocardial infarct size, cardiac function and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rat hearts subjected to in vivo myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R injury. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male adult rats underwent 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 3, 24, or 72 h of reperfusion. Animals were pretreated with LA or vehicle before coronary artery ligation. The level of MI/R- induced LDH and CK release, infarct size, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac functional impairment were examined and compared. Western blot analysis was performed to elucidate the mechanism of LA pretreatment. The level of inflammatory cytokine TNF-α released to serum and accumulated in injured myocardium as well as neutrophil accumulation in injured myocardium were also examined after MI/R injury. Our results reveal that LA administration significantly reduced LDH and CK release, attenuated myocardial infarct size, decreased cardiomyocytes apoptosis, and partially preserved heart function. Western blot analysis showed that LA pretreatment up-regulated Akt phosphorylation and Nrf2 nuclear translocation while producing no impact on p38MAPK activation or nitric oxide (NO production. LA pretreatment also increased expression of HO-1, a major target of Nrf2. LA treatment inhibited neutrophil accumulation and release of TNF-α. Moreover, PI3K inhibition abolished the beneficial effects of LA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicates that LA attenuates cardiac dysfunction by reducing cardiomyoctyes necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation after MI/R. LA exerts its action by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway as well as subsequent Nrf2 nuclear translocation and induction of cytoprotective genes such as HO-1.

  13. 脑梗死患者病前智力的估计方法及其应用%Premorbid intelligence of patients with cerebral infarction:estimation and utilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐细容; 曾慧; 姚树桥

    2014-01-01

    effect size of 0.26,and so did IQs estimated with combination of demographic variables and performance on the Information or Figural Matrix (effect size:0.24 and 0.38 respectively).The latter two kinds of estimated IQs were adopted and transformed into standard scores to estimate premorbid intelligence.The two kinds of estimated normal scores of intelligence were higher than normal scores of the Digit Symbol (0.70 and 0.63 respectively) and the Block Design(0.67 and 0.61 respectively)in the patients group.As regarding the healthy group,the counterparts of discrepancies between estimates of intelligence and obtained scores were 0.21,0.21,0.12 and 0.12 respectively,which were significantly smaller than those in the patients group.Conclusion IQ estimated with combination of demographic variables and performance on the Information or Figural Matrix are suggested to estimate premorbid intelligence of patients with cerebral infarction.

  14. Distance software: design and analysis of distance sampling surveys for estimating population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Len; Buckland, Stephen T; Rexstad, Eric A; Laake, Jeff L; Strindberg, Samantha; Hedley, Sharon L; Bishop, Jon Rb; Marques, Tiago A; Burnham, Kenneth P

    2010-02-01

    1.Distance sampling is a widely used technique for estimating the size or density of biological populations. Many distance sampling designs and most analyses use the software Distance.2.We briefly review distance sampling and its assumptions, outline the history, structure and capabilities of Distance, and provide hints on its use.3.Good survey design is a crucial prerequisite for obtaining reliable results. Distance has a survey design engine, with a built-in geographic information system, that allows properties of different proposed designs to be examined via simulation, and survey plans to be generated.4.A first step in analysis of distance sampling data is modelling the probability of detection. Distance contains three increasingly sophisticated analysis engines for this: conventional distance sampling, which models detection probability as a function of distance from the transect and assumes all objects at zero distance are detected; multiple-covariate distance sampling, which allows covariates in addition to distance; and mark-recapture distance sampling, which relaxes the assumption of certain detection at zero distance.5.All three engines allow estimation of density or abundance, stratified if required, with associated measures of precision calculated either analytically or via the bootstrap.6.Advanced analysis topics covered include the use of multipliers to allow analysis of indirect surveys (such as dung or nest surveys), the density surface modelling analysis engine for spatial and habitat modelling, and information about accessing the analysis engines directly from other software.7.Synthesis and applications. Distance sampling is a key method for producing abundance and density estimates in challenging field conditions. The theory underlying the methods continues to expand to cope with realistic estimation situations. In step with theoretical developments, state-of-the-art software that implements these methods is described that makes the methods

  15. Transmission Bottleneck Size Estimation from Pathogen Deep-Sequencing Data, with an Application to Human Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel Leonard, Ashley; Weissman, Daniel B; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Ghedin, Elodie; Koelle, Katia

    2017-07-15

    The bottleneck governing infectious disease transmission describes the size of the pathogen population transferred from the donor to the recipient host. Accurate quantification of the bottleneck size is particularly important for rapidly evolving pathogens such as influenza virus, as narrow bottlenecks reduce the amount of transferred viral genetic diversity and, thus, may decrease the rate of viral adaptation. Previous studies have estimated bottleneck sizes governing viral transmission by using statistical analyses of variants identified in pathogen sequencing data. These analyses, however, did not account for variant calling thresholds and stochastic viral replication dynamics within recipient hosts. Because these factors can skew bottleneck size estimates, we introduce a new method for inferring bottleneck sizes that accounts for these factors. Through the use of a simulated data set, we first show that our method, based on beta-binomial sampling, accurately recovers transmission bottleneck sizes, whereas other methods fail to do so. We then apply our method to a data set of influenza A virus (IAV) infections for which viral deep-sequencing data from transmission pairs are available. We find that the IAV transmission bottleneck size estimates in this study are highly variable across transmission pairs, while the mean bottleneck size of 196 virions is consistent with a previous estimate for this data set. Furthermore, regression analysis shows a positive association between estimated bottleneck size and donor infection severity, as measured by temperature. These results support findings from experimental transmission studies showing that bottleneck sizes across transmission events can be variable and influenced in part by epidemiological factors.IMPORTANCE The transmission bottleneck size describes the size of the pathogen population transferred from the donor to the recipient host and may affect the rate of pathogen adaptation within host populations. Recent

  16. Transmission Bottleneck Size Estimation from Pathogen Deep-Sequencing Data, with an Application to Human Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel Leonard, Ashley; Weissman, Daniel B.; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Ghedin, Elodie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bottleneck governing infectious disease transmission describes the size of the pathogen population transferred from the donor to the recipient host. Accurate quantification of the bottleneck size is particularly important for rapidly evolving pathogens such as influenza virus, as narrow bottlenecks reduce the amount of transferred viral genetic diversity and, thus, may decrease the rate of viral adaptation. Previous studies have estimated bottleneck sizes governing viral transmission by using statistical analyses of variants identified in pathogen sequencing data. These analyses, however, did not account for variant calling thresholds and stochastic viral replication dynamics within recipient hosts. Because these factors can skew bottleneck size estimates, we introduce a new method for inferring bottleneck sizes that accounts for these factors. Through the use of a simulated data set, we first show that our method, based on beta-binomial sampling, accurately recovers transmission bottleneck sizes, whereas other methods fail to do so. We then apply our method to a data set of influenza A virus (IAV) infections for which viral deep-sequencing data from transmission pairs are available. We find that the IAV transmission bottleneck size estimates in this study are highly variable across transmission pairs, while the mean bottleneck size of 196 virions is consistent with a previous estimate for this data set. Furthermore, regression analysis shows a positive association between estimated bottleneck size and donor infection severity, as measured by temperature. These results support findings from experimental transmission studies showing that bottleneck sizes across transmission events can be variable and influenced in part by epidemiological factors. IMPORTANCE The transmission bottleneck size describes the size of the pathogen population transferred from the donor to the recipient host and may affect the rate of pathogen adaptation within host populations

  17. Integrating Breeding Bird Survey and demographic data to estimate Wood Duck population size in the Atlantic Flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Guthrie S.; Sauer, John; Boomer, G. Scott; Devers, Patrick K.; Garrettson, Pamela R.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) uses data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) to assist in monitoring and management of some migratory birds. However, BBS analyses provide indices of population change rather than estimates of population size, precluding their use in developing abundance-based objectives and limiting applicability to harvest management. Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) are important harvested birds in the Atlantic Flyway (AF) that are difficult to detect during aerial surveys because they prefer forested habitat. We integrated Wood Duck count data from a ground-plot survey in the northeastern U.S. with AF-wide BBS, banding, parts collection, and harvest data to derive estimates of population size for the AF. Overlapping results between the smaller-scale intensive ground-plot survey and the BBS in the northeastern U.S. provided a means for scaling BBS indices to the breeding population size estimates. We applied these scaling factors to BBS results for portions of the AF lacking intensive surveys. Banding data provided estimates of annual survival and harvest rates; the latter, when combined with parts-collection data, provided estimates of recruitment. We used the harvest data to estimate fall population size. Our estimates of breeding population size and variability from the integrated population model (N̄ = 0.99 million, SD = 0.04) were similar to estimates of breeding population size based solely on data from the AF ground-plot surveys and the BBS (N̄ = 1.01 million, SD = 0.04) from 1998 to 2015. Integrating BBS data with other data provided reliable population size estimates for Wood Ducks at a scale useful for harvest and habitat management in the AF, and allowed us to derive estimates of important demographic parameters (e.g., seasonal survival rates, sex ratio) that were not directly informed by data.

  18. Estimating the Size and Timing of the Maximum Amplitude of Solar Cycle 24

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Jun Li; Peng-Xin Gao; Tong-Wei Su

    2005-01-01

    A simple statistical method is used to estimate the size and timing of maximum amplitude of the next solar cycle (cycle 24). Presuming cycle 23 to be a short cycle (as is more likely), the minimum of cycle 24 should occur about December 2006 (±2 months) and the maximum, around March 2011 (±9 months),and the amplitude is 189.9 ± 15.5, if it is a fast riser, or about 136, if it is a slow riser. If we presume cycle 23 to be a long cycle (as is less likely), the minimum of cycle 24 should occur about June 2008 (±2 months) and the maximum, about February 2013 (±8 months) and the maximum will be about 137 or 80, according as the cycle is a fast riser or a slow riser.

  19. Risk and size estimation of debris flow caused by storm rainfall in mountain regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Genwei

    2003-01-01

    Debris flow is a common disaster in mountain regions. The valley slope, storm rainfall and amassed sand-rock materials in a watershed may influence the types of debris flow. The bursting of debris flow is not a pure random event. Field investigations show the periodicity of its burst, but no directive evidence has been found yet. A risk definition of debris flow is proposed here based upon the accumulation and the starting conditions of loose material in channel. According to this definition, the risk of debris flow is of quasi-periodicity. A formula of risk estimation is derived. Analysis of relative factors reveals the relationship between frequency and size of debris flow. For a debris flow creek, the longer the time interval between two occurrences of debris flows is, the bigger the bursting event will be.

  20. Estimation of the effective population size (Ne) and its application in the management of small populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Mena, Belen

    2016-01-01

    windows within chromosomes. Heterogeneity in Ne has implications for conservation management as Ne is used to evaluate the threat status of populations. Ne can vary locally along the genome, hence a population can be wrongly classified if heterogeneity in Ne is not taken into account when assessing...... the population against threat status thresholds. When molecular markers are not available, populations can be managed using pedigree information. However, this is challenging to do so for group-living species since individuals and their parentage are difficult to determine. We adapted a pedigree-based method......Effective population size (Ne) is an important concept to understand the evolution of a population. In conservation, Ne is used to assess the threat status of a population, evaluate its genetic viability in the future and set conservation priorities. An accurate estimation of Ne is thus essential...

  1. Puget Sound porpoise population - Estimates of harbor porpoise population size in the main basin of Puget Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Estimates of harbor porpoise population size in the main basin of Puget Sound. This abundance will be derived from established methodology for marine mammal...

  2. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data.

  3. Estimation of phytoplankton size fractions based on spectral features of remote sensing ocean color data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuchuan; Li, Lin; Song, Kaishan; Cassar, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Through its influence on the structure of pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton size distribution (pico-, nano-, and micro-plankton) is believed to play a key role in "the biological pump." In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to estimate phytoplankton size fractions (PSF) for micro-, nano-, and pico-plankton (fm, fn, and fp, respectively) from the spectral features of remote-sensing data. From remote-sensing reflectance spectrum (Rrs(λ)), the algorithm constructs four types of spectral features: a normalized Rrs(λ), band ratios, continuum-removed spectra, and spectral curvatures. Using support vector machine recursive feature elimination, the algorithm ranks the constructed spectral features and Rrs(λ) according to their sensitivities to PSF which is then regressed against the sensitive spectral features through support vector regression. The algorithm is validated with (1) simulated Rrs(λ) and PSF, and (2) Rrs(λ) obtained by Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and PSF determined from High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments. The validation results show the overall effectiveness of the algorithm in estimating PSF, with R2 of (1) 0.938 (fm) for the simulated SeaWiFS data set; and (2) 0.617 (fm), 0.475 (fn), and 0.587 (fp) for the SeaWiFS satellite data set. The validation results also indicate that continuum-removed spectra and spectral curvatures are the dominant spectral features sensitive to PSF with their wavelengths mainly centered on the pigment-absorption domain. Global spatial distributions of fm, fn, and fp were mapped with monthly SeaWiFS images. Overall, their biogeographical distributions are consistent with our current understanding that pico-plankton account for a large proportion of total phytoplankton biomass in oligotrophic regions, nano-plankton in transitional areas, and micro-plankton in high-productivity regions.

  4. Estimating the size of Romanian shadow economy using Gutmann’s simple currency ratio approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ana Maria DAVIDESCU (ALEXANDRU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Currency is widely assumed to have a comparative advantage over checks for the payment of purchases of goods and services that individuals wish to conceal from the authorities. A rise in currency stocks and payments may be taken as a rough indicator of the extent to which these transactions may not be reported to government authorities.The paper aims to estimate the size of subterranean economy using the simple currency ratio method of Gutmann for quarterly data covering the period 2000-2010. Thus, the study analyzes the ratio of currency to demand deposits in order to estimate the amount of economic activity in the subterranean economy.The empirical results point out that the illegal economic activities are about four billion RON at the middle of 2000; it constitutes 17.4 percent of the official GNP. During the period 2001-2004, illegal economic activities follow a downward path reaching 9.5% of official GNP at the end of 2004. For the period 2004-2006, unofficial economic activities fit a slow upward trend until the second quarter of 2006, for which the size of subterranean economy reaches the value of 12.3% of official GNP.Beginning with 2007, the amount of illegal activities as % of official GNP begin to decrease until the third quarter of 2008, which is the base year in which no shadow economy is supposed to exist. For the last years, the ratio of subterranean economy to official economy increased slowly, reaching about 9.3% in the second quarter of 2010.

  5. Integrating batch marks and radio tags to estimate the size of a closed population with a movement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Carl James; Cope, Scott; Fratton, Glenda

    2013-12-01

    Movement models require individually identifiable marks to estimate the movement rates among strata. But they are relatively expensive to apply and monitor. Batch marks can be readily applied, but individual animal movements cannot be identified. We describe a method to estimate population size in a stratified population when movement takes place among strata and animals are marked with a combination of batch and individually identifiable tags. A hierarchical model with Bayesian inference is developed that pools information across segments on the detection efficiency based on radio-tagged fish and also uses the movement of the radio-tagged fish to impute the movement of the batch-marked fish to provide estimates of the population size on a segment and river level. The batch marks provide important information to help estimate the movement rates, but contribute little to the overall estimate of the population size. In this case, the approximate equal catchability among strata in either sample obviates the need for stratification.

  6. ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF LATE VENEER IMPACTORS FROM IMPACT-INDUCED MIXING ON MERCURY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Barr, A. C., E-mail: rivera-valentin@brown.edu [Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, 324 Brook Street, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Late accretion of a ''veneer'' of compositionally diverse planetesimals may introduce chemical heterogeneity in the mantles of the terrestrial planets. The size of the late veneer objects is an important control on the angular momenta, eccentricities, and inclinations of the terrestrial planets, but current estimates range from meter-scale bodies to objects with diameters of thousands of kilometers. We use a three-dimensional global Monte Carlo model of impact cratering, excavation, and ejecta blanket formation to show that evidence of mantle heterogeneity can be preserved within ejecta blankets of mantle-exhuming impacts on terrestrial planets. Compositionally distinct provinces implanted at the time of the late veneer are most likely to be preserved in bodies whose subsequent geodynamical evolution is limited. Mercury may have avoided intensive mixing by solid-state convection during much of its history. Its subsequent bombardment may have then excavated evidence of primordial mantle heterogeneity introduced by the late veneer. Simple geometric arguments can predict the amount of mantle material in the ejecta blanket of mantle-exhuming impacts, and deviations in composition relative to geometric predictions can constrain the length-scale of chemical heterogeneities in the subsurface. A marked change in the relationship between mantle and ejecta composition occurs when chemically distinct provinces are ∼250 km in diameter; thus, evidence of bombardment by thousand-kilometer-sized objects should be readily apparent from the variation in compositions of ejecta blankets in Mercury's ancient cratered terrains.

  7. Smaller desert dust cooling effect estimated from analysis of dust size and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Ridley, David A.; Zhou, Qing; Miller, Ron L.; Zhao, Chun; Heald, Colette L.; Ward, Daniel S.; Albani, Samuel; Haustein, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Desert dust aerosols affect Earth's global energy balance through direct interactions with radiation, and through indirect interactions with clouds and ecosystems. But the magnitudes of these effects are so uncertain that it remains unclear whether atmospheric dust has a net warming or cooling effect on global climate. Consequently, it is still uncertain whether large changes in atmospheric dust loading over the past century have slowed or accelerated anthropogenic climate change, or what the effects of potential future changes in dust loading will be. Here we present an analysis of the size and abundance of dust aerosols to constrain the direct radiative effect of dust. Using observational data on dust abundance, in situ measurements of dust optical properties and size distribution, and climate and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations of dust lifetime, we find that the dust found in the atmosphere is substantially coarser than represented in current global climate models. As coarse dust warms the climate, the global dust direct radiative effect is likely to be less cooling than the ~-0.4 W m-2 estimated by models in a current global aerosol model ensemble. Instead, we constrain the dust direct radiative effect to a range between -0.48 and +0.20 W m-2, which includes the possibility that dust causes a net warming of the planet.

  8. SANDY: A Matlab tool to estimate the sediment size distribution from a sieve analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Martínez, Gabriel; Rivillas-Ospina, Germán Daniel; Mariño-Tapia, Ismael; Posada-Vanegas, Gregorio

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new computational tool called SANDY© which calculates the sediment size distribution and its textural parameters from a sieved sediment sample using Matlab®. The tool has been developed for professionals involved in the study of sediment transport along coastal margins, estuaries, rivers and desert dunes. The algorithm uses several types of statistical analyses to obtain the main textural characteristics of the sediment sample (D50, mean, sorting, skewness and kurtosis). SANDY© includes the method of moments (geometric, arithmetic and logarithmic approaches) and graphical methods (geometric, arithmetic and mixed approaches). In addition, it provides graphs of the sediment size distribution and its classification. The computational tool automatically exports all the graphs as enhanced metafile images and the final report is also exported as a plain text file. Parameters related to bed roughness such as Nikuradse and roughness length are also computed. Theoretical depositional environments are established by a discriminant function analysis. Using the uniformity coefficient the hydraulic conductivity of the sand as well as the porosity and void ratio of the sediment sample are obtained. The maximum relative density related to sand compaction is also computed. The Matlab® routine can compute one or several samples. SANDY© is a useful tool for estimating the sediment textural parameters which are the basis for studies of sediment transport.

  9. A NOVEL APPROACH TO VIDEO COMPRESSION TECHNIQUE USING VARIABLE BLOCK SIZES IN MOTION ESTIMATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinith Chauhan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Compression basically means reducing image data. As mentioned previously, a digitized analog video sequence can comprise of up to 165 Mbps of data. To reduce the media overheads for distributing these sequences, the following techniques are commonly employed to achieve desirable reductions in image data Reduce color nuances within the image, reduce the color resolution with respect to the prevailing light intensity, Remove small, invisible parts, of the picture, Compare adjacent images and remove details that are unchanged between two images. The first three are image based compression techniques, where only one frame is evaluated and compressed at a time. The last one is or video compression technique where different adjacent frames are compared as a way to further reduced the image data. All of these techniques are based on an accurate understanding of how the human brain and eyes work together to form a complex visual system. As a result of these subtle reductions, a significant reduction in the resultant files size for the image sequences is achievable with little or no adverse effect in their visual quality. The extent, to which these image modifications are humanly visible, is typically dependent upon the degree to which the chosen compression technique is used. Often 50% to 90% compression can be achieved with no visible difference, and in some scenarios even beyond 95%. In this paper variable block sizes in motion estimation process is used for video compression.

  10. Population Size Estimation of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Tbilisi, Georgia; Multiple Methods and Triangulation of Findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lela Sulaberidze

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of the population size of men who have sex with men (MSM is critical to the success of HIV program planning and to monitoring of the response to epidemic as a whole, but is quite often missing. In this study, our aim was to estimate the population size of MSM in Tbilisi, Georgia and compare it with other estimates in the region.In the absence of a gold standard for estimating the population size of MSM, this study reports a range of methods, including network scale-up, mobile/web apps multiplier, service and unique object multiplier, network-based capture-recapture, Handcock RDS-based and Wisdom of Crowds methods. To apply all these methods, two surveys were conducted: first, a household survey among 1,015 adults from the general population, and second, a respondent driven sample of 210 MSM. We also conducted a literature review of MSM size estimation in Eastern European and Central Asian countries.The median population size of MSM generated from all previously mentioned methods was estimated to be 5,100 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 3,243~9,088. This corresponds to 1.42% (95%CI: 0.9%~2.53% of the adult male population in Tbilisi.Our size estimates of the MSM population (1.42% (95%CI: 0.9%~2.53% of the adult male population in Tbilisi fall within ranges reported in other Eastern European and Central Asian countries. These estimates can provide valuable information for country level HIV prevention program planning and evaluation. Furthermore, we believe, that our results will narrow the gap in data availability on the estimates of the population size of MSM in the region.

  11. Atmospheric number size distributions of soot particles and estimation of emission factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rose

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Number fractions of externally mixed particles of four different sizes (30, 50, 80, and 150 nm in diameter were measured using a Volatility Tandem DMA. The system was operated in a street canyon (Eisenbahnstrasse, EI and at an urban background site (Institute for Tropospheric Research, IfT, both in the city of Leipzig, Germany as well as at a rural site (Melpitz (ME, a village near Leipzig. Intensive campaigns of 3–5 weeks each took place in summer 2003 as well as in winter 2003/04. The data set thus obtained provides mean number fractions of externally mixed soot particles of atmospheric aerosols in differently polluted areas and different seasons (e.g. at 80 nm on working days, 60% (EI, 22% (IfT, and 6% (ME in summer and 26% (IfT, and 13% (ME in winter. Furthermore, a new method is used to calculate the size distribution of these externally mixed soot particles from parallel number size distribution measurements. A decrease of the externally mixed soot fraction with decreasing urbanity and a diurnal variation linked to the daily traffic changes demonstrate, that the traffic emissions have a significant impact on the soot fraction in urban areas. This influence becomes less in rural areas, due to atmospheric mixing and transformation processes. For estimating the source strength of soot particles emitted by vehicles (veh, soot particle emission factors were calculated using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM. The emission factor for an average vehicle was found to be (1.5±0.4·1014 #(km·veh. The separation of the emission factor into passenger cars ((5.8±2·1013} #(km·veh and trucks ((2.5±0.9·1015 #(km·veh yielded in a 40-times higher emission factor for trucks compared to passenger cars.

  12. Estimating particle sizes, concentrations, and total mass of ash in volcanic clouds using weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D. M.; Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    Radar observations of the March 19, 1982 ash eruption of Mount St. Helens were used to estimate the volume of the ash cloud (2000 + or - 500 cu km), the concentration of ash (0.2-0.6 g/cu m), and the total mass of ash erupted (3-10 x 10 to the 11th g). Previously published ashfall data for the May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption were studied using an inversion technique to estimate 6-hr mean particle concentration (3 g/cu m), the size distribution, the total ashfall mass (5 x 10 to the 14th g), and radar reflectivity factors for the ash cloud. Because volcanic ash clouds with particle concentrations of at least 0.2 g/cu m are produced in very small (in terms of total ashfall mass) eruptions of duration less than 1 min, volcanic ash clouds must be considered an extremely serious hazard to in-flight aircraft, regardless of the eruption magnitude.

  13. Estimation of avian population sizes and species richness across a boreal landscape in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, C.M.; Swanson, S.A.; Nigro, Debora A.; Matsuoka, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the distribution of birds breeding within five ecological landforms in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, a 10,194-km2 roadless conservation unit on the Alaska-Canada border in the boreal forest zone. Passerines dominated the avifauna numerically, comprising 97% of individuals surveyed but less than half of the 115 species recorded in the Preserve. We used distance-sampling and discrete-removal models to estimate detection probabilities, densities, and population sizes across the Preserve for 23 species of migrant passerines and five species of resident passerines. Yellow-rumped Warblers (Dendroica coronata) and Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) were the most abundant species, together accounting for 41% of the migrant passerine populations estimated. White-winged Crossbills (Loxia leucoptera), Boreal Chickadees (Poecile hudsonica), and Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis) were the most abundant residents. Species richness was greatest in the Floodplain/Terrace landform flanking the Yukon River but densities were highest in the Subalpine landform. Species composition was related to past glacial history and current physiography of the region and differed notably from other areas of the northwestern boreal forest. Point-transect surveys, augmented with auxiliary observations, were well suited to sampling the largely passerine avifauna across this rugged landscape and could be used across the boreal forest region to monitor changes in northern bird distribution and abundance. ?? 2009 The Wilson Ornithological Society.

  14. A new way of using modelling to estimate the size of a motoneurone's EPSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter B C

    2002-01-01

    Earlier modelling of a noisy motoneurone has been extended to provide a new measure of excitability. The distance-to-threshold estimate of an MN's AHP, derived from its interval histogram, is used to create a simplified daughter model to mimic the behaviour of its parent and determine a new measure of an MN's response to a stimulus. This Estimated Potential (EP) provides a linear measure of the size of the parent's underlying EPSP, irrespective of its firing rate, and thereby improves on the classic firing index from which it is derived. The EP is applicable with both random and spike-triggered stimulation. It is emphasized that in the presence of noise a tonically firing MN's average responsiveness at a given time during its AHP depends upon what may be termed the "survivor's mean trajectory", rather than upon the "distance to threshold" AHP found in the absence of noise; these differ because noise-induced spiking eliminates individual trajectories when they reach threshold.

  15. Application of the LSQR algorithm in non-parametric estimation of aerosol size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Lew, Zhongyuan; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping; Luo, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Based on the Least Squares QR decomposition (LSQR) algorithm, the aerosol size distribution (ASD) is retrieved in non-parametric approach. The direct problem is solved by the Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA) and the Lambert-Beer Law. An optimal wavelength selection method is developed to improve the retrieval accuracy of the ASD. The proposed optimal wavelength set is selected by the method which can make the measurement signals sensitive to wavelength and decrease the degree of the ill-condition of coefficient matrix of linear systems effectively to enhance the anti-interference ability of retrieval results. Two common kinds of monomodal and bimodal ASDs, log-normal (L-N) and Gamma distributions, are estimated, respectively. Numerical tests show that the LSQR algorithm can be successfully applied to retrieve the ASD with high stability in the presence of random noise and low susceptibility to the shape of distributions. Finally, the experimental measurement ASD over Harbin in China is recovered reasonably. All the results confirm that the LSQR algorithm combined with the optimal wavelength selection method is an effective and reliable technique in non-parametric estimation of ASD.

  16. A multi-resolution multi-size-windows disparity estimation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Bauza, Judit; Shiralkar, Manish

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for estimating the disparity between 2 images of a stereo pair. The disparity is related to the depth of the objects in the scene. Being able to obtain the depth of the objects in the scene is useful in many applications such as virtual reality, 3D user interfaces, background-foreground segmentation, or depth-image-based synthesis. This last application has motivated the proposed algorithm as part of a system that estimates disparities from a stereo pair and synthesizes new views. Synthesizing virtual views enables the post-processing of 3D content to adapt to user preferences or viewing conditions, as well as enabling the interface with multi-view auto-stereoscopic displays. The proposed algorithm has been designed to fulfill the following constraints: (a) low memory requirements, (b) local and parallelizable processing, and (c) adaptability to a sudden reduction in processing resources. Our solution uses a multi-resolution multi-size-windows approach, implemented as a line-independent process, well-suited for GPU implementation. The multi-resolution approach provides adaptability to sudden reduction in processing capabilities, besides computational advantages; the windows-based image processing algorithm guarantees low-memory requirements and local processing.

  17. Effects of sample size on estimation of rainfall extremes at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Boessenkool

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High precipitation quantiles tend to rise with temperature, following the so-called Clausius–Clapeyron (CC scaling. It is often reported that the CC-scaling relation breaks down and even reverts for very high temperatures. In our study, we investigate this reversal using observational climate data from 142 stations across Germany. One of the suggested meteorological explanations for the breakdown is limited moisture supply. Here we argue that, instead, it could simply originate from undersampling. As rainfall frequency generally decreases with higher temperatures, rainfall intensities as dictated by CC scaling are less likely to be recorded than for moderate temperatures. Empirical quantiles are conventionally estimated from order statistics via various forms of plotting position formulas. They have in common that their largest representable return period is given by the sample size. In small samples, high quantiles are underestimated accordingly. The small-sample effect is weaker, or disappears completely, when using parametric quantile estimates from a generalized Pareto distribution (GPD fitted with L moments. For those, we obtain quantiles of rainfall intensities that continue to rise with temperature.

  18. Estimation of the population size of Canadian commercial poultry farms by log-linear capture-recapture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allaki, Farouk; Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André; Paré, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the population size of Canadian poultry farms in 3 subpopulations (British Columbia, Ontario, and Other) by poultry category. We used data for 2008 to 2011 from the Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza (NAI) Surveillance System (CanNAISS). Log-linear capture-recapture models were applied to estimate the number of commercial chicken and turkey farms. The estimated size of farm populations was validated by comparing sizes to data provided by the Canadian poultry industry in 2007, which were assumed to be complete and exhaustive. Our results showed that the log-linear modelling approach was an appropriate tool to estimate the population size of Canadian commercial chicken and turkey farms. The 2007 farm population size for each poultry category was included in the 95% confidence intervals of the farm population size estimates. Log-linear capture-recapture modelling might be useful for estimating the number of farms using surveillance data when no comprehensive registry exists.

  19. Soluble TNF-related apoptosis induced ligand (sTRAIL) is augmented by Post-Conditioning and correlates to infarct size and left ventricle dysfunction in STEMI patients: a substudy from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, André; Santos, Mário; Magalhães, Rui; Oliveira, José Carlos; Pacheco, Ana; Silveira, João; Cabral, Sofia; Torres, Severo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Carvalho, Henrique

    2017-02-01

    Low levels of Soluble TNF-related apoptosis induced ligand (sTRAIL) seem to be related to worse prognosis after an acute coronary syndrome. PostConditioning (PostCond) may protect the heart from reperfusion injury. We sought to evaluate the impact of PostCond on sTRAIL in relationship to infarct size (area under the curve of Troponin T, AUCTnT) and left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) in a series of patients undergoing primary coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In a substudy of a randomized trial that tested the effects of PostCond in STEMI-patients, sTRAIL was measured 24 h after reperfusion (PostCond n = 39, Control n = 39). Correlations between sTRAIL and both AUCTnT and LVEF were studied for each study arm. At 24 h, sTRAIL was higher for PostCond vs Controls (46.4 ± 30.6 vs 32.9 ± 23.4, p = 0.031), was negatively related to AUCTnT [B = -0.09, 95 % CI (-0.15 to -0.30), p = 0.005] and was positively related to both in-hospital [B = 0.10, 95 % CI (0.02-0.17), p = 0.018], and follow-up LVEF [B = 0.21, 95 % (0.10-0.32), p = 0.001]. No significant relationship was found for Controls. On multivariate analysis, PostCond was an independent predictor for sTRAIL [B = 12.13 95 % CI (0.40-23.87), p = 0.043]. In conclusion, PostCond positively influenced sTRAIL, which was related to reduced infarct size and better LVEF. Further studies are needed to understand potential mechanisms elicited by PostCond in infarct size reduction.

  20. Novel adjunctive treatments of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Pryds, Kasper; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability worldwide and myocardial infarct size is a major determinant of prognosis. Early and successful restoration of myocardial reperfusion following an ischemic event is the most effective strategy to reduce final infarct size and improve...... by endovascular infusion of cold saline all reduce infarct size and may confer clinical benefit for patients admitted with acute myocardial infarcts. Equally promising, three follow-up studies of the effect of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) show clinical prognostic benefit in patients undergoing coronary...... clinical outcome, but reperfusion may induce further myocardial damage itself. Development of adjunctive therapies to limit myocardial reperfusion injury beyond opening of the coronary artery gains increasing attention. A vast number of experimental studies have shown cardioprotective effects of ischemic...

  1. Robust Variance Estimation with Dependent Effect Sizes: Practical Considerations Including a Software Tutorial in Stata and SPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Methodologists have recently proposed robust variance estimation as one way to handle dependent effect sizes in meta-analysis. Software macros for robust variance estimation in meta-analysis are currently available for Stata (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA) and SPSS (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), yet there is little guidance for authors regarding…

  2. Robust Variance Estimation with Dependent Effect Sizes: Practical Considerations Including a Software Tutorial in Stata and SPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Methodologists have recently proposed robust variance estimation as one way to handle dependent effect sizes in meta-analysis. Software macros for robust variance estimation in meta-analysis are currently available for Stata (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA) and SPSS (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), yet there is little guidance for authors regarding…

  3. Comparison of the effects of two bongo net mesh sizes on the estimation of abundance and size of Engraulidae eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Menegassi del Favero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies of ichthyoplankton retention by nets of different mesh sizes are important because they help in choosing a sampler when planning collection and the establishment of correction factors. These factors make it possible to compare studies performed with nets of different mesh sizes. In most studies of mesh retention of fish eggs, the taxonomic identification is done at the family level, resulting in the loss of detailed information. We separated Engraulidae eggs, obtained with 0.333 mm and 0.505 mm mesh bongo nets at 172 oceanographic stations in the southeastern Brazilian Bight, into four groups based on their morphometric characteristics. The difference in the abundance of eggs caught by the two nets was not significant for those groups with highest volume, types A and B, but in type C (Engraulis anchoita, the most eccentric, and in type D, of the smallest volume, the difference was significant. However, no significant difference was observed in the egg size sampled with each net for E. anchoita and type D, which exhibited higher abundance in the 0.333 mm mesh net and minor axis varying from 0.45-0.71 mm, smaller than the 0.505 mm mesh aperture and the mesh diagonal.

  4. Do Adults Show a Curse of Knowledge in False-Belief Reasoning? A Robust Estimate of the True Effect Size

    OpenAIRE

    Ryskin, Rachel A.; Sarah Brown-Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than...

  5. Numerical analysis for determination of the presence of a tumor and estimation of its size and location in a tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik; Singh, Rupesh; Mishra, Subhash C

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the numerical analysis to ascertain the presence of a tumor and to estimate its size and location in a tissue. Heat transfer in the tissue is modeled using the Pennes bioheat transfer equation, and is solved using the finite volume method. Consideration is given to 1-D brain and breast tissues. Temperature distributions in the tissues are specific to the tumor grades, its locations and sizes, and these are different than that of a normal tissue. With temperature distribution known a priori, estimations of the position and the size of a tumor are done using the inverse analysis. The proposed approach gives a correct estimation of the presence of a tumor and its location and size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating Total Claim Size in the Auto Insurance Industry: a Comparison between Tweedie and Zero-Adjusted Inverse Gaussian Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bruscato Bortoluzzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to estimate insurance claims from an auto dataset using the Tweedie and zero-adjusted inverse Gaussian (ZAIG methods. We identify factors that influence claim size and probability, and compare the results of these methods which both forecast outcomes accurately. Vehicle characteristics like territory, age, origin and type distinctly influence claim size and probability. This distinct impact is not always present in the Tweedie estimated model. Auto insurers should consider estimating total claim size using both the Tweedie and ZAIG methods. This allows for an estimation of confidence interval based on empirical quantiles using bootstrap simulation. Furthermore, the fitted models may be useful in developing a strategy to obtain premium pricing.

  7. A Machine Learning Approach to Estimate Riverbank Geotechnical Parameters from Sediment Particle Size Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Fabio; Brooks, Andrew; Spencer, John; Borombovits, Daniel; Curwen, Graeme; Olley, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Assessing bank stability using geotechnical models traditionally involves the laborious collection of data on the bank and floodplain stratigraphy, as well as in-situ geotechnical data for each sedimentary unit within a river bank. The application of geotechnical bank stability models are limited to those sites where extensive field data has been collected, where their ability to provide predictions of bank erosion at the reach scale are limited without a very extensive and expensive field data collection program. Some challenges in the construction and application of riverbank erosion and hydraulic numerical models are their one-dimensionality, steady-state requirements, lack of calibration data, and nonuniqueness. Also, numerical models commonly can be too rigid with respect to detecting unexpected features like the onset of trends, non-linear relations, or patterns restricted to sub-samples of a data set. These shortcomings create the need for an alternate modelling approach capable of using available data. The application of the Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) approach is well-suited to the analysis of noisy, sparse, nonlinear, multidimensional, and scale-dependent data. It is a type of unsupervised artificial neural network with hybrid competitive-cooperative learning. In this work we present a method that uses a database of geotechnical data collected at over 100 sites throughout Queensland State, Australia, to develop a modelling approach that enables geotechnical parameters (soil effective cohesion, friction angle, soil erodibility and critical stress) to be derived from sediment particle size data (PSD). The model framework and predicted values were evaluated using two methods, splitting the dataset into training and validation set, and through a Bootstrap approach. The basis of Bootstrap cross-validation is a leave-one-out strategy. This requires leaving one data value out of the training set while creating a new SOM to estimate that missing value based on the

  8. Squares of different sizes: effect of geographical projection on model parameter estimates in species distribution modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budic, Lara; Didenko, Gregor; Dormann, Carsten F

    2016-01-01

    In species distribution analyses, environmental predictors and distribution data for large spatial extents are often available in long-lat format, such as degree raster grids. Long-lat projections suffer from unequal cell sizes, as a degree of longitude decreases in length from approximately 110 km at the equator to 0 km at the poles. Here we investigate whether long-lat and equal-area projections yield similar model parameter estimates, or result in a consistent bias. We analyzed the environmental effects on the distribution of 12 ungulate species with a northern distribution, as models for these species should display the strongest effect of projectional distortion. Additionally we choose four species with entirely continental distributions to investigate the effect of incomplete cell coverage at the coast. We expected that including model weights proportional to the actual cell area should compensate for the observed bias in model coefficients, and similarly that using land coverage of a cell should decrease bias in species with coastal distribution. As anticipated, model coefficients were different between long-lat and equal-area projections. Having progressively smaller and a higher number of cells with increasing latitude influenced the importance of parameters in models, increased the sample size for the northernmost parts of species ranges, and reduced the subcell variability of those areas. However, this bias could be largely removed by weighting long-lat cells by the area they cover, and marginally by correcting for land coverage. Overall we found little effect of using long-lat rather than equal-area projections in our analysis. The fitted relationship between environmental parameters and occurrence probability differed only very little between the two projection types. We still recommend using equal-area projections to avoid possible bias. More importantly, our results suggest that the cell area and the proportion of a cell covered by land should be

  9. Integration of in situ Imaging and Chord Length Distribution Measurements for Estimation of Particle Size and Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Agimelen, Okpeafoh S; McGinty, John; Tachtatzis, Christos; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Haley, Ian; Sefcik, Jan; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient processing of particulate products across various manufacturing steps requires that particles possess desired attributes such as size and shape. Controlling the particle production process to obtain required attributes will be greatly facilitated using robust algorithms providing the size and shape information of the particles from in situ measurements. However, obtaining particle size and shape information in situ during manufacturing has been a big challenge. This is because the problem of estimating particle size and shape (aspect ratio) from signals provided by in-line measuring tools is often ill posed, and therefore it calls for appropriate constraints to be imposed on the problem. One way to constrain uncertainty in estimation of particle size and shape from in-line measurements is to combine data from different measurements such as chord length distribution (CLD) and imaging. This paper presents two different methods for combining imaging and CLD data obtained with in-line tools in order to ...

  10. Fitting state-space integral projection models to size-structured time series data to estimate unknown parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J Wilson; Nickols, Kerry J; Malone, Daniel; Carr, Mark H; Starr, Richard M; Cordoleani, Flora; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan; Botsford, Louis W

    2016-12-01

    Integral projection models (IPMs) have a number of advantages over matrix-model approaches for analyzing size-structured population dynamics, because the latter require parameter estimates for each age or stage transition. However, IPMs still require appropriate data. Typically they are parameterized using individual-scale relationships between body size and demographic rates, but these are not always available. We present an alternative approach for estimating demographic parameters from time series of size-structured survey data using a Bayesian state-space IPM (SSIPM). By fitting an IPM in a state-space framework, we estimate unknown parameters and explicitly account for process and measurement error in a dataset to estimate the underlying process model dynamics. We tested our method by fitting SSIPMs to simulated data; the model fit the simulated size distributions well and estimated unknown demographic parameters accurately. We then illustrated our method using nine years of annual surveys of the density and size distribution of two fish species (blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus, and gopher rockfish, S. carnatus) at seven kelp forest sites in California. The SSIPM produced reasonable fits to the data, and estimated fishing rates for both species that were higher than our Bayesian prior estimates based on coast-wide stock assessment estimates of harvest. That improvement reinforces the value of being able to estimate demographic parameters from local-scale monitoring data. We highlight a number of key decision points in SSIPM development (e.g., open vs. closed demography, number of particles in the state-space filter) so that users can apply the method to their own datasets. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Reliable estimation of adsorption isotherm parameters using adequate pore size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseinzadeh, Danial; Shahsavand, Akbar [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The equilibrium adsorption isotherm has a crucial effect on various characteristics of the solid adsorbent (e.g., pore volume, bulk density, surface area, pore geometry). A historical paradox exists in conventional estimation of adsorption isotherm parameters. Traditionally, the total amount of adsorb material (total adsorption isotherm) has been considered equivalent to the local adsorption isotherm. This assumption is only valid when the corresponding pore size or energy distribution (PSD or ED) of the porous adsorbent can be successfully represented with the Dirac delta function. In practice, the actual PSD (or ED) is far from such assumption, and the traditional method for prediction of local adsorption isotherm parameters leads to serious errors. Up to now, the powerful combination of inverse theory and linear regularization technique has drastically failed when used for extraction of PSD from real adsorption data. For this reason, all previous researches used synthetic data because they were not able to extract proper PSD from the measured total adsorption isotherm with unrealistic parameters of local adsorption isotherm. We propose a novel approach that can successfully provide the correct values of local adsorption isotherm parameters without any a priori and unrealistic assumptions. Two distinct methods are suggested and several illustrative (synthetic and real experimental) examples are presented to clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly proposed methods on computing the correct values of local adsorption isotherm parameters. The so-called Iterative and Optima methods' impressive performances on extraction of correct PSD are validated using several experimental data sets.

  12. Estimation of the size of molluscan larval settlement using the death assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, E. N.; Cummins, H.; Stanton, R. J.; Staff, G.

    1984-04-01

    The death assemblage is an important source of information about temporal variability in community composition. The living community and the short-term death assemblage have been studied at a sandy-bottom station in the Laguna Madre, Texas. Abundance peaks of living species are usually followed by long-term abundance increases of the same species in the death assemblage. This phenomenon provides a tool for investigating between-sampling-occasion events in the preservable component of the living community. Given a six-week sampling regimen, approximately 90% of all individuals settle, live and die during the period between consecutive sampling occasions and are not collected alive. Thus, larval settlements are consistently underestimated by about 90% from data on the living community. Comparisons of year-to-year variability in settlement and survivorship of settled individuals in the youngest age classes may be considerably in error. Better estimations of actual settlement and survivorship can be made from the death assemblage provided that the rate of taphonomic loss can be quantified. The rate of taphonomic loss can be expressed as the species' half-life, the time required for the destruction of 50% of the individuals that were added to the death assemblage following settlement. Half-lives for the smallest size classes in the death assemblage at this site are about 100 days.

  13. Automatic infarct planimetry by means of swarm-based clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Van Vuuren, Pieter A.; Van Vuuren, Derick

    2014-01-01

    Infarct planimetry is an important tool in cardiology research. At present this technique entails that infarct size is manually determined from scanned images of prepared heart sections. Existing attempts at automating infarct planimetry are limited in that they require user input in the form of starting points for region growing algorithms or template values for classification algorithms. In this paper a new automatic infarct planimetry (AIP) algorithm is presented. The ...

  14. How Big Is It Really? Assessing the Efficacy of Indirect Estimates of Body Size in Asian Elephants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N Chapman

    Full Text Available Information on an organism's body size is pivotal in understanding its life history and fitness, as well as helping inform conservation measures. However, for many species, particularly large-bodied wild animals, taking accurate body size measurements can be a challenge. Various means to estimate body size have been employed, from more direct methods such as using photogrammetry to obtain height or length measurements, to indirect prediction of weight using other body morphometrics or even the size of dung boli. It is often unclear how accurate these measures are because they cannot be compared to objective measures. Here, we investigate how well existing estimation equations predict the actual body weight of Asian elephants Elephas maximus, using body measurements (height, chest girth, length, foot circumference and neck circumference taken directly from a large population of semi-captive animals in Myanmar (n = 404. We then define new and better fitting formulas to predict body weight in Myanmar elephants from these readily available measures. We also investigate whether the important parameters height and chest girth can be estimated from photographs (n = 151. Our results show considerable variation in the ability of existing estimation equations to predict weight, and that the equations proposed in this paper predict weight better in almost all circumstances. We also find that measurements from standardised photographs reflect body height and chest girth after applying minor adjustments. Our results have implications for size estimation of large wild animals in the field, as well as for management in captive settings.

  15. How Big Is It Really? Assessing the Efficacy of Indirect Estimates of Body Size in Asian Elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon N; Mumby, Hannah S; Crawley, Jennie A H; Mar, Khyne U; Htut, Win; Thura Soe, Aung; Aung, Htoo Htoo; Lummaa, Virpi

    2016-01-01

    Information on an organism's body size is pivotal in understanding its life history and fitness, as well as helping inform conservation measures. However, for many species, particularly large-bodied wild animals, taking accurate body size measurements can be a challenge. Various means to estimate body size have been employed, from more direct methods such as using photogrammetry to obtain height or length measurements, to indirect prediction of weight using other body morphometrics or even the size of dung boli. It is often unclear how accurate these measures are because they cannot be compared to objective measures. Here, we investigate how well existing estimation equations predict the actual body weight of Asian elephants Elephas maximus, using body measurements (height, chest girth, length, foot circumference and neck circumference) taken directly from a large population of semi-captive animals in Myanmar (n = 404). We then define new and better fitting formulas to predict body weight in Myanmar elephants from these readily available measures. We also investigate whether the important parameters height and chest girth can be estimated from photographs (n = 151). Our results show considerable variation in the ability of existing estimation equations to predict weight, and that the equations proposed in this paper predict weight better in almost all circumstances. We also find that measurements from standardised photographs reflect body height and chest girth after applying minor adjustments. Our results have implications for size estimation of large wild animals in the field, as well as for management in captive settings.

  16. Beak Measurements of Octopus (Octopus variabilis) in Jiaozhou Bay and Their Use in Size and Biomass Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ying; REN Yiping; MENG Wenrong; LI Long; MAO Xia; HAN Dongyan; MA Qiuyun

    2013-01-01

    Cephalopods play key roles in global marine ecosystems as both predators and preys.Regressive estimation of original size and weight of cephalopod from beak measurements is a powerful tool of interrogating the feeding ecology of predators at higher trophic levels.In this study,regressive relationships among beak measurements and body length and weight were determined for an octopus species (Octopus variabilis),an important endemic cephalopod species in the northwest Pacific Ocean.A total of 193 individuals (63 males and 130 females) were collected at a monthly interval from Jiaozhou Bay,China.Regressive relationships among 6 beak measurements (upper hood length,UHL; upper crest length,UCL; lower hood length,LHL; lower crest length,LCL; and upper and lower beak weights) and mantle length (ML),total length (TL) and body weight (W) were determined.Results showed that the relationships between beak size and TL and beak size and ML were linearly regressive,while those between beak size and W fitted a power function model.LHL and UCL were the most useful measurements for estimating the size and biomass of O.variabilis.The relationships among beak measurements and body length (either ML or TL) were not significantly different between two sexes; while those among several beak measurements (UHL,LHL and LBW) and body weight (W) were sexually different.Since male individuals of this species have a slightly greater body weight distribution than female individuals,the body weight was not an appropriate measurement for estimating size and biomass,especially when the sex of individuals in the stomachs of predators was unknown.These relationships provided essential information for future use in size and biomass estimation of O.variabilis,as well as the estimation of predator/prey size ratios in the diet of top predators.

  17. Beak measurements of octopus ( Octopus variabilis) in Jiaozhou Bay and their use in size and biomass estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Ren, Yiping; Meng, Wenrong; Li, Long; Mao, Xia; Han, Dongyan; Ma, Qiuyun

    2013-09-01

    Cephalopods play key roles in global marine ecosystems as both predators and preys. Regressive estimation of original size and weight of cephalopod from beak measurements is a powerful tool of interrogating the feeding ecology of predators at higher trophic levels. In this study, regressive relationships among beak measurements and body length and weight were determined for an octopus species ( Octopus variabilis), an important endemic cephalopod species in the northwest Pacific Ocean. A total of 193 individuals (63 males and 130 females) were collected at a monthly interval from Jiaozhou Bay, China. Regressive relationships among 6 beak measurements (upper hood length, UHL; upper crest length, UCL; lower hood length, LHL; lower crest length, LCL; and upper and lower beak weights) and mantle length (ML), total length (TL) and body weight (W) were determined. Results showed that the relationships between beak size and TL and beak size and ML were linearly regressive, while those between beak size and W fitted a power function model. LHL and UCL were the most useful measurements for estimating the size and biomass of O. variabilis. The relationships among beak measurements and body length (either ML or TL) were not significantly different between two sexes; while those among several beak measurements (UHL, LHL and LBW) and body weight (W) were sexually different. Since male individuals of this species have a slightly greater body weight distribution than female individuals, the body weight was not an appropriate measurement for estimating size and biomass, especially when the sex of individuals in the stomachs of predators was unknown. These relationships provided essential information for future use in size and biomass estimation of O. variabilis, as well as the estimation of predator/prey size ratios in the diet of top predators.

  18. 超声二维心肌应变的变化与心肌梗死范围的相关性研究%Relation between myocardial strain and infarction size detected by two-dimensional echocardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梅青; 王秋霜; 黄党生; 张丽伟; 欧阳巧红; 王宇玫; 安秀芝

    2013-01-01

    目的 评价心肌梗死患者超声二维心肌应变的变化与心肌梗死范围的相关性.方法 选择71例急性心肌梗死患者,于心肌梗死后3~6个月行超声心动图和单光子发射计算机断层摄影(SPECT)检查,根据心肌梗死面积将患者分为A组28例(心肌梗死面积<12%),B组43例(心肌梗死面积≥12%).所有患者行超声二维斑点追踪分析,测量心肌收缩期整体纵向应变(GLS)、收缩期整体径向应变(GRS)、收缩期整体圆周应变(GCS),对心肌应变与SPECT检测的左心室壁缺血坏死心肌的面积占左心室壁的百分比(Extent)进行相关分析,并应用ROC曲线评价3种心肌应变检测心肌梗死范围的价值.结果 B组的GLS、GCS及GRS均低于A组(P<0.05).GLS、GCS与Extent均相关(r=0.721、r=0.504,P<0.01),GLS、GCS及GRS的ROC曲线下面积分别为0.818、0.749、0.678,诊断心肌梗死面积≥12%对应的界值分别为-13.83%、-11.65%、26.64%,敏感性和特异性分别为72.7%、88.9%,63.6%、88.9%,81.8%、55.6%.结论 超声二维心肌应变的变化能够反映心肌梗死范围的改变,其中GLS能够较好地评价心肌梗死范围.%Objective To assess the relation between myocardial strain and infarction size detected by two-dimensional echocardiography in patients with myocardial infarction .Methods Seventy-one acute myocardial infarction patients ,who underwent echocardiography and single photon e-mission computed tomography (SPECT ) 3 -6 months after onset of the disease ,were divided into group A with its myocardial infarction size<12% (n=28)and group B with its myocardial infarction size≥l2% (n=43).Their cardiac global longitudinal strain (GLS ),global radial strain (GRS) and global circumference strain (GCS ) were detected by two-dimensional echocardiography and compared with the left ventricular ischemic size detected by SPECT .ROC curves were plotted for the GLS ,GCS and GRS .Results The incidence of GLS ,GCS and GRS was significantly

  19. Optimized Heart Sampling and Systematic Evaluation of Cardiac Therapies in Mouse Models of Ischemic Injury: Assessment of Cardiac Remodeling and Semi-Automated Quantification of Myocardial Infarct Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Mariana; Araújo, Ana; Esteves, Tiago; Laundos, Tiago L; Freire, Ana G; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua; Nascimento, Diana S

    2015-12-02

    Cardiac therapies are commonly tested preclinically in small-animal models of myocardial infarction. Following functional evaluation, post-mortem histological analysis is essential to assess morphological and molecular alterations underlying the effectiveness of treatment. However, non-methodical and inadequate sampling of the left ventricle often leads to misinterpretations and variability, making direct study comparisons unreliable. Protocols are provided for representative sampling of the ischemic mouse heart followed by morphometric analysis of the left ventricle. Extending the use of this sampling to other types of in situ analysis is also illustrated through the assessment of neovascularization and cellular engraftment in a cell-based therapy setting. This is of interest to the general cardiovascular research community as it details methods for standardization and simplification of histo-morphometric evaluation of emergent heart therapies. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Mnemiopsis leidyi (Ctenophora) in Narragansett Bay, 1975-1979: Abundance, size composition and estimation of grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deason, Ellen E.

    1982-08-01

    Surveys of the distribution, abundance and size of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi were carried out in Narragansett Bay, R.I. over a 5-year period, 1975-1979. Yearly variations were observed in time of initiation of the ctenophore increase and maximum abundance. Biomass maxima ranged from 0·2 to 3 g dry weight m -3 at Station 2 in lower Narragansett Bay while maximum abundance varied from 20 to 100 animals m -3. Ctenophores less than 1 cm in length generally composed up to 50% of the biomass and 95% of the numerical abundance during the peak of the M. leidyi pulse. During the 1978 maxima and the declining stages of the pulse each year, 100% of the population was composed of small animals. M. leidyi populations increased earlier, reached greater maximum abundances, and were more highly dominated by small animals in the upper bay than toward the mouth of the bay. The averageclearance rate of M. leidyi larvae feeding on A. tonsa at 22°C was 0·36 l mg -1 dry weight day -1, with apparent selection for nauplii relative to copepodites. Predation and excretion rates applied to ctenophore biomass estimated for Narragansett Bay indicated that M. leidyi excretion is minor but predation removed a bay-wide mean of 20% of the zooplankton standing stock daily during August of 1975 and 1976. Variation in M. leidyi predation at Station 2 was inversely related to mean zooplankton biomass during August and September, which increased 4-fold during the 5-year period.

  1. Calibrating abundance indices with population size estimators of red back salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) in a New England forest

    OpenAIRE

    Siddig, Ahmed A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Scott Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Herpetologists and conservation biologists frequently use convenient and cost-effective, but less accurate, abundance indices (e.g., number of individuals collected under artificial cover boards or during natural objects surveys) in lieu of more accurate, but costly and destructive, population size estimators to detect and monitor size, state, and trends of amphibian populations. Although there are advantages and disadvantages to each approach, reliable use of abundance indices requires that ...

  2. Distribution of the two-sample t-test statistic following blinded sample size re-estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kaifeng

    2016-05-01

    We consider the blinded sample size re-estimation based on the simple one-sample variance estimator at an interim analysis. We characterize the exact distribution of the standard two-sample t-test statistic at the final analysis. We describe a simulation algorithm for the evaluation of the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis at given treatment effect. We compare the blinded sample size re-estimation method with two unblinded methods with respect to the empirical type I error, the empirical power, and the empirical distribution of the standard deviation estimator and final sample size. We characterize the type I error inflation across the range of standardized non-inferiority margin for non-inferiority trials, and derive the adjusted significance level to ensure type I error control for given sample size of the internal pilot study. We show that the adjusted significance level increases as the sample size of the internal pilot study increases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size.

  4. Monitoring the size and protagonists of the drug market: combining supply and demand data sources and estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carla

    2013-06-01

    The size of the illicit drug market is an important indicator to assess the impact on society of an important part of the illegal economy and to evaluate drug policy and law enforcement interventions. The extent of illicit drug use and of the drug market can essentially only be estimated by indirect methods based on indirect measures and on data from various sources, as administrative data sets and surveys. The combined use of several methodologies and data sets allows to reduce biases and inaccuracies of estimates obtained on the basis of each of them separately. This approach has been applied to Italian data. The estimation methods applied are capture-recapture methods with latent heterogeneity and multiplier methods. Several data sets have been used, both administrative and survey data sets. First, the retail dealer prevalence has been estimated on the basis of administrative data, then the user prevalence by multiplier methods. Using information about behaviour of dealers and consumers from survey data, the average amount of a substance used or sold and the average unit cost have been estimated and allow estimating the size of the drug market. The estimates have been obtained using a supply-side approach and a demand-side approach and have been compared. These results are in turn used for estimating the interception rate for the different substances in term of the value of the substance seized with respect to the total value of the substance to be sold at retail prices.

  5. Inverse Probability Weighted Generalised Empirical Likelihood Estimators : Firm Size and R&D Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inkmann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The inverse probability weighted Generalised Empirical Likelihood (IPW-GEL) estimator is proposed for the estimation of the parameters of a vector of possibly non-linear unconditional moment functions in the presence of conditionally independent sample selection or attrition.The estimator is applied

  6. Population size and stopover duration estimation using mark–resight data and Bayesian analysis of a superpopulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, James E.; Kendall, William; Royle, J. Andrew; Converse, Sarah J.; Andres, Brad A.; Buchanan, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of a mark–recapture–resight model that allows estimation of population size, stopover duration, and arrival and departure schedules at migration areas. Estimation is based on encounter histories of uniquely marked individuals and relative counts of marked and unmarked animals. We use a Bayesian analysis of a state–space formulation of the Jolly–Seber mark–recapture model, integrated with a binomial model for counts of unmarked animals, to derive estimates of population size and arrival and departure probabilities. We also provide a novel estimator for stopover duration that is derived from the latent state variable representing the interim between arrival and departure in the state–space model. We conduct a simulation study of field sampling protocols to understand the impact of superpopulation size, proportion marked, and number of animals sampled on bias and precision of estimates. Simulation results indicate that relative bias of estimates of the proportion of the population with marks was low for all sampling scenarios and never exceeded 2%. Our approach does not require enumeration of all unmarked animals detected or direct knowledge of the number of marked animals in the population at the time of the study. This provides flexibility and potential application in a variety of sampling situations (e.g., migratory birds, breeding seabirds, sea turtles, fish, pinnipeds, etc.). Application of the methods is demonstrated with data from a study of migratory sandpipers.

  7. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: The effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall by means of variograms. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and a layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation method on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with large outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling) and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments (non-robust and robust estimators) and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least 200 sampling points for reliable variogram estimates. These suggested sample sizes exceed the number recommended by studies dealing with Gaussian data by up to 100 %. Given that most previous

  8. Effective population size of natural populations of Drosophila buzzatii, with a comparative evaluation of nine methods of estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J S F

    2011-11-01

    Allozyme and microsatellite data from numerous populations of Drosophila buzzatii have been used (i) to determine to what degree N(e) varies among generations within populations, and among populations, and (ii) to evaluate the congruence of four temporal and five single-sample estimators of N(e) . Effective size of different populations varied over two orders of magnitude, most populations are not temporally stable in genetic composition, and N(e) showed large variation over generations in some populations. Short-term N(e) estimates from the temporal methods were highly correlated, but the smallest estimates were the most precise for all four methods, and the most consistent across methods. Except for one population, N(e) estimates were lower when assuming gene flow than when assuming populations that were closed. However, attempts to jointly estimate N(e) and immigration rate were of little value because the source of migrants was unknown. Correlations among the estimates from the single-sample methods generally were not significant although, as for the temporal methods, estimates were most consistent when they were small. These single-sample estimates of current N(e) are generally smaller than the short-term temporal estimates. Nevertheless, population genetic variation is not being depleted, presumably because of past or ongoing migration. A clearer picture of current and short-term effective population sizes will only follow with better knowledge of migration rates between populations. Different methods are not necessarily estimating the same N(e) , they are subject to different bias, and the biology, demography and history of the population(s) may affect different estimators differently.

  9. A novel statistical method to estimate the effective SNP size in vertebrate genomes and categorized genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhongming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local environment of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs contains abundant genetic information for the study of mechanisms of mutation, genome evolution, and causes of diseases. Recent studies revealed that neighboring-nucleotide biases on SNPs were strong and the genome-wide bias patterns could be represented by a small subset of the total SNPs. It remains unsolved for the estimation of the effective SNP size, the number of SNPs that are sufficient to represent the bias patterns observed from the whole SNP data. Results To estimate the effective SNP size, we developed a novel statistical method, SNPKS, which considers both the statistical and biological significances. SNPKS consists of two major steps: to obtain an initial effective size by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS test and to find an intermediate effective size by interval evaluation. The SNPKS algorithm was implemented in computer programs and applied to the real SNP data. The effective SNP size was estimated to be 38,200, 39,300, 38,000, and 38,700 in the human, chimpanzee, dog, and mouse genomes, respectively, and 39,100, 39,600, 39,200, and 42,200 in human intergenic, genic, intronic, and CpG island regions, respectively. Conclusion SNPKS is the first statistical method to estimate the effective SNP size. It runs efficiently and greatly outperforms the algorithm implemented in SNPNB. The application of SNPKS to the real SNP data revealed the similar small effective SNP size (38,000 – 42,200 in the human, chimpanzee, dog, and mouse genomes as well as in human genomic regions. The findings suggest strong influence of genetic factors across vertebrate genomes.

  10. RNAseqPS: A Web Tool for Estimating Sample Size and Power for RNAseq Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Guo; Shilin Zhao; Chung-I Li; Quanhu Sheng; Yu Shyr

    2014-01-01

    Sample size and power determination is the first step in the experimental design of a successful study. Sample size and power calculation is required for applications for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Sample size and power calculation is well established for traditional biological studies such as mouse model, genome wide association study (GWAS), and microarray studies. Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing technology have allowed RNAseq to replace microarray as the...

  11. Estimating the Size of the Methamphetamine-Using Population in New York City Using Network Sampling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Kirk; Khan, Bilal; Wendel, Travis; McLean, Katherine; Misshula, Evan; Curtis, Ric

    2012-12-01

    As part of a recent study of the dynamics of the retail market for methamphetamine use in New York City, we used network sampling methods to estimate the size of the total networked population. This process involved sampling from respondents' list of co-use contacts, which in turn became the basis for capture-recapture estimation. Recapture sampling was based on links to other respondents derived from demographic and "telefunken" matching procedures-the latter being an anonymized version of telephone number matching. This paper describes the matching process used to discover the links between the solicited contacts and project respondents, the capture-recapture calculation, the estimation of "false matches", and the development of confidence intervals for the final population estimates. A final population of 12,229 was estimated, with a range of 8235 - 23,750. The techniques described here have the special virtue of deriving an estimate for a hidden population while retaining respondent anonymity and the anonymity of network alters, but likely require larger sample size than the 132 persons interviewed to attain acceptable confidence levels for the estimate.

  12. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Monson

    Full Text Available During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2 (std. err. = 0.02, herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06 and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  13. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Daniel H; Udevitz, Mark S; Jay, Chadwick V

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2) (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06) and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  14. Robust variance estimation with dependent effect sizes: practical considerations including a software tutorial in Stata and spss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Methodologists have recently proposed robust variance estimation as one way to handle dependent effect sizes in meta-analysis. Software macros for robust variance estimation in meta-analysis are currently available for Stata (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA) and spss (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA), yet there is little guidance for authors regarding the practical application and implementation of those macros. This paper provides a brief tutorial on the implementation of the Stata and spss macros and discusses practical issues meta-analysts should consider when estimating meta-regression models with robust variance estimates. Two example databases are used in the tutorial to illustrate the use of meta-analysis with robust variance estimates.

  15. HydrogeoSieveXL: an Excel-based tool to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain-size analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    For over a century, hydrogeologists have estimated hydraulic conductivity ( K) from grain-size distribution curves. The benefits of the practice are simplicity, cost, and a means of identifying spatial variations in K. Many techniques have been developed over the years, but all suffer from similar shortcomings: no accounting of heterogeneity within samples (i.e., aquifer structure is lost), loss of grain packing characteristics, and failure to account for the effects of overburden pressure on K. In addition, K estimates can vary by an order of magnitude between the various methods, and it is not generally possible to identify the best method for a given sample. The drawbacks are serious, but the advantages have seen the use of grain-size distribution curves for K estimation continue, often using a single selected method to estimate K in a given project. In most cases, this restriction results from convenience. It is proposed here that extending the analysis to include several methods would be beneficial since it would provide a better indication of the range of K that might apply. To overcome the convenience limitation, an Excel-based spreadsheet program, HydrogeoSieveXL, is introduced here. HydrogeoSieveXL is a freely available program that calculates K from grain-size distribution curves using 15 different methods. HydrogeoSieveXL was found to calculate K values essentially identical to those reported in the literature, using the published grain-size distribution curves.

  16. Estimation of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Genome Size Based on k-mer and Flow Cytometric Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Whiteflies of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae cryptic species complex are among the most important agricultural insect pests in the world. These phloem-feeding insects can colonize over 1000 species of plants worldwide and inflict severe economic losses to crops, mainly through the transmission of pathogenic viruses. Surprisingly, there is very little genomic information about whiteflies. As a starting point to genome sequencing, we report a new estimation of the genome size of the B. tabaci B biotype or Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1 population. Using an isogenic whitefly colony with over 6500 haploid male individuals for genomic DNA, three paired-end genomic libraries with insert sizes of ~300 bp, 500 bp and 1 Kb were constructed and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 system. A total of ~50 billion base pairs of sequences were obtained from each library. K-mer analysis using these sequences revealed that the genome size of the whitefly was ~682.3 Mb. In addition, the flow cytometric analysis estimated the haploid genome size of the whitefly to be ~690 Mb. Considering the congruency between both estimation methods, we predict the haploid genome size of B. tabaci MEAM1 to be ~680–690 Mb. Our data provide a baseline for ongoing efforts to assemble and annotate the B. tabaci genome.

  17. Variance Estimation, Design Effects, and Sample Size Calculations for Respondent-Driven Sampling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salganik, Matthew J

    2006-01-01

    .... A recently developed statistical approach called respondent-driven sampling improves our ability to study hidden populations by allowing researchers to make unbiased estimates of the prevalence...

  18. The CBF threshold and dynamics for focal cerebral infarction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, M; Tanabe, J; Pulsinelli, W A

    1992-05-01

    Two strategies were used to estimate the blood flow threshold for focal cerebral infarction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery and common carotid artery occlusion (MCA/CCAO). The first compared the volume of cortical infarction (24 h after ischemia onset) to the volumes of ischemic cortex (image analysis of [14C]iodoantipyrine CBF autoradiographs) perfused below CBF values less than 50 (VIC50) and less than 25 ml 100 g-1 min-1 (VIC25) at serial intervals during the first 3 h of ischemia. The infarct process becomes irreversible within 3 h in this model. In the second, measurements of CBF at the border separating normal from infarcted cortex at 24 h after ischemia onset were used as an index of the threshold. During the first 3 h of ischemia, VIC50 increased slightly to reach a maximum size at 3 h that closely matched the 24 h infarct volume. VIC25, in contrast, consistently underestimated the infarct volume by a factor of 2-3. CBF at the 24 h infarct border averaged 50 ml 100 g-1 min -1. Taken together, the results indicate that the CBF threshold for infarction in SHRs approaches 50 ml 100 g-1 min-1 when ischemia persists for greater than or equal to 3 h. This threshold value is approximately three times higher than in primates. Since cortical neuronal density is also threefold greater in rats than in primates, the higher injury threshold in the rat may reflect a neuronal primacy in determining the brain's susceptibility to partial ischemia.

  19. An Estimation of the Number and Size of Atoms in a Printed Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Beth; Collett, Edward; Tabor-Morris, Anne; Croman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Elementary school students learn that atoms are very, very small. Students are also taught that atoms (and molecules) are the fundamental constituents of the material world. Numerical values of their size are often given, but, nevertheless, it is difficult to imagine their size relative to one's everyday surroundings. In order for students to…

  20. Linkage Disequilibrium Estimation of Effective Population Size with Immigrants from Divergent Populations: A Case Study on Spanish Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, Gilbert Michael; Broderick, Damien; Buckworth, Rik C; Ovenden, Jennifer R

    2013-03-11

    Estimates of genetic effective population size (Ne) using molecular markers are a potentially useful tool for the management of endangered through to commercial species. But, pitfalls are predicted when the effective size is large, as estimates require large numbers of samples from wild populations for statistical validity. Our simulations showed that linkage disequilibrium estimates of Ne up to 10,000 with finite confidence limits can be achieved with sample sizes around 5000. This was deduced from empirical allele frequencies of seven polymorphic microsatellite loci in a commercially harvested fisheries species, the narrow barred Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson). As expected, the smallest standard deviation of Ne estimates occurred when low frequency alleles were excluded. Additional simulations indicated that the linkage disequilibrium method was sensitive to small numbers of genotypes from cryptic species or conspecific immigrants. A correspondence analysis algorithm was developed to detect and remove outlier genotypes that could possibly be inadvertently sampled from cryptic species or non-breeding immigrants from genetically separate populations. Simulations demonstrated the value of this approach in Spanish mackerel data. When putative immigrants were removed from the empirical data, 95% of the Ne estimates from jacknife resampling were above 24,000.

  1. Idiopathic Renal Infarction Mimicking Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Francesco; Scarano, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Renal infarction is a rare cause of referral to the emergency department, with very low estimated incidence (0.004%–0.007%). Usually, it manifests in patients aged 60–70 with risk factors for thromboembolism, mostly related to heart disease, atrial fibrillation in particular. We report a case of idiopathic segmental renal infarction in a 38-year-old patient, presenting with acute abdominal pain with no previous known history or risk factors for thromboembolic diseases. Because of its aspecific clinical presentation, this condition can mimic more frequent pathologies including pyelonephritis, nephrolithiasis, or as in our case appendicitis. Here we highlight the extremely ambiguous presentation of renal infarct and the importance for clinicians to be aware of this condition, particularly in patients without clear risk factors, as it usually has a good prognosis after appropriate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28203466

  2. Considerations on the practical application of the size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) method of AAPM Report 204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noferini, Linhsia; Fulcheri, Christian; Taddeucci, Adriana; Bartolini, Marco; Gori, Cesare

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is responsible for much of the radiation exposure to the population for medical purposes. The technique requires high doses that vary widely from center to center, and for different scanners and radiologists as well. In order to monitor doses to patients, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has developed the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE), which consists of the determination of patient size dependent coefficients for converting the standard dosimetric index, CTDIvol, into an estimate of the dose actually absorbed by the patient. The present work deals with issues concerning the use of SSDE in the clinical practice. First the issue regarding how much SSDE varies when, for a given CT protocol, the scan covers slightly different volumes is addressed. Then, the differences among SSDE values derived from different patient size descriptors are investigated. For these purposes, data from a clinical archive are analyzed by an automatic procedure specifically developed for SSDE.

  3. Do adults show a curse of knowledge in false-belief reasoning? A robust estimate of the true effect size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskin, Rachel A; Brown-Schmidt, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than 33% power to detect an effect of this magnitude. The influence of plausibility on the curse of knowledge in adults appears to be small enough that its impact on real-life perspective-taking may need to be reevaluated.

  4. Do adults show a curse of knowledge in false-belief reasoning? A robust estimate of the true effect size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Ryskin

    Full Text Available Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than 33% power to detect an effect of this magnitude. The influence of plausibility on the curse of knowledge in adults appears to be small enough that its impact on real-life perspective-taking may need to be reevaluated.

  5. Estimation of hominoid ancestral population sizes under bayesian coalescent models incorporating mutation rate variation and sequencing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ralph; Yang, Ziheng

    2008-09-01

    Estimation of population parameters for the common ancestors of humans and the great apes is important in understanding our evolutionary history. In particular, inference of population size for the human-chimpanzee common ancestor may shed light on the process by which the 2 species separated and on whether the human population experienced a severe size reduction in its early evolutionary history. In this study, the Bayesian method of ancestral inference of Rannala and Yang (2003. Bayes estimation of species divergence times and ancestral population sizes using DNA sequences from multiple loci. Genetics. 164:1645-1656) was extended to accommodate variable mutation rates among loci and random species-specific sequencing errors. The model was applied to analyze a genome-wide data set of approximately 15,000 neutral loci (7.4 Mb) aligned for human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque. We obtained robust and precise estimates for effective population sizes along the hominoid lineage extending back approximately 30 Myr to the cercopithecoid divergence. The results showed that ancestral populations were 5-10 times larger than modern humans along the entire hominoid lineage. The estimates were robust to the priors used and to model assumptions about recombination. The unusually low X chromosome divergence between human and chimpanzee could not be explained by variation in the male mutation bias or by current models of hybridization and introgression. Instead, our parameter estimates were consistent with a simple instantaneous process for human-chimpanzee speciation but showed a major reduction in X chromosome effective population size peculiar to the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, possibly due to selective sweeps on the X prior to separation of the 2 species.

  6. Effects of resting ischemia assessed by thallium scintigraphy on QRS scoring system for estimating left ventricular function quantified by radionuclide angiography in acute myocardial infarction patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePace, N.L.; Hakki, A.H.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether resting ischemia limits the usefulness of the QRS scoring system in predicting left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) in patients with acute infarction. We studied 48 patients after acute infarction by means of 12-lead ECG, thallium-201 scintigraphy, and radionuclide angiography. The thallium-201 scintigrams showed fixed defects in 25 patients, perfusion defects with partial or complete redistribution in the delayed images in 19 patients, and normal images in the remaining four patients. In the 48 patients there was a significant correlation between the QRS score and LVEF (r . -0.67; p less than 0.001). Patients with fixed defects showed a better correlation than patients with resting ischemia (r . -0.77 vs r . -0.60). A QRS score of 3 or less was used to separate patients with LVEF of 40% or greater from those with lower LVEF in patients with fixed defects (p . 0.0005), but this cutoff did not categorize patients with resting ischemia as to LVEF. Thus the presence of rest ischemia in patients with acute infarction may affect the correlation between QRS score and LVEF.

  7. Effects of resting ischemia assessed by thallium scintigraphy on QRS scoring system for estimating left ventricular function quantified by radionuclide angiography in acute myocardial infarction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Hakki, A H; Iskandrian, A S

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether resting ischemia limits the usefulness of the QRS scoring system in predicting left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) in patients with acute infarction. We studied 48 patients after acute infarction by means of 12-lead ECG, thallium-201 scintigraphy, and radionuclide angiography. The thallium-201 scintigrams showed fixed defects in 25 patients, perfusion defects with partial or complete redistribution in the delayed images in 19 patients, and normal images in the remaining four patients. In the 48 patients there was a significant correlation between the QRS score and LVEF (r = -0.67; p less than 0.001). Patients with fixed defects showed a better correlation than patients with resting ischemia (r = -0.77 vs r = -0.60). A QRS score of 3 or less was used to separate patients with LVEF of 40% or greater from those with lower LVEF in patients with fixed defects (p = 0.0005), but this cutoff did not categorize patients with resting ischemia as to LVEF. Thus the presence of rest ischemia in patients with acute infarction may affect the correlation between QRS score and LVEF.

  8. Subcortical infarction resulting in acquired stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabarra, A M; Elkind, M S; Roberts, J K; Marshall, R S

    2000-10-01

    Stuttering is an uncommon presentation of acute stroke. Reported cases have often been associated with left sided cortical lesions, aphasia, and difficulties with other non-linguistic tests of rhythmic motor control. Three patients with subcortical lesions resulting in stuttering are discussed. In one patient the ability to perform time estimations with a computerised repetitive time estimation task was characterised. One patient had a pontine infarct with clinical evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. A second patient had a left basal ganglionic infarct and a disruption of timing estimation. A third patient had a left subcortical infarct and a mild aphasia. These findings expand the reported distribution of infarction that can result in acquired stuttering. Subcortical mechanisms of speech control and timing may contribute to the pathophysiology of acquired stuttering.

  9. Joint Behaviour of Semirecursive Kernel Estimators of the Location and of the Size of the Mode of a Probability Density Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Mokkadem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Let and denote the location and the size of the mode of a probability density. We study the joint convergence rates of semirecursive kernel estimators of and . We show how the estimation of the size of the mode allows measuring the relevance of the estimation of its location. We also enlighten that, beyond their computational advantage on nonrecursive estimators, the semirecursive estimators are preferable to use for the construction of confidence regions.

  10. Estimation of Pore Size Distribution by CO2 Adsorptionand Its Application in Physical Activation of Precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The CO2 adsorption data may show more than one section in theDubinin-Radushkevich-Kaganer(DRK) plot ifsamples had been over-activated. Each section in the plot represents arange of pore size.The whole DRK plot provided information on the pore size distribution(PSD)of a sample, which may be used to monitor the effect of activationconditions in activation processes.

  11. RNAseqPS: A Web Tool for Estimating Sample Size and Power for RNAseq Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Zhao, Shilin; Li, Chung-I; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sample size and power determination is the first step in the experimental design of a successful study. Sample size and power calculation is required for applications for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Sample size and power calculation is well established for traditional biological studies such as mouse model, genome wide association study (GWAS), and microarray studies. Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing technology have allowed RNAseq to replace microarray as the technology of choice for high-throughput gene expression profiling. However, the sample size and power analysis of RNAseq technology is an underdeveloped area. Here, we present RNAseqPS, an advanced online RNAseq power and sample size calculation tool based on the Poisson and negative binomial distributions. RNAseqPS was built using the Shiny package in R. It provides an interactive graphical user interface that allows the users to easily conduct sample size and power analysis for RNAseq experimental design. RNAseqPS can be accessed directly at http://cqs.mc.vanderbilt.edu/shiny/RNAseqPS/.

  12. Depression following myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe life event that is accompanied by an increased risk of depression. Mounting evidence suggests that post-MI depression is associated with adverse outcomes, but the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear, and no previous studies have examined...... whether the mental burden of MI is so heavy that it increases the risk of suicide. Although post-MI depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognised and under-treated. The development of new strategies to improve the quality of care for people with post-MI depression requires...... thorough understanding of the mechanisms that influence the prognosis as well as knowledge of the present care provided. The purpose of this PhD thesis is accordingly subdivided into four specific aims: 1. To estimate the prevalence of depression in people with MI after three months, and to estimate...

  13. Estimating population size using single-nucleotide polymorphism-based pedigree data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Robert; Norman, Anita J; Schneider, Michael; Spong, Göran

    2016-05-01

    Reliable population estimates are an important aspect of sustainable wildlife management and conservation but can be difficult to obtain for rare and elusive species. Here, we test a new census method based on pedigree reconstruction recently developed by Creel and Rosenblatt (2013). Using a panel of 96 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we genotyped fecal samples from two Swedish brown bear populations for pedigree reconstruction. Based on 433 genotypes from central Sweden (CS) and 265 from northern Sweden (NS), the population estimates (N = 630 for CS, N = 408 for NS) fell within the 95% CI of the official estimates. The precision and accuracy improved with increasing sampling intensity. Like genetic capture-mark-recapture methods, this method can be applied to data from a single sampling session. Pedigree reconstruction combined with noninvasive genetic sampling may thus augment population estimates, particularly for rare and elusive species for which sampling may be challenging.

  14. The proportionator: unbiased stereological estimation using biased automatic image analysis and non-uniform probability proportional to size sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2008-01-01

    of its entirely different sampling strategy, based on known but non-uniform sampling probabilities, the proportionator for the first time allows the real CE at the section level to be automatically estimated (not just predicted), unbiased - for all estimators and at no extra cost to the user.......The proportionator is a novel and radically different approach to sampling with microscopes based on well-known statistical theory (probability proportional to size - PPS sampling). It uses automatic image analysis, with a large range of options, to assign to every field of view in the section......, the desired number of fields are sampled automatically with probability proportional to the weight and presented to the expert observer. Using any known stereological probe and estimator, the correct count in these fields leads to a simple, unbiased estimate of the total amount of structure in the sections...

  15. Estimating sample size for landscape-scale mark-recapture studies of North American migratory tree bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Laura E.; Lukacs, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Concern for migratory tree-roosting bats in North America has grown because of possible population declines from wind energy development. This concern has driven interest in estimating population-level changes. Mark-recapture methodology is one possible analytical framework for assessing bat population changes, but sample size requirements to produce reliable estimates have not been estimated. To illustrate the sample sizes necessary for a mark-recapture-based monitoring program we conducted power analyses using a statistical model that allows reencounters of live and dead marked individuals. We ran 1,000 simulations for each of five broad sample size categories in a Burnham joint model, and then compared the proportion of simulations in which 95% confidence intervals overlapped between and among years for a 4-year study. Additionally, we conducted sensitivity analyses of sample size to various capture probabilities and recovery probabilities. More than 50,000 individuals per year would need to be captured and released to accurately determine 10% and 15% declines in annual survival. To detect more dramatic declines of 33% or 50% survival over four years, then sample sizes of 25,000 or 10,000 per year, respectively, would be sufficient. Sensitivity analyses reveal that increasing recovery of dead marked individuals may be more valuable than increasing capture probability of marked individuals. Because of the extraordinary effort that would be required, we advise caution should such a mark-recapture effort be initiated because of the difficulty in attaining reliable estimates. We make recommendations for what techniques show the most promise for mark-recapture studies of bats because some techniques violate the assumptions of mark-recapture methodology when used to mark bats.

  16. Estimation of turbulent kinetic energy using 4D phase-contrast MRI: Effect of scan parameters and target vessel size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Baek, Jehyun; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Quantifying turbulence velocity fluctuation is important because it indicates the fluid energy dissipation of the blood flow, which is closely related to the pressure drop along the blood vessel. This study aims to evaluate the effects of scan parameters and the target vessel size of 4D phase-contrast (PC)-MRI on quantification of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Comprehensive 4D PC-MRI measurements with various velocity-encoding (VENC), echo time (TE), and voxel size values were carried out to estimate TKE distribution in stenotic flow. The total TKE (TKEsum), maximum TKE (TKEmax), and background noise level (TKEnoise) were compared for each scan parameter. The feasibility of TKE estimation in small vessels was also investigated. Results show that the optimum VENC for stenotic flow with a peak velocity of 125cm/s was 70cm/s. Higher VENC values overestimated the TKEsum by up to six-fold due to increased TKEnoise, whereas lower VENC values (30cm/s) underestimated it by 57.1%. TE and voxel size did not significantly influence the TKEsum and TKEnoise, although the TKEmax significantly increased as the voxel size increased. TKE quantification in small-sized vessels (3-5-mm diameter) was feasible unless high-velocity turbulence caused severe phase dispersion in the reference image. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimating the size of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection: a summary of experiences and lessons presented during a technical meeting on size estimation among key populations in Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongbao; Calleja, Jesus Maria Garcia; Zhao, Jinkou; Reddy, Amala; Seguy, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Size estimates of key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure are recognized as critical for understanding the trajectory of the HIV epidemic and planning and monitoring an effective response, especially for countries with concentrated and low epidemics such as those in Asia. To help countries estimate population sizes of key populations, global guidelines were updated in 2011 to reflect new technical developments and recent field experiences in applying these methods. In September 2013, a meeting of programme managers and experts experienced with population size estimates (PSE) for key populations was held for 13 Asian countries. This article summarizes the key results presented, shares practical lessons learnt and reviews the methodological approaches from implementing PSE in 13 countries. It is important to build capacity to collect, analyse and use PSE data; establish a technical review group; and implement a transparent, well documented process. Countries should adapt global PSE guidelines and maintain operational definitions that are more relevant and useable for country programmes. Development of methods for non-venue-based key populations requires more investment and collaborative efforts between countries and among partners.

  18. Estimating the size of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection: a summary of experiences and lessons presented during a technical meeting on size estimation among key populations in Asian countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Jesus Maria Garcia; Zhao, Jinkou; Reddy, Amala; Seguy, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Problem Size estimates of key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure are recognized as critical for understanding the trajectory of the HIV epidemic and planning and monitoring an effective response, especially for countries with concentrated and low epidemics such as those in Asia. Context To help countries estimate population sizes of key populations, global guidelines were updated in 2011 to reflect new technical developments and recent field experiences in applying these methods. Action In September 2013, a meeting of programme managers and experts experienced with population size estimates (PSE) for key populations was held for 13 Asian countries. This article summarizes the key results presented, shares practical lessons learnt and reviews the methodological approaches from implementing PSE in 13 countries. Lessons learnt It is important to build capacity to collect, analyse and use PSE data; establish a technical review group; and implement a transparent, well documented process. Countries should adapt global PSE guidelines and maintain operational definitions that are more relevant and useable for country programmes. Development of methods for non-venue-based key populations requires more investment and collaborative efforts between countries and among partners. PMID:25320676

  19. Estimating the size of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection: a summary of experiences and lessons presented during a technical meeting on size estimation among key populations in Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbao Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Size estimates of key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure are recognized as critical for understanding the trajectory of the HIV epidemic and planning and monitoring an effective response, especially for countries with concentrated and low epidemics such as those in Asia. Context: To help countries estimate population sizes of key populations, global guidelines were updated in 2011 to reflect new technical developments and recent field experiences in applying these methods. Action: In September 2013, a meeting of programme managers and experts experienced with population size estimates (PSE for key populations was held for 13 Asian countries. This article summarizes the key results presented, shares practical lessons learnt and reviews the methodological approaches from implementing PSE in 13 countries. Lessons learnt: It is important to build capacity to collect, analyse and use PSE data; establish a technical review group; and implement a transparent, well-documented process. Countries should adapt global PSE guidelines and maintain operational definitions that are more relevant and useable for country programmes. Development of methods for non-venue-based key populations requires more investment and collaborative efforts between countries and among partners.

  20. Sample size estimation to substantiate freedom from disease for clustered binary data with a specific risk profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostoulas, P.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Browne, W. J.;

    2013-01-01

    and power when applied to these groups. We propose the use of the variance partition coefficient (VPC), which measures the clustering of infection/disease for individuals with a common risk profile. Sample size estimates are obtained separately for those groups that exhibit markedly different heterogeneity......SUMMARY Disease cases are often clustered within herds or generally groups that share common characteristics. Sample size formulae must adjust for the within-cluster correlation of the primary sampling units. Traditionally, the intra-cluster correlation coefficient (ICC), which is an average...

  1. Analysis of the Influence of Plot Size and LiDAR Density on Forest Structure Attribute Estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Luis A. Ruiz; Txomin Hermosilla; Francisco Mauro; Miguel Godino

    2014-01-01

    Licencia Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) This paper assesses the combined effect of field plot size and LiDAR density on the estimation of four forest structure attributes: volume, total biomass, basal area and canopy cover. A total of 21 different plot sizes were considered, obtained by decreasing the field measured plot radius value from 25 to 5 m with regular intervals of 1 m. LiDAR data densities were simulated by randomly removing LiDAR pulses until ...

  2. Size distribution estimation of cavitation bubble cloud via bubbles dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposed an acoustic technique to estimate size distribution of a cavitation bubble cloud induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) based on the dissolution of bubble cloud trapped by a wide beam of low acoustic pressure, after the acoustic exposure of FUS is turned off. Dissolution of cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with degassed saline or saturated saline has been respectively studied to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of FUS on size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  3. The tole of ischemic preconditioning in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Anđelka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Ischemic preconditioning is a phenomenon in which brief episodes of ischemia and reperfusion increase myocardial tolerance and substantially reduce the infarction size. Case report Two patients with acute left anterior descending artery occlusion received fibrinolytic therapy within 6 hours of symptom onset, but nevertheless developed myocardial infarctions of different size. The first patient, without a history of preinfarction angina, developed a large anterior infarction, because there was no time for ischemic preconditioning or development of coronary collateral vessels. The second patient, with a 4-day history of preinfarction angina, had a more favorable outcome-he developed apical necrosis, with greater myocardial viability in the infarct-related area. Conclusion The beneficial effects of angina occurring 24-48h before infarction are resulting from ischemic preconditioning, which reduces cardiac mortality, infarct size and occurrence of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. .

  4. A comparison of methods for sample size estimation for non-inferiority studies with binary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julious, Steven A; Owen, Roger J

    2011-12-01

    Non-inferiority trials are motivated in the context of clinical research where a proven active treatment exists and placebo-controlled trials are no longer acceptable for ethical reasons. Instead, active-controlled trials are conducted where a treatment is compared to an established treatment with the objective of demonstrating that it is non-inferior to this treatment. We review and compare the methodologies for calculating sample sizes and suggest appropriate methods to use. We demonstrate how the simplest method of using the anticipated response is predominantly consistent with simulations. In the context of trials with binary outcomes with expected high proportions of positive responses, we show how the sample size is quite sensitive to assumptions about the control response. We recommend when designing such a study that sensitivity analyses be performed with respect to the underlying assumptions and that the Bayesian methods described in this article be adopted to assess sample size.

  5. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  6. Estimating Population Size from Dung-based DNA Capture–Recapture Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Lukacs

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive samples of animal dung are being collected for use with DNA-based capture–recapture analysis to estimate the abundance of the species. A typical sampling strategy involves repeated sampling of transects or grids to search for dung. Searches performed on different transects or on different occasions are often considered the capture sessions for capture–recapture analysis. It is possible that multiple samples of dung from the same individual are found within an occasion. Most current capture–recapture models do not account for this additional data. We present a generalization of the geographically and demographically closed population capture–recapture models that use the numbers of dung found for each individual during each sampling occasion to help estimate heterogeneity in capture probability. We demonstrate that in the face of heterogeneity caused by unequal amounts of dung available per individual, the estimator developed here out performs standard capture–recapture abundance estimation. The estimator allows the benefit of using all data collected while not adding additional costs to the study. We present an example using dung-based capture–recapture data from African elephants to demonstrate the method.

  7. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Grool, Anne M; Mali, Willem P; Van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kloppenborg, Raoul P; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on cerebellar infarcts have been largely restricted to acute infarcts in patients with clinical symptoms, and cerebellar infarcts have been evaluated with the almost exclusive use of transversal MR images. We aimed to document the occurrence and 3D-imaging patterns of cerebellar infarcts presenting as an incidental finding on MRI. We analysed the 1.5 Tesla MRI, including 3D T1-weighted datasets, of 636 patients (mean age 62 ± 9 years, 81% male) from the SMART-Medea study. Cerebellar infarct analyses included an assessment of size, cavitation and gliosis, of grey and white matter involvement, and of infarct topography. One or more cerebellar infarcts (mean 1.97; range 1-11) were detected in 70 out of 636 patients (11%), with a total amount of 138 infarcts identified, 135 of which showed evidence of cavitation. The average mean axial diameter was 7 mm (range 2-54 mm), and 131 infarcts (95%) were smaller than 20 mm. Hundred-thirty-four infarcts (97%) involved the cortex, of which 12 in combination with subcortical white matter. No infarcts were restricted to subcortical branches of white matter. Small cortical infarcts involved the apex of a deep (pattern 1) or shallow fissure (pattern 2), or occurred alongside one (pattern 3) or opposite sides (pattern 4) of a fissure. Most (87%) cerebellar infarcts were situated in the posterior lobe. Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  8. ESTIMATE OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION GOLD KINETIC REACTIONS ULTRAFAST, USING LIGHT ABSORPTION SPECTRA

    OpenAIRE

    Briano, Julio; Universidad de Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico; Irizarry, Roberto; Dupont Electronics - USA; Vicuña Galindo, Eder; Facultad de Qúmica e lng. Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption spectra were used to estímate gold particles growing kinetics following a gold salt (HAuCl4) reduction by sulfite in aqueous solution. Due this process is extremely fast, e.g. part1cles reach 150nm s1ze in less a second, a special equipment denorninated Stopped Flow Reactor (AFR) was used. Light spectra was modeled using Mie theory for monodisperse particles with1n 30-250nm range size, and tor minor sizes experimental spectra of commercial colloids were used, due to uncertain...

  9. Estimates of zooplankton abundance and size distribution with the Optical Plankton Counter (OPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Petersen, D.; Schnack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The capability of the Optical Plankton Count er (OPC) to examine the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton was tested in Storfjorden, Norway, in June 1993. Selected material obtained from net sampling was measured with a laboratory version of the OPC and compared with microscope analysis...... in order to identify main species in the in situ size frequency distributions obtained by the submersible version of the OPC. Differences in the particle concentration between shallow and deep water layers were clearly resolved by the submersible OPC, but the high diversity of the zooplankton community...... of zooplankton...

  10. Bayesian sample size calculation for estimation of the difference between two binomial proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshk, Hamid; Nematollahi, Nader; Maroufy, Vahed; Marriott, Paul; Gittins, John

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we discuss a decision theoretic or fully Bayesian approach to the sample size question in clinical trials with binary responses. Data are assumed to come from two binomial distributions. A Dirichlet distribution is assumed to describe prior knowledge of the two success probabilities p1 and p2. The parameter of interest is p = p1 - p2. The optimal size of the trial is obtained by maximising the expected net benefit function. The methodology presented in this article extends previous work by the assumption of dependent prior distributions for p1 and p2.

  11. Intestinal ischemia and infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001151.htm Small intestinal ischemia and infarction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intestinal ischemia and infarction occurs when there is a narrowing ...

  12. Effect of sample moisture content on XRD-estimated cellulose crystallinity index and crystallite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph; Carlos Baez; Richard S. Reiner; Steve P. Verrill

    2017-01-01

    Although X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been the most widely used technique to investigate crystallinity index (CrI) and crystallite size (L200) of cellulose materials, there are not many studies that have taken into account the role of sample moisture on these measurements. The present investigation focuses on a variety of celluloses and cellulose...

  13. Experimental Estimates of the Impacts of Class Size on Test Scores: Robustness and Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weili; Lehrer, Steven F.

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of class size reductions (CSRs) draw heavily on the results from Project Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio to support their initiatives. Adding to the political appeal of these initiative are reports that minority and economically disadvantaged students received the largest benefits from smaller classes. We extend this research in two…

  14. How much data resides in a web collection: how to estimate size of a web collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelghati, Mohammadreza; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Keulen, van Maurice

    2013-01-01

    With increasing amount of data in deep web sources (hidden from general search engines behind web forms), accessing this data has gained more attention. In the algorithms applied for this purpose, it is the knowledge of a data source size that enables the algorithms to make accurate decisions in sto

  15. Estimating payload internal temperatures and radiator size for multimegawatt space platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-08-01

    A conceptual space platform consists of a payload, a power conditioning unit (PCU), and two radiators: the main radiator and a secondary radiator. A computer program was written to determine the required size of the two radiators and the temperatures of the PCU and payload for a given platform power level. An iterative approach is necessary because the required size of the main radiator depends on the size of the secondary radiator and vice versa. Also, the temperatures of the payload and PCU depend on the size of the radiators. The program user can subdivide the two radiators into any number of nodes to increase the accuracy of the radiant heat transfer solution. The use of more nodes also allows better prediction of the nonlinear temperature drop that occurs across the radiators as the working fluid deposits the platform's waste heat in the radiator. View factor expressions are automatically calculated for different choices of the number of nodes. The user can also select different separation distances between the various platform structures. A model is included to couple the radiant and conduction heat transfer that occurs between the payload and its meteoroid shell and between the PCU and its shell. Also, the program allows the use of a refrigerator to cool the payload. If a refrigerator is used, the program determines the amount of additional thermal power needed to run the refrigerator. The results of parametric calculations are included to demonstrate the use of the program.

  16. Using LiDAR derivatives to estimate sediment grain size on beaches in False Bay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burns, J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available to global and climate change in particular, continues to have a big impact on coastal environments. The vulnerability of the sandy coast is dependent on the physical characteristics such as orientation/exposure, beach slope, and sand grain size...

  17. Improving Accuracy of Portion-Size Estimations through a Stimulus Equivalence Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Nicole L.; Borrero, John C.; Fisher, Alyssa; Kahng, SungWoo

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity continues to increase in the United States (Gordon-Larsen, The, & Adair, 2010). Obesity can be attributed, in part, to overconsumption of energy-dense foods. Given that overeating plays a role in the development of obesity, interventions that teach individuals to identify and consume appropriate portion sizes are…

  18. Improved patient size estimates for accurate dose calculations in abdomen computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Lae

    2017-07-01

    The radiation dose of CT (computed tomography) is generally represented by the CTDI (CT dose index). CTDI, however, does not accurately predict the actual patient doses for different human body sizes because it relies on a cylinder-shaped head (diameter : 16 cm) and body (diameter : 32 cm) phantom. The purpose of this study was to eliminate the drawbacks of the conventional CTDI and to provide more accurate radiation dose information. Projection radiographs were obtained from water cylinder phantoms of various sizes, and the sizes of the water cylinder phantoms were calculated and verified using attenuation profiles. The effective diameter was also calculated using the attenuation of the abdominal projection radiographs of 10 patients. When the results of the attenuation-based method and the geometry-based method shown were compared with the results of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, the effective diameter of the attenuation-based method was found to be similar to the effective diameter of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, with a difference of less than 3.8%, but the geometry-based method showed a difference of less than 11.4%. This paper proposes a new method of accurately computing the radiation dose of CT based on the patient sizes. This method computes and provides the exact patient dose before the CT scan, and can therefore be effectively used for imaging and dose control.

  19. How much data resides in a web collection: how to estimate size of a web collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelghati, Mohammadreza; Hiemstra, Djoerd; van Keulen, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    With increasing amount of data in deep web sources (hidden from general search engines behind web forms), accessing this data has gained more attention. In the algorithms applied for this purpose, it is the knowledge of a data source size that enables the algorithms to make accurate decisions in

  20. Estimating size and scope economies in the Portuguese water sector using the Bayesian stochastic frontier analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Pedro, E-mail: pedrocarv@coc.ufrj.br [Computational Modelling in Engineering and Geophysics Laboratory (LAMEMO), Department of Civil Engineering, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pedro Calmon - Ilha do Fundão, 21941-596 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Center for Urban and Regional Systems (CESUR), CERIS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Marques, Rui Cunha, E-mail: pedro.c.carvalho@tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Center for Urban and Regional Systems (CESUR), CERIS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2016-02-15

    This study aims to search for economies of size and scope in the Portuguese water sector applying Bayesian and classical statistics to make inference in stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). This study proves the usefulness and advantages of the application of Bayesian statistics for making inference in SFA over traditional SFA which just uses classical statistics. The resulting Bayesian methods allow overcoming some problems that arise in the application of the traditional SFA, such as the bias in small samples and skewness of residuals. In the present case study of the water sector in Portugal, these Bayesian methods provide more plausible and acceptable results. Based on the results obtained we found that there are important economies of output density, economies of size, economies of vertical integration and economies of scope in the Portuguese water sector, pointing out to the huge advantages in undertaking mergers by joining the retail and wholesale components and by joining the drinking water and wastewater services. - Highlights: • This study aims to search for economies of size and scope in the water sector; • The usefulness of the application of Bayesian methods is highlighted; • Important economies of output density, economies of size, economies of vertical integration and economies of scope are found.

  1. Words as Species: An Alternative Approach to Estimating Productive Vocabulary Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meara, Paul M.; Alcoy, Juan Carlos Olmos

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of how we might be able to assess productive vocabulary size in second language learners. It discusses some previous attempts to develop measures of this sort, and argues that a fresh approach is needed in order to overcome some persistent problems that dog research in this area. The paper argues that there might be…

  2. Regularization Methods for Fitting Linear Models with Small Sample Sizes: Fitting the Lasso Estimator Using R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W. Holmes; Finch, Maria E. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and data analysts are sometimes faced with the problem of very small samples, where the number of variables approaches or exceeds the overall sample size; i.e. high dimensional data. In such cases, standard statistical models such as regression or analysis of variance cannot be used, either because the resulting parameter estimates…

  3. Improving the rainfall rate