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Sample records for induced helix-coil transition

  1. Thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen from rat tail tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionkowska, A; Kamińska, A

    1999-05-01

    The thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen solution, collagen film and pieces of rat tail tendon (RTT) were compared. Their thermal stability's were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by viscometric measurements. The denaturation temperatures of collagen solution, film and pieces of RTT were different. The helix-coil transition occur near 40 degrees C in collagen solution, near 112 degrees C in collagen film, and near 101 degrees C in pieces of RTT. After UV irradiation the thermal helix-coil transition of collagen samples were changed. These changes depend on the degree of hydratation.

  2. Glass-like dynamics of the strain-induced coil/helix transition on a permanent polymer network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsin, O; Caroli, C; Baumberger, T

    2016-02-14

    We study the stress response to a step strain of covalently bonded gelatin gels in the temperature range where triple helix reversible crosslink formation is prohibited. We observe slow stress relaxation towards a T-dependent finite asymptotic level. We show that this is assignable to the strain-induced coilhelix transition, previously evidenced by Courty et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 13457 (2005)], of a fraction of the polymer strands. Relaxation proceeds, in a first stage, according to a stretched exponential dynamics, then crosses over to a terminal simple exponential decay. The respective characteristic times τK and τf exhibit an Arrhenius-like T-dependence with an associated energy E incompatibly larger than the activation barrier height for the isomerisation process which sets the clock for an elementary coilhelix transformation event. We tentatively assign this glass-like slowing down of the dynamics to the long-range couplings due to the mechanical noise generated by the local elementary events in this random elastic medium.

  3. Ab initio theory of helix <-> coil phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest a theoretical method based on the statistical mechanics for treating the alpha-helix <-> random coil transition in alanine polypeptides. We consider this process as a first-order phase transition and develop a theory which is free of model parameters and is based solely ...

  4. Intersegment interactions and helix-coil transition within the generalized model of polypeptide chains approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badasyan, A. V.; Hayrapetyan, G. N.; Tonoyan, Sh. A.; Mamasakhlisov, Y. Sh.; Benight, A. S.; Morozov, V. F.

    2009-09-01

    The generalized model of polypeptide chains is extended to describe the helix-coil transition in a system comprised of two chains interacting side-by-side. The Hamiltonian of the model takes into account four possible types of interactions between repeated units of the two chains, i.e., helix-helix, helix-coil, coil-helix, and coil-coil. Analysis reveals when the energy Ihh+Icc of (h-h, c-c) interactions overwhelms the energy Ihc+Ich of mixed (h-c, c-h) interactions, the correlation length rises substantially, resulting in narrowing of the transition interval. In the opposite case, when Ihh+Icctransition point. Conceptual links are established with experimentally oriented theories of Ghosh and Dill [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 2306 (2009)] and Skolnick and Holtzer [Biochemistry 25, 6192 (1986)], providing a potential explanation for both favorable helix formation and disfavored intersegment interactions from the same theoretical perspective.

  5. The Effect of a Helix-Coil Transition on the Extension Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhot, Arnaud; Halperin, Avi

    2000-03-01

    The secondary structure of a polymer affects its deformation behavior in accordance with the Le Chatelier principle. An important example of such secondary structure is the alpha helix encountered in polypeptides. Similar structure was recently proposed for PEO in aqueous media. Our discussion concerns the coupling of the cooperative helix-coil transition and the extension elasticity. In particular, we analyze the extension of a long single chain by use of optical tweezers or AFM. We consider chains that exist in the coil-state when unperturbed. The transition nevertheless occurs because the extension favors the low entropy helical state. As a result, the corresponding force law exhibits a plateau. The analysis of this situation involves two ingredients: (I) the stretching free energy penalty for a rod-coil mutiblock copolymer (II) the entropy associated with the possible placements of the rod and coil blocks.

  6. Salt- and pH-Triggered Helix-Coil Transition of Ionic Polypeptides under Physiology Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingsong; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Yue; Cai, Zhicheng; Yang, Lijiang; Lu, Hua

    2018-06-11

    Controlling the helix-coil transition of polypeptides under physiological conditions is an attractive way toward smart functional materials. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of tertiary amine-functionalized ethylene glycol (EG x )-linked polypeptide electrolytes with their secondary structures tunable under physiological conditions. The resultant polymers, denoted as P(EG x DMA-Glu) ( x = 1, 2, and 3), show excellent aqueous solubility (>20 mg/mL) regardless of their charge states. Unlike poly-l-lysine that can form a helix only at pH above 10, P(EG x DMA-Glu) undergo a pH-dependent helix-coil switch with their transition points within the physiological range (pH ∼5.3-6.5). Meanwhile, P(EG x DMA-Glu) exhibit an unusual salt-induced helical conformation presumably owing to the unique properties of EG x linkers. Together, the current work highlights the importance of fine-tuning the linker chemistry in achieving conformation-switchable polypeptides and represents a facile approach toward stimuli-responsive biopolymers for advanced biological applications.

  7. The generalized model of polypeptide chain describing the helix-coil transition in biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamasakhlisov, E.S.; Badasyan, A.V.; Tsarukyan, A.V.; Grigoryan, A.V.; Morozov, V.F.

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we summarize some results of our theoretical investigations of helix-coil transition both in single-strand (polypeptides) and two-strand (polynucleotides) macromolecules. The Hamiltonian of the Generalized Model of Polypeptide Chain (GMPC) is introduced to describe the system in which the conformations are correlated over some dimensional range Δ (it equals 3 for polypeptide, because one H-bond fixes three pairs of rotation, for double strand DNA it equals to one chain rigidity because of impossibility of loop formation on the scale less than Δ). The Hamiltonian does not contain any parameter designed especially for helix-coil transition and uses pure molecular microscopic parameters (the energy of hydrogen bond formation, reduced partition function of repeated unit, the number of repeated units fixed by one hydrogen bond, the energies of interaction between the repeated units and the solvent molecules). To calculate averages we evaluate the partition function using the transfer-matrix approach. The GMPC allowed to describe the influence of a number of factors, affecting the transition, basing on a unified microscopic approach. Thus we obtained, that solvents change transition temperature and interval in different ways, depending on type of solvent and on energy of solvent- macromolecule interaction; stacking on the background of H-bonding increases stability and decreases cooperativity of melting. For heterogeneous DNA we could analytically derive well known formulae for transition temperature and interval. In the framework of GMPC we calculate and show the difference of two order parameters of helix-coil transition - the helicity degree, and the average fraction of repeated units in helical conformation. Given article has the aim to review the results obtained during twenty years in the context of GMPC. (author)

  8. Yang-Lee zeros for a Potts model of helix-coil transition with nontrivial topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananikian, N.; Ananikyan, L.; Artuso, R.; Sargsyan, K.

    2007-07-01

    The Yang-Lee partition function zeros of the Q-state Potts model on a zigzag ladder are studied by a transfer-matrix approach. This Q-state model has a non-trivial topology induced by three-site interactions on a zigzag ladder and is proposed as a description of helix-coil transition in homo-polymers. The Yang-Lee zeros are associated to complex values of the solvent-related coupling constant K (magnetic field) and they are exactly derived for arbitrary values of the system parameters: Q, J (coupling constant of hydrogen binding) and temperature. It is shown that there is only a quasi-phase transition for all temperatures. The densities of the Yang-Lee zeros are singular at the edge singularity points and the critical exponent σ = -1/2. (author)

  9. Exploring the membrane fusion mechanism through force-induced disassembly of HIV-1 six-helix bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Kai [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Lou, Jizhong, E-mail: jlou@ibp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Enveloped virus, such as HIV-1, employs membrane fusion mechanism to invade into host cell. HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain uses six-helix bundle configuration to accomplish this process. Using molecular dynamic simulations, we confirmed the stability of this six-helix bundle by showing high occupancy of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Key residues and interactions important for the bundle integration were characterized by force-induced unfolding simulations of six-helix bundle, exhibiting the collapse order of these groups of interactions. Moreover, our results in some way concerted with a previous theory that the formation of coiled-coil choose a route which involved cooperative interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal helix. -- Highlights: •Unfolding of HIV-1 gp41 six-helix bundle is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. •Specific interactions responsible for the stability of HIV-1 envelope post-fusion conformation were identified. •The gp41 six-helix bundle transition inducing membrane fusion might be a cooperative process of the three subunits.

  10. Representing environment-induced helix-coil transitions in a coarse grained peptide model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Globisch, Christoph; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Coarse grained (CG) models are widely used in studying peptide self-assembly and nanostructure formation. One of the recurrent challenges in CG modeling is the problem of limited transferability, for example to different thermodynamic state points and system compositions. Understanding transferability is generally a prerequisite to knowing for which problems a model can be reliably used and predictive. For peptides, one crucial transferability question is whether a model reproduces the molecule's conformational response to a change in its molecular environment. This is of particular importance since CG peptide models often have to resort to auxiliary interactions that aid secondary structure formation. Such interactions take care of properties of the real system that are per se lost in the coarse graining process such as dihedral-angle correlations along the backbone or backbone hydrogen bonding. These auxiliary interactions may then easily overstabilize certain conformational propensities and therefore destroy the ability of the model to respond to stimuli and environment changes, i.e. they impede transferability. In the present paper we have investigated a short peptide with amphiphilic EALA repeats which undergoes conformational transitions between a disordered and a helical state upon a change in pH value or due to the presence of a soft apolar/polar interface. We designed a base CG peptide model that does not carry a specific (backbone) bias towards a secondary structure. This base model was combined with two typical approaches of ensuring secondary structure formation, namely a C α -C α -C α -C α pseudodihedral angle potential or a virtual site interaction that mimics hydrogen bonding. We have investigated the ability of the two resulting CG models to represent the environment-induced conformational changes in the helix-coil equilibrium of EALA. We show that with both approaches a CG peptide model can be obtained that is environment-transferable and that

  11. Strong contributions from vertical triads to helix-partner preferences in parallel coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkruger, Jay D; Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-09-26

    Pairing preferences in heterodimeric coiled coils are determined by complementarities among side chains that pack against one another at the helix-helix interface. However, relationships between dimer stability and interfacial residue identity are not fully understood. In the context of the "knobs-into-holes" (KIH) packing pattern, one can identify two classes of interactions between side chains from different helices: "lateral", in which a line connecting the adjacent side chains is perpendicular to the helix axes, and "vertical", in which the connecting line is parallel to the helix axes. We have previously analyzed vertical interactions in antiparallel coiled coils and found that one type of triad constellation (a'-a-a') exerts a strong effect on pairing preferences, while the other type of triad (d'-d-d') has relatively little impact on pairing tendencies. Here, we ask whether vertical interactions (d'-a-d') influence pairing in parallel coiled-coil dimers. Our results indicate that vertical interactions can exert a substantial impact on pairing specificity, and that the influence of the d'-a-d' triad depends on the lateral a' contact within the local KIH motif. Structure-informed bioinformatic analyses of protein sequences reveal trends consistent with the thermodynamic data derived from our experimental model system in suggesting that heterotriads involving Leu and Ile are preferred over homotriads involving Leu and Ile.

  12. Theoretical study for volume changes associated with the helix-coil transition of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Harano, Y; Kovalenko, A; Hirata, F

    2001-12-01

    We calculate the partial molar volumes and their changes associated with the coil(extended)-to-helix transition of two types of peptide, glycine-oligomer and glutamic acid-oligomer, in aqueous solutions by using the Kirkwood-Buff solution theory coupled with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. The volume changes associated with the transition are small and positive. The volume is analyzed by decomposing it into five contributions following the procedure proposed by Chalikian and Breslauer: the ideal volume, the van der Waals volume, the void volume, the thermal volume, and the interaction volume. The ideal volumes and the van der Waals volumes do not change appreciably upon the transition. In the both cases of glycine-peptide and glutamic acid-peptide, the changes in the void volumes are positive, while those in the thermal volumes are negative, and tend to balance those in the void volumes. The change in the interaction volume of glycine-peptide does not significantly contribute, while that of glutamic acid-peptide makes a negative contribution. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers 59: 512-519, 2001

  13. Optimized molecular dynamics force fields applied to the helix-coil transition of polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Robert B; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-07-02

    Obtaining the correct balance of secondary structure propensities is a central priority in protein force-field development. Given that current force fields differ significantly in their alpha-helical propensities, a correction to match experimental results would be highly desirable. We have determined simple backbone energy corrections for two force fields to reproduce the fraction of helix measured in short peptides at 300 K. As validation, we show that the optimized force fields produce results in excellent agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for folded proteins and short peptides not used in the optimization. However, despite the agreement at ambient conditions, the dependence of the helix content on temperature is too weak, a problem shared with other force fields. A fit of the Lifson-Roig helix-coil theory shows that both the enthalpy and entropy of helix formation are too small: the helix extension parameter w agrees well with experiment, but its entropic and enthalpic components are both only about half the respective experimental estimates. Our structural and thermodynamic analyses point toward the physical origins of these shortcomings in current force fields, and suggest ways to address them in future force-field development.

  14. Effect of the Helix-Coil transition in Bovine skin gelatin on its associative phase separation with Lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, Y.A.; Zhuravleva, I.L.; Volodine, A.; Moldenaers, P.; Cardinaels, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that the formation of electrostatic polyelectrolyte complexes can induce conformational changes in the interacting macromolecules. However, the opposite effect, namely, that of the helix–coil transition of one of the interacting polyelectrolytes on its associative phase separation with

  15. Helix-coil transition of a four-way DNA junction observed by multiple fluorescence parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vámosi, György; Clegg, Robert M

    2008-10-16

    The thermal denaturation of immobile four-way DNA ("Holliday-") junctions with 17 base pair arms was studied via fluorescence spectroscopic measurements. Two arms of the molecule were labeled at the 5'-end with fluorescein and tetramethylrhodamine, respectively. Melting was monitored by the fluorescence intensity of the dyes, the fluorescence anisotropy of tetramethylrhodamine, and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein and rhodamine. To fit the thermal denaturation curves of the four-way junctions, two basic thermodynamic models were tested: (1) all-or-none transitions assuming a molecularity of one, two, or four and (2) a statistical "zipper" model. The all-or-none models correspond to reaction mechanisms assuming that the cooperative melting unit (that is, the structure changing from complete helix to complete coil) consists of (1) one arm, (2) two neighboring arms (which have one continuous strand common to the two arms), or (3) all four arms. In each case, the melting of the cooperative unit takes place in a single step. The tetramolecular reaction model (four-arm melting) yielded unrealistically low van't Hoff enthalpy and entropy values, whereas the monomolecular model (one-arm melting) resulted in a poor fit to the experimental data. The all-or-none bimolecular (two neighboring arm model) fit gave intermediate standard enthalpy change (Delta H) values between those expected for the melting of a duplex with a total length between the helix lengths of one and two arms (17 and 34 base pairs). Simulations according to the zipper model fit the experimental curves best when the length of the simulated duplex was assumed to be 34 base pairs, the length of a single strand. This suggests that the most important parameter determining the melting behavior of the molecule is the end-to-end distance of the strands (34 bases) rather than the length of the individual arms (17 base pairs) and that the equilibrium concentration of partially denatured

  16. Investigation of light-induced conformation changes in spiropyran-modified succinylated poly(L-lysine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, T M; Stone, M O; Natarajan, L V; Crane, R L

    1995-08-01

    To determine the maximum range of coupling between side-chain photochromism and polypeptide conformation change, we modified the carboxylate side chains of succinylated poly(L-lysine) with a spiropyran to form polypeptide I. The extent of modification was determined to be 35.5%. The spacer group length between the polypeptide alpha-carbon and the dye was 12 atoms, providing minimum polypeptide-dye interaction. Conformation changes were monitored by circular dichroism as a function of light adaptation and solvent composition (hexafluoroisopropanol [HFIP] vs trifluoroethanol [TFE]). Under all solvent compositions, the dark-adapted dye was in the merocyanine form. Light adaptation by visible light converted the dye to the spiropyran form. When dissolved in TFE, I adopted a helical conformation insensitive to light adaptation. With increasing percentage HFIP, a solvent-induced helix-to-coil transition was observed around 80% (vol/vol) HFIP. At 100% HFIP, both light- and dark-adapted forms of I were in the coil state. Near the midpoint of the solvent-induced helix-to-coil transition, light adaptation caused conformation changes. Applying helix-to-coil transition theory, we measured a statistically significant difference in coil segment-HFIP binding constant for light- vs dark-adapted solutions (6.38 +/- 0.03 M-1 vs 6.56 +/- 0.03 M-1), but not for the nucleation parameter sigma (1.2 +/- 0.4 10(-3) vs 1.3 +/- 0.3 x 10(-3). The small binding constant difference translated to a light-induced binding energy difference of 17 cal/mol/monomer. Near the midpoint of the helix-to-coil transition, collective interactions between monomer units made possible the translation of a small energy difference (less than RT) into large macromolecular conformation changes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Conformational Diffusion and Helix Formation Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Garcia, Angel E.; Garde, Shekhar

    2000-01-01

    The time, temperature, and sequence dependences of helix formation kinetics of fully atomistic peptide models in explicit solvent are described quantitatively by a diffusive search within the coil state with barrierless transitions into the helical state. Conformational diffusion leads to nonexponential kinetics and jump-width dependences in temperature jump experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  18. Conformational Diffusion and Helix Formation Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, Gerhard [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Building 5, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States); Garcia, Angel E. [Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group T-10, MS K710, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Garde, Shekhar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2000-09-18

    The time, temperature, and sequence dependences of helix formation kinetics of fully atomistic peptide models in explicit solvent are described quantitatively by a diffusive search within the coil state with barrierless transitions into the helical state. Conformational diffusion leads to nonexponential kinetics and jump-width dependences in temperature jump experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Characterization of the biomechanical properties of T4 pili expressed by Streptococcus pneumoniae--a comparison between helix-like and open coil-like pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, Mickaël; Koutris, Efstratios; Andersson, Magnus; Wiklund, Krister; Björnham, Oscar; Schedin, Staffan; Axner, Ove

    2009-07-13

    Bacterial adhesion organelles, known as fimbria or pili, are expressed by gram-positive as well as gram-negative bacteria families. These appendages play a key role in the first steps of the invasion and infection processes, and they therefore provide bacteria with pathogenic abilities. To improve the knowledge of pili-mediated bacterial adhesion to host cells and how these pili behave under the presence of an external force, we first characterize, using force measuring optical tweezers, open coil-like T4 pili expressed by gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae with respect to their biomechanical properties. It is shown that their elongation behavior can be well described by the worm-like chain model and that they possess a large degree of flexibility. Their properties are then compared with those of helix-like pili expressed by gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), which have different pili architecture. The differences suggest that these two types of pili have distinctly dissimilar mechanisms to adhere and sustain external forces. Helix-like pili expressed by UPEC bacteria adhere to host cells by single adhesins located at the distal end of the pili while their helix-like structures act as shock absorbers to dampen the irregularly shear forces induced by urine flow and to increase the cooperativity of the pili ensemble, whereas open coil-like pili expressed by S. pneumoniae adhere to cells by a multitude of adhesins distributed along the pili. It is hypothesized that these two types of pili represent different strategies of adhering to host cells in the presence of external forces. When exposed to significant forces, bacteria expressing helix-like pili remain attached by distributing the external force among a multitude of pili, whereas bacteria expressing open coil-like pili sustain large forces primarily by their multitude of binding adhesins which presumably detach sequentially.

  20. Anomalies in the coil-stretch transition of flexible polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Aishani; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2018-03-01

    The flow-induced coil-stretch transition of high molecular weight polymers has generally been held to be of first order. But evidence of significant slowing down in the rate at which the polymers relax to equilibrium in the vicinity of the transition suggests that the thermodynamic character of the transition may be less clear-cut. The above slowing down effect is actually characteristic of a second-order transition, and it points to the existence of a broad spectrum of conformational states in the transition region, analogous to the existence of fluctuations of all length scales at a critical point. In this paper, using a path integral approach based on a free-draining finitely extensible chain model, we calculate various polymer properties as a function of elongational flow as a way of exploring different statistical mechanical details of the coil-stretch transition. These properties include the molecular weight dependence of the flow-extension curve of the polymer, the distribution of its steady-state end-to-end distances, and the characteristic relaxation time τR of these distances. Among other findings, our calculations indicate that the coil-stretch transition is discontinuous in the N → ∞ limit, that the effective free energy of the chain is unimodal at all values of the flow, becoming broad and flat in the immediate vicinity of the transition, and that the ratio of τR to the Rouse relaxation time increases abruptly at the transition before eventually reaching a plateau value at large flow strengths. These aspects of the coil-stretch transition place it among a larger class of unconventional nominally first-order single chain transitions that include the adsorption transition of surface-tethered polymers and the escape transition of compressed polymers.

  1. Effect of TFE on the Helical Content of AK17 and HAL-1 Peptides: Theoretical Insights into the Mechanism of Helix Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymětal, Jiří; Bednárová, Lucie; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2016-02-18

    Fluorinated alcohols such as 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) are among the most frequently used cosolvents in experiment studies of peptides. They have significant effects on secondary structure and a particularly strong promotion of α-helix is induced by TFE. In this study we validated recently proposed force field parameters for TFE in molecular dynamics simulations with two model peptides-alanine-rich AK-17 and antimicrobial peptide halictine-1 (HAL-1). In the case of HAL-1, we characterized the effect of TFE on this peptide experimentally by ECD spectroscopy. Our TFE model in question reproduced the helix-promoting effect of TFE and provided insight into the mechanisms of TFE action on peptides. Our simulations confirmed the preferential interaction of TFE molecules with α-helices, although the TFE molecules accumulate in the vicinity of the peptides in various conformations. Moreover, we observed a significant effect of TFE on the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition and a change in local conformational preferences in the unfolded (coil) state induced by TFE. In addition, our simulation-based analysis suggests that different mechanisms participate in helix stabilization in both model peptides in water and TFE solution. Our results thus support the picture of complex TFE action on peptides that is further diversified by the identity and intrinsic properties of the peptide.

  2. α-helix to β-hairpin transition of human amylin monomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sadanand; Chiu, Chi-cheng; Reddy, Allam S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2013-04-01

    The human islet amylin polypeptide is produced along with insulin by pancreatic islets. Under some circumstances, amylin can aggregate to form amyloid fibrils, whose presence in pancreatic cells is a common pathological feature of Type II diabetes. A growing body of evidence indicates that small, early stage aggregates of amylin are cytotoxic. A better understanding of the early stages of the amylin aggregation process and, in particular, of the nucleation events leading to fibril growth could help identify therapeutic strategies. Recent studies have shown that, in dilute solution, human amylin can adopt an α-helical conformation, a β-hairpin conformation, or an unstructured coil conformation. While such states have comparable free energies, the β-hairpin state exhibits a large propensity towards aggregation. In this work, we present a detailed computational analysis of the folding pathways that arise between the various conformational states of human amylin in water. A free energy surface for amylin in explicit water is first constructed by resorting to advanced sampling techniques. Extensive transition path sampling simulations are then employed to identify the preferred folding mechanisms between distinct minima on that surface. Our results reveal that the α-helical conformer of amylin undergoes a transformation into the β-hairpin monomer through one of two mechanisms. In the first, misfolding begins through formation of specific contacts near the turn region, and proceeds via a zipping mechanism. In the second, misfolding occurs through an unstructured coil intermediate. The transition states for these processes are identified. Taken together, the findings presented in this work suggest that the inter-conversion of amylin between an α-helix and a β-hairpin is an activated process and could constitute the nucleation event for fibril growth.

  3. Frictional pressure drop of steam-water two-phase flow in helical coils with small helix diameter of HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Qincheng; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan; Zheng Jianxue

    1996-01-01

    Experiments of steam-water two-phase flow frictional pressure drop through five vertically and horizontally positioned helical coils were carried out in the high pressure steam water test loop of Xi'an Jiaotong University. Two kinds of tube with inner diameters of 10 mm and 12 mm were used to form the coils. The helix diameter was 115 mm with coil pitch 22.5 mm. The experimental conditions were: pressure p = 4-14 MPa, mass velocity G = 400-2000 kg/(m 2 ·s), and inner wall heat flux q = 0-750 kW/m 2 . Theoretical analysis with a semi-empirical correlation was made to predict the two-phase flow fictional pressure drop through these kinds of helical coils

  4. Delivery of AAV2/9-microdystrophin genes incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal domain of dystrophin improves muscle pathology and restores the level of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin in skeletal muscles of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeyoung; Malerba, Alberto; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Trollet, Capucine; Boldrin, Luisa; Ferry, Arnaud; Popplewell, Linda; Foster, Helen; Foster, Keith; Dickson, George

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe X-linked inherited muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used to deliver genes efficiently for dystrophin expression in skeletal muscles. To overcome limited packaging capacity of AAV vectors (pathology of dystrophic mdx mice. However, the CT domain of dystrophin is thought to recruit part of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, which acts as a mediator of signaling between extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton in muscle fibers. In this study, we extended the ΔR4-23/ΔCT microdystrophin by incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin (MD2), which contains the α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin binding sites. Intramuscular injection of AAV2/9 expressing CT domain-extended microdystrophin showed efficient dystrophin expression in tibialis anterior muscles of mdx mice. The presence of the CT domain of dystrophin in MD2 increased the recruitment of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin at the sarcolemma and significantly improved the muscle resistance to lengthening contraction-induced muscle damage in the mdx mice compared with MD1. These results suggest that the incorporation of helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin to the microdystrophins will substantially improve their efficiency in restoring muscle function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  5. Double-helix stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A ∼ 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-β MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications

  6. A look at the effect of sequence complexity on pressure destabilisation of DNA polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Gamal; Macgregor, Robert B

    2015-04-01

    Our previous studies on the helix-coil transition of double-stranded DNA polymers have demonstrated that molar volume change (ΔV) accompanying the thermally-induced transition can be positive or negative depending on the experimental conditions, that the pressure-induced transition is more cooperative than the heat-induced transition [Rayan and Macgregor, J Phys Chem B2005, 109, 15558-15565], and that the pressure-induced transition does not occur in the absence of water [Rayan and Macgregor, Biophys Chem, 2009, 144, 62-66]. Additionally, we have shown that ΔV values obtained by pressure-dependent techniques differ from those obtained by ambient pressure techniques such as PPC [Rayan et al. J Phys Chem B2009, 113, 1738-1742] thus shedding light on the effects of pressure on DNA polymers. Herein, we examine the effect of sequence complexity, and hence cooperativity on pressure destabilisation of DNA polymers. Working with Clostridium perfringes DNA under conditions such that the estimated ΔV of the helix-coil transition corresponds to -1.78 mL/mol (base pair) at atmospheric pressure, we do not observe the pressure-induced helix-coil transition of this DNA polymer, whereas synthetic copolymers poly[d(A-T)] and poly[d(I-C)] undergo cooperative pressure-induced transitions at similar ΔV values. We hypothesise that the reason for the lack of pressure-induced helix-coil transition of C. perfringens DNA under these experimental conditions lies in its sequence complexity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Salt effects on hydrophobic interaction and charge screening in the folding of a negatively charged peptide to a coiled coil (leucine zipper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesarov, I; Dürr, E; Thomas, R M; Bosshard, H R

    1998-05-19

    The stability of a coiled coil or leucine zipper is controlled by hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces between the constituent helices. We have designed a 30-residue peptide with the repeating seven-residue pattern of a coiled coil, (abcdefg)n, and with Glu in positions e and g of each heptad. The glutamate side chains prevented folding at pH values above 6 because of electrostatic repulsion across the helix dimer interface as well as within the individual helices. Protonation of the carboxylates changed the conformation from a random coil monomer to a coiled coil dimer. Folding at alkaline pH where the peptide had a net charge of -7e was promoted by the addition of salts. The nature of the charge screening cation was less important than that of the anion. The high salt concentrations (>1 M) necessary to induce folding indicated that the salt-induced folding resulted from alterations in the protein-water interaction. Folding was promoted by the kosmotropic anions sulfate and fluoride and to a lesser extent by the weak kosmotrope formate, whereas chloride and the strong chaotrope perchlorate were ineffective. Kosmotropes are excluded from the protein surface, which is preferentially hydrated, and this promotes folding by strengthening hydrophobic interactions at the coiled coil interface. Although charge neutralization also contributed to folding, it was effective only when the screening cation was partnered by a good kosmotropic anion. Folding conformed to a two-state transition from random coil monomer to coiled coil dimer and was enthalpy driven and characterized by a change in the heat capacity of unfolding of 3.9 +/- 1.2 kJ mol-1 K-1. The rate of folding was analyzed by fluorescence stopped-flow measurements. Folding occurred in a biphasic reaction in which the rapid formation of an initial dimer (kf = 2 x 10(7) M-1 s-1) was followed by an equally rapid concentration-independent rearrangement to the folded dimer (k > 100 s-1).

  8. Nucleic acid helices: I. Structure of M1 RNA from E. coli as determined bypsoralen crosslinking. II. Thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing 3. 0 M tetramethylammonium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This work includes two different investigations examining nucleic acid helices. The first study discusses secondary and tertiary interactions in the RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli. The second study discusses the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing tetramethylammonium chloride. The RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli (M1 RNA) has been photoreacted with 4{prime}-hydroxymethyl-4,5{prime}8-trimethylpsoralen and long wave UV light (320-380 nm) in a buffer in which the M1 RNA alone acts as a true catalyst of tRNA processing. Limited specific digestion followed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis yields fragments crosslinked by HMT. The positions of the crosslinks have been determined to within {plus minus}15 nucleotides by photoreversal of the isolated crosslinked fragments and enzymatic sequencing of the resulting RNA. Further assignments of the exact locations of the crosslinks have been made on the known photoreactivity of the psoralen with different bases.

  9. Nucleic acid helices: I. Structure of M1 RNA from E. coli as determined bypsoralen crosslinking. II. Thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing 3.0 M tetramethylammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This work includes two different investigations examining nucleic acid helices. The first study discusses secondary and tertiary interactions in the RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli. The second study discusses the thermodynamics of the helix-coil transition of DNA oligonucleotides in solutions containing tetramethylammonium chloride. The RNA moiety of ribonuclease P from Escherichia coli (M1 RNA) has been photoreacted with 4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5'8-trimethylpsoralen and long wave UV light (320-380 nm) in a buffer in which the M1 RNA alone acts as a true catalyst of tRNA processing. Limited specific digestion followed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis yields fragments crosslinked by HMT. The positions of the crosslinks have been determined to within ±15 nucleotides by photoreversal of the isolated crosslinked fragments and enzymatic sequencing of the resulting RNA. Further assignments of the exact locations of the crosslinks have been made on the known photoreactivity of the psoralen with different bases

  10. Low pressure-induced secondary structure transitions of regenerated silk fibroin in its wet film studied by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhipeng; Liu, Zhao; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Huang, He

    2018-06-01

    The secondary structure transitions of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) under different external perturbations have been studied extensively, except for pressure. In this work, time-resolved infrared spectroscopy with the attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory was employed to follow the secondary structure transitions of RSF in its wet film under low pressure. It has been found that pressure alone is favorable only to the formation of β-sheet structure. Under constant pressure there is an optimum amount of D 2 O in the wet film (D 2 O : film = 2:1) so as to provide the optimal condition for the reorganization of the secondary structure and to have the largest formation of β-sheet structure. Under constant amount of D 2 O and constant pressure, the secondary structure transitions of RSF in its wet film can be divided into three stages along with time. In the first stage, random coil, α-helix, and β-turn were quickly transformed into β-sheet. In the second stage, random coil and β-turn were relatively slowly transformed into β-sheet and α-helix, and the content of α-helix was recovered to the value prior to the application of pressure. In the third and final stage, no measurable changes can be found for each secondary structure. This study may be helpful to understand the secondary structure changes of silk fibroin in silkworm's glands under hydrostatic pressure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Conserved residues in the coiled-coil pocket of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 are essential for viral replication and interhelical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Hongmei; Konstantinidis, Alex K.; Stewart, Kent D.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Ng, Teresa; Swift, Kerry; Matayoshi, Edmund D.; Kati, Warren; Kohlbrenner, William; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 plays an important role in mediating the fusion of HIV with host cells. During the fusion process, three N-terminal helices and three C-terminal helices pack in an anti-parallel direction to form a six-helix bundle. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the gp41 core demonstrated that within each coiled-coil interface, there is a deep and large pocket, formed by a cluster of residues in the N-helix coiled-coil. In this report, we systematically analyzed the role of seven conserved residues that are either lining or packing this pocket on the infectivity and interhelical interaction using novel approaches. Our results show that residues L568, V570, W571, and K574 of the N-helix that are lining the side chain and right wall of the pocket are important for establishing a productive infection. Mutations V570A and W571A completely abolished replication, while replication of the L568A and K574A mutants was significantly attenuated relative to wild type. Similarly, residues W628, W631, and I635 of the C-helix that insert into the pocket are essential for infectivity. The impaired infectivity of these seven mutants is in part attributed to the loss in binding affinity of the interhelical interaction. Molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the coiled-coil further shows that alanine substitution of those residues disrupts the hydrophobic interaction between the N- and C-helix. These results suggest that the conserved residues in the coiled-coil domain play a key role in HIV infection and this coiled-coil pocket is a good target for development of inhibitors against HIV. In addition, our data indicate that the novel fluorescence polarization assay described in this study could be valuable in screening for inhibitors that block the interhelical interaction and HIV entry

  12. Sub-20 nm Stable Micelles Based on a Mixture of Coiled-Coils: A Platform for Controlled Ligand Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, JooChuan; Ma, Dan; Jung, Benson T; Keten, Sinan; Xu, Ting

    2017-11-13

    Ligand-functionalized, multivalent nanoparticles have been extensively studied for biomedical applications from imaging agents to drug delivery vehicles. However, the ligand cluster size is usually heterogeneous and the local valency is ill-defined. Here, we present a mixed micelle platform hierarchically self-assembled from a mixture of two amphiphilic 3-helix and 4-helix peptide-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid hybrid conjugates. We demonstrate that the local multivalent ligand cluster size on the micelle surface can be controlled based on the coiled-coil oligomeric state. The oligomeric states of mixed peptide bundles were found to be in their individual native states. Similarly, mixed micelles indicate the orthogonal self-association of coiled-coil amphiphiles. Using differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence recovery spectroscopy, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we studied the distribution of coiled-coil bundles within the mixed micelles and observed migration of coiled-coils into nanodomains within the sub-20 nm mixed micelle. This report provides important insights into the assembly and formation of nanophase-separated micelles with precise control over the local multivalent state of ligands on the micelle surface.

  13. Transition of W7-X non-planar coils from manufacturing to assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrke, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)], E-mail: gunnar.ehrke@ipp.mpg.de

    2009-06-15

    The main magnetic field of Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment (W7-X) at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Greifswald, Germany will be provided by 50 non-planar coils and supported by 20 planar coils. The non-planar coils were delivered by a consortium (CON) consisting of Babcock Noell GmbH Germany (BNG) and ASG Superconductors S.p.A. Italy (ASG). The coil production ended with the delivery of the last non-planar coil in March 2008 at the manufacturing branch of BNG in Zeitz, Germany. The construction of the coils was characterised by design changes, many rework actions and resulting time delays. Due to these numerous adjustments and changes a continuous improvement process was needed. This paper will give an overview about the transition of the non-planar coils from the acceptance tests at the manufacturer site to the beginning of the assembly at IPP. Furthermore this report will highlight technical interfaces in the period of transition.

  14. Equilibrium shift in solution: molecular shape recognition and precipitation of a synthetic double helix using helicene-grafted silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Masamichi; Ichinose, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2014-01-27

    Chiral silica nanoparticles (70 nm) grafted with (P)-helicene recognized the molecular shape of double helix and random coil (P)-ethynylhelicene oligomers in solution. A mixture of the (P)-nanoparticles and double helix precipitated much faster than a mixture of the (P)-nanoparticles and random coil, and the precipitate contained only the double helix. The mixture of the (P)-nanoparticles and (P)-ethynylhelicene pentamer reversibly dispersed in trifluoromethylbenzene upon heating at 70 °C and precipitated upon cooling at 25 °C. When a 10:90 equilibrium mixture of the double helix and random coil in solution was treated with the (P)-nanoparticles, the double helix was precipitated in 53% yield and was accompanied by equilibrium shift. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Phase transitions in polypeptides: analysis of energy fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2009-01-01

    The helix random coil transition in alanine, valine, and leucine polypeptides consisting of 30 amino acids is studied in vacuo using the Langevin molecular dynamics approach. The influence of side chain radicals on internal energy and heat capacity of the polypeptides is discussed. The heat...... of simulation time. This study provides a comparison of methods for the description of structural transitions in polypeptides....

  16. Intermediate conformation between native β-sheet and non-native α-helix is a precursor of trifluoroethanol-induced aggregation of Human Carbonic Anhydrase-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Preeti; Deep, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HCAII forms amyloid-like aggregates at moderate concentration of trifluoroethanol. • Protein adopts a state between β-sheet and α-helix at moderate % of TFE. • Hydrophobic surface(s) of partially structured conformation forms amyloid. • High % of TFE induces stable α-helical state preventing aggregation. - Abstract: In the present work, we examined the correlation between 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced conformational transitions of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) and its aggregation propensity. Circular dichroism data indicates that protein undergoes a transition from β-sheet to α-helix on addition of TFE. The protein was found to aggregate maximally at moderate concentration of TFE at which it exists somewhere between β-sheet and α-helix, probably in extended non-native β-sheet conformation. Thioflavin-T (ThT) and Congo-Red (CR) assays along with fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data suggest that the protein aggregates induced by TFE possess amyloid-like features. Anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding studies reveal that the exposure of hydrophobic surface(s) was maximum in intermediate conformation. Our study suggests that the exposed hydrophobic surface and/or the disruption of the structural features protecting a β-sheet protein might be the major reason(s) for the high aggregation propensity of non-native intermediate conformation of HCAII

  17. Space confinement and rotation stress induced self-organization of double-helix nanostructure: a nanotube twist with a moving catalyst head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Huang, Jia-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2012-05-22

    Inorganic materials with double-helix structure have attracted intensive attention due to not only their elegant morphology but also their amazing morphology-related potential applications. The investigation on the formation mechanism of the inorganic double-helix nanostructure is the first step for the fundamental studies of their materials or physical properties. Herein, we demonstrated the space confinement and rotation stress induced self-organization mechanism of the carbon nanotube (CNT)-array double helices under scanning electron microscopy by directly observing their formation process from individual layered double hydroxide flakes, which is a kind of hydrotalcite-like material composed of positively charged layers and charge-balancing interlayer anions. Space confinement is considered to be the most important extrinsic factor for the formation of CNT-array double helices. Synchronous growth of the CNT arrays oppositely from LDH flakes with space confinement on both sides at the same time is essential for the growth of CNT-array double helices. Coiling of the as-grown CNT arrays into double helices will proceed by self-organization, tending to the most stable morphology in order to release their internal rotation stress. Based on the demonstrated mechanism, effective routes were carried out to improve the selectivity for CNT-array double helices. The work provides a promising method for the fabrication of double-helix nanostructures with their two helices connected at the end by self-assembly.

  18. Field-induced Gap and Quantized Charge Pumping in Nano-helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-02-15

    We propose several novel physical phenomena based on nano-scale helical wires. Applying a static electric field transverse to the helical wire induces a metal to insulator transition, with the band gap determined by the applied voltage. Similar idea can be applied to 'geometrically' constructing one-dimensional systems with arbitrary external potential. With a quadrupolar electrode configuration, the electric field could rotate in the transverse plane, leading to a quantized dc charge current proportional to the frequency of the rotation. Such a device could be used as a new standard for the high precession measurement of the electric current. The inverse effect implies that passing an electric current through a helical wire in the presence of a transverse static electric field can lead to a mechanical rotation of the helix. This effect can be used to construct nano-scale electro-mechanical motors. Finally, our methodology also enables new ways of controlling and measuring the electronic properties of helical biological molecules such as the DNA.

  19. A double-helix and cross-patterned solenoid used as a wirelessly powered receiver for medical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shitong; Wang, Hao; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2018-05-01

    Many medical implants need to be designed in the shape of a cylinder (rod), a cuboid or a capsule in order to adapt to a specific site within the human body or facilitate the implantation procedure. In order to wirelessly power these types of implants, a pair of coils, one is located inside the human body and one is outside, is often used. Since most organs such as major muscles, blood vessels, and nerve bundles are anatomically parallel to the body surface, the most desired wireless power transfer (WPT) direction is from the external power transmission pad (a planar coil) to the lateral surface of the implant. However, to obtain optimal coupling, the currently used solenoid coil requires being positioned perpendicular to the body surface, which is often medically or anatomically unacceptable. In this research, a concentric double-helix (DH) coil with an air core is presented for use in implantable devices. Two helical coils are tilted at opposite angles (±45 degrees) to form a cross pattern. The WPT system is designed using the magnetic resonance concept for wireless power transfer (MR-WPT). The power transfer efficiency (PTE) relies on the near-field magnetic coupling which is closely related to the location and orientation of the DH coil. We explain how the novel structure of the DH solenoid magnifies the mutual inductance with the widely adopted circular planner coil and how the PTE is improved in comparison to the case of the conventional solenoid coil. We also study an important case where the double-helix power reception coil is laterally and angularly misaligned with the transmitter. Finally, our computational study using the finite element method and experimental study with actually constructed prototypes are presented which have proven our new double-helix coil design.

  20. A double-helix and cross-patterned solenoid used as a wirelessly powered receiver for medical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shitong Mao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Many medical implants need to be designed in the shape of a cylinder (rod, a cuboid or a capsule in order to adapt to a specific site within the human body or facilitate the implantation procedure. In order to wirelessly power these types of implants, a pair of coils, one is located inside the human body and one is outside, is often used. Since most organs such as major muscles, blood vessels, and nerve bundles are anatomically parallel to the body surface, the most desired wireless power transfer (WPT direction is from the external power transmission pad (a planar coil to the lateral surface of the implant. However, to obtain optimal coupling, the currently used solenoid coil requires being positioned perpendicular to the body surface, which is often medically or anatomically unacceptable. In this research, a concentric double-helix (DH coil with an air core is presented for use in implantable devices. Two helical coils are tilted at opposite angles (±45 degrees to form a cross pattern. The WPT system is designed using the magnetic resonance concept for wireless power transfer (MR-WPT. The power transfer efficiency (PTE relies on the near-field magnetic coupling which is closely related to the location and orientation of the DH coil. We explain how the novel structure of the DH solenoid magnifies the mutual inductance with the widely adopted circular planner coil and how the PTE is improved in comparison to the case of the conventional solenoid coil. We also study an important case where the double-helix power reception coil is laterally and angularly misaligned with the transmitter. Finally, our computational study using the finite element method and experimental study with actually constructed prototypes are presented which have proven our new double-helix coil design.

  1. Critical phenomena and polymer coil-to-globule transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, B.; Xu Renliang; Wang Zhulun; Zuo Ju

    1988-01-01

    Small-angle scattering techniques including laser light scattering (LLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been useful tools to measure the static and dynamic properties (in terms of critical fluctuations) of fluids, fluid mixtures, polymer and micellar solutions, polymer blends and metallic alloys. A brief review is given of recent results in critical-phenomena experiments using small-angle scattering techniques. Topics of current interest are pointed out, and a guide to the vast literature on critical opalescence is provided. Coil-to-globule transition in polymer solutions has been a classic experimental challenge over the past decade. In order to succeed in reaching the collapsed regime, it becomes important to realize that single coil contraction of a linear polymer molecule in solution takes place in the neighborhood of phase separations. By using the recent development of a small-angle light-scattering spectrometer and by taking advantage of a successful polymer fractionation experiment, the transition behavior of linear polystyrene in cyclohexane from the Θ state to the collapsed regime can be characterized based on both the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius. (orig.)

  2. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain ...

  3. CCBuilder: an interactive web-based tool for building, designing and assessing coiled-coil protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher W; Bruning, Marc; Ibarra, Amaurys Á; Bartlett, Gail J; Thomson, Andrew R; Sessions, Richard B; Brady, R Leo; Woolfson, Derek N

    2014-11-01

    The ability to accurately model protein structures at the atomistic level underpins efforts to understand protein folding, to engineer natural proteins predictably and to design proteins de novo. Homology-based methods are well established and produce impressive results. However, these are limited to structures presented by and resolved for natural proteins. Addressing this problem more widely and deriving truly ab initio models requires mathematical descriptions for protein folds; the means to decorate these with natural, engineered or de novo sequences; and methods to score the resulting models. We present CCBuilder, a web-based application that tackles the problem for a defined but large class of protein structure, the α-helical coiled coils. CCBuilder generates coiled-coil backbones, builds side chains onto these frameworks and provides a range of metrics to measure the quality of the models. Its straightforward graphical user interface provides broad functionality that allows users to build and assess models, in which helix geometry, coiled-coil architecture and topology and protein sequence can be varied rapidly. We demonstrate the utility of CCBuilder by assembling models for 653 coiled-coil structures from the PDB, which cover >96% of the known coiled-coil types, and by generating models for rarer and de novo coiled-coil structures. CCBuilder is freely available, without registration, at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/app/cc_builder/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Read

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation.

  5. Quasi-static electric field in a cylindrical volume conductor induced by external coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselle, K P; Stuchly, M A

    1994-02-01

    An expansion technique based on modified Bessel functions is used to obtain an analytical solution for the electric field induced in a homogeneous cylindrical volume conductor by an external coil. The current in the coil is assumed to be changing slowly so that quasi-static conditions can be justified. Valid for any coil type, this solution is ideal for fast computation of the induced electric field at a large number of points. Efficient implementation of this method in a computer code is described and numerical results are presented for a perpendicular circular coil and a tangential double-square coil.

  6. TOWARDS UNDERSTANDING OF HELIX B BASED CONFORMATIONAL DISEASES IN SERPIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Aman Jairajpuri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (serpins are a unique family of protease inhibitors that are prone to polymer formation due to their metastable nature and a complex inhibition mechanism that involves large scale conformational change. Helix B is in the shutter region near the strand 2A and strand 3A of �-sheet A, where reactive centre loop inserts during the serpin inhibition mechanism. Helix B region in serpins is a mutation hotspot for naturally occurring variants that result in pathological conditions due to polymerization. Helix B residues are completely buried in the native state and loop inserted latent state but not in the inhibitory loop inserted cleaved conformation. Native to cleaved transition during inhibition forms a large cavity in the shutter region, which invariably is the largest cavity in most serpins in native state. In a recent paper we had for the first time hypothesized that exposure of helix B at the N-terminal end is important for smooth insertion of the reactive center loop during serpin inhibition mechanism. It is therefore possible that natural variant that induces conformational deformation of helix B probably alter the cavity size which increases the rate of loop-sheet interaction between the monomers resulting in increased polymerization.

  7. Design features of the A-cell and transition coils of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, R.E.; Wohlwend, J.W.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The MFTF-B transition coil and A-cell magnet designs use variations of the copper-stabilized NbTi conductor developed by LLNL for the MFTF Yin-Yang magnets. This conductor will be wound on the one inch thick (12.7 mm) stainless steel coil forms using a two-axis winding machine similar to the existing LLNL Yin-Yang winding machine. After winding, covers will be placed over the coil and welded to the coil form to form a helium-tight jacket around the conductor. These jacketed coils are then enclosed in thick structural cases that react the large Lorentz forces on the magnets. The space between the coil jacket and case will be filled by a stainless steel bladder that will be injected with urethane. The injection bladder will provide cooling passages during cooldown as well as transmitting the Lorentz forces between the jacket and the case. The large self-equilibrating lobe-spreading forces on the magnets (29.10 6 lb, 127.0 MN) for the A-cell are reacted primarily through the thick 304 LN case into the external superstructure. The net Lorentz forces and the inertial forces on the magnet are reacted through support systems into the LLNL vacuum vessel structure

  8. Flow pattern assessment in tubes with wire coil inserts in laminar and transition regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Solano, J.P.; Vicente, P.G.; Viedma, A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the flow mechanisms in tubes with wire coils using hydrogen bubble visualization and PIV techniques. Results have been contrasted with experimental data on pressure drop. The relation between the observed flow patterns and the friction factor has been analysed. The experimental analysis that has been carried out allows one to state that at low Reynolds numbers (Re < 400) the flow in tubes with wire coils is basically similar to the flow in smooth tubes. At Reynolds numbers between 500 and 700 and in short pitch wire coils a recirculating flow appears. The insertion of wires coils in a smooth tube accelerates significantly the transition to turbulence. This is produced at Reynolds numbers between 700 and 1000 depending on the wire pitch

  9. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  10. Conformational plasticity of the coiled-coil domain of BmrR is required for bmr operator binding: the structure of unliganded BmrR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Newberry, Kate J; Brennan, Richard G

    2010-04-30

    The multidrug-binding transcription regulator BmrR from Bacillus subtilis is a MerR family member that binds to a wide array of cationic lipophilic toxins to activate the transcription of the multidrug efflux pump gene bmr. Transcription activation from the sigma(A)-dependent bmr operator requires BmrR to remodel the nonoptimal 19-bp spacer between the -10 promoter element and the -35 promoter element in order to facilitate productive RNA polymerase binding. Despite the availability of several structures of BmrR bound to DNA and drugs, the lack of a BmrR structure in its unliganded or apo (DNA free and drug free) state hinders our full understanding of the structural transitions required for DNA binding and transcription activation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the constitutively active, unliganded BmrR mutant BmrR(E253Q/R275E). Superposition of the ligand-free (apo BmrR(E253Q/R275E)) and DNA-bound BmrR structures reveals that apo BmrR must undergo significant rearrangement in order to assume the DNA-bound conformation, including an outward rotation of minor groove binding wings, an inward movement of helix-turn-helix motifs, and a downward relocation of pliable coiled-coil helices. Computational analysis of the DNA-free and DNA-bound structures reveals a flexible joint that is located at the center of the coiled-coil helices. This region, which is composed of residues 94 through 98, overlaps the helical bulge that is observed only in the apo BmrR structure. This conformational hinge is likely common to other MerR family members with large effector-binding domains, but appears to be missing from the smaller metal-binding MerR family members. Interestingly, the center-to-center distance of the recognition helices of apo BmrR is 34 A and suggests that the conformational change from the apo BmrR structure to the bmr operator-bound BmrR structure is initiated by the binding of this transcription activator to a more B-DNA-like conformation. (c) 2010 Elsevier

  11. Comparison of the induced fields using different coil configurations during deep transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Lu

    Full Text Available Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS plays a role in the study of reward and motivation mechanisms, which may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, electric field distributions induced in the brain by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS are still unknown. In this paper, the double cone coil, H-coil and Halo-circular assembly (HCA coil which have been proposed for dTMS have been numerically designed. The distributions of magnetic flux density, induced electric field in an anatomically based realistic head model by applying the dTMS coils were numerically calculated by the impedance method. Results were compared with that of standard figure-of-eight (Fo8 coil. Simulation results show that double cone, H- and HCA coils have significantly deep field penetration compared to the conventional Fo8 coil, at the expense of induced higher and wider spread electrical fields in superficial cortical regions. Double cone and HCA coils have better ability to stimulate deep brain subregions compared to that of the H-coil. In the mean time, both double cone and HCA coils increase risk for optical nerve excitation. Our results suggest although the dTMS coils offer new tool with potential for both research and clinical applications for psychiatric and neurological disorders associated with dysfunctions of deep brain regions, the selection of the most suitable coil settings for a specific clinical application should be based on a balanced evaluation between stimulation depth and focality.

  12. pH-jump induced α-helix folding of poly-L-glutamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donten, Mateusz L.; Hamm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► pH-jump as truly biomimetic tool to initiate non-equilibrium dynamics of biomolecules. ► Design criteria to widen the applicability of pH-jumps are developed. ► Folding of poly-L-Glu in dependence of starting pH, pH jump size and helix length. ► Length dependence provides strong evidence for a nucleation–propagation scenario. - Abstract: pH jumps are a truly biomimetic technique to initiate non-equilibrium dynamics of biomolecules. In this work, the pH jump induced α-helix folding of poly-L-glutamic acid is investigated upon proton release from o-nitrobenzaldehyde. The aim of this work is twofold: On the one hand, design criteria of pH jump experiments are discussed, on the other hand, the folding mechanism of poly-L-glutamic acid is clarified by probing the IR response of the amide I band. Its folding kinetics is studied in dependence of the starting pD, the size of the pD jump and the length of the helix. While no dependence on the first two parameters could be detected, the folding time varies from 0.6 μs to 1.8 μs for helix lengths of 20 residue to 440 residue, respectively. It converges to a long-length limit at about 50 residue, a result which is attributed to a nucleation–propagation mechanism

  13. Test of a model coil of TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Claudet, G.; Disdier, F.; Hamelin, J.; Libeyre, P.; Mayaux, C.; Meuris, C.; Parain, J.; Torossian, A.

    1980-10-01

    Inside the qualifying test programme, supporting the 'Tore Supra' Tokamak design, a reduced scale model of coil was fabricated by an industrial firm and fully tested. This model coil is provided with the same features as those retained for the complete magnet and is built according to the same design; in particular the Nb-Ti mixed matrix monolithic conductor is cooled by a pressurized superfluid helium bath, supplied from a model of the envisaged complete cryogenic system. Three main objectives have been assigned to this test: operation of the cryogenic system, stability of the superconductor winding under high mechanical stresses, mainly shear, and simulation of coil quench conditions. For this purpose, the model coil (outside bore 0.8 m) is located inside a 4 T magnet, an hydraulic jack applies a 1 MN force along a coil diameter. Operation of the model coil has been found highly stable, under the conditions of applied field and forces, a coil transition can be induced by an electrical heater only when the superfluid bath temperature is close to Tlambda. The 1.8 K cryogenic system provides a useful calorimetric measure of total losses induced inside the winding; its operation has been quite simple and reliable, permitting a sure extrapolation to a much larger size

  14. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Halavaty, Andrei S; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices α4 and α7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix α4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix α4) and Gln130 (helix α7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix α4. This local conformational switch of helix α4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution small-molecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Flow-induced vibration of helical coil compression springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, F.E.; King, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Helical coil compression springs are used in some nuclear fuel assembly designs to maintain holddown and to accommodate thermal expansion. In the reactor environment, the springs are exposed to flowing water, elevated temperatures and pressures, and irradiation. Flow parallel to the longitudinal axis of the spring may excite the spring coils and cause vibration. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the flow-induced vibration (FIV) response characteristics of the helical coil compression springs. Experimental tests indicate that a helical coil spring responds like a single circular cylinder in cross-flow. Two FIV excitation mechanisms control spring vibration. Namely: 1) Turbulent Buffeting causes small amplitude vibration which increases as a function of velocity squared. 2) Vortex Shedding causes large amplitude vibration when the spring natural frequency and Strouhal frequency coincide. Several methods can be used to reduce or to prevent vortex shedding large amplitude vibrations. One method is compressing the spring to a coil pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2 thereby suppressing the vibration amplitude. Another involves modifying the spring geometry to alter its stiffness and frequency characteristics. These changes result in separation of the natural and Strouhal frequencies. With an understanding of how springs respond in the flowing water environment, the spring physical parameters can be designed to avoid large amplitude vibration. (orig.)

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of cavity creating mutations in an engineered leucine zipper and energetics of glycerol-induced coiled coil stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, E; Jelesarov, I

    2000-04-18

    Protein stability in vitro can be influenced either by introduction of mutations or by changes in the chemical composition of the solvent. Recently, we have characterized the thermodynamic stability and the rate of folding of the engineered dimeric leucine zipper A(2), which has a strengthened hydrophobic core [Dürr, E., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 870-880]. Here we report on the energetic consequences of a cavity introduced by Leu/Ala substitution at the tightly packed dimeric interface and how addition of 30% glycerol affects the folding thermodynamics of A(2) and the cavity mutants. Folding could be described by a two-state transition from two unfolded monomers to a coiled coil dimer. Removal of six methylene groups by Leu/Ala substitutions destabilized the dimeric coiled coil by 25 kJ mol(-1) at pH 3.5 and 25 degrees C in aqueous buffer. Destabilization was purely entropic at around room temperature and became increasingly enthalpic at elevated temperatures. Mutations were accompanied by a decrease of the unfolding heat capacity by 0.5 kJ K(-1) mol(-1). Addition of 30% glycerol increased the free energy of folding of A(2) and the cavity mutants by 5-10 kJ mol(-1) and lowered the unfolding heat capacity by 25% for A(2) and by 50% for the Leu/Ala mutants. The origin of the stabilizing effect of glycerol varied with temperature. Stabilization of the parent leucine zipper A(2) was enthalpic with an unfavorable entropic component between 0 and 100 degrees C. In the case of cavity mutants, glycerol induced enthalpic stabilization below 50 degrees C and entropic stabilization above 50 degrees C. The effect of glycerol could not be accounted for solely by the enthalpy and entropy of transfer or protein surface from water to glycerol/water mixture. We propose that in the presence of glycerol the folded coiled coil dimer is better packed and displays less intramolecular fluctuations, leading to enhanced enthalpic interactions and to an

  17. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, B.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-02-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts.

  18. The Helix Nebula Viewed in HCO+: Large-scale Mapping of the J = 1 → 0 Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, N. R.; Zack, L. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2013-11-01

    The J = 1 → 0 transition of HCO+ at 89 GHz has been mapped across the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) with 70'' spatial resolution (1.68 km s-1 velocity resolution) using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. This work is the first large-scale mapping project of a dense gas tracer (n(H2) ~ 105 cm-3) in old planetary nebulae. Observations of over 200 positions encompassing the classical optical image were conducted with a 3σ noise level of ~20 mK. HCO+ was detected at most positions, often exhibiting multiple velocity components indicative of complex kinematic structures in dense gas. The HCO+ spectra suggest that the Helix is composed of a bipolar, barrel-like structure with red- and blue-shifted halves, symmetric with respect to the central star and oriented ~10° east from the line of sight. A second bipolar, higher velocity outflow exists as well, situated along the direction of the Helix "plumes." The column density of HCO+ across the Helix is N tot ~ 1.5 × 1010-5.0 × 1011 cm-2, with an average value N ave ~ 1 × 1011 cm-2, corresponding to an abundance, relative to H2, of f ~ 1.4 × 10-8. This value is similar to that observed in young PN, and contradicts chemical models, which predict that the abundance of HCO+ decreases with nebular age. This study indicates that polyatomic molecules readily survive the ultraviolet field of the central white dwarf, and can be useful in tracing nebular morphology in the very late stages of stellar evolution.

  19. Kinetics of Coil-to-Globule Transition of Dansyl-Labeled Poly(N-sopropylacrylamide) Chains in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-liang; Ye, Xiao-dong; Ding, Yan-wei; Liu, Shi-lin

    2012-08-01

    The coil-to-globule transition of thermally sensitive linear poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) labeled with dansyl group is induced by 1.54 μm laser pulses (width≈10 ns). The dansyl group is used to follow the transition kinetics because its fluorescence intensity is very sensitive to its micro-environment. As the molar ratio of NIPAM monomer to dansyl group increases from 110 to 300, the effect of covalently attached dansyl fluorophores on the transition decreases. In agreement with our previous study in which we used 8-anilino-1-naphthalensulfonic acid ammonium salt free in water as a fluorescent probe, the current study reveals that the transition has two distinct stages with two characteristic times, namely, τfast≈0.1 ms, which can be attributed to the nucleation and formation of some “pearls" (locally contracting segments) on the chain, and τslow≈0.5 ms, which is related to the merging and coarsening of the “pearls". τfast is independent of the PNIPAM chain length over a wide range (Mw=2.8×106-4.2×107 g/mol). On the other hand, τslow only slightly increases with the chain length.

  20. Communication: A coil-stretch transition in planar elongational flow of an entangled polymeric melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafar Sefiddashti, Mohammad H.; Edwards, Brian J.; Khomami, Bamin

    2018-04-01

    Virtual experimentation of atomistic entangled polyethylene melts undergoing planar elongational flow revealed an amazingly detailed depiction of individual macromolecular dynamics and the resulting effect on bistable configurational states. A clear coil-stretch transition was evident, in much the same form as first envisioned by de Gennes for dilute solutions of high polymers, resulting in an associated hysteresis in the configurational flow profile over the range of strain rates predicted by theory. Simulations conducted at steady state revealed bimodal distribution functions, in which equilibrium configurational states were simultaneously populated by relatively coiled and stretched molecules which could transition from one conformational mode to the other over a relatively long time scale at critical values of strain rates. The implication of such behavior points to a double-well conformational free energy potential with an activation barrier between the two configurational minima.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structures of GCN4p Are Largely Conserved When Ion Pairs Are Disrupted at Acidic pH but Show a Relaxation of the Coiled Coil Superhelix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Anne R; Brady, Megan R; Maciejewski, Mark W; Kammerer, Richard A; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2017-03-21

    To understand the roles ion pairs play in stabilizing coiled coils, we determined nuclear magnetic resonance structures of GCN4p at three pH values. At pH 6.6, all acidic residues are fully charged; at pH 4.4, they are half-charged, and at pH 1.5, they are protonated and uncharged. The α-helix monomer and coiled coil structures of GCN4p are largely conserved, except for a loosening of the coiled coil quaternary structure with a decrease in pH. Differences going from neutral to acidic pH include (i) an unwinding of the coiled coil superhelix caused by the loss of interchain ion pair contacts, (ii) a small increase in the separation of the monomers in the dimer, (iii) a loosening of the knobs-into-holes packing motifs, and (iv) an increased separation between oppositely charged residues that participate in ion pairs at neutral pH. Chemical shifts (HN, N, C', Cα, and Cβ) of GCN4p display a seven-residue periodicity that is consistent with α-helical structure and is invariant with pH. By contrast, periodicity in hydrogen exchange rates at neutral pH is lost at acidic pH as the exchange mechanism moves into the EX1 regime. On the basis of 1 H- 15 N nuclear Overhauser effect relaxation measurements, the α-helix monomers experience only small increases in picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics at acidic pH. By contrast, 13 C rotating frame T 1 relaxation (T 1ρ ) data evince an increase in picosecond to nanosecond side-chain dynamics at lower pH, particularly for residues that stabilize the coiled coil dimerization interface through ion pairs. The results on the structure and dynamics of GCNp4 over a range of pH values help rationalize why a single structure at neutral pH poorly predicts the pH dependence of the unfolding stability of the coiled coil.

  2. Salt bridge interactions within the β2 integrin α7 helix mediate force-induced binding and shear resistance ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Linda; Li, Ning; Shu, Xinyu; Zhou, Lüwen; Lü, Shouqin; Chen, Shenbao; Mao, Debin; Long, Mian

    2018-01-01

    The functional performance of the αI domain α 7 helix in β 2 integrin activation depends on the allostery of the α 7 helix, which axially slides down; therefore, it is critical to elucidate what factors regulate the allostery. In this study, we determined that there were two conservative salt bridge interaction pairs that constrain both the upper and bottom ends of the α 7 helix. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for three β 2 integrin members, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; α L β 2 ), macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1; α M β 2 ) and α x β 2 , indicated that the magnitude of the salt bridge interaction is related to the stability of the αI domain and the strength of the corresponding force-induced allostery. The disruption of the salt bridge interaction, especially with double mutations in both salt bridges, significantly reduced the force-induced allostery time for all three members. The effects of salt bridge interactions of the αI domain α 7 helix on β 2 integrin conformational stability and allostery were experimentally validated using Mac-1 constructs. The results demonstrated that salt bridge mutations did not alter the conformational state of Mac-1, but they did increase the force-induced ligand binding and shear resistance ability, which was consistent with MD simulations. This study offers new insight into the importance of salt bridge interaction constraints of the αI domain α 7 helix and external force for β 2 integrin function. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Unraveling double stranded alpha-helical coiled coils: an x-ray diffraction study on hard alpha-keratin fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplak, L; Doucet, J; Briki, F

    2001-04-15

    Transformations of proteins secondary and tertiary structures are generally studied in globular proteins in solution. In fibrous proteins, such as hard alpha-keratin, that contain long and well-defined double stranded alpha-helical coiled coil domains, such study can be directly done on the native fibrous tissue. In order to assess the structural behavior of the coiled coil domains under an axial mechanical stress, wide angle x-ray scattering and small angle x-ray scattering experiments have been carried out on stretched horse hair fibers at relative humidity around 30%. Our observations of the three major axial spacings as a function of the applied macroscopic strain have shown two rates. Up to 4% macroscopic strain the coiled coils were slightly distorted but retained their overall conformation. Above 4% the proportion of coiled coil domains progressively decreased. The main and new result of our study is the observation of the transition from alpha-helical coiled coils to disordered chains instead of the alpha-helical coiled coil to beta-sheet transition that occurs in wet fibers.

  4. Recognition and Binding of a Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide to Carbonic Anhydrase Occurs via Partly Folded Intermediate Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignell, Martin; Becker, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the association of a helix-loop-helix peptide scaffold carrying a benzenesulfonamide ligand to carbonic anhydrase using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The helix-loop-helix peptide, developed for biosensing applications, is labeled with the fluorescent probe dansyl, which serves as a polarity-sensitive reporter of the binding event. Using maximum entropy analysis of the fluorescence lifetime of dansyl at 1:1 stoichiometry reveals three characteristic fluorescence lifetime groups, interpreted as differently interacting peptide/protein structures. We characterize these peptide/protein complexes as mostly bound but unfolded, bound and partly folded, and strongly bound and folded. Furthermore, analysis of the fluorescence anisotropy decay resulted in three different dansyl rotational correlation times, namely 0.18, 1.2, and 23 ns. Using the amplitudes of these times, we can correlate the lifetime groups with the corresponding fluorescence anisotropy component. The 23-ns rotational correlation time, which appears with the same amplitude as a 17-ns fluorescence lifetime, shows that the dansyl fluorophore follows the rotational diffusion of carbonic anhydrase when it is a part of the folded peptide/protein complex. A partly folded and partly hydrated interfacial structure is manifested in an 8-ns dansyl fluorescence lifetime and a 1.2-ns rotational correlation time. This structure, we believe, is similar to a molten-globule-like interfacial structure, which allows segmental movement and has a higher degree of solvent exposure of dansyl. Indirect excitation of dansyl on the helix-loop-helix peptide through Förster energy transfer from one or several tryptophans in the carbonic anhydrase shows that the helix-loop-helix scaffold binds to a tryptophan-rich domain of the carbonic anhydrase. We conclude that binding of the peptide to carbonic anhydrase involves a transition from a disordered to an ordered structure of the

  5. Coiled-coil forming peptides for the induction of silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Božič Abram, Sabina; Aupič, Jana; Dražić, Goran; Gradišar, Helena; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Biopolymers with defined sequence patterns offer an attractive alternative for the formation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP). A set of coiled-coil dimer forming peptides was tested for their AgNP formation ability. Seventeen of those peptides mediated the formation of AgNPs in aqueous solution at neutral pH, while the formation of a coiled-coil dimer inhibited the nanoparticle generation. A QSAR regression model on the relationship between sequence and function suggests that in this peptide type the patterns KXQQ and KXEE are favorable, whereas Ala residues appear to have an inhibitory effect. UV–VIS spectra of the obtained nanoparticles gave a peak at around 420 nm, typical for AgNPs in the size range around 40 nm, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Peptide-induced AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity, even after a 15 min contact time, while they had low toxicity to human cells at the same concentrations. These results show that our designed peptides generate AgNPs with antibacterial activity at mild conditions and might be used for antibacterial coatings. - Highlights: • 17 of the 30 tested coiled-coil forming peptides induce AgNP formation. • Coiled-coil dimer formation suppresses AgNP generation of individual peptides. • Size of the peptide-induced silver nanoparticles is around 40 nm. • QSAR analysis points to the importance of KXQQ and KXEE motifs for AgNP generation. • Peptide-induced silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial activity.

  6. Coiled-coil forming peptides for the induction of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Božič Abram, Sabina [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Graduate School of Biomedicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Aupič, Jana [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Doctoral Programme in Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Dražić, Goran [Laboratory for Materials Chemistry, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gradišar, Helena [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST, Centre of Excellence, Trg Osvobodilne fronte 13, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Jerala, Roman, E-mail: roman.jerala@ki.si [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST, Centre of Excellence, Trg Osvobodilne fronte 13, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)

    2016-04-08

    Biopolymers with defined sequence patterns offer an attractive alternative for the formation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP). A set of coiled-coil dimer forming peptides was tested for their AgNP formation ability. Seventeen of those peptides mediated the formation of AgNPs in aqueous solution at neutral pH, while the formation of a coiled-coil dimer inhibited the nanoparticle generation. A QSAR regression model on the relationship between sequence and function suggests that in this peptide type the patterns KXQQ and KXEE are favorable, whereas Ala residues appear to have an inhibitory effect. UV–VIS spectra of the obtained nanoparticles gave a peak at around 420 nm, typical for AgNPs in the size range around 40 nm, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Peptide-induced AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity, even after a 15 min contact time, while they had low toxicity to human cells at the same concentrations. These results show that our designed peptides generate AgNPs with antibacterial activity at mild conditions and might be used for antibacterial coatings. - Highlights: • 17 of the 30 tested coiled-coil forming peptides induce AgNP formation. • Coiled-coil dimer formation suppresses AgNP generation of individual peptides. • Size of the peptide-induced silver nanoparticles is around 40 nm. • QSAR analysis points to the importance of KXQQ and KXEE motifs for AgNP generation. • Peptide-induced silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial activity.

  7. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  8. Sensitive quench detection of the HTS coil using a co-winding coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Tomohiro; Ariyama, Takahiro; Takao, Tomoaki; Tsukamoto, Osami

    2017-01-01

    The authors have studied the co-winding coil method (CW method) using the co-wound coil electrically insulated from the HTS coil. In this method, the quench is detected by the voltage difference between the coil of the HTS tape (HTS coil) and the coil of the normal conductor (CW coil). The voltage induced in the CW coil caused by the change of the magnetic field is almost the same as that in the HTS coil because the coils are magnetically coupled close to each other. Therefore, it is expected that the induced voltage will be canceled with high accuracy and that the resistive voltage in the HTS coil will be detected with greater sensitivity compared to the bridge balance method, which is used commonly. In this study, quench detection applying the CW method is demonstrated using an experimental double-pancake coil. A tape with the copper layer deposited on the polymer substrate was used as the insulated conductor wire to form the CW coil. An additional pancake coil was used to expose the experimental double-pancake coil to the external magnetic field asymmetrically. It was shown that the CW method can detect the resistive voltage with greater sensitivity even when the HTS coil was exposed to the changing asymmetric external magnetic field. (author)

  9. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix for Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    x86 binaries, although it can be targeted to any platform that is targeted by IDA Pro. Currently, IDA Pro targets more than 40 processors and...effects its own transformations. Helix/Kevlar then automatically generates SPRI rules for any program variants by essentially performing a “ smart diff...execute permission on the pages of memory it uses, leaving only execute (but not write) permission on the code cache. Strata also watches for attempts

  10. Characterization of Radiation Induced Current in RF coils of Linac-MR Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Benjamin Lester

    Real-time MR imaging of the cancer patients undergoing external beam radiation treatment represents the next generation in image guided radiotherapy. However, the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI is exposed to the pulsed radiation of the linear accelerator in the systems where a medical linear accelerator is integrated with the MRI. This thesis is primarily concerned with the instantaneous effect of pulsed radiation on the RF coils, in particular the Radiation Induced Current (RIC). The RIC results from the charge imbalance created by the ejection of Compton electrons from the thin conductors of the RF coils during the pulsed irradiation. This work spans the initial observations of the RIC in real coils, a detailed characterization of the RIC and finally its impact on the MR image. The first part presented the measurements of the instantaneous RIC in two different MRI RF coils. Some basic characterization of the RIC included the isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, the dependence of RIC on linear accelerator dose rate, and the effect of placing wax buildup on the coil to reduce RIC. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence of the RIC amplitude on dose rate was observed. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. In the second part, a buildup method of RIC removal in planar conductors is tested, a Monte Carlo method of RIC calculation in metal conductors is presented and validated, and the Monte Carlo method is used to examine the effects of magnetic fields on both planar conductor and practical cylindrical coil geometries. The buildup method of RIC removal is effective in planar geometries and in cylindrical coil geometries when the coil conductor is in direct contact with the patient. The presence of air gap between the coil and patient makes this method of RIC removal less effective although placing buildup still reduces the RIC

  11. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined

  12. On the molecular origin of the cooperative coil-to-globule transition of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, L; Zaccarelli, E; Chiessi, E

    2018-04-18

    By means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the behaviour of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), PNIPAM, in water at temperatures below and above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), including the undercooled regime. The transition between water soluble and insoluble states at the LCST is described as a cooperative process involving an intramolecular coil-to-globule transition preceding the aggregation of chains and the polymer precipitation. In this work we investigate the molecular origin of such cooperativity and the evolution of the hydration pattern in the undercooled polymer solution. The solution behaviour of an atactic 30-mer at high dilution is studied in the temperature interval from 243 to 323 K with a favourable comparison to available experimental data. In the water soluble states of PNIPAM we detect a correlation between polymer segmental dynamics and diffusion motion of bound water, occurring with the same activation energy. Simulation results show that below the coil-to-globule transition temperature PNIPAM is surrounded by a network of hydrogen bonded water molecules and that the cooperativity arises from the structuring of water clusters in proximity to hydrophobic groups. Differently, the perturbation of the hydrogen bond pattern involving water and amide groups occurs above the transition temperature. Altogether these findings reveal that even above the LCST PNIPAM remains largely hydrated and that the coil-to-globule transition is related with a significant rearrangement of the solvent in the proximity of the surface of the polymer. The comparison between the hydrogen bonding of water in the surrounding of PNIPAM isopropyl groups and in the bulk displays a decreased structuring of solvent at the hydrophobic polymer-water interface across the transition temperature, as expected because of the topological extension along the chain of such interface. No evidence of an upper critical solution temperature behaviour

  13. Quadruple Cone Coil with improved focality than Figure-8 coil in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Lee, Erik G.; Hadimani, Ravi L.; Jiles, David C.

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive therapy which uses a time varying magnetic field to induce an electric field in the brain and to cause neuron depolarization. Magnetic coils play an important role in the TMS therapy since their coil geometry determines the focality and penetration's depth of the induced electric field in the brain. Quadruple Cone Coil (QCC) is a novel coil with an improved focality when compared to commercial Figure-8 coil. The results of this newly designed QCC coil are compared with the Figure-8 coil at two different positions of the head - vertex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, over the 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. Parameters such as volume of stimulation, maximum electric, area of stimulation and location of maximum electric field are determined with the help of computer modelling of both coils. There is a decrease in volume of brain stimulated by 11.6 % and a modest improvement of 8 % in the location of maximum electric field due to QCC in comparison to the Figure-8 coil. The Carver Charitable Trust and The Galloway Foundation.

  14. Teaching helix and problems connected with helix using GeoGebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bímová, Daniela

    2017-12-01

    The contribution presents the dynamic applets created in GeoGebra that show the origin and main properties of a helix and it also presents some constructive problems connected with the helix. There are created the step by step algorithms of some constructions in the chosen applets. Three-dimensional applets include illustrative helix samples and spatial animations that help students better see problems concerning the helix spatially. There is mentioned the website in the contribution on which there is situated GeoGebra book dedicated to the topic "Helix" and containing the mentioned applets. The created applets and materials of the GeoGebra book "Helix" help in teaching and studying the course Constructive Geometry determined for the students of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the Technical University of Liberec.

  15. DNA binding specificity of the basic-helix-loop-helix protein MASH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhan, D; el-Ariss, C; Neuenschwander, M; Sieber, M; Stackhouse, J F; Allemann, R K

    1995-09-05

    Despite the high degree of sequence similarity in their basic-helix-loop-helix (BHLH) domains, MASH-1 and MyoD are involved in different biological processes. In order to define possible differences between the DNA binding specificities of these two proteins, we investigated the DNA binding properties of MASH-1 by circular dichroism spectroscopy and by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Upon binding to DNA, the BHLH domain of MASH-1 underwent a conformational change from a mainly unfolded to a largely alpha-helical form, and surprisingly, this change was independent of the specific DNA sequence. The same conformational transition could be induced by the addition of 20% 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The apparent dissociation constants (KD) of the complexes of full-length MASH-1 with various oligonucleotides were determined from half-saturation points in EMSAs. MASH-1 bound as a dimer to DNA sequences containing an E-box with high affinity KD = 1.4-4.1 x 10(-14) M2). However, the specificity of DNA binding was low. The dissociation constant for the complex between MASH-1 and the highest affinity E-box sequence (KD = 1.4 x 10(-14) M2) was only a factor of 10 smaller than for completely unrelated DNA sequences (KD = approximately 1 x 10(-13) M2). The DNA binding specificity of MASH-1 was not significantly increased by the formation of an heterodimer with the ubiquitous E12 protein. MASH-1 and MyoD displayed similar binding site preferences, suggesting that their different target gene specificities cannot be explained solely by differential DNA binding. An explanation for these findings is provided on the basis of the known crystal structure of the BHLH domain of MyoD.

  16. Sequence charge decoration dictates coil-globule transition in intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Taylor; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2018-03-28

    We present an analytical theory to compute conformations of heteropolymers-applicable to describe disordered proteins-as a function of temperature and charge sequence. The theory describes coil-globule transition for a given protein sequence when temperature is varied and has been benchmarked against the all-atom Monte Carlo simulation (using CAMPARI) of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In addition, the model quantitatively shows how subtle alterations of charge placement in the primary sequence-while maintaining the same charge composition-can lead to significant changes in conformation, even as drastic as a coil (swelled above a purely random coil) to globule (collapsed below a random coil) and vice versa. The theory provides insights on how to control (enhance or suppress) these changes by tuning the temperature (or solution condition) and charge decoration. As an application, we predict the distribution of conformations (at room temperature) of all naturally occurring IDPs in the DisProt database and notice significant size variation even among IDPs with a similar composition of positive and negative charges. Based on this, we provide a new diagram-of-states delineating the sequence-conformation relation for proteins in the DisProt database. Next, we study the effect of post-translational modification, e.g., phosphorylation, on IDP conformations. Modifications as little as two-site phosphorylation can significantly alter the size of an IDP with everything else being constant (temperature, salt concentration, etc.). However, not all possible modification sites have the same effect on protein conformations; there are certain "hot spots" that can cause maximal change in conformation. The location of these "hot spots" in the parent sequence can readily be identified by using a sequence charge decoration metric originally introduced by Sawle and Ghosh. The ability of our model to predict conformations (both expanded and collapsed states) of IDPs at a high

  17. Sequence charge decoration dictates coil-globule transition in intrinsically disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Taylor; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2018-03-01

    We present an analytical theory to compute conformations of heteropolymers—applicable to describe disordered proteins—as a function of temperature and charge sequence. The theory describes coil-globule transition for a given protein sequence when temperature is varied and has been benchmarked against the all-atom Monte Carlo simulation (using CAMPARI) of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In addition, the model quantitatively shows how subtle alterations of charge placement in the primary sequence—while maintaining the same charge composition—can lead to significant changes in conformation, even as drastic as a coil (swelled above a purely random coil) to globule (collapsed below a random coil) and vice versa. The theory provides insights on how to control (enhance or suppress) these changes by tuning the temperature (or solution condition) and charge decoration. As an application, we predict the distribution of conformations (at room temperature) of all naturally occurring IDPs in the DisProt database and notice significant size variation even among IDPs with a similar composition of positive and negative charges. Based on this, we provide a new diagram-of-states delineating the sequence-conformation relation for proteins in the DisProt database. Next, we study the effect of post-translational modification, e.g., phosphorylation, on IDP conformations. Modifications as little as two-site phosphorylation can significantly alter the size of an IDP with everything else being constant (temperature, salt concentration, etc.). However, not all possible modification sites have the same effect on protein conformations; there are certain "hot spots" that can cause maximal change in conformation. The location of these "hot spots" in the parent sequence can readily be identified by using a sequence charge decoration metric originally introduced by Sawle and Ghosh. The ability of our model to predict conformations (both expanded and collapsed states) of IDPs at

  18. Drawing-induced changes in morphology and mechanical properties of hornet silk gel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Tsunenori; Kojima, Katsura; Togawa, Eiji; Sezutsu, Hideki; Zhang, Qiang; Teramoto, Hidetoshi; Tamada, Yasushi

    2010-04-12

    Complete amino acid sequences of the four major proteins (Vssilk 1-4) of silk (hornet silk) obtained from yellow hornet ( Vespa simillima , Vespinae, Vespidae) cocoons have been determined. The native structure of the hornet silk (HS), in which Vssilk 1-4 have an alpha-helix domain with coiled-coil alpha-helices and a beta-sheet domain, is restored when hornet silk gel films (HSGFs) are formed by pressing and drying HS hydrogel. Necking occurs when dry HSGFs are drawn; however, wet HSGFs can be uniaxially drawn with a draw ratio (DR) of 2. Drawing helps obtain high-performance films with a maximum tensile strength and tensile modulus of 170 MPa and 5.5 GPa, respectively. Drawing-induced changes in the orientation and conformation of the coiled-coil structure are investigated.

  19. Large superconducting coil fabrication development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Allred, E.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Burn, P.B.; Deaderick, R.I.; Henderson, G.M.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    Toroidal fields for some fusion devices will be produced by an array of large superconducting coils. Their size, space limitation, and field requirements dictate that they be high performance coils. Once installed, accessibility for maintenance and repairs is severely restricted; therefore, good reliability is an obvious necessity. Sufficient coil fabrication will be undertaken to develop and test methods that are reliable, fast, and economical. Industrial participation will be encouraged from the outset to insure smooth transition from development phases to production phases. Initially, practice equipment for three meter bore circular coils will be developed. Oval shape coil forms will be included in the practice facility later. Equipment that is more automated will be developed with the expectation of winding faster and obtaining good coil quality. Alternate types of coil construction, methods of winding and insulating, will be investigated. Handling and assembly problems will be studied. All technology developed must be feasible for scaling up when much larger coils are needed. Experimental power reactors may need coils having six meter or larger bores

  20. The heterotrimeric laminin coiled-coil domain exerts anti-adhesive effects and induces a pro-invasive phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Santos-Valle

    Full Text Available Laminins are large heterotrimeric cross-shaped extracellular matrix glycoproteins with terminal globular domains and a coiled-coil region through which the three chains are assembled and covalently linked. Laminins are key components of basement membranes, and they serve as attachment sites for cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In this work, we produced a recombinant fragment comprising the entire laminin coiled-coil of the α1-, β1-, and γ1-chains that assemble into a stable heterotrimeric coiled-coil structure independently of the rest of the molecule. This domain was biologically active and not only failed to serve as a substrate for cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation but also inhibited cell adhesion to laminin when added to cells in a soluble form at the time of seeding. Furthermore, gene array expression profiling in cells cultured in the presence of the laminin coiled-coil domain revealed up-regulation of genes involved in cell motility and invasion. These findings were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and zymography assays. In conclusion, this study shows for the first time that the laminin coiled-coil domain displays anti-adhesive functions and has potential implications for cell migration during matrix remodeling.

  1. Theoretical study of solvent effects on the coil-globule transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, James M.; Opps, Sheldon B.; Abou Risk, Nicholas

    2009-06-01

    The coil-globule transition of a polymer in a solvent has been studied using Monte Carlo simulations of a single chain subject to intramolecular interactions as well as a solvent-mediated effective potential. This solvation potential was calculated using several different theoretical approaches for two simple polymer/solvent models, each employing hard-sphere chains and hard-sphere solvent particles as well as attractive square-well potentials between some interaction sites. For each model, collapse is driven by variation in a parameter which changes the energy mismatch between monomers and solvent particles. The solvation potentials were calculated using two fundamentally different methodologies, each designed to predict the conformational behavior of polymers in solution: (1) the polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory and (2) a many-body solvation potential (MBSP) based on scaled particle theory introduced by Grayce [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 5171 (1997)]. For the PRISM calculations, two well-studied solvation monomer-monomer pair potentials were employed, each distinguished by the closure relation used in its derivation: (i) a hypernetted-chain (HNC)-type potential and (ii) a Percus-Yevick (PY)-type potential. The theoretical predictions were each compared to results obtained from explicit-solvent discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations on the same polymer/solvent model systems [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 194904 (2006)]. In each case, the variation in the coil-globule transition properties with solvent density is mostly qualitatively correct, though the quantitative agreement between the theory and prediction is typically poor. The HNC-type potential yields results that are more qualitatively consistent with simulation. The conformational behavior of the polymer upon collapse predicted by the MBSP approach is quantitatively correct for low and moderate solvent densities but is increasingly less accurate for higher densities. At high solvent densities

  2. Experimental approach to investigate the constrained recovery behavior of coiled monofilament polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, S. S.; Nunes, L. C. S.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new approach for investigating the thermo-mechanical behavior of coiled oriented polymer fibers with fixed ends and promote an understanding of the actuation response of coiled polymers in constrained recovery applications. In the proposed experimental methodology, a coiled fiber was pre-stretched by 50% and the distance between its ends remained constant, then it was subjected to a heating-cooling cycle ranging from 30 °C to 120 °C and the induced restoring force was measured. Based on these measurements, axial deformation and shear strain were obtained from full-field displacements extracted by the digital image correlation method from images of the coiled fiber. Three coiled fibers with different initial pitch angles were manufactured, and samples with lengths of 15 mm and 20 mm were tested. Bias angles and coil radius were also estimated using the experimental data associated with the helical spring theory. Results show that significant shape changes can be noticed above the glass transition temperature (47 °C), and these changes induce variation in the resultant forces. The effects of thermal softening and thermal contraction for a modest negative thermal expansion coefficient became evident at temperatures ranging from ∼47 °C to ∼90 °C, while the response of a coiled homochiral polymer fiber was achieved at temperatures close to 90 °C. During the cooling process, saturated states of the axial deformation and shear strain of the coiled fibers were observed at temperatures between 120 °C and 100 °C.

  3. A study on mechanical properties and flow-induced vibrations of coil-shaped holddown spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2010-01-01

    The fuel assemblies used in the OPR1000s in Korea employ four coil-shaped hold-down springs to exert compressive load at the top of fuel assembly so that the assemblies may not be damaged by preventing its hydraulic-induced lifting-off from its lower seating surface. However, the coolant flow generates the flow-induced vibration at the coil-shaped hold-down springs which may cause wear on the spring surfaces. A hold-own spring may be fractured if torsional stress acting on its worn area exceeds a stress limit, resulting in the loss of hold-down spring force of the fuel assembly. In this paper, flow-induced vibration tests were performed for standard and improved coil type hold-down springs to investigate the effects of these two hold-down spring designs on flow-induced vibration wear. In parallel, a wide spectrum of mechanical tests was performed to obtain vibration-related characteristics of these two hold-down springs, which can be used as input data for the fuel assembly static and dynamic analysis. It is found that the improved hold-down spring design is better against flow-induced vibration wear than the standard one. With the use of the three-dimensional Solidwork model, the stress-related design lifetime of the improved hold-down spring was estimated by extrapolating its wear data measured from the flow-induced vibration tests, which indicates that the improved HD spring design will maintain integrity during the fuel design lifetime in OPR1000s in Korea.

  4. Non-equilibrium effects evidenced by vibrational spectra during the coil-to-globule transition in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) subjected to an ultrafast heating-cooling cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sanket A; Kamath, Ganesh; Suthar, Kamlesh J; Mancini, Derrick C; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-03-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with finite element calculations are used to explore the conformational dynamics of a thermo-sensitive oligomer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), subjected to an ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle. Finite element (FE) calculations were used to predict the temperature profile resulting from laser-induced heating of the polymer-aqueous system. The heating rate (∼0.6 K ps(-1)) deduced from FE calculations was used to heat an aqueous solution of PNIPAM consisting of 30 monomeric units (30-mer) from 285 K to 315 K. Non-equilibrium effects arising from the ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle results in a hysteresis during the coil-to-globule transition. The corresponding atomic scale conformations were characterized by monitoring the changes in the vibrational spectra, which provided a reliable metric to study the coil-to-globule transition in PNIPAM and vice-versa across the LCST. The vibrational spectra of bonds involving atoms from the oligomer backbone and the various side-groups (amide I, amide II, and the isopropyl group of PNIPAM) of the oligomers were analyzed to study the conformational changes in the oligomer corresponding to the observed hysteresis. The differences in the vibrational spectra calculated at various temperatures during heating and cooling cycles were used to understand the coil-to-globule and globule-to-coil transitions in the PNIPAM oligomer and identify the changes in the relative interactions between various atoms in the backbone and in the side groups of the oligomer with water. The shifts in the computed vibrational spectral peaks and the changes in the intensity of peaks for the different regions of PNIPAM, seen across the LCST during the heating cycle, are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The changes in the radius of gyration (Rg) and vibrational spectra for amide I and amide II regions of PNIPAM suggest a clear coil-to-globule transition at ∼301 K during the

  5. IFITM3 requires an amphipathic helix for antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesarino, Nicholas M; Compton, Alex A; McMichael, Temet M; Kenney, Adam D; Zhang, Lizhi; Soewarna, Victoria; Davis, Matthew; Schwartz, Olivier; Yount, Jacob S

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) is a cellular factor that blocks virus fusion with cell membranes. IFITM3 has been suggested to alter membrane curvature and fluidity, though its exact mechanism of action is unclear. Using a bioinformatic approach, we predict IFITM3 secondary structures and identify a highly conserved, short amphipathic helix within a hydrophobic region of IFITM3 previously thought to be a transmembrane domain. Consistent with the known ability of amphipathic helices to alter membrane properties, we show that this helix and its amphipathicity are required for the IFITM3-dependent inhibition of influenza virus, Zika virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, Ebola virus, and human immunodeficiency virus infections. The homologous amphipathic helix within IFITM1 is also required for the inhibition of infection, indicating that IFITM proteins possess a conserved mechanism of antiviral action. We further demonstrate that the amphipathic helix of IFITM3 is required to block influenza virus hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion. Overall, our results provide evidence that IFITM proteins utilize an amphipathic helix for inhibiting virus fusion. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Model of vortex dynamics in superconducting films in two-coil measurements of the coherence length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas; Loh, Yen Lee

    In two-coil measurements on superconducting films, a magnetic field from a small coil is applied to the center of the film. When the amplitude of the ac field is increased, the film undergoes a transition from the ``Meissner'' state to a state with vortices and antivortices. Ultimately, the vortex density matches the applied magnetic field and field screening is negligible. Experimentally, the field at the transition is related to the superconducting coherence length, although a full theory of the relationship is lacking. We show that the mutual inductance between drive and pickup coils, on opposite sides of the film, as a function of ac field amplitude is well-described by a phenomenological model in which vortices and antivortices appear together in the film at the radius where the induced supercurrent is strongest, and then they move through a landscape of moderately strong vortex pinning sites. Work at OSU supported by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences through Grant No. FG02-08ER46533.

  7. Quench analysis of pancake wound REBCO coils with low resistance between turns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, W Denis; Jaroszynski, Jan J; Abraimov, Dymtro V; Joyner, Rachel E; Khan, Amanatullah

    2016-01-01

    Quench in a pancake wound REBCO superconducting coil with low resistance (LR) between turns is examined by numerical analysis. In these calculations it is generally observed that once established, quench propagates rapidly in LR coils. Large transients are induced in the azimuthal solenoid current, allowed by the LR between turns, and become self-propagating. The transition from an initial state characterized by thermal diffusion to the dynamic inductive state of quench propagation is observed. The analysis is applied to the inner coil of a 30 T magnet where the quench performance is studied as a function of the value of resistance between turns. Rapid propagation of quench is seen in calculations for resistance between turns significantly greater than the resistance reported for no-insulation coils. The influence on quench of both steel co-wind and the amount of copper in the conductor is examined through calculation of the maximum temperature and the quench propagation velocity. (paper)

  8. Qualifying tests for TRIAM-1M superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nagao, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-09-01

    In the strong toroidal magnetic field experimental facility ''TRIAM-1M'' currently under construction, construction of the superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil and the following qualifying tests conducted on the full-scale superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil actually fabricated are described: (1) coil excitation test, (2) superconducting stability test, (3) external magnetic field application test, and (4) high-speed excitation test. On the basis of these test results, stability was evaluated of the superconducting coil being operated in the tokamak device. In normal tokamak operation, there occurs no normal conduction transition. At the time of plasma disruption, though this transition takes place in part of the coil, the superconducting state is immediately restored. By its electromagnetic force analysis, the superconducting coil is also stable in structure.

  9. Effect of Contour Shape of Nervous System Electromagnetic Stimulation Coils on the Induced Electrical Field Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daskalov Ivan K

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromagnetic stimulation of the nervous system has the advantage of reduced discomfort in activating nerves. For brain structures stimulation, it has become a clinically accepted modality. Coil designs usually consider factors such as optimization of induced power, focussing, field shape etc. In this study we are attempting to find the effect of the coil contour shape on the electrical field distribution for magnetic stimulation. Method and results We use the maximum of the induced electric field stimulation in the region of interest as the optimization criterion. This choice required the application of the calculus of variation, with the contour perimeter taken as a pre-set condition. Four types of coils are studied and compared: circular, square, triangular and an 'optimally' shaped contour. The latter yields higher values of the induced electrical field in depths up to about 30 mm, but for depths around 100 mm, the circular shape has a slight advantage. The validity of the model results was checked by experimental measurements in a tank with saline solution, where differences of about 12% were found. In view the accuracy limitations of the computational and measurement methods used, such differences are considered acceptable. Conclusion We applied an optimization approach, using the calculus of variation, which allows to obtain a coil contour shape corresponding to a selected criterion. In this case, the optimal contour showed higher intensities for a longer line along the depth-axis. The method allows modifying the induced field structure and focussing the field to a selected zone or line.

  10. Effects of coil orientation on the electric field induced by TMS over the hand motor area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Responses elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand motor area depend on the position and orientation of the stimulating coil. In this work, we computationally investigate the induced electric field for multiple coil orientations and locations in order to determine which parts of the brain are affected and how the sensitivity of motor cortical activation depends on the direction of the electric field. The finite element method is used for calculating the electric field induced by TMS in two individual anatomical models of the head and brain. The orientation of the coil affects both the strength and depth of penetration of the electric field, and the field strongly depends on the direction of the sulcus, where the target neurons are located. The coil position that gives the strongest electric field in the target cortical region may deviate from the closest scalp location by a distance on the order of 1 cm. Together with previous experimental data, the results support the hypothesis that the cortex is most sensitive to fields oriented perpendicular to the cortical layers, while it is relatively insensitive to fields parallel to them. This has important implications for targeting of TMS. To determine the most effective coil position and orientation, it is essential to consider both biological (the direction of the targeted axons) and physical factors (the strength and direction of the electric field). (paper)

  11. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikačević N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations. Non-reactive flow is simulated, though viscosity is treated as variable in the direction of flow, as it increases during the reaction. The design and operating parameters (reactor diameter, number of coils and inlet velocity are varied in CFD simulations, in order to examine the effects on the flow pattern. Given that 3D simulations are not practical for fast computations needed for optimization, scale-up and control, CFD flow model is reduced to one-dimensional axial dispersion (AD model with spatially variable dispersion coefficient. Dimensionless dispersion coefficient (Pe is estimated under different conditions and results are analyzed. Finally, correlation which relates Pe number with Reynolds number and number of coils from the reactor entrance is proposed for the particular reactor application and conditions.

  12. Triple Helix going abroad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull; Hu, Yimei

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to explore to what extent the Tripple helix is being internationalized. Each of the helixes have their own internationalization rationale but the article show by small example that the helix itself is being internationalized and integrated with the host country tripple h...

  13. Dimerization of the docking/adaptor protein HEF1 via a carboxy-terminal helix-loop-helix domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, S F; Zhang, Y Z; Fashena, S J; Toby, G; Estojak, J; Golemis, E A

    1999-10-10

    HEF1, p130(Cas), and Efs define a family of multidomain docking proteins which plays a central coordinating role for tyrosine-kinase-based signaling related to cell adhesion. HEF1 function has been specifically implicated in signaling pathways important for cell adhesion and differentiation in lymphoid and epithelial cells. While the SH3 domains and SH2-binding site domains (substrate domains) of HEF1 family proteins are well characterized and binding partners known, to date the highly conserved carboxy-terminal domains of the three proteins have lacked functional definition. In this study, we have determined that the carboxy-terminal domain of HEF1 contains a divergent helix-loop-helix (HLH) motif. This motif mediates HEF1 homodimerization and HEF1 heterodimerization with a recognition specificity similar to that of the transcriptional regulatory HLH proteins Id2, E12, and E47. We had previously demonstrated that the HEF1 carboxy-terminus expressed as a separate domain in yeast reprograms cell division patterns, inducing constitutive pseudohyphal growth. Here we show that pseudohyphal induction by HEF1 requires an intact HLH, further supporting the idea that this motif has an effector activity for HEF1, and implying that HEF1 pseudohyphal activity derives in part from interactions with yeast helix-loop-helix proteins. These combined results provide initial insight into the mode of function of the HEF1 carboxy-terminal domain and suggest that the HEF1 protein may interact with cellular proteins which control differentiation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. Flow-induced vibration of steam generator helical tubes subjected to external liquid cross flow and internal two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Chull Jo; Myung Jo Jhung; Woong Sik Kim; Hho Jung Kim

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper addresses the potential flow-induced vibration problems in a helically-coiled tube steam generator of integral-type nuclear reactor, of which the tubes are subjected to liquid cross flow externally and multi-phase flow externally. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted using a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency and corresponding mode shape of the helical type tubes with various conditions, a finite element analysis code is used. Based on the results of both helical coiled tube steam generator thermal-hydraulic and coiled tube modal analyses, turbulence-induced vibration and fluid-elastic instability analyses are performed. And then the potential for damages on the tubes due to either turbulence-induced vibration or fluid-elastic instability is assessed. In the assessment, special emphases are put on the detailed investigation for the effects of support conditions, coil diameter, and helix pitch on the modal, vibration amplitude and instability characteristics of tubes, from which a technical information and basis needed for designers and regulatory reviewers can be derived. (authors)

  15. Hypersonic evanescent waves generated with a planar spiral coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, A C; Araya-Kleinsteuber, B; Sethi, R S; Mehta, H M; Lowe, C R

    2003-09-01

    A planar spiral coil has been used to induce hypersonic evanescent waves in a quartz substrate with the unique ability to focus the acoustic wave down onto the chemical recognition layer. These special sensing conditions were achieved by investigating the application of a radio frequency current to a coaxial waveguide and spiral coil, so that wideband repeating electrical resonance conditions could be established over the MHz to GHz frequency range. At a selected operating frequency of 1.09 GHz, the evanescent wave depth of a quartz crystal hypersonic resonance is reduced to 17 nm, minimising unwanted coupling to the bulk fluid. Verification of the validity of the hypersonic resonance was carried out by characterising the system electrically and acoustically: Impedance calculations of the combined coil and coaxial waveguide demonstrated an excellent fit to the measured data, although above 400 MHz a transition zone was identified where unwanted impedance is parasitic of the coil influence efficiency, so the signal-to-noise ratio is reduced from 3000 to 300. Acoustic quartz crystal resonances at intervals of precisely 13.2138 MHz spacing, from the 6.6 MHz ultrasonic range and onto the desired hypersonic range above 1 GHz, were incrementally detected. Q factor measurements demonstrated that reductions in energy lost from the resonator to the fluid interface were consistent with the anticipated shrinkage of the evanescent wave with increasing operating frequency. Amplitude and frequency reduction in contact with a glucose solution was demonstrated at 1.09 GHz. The complex physical conditions arising at the solid-liquid interface under hypersonic entrainment are discussed with respect to acceleration induced slippage, rupture, longitudinal and shear radiation and multiphase relaxation affects.

  16. SDS-Induced Fibrillation of α-Synuclein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giehm, L.; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De; Pedersen, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    . In this fibrillogenic complex, 4 αSN molecules initially associate with 40-50 SDS molecules to form a shared micelle that gradually grows in size. The complex initially exhibits a mixture of random coil and α-helix, but incubation results in a structural conversion into β-sheet structure and concomitant formation......-stabilized micelles. Thus, fibrillation in this case occurs by a process of continuous accretion rather than by the rate-limiting accumulation of a distinct nucleus. The morphology of the SDS-induced fibrils does not exhibit the classical rod-like structures formed by αSN when aggregated by agitation in the absence...

  17. MURC, a muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein that modulates the Rho/ROCK pathway, induces cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Ueyama, Tomomi; Isodono, Koji; Tagawa, Masashi; Takehara, Naofumi; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Harada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Shioi, Tetsuo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-05-01

    We identified a novel muscle-restricted putative coiled-coil protein, MURC, which is evolutionarily conserved from frog to human. MURC was localized to the cytoplasm with accumulation in the Z-line of the sarcomere in the murine adult heart. MURC mRNA expression in the heart increased during the developmental process from the embryonic stage to adulthood. In response to pressure overload, MURC mRNA expression increased in the hypertrophied heart. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified the serum deprivation response (SDPR) protein, a phosphatidylserine-binding protein, as a MURC-binding protein. MURC induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which modulated serum response factor-mediated atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression and myofibrillar organization. SDPR augmented MURC-induced transactivation of the ANP promoter in cardiomyocytes, and RNA interference of SDPR attenuated the action of MURC on the ANP promoter. Transgenic mice expressing cardiac-specific MURC (Tg-MURC) exhibited cardiac contractile dysfunction and atrioventricular (AV) conduction disturbances with atrial chamber enlargement, reduced thickness of the ventricular wall, and interstitial fibrosis. Spontaneous episodes of atrial fibrillation and AV block were observed in Tg-MURC mice. These findings indicate that MURC modulates RhoA signaling and that MURC plays an important role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance with increased vulnerability to atrial arrhythmias.

  18. MURC, a Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil Protein That Modulates the Rho/ROCK Pathway, Induces Cardiac Dysfunction and Conduction Disturbance▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Ueyama, Tomomi; Isodono, Koji; Tagawa, Masashi; Takehara, Naofumi; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Harada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Shioi, Tetsuo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-01-01

    We identified a novel muscle-restricted putative coiled-coil protein, MURC, which is evolutionarily conserved from frog to human. MURC was localized to the cytoplasm with accumulation in the Z-line of the sarcomere in the murine adult heart. MURC mRNA expression in the heart increased during the developmental process from the embryonic stage to adulthood. In response to pressure overload, MURC mRNA expression increased in the hypertrophied heart. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified the serum deprivation response (SDPR) protein, a phosphatidylserine-binding protein, as a MURC-binding protein. MURC induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which modulated serum response factor-mediated atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression and myofibrillar organization. SDPR augmented MURC-induced transactivation of the ANP promoter in cardiomyocytes, and RNA interference of SDPR attenuated the action of MURC on the ANP promoter. Transgenic mice expressing cardiac-specific MURC (Tg-MURC) exhibited cardiac contractile dysfunction and atrioventricular (AV) conduction disturbances with atrial chamber enlargement, reduced thickness of the ventricular wall, and interstitial fibrosis. Spontaneous episodes of atrial fibrillation and AV block were observed in Tg-MURC mice. These findings indicate that MURC modulates RhoA signaling and that MURC plays an important role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance with increased vulnerability to atrial arrhythmias. PMID:18332105

  19. Dissolution and regeneration of non-mulberry Eriogyna Pyretorum silk fibroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuhang; Li, Xiufang; Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Shuqin; You, Renchuan

    2017-10-01

    Protein-based materials have been actively pursued as biomaterials because of their nontoxicity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, we demonstrated the potential of Eriogyna pyretorum silk fibroin (ESF), a non-mulberry silk protein, as biomaterials. The degummed ESF fibers could be dissolved completely by Ca(NO3)2/H2O/C2H5OH solution to produce regenerated ESF. The solubility was strongly dependent on the addition of C2H5OH, heating temperature and dissolving time. α-helix and random coil are main molecular conformation in aqueous ESF solution. The sol-gel transition behavior of regenerated ESF was also studied, indicating that the conformational transition of regenerated ESF from random coil/α-helix to β-sheet during gelation. Especially, ESF showed more rapid gelation than mulberry silk fibroin (BSF). Consequently, the gelation rate of BSF could be controlled ranging from tens of minutes to days by changing the ESF ratio, providing useful options for the fabrication of silk hydrogels. Water-stable regenerated ESF film could be achieved by using aqueous ethanol to induce structural transition. Tensile tests showed that the ESF films have a dry strength of approximate 31.0 MPa and a wet strength of approximate 3.3 MPa. This study provides new opportunities as an alternative natural protein material for biomedical applications.

  20. Helically coiled tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a heat exchanger such as a steam generator for a nuclear reactor, two or more bundles of helically coiled tubes are arranged in series with the tubes in each bundle integrally continuing through the tube bundles arranged in series therewith. Pitch values for the tubing in any pair of tube bundles, taken transverse to the path of the reactor coolant flow about the tubes, are selected as a ratio of two unequal integers to permit efficient operation of each tube bundle while maintaining the various tube bundles of the heat exchanger within a compact envelope. Preferably, the helix angle and tube pitch parallel to the path of coolant flow are constant for all tubes in a single bundle so that the tubes are of approximately the same length within each bundle

  1. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  2. Characteristics of bowl-shaped coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keita; Suyama, Momoko; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Kim, Dongmin; Saitoh, Youichi; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used as a method for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Daily TMS sessions can provide continuous therapeutic effectiveness, and the installation of TMS systems at patients' homes has been proposed. A figure-eight coil, which is normally used for TMS therapy, induces a highly localized electric field; however, it is challenging to achieve accurate coil positioning above the targeted brain area using this coil. In this paper, a bowl-shaped coil for stimulating a localized but wider area of the brain is proposed. The coil's electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed using finite element methods, and the analysis showed that the bowl-shaped coil induced electric fields in a wider area of the brain model than a figure-eight coil. The expanded distribution of the electric field led to greater robustness of the coil to the coil-positioning error. To improve the efficiency of the coil, the relationship between individual coil design parameters and the resulting coil characteristics was numerically analyzed. It was concluded that lengthening the outer spherical radius and narrowing the width of the coil were effective methods for obtaining a more effective and more uniform distribution of the electric field.

  3. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  4. Insights on the structure and stability of Licanantase: a trimeric acid-stable coiled-coil lipoprotein from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Abarca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Licanantase (Lic is the major component of the secretome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans when grown in elemental sulphur. When used as an additive, Lic improves copper recovery from bioleaching processes. However, this recovery enhancement is not fully understood. In this context, our aim is to predict the 3D structure of Lic, to shed light on its structure-function relationships. Bioinformatics analyses on the amino acid sequence of Lic showed a great similarity with Lpp, an Escherichia coli Lipoprotein that can form stable trimers in solution. Lic and Lpp share the secretion motif, intracellular processing and alpha helix structure, as well as the distribution of hydrophobic residues in heptads forming a hydrophobic core, typical of coiled-coil structures. Cross-linking experiments showed the presence of Lic trimers, supporting our predictions. Taking the in vitro and in silico evidence as a whole, we propose that the most probable structure for Lic is a trimeric coiled-coil. According to this prediction, a suitable model for Lic was produced using the de novo algorithm “Rosetta Fold-and-Dock”. To assess the structural stability of our model, Molecular Dynamics (MD and Replica Exchange MD simulations were performed using the structure of Lpp and a 14-alanine Lpp mutant as controls, at both acidic and neutral pH. Our results suggest that Lic was the most stable structure among the studied proteins in both pH conditions. This increased stability can be explained by a higher number of both intermonomer hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds, key elements for the stability of Lic’s secondary and tertiary structure.

  5. Democracy and environment as references for quadruple and quintuple helix innovation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayannis, Elias G.; Campbell, David F. J.; Orr, Barron J.

    2015-04-01

    The perspective of democracy and the ecological context define key references for knowledge production and innovation in innovation systems. Particularly under conditions of environmental change where enhancing the potential for adaptation is critical, this requires a closer look at ecological responsibility and sensitivity in the different innovation models and governance regimes. The "Quintuple Helix" innovation model is an approach that stresses the necessary socio-ecological transition of society and economy by adding an environment helix to an innovation system already made up of three (university-industry-government) or four (civil society relations) helices in a way that supports adaptation by incorporating global warming as both a challenge to and a driver of innovation. There is the proposition that knowledge production and innovation co-evolve with democracy (Carayannis and Campbell, 2014). In the Triple Helix model (Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff, 2000) the existence of a democracy does not appear to be necessary for knowledge production and innovation. However, the Quadruple Helix (Carayannis and Campbell, 2009, 2010 and 2014) is defined and represented by additional key attributes and components: "media-based and culture-based public", "civil society" and "arts, artistic research and arts-based innovation" (Bast, Carayannis and Campbell, 2015). Implications of this are that the fourth helix in the Quadruple Helix innovation systems brings in and represents the perspective of "dimension of democracy" or the "context of democracy" for knowledge in general and knowledge production and innovation in more particular. Within theories of democracy there is a competition between narrow and broader concepts of democracy (Campbell, 2013). This is particularly true when democracy is to be understood to transcend more substantially the narrow understanding of being primarily based on or being primarily rooted in government institutions (within a Triple Helix

  6. Fabrication experiments for large helix heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgsmueller, P.

    1978-01-01

    The helical tube has gained increasing attention as a heat transfer element for various kinds of heat exchangers over the last decade. Regardless of reactor type and heat transport medium, nuclear steam generators of the helix type are now in operation, installlation, fabrication or in the project phase. As a rule, projects are based on the extrapolation of existing technologies. In the particlular case of steam generators for HTGR power stations, however, existing experience is with steam generators of up to about 2 m diameter whereas several projects involve units more than twice as large. For this reason it was felt that a fabrication experiment was necessary in order to verify the feasibility of modern steam generator designs. A test rig was erected in the SULZER steam generator shops at Mantes, France, and skilled personnel and conventional production tools were employed in conducting experiments relating to the coiling, handling and threading of large helices. (Auth.)

  7. Analysis of α-helix unfolding in the pine nut peptide Lys-Cys-His-Lys-Pro induced by pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jie; Zhang, Sitian; Zhang, Mingdi; Lin, Songyi

    2017-09-01

    A variety of analytical techniques were applied to explore the effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) on α-helix structural changes in the novel antioxidant peptide Lys-Cys-His-Lys-Pro (KCHKP, 611.76 Da). The relative α-helix content of the KCHKP peptide was significantly altered from 100% to 89.91 ± 0.97% when the electric pulse frequency was 1800 Hz and the field intensity was 10 kV cm -1 . Moreover, the 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azinobis diammonium salt (ABTS) radical-scavenging activities of PEF-treated KCHKP were increased from 56.31% ± 0.74% to 84.33% ± 1.23% and from 40.56% ± 0.78% to 51.33% ± 0.27%, respectively. PEF treatment increased peptide linkage stretch vibration and altered hydrogen bonding of KCHKP. The stability of the α-helix structure was influenced by hydrogen bonds within the peptide linkage of KCHKP induced by PEF and was related to changes in antioxidant activity. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Hook1 inhibits malignancy and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xu; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Wei; Hu, Qida; Lou, Yu; Fu, Qi-Han; Zhang, Jing-Ying; Chen, Yi-Wen; Ye, Long-Yun; Wang, Yi; Xie, Shang-Zhi; Hu, Li-Qiang; Liang, Ting-Bo; Bai, Xue-Li

    2017-07-01

    Hook1 is a member of the hook family of coiled-coil proteins, which is recently found to be associated with malignant tumors. However, its biological function in hepatocellular carcinoma is yet unknown. Here, we evaluated the Hook1 levels in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples and matched peritumoral tissues by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Small interfering RNA knockdown and a transforming growth factor-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition model were employed to investigate the biological effects of Hook1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Our results indicated that Hook1 levels were significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than in the peritumoral tissues. In addition, Hook1 expression was significantly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma malignancy. Hook1 was downregulated after transforming growth factor-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Moreover, Hook1 knockdown promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition and attenuated the sensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells to doxorubicin. In summary, our results indicate that downregulation of Hook1 plays a pivotal role in hepatocellular carcinoma progression via epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hook1 may be used as a novel marker and therapeutic molecular target in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Superconducting coil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics

  10. Thermally Induced Alpha-Helix to Beta-Sheet Transition in Regenerated Silk Fibers and Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummy,L.; Phillips, D.; Stone, M.; Farmer, B.; Naik, R.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of thin films cast from regenerated solutions of Bombyx mori cocoon silk in hexafluoroisopropyl alcohol (HFIP) was studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during heating. A solid-state conformational transition from an alpha-helical structure to the well-known beta-sheet silk II structure occurred at a temperature of approximately 140 degrees C. The transition appeared to be homogeneous, as both phases do not coexist within the resolution of the current study. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of the films showed an endothermic melting peak followed by an exothermic crystallization peak, both occurring near 140 degrees C. Oriented fibers were also produced that displayed this helical molecular conformation. Subsequent heating above the structural transition temperature produced oriented beta-sheet fibers very similar in structure to B. mori cocoon fibers. Heat treatment of silk films at temperatures well below their degradation temperature offers a controllable route to materials with well-defined structures and mechanical behavior.

  11. Facilitating Quintuple helix innovation with urban living labs

    OpenAIRE

    Baccarne, Bastiaan; Schuurman, Dimitri; De Marez, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the Urban Living Lab approach as a way to put the Quintuple Helix model for innovation into practice. In this analysis we focus on the concepts innovation democracy, ‘mode 3’ knowledge production, the innovation ecosystem as a system of societal subsystems and socioecological transition. The empirical analysis is performed by means of a multidimensional case study design, applied on a project-based ad hoc collaborative innovation development process in an ecological doma...

  12. Evaluation of a tungsten coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence detection approach for trace elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezer, Muhsin; Elwood, Seth A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Simeonsson, Josef B.

    2006-01-01

    The analytical utility of a tungsten (W)-coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) approach has been evaluated for trace level measurements of elemental chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), copper (Cu), thallium (Tl), indium (In), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn) and mercury (Hg). Measurements of As, Cr, In, Se, Sb, Pb, Tl, and Sn were performed by laser-induced fluorescence using a single dye laser operating near 460 nm whose output was converted by frequency doubling and stimulated Raman scattering to wavelengths ranging from 196 to 286 nm for atomic excitation. Absolute limits of detection (LODs) of 1, 0.3, 0.3, 0.2, 1, 6, 1, 0.2 and 0.8 pg and concentration LODs of 100, 30, 30, 20, 100, 600, 100, 20, and 80 pg/mL were achieved for As, Se, Sb, Sn, In, Cu, Cr, Pb and Tl, respectively. Determinations of Hg, Pb, Zn and Cd were performed using two-color excitation approaches and resulted in absolute LODs of 2, 30, 5 and 0.6 pg, respectively, and concentration LODs of 200, 3000, 500 and 60 pg/mL, respectively. The sensitivities achieved by the W-coil LIF approaches compare well with those reported by W-coil atomic absorption spectrometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and graphite furnace electrothermal atomization-LIF approaches. The accuracy of the approach was verified through the analysis of a multielement reference solution containing Sb, Pb and Tl which each had certified performance acceptance limits of 19.6-20.4 μg/mL. The determined concentrations were 20.05 ± 2.60, 20.70 ± 2.27 and 20.60 ± 2.46 μg/mL, for Sb, Pb and Tl, respectively. The results demonstrate that W-coil LIF provides good analytical performance for trace analyses due to its high sensitivity, linearity, and capability to measure multiple elements using a single tunable laser and suggest that the development of portable W-coil LIF instrumentation using compact, solid-state lasers is feasible

  13. Evaluation of a tungsten coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence detection approach for trace elemental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Muhsin; Elwood, Seth A; Jones, Bradley T; Simeonsson, Josef B

    2006-06-30

    The analytical utility of a tungsten (W)-coil atomization-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) approach has been evaluated for trace level measurements of elemental chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), copper (Cu), thallium (Tl), indium (In), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn) and mercury (Hg). Measurements of As, Cr, In, Se, Sb, Pb, Tl, and Sn were performed by laser-induced fluorescence using a single dye laser operating near 460 nm whose output was converted by frequency doubling and stimulated Raman scattering to wavelengths ranging from 196 to 286 nm for atomic excitation. Absolute limits of detection (LODs) of 1, 0.3, 0.3, 0.2, 1, 6, 1, 0.2 and 0.8 pg and concentration LODs of 100, 30, 30, 20, 100, 600, 100, 20, and 80 pg/mL were achieved for As, Se, Sb, Sn, In, Cu, Cr, Pb and Tl, respectively. Determinations of Hg, Pb, Zn and Cd were performed using two-color excitation approaches and resulted in absolute LODs of 2, 30, 5 and 0.6 pg, respectively, and concentration LODs of 200, 3000, 500 and 60 pg/mL, respectively. The sensitivities achieved by the W-coil LIF approaches compare well with those reported by W-coil atomic absorption spectrometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, and graphite furnace electrothermal atomization-LIF approaches. The accuracy of the approach was verified through the analysis of a multielement reference solution containing Sb, Pb and Tl which each had certified performance acceptance limits of 19.6-20.4 microg/mL. The determined concentrations were 20.05+/-2.60, 20.70+/-2.27 and 20.60+/-2.46 microg/mL, for Sb, Pb and Tl, respectively. The results demonstrate that W-coil LIF provides good analytical performance for trace analyses due to its high sensitivity, linearity, and capability to measure multiple elements using a single tunable laser and suggest that the development of portable W-coil LIF instrumentation using compact, solid-state lasers is feasible.

  14. Multiple helix ecosystems for sustainable competitiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, João; Farinha, Luís; Fernandes, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the main issues, challenges, opportunities, and trends involving the interactions between academia, industry, government and society. Specifically, it aims to explore how these interactions enhance the ways in which companies deliver products and services in order to achieve sustainable competitiveness in the marketplace. Sustainable competitiveness has been widely discussed by academics and practitioners, considering the importance of protecting the environment while sustaining the economic goals of organizations. The Quintuple Helix innovation model is a framework for facilitating knowledge, innovation and sustainable competitive advantage. It embeds the Triple and the Quadruple Helix models by adding a fifth helix, the “natural environment.” The Triple Helix model focuses on the university-industry-government triad, while the Quadruple adds civil society (the media- and culture-driven public) as a fourth helix. The Quintuple Helix model facilitates research, public policy, and pract...

  15. Stability tests of the Westinghouse coil in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse coil is one of three forced-flow coils in the six-coil toroidal array of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is wound with an 18-kA, Nb 3 Sn/Cu, cable-in-conduit superconductor structurally supported by aluminum plates and cooled by 4-K, 15-atm supercritical helium. The coil is instrumented to permit measurement of helium temperature, pressure, and flow rate; structure temperature and strain; field; and normal zone voltage. A resistive heater has been installed to simulate nuclear heating, and inductive heaters have been installed to facilitate stability testing. The coil has been tested both individually and in the six-coil array. The tests covered charging to full design current and field, measuring the current-sharing threshold temperature using the resistive heaters, and measuring the stability margin using the pulsed inductive heaters. At least one section of the conductor exhibits a very broad resistive transition (resistive transition index = 4). The broad transition, though causing the appearance of voltage at relatively low temperatures, does not compromise the stability margin of the coil, which was greater than 1.1 J/cm 3 of strands. In another, nonresistive location, the stability margin was between 1.7 and 1.9 J/cm 3 of strands. The coil is completely stable in operation at 100% design current in both the single- and six-coil modes

  16. Magnetic Field Alignment of PS-P4VP: a Non-Liquid Crystalline Coil-Coil Block Copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Zhang, Kai; Larson, Steven; Gopalan, Padma; O'Hern, Corey; Osuji, Chinedum

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic fields provide the ability to control alignment of self-assembled soft materials such as block copolymers. Most prior work in this area has relied on the presence of ordered assemblies of anisotropic liquid crystalline species to ensure sufficient magnetic anisotropy to drive alignment. Recent experiments with poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine), a non-liquid crystalline BCP, however, show field-induced alignment of a lamellar microstructure during cooling across the order-disorder transition. Using in situ x-ray scattering, we examine the roles of field strength and cooling rate on the alignment response of this low MW coil-coil BCP. Alignment is first observed at field strengths as low as 1 Tesla and improves markedly with both increasing field strength and slower cooling. We present a geometric argument to illustrate the origin of a finite, non-trivial magnetic susceptibility anisotropy for highly stretched surface-tethered polymer chains and corroborate this using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We rationalize the magnetic field response of the system in terms of the mobility afforded by the absence of entanglements, the intrinsic anisotropy resulting from the stretched polymer chains and sterically constrained conjugated rings, and the large grain size in these low molecular weight materials.

  17. A drift-pump coil design for a Tandem Mirror Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S.; Logan, B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes both the theory and mechanical design behind a new concept for trapped ion removal from tandem mirror end plugs. The design has been developed for the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). The new drift-pump coils replace charge exchange pump beams. Pump beams consume large amounts of power and seriously reduce reactor performance. Drift-pump coils consume only a few megawatts of power and introduce no added burden to the reactor vacuum pumps. In addition, they are easy to replace. The coils are similar in shape to a paper clip and are located at two positions in each end plug. The coils between the transition coil and the first anchor yinyang serve to remove ions trapped in the magnetic well just outboard of the high field choke coil. The coils located between the anchor coil set and the plug coil set remove sloshing ions and trapped cold ions from the plug region

  18. Generating structured light with phase helix and intensity helix using reflection-enhanced plasmonic metasurface at 2 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifan; Du, Jing; Zhang, Jinrun; Shen, Li; Wang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Mid-infrared (2-20 μm) light has been attracting great attention in many areas of science and technology. Beyond the extended wavelength range from visible and near-infrared to mid-infrared, shaping spatial structures may add opportunities to grooming applications of mid-infrared photonics. Here, we design and fabricate a reflection-enhanced plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate efficient generation of structured light with the phase helix and intensity helix at 2 μm. This work includes two distinct aspects. First, structured light (phase helix, intensity helix) generation at 2 μm, which is far beyond the ability of conventional spatial light modulators, is enabled by the metasurface with sub-wavelength engineered structures. Second, the self-referenced intensity helix against environmental noise is generated without using a spatially separated light. The demonstrations may open up advanced perspectives to structured light applications at 2 μm, such as phase helix for communications and non-communications (imaging, sensing) and intensity helix for enhanced microscopy and advanced metrology.

  19. A Classification of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of soybean allows an unprecedented opportunity for the discovery of the genes controlling important traits. In particular, the potential functions of regulatory genes are a priority for analysis. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH family of transcription factors is known to be involved in controlling a wide range of systems critical for crop adaptation and quality, including photosynthesis, light signalling, pigment biosynthesis, and seed pod development. Using a hidden Markov model search algorithm, 319 genes with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor domains were identified within the soybean genome sequence. These were classified with respect to their predicted DNA binding potential, intron/exon structure, and the phylogeny of the bHLH domain. Evidence is presented that the vast majority (281 of these 319 soybean bHLH genes are expressed at the mRNA level. Of these soybean bHLH genes, 67% were found to exist in two or more homeologous copies. This dataset provides a framework for future studies on bHLH gene function in soybean. The challenge for future research remains to define functions for the bHLH factors encoded in the soybean genome, which may allow greater flexibility for genetic selection of growth and environmental adaptation in this widely grown crop.

  20. Tunable single photonic defect-mode in cholesteric liquid crystals with laser-induced local modifications of helix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Lee, Chee Heng; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    The authors demonstrate a tunable single photonic defect-mode in a single cholesteric liquid crystal material based on a structural defect introduced by local modification of the helix. An unpolymerized region of cholesteric liquid crystal acting as the defect was left between two polymerized regions via a two-photon excitation laser-lithography process. Upon polymerization, the cholesteric liquid crystal helix elongated and became thermally stable, and a single photonic defect mode was exhibited due to the contrast in the helix pitch at the defect. The defect mode showed tunability upon heating, and a 36 nm redshift was seen over a temperature range of 30 deg. C

  1. Origin and Diversification of Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Nuno; Dolan, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a class of transcription factors found throughout eukaryotic organisms. Classification of the complete sets of bHLH proteins in the sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (rice) has defined the diversity of these proteins among flowering plants. However, the evolutionary relationships of different plant bHLH groups and the diversity of bHLH proteins in more ancestral groups of plants are currently unknown. In this study, we use wh...

  2. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  3. Chirality-specific lift forces of helix under shear flows: Helix perpendicular to shear plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Yi

    2017-02-01

    Chiral objects in shear flow experience a chirality-specific lift force. Shear flows past helices in a low Reynolds number regime were studied using slender-body theory. The chirality-specific lift forces in the vorticity direction experienced by helices are dominated by a set of helix geometry parameters: helix radius, pitch length, number of turns, and helix phase angle. Its analytical formula is given. The chirality-specific forces are the physical reasons for the chiral separation of helices in shear flow. Our results are well supported by the latest experimental observations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez; Power, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  5. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez [Depto. Electromagnetismo y F. de la Materia Facultad de Ciencias University of Granada Avda. Fuentenueva E-18071 (Spain); Power, Henry, E-mail: ccobos@ugr.e [School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-07

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  6. The coiled-coil domain of MURC/cavin-4 is involved in membrane trafficking of caveolin-3 in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Daisuke; Ogata, Takehiro; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Taniguchi, Takuya; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2015-12-15

    Muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein (MURC), also referred to as cavin-4, is a member of the cavin family that works cooperatively with caveolins in caveola formation and function. Cavins are cytoplasmic proteins with coiled-coil domains and form heteromeric complexes, which are recruited to caveolae in cells expressing caveolins. Among caveolins, caveolin-3 (Cav3) is exclusively expressed in muscle cells, similar to MURC/cavin-4. In the heart, Cav3 overexpression contributes to cardiac protection, and its deficiency leads to progressive cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the MURC/cavin-4 gene have been identified in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. In the present study, we show the role of MURC/cavin-4 as a caveolar component in the heart. In H9c2 cells, MURC/cavin-4 was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas a MURC/cavin-4 mutant lacking the coiled-coil domain (ΔCC) was primarily localized to the cytoplasm. ΔCC bound to Cav3 and impaired membrane localization of Cav3 in cardiomyocytes. Additionally, although ΔCC did not alter Cav3 mRNA expression, ΔCC decreased the Cav3 protein level. MURC/cavin-4 and ΔCC similarly induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy; however, ΔCC showed higher hypertrophy-related fetal gene expression than MURC/cavin-4. ΔCC induced ERK activation in cardiomyocytes. Transgenic mice expressing ΔCC in the heart (ΔCC-Tg mice) showed impaired cardiac function accompanied by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and marked interstitial fibrosis. Hearts from ΔCC-Tg mice showed a reduction of the Cav3 protein level and activation of ERK. These results suggest that MURC/cavin-4 requires its coiled-coil domain to target the plasma membrane and to stabilize Cav3 at the plasma membrane of cardiomyocytes and that MURC/cavin-4 functions as a crucial caveolar component to regulate cardiac function. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Comprehensive Survey on Improved Focality and Penetration Depth of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Employing Multi-Coil Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xile Wei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-coil arrays applied in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS are proposed to accurately stimulate brain tissues and modulate neural activities by an induced electric field (EF. Composed of numerous independently driven coils, a multi-coil array has alternative energizing strategies to evoke EFs targeting at different cerebral regions. To improve the locating resolution and the stimulating focality, we need to fully understand the variation properties of induced EFs and the quantitative control method of the spatial arrangement of activating coils, both of which unfortunately are still unclear. In this paper, a comprehensive analysis of EF properties was performed based on multi-coil arrays. Four types of planar multi-coil arrays were used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of EFs and the structure of stimuli coils. By changing coil-driven strategies in a basic 16-coil array, we find that an EF induced by compactly distributed coils decays faster than that induced by dispersedly distributed coils, but the former has an advantage over the latter in terms of the activated brain volume. Simulation results also indicate that the attenuation rate of an EF induced by the 36-coil dense array is 3 times and 1.5 times greater than those induced by the 9-coil array and the 16-coil array, respectively. The EF evoked by the 36-coil dispense array has the slowest decay rate. This result demonstrates that larger multi-coil arrays, compared to smaller ones, activate deeper brain tissues at the expense of decreased focality. A further study on activating a specific field of a prescribed shape and size was conducted based on EF variation. Accurate target location was achieved with a 64-coil array 18 mm in diameter. A comparison between the figure-8 coil, the planar array, and the cap-formed array was made and demonstrates an improvement of multi-coil configurations in the penetration depth and the focality. These findings suggest

  8. Comprehensive Survey on Improved Focality and Penetration Depth of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Employing Multi-Coil Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xile; Li, Yao; Lu, Meili; Wang, Jiang; Yi, Guosheng

    2017-11-14

    Multi-coil arrays applied in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are proposed to accurately stimulate brain tissues and modulate neural activities by an induced electric field (EF). Composed of numerous independently driven coils, a multi-coil array has alternative energizing strategies to evoke EFs targeting at different cerebral regions. To improve the locating resolution and the stimulating focality, we need to fully understand the variation properties of induced EFs and the quantitative control method of the spatial arrangement of activating coils, both of which unfortunately are still unclear. In this paper, a comprehensive analysis of EF properties was performed based on multi-coil arrays. Four types of planar multi-coil arrays were used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of EFs and the structure of stimuli coils. By changing coil-driven strategies in a basic 16-coil array, we find that an EF induced by compactly distributed coils decays faster than that induced by dispersedly distributed coils, but the former has an advantage over the latter in terms of the activated brain volume. Simulation results also indicate that the attenuation rate of an EF induced by the 36-coil dense array is 3 times and 1.5 times greater than those induced by the 9-coil array and the 16-coil array, respectively. The EF evoked by the 36-coil dispense array has the slowest decay rate. This result demonstrates that larger multi-coil arrays, compared to smaller ones, activate deeper brain tissues at the expense of decreased focality. A further study on activating a specific field of a prescribed shape and size was conducted based on EF variation. Accurate target location was achieved with a 64-coil array 18 mm in diameter. A comparison between the figure-8 coil, the planar array, and the cap-formed array was made and demonstrates an improvement of multi-coil configurations in the penetration depth and the focality. These findings suggest that there is a

  9. Manufacture and mechanical test of a TORE SUPRA model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Claudet, G.; Disdier, F.; Hamelin, J.; Libeyre, P.; Mayaux, G.; Meuris, C.; Parain, J.; Torossian, A.

    1980-09-01

    Inside the qualifying test programme, supporting the Tore Supra Design, a reduced scale model of a Bsub(T) coil was fabricated by a large industrial firm. This model coil is provided with the same features as those retained for the complete magnet. Tests of this model coil have been carried out in such a way that most of stresses which will arise in Tore Supra windings are simulated; simultaneously its cryogenic supply is fully representative of the system retained for the complete machine. Operation of the model coil has been found highly stable; under the conditions of applied field and forces a coil transition could be triggered, by an electrical heater located inside the coil, only when the temperature of the superfluid helium bath was close to Tsub(lambda). Thus, design and manufacturing techniques have been qualified satisfactorily to proceed to the next step: fabrication of the superconducting Bsub(T) coils of Tore Supra

  10. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  11. On the structure of K/l-hybrid carrageenans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, F. van de; Peppelman, H.A.; Rollema, H.S.; Tromp, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    The coil-to-helix transition and temperature dependence of the viscosity of commercial κ/ι-hybrid carrageenans produced by the red algae Sarcothalia crispata, Mazaella laminarioides, and Chondrus crispus were studied using rheometry and optical rotation. The structure of these κ/ι-hybrid

  12. FRC translation into a compression coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The equilibrium and translational kinematics of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRCs) in a cylindrical coil which does not conserve flux are problems that arise in connection with adiabatic compressional heating. In this paper, they consider several features of the problem of FRC translation into a compression coil. First, the magnitude of the guide field is calculated and found to exceed that which would be applied to a flux conserver. Second, energy conservation is applied to FRC translation from a flux conserver into a compression coil. It is found that a significant temperature decrease is required for translation to be energetically possible. The temperature change depends on the external inductance in the compression circuit. An analogous case is that of a compression region composed of a compound magnet; in this case the temperature change depends on the ratio of inner and outer coil radii. Finally, the kinematics of intermediate translation states are calculated using an abrupt transition model. It is found, in this model, that the FRC must overcome a potential hill during translation, which requires a small initial velocity

  13. Apparatus and method for reducing inductive coupling between levitation and drive coils within a magnetic propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for reducing inductive coupling between levitation and drive coils within a magnetic levitation system. A pole array has a magnetic field. A levitation coil is positioned so that in response to motion of the magnetic field of the pole array a current is induced in the levitation coil. A first drive coil having a magnetic field coupled to drive the pole array also has a magnetic flux which induces a parasitic current in the levitation coil. A second drive coil having a magnetic field is positioned to attenuate the parasitic current in the levitation coil by canceling the magnetic flux of the first drive coil which induces the parasitic current. Steps in the method include generating a magnetic field with a pole array for levitating an object; inducing current in a levitation coil in response to motion of the magnetic field of the pole array; generating a magnetic field with a first drive coil for propelling the object; and generating a magnetic field with a second drive coil for attenuating effects of the magnetic field of the first drive coil on the current in the levitation coil.

  14. Numerical investigation on the convective heat transfer in a spiral coil with radiant heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Milan Lj.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to numerically investigate the heat transfer in spiral coil tube in the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes. The Archimedean spiral coil was exposed to radiant heating and should represent heat absorber of parabolic dish solar concentrator. Specific boundary conditions represent the uniqueness of this study, since the heat flux upon the tube external surfaces varies not only in the circumferential direction, but also in the axial direction. The curvature ratio of spiral coil varies from 0.029 at the flow inlet to 0.234 at the flow outlet, while the heat transfer fluid is water. The 3-D steady-state transport equations were solved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Results showed that secondary flows strongly affect the flow and that the heat transfer is strongly asymmetric, with higher values near the outer wall of spiral. Although overall turbulence levels were lower than in a straight pipe, heat transfer rates were larger due to the curvature-induced modifications of the mean flow and temperature fields. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 42006

  15. Effects of Gradient Coil Noise and Gradient Coil Replacement on the Reproducibility of Resting State Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagarinao, Epifanio; Tsuzuki, Erina; Yoshida, Yukina; Ozawa, Yohei; Kuzuya, Maki; Otani, Takashi; Koyama, Shuji; Isoda, Haruo; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Maesawa, Satoshi; Naganawa, Shinji; Sobue, Gen

    2018-01-01

    The stability of the MRI scanner throughout a given study is critical in minimizing hardware-induced variability in the acquired imaging data set. However, MRI scanners do malfunction at times, which could generate image artifacts and would require the replacement of a major component such as its gradient coil. In this article, we examined the effect of low intensity, randomly occurring hardware-related noise due to a faulty gradient coil on brain morphometric measures derived from T1-weighted images and resting state networks (RSNs) constructed from resting state functional MRI. We also introduced a method to detect and minimize the effect of the noise associated with a faulty gradient coil. Finally, we assessed the reproducibility of these morphometric measures and RSNs before and after gradient coil replacement. Our results showed that gradient coil noise, even at relatively low intensities, could introduce a large number of voxels exhibiting spurious significant connectivity changes in several RSNs. However, censoring the affected volumes during the analysis could minimize, if not completely eliminate, these spurious connectivity changes and could lead to reproducible RSNs even after gradient coil replacement.

  16. Helix-Hopes on Finite Hyperfields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Vougiouklis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperstructure theory can overcome restrictions which ordinary algebraic structures have. A hyperproduct on non-square ordinary matrices can be defined by using the so called helix-hyperoperations. We study the helix-hyperstructures on the representations using ordinary fields. The related theory can be faced by defining the hyperproduct on the set of non square matrices. The main tools of the Hyperstructure Theory are the fundamental relations which connect the largest class of hyperstructures, the Hv-structures, with the corresponding classical ones. We focus on finite dimensional helix-hyperstructures and on small Hv-fields, as well.

  17. Large coil task and results of testing US coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb 3 Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined

  18. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate

  19. Binding of HIV-1 gp41-directed neutralizing and non-neutralizing fragment antibody binding domain (Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv antibodies to the ectodomain of gp41 in the pre-hairpin and six-helix bundle conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Louis

    Full Text Available We previously reported a series of antibodies, in fragment antigen binding domain (Fab formats, selected from a human non-immune phage library, directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR of HIV-1 gp41. Broadly neutralizing antibodies from that series bind to both the fully exposed N-HR trimer, representing the pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41, and to partially-exposed N-HR helices within the context of the gp41 six-helix bundle. While the affinities of the Fabs for pre-hairpin intermediate mimetics vary by only 2 to 20-fold between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, differences in inhibition of viral entry exceed three orders of magnitude. Here we compare the binding of neutralizing (8066 and non-neutralizing (8062 antibodies, differing in only four positions within the CDR-H2 binding loop, in Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv formats, to several pre-hairpin intermediate and six-helix bundle constructs of gp41. Residues 56 and 58 of the mini-antibodies are shown to be crucial for neutralization activity. There is a large differential (≥ 150-fold in binding affinity between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to the six-helix bundle of gp41 and binding to the six-helix bundle does not involve displacement of the outer C-terminal helices of the bundle. The binding stoichiometry is one six-helix bundle to one Fab or three ScFvs. We postulate that neutralization by the 8066 antibody is achieved by binding to a continuum of states along the fusion pathway from the pre-hairpin intermediate all the way to the formation of the six-helix bundle, but prior to irreversible fusion between viral and cellular membranes.

  20. The triple helix of collagens - an ancient protein structure that enabled animal multicellularity and tissue evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Aaron L; Boudko, Sergei P; Rokas, Antonis; Hudson, Billy G

    2018-04-09

    The cellular microenvironment, characterized by an extracellular matrix (ECM), played an essential role in the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity in animals (metazoans), and in the subsequent evolution of diverse animal tissues and organs. A major ECM component are members of the collagen superfamily -comprising 28 types in vertebrates - that exist in diverse supramolecular assemblies ranging from networks to fibrils. Each assembly is characterized by a hallmark feature, a protein structure called a triple helix. A current gap in knowledge is understanding the mechanisms of how the triple helix encodes and utilizes information in building scaffolds on the outside of cells. Type IV collagen, recently revealed as the evolutionarily most ancient member of the collagen superfamily, serves as an archetype for a fresh view of fundamental structural features of a triple helix that underlie the diversity of biological activities of collagens. In this Opinion, we argue that the triple helix is a protein structure of fundamental importance in building the extracellular matrix, which enabled animal multicellularity and tissue evolution. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-​coil transitions suppressed in a cell-​penetrating peptide at the air-​water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schach, D.; Globisch, C.; Roeters, S.J.; Woutersen, S.; Fuchs, A.; Weiss, C.K.; Backus, E.H.G.; Landfester, K.; Bonn, M.; Peter, C.; Weidner, T.

    2014-01-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-​Ala-​Leu-​Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-​helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate

  2. Role of end effects in helical aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gestel, van J.A.M.; Schoot, van der P.P.A.M.; Michels, M.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    End effects are known to play a pivotal role in equilibrium polymerization. To investigate their role in detail, we apply constraints to the first and last bonds of model linear aggregates that exhibit a helix-coil type configurational transition. Three different classes of behavior manifest

  3. FRC translation into a compression coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Several features of the problem of FRC translation into a compression coil are considered. First, the magnitude of the guide field is calculated and found to exceed that which would be applied to a flux conserver. Second, energy conservation is applied to FRC translation from a flux conserver into a compression coil. It is found that a significant temperature decrease is required for translation to be energetically possible. The temperature change depends on the external inductance in the compression circuit. An analogous case is that of a compression region composed of a compound magnet; in this case the temperature change depends on the ratio of inner and outer coil radii. Finally, the kinematics of intermediate translation states are calculated using an ''abrupt transition'' model. It is found, in this model, that the FRC must overcome a potential hill during translation, which requires a small initial velocity

  4. Effect of electromagnetic radiation on the coils used in aneurysm embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xianli; Wu, Zhongxue; Li, Youxiang

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of electromagnetic radiation in our daily lives on the coils used in aneurysm embolization. Faraday's electromagnetic induction principle was applied to analyze the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the coils used in aneurysm embolization. To induce a current of 0.5mA in less than 5 mm platinum coils required to stimulate peripheral nerves, the minimum magnetic field will be 0.86 μT. To induce a current of 0.5 mA in platinum coils by a hair dryer, the minimum aneurysm radius is 2.5 mm (5 mm aneurysm). To induce a current of 0.5 mA in platinum coils by a computer or TV, the minimum aneurysm radius is 8.6 mm (approximate 17 mm aneurysm). The minimum magnetic field is much larger than the flux densities produced by computer and TV, while the minimum aneurysm radius is much larger than most aneurysm sizes to levels produced by computer and TV. At present, the effects of electromagnetic radiation in our daily lives on intracranial coils do not produce a harmful reaction. Patients with coiled aneurysm are advised to avoid using hair dryers. This theory needs to be proved by further detailed complex investigations. Doctors should give patients additional instructions before the procedure, depending on this study.

  5. Gibberellin-regulated gene in the basal region of rice leaf sheath encodes basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Takasaki, Hironori

    2009-07-01

    Genes regulated by gibberellin (GA) during leaf sheath elongation in rice seedlings were identified using the transcriptome approach. mRNA from the basal regions of leaf sheaths treated with GA3 was analyzed by high-coverage gene expression profiling. 33,004 peaks were detected, and 30 transcripts showed significant changes in the presence of GA3. Among these, basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AK073385) was significantly upregulated. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that expression of AK073385 was controlled by GA3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AK073385) is therefore involved in the regulation of gene expression by GA3.

  6. Eddy current testing probe with dual half-cylindrical coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byung-Hoon; Choi, Jung-Mi; Kim, Soo-Yong

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a new eddy current probe composed of a dual half-cylindrical (2HC) coil as an exciting coil and a sensing coil that is placed in the small gap of the 2HC coil. The 2HC coil induces a linear eddy current on the narrow region within the target medium. The magnitude of eddy current has a maximum peak with the narrow width, underneath the center of the exciting 2HC coil. Because of the linear eddy current, the probe can be used to detect not only the existence of a crack but also its direction in conducting materials. Using specimen with a machined crack, and varying the exciting frequency from 0.5 to 100 kHz, we investigated the relationships between the direction of crack and the output voltage of the sensing coil.

  7. Titration of poly(dA-dT) . poly(dA-dT) in solution at variable NaCl concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, Marta; Boicelli, C Andrea; Cadoni, Fabio; Gennaro, Giuseppe; Giomini, Marcello; Giuliani, Anna M; Giustini, Mauro

    2004-10-05

    CD and uv absorption data showed that high molecular weight poly(dA-dT) . poly(dA-dT), at 298 K, undergoes an acid-induced transition from B-double helix to random coil in NaCl solutions of different concentrations, ranging from 0.005 to 0.600M. Similarly, titration of the polynucleotide with a strong base causes duplex-to-single strands transition. The base- and acid-induced transitions were both reversible by back-titration (with an acid or, respectively, with a base): the apparent pKa were the same in both directions. However, the number of protons per titratable site (adenine N1) required to reach half-denaturation was in great excess over the stoichiometric value; to a much larger extent, the same effect was observed also for the deprotonation of the N3H sites of thymine. Moreover, in the basic denaturation experiments, at low salt concentrations ([NaCl]acid than calculated was needed to back-titrate the base excess to half-denaturation. Both effects could be qualitatively justified on the basis of the counterion condensation theory of polyelectrolytes and considering the energy barrier created by the negatively charged phosphodiester groups to the penetration of the OH- ions inside the double helix and the screening effect of the Na+ ions on such charges, in the deprotonation experiments.

  8. Magnetic field alignment of coil-coil diblock copolymers and blends via intrinsic chain anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Majewski, Pawel; Larson, Steven; Yager, Kevin; Gopalan, Padma; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Chan, Edwin; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic fields can control alignment of self-assembled soft materials such as block copolymers provided there is a suitably large magnetic susceptibility anisotropy present in the system. Recent results have highlighted the existence of a non-trivial intrinsic anisotropy in coil-coil diblock copolymers, specifically in lamellar-forming PS-b-P4VP, which enables alignment at field strengths of a few tesla in systems lacking mesogenic components. Alignment is predicated on correlation in the orientation of end-end vectors implied by the localization of block junctions at the microdomain interface and is observed on cooling across the order-disorder transition in the presence of the field. For appropriate combinations of field strength and grain size, we can leverage intrinsic chain anisotropy to magnetically direct self-assembly of many non-mesogenic systems, including other coil-coil BCPs like PS-b-PDMS and PS-b-PMMA, blends of BCPs of disparate morphologies and MWs, and blends of BCPs with homopolymers. This is noteworthy as blends of PS-b-P4VP with PEO provide a route to form functional materials such as nanoporous films by dissolution of PEO, or aligned ion conduction materials. We survey these various systems using TEM and in-situ X-ray scattering to study the phase behavior and temperature-, time- and field- dependent dynamics of alignment.

  9. Chiral transformation: From single nanowire to double helix

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2011-12-21

    We report a new type of water-soluble ultrathin Au-Ag alloy nanowire (NW), which exhibits unprecedented behavior in a colloidal solution. Upon growth of a thin metal (Pd, Pt, or Au) layer, the NW winds around itself to give a metallic double helix. We propose that the winding originates from the chirality within the as-synthesized Au-Ag NWs, which were induced to untwist upon metal deposition. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Nonlinear instabilities induced by the F coil power amplifier at FTU: Modeling and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccarian, L.; Boncagni, L.; Cascone, D.; Centioli, C.; Cerino, S.; Gravanti, F.; Iannone, F.; Mecocci, F.; Pangione, L.; Podda, S.; Vitale, V.; Vitelli, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the instabilities caused by the nonlinear behavior of the F coil current amplifier at FTU. This behavior induces closed-loop instability of the horizontal position stabilizing loop whenever the requested current is below the circulating current level. In the paper we first illustrate a modeling phase where nonlinear dynamics are derived and identified to reproduce the open-loop responses measured by the F coil current amplifier. The derived model is shown to successfully reproduce the experimental behavior by direct comparison with experimental data. Based on this dynamic model, we then reproduce the closed-loop scenario of the experiment and show that the proposed nonlinear model successfully reproduces the nonlinear instabilities experienced in the experimental sessions. Given the simulation setup, we next propose a nonlinear control solution to this instability problem. The proposed solution is shown to recover stability in closed-loop simulations. Experimental tests are scheduled for the next experimental campaign after the FTU restart.

  11. Helix-helix inversion of an optically-inactive π-conjugated foldamer triggered by concentration changes of a single enantiomeric guest leading to a change in the helical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijia; Ousaka, Naoki; Horie, Miki; Mamiya, Fumihiko; Yashima, Eiji

    2016-09-27

    A preferred-handed helicity induced in an optically-inactive poly(phenyleneethynylene)-based foldamer bearing carboxylic acid pendants upon complexation with a single enantiomeric diamine was subsequently inverted into the opposite helix upon further addition of the diamine, accompanied by a remarkable change in the stability of the helices.

  12. How much detail is needed in modeling a transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-8 coil: Measurements and brain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandija, Stefano; Sommer, Iris E. C.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite TMS wide adoption, its spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal effects are not well understood. Although progress has been made in predicting induced currents in the brain using realistic finite element models (FEM), there is little consensus on how a magnetic field of a typical TMS coil should be modeled. Empirical validation of such models is limited and subject to several limitations. Methods We evaluate and empirically validate models of a figure-of-eight TMS coil that are commonly used in published modeling studies, of increasing complexity: simple circular coil model; coil with in-plane spiral winding turns; and finally one with stacked spiral winding turns. We will assess the electric fields induced by all 3 coil models in the motor cortex using a computer FEM model. Biot-Savart models of discretized wires were used to approximate the 3 coil models of increasing complexity. We use a tailored MR based phase mapping technique to get a full 3D validation of the incident magnetic field induced in a cylindrical phantom by our TMS coil. FEM based simulations on a meshed 3D brain model consisting of five tissues types were performed, using two orthogonal coil orientations. Results Substantial differences in the induced currents are observed, both theoretically and empirically, between highly idealized coils and coils with correctly modeled spiral winding turns. Thickness of the coil winding turns affect minimally the induced electric field, and it does not influence the predicted activation. Conclusion TMS coil models used in FEM simulations should include in-plane coil geometry in order to make reliable predictions of the incident field. Modeling the in-plane coil geometry is important to correctly simulate the induced electric field and to correctly make reliable predictions of neuronal activation PMID:28640923

  13. How much detail is needed in modeling a transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-8 coil: Measurements and brain simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Petar I; Mandija, Stefano; Sommer, Iris E C; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2017-01-01

    Despite TMS wide adoption, its spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal effects are not well understood. Although progress has been made in predicting induced currents in the brain using realistic finite element models (FEM), there is little consensus on how a magnetic field of a typical TMS coil should be modeled. Empirical validation of such models is limited and subject to several limitations. We evaluate and empirically validate models of a figure-of-eight TMS coil that are commonly used in published modeling studies, of increasing complexity: simple circular coil model; coil with in-plane spiral winding turns; and finally one with stacked spiral winding turns. We will assess the electric fields induced by all 3 coil models in the motor cortex using a computer FEM model. Biot-Savart models of discretized wires were used to approximate the 3 coil models of increasing complexity. We use a tailored MR based phase mapping technique to get a full 3D validation of the incident magnetic field induced in a cylindrical phantom by our TMS coil. FEM based simulations on a meshed 3D brain model consisting of five tissues types were performed, using two orthogonal coil orientations. Substantial differences in the induced currents are observed, both theoretically and empirically, between highly idealized coils and coils with correctly modeled spiral winding turns. Thickness of the coil winding turns affect minimally the induced electric field, and it does not influence the predicted activation. TMS coil models used in FEM simulations should include in-plane coil geometry in order to make reliable predictions of the incident field. Modeling the in-plane coil geometry is important to correctly simulate the induced electric field and to correctly make reliable predictions of neuronal activation.

  14. How much detail is needed in modeling a transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-8 coil: Measurements and brain simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar I Petrov

    Full Text Available Despite TMS wide adoption, its spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal effects are not well understood. Although progress has been made in predicting induced currents in the brain using realistic finite element models (FEM, there is little consensus on how a magnetic field of a typical TMS coil should be modeled. Empirical validation of such models is limited and subject to several limitations.We evaluate and empirically validate models of a figure-of-eight TMS coil that are commonly used in published modeling studies, of increasing complexity: simple circular coil model; coil with in-plane spiral winding turns; and finally one with stacked spiral winding turns. We will assess the electric fields induced by all 3 coil models in the motor cortex using a computer FEM model. Biot-Savart models of discretized wires were used to approximate the 3 coil models of increasing complexity. We use a tailored MR based phase mapping technique to get a full 3D validation of the incident magnetic field induced in a cylindrical phantom by our TMS coil. FEM based simulations on a meshed 3D brain model consisting of five tissues types were performed, using two orthogonal coil orientations.Substantial differences in the induced currents are observed, both theoretically and empirically, between highly idealized coils and coils with correctly modeled spiral winding turns. Thickness of the coil winding turns affect minimally the induced electric field, and it does not influence the predicted activation.TMS coil models used in FEM simulations should include in-plane coil geometry in order to make reliable predictions of the incident field. Modeling the in-plane coil geometry is important to correctly simulate the induced electric field and to correctly make reliable predictions of neuronal activation.

  15. Immune response against the coiled coil domain of Sjögren's syndrome associated autoantigen Ro52 induces salivary gland dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Magdalena; Bagavant, Harini; Biswas, Indranil; Ballard, Abigail; Deshmukh, Umesh S

    2018-01-31

    The structural domains of Ro52, termed the RING, B-box, coiled coil (CC) and B30.2/SPRY are targets of anti-Ro52 in multiple autoimmune disorders. In Sjögren's syndrome patients, the presence of anti-Ro52 is associated with higher disease severity, and in mice, they induce salivary gland hypofunction. This study was undertaken to investigate whether immune responses against different domains of Ro52, influences salivary gland disease in mice. Female NZM2758 mice were immunised with Ro52 domains expressed as recombinant fusion proteins with maltose binding protein (MBP) [MBP-RING-B-box, MBP-CC, MBP-CC(ΔC19), MBP-B30.2/SPRY]. Sera from immunised mice were studied for IgG antibodies to Ro52 by immunoprecipitation, and to salivary gland cells by immunofluorescence. Pilocarpine-induced saliva production was measured to evaluate salivary gland function. Submandibular glands were investigated by histopathology for inflammation and by immune-histochemistry for IgG deposition. Mice immunised with different Ro52-domains had comparable reactivity to Ro52 and to salivary gland cells. However, only mice immunised with the CC domain and its C-terminal truncated version CC(ΔC19) showed a significant drop in saliva production. None of the mice developed severe salivary gland inflammation. The salivary gland hypofunction significantly correlated with increased intra-lobar IgG deposits in the submandibular salivary glands. Our data demonstrate that epitope specificity of anti-Ro52 antibodies plays a critical role in the induction of glandular dysfunction. Clearly, screening Sjögren's syndrome patients for relative levels of Ro52 domain specific antibodies will be more informative for associating anti-Ro52 with clinical measures of the disorder.

  16. Extending the self-assembly of coiled-coil hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robson Marsden, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Of the various biomolecular building blocks in use in nature, coiled-coil forming peptides are amongst those with the most potential as building blocks for the synthetic self-assembly of nanostructures. Native coiled coils have the ability to function in, and influence, complex systems composed of

  17. Finite element modeling of TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.A.; O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Poloidal Field (PF) coils were originally analyzed to TFTR design conditions. The coils have been reanalyzed by PPPL and Grumman to determine operating limits under as-built conditions. Critical stress levels, based upon data obtained from the reanalysis of each PF coil, are needed for input to the TFTR simulation code algorithms. The primary objective regarding structural integrity has been to ascertain the magnitude and location of critical internal stresses in each PF coil due to various combinations of electromagnetic and thermally induced loads. For each PF coil, a global finite element model (FEM) of a coil sector is being analyzed to obtain the basic coil internal loads and displacements. Subsequent fine mesh local models of the coil lead stem and lead spur regions produce the magnitudes and locations of peak stresses. Each copper turn and its surrounding insulation are modeled using solid finite elements. The corresponding electromagnetic and thermal analyses are similarly modeled. A series of test beams were developed to determine the best combination of MSC/NASTRAN-type finite elements for use in PF coil analysis. The results of this analysis compare favorably with those obtained by the earlier analysis which was limited in scope

  18. Flow-induced vibration analysis of a helical coil steam generator experiment using large eddy simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haomin; Solberg, Jerome; Merzari, Elia; Kraus, Adam; Grindeanu, Iulian

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of flow-induced vibration in a helical coil steam generator experiment conducted at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1980s. In the experiment, a half-scale sector model of a steam generator helical coil tube bank was subjected to still and flowing air and water, and the vibrational characteristics were recorded. The research detailed in this document utilizes the multi-physics simulation toolkit SHARP developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in cooperation with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, to simulate the experiment. SHARP uses the spectral element code Nek5000 for fluid dynamics analysis and the finite element code DIABLO for structural analysis. The flow around the coil tubes is modeled in Nek5000 by using a large eddy simulation turbulence model. Transient pressure data on the tube surfaces is sampled and transferred to DIABLO for the structural simulation. The structural response is simulated in DIABLO via an implicit time-marching algorithm and a combination of continuum elements and structural shells. Tube vibration data (acceleration and frequency) are sampled and compared with the experimental data. Currently, only one-way coupling is used, which means that pressure loads from the fluid simulation are transferred to the structural simulation but the resulting structural displacements are not fed back to the fluid simulation

  19. An amphipathic alpha-helix controls multiple roles of brome mosaic virus protein 1a in RNA replication complex assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Brome mosaic virus (BMV protein 1a has multiple key roles in viral RNA replication. 1a localizes to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes as a peripheral membrane protein, induces ER membrane invaginations in which RNA replication complexes form, and recruits and stabilizes BMV 2a polymerase (2a(Pol and RNA replication templates at these sites to establish active replication complexes. During replication, 1a provides RNA capping, NTPase and possibly RNA helicase functions. Here we identify in BMV 1a an amphipathic alpha-helix, helix A, and use NMR analysis to define its structure and propensity to insert in hydrophobic membrane-mimicking micelles. We show that helix A is essential for efficient 1a-ER membrane association and normal perinuclear ER localization, and that deletion or mutation of helix A abolishes RNA replication. Strikingly, mutations in helix A give rise to two dramatically opposite 1a function phenotypes, implying that helix A acts as a molecular switch regulating the intricate balance between separable 1a functions. One class of helix A deletions and amino acid substitutions markedly inhibits 1a-membrane association and abolishes ER membrane invagination, viral RNA template recruitment, and replication, but doubles the 1a-mediated increase in 2a(Pol accumulation. The second class of helix A mutations not only maintains efficient 1a-membrane association but also amplifies the number of 1a-induced membrane invaginations 5- to 8-fold and enhances viral RNA template recruitment, while failing to stimulate 2a(Pol accumulation. The results provide new insights into the pathways of RNA replication complex assembly and show that helix A is critical for assembly and function of the viral RNA replication complex, including its central role in targeting replication components and controlling modes of 1a action.

  20. Complexes of neutralizing and non-neutralizing affinity matured Fabs with a mimetic of the internal trimeric coiled-coil of HIV-1 gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gustchina

    Full Text Available A series of mini-antibodies (monovalent and bivalent Fabs targeting the conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR of HIV-1 gp41 has been previously constructed and reported. Crystal structures of two closely related monovalent Fabs, one (Fab 8066 broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of HIV-1 subtype B and C viruses, and the other (Fab 8062 non-neutralizing, representing the extremes of this series, were previously solved as complexes with 5-Helix, a gp41 pre-hairpin intermediate mimetic. Binding of these Fabs to covalently stabilized chimeric trimers of N-peptides of HIV-1 gp41 (named (CCIZN363 or 3-H has now been investigated using X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and a variety of biophysical methods. Crystal structures of the complexes between 3-H and Fab 8066 and Fab 8062 were determined at 2.8 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Although the structures of the complexes with the neutralizing Fab 8066 and its non-neutralizing counterpart Fab 8062 were generally similar, small differences between them could be correlated with the biological properties of these antibodies. The conformations of the corresponding CDRs of each antibody in the complexes with 3-H and 5-Helix are very similar. The adaptation to a different target upon complex formation is predominantly achieved by changes in the structure of the trimer of N-HR helices, as well as by adjustment of the orientation of the Fab molecule relative to the N-HR in the complex, via rigid-body movement. The structural data presented here indicate that binding of three Fabs 8062 with high affinity requires more significant changes in the structure of the N-HR trimer compared to binding of Fab 8066. A comparative analysis of the structures of Fabs complexed to different gp41 intermediate mimetics allows further evaluation of biological relevance for generation of neutralizing antibodies, as well as provides novel structural insights into immunogen

  1. Role of amphipathic helix of a herpesviral protein in membrane deformation and T cell receptor downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Ki Min

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that function as platforms for signal transduction and membrane trafficking. Tyrosine kinase interacting protein (Tip of T lymphotropic Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS is targeted to lipid rafts in T cells and downregulates TCR and CD4 surface expression. Here, we report that the membrane-proximal amphipathic helix preceding Tip's transmembrane (TM domain mediates lipid raft localization and membrane deformation. In turn, this motif directs Tip's lysosomal trafficking and selective TCR downregulation. The amphipathic helix binds to the negatively charged lipids and induces liposome tubulation, the TM domain mediates oligomerization, and cooperation of the membrane-proximal helix with the TM domain is sufficient for localization to lipid rafts and lysosomal compartments, especially the mutivesicular bodies. These findings suggest that the membrane-proximal amphipathic helix and TM domain provide HVS Tip with the unique ability to deform the cellular membranes in lipid rafts and to downregulate TCRs potentially through MVB formation.

  2. The swimming of a perfect deforming helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koens, Lyndon; Zhang, Hang; Mourran, Ahmed; Lauga, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Many bacteria rotate helical flagellar filaments in order to swim. When at rest or rotated counter-clockwise these flagella are left handed helices but they undergo polymorphic transformations to right-handed helices when the motor is reversed. These helical deformations themselves can generate motion, with for example Rhodobacter sphaeroides using the polymorphic transformation of the flagellum to generate rotation, or Spiroplasma propagating a change of helix handedness across its body's length to generate forward motion. Recent experiments reported on an artificial helical microswimmer generating motion without a propagating change in handedness. Made of a temperature sensitive gel, these swimmers moved by changing the dimensions of the helix in a non-reciprocal way. Inspired by these results and helix's ubiquitous presence in the bacterial world, we investigate how a deforming helix moves within a viscous fluid. Maintaining a single handedness along its entire length, we discuss how a perfect deforming helix can create a non-reciprocal swimming stroke, identify its principle directions of motion, and calculate the swimming kinematics asymptotically.

  3. Tuberothalamic Artery Infarction Following Coil Embolization of a Ruptured Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Belonging to a Transitional Type Posterior Cerebral Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong Duk; Kwon, Soon Chan; Muniandy, Sarawana; Park, Eun Suk; Sim, Hong Bo; Lyo, In Uk

    2013-01-01

    Summary There are many potential anatomical variations in the connection between the internal carotid artery and the posterior circulation through the posterior communicating artery (PCoA). We describe the endovascular treatment of an aneurysm arising near the origin of the PCoA belonging to a transitional type posterior cerebral artery. Coil embolization subsequently resulted in thrombo-occlusion of the adjacent PCoA causing thalamic infarction even though sufficient retrograde flow had been confirmed pre-operatively by Allcock’s test. PMID:24070079

  4. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.; Furth, H.P.; Johnson, J.L.; Ludescher, C.; Weimer, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  5. Protection for low current superconducting coils wound with insulated strand cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, J.

    1980-09-01

    The insulated strand cable concept for winding of low current superconducting coil leads to an ideal quench protection by induction coupling. A superconducting secondary loop was made within a cable of a 6.2 Henry dipole coil. When quenching occurred, current was induced in the secondary strand above the critical value. The normal strand quenched the whole cable due to good thermal contact. The secondary loop works as a heater turned on as the wire becomes normal throughout the coil. With a well spread quench, the energy dissipation density is decreased thus preventing local burnout. The mechanism is possible because of close coupling that is present in the insulated cable as in bifilar winding. For the coil tested a 12 strand cable was used, thus a favorable 11 to 1 turn ratio was obtained for the primary to secondary. The superconductor in the secondary had a lower resistance until the critical current was achieved. A theoretical explanation is described for a simplified circuit. Test on the dipole coil with four individual shells showed that the one shell protected with the induced coupling heater always had a more rapid reduction of current. The induced coupling heater tested and explained in this paper works automatically and does not rely on mechanical or electrical devices

  6. Alpha-helix <-> random coil phase transition: analysis of ab initio theory predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    have obtained same thermodynamical characteristics from the use of molecular dynamics simulations and compared them with the results of the new statistical mechanics approach. The comparison proves the validity of the statistical mechanic approach and establishes its accuracy....

  7. Progesterone modulation of transmembrane helix-helix interactions between the α-subunit of Na/K-ATPase and phospholipid N-methyltransferase in the oocyte plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askari Amir

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progesterone binding to the surface of the amphibian oocyte initiates the meiotic divisions. Our previous studies with Rana pipiens oocytes indicate that progesterone binds to a plasma membrane site within the external loop between the M1 and M2 helices of the α-subunit of Na/K-ATPase, triggering a cascade of lipid second messengers and the release of the block at meiotic prophase. We have characterized this site, using a low affinity ouabain binding isoform of the α1-subunit. Results Preparations of isolated plasma membranes from Rana oocytes demonstrate that physiological levels of progesterone (or the non-metabolizable progestin R5020 successively activate phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PE-NMT and sphingomyelin synthase within seconds. Inhibition of PE-NMT blocks the progesterone induction of meiosis in intact oocytes, whereas its initial product, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine (PME, can itself initiate meiosis in the presence of the inhibitor. Published X-ray crystallographic data on Na/K-ATPase, computer-generated 3D projections, heptad repeat analysis and hydrophobic cluster analysis of the transmembrane helices predict that hydrophobic residues L, V, V, I, F and Y of helix M2 of the α1-subunit interact with F, L, G, L, L and F, respectively, of helix M3 of PE-NMT. Conclusion We propose that progesterone binding to the first external loop of the α1-subunit facilitates specific helix-helix interactions between integral membrane proteins to up-regulate PE-NMT, and, that successive interactions between two or more integral plasma membrane proteins induce the signaling cascades which result in completion of the meiotic divisions.

  8. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  9. Magnetic Test Facility - Sensor and Coil Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    amplitude of signals induced into the sensor. 2.1.1.2 Fluxgate magnetometers Fluxgate sensors consist of a ferromagnetic core, around which drive and sense...kHz range to be measured. Fluxgate magnetometers do not have a lower limit to their fre- quency response, and hence can be used to measure...placed within a larger triaxial coil which is used in conjunction with a fluxgate magnetometer to cancel earth’s field at the cen- tre of the coil. A

  10. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders

    2009-01-01

    tools are available for predicting coiled-coil domains in protein sequences, including those based on position-specific score matrices and machine learning methods. RESULTS: In this article, we introduce a hidden Markov model (CCHMM_PROF) that exploits the information contained in multiple sequence...... alignments (profiles) to predict coiled-coil regions. The new method discriminates coiled-coil sequences with an accuracy of 97% and achieves a true positive rate of 79% with only 1% of false positives. Furthermore, when predicting the location of coiled-coil segments in protein sequences, the method reaches...

  11. Photonic crystal fiber coil sensor for water-depth sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen-Feng; Yu, Chin-Ping

    2013-05-01

    We fabricate a PCF coil sensor for water-depth sensing by winding a PCF on a plastic straw. Due to the bending-induced birefringence along the PCF, we can observe clear interference pattern in the output spectrum by placing the PCF coil into a Sagnac fiber loop. As we horizontally immerse the fabricated PCF coil into water, a nonlinear relationship between the water depth and the wavelength shift can be obtained. We have also measured the interference spectrum by vertically immersing the PCF coil into water. We can observe a linear relationship between the water depth and the wavelength shift, and the measured water-depth sensitivity for vertical immersion is -1.17 nm/mm.

  12. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2007-05-21

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured)

  13. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T

    2007-01-01

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured)

  14. Dual catalytic purpose of the tungsten filament during the synthesis of single-helix carbon microcoils by hot-wire CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the deposition of crystalline single-helix carbon microcoils, in the as-deposited state, by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process without any special preparation of nano-sized transition metal catalysts and subsequent...

  15. Private Venture Capital’s Investment on University Spin-Offs: A Case Study of Tsinghua University Based on Triple Helix Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Yuchen; Hu, Yimei; Wang, Jingyi

    2015-01-01

    and transition economies where governments are transforming their roles. Thus the main purpose of this study is to investigate how private venture capitals’ investment willingness on university spin-offs are influenced by universities and governments under the Chinese context based on the triple helix model....... Through an in-depth case study on the interactions of triple helix actors of Tsinghua University’s spin-offs, it is found that government and university developing an environment of marketization exert positive influences on the investment willingness of private venture capitals. Whilst financial direct...

  16. The N-terminal amphipathic helix of the topological specificity factor MinE is associated with shaping membrane curvature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ling Shih

    Full Text Available Pole-to-pole oscillations of the Min proteins in Escherichia coli are required for the proper placement of the division septum. Direct interaction of MinE with the cell membrane is critical for the dynamic behavior of the Min system. In vitro, this MinE-membrane interaction led to membrane deformation; however, the underlying mechanism remained unclear. Here we report that MinE-induced membrane deformation involves the formation of an amphipathic helix of MinE(2-9, which, together with the adjacent basic residues, function as membrane anchors. Biochemical evidence suggested that the membrane association induces formation of the helix, with the helical face, consisting of A2, L3, and F6, inserted into the membrane. Insertion of this helix into the cell membrane can influence local membrane curvature and lead to drastic changes in membrane topology. Accordingly, MinE showed characteristic features of protein-induced membrane tubulation and lipid clustering in in vitro reconstituted systems. In conclusion, MinE shares common protein signatures with a group of membrane trafficking proteins in eukaryotic cells. These MinE signatures appear to affect membrane curvature.

  17. One Peptide Reveals the Two Faces of α-Helix Unfolding-Folding Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Cruz, Pedro F; Arnaut, Luis G; Brito, Rui M M; Serpa, Carlos

    2018-04-12

    The understanding of fast folding dynamics of single α-helices comes mostly from studies on rationally designed peptides displaying sequences with high helical propensity. The folding/unfolding dynamics and energetics of α-helix conformations in naturally occurring peptides remains largely unexplored. Here we report the study of a protein fragment analogue of the C-peptide from bovine pancreatic ribonuclease-A, RN80, a 13-amino acid residue peptide that adopts a highly populated helical conformation in aqueous solution. 1 H NMR and CD structural studies of RN80 showed that α-helix formation displays a pH-dependent bell-shaped curve, with a maximum near pH 5, and a large decrease in helical content in alkaline pH. The main forces stabilizing this short α-helix were identified as a salt bridge formed between Glu-2 and Arg-10 and the cation-π interaction involving Tyr-8 and His-12. Thus, deprotonation of Glu-2 or protonation of His-12 are essential for the RN80 α-helix stability. In the present study, RN80 folding and unfolding were triggered by laser-induced pH jumps and detected by time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry (PAC). The photoacid proton release, amino acid residue protonation, and unfolding/folding events occur at different time scales and were clearly distinguished using time-resolved PAC. The partial unfolding of the RN80 α-helix, due to protonation of Glu-2 and consequent breaking of the stabilizing salt bridge between Glu-2 and Arg-10, is characterized by a concentration-independent volume expansion in the sub-microsecond time range (0.8 mL mol -1 , 369 ns). This small volume expansion reports the cost of peptide backbone rehydration upon disruption of a solvent-exposed salt bridge, as well as backbone intrinsic expansion. On the other hand, RN80 α-helix folding triggered by His-12 protonation and subsequent formation of a cation-π interaction leads to a microsecond volume contraction (-6.0 mL mol -1 , ∼1.7 μs). The essential role of two

  18. MRI surface-coil pair with strong inductive coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Hyde, James S

    2016-12-01

    A novel inductively coupled coil pair was used to obtain magnetic resonance phantom images. Rationale for using such a structure is described in R. R. Mett et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 084703 (2016)]. The original rationale was to increase the Q-value of a small diameter surface coil in order to achieve dominant loading by the sample. A significant improvement in the vector reception field (VRF) is also seen. The coil assembly consists of a 3-turn 10 mm tall meta-metallic self-resonant spiral (SRS) of inner diameter 10.4 mm and outer diameter 15.1 mm and a single-loop equalization coil of 25 mm diameter and 2 mm tall. The low-frequency parallel mode was used in which the rf currents on each coil produce magnetic fields that add constructively. The SRS coil assembly was fabricated and data were collected using a tissue-equivalent 30% polyacrylamide phantom. The large inductive coupling of the coils produces phase-coherency of the rf currents and magnetic fields. Finite-element simulations indicate that the VRF of the coil pair is about 4.4 times larger than for a single-loop coil of 15 mm diameter. The mutual coupling between coils influences the current ratio between the coils, which in turn influences the VRF and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Data on a tissue-equivalent phantom at 9.4 T show a total SNR increase of 8.8 over the 15 mm loop averaged over a 25 mm depth and diameter. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with the magnetic resonance theory of the emf induced by spins in a coil, the theory of inductively coupled resonant circuits, and the superposition principle. The methods are general for magnetic resonance and other types of signal detection and can be used over a wide range of operating frequencies.

  19. Designing cooperatively folded abiotic uni- and multimolecular helix bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Soumen; Chi, Bo; Granier, Thierry; Qi, Ting; Maurizot, Victor; Huc, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Abiotic foldamers, that is foldamers that have backbones chemically remote from peptidic and nucleotidic skeletons, may give access to shapes and functions different to those of peptides and nucleotides. However, design methodologies towards abiotic tertiary and quaternary structures are yet to be developed. Here we report rationally designed interactional patterns to guide the folding and assembly of abiotic helix bundles. Computational design facilitated the introduction of hydrogen-bonding functionalities at defined locations on the aromatic amide backbones that promote cooperative folding into helix-turn-helix motifs in organic solvents. The hydrogen-bond-directed aggregation of helices not linked by a turn unit produced several thermodynamically and kinetically stable homochiral dimeric and trimeric bundles with structures that are distinct from the designed helix-turn-helix. Relative helix orientation within the bundles may be changed from parallel to tilted on subtle solvent variations. Altogether, these results prefigure the richness and uniqueness of abiotic tertiary structure behaviour.

  20. A new role for E12/E47 in the repression of E-cadherin expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Moreno, M A; Locascio, A; Rodrigo, I

    2001-01-01

    Down-regulation of E-cadherin expression is a determinant of tumor cell invasiveness, an event frequently associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Here we show that the mouse E12/E47 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (the E2A gene product) acts as a repressor of E-cadherin ex......Down-regulation of E-cadherin expression is a determinant of tumor cell invasiveness, an event frequently associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Here we show that the mouse E12/E47 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (the E2A gene product) acts as a repressor of E...

  1. Optimization of Coil Element Configurations for a Matrix Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Stefan; Layton, Kelvin J; Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jurgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2018-01-01

    Recently, matrix gradient coils (also termed multi-coils or multi-coil arrays) were introduced for imaging and B 0 shimming with 24, 48, and even 84 coil elements. However, in imaging applications, providing one amplifier per coil element is not always feasible due to high cost and technical complexity. In this simulation study, we show that an 84-channel matrix gradient coil (head insert for brain imaging) is able to create a wide variety of field shapes even if the number of amplifiers is reduced. An optimization algorithm was implemented that obtains groups of coil elements, such that a desired target field can be created by driving each group with an amplifier. This limits the number of amplifiers to the number of coil element groups. Simulated annealing is used due to the NP-hard combinatorial nature of the given problem. A spherical harmonic basis set up to the full third order within a sphere of 20-cm diameter in the center of the coil was investigated as target fields. We show that the median normalized least squares error for all target fields is below approximately 5% for 12 or more amplifiers. At the same time, the dissipated power stays within reasonable limits. With a relatively small set of amplifiers, switches can be used to sequentially generate spherical harmonics up to third order. The costs associated with a matrix gradient coil can be lowered, which increases the practical utility of matrix gradient coils.

  2. Levitation Experiment Using a High-Temperature Superconductor Coil for a Plasma Confinement Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Junji; Ozawa, Daisaku; Ogawa, Yuichi; Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Sinji; Mito, Toshiyuki

    2001-10-01

    Levitation experiments using a high-temperature superconductor coil have been carried out. A coil with a minor radius of 42 mm was fabricated with a Bi-2223 tape conductor, and immersed in the liquid nitrogen. The coil current was induced by the field-cooling method up to the critical current value. The current decay of the coil can be accounted for by the flux flow resistance and the normal resistance at the lap joint. The high-temperature superconductor coil can be levitated for 4 min or more within an accuracy of 25-30 μm.

  3. Zero current measurements using the Rogowski coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Jakubova, I.; Kadlec, P.; Senk, J.; Vavra, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The zero current measurements using the Rogowski coil carried out on the model of the extinguishing chamber of hv SF 6 circuit breaker with self-flow generation are presented in the paper. The time course of the post-arc current obtained by numerical integration of the measured induced voltage of the Rogowski coil gives information not only about the value of the residual current after the successful interruption but also about the current changes connected with the dynamic behaviour of the arc during its quenching. (author)

  4. Use of a High-Temperature Superconducting Coil for Magnetic Energy Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagnard, J-F; Crate, D; Jamoye, J-F; Laurent, Ph; Mattivi, B; Cloots, R; Ausloos, M; Genon, A; Vanderbemden, Ph

    2006-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage device (SMES) has been realised using a 350 m-long BSCCO tape wound as a ''pancake'' coil. The coil is mounted on a cryocooler allowing temperatures down to 17.2 K to be achieved. The temperature dependence of coil electrical resistance R(T) shows a superconducting transition at T = 102.5 K. Measurements of the V(I) characteristics were performed at several temperatures between 17.2 K and 101.5 K to obtain the temperature dependence of the critical current (using a 1 μV/cm criterion). Critical currents were found to exceed 100 A for T < 30 K. An electronic DC-DC converter was built in order to control the energy flow in and out of the superconducting coil. The converter consists of a MOS transistor bridge switching at a 80 kHz frequency and controlled with standard Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) techniques. The system was tested using a 30 V squared wave power supply as bridge input voltage. The coil current, the bridge input and output voltages were recorded simultaneously. Using a 10 A setpoint current in the superconducting coil, the whole system (coil + DC-DC converter) can provide a stable output voltage showing uninterruptible power supply (UPS) capabilities over 1 s

  5. Routine phasing of coiled-coil protein crystal structures with AMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens M. H. Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coiled-coil protein folds are among the most abundant in nature. These folds consist of long wound α-helices and are architecturally simple, but paradoxically their crystallographic structures are notoriously difficult to solve with molecular-replacement techniques. The program AMPLE can solve crystal structures by molecular replacement using ab initio search models in the absence of an existent homologous protein structure. AMPLE has been benchmarked on a large and diverse test set of coiled-coil crystal structures and has been found to solve 80% of all cases. Successes included structures with chain lengths of up to 253 residues and resolutions down to 2.9 Å, considerably extending the limits on size and resolution that are typically tractable by ab initio methodologies. The structures of two macromolecular complexes, one including DNA, were also successfully solved using their coiled-coil components. It is demonstrated that both the ab initio modelling and the use of ensemble search models contribute to the success of AMPLE by comparison with phasing attempts using single structures or ideal polyalanine helices. These successes suggest that molecular replacement with AMPLE should be the method of choice for the crystallographic elucidation of a coiled-coil structure. Furthermore, AMPLE may be able to exploit the presence of a coiled coil in a complex to provide a convenient route for phasing.

  6. A pilot study of planar coil based magnetic stimulation using acute hippocampal slice in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H J; Kang, H K; Wang, M; Jo, J; Chung, E; Kim, S

    2017-07-01

    Micromagnetic stimulation using small-sized implantable coils has recently been studied. The main advantage of this method is that it can provide sustainable stimulation performance even if a fibrotic encapsulation layer is formed around the implanted coil by inflammation response, because indirectly induced currents are used to induce neural responses. In previous research, we optimized the geometrical and control parameters used in implantable magnetic stimulation. Based on those results, we fabricated the planar coil and studied the LTP effect in the hippocampal slice by two different magnetic stimulation protocols using the quadripulse stimulation (QPS) pattern. We found that direct magnetic stimulation (DMS) induced insignificant LTP effect and priming magnetic stimulation (PMS) occluded LTP effect after tetanic stimulation, when QPS patterned magnetic stimulation with 1 A current pulse was applied to the planar coil.

  7. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was -5 degree F and, with the addition of a 30 degree F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25 degree F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50 degree F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack

  8. Coil optimisation for transcranial magnetic stimulation in realistic head geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Lari M; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Mutanen, Tuomas P; Stenroos, Matti; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows focal, non-invasive stimulation of the cortex. A TMS pulse is inherently weakly coupled to the cortex; thus, magnetic stimulation requires both high current and high voltage to reach sufficient intensity. These requirements limit, for example, the maximum repetition rate and the maximum number of consecutive pulses with the same coil due to the rise of its temperature. To develop methods to optimise, design, and manufacture energy-efficient TMS coils in realistic head geometry with an arbitrary overall coil shape. We derive a semi-analytical integration scheme for computing the magnetic field energy of an arbitrary surface current distribution, compute the electric field induced by this distribution with a boundary element method, and optimise a TMS coil for focal stimulation. Additionally, we introduce a method for manufacturing such a coil by using Litz wire and a coil former machined from polyvinyl chloride. We designed, manufactured, and validated an optimised TMS coil and applied it to brain stimulation. Our simulations indicate that this coil requires less than half the power of a commercial figure-of-eight coil, with a 41% reduction due to the optimised winding geometry and a partial contribution due to our thinner coil former and reduced conductor height. With the optimised coil, the resting motor threshold of abductor pollicis brevis was reached with the capacitor voltage below 600 V and peak current below 3000 A. The described method allows designing practical TMS coils that have considerably higher efficiency than conventional figure-of-eight coils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Results of 3-dimensional structural FE-modeling of the coil end-regions of the LHC main dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeck, U; Schillo, M; Perini, D; Siegel, N

    2000-01-01

    The transition region between the straight part and the ends of the coils of the LHC model and prototype dipole magnets are often identified as the origin of training quenches. In order to study how the discontinuities in the material properties of these regions affect coil pre-stress and possibly gain more insight in the quench behavior, a program was set up at CERN to analyze by 3D-FEM these particular regions. The ACCEL team, who performed a similar analysis for the main quadrupoles of the Superconducting Supercollider SSC, is entrusted with this program. In this paper we report on the results of 3D-modeling and analysis of the coil return end region, including the complete coil mass, of a 1-m single bore model magnet. This magnet represents all relevant features of the "two-in-one" LHC main dipole design concerning the winding configuration, the collar pack, the yoke, and the outer shell representing the He-vessel. The transition region between coil ends and straight section is modeled by slicing the magn...

  10. Critical Assessment of Current Force Fields. Short Peptide Test Case

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymětal, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 441-451 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11020 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Helix-coil transition * protein-folding simulations * amino-acids * side-chain * alanine dipeptide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  11. On Thermoeconomic Diagnosis of a Fouled Direct Expansion Coil: Effects of Induced Malfunctions on Quantitative Performance of the Diagnostic Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Piacentino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoeconomic diagnosis represents a promising technique for the detection ofcommon faults in refrigeration systems, which are responsible of degradation in theirenergetic performance. Recently, the authors have carried out a sensitivity analysis of theperformance of this method to the thermodynamic conditions of inlet air and to thegeometry of the direct expansion coil, in case of degradation induced by evaporatorfouling. The analysis showed that the method is able to detect this fault, but sometimes itsquantitative assessments are not satisfactory. In order to understand more in-depth theorigin of such results and identify margins for refinement of the technique, this paper isaimed at evaluating at what extent changes in the exergetic performance of faults-freecomponents may negatively influence the model capability to detect the fouledevaporator and quantify the consequent additional exergy consumption. The resultssuggest that the method is particularly sensitive to the cost of “induced malfunctions” onthe compressor and the condenser, especially when low coil depth or high relativehumidity of inlet air are considered.

  12. Helix probe areas for the utilization of geothermal power. A practical example; Helix-Sondenfelder zur Nutzung von Erdwaerme. Ein Praxisbeispiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuebert, Markus; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone [tewag Technologie - Erdwaermeanlagen - Umweltschutz GmbH, Starzach (Germany); Tietz, Jan [REHAU AG und Co., Erlangen-Eltersdorf (Germany); Riepold, Markus; Gloeckl, Andreas [MR Tiefbau GmbH, Brunnen (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    Thanks to their spiral shape so-called helix probes with a tube length of 40 meter have a height of only three meter: A lot of heat exchange area in a small space. Thus, helix probes are an ideal solution for the utilization of geothermal energy at places at which one cannot drill deeply due to geothermal reasons. Under this aspect, the contribution under consideration reports on the planning of a helix probe area being sustainably adapted to the user requirements for the new construction of a production facility.

  13. Tuberothalamic Artery Infarction Following Coil Embolization of a Ruptured Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Belonging to a Transitional Type Posterior Cerebral Artery: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyeong Duk; Kwon, Soon Chan; Muniandy, Sarawana; Park, Eun Suk; Sim, Hong Bo; Lyo, In Uk

    2013-01-01

    There are many potential anatomical variations in the connection between the internal carotid artery and the posterior circulation through the posterior communicating artery (PCoA). We describe the endovascular treatment of an aneurysm arising near the origin of the PCoA belonging to a transitional type posterior cerebral artery. Coil embolization subsequently resulted in thrombo-occlusion of the adjacent PCoA causing thalamic infarction even though sufficient retrograde flow had been confirm...

  14. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  15. Electric field measurement of two commercial active/sham coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James Evan; Peterchev, Angel V

    2018-06-22

    Sham TMS coils isolate the ancillary effects of their active counterparts, but typically induce low-strength electric fields (E-fields) in the brain, which could be biologically active. We measured the E-fields induced by two pairs of commonly-used commercial active/sham coils. Approach: E-field distributions of the active and sham configurations of the Magstim 70 mm AFC and MagVenture Cool-B65 A/P coils were measured over a 7-cm-radius, hemispherical grid approximating the cortical surface. Peak E-field strength was recorded over a range of pulse amplitudes. Main results: The Magstim and MagVenture shams induce peak E-fields corresponding to 25.3% and 7.72% of their respective active values. The MagVenture sham has an E-field distribution shaped like its active counterpart. The Magstim sham induces nearly zero E-field under the coil's center, and its peak E-field forms a diffuse oval 3-7 cm from the center. Electrical scalp stimulation paired with the MagVenture sham is estimated to increase the sham E-field in the brain up to 10%. Significance: Different commercial shams induce different E-field strengths and distributions in the brain, which should be considered in interpreting outcomes of sham stimulation. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Levitation experiment using a high-temperature superconductor coil for a plasma confinement device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Junji; Ogawa, Yuichi [Tokyo Univ., High Temperature Plasma Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ozawa, Daisaku [Tokyo Univ., School of Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Sinji; Mito, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Levitation experiments using a high-temperature superconductor coil have been carried out. A coil with a minor radius of 42 mm was fabricated with a Bi-2223 tape conductor, and immersed in the liquid nitrogen. The coil current was induced by the field-cooling method up to the critical current value. The current decay of the coil can be accounted for by the flux flow resistance and the normal resistance at the lap joint. The high-temperature superconductor coil can be levitated for 4 min or more within an accuracy of 25-30 {mu}m. (author)

  17. Levitation experiment using a high-temperature superconductor coil for a plasma confinement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Junji; Ogawa, Yuichi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Sinji; Mito, Toshiyuki

    2001-01-01

    Levitation experiments using a high-temperature superconductor coil have been carried out. A coil with a minor radius of 42 mm was fabricated with a Bi-2223 tape conductor, and immersed in the liquid nitrogen. The coil current was induced by the field-cooling method up to the critical current value. The current decay of the coil can be accounted for by the flux flow resistance and the normal resistance at the lap joint. The high-temperature superconductor coil can be levitated for 4 min or more within an accuracy of 25-30 μm. (author)

  18. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, Richard Wood [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by 31P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 Å of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an α-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  19. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  20. Water-induced ethanol dewetting transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiuping; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Chunlei

    2012-07-14

    The dewetting transitions of two hydrophobic plates immersed in pure water, aqueous ethanol solutions with concentrations from 25% to 90%, and pure ethanol were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations, where the dewetting transition was analogous to a first-order phase transition from liquid to vapor. It was found that the dewetting transitions occurred except that in the pure ethanol system. Although the ethanol molecules prefer to locate in the vicinity of the two plates, the inter-plate region is unfavorable for water molecules, due to losing more than one hydrogen bond. Moreover, each inter-plate water molecule forms hydrogen bonds on average with about two ethanol molecules. These intermolecular hydrogen bonds cause water and ethanol to cooperatively fill or exit the inter-plate region. Thus, water molecules play a more important role in the inter-plate filling/empty process, and induce the ethanol dewetting transition. Our results provide insight into the effect of water on the ethanol dewetting phenomena.

  1. An Amphipathic Helix Directs Cellular Membrane Curvature Sensing and Function of the BAR Domain Protein PICK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlo, Rasmus; Lund, Viktor K; Lycas, Matthew D; Jansen, Anna M; Khelashvili, George; Andersen, Rita C; Bhatia, Vikram; Pedersen, Thomas S; Albornoz, Pedro B C; Johner, Niklaus; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Christensen, Nikolaj R; Erlendsson, Simon; Stoklund, Mikkel; Larsen, Jannik B; Weinstein, Harel; Kjærulff, Ole; Stamou, Dimitrios; Gether, Ulrik; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2018-05-15

    BAR domains are dimeric protein modules that sense, induce, and stabilize lipid membrane curvature. Here, we show that membrane curvature sensing (MCS) directs cellular localization and function of the BAR domain protein PICK1. In PICK1, and the homologous proteins ICA69 and arfaptin2, we identify an amphipathic helix N-terminal to the BAR domain that mediates MCS. Mutational disruption of the helix in PICK1 impaired MCS without affecting membrane binding per se. In insulin-producing INS-1E cells, super-resolution microscopy revealed that disruption of the helix selectively compromised PICK1 density on insulin granules of high curvature during their maturation. This was accompanied by reduced hormone storage in the INS-1E cells. In Drosophila, disruption of the helix compromised growth regulation. By demonstrating size-dependent binding on insulin granules, our finding highlights the function of MCS for BAR domain proteins in a biological context distinct from their function, e.g., at the plasma membrane during endocytosis. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.I.; Scoville, J.T.

    1995-12-01

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60 degree wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak

  3. Electric field depth-focality tradeoff in transcranial magnetic stimulation: simulation comparison of 50 coil designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2013-01-01

    Various transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil designs are available or have been proposed. However, key coil characteristics such as electric field focality and attenuation in depth have not been adequately compared. Knowledge of the coil focality and depth characteristics can help TMS researchers and clinicians with coil selection and interpretation of TMS studies. To quantify the electric field focality and depth of penetration of various TMS coils. The electric field distributions induced by 50 TMS coils were simulated in a spherical human head model using the finite element method. For each coil design, we quantified the electric field penetration by the half-value depth, d(1/2), and focality by the tangential spread, S(1/2), defined as the half-value volume (V(1/2)) divided by the half-value depth, S(1/2) = V(1/2)/d(1/2). The 50 TMS coils exhibit a wide range of electric field focality and depth, but all followed a depth-focality tradeoff: coils with larger half-value depth cannot be as focal as more superficial coils. The ranges of achievable d(1/2) are similar between coils producing circular and figure-8 electric field patterns, ranging 1.0-3.5 cm and 0.9-3.4 cm, respectively. However, figure-8 field coils are more focal, having S(1/2) as low as 5 cm(2) compared to 34 cm(2) for circular field coils. For any coil design, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electrical field spread. Novel coil designs should be benchmarked against comparison coils with consistent metrics such as d(1/2) and S(1/2). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tuberothalamic artery infarction following coil embolization of a ruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm belonging to a transitional type posterior cerebral artery. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong Duk; Kwon, Soon Chan; Muniandy, Sarawana; Park, Eun Suk; Sim, Hong Bo; Lyo, In Uk

    2013-09-01

    There are many potential anatomical variations in the connection between the internal carotid artery and the posterior circulation through the posterior communicating artery (PCoA). We describe the endovascular treatment of an aneurysm arising near the origin of the PCoA belonging to a transitional type posterior cerebral artery. Coil embolization subsequently resulted in thrombo-occlusion of the adjacent PCoA causing thalamic infarction even though sufficient retrograde flow had been confirmed pre-operatively by Allcock's test.

  5. Conformational switching in the coiled-coil domains of a proteasomal ATPase regulates substrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoberger, Aaron; Brettrager, Evan J; Smith, David M

    2018-06-18

    Protein degradation in all domains of life requires ATPases that unfold and inject proteins into compartmentalized proteolytic chambers. Proteasomal ATPases in eukaryotes and archaea contain poorly understood N-terminally conserved coiled-coil domains. In this study, we engineer disulfide crosslinks in the coiled-coils of the archaeal proteasomal ATPase (PAN) and report that its three identical coiled-coil domains can adopt three different conformations: (1) in-register and zipped, (2) in-register and partially unzipped, and (3) out-of-register. This conformational heterogeneity conflicts with PAN's symmetrical OB-coiled-coil crystal structure but resembles the conformational heterogeneity of the 26S proteasomal ATPases' coiled-coils. Furthermore, we find that one coiled-coil can be conformationally constrained even while unfolding substrates, and conformational changes in two of the coiled-coils regulate PAN switching between resting and active states. This switching functionally mimics similar states proposed for the 26S proteasome from cryo-EM. These findings thus build a mechanistic framework to understand regulation of proteasome activity.

  6. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls

  7. Measurement of heating coil temperature for e-cigarettes with a "top-coil" clearomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhao; Wang, Ping; Ito, Kazuhide; Fowles, Jeff; Shusterman, Dennis; Jaques, Peter A; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-01-01

    To determine the effect of applied power settings, coil wetness conditions, and e-liquid compositions on the coil heating temperature for e-cigarettes with a "top-coil" clearomizer, and to make associations of coil conditions with emission of toxic carbonyl compounds by combining results herein with the literature. The coil temperature of a second generation e-cigarette was measured at various applied power levels, coil conditions, and e-liquid compositions, including (1) measurements by thermocouple at three e-liquid fill levels (dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet), three coil resistances (low, standard, and high), and four voltage settings (3-6 V) for multiple coils using propylene glycol (PG) as a test liquid; (2) measurements by thermocouple at additional degrees of coil wetness for a high resistance coil using PG; and (3) measurements by both thermocouple and infrared (IR) camera for high resistance coils using PG alone and a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of PG and glycerol (PG/GL). For single point thermocouple measurements with PG, coil temperatures ranged from 322 ‒ 1008°C, 145 ‒ 334°C, and 110 ‒ 185°C under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions, respectively, for the total of 13 replaceable coil heads. For conditions measured with both a thermocouple and an IR camera, all thermocouple measurements were between the minimum and maximum across-coil IR camera measurements and equal to 74% ‒ 115% of the across-coil mean, depending on test conditions. The IR camera showed details of the non-uniform temperature distribution across heating coils. The large temperature variations under wet-through-wick conditions may explain the large variations in formaldehyde formation rate reported in the literature for such "top-coil" clearomizers. This study established a simple and straight-forward protocol to systematically measure e-cigarette coil heating temperature under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions. In addition to applied power, the

  8. High-T /SUB c/ Superconducting integrated circuit: a dc SQUID with input coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Iorio, M.S.; Beasley, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    We have fabricated a high transition temperature superconducting integrated circuit consisting of a dc SQUID and an input coupling coil. The purpose is to ascertain the generic problems associated with constructing a high-T /SUB c/ circuit as well as to fabricate a high performance dc SQUID. The superconductor used for both the SQUID and the input coil is Nb 3 Sn which must be deposited at 800 0 C. Importantly, the insulator separating SQUID and input coil maintains its integrity at this elevated temperature. A hole in the insulator permits contact to the innermost winding of the coil. This contact has been achieved without significant degradation of the superconductivity. Consequently, the device operates over a wide temperature range, from below 4.2 K to near T /SUB c/

  9. Interactions between the mixotrophic dinoflagellate Takayama helix and common heterotrophic protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Jin Hee; Jeong, Hae Jin; Lim, An Suk; Lee, Kyung Ha

    2017-09-01

    The phototrophic dinoflagellate Takayama helix that is known to be harmful to abalone larvae has recently been revealed to be mixotrophic. Although mixotrophy elevates the growth rate of T. helix by 79%-185%, its absolute growth rate is still as low as 0.3d -1 . Thus, if the mortality rate of T. helix due to predation is high, this dinoflagellate may not easily prevail. To investigate potential effective protistan grazers on T. helix, feeding by diverse heterotrophic dinoflagellates such as engulfment-feeding Oxyrrhis marina, Gyrodinium dominans, Gyrodinium moestrupii, Polykrikos kofoidii, and Noctiluca scintillans, peduncle-feeding Aduncodinium glandula, Gyrodiniellum shiwhaense, Luciella masanensis, and Pfiesteria piscicida, pallium-feeding Oblea rotunda and Protoperidinium pellucidum, and the naked ciliates Pelagostrobilidium sp. (ca. 40μm in cell length) and Strombidinopsis sp. (ca. 150μm in cell length) on T. helix was explored. Among the tested heterotrophic protists, O. marina, G. dominans, G. moestrupii, A. glandula, L. masanensis, P. kofoidii, P. piscicida, and Strombidinopsis sp. were able to feed on T. helix. The growth rates of all these predators except Strombidinopsis sp. with T. helix prey were lower than those without the prey. The growth rate of Strombidinopsis sp. on T. helix was almost zero although the growth rate of Strombidinopsis sp. with T. helix prey was higher than those without the prey. Moreover, T. helix fed on O. marina and P. pellucidum and lysed the cells of P. kofoidii and G. shiwhaense. With increasing the concentrations of T. helix, the growth rates of O. marina and P. kofoidii decreased, but those of G. dominans and L. masanensis largely did not change. Therefore, reciprocal predation, lysis, no feeding, and the low ingestion rates of the common protists preying on T. helix may result in a low mortality rate due to predation, thereby compensating for this species' low growth rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Comparative Study on the Adaptation and Growth Dynamics of the Helix pomatia and Helix aspersa Muller Terrestrial Snails Under Different Feeding Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Toader-Williams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We used Helix pomatia and Helix aspersa species and measure their growth as the snails were approaching the hibernation season. Helix pomatia 2yo shown a decrease in weight while being raised in enclosed parcels of 4sqm the younger Helix pomatia 1yo as well as Helix aspersa Muller demonstrated the ability to adapt relatively fast to the same conditions. We established 5 experimental lots in a Helix pomatia farm, GPS coordinates N46.606040 E23.599950. Control lot contained Taraxacum officinales, Sonchus oleraceus, Equisetum arvense and Atriplex hortensis, wild flora found within the farm. The other lots contained the same plants as the control lot plus different combinations of imported plants from other areals. The H. pomatia 2yo weight decreased in the control lot by a mean of -3.86% while H. aspersa 1yo marked an increase of +16.89% in the same lot during the same period. The lot containing lupinus polyphyllus delivered snails with weight gain of +24.66% for H. pomatia 2yo and an increase of only +1.98% for H. aspersa 1yo. As a contrast, H. pomatia 2yo gained only +7.72% while H. aspersa 1yo gained +28.89%, in the lot containing Lavanda officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare and Hyssopus officinalis among the other plants.

  11. Superconducting magnetic coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  12. Magnetic resonance dacryocystography: comparison between conventional surface coils and microscopic coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Junior, Luiz de; Wolosker, Angela Maria Borri; Borri, Maria Lucia; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo; Hartmann, Luiz Guilherme de Carvalho; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized in the evaluation of the lacrimal apparatus with some advantages over conventional dacryocystography. The present study was aimed at acquiring high resolution images utilizing microscopic coils for evaluating typical structures of the lacrimal apparatus as compared with the findings observed with conventional surface coils. Materials and methods: Five asymptomatic volunteers with no history of epiphora were submitted to high-field magnetic resonance imaging with microscopic and conventional surface coils, and STIR sequence after instillation of saline solution. The definition of normal anatomic structures of lacrimal apparatuses was compared utilizing conventional and microscopic surface coils. Based on a consensual scoring system, the mean values for each structure were calculated by two observers. Results: In 90% of cases, higher scores were attributed to images acquired with the microscopic coil. On average, a 1.17 point increase was observed in the scoring of anatomic structures imaged with the microscopic coil. Additionally, a subjective improvement was observed in the signal-to-noise ratio with the microscopic coil. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance dacryocystography with microscopic coils is the appropriate method for evaluating the lacrimal apparatus, providing images with better quality as compared with those acquired with conventional surface coils. (author)

  13. Mechanical stress analysis for the poloidal field coils of TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ane, J.M.; Perin, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Hoop stresses, up to 100 MPa, in the poloidal field coils of TORE SUPRA have to be reacted back to the main body of the coil where a conductor ends or is twisted for an interturn or an interlayer transition. The load is taken by shear stress through the insulation. Carefully designed configurations, based on 1D, 2D and 3D analysis results, limit the shear stress levels to 15 MPa. A fatigue test of a conductor termination has shown that the experimental results are in good agreement with the calculated stresses

  14. Government and Governance of Regional Triple Helix Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danson, Mike; Todeva, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual paper contributes to the discussion of the role of regional government and regional Triple Helix constellations driving economic development and growth within regional boundaries. The impact of regionalism and subsidiarity on regional Triple Helix constellations, and the questions of governmentality, governance and institutional…

  15. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  16. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  17. Fault Analysis of ITER Coil Power Supply System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Ho; Jun, Tao; Benfatto, Ivone

    2009-01-01

    The ITER magnet coils are all designed using superconductors with high current carrying capability. The Toroidal Field (TF) coils operate in a steadystate mode with a current of 68 kA and discharge the stored energy in case of quench with using 9 interleaved Fast Discharge Units (FDUs). The Central Solenoid (CS) coils and Poloidal Field (PF) coils operate in a pulse mode with currents of up to 45 kA and require fast variation of currents inducing more than 10 kV during normal operation on the coil terminals using Switching Network (SN) systems (CSs, PF1 and 6) and Booster and VS converters (PF2 to 5), which are series connected to Main converters. SN and FDU systems comprise high current DC circuit breakers and resistors for generating high voltage (SN) and to dissipate magnetic energy (FDUs). High transient voltages can arise due to the switching operation of SN and FD and the characteristics of resistors and stray components of DC distribution systems. Also, faults in power supply control such as shorts or grounding faults can produce higher voltages between terminals and between terminal and ground. Therefore, the design of the coil insulation, coil terminal regions, feeders, feed throughs, pipe breaks and instrumentation must take account of these high voltages during normal and abnormal conditions. Voltage insulation level can be defined and it is necessary to test the coils at higher voltages, to be sure of reliable performance during the lifetime of operation. This paper describes the fault analysis of the TF, CS and PF coil power supply systems, taking account of the stray parameter of the power supply and switching systems and inductively coupled superconducting coil models. Resistor grounding systems are included in the simulation model and all fault conditions such as converter hardware and software faults, switching system hardware and software faults, DC short circuits and single grounding faults are simulated. The occurrence of two successive faults

  18. Double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent swirling annular jet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanierschot, M.; Percin, M.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the structure and dynamics of double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent annular swirling jet. Double helix breakdown has been reported previously for the laminar flow regime, but this structure has rarely been observed in turbulent flow. The flow field is investigated experimentally by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry. Notwithstanding the axisymmetric nature of the time-averaged flow, analysis of the instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) vortical structures shows the existence of a vortex core along the central axis which breaks up into a double helix downstream. The winding sense of this double helix is opposite to the swirl direction (m =-2 ) and it is wrapped around a central vortex breakdown bubble. This structure is quite different from double helix breakdown found in laminar flows where the helix is formed in the wake of the bubble and not upstream. The double helix precesses around the central axis of the jet with a precessing frequency corresponding to a Strouhal number of 0.27.

  19. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Pla...

  20. An α-Helix-Mimicking 12,13-Helix: Designed α/β/γ-Foldamers as Selective Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Claire M; Miles, Jennifer A; Robin, Sylvie; Wilson, Andrew J; Aitken, David J

    2016-09-05

    A major current challenge in bioorganic chemistry is the identification of effective mimics of protein secondary structures that act as inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this work, trans-2-aminocyclobutanecarboxylic acid (tACBC) was used as the key β-amino acid component in the design of α/β/γ-peptides to structurally mimic a native α-helix. Suitably functionalized α/β/γ-peptides assume an α-helix-mimicking 12,13-helix conformation in solution, exhibit enhanced proteolytic stability in comparison to the wild-type α-peptide parent sequence from which they are derived, and act as selective inhibitors of the p53/hDM2 interaction. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish, M.; Brooks, A.; Rushinski, J.; Upcavage, R.

    2009-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure

  2. Determining hyperfine transitions with electromagnetically induced transparency and optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Yi-Chi; Tsai Chin-Chun; Huang Chen-Han; Chui Hsiang-Chen; Chang Yung-Yung

    2011-01-01

    A system is designed to observe the phenomena of electromagnetically induced transparency and optical pumping in cesium D 1 and D 2 lines at room temperature. When a pump laser is frequency-locked on the top of a hyperfine transition and the frequency of the probe laser scans over another hyperfine transition, a spectrum of V-type electromagnetically induced transparency or an optical pumping can be observed depending on whether the two lasers share a common ground state. Therefore, these results can be used to identify the unknown hyperfine transitions of the D 1 line transitions. For educational purposes, this system is helpful for understanding the electromagnetically induced transparency and the optical pumping

  3. Effect of Hedera helix on lung histopathology in chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoglu, Arzu Babayigit; Karaman, Ozkan; Erge, Duygu Olmez; Erbil, Guven; Yilmaz, Osman; Kivcak, Bijen; Bagriyanik, H Alper; Uzuner, Nevin

    2012-12-01

    Hedera helix is widely used to treat bronchial asthma for many years. However, effects of this herb on lung histopathology is still far from clear. We aimed to determine the effect of oral administration of Hedera helix on lung histopathology in a murine model of chronic asthma.BALB/c mice were divided into four groups; I (Placebo), II (Hedera helix), III (Dexamethasone) and IV (Control). All mice except controls were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Then, mice in group I received saline, group II 100 mg/kg Hedera helix and group III 1 mg/kg dexamethasone via orogastic gavage once daily for one week. Airway histopathology was evaluated by using light and electron microscopy in all groups.Goblet cell numbers and thicknesses of basement membrane were found significantly lower in group II, but there was no statistically significant difference in terms of number of mast cells, thicknesses of epithelium and subepithelial smooth muscle layers between group I and II. When Hedera helix and dexamethasone groups were compared with each other, thickness of epithelium, subepithelial muscle layers, number of mast cells and goblet cells of group III were significantly ameliorated when compared with the group II. Although Hedera helix administration reduced only goblet cell counts and the thicknesses of basement membrane in the asthmatic airways, dexamethasone ameliorated all histopathologic parameters except thickness of basement membrane better than Hedera helix.

  4. Electromagnetic-coil (EM-coil) measurement technique to verify presence of metal/absence of oxide attribute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.L.; Hockey, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    range between 10 -6 and 10 -20 mhos/meter, while the metals and alloys typically span a range between 7x10 7 and 5x10 5 mhos/meter. Measurements have been made using materials spanning both ends of each range. The EM coil method operates on the basis of Faraday's Law of induction. An alternating low-voltage signal is applied to an encircling coil at a selected frequency, generating a magnetic field at a storage containers surface. An electric field, of the same frequency, is generated in all metal objects placed inside the coil. The intensity of this electric field diminishes with depth into a metal. This electric field then causes electric current (commonly referred to as eddy current) to flow throughout conductive objects. As these induced currents flow they also generate a secondary magnetic field causing the coils impedance to change in proportion to the total magnetic field passing through the coil. A high-precision, impedance measuring device can monitor the coil's impedance and thus obtain an electromagnetic signature for all conductive objects placed inside the coil. The EM-coil is inherently less intrusive than a radiation measurement since it is sensitive to the combination of configuration and composition. On a mathematical basis, component information cannot be extracted from this measurement because the coil impedance is a two-parameter quantity and the number of parameters affecting the coil impedance is much greater than two. The EM-coil method can make a determination that a container does or does not enclose metal in the expected configuration. Radiation detection methods on the other hand may only be able to establish the lack of oxide, which thereby implies the presence of metal, a weaker statement. The EM-coil data analysis is extremely simple, requiring the definition of a region of interest in a two- dimensional plot. The EM-coil method is able to make a measurement in less than a minute, whereas radiation measurement methods demonstrated to

  5. Application of Near-Infrared and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in the Characterization of Ligand-Induced Conformation Changes in Folate Binding Protein Purified from Bovine Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy have been applied to detect structural alterations in folate binding protein (FBP) induced by ligation in different buffer types. The amide I region pointed to a beta-sheet to alpha-helix transition upon ligation in acetate...

  6. Composite coils for toroidal field coils and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Trujillo, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite toroidal field (TF) generating means consisting of segmented magnetic coil windings is disclosed. Each coil winding of the TF generating means consists of a copper or copper alloy conductor segment and an aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segment. The conductor segments are joined at a high strength, low electrical resistance joint and the joint may either be a mechanical or metallurgical one. The use of the aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segments improves the neutron economy of the reactor with which the TF coil is associated and reduces TF coil nuclear heating and heating gradients, and activation in the TF coils

  7. Outcomes with single-coil versus dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Nicholas; Kaura, Amit; Murgatroyd, Francis; Dhillon, Para; Scott, Paul A

    2018-03-01

    Dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads have traditionally been used over single-coil leads due to concerns regarding high defibrillation thresholds (DFT) and consequent poor shock efficacy. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this position may be unfounded and that dual-coil leads may also be associated with higher complication rates during lead extraction. This meta-analysis collates data comparing dual- and single-coil ICD leads. Electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and non-randomized studies comparing single-coil and dual-coil leads. The mean differences in DFT and summary estimates of the odds-ratio (OR) for first-shock efficacy and the hazard-ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated using random effects models. Eighteen studies including a total of 138,124 patients were identified. Dual-coil leads were associated with a lower DFT compared to single coil leads (mean difference -0.83J; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.39--0.27; P = 0.004). There was no difference in the first-shock success rate with dual-coil compared to single-coil leads (OR 0.74; 95%CI 0.45-1.21; P=0.22). There was a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality associated with single-coil leads (HR 0.91; 95%CI 0.86-0.95; P dual-coil leads. The mortality benefit with single-coil leads most likely represents patient selection bias. Given the increased risk and complexity of extracting dual-coil leads, centres should strongly consider single-coil ICD leads as the lead of choice for routine new left-sided ICD implants. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Pressure induced phase transition behaviour in -electron based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present review on the high pressure phase transition behaviour of ... For instance, closing of energy gaps lead to metal–insulator transitions [4], shift in energy ... systematic study of the pressure induced structural sequences has become ...

  9. Field-induced transitions in DySb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, T.O.; Lander, G.H.; Korty, F.W.; Kouvel, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    The NaCl-structured compound DySb, which in zero field transforms abruptly at T/sub N/ approximately 9.5 0 K to a Type-II antiferromagnetic (A) state with a nearly tetragonal lattice distortion, was previously found to exhibit rapid field-induced changes in magnetization at 1.5 0 K. The field-induced transitions in a DySb crystal have been studied by neutron diffraction and magnetization measurements in fields up to approximately 60 kOe applied parallel to each of the principal axes. In the broken bracket 100 broken bracket case, the transition from the A to an intermediate ferrimagnetic (Q) state is first-order at 4.2 0 K (critical field H/sub c/ approximately 21 kOe) but is continuous from approximately 6 0 K up to T/sub N/: as H/sub c/ → 0. The Q-to-paramagnetic (P) transition is rapid but continuous at 4.2 0 K (H/sub c/ approximately 40 kOe) and becomes broad as T/sub N/ is approached. In the broken bracket 110 broken bracket case the A-to-Q transition remains essentially first-order from 4.2 0 K (H/sub c/ approximately 15 kOe) up to T/sub N/; above T/sub N/ rapid P-to-Q transitions occur at very high fields. The magnetic structure of the Q state is found to be that of HoP. (U.S.)

  10. Coloured-noise-induced transitions in nonlinear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankin, R.; Laas, T.; Soika, E.; Sauga, A.; Rekker, A.; Ainsaar, A.; Ugaste, Ue.

    2008-01-01

    In a stochastic framework, macroscopic approaches are sought to describe microscopic interaction between different species. Coloured-noise-induced transitions in stochastic N-species Lotka-Volterra systems are considered analytically as an appropriate model expendable to many natural and nano-technological processes. All the results discussed are computed by means of a dynamical mean-field approximation. It is demonstrated that interplay of coloured noise and interaction intensities of species can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as discontinuous transitions of the mean population density, noise-induced Hopf bifurcations and relaxation oscillation. The necessary conditions for the cooperation effects are also discussed. Particularly, it is established that, in the case of the Beddington functional response, in certain parameter regions of the model an increase in noise correlation time can cause multiple transitions (more than two) between relaxation oscillatory regimes and equilibrium states. (authors)

  11. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  12. Silk fibroin membranes from solvent-crystallized silk fibroin/gelatin blends: Effects of blend and solvent composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Eun S. [Fiber and Polymer Science Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Frankowski, David J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Hudson, Samuel M. [Fiber and Polymer Science Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Spontak, Richard J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States) and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)]. E-mail: Rich_Spontak@ncsu.edu

    2007-04-15

    Protein membranes have been prepared by mixing gelatin (G) with Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) and using aqueous methanol (MeOH) to induce SF crystallization. Amorphous blends of these polymers appear quasi-homogeneous, as discerned from visual observation, electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon subsequent exposure to aqueous MeOH, SF undergoes a conformational change from random-coil to {beta}-sheet. This transformation occurs in pure SF, as well as in each of the G/SF blends, as discerned from FTIR spectroscopy and thermal calorimetry. The influence of MeOH-induced SF crystallization on structure and property development has been measured as functions of blend and solvent composition. By preserving a support scaffold above the G helix-to-coil transition temperature, the formation of crystalline SF networks in G/SF blends can be used to stabilize G-based hydrogels or generate SF membranes for biomaterial, pharmaceutical and gas-separation purposes. The present study not only examines the properties of G/SF blends before and after SF crystallization, but also establishes the foundation for future research into thermally-responsive G/SF bioconjugates.

  13. Conformational Flexibility Enables the Function of a BECN1 Region Essential for Starvation-Mediated Autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Yang; Ramanathan, Arvind; Glover, Karen; Stanley, Christopher; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Yang, Zhongyu; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C.

    2016-04-05

    BECN1 is essential for autophagy, a critical eukaryotic cellular homeostasis pathway. Here we delineate a highly conserved BECN1 domain located between previously characterized BH3 and coiled-coil domains and elucidate its structure and role in autophagy. The 2.0 angstrom sulfur-single-wavelength anomalous dispersion X-ray crystal structure of this domain demonstrates that its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half is helical; hence, we name it the flexible helical domain (FHD). Circular dichroism spectroscopy, double electron electron resonance electron paramagnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses confirm that the FHD is partially disordered, even in the context of adjacent BECN1 domains. Molecular dynamic simulations fitted to SAXS data indicate that the FHD transiently samples more helical conformations. FHD helicity increases in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, suggesting it may become more helical upon binding. Lastly, cellular studies show that conserved FHD residues are required for starvation-induced autophagy. Thus, the FHD likely undergoes a binding-associated disorder to-helix transition, and conserved residues critical for this interaction are essential for starvation-induced autophagy.

  14. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  15. HydroSoft coil versus HydroCoil for endovascular aneurysm occlusion study: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xinbin; Fan Yimu; Zhang Jianning

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The HydroCoil Embolic System (HES) was developed to reduce recurrences of aneurysms relative to platinum coils. But the HydroCoil Embolic System was characterized with many limitations. The manufacturer had recognized the challenge and recently a new design of hydrogel-coated coil-HydroSoft has become available in the market as the new generation HydroCoil. We reported our initial experience using HydroSoft coil versus HydroCoil in our center. Methods: 75 aneurysms embolized primarily using HydroSoft Coils from July 2008 to May 2009 were compared with 66 volume- and shape-matched aneurysms treated with HydroCoils from March 2006 to August 2008. Outcome measures included length and number of coils used, contrast volume, and length of hospital stay. During embolization, a stable framework was first established with bare coils, and hydrogel-coated coils were used subsequently to increase the packing density. Follow-up angiographic results 6 months after treatment were evaluated among some of the patients. Results: Successful coil embolization was achieved in all patients. There were no differences in average total coil length used per aneurysm. There were no differences in length of hospital stay and packing density. HydroSoft coils were more suitable using as the finishing or final coil. HydroSoft coil decreased the procedure-related retreated rates, and aneurysm packing was finished with soft, flexible HydroSoft coil and decreased the neck remnant rates. Follow-up angiography in HydroSoft-treated patients at 6 months revealed aneurysm stability without significant residual neck. Conclusions: HydroSoft coil allowed us to deploy coated coils with good packing density. A slight expansion of these coils at the neck can be expected to reduce neck remnant and potentially inhibit recurrence.

  16. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Mohanti, R.; Duggan, W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  17. The basic helix-loop-helix region of the transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 is preorganized to bind DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovic, Matija; Wienk, Hans; Coglievina, Maristella; Boelens, Rolf; Pongor, Sándor; Pintar, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1, one of the main downstream effectors in Notch signaling, is a transcriptional repressor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. Using nuclear magnetic resonance methods, we have determined the structure and dynamics of a recombinant protein, H1H, which includes an

  18. Normal-zone detectors for the MFTF-B coils. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this report uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages. The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take place in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent. An example of the detector design is given for four coils with realistic parameters. The effect on accuracy of changes in the system parameters is discussed

  19. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space

  20. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Kevrekidis, Ioannis G., E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hummer, Gerhard, E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Theoretical Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  1. Automated de novo phasing and model building of coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Models generated by de novo structure prediction can be very useful starting points for molecular replacement for systems where suitable structural homologues cannot be readily identified. Protein-protein complexes and de novo-designed proteins are examples of systems that can be challenging to phase. In this study, the potential of de novo models of protein complexes for use as starting points for molecular replacement is investigated. The approach is demonstrated using homomeric coiled-coil proteins, which are excellent model systems for oligomeric systems. Despite the stereotypical fold of coiled coils, initial phase estimation can be difficult and many structures have to be solved with experimental phasing. A method was developed for automatic structure determination of homomeric coiled coils from X-ray diffraction data. In a benchmark set of 24 coiled coils, ranging from dimers to pentamers with resolutions down to 2.5 Å, 22 systems were automatically solved, 11 of which had previously been solved by experimental phasing. The generated models contained 71-103% of the residues present in the deposited structures, had the correct sequence and had free R values that deviated on average by 0.01 from those of the respective reference structures. The electron-density maps were of sufficient quality that only minor manual editing was necessary to produce final structures. The method, named CCsolve, combines methods for de novo structure prediction, initial phase estimation and automated model building into one pipeline. CCsolve is robust against errors in the initial models and can readily be modified to make use of alternative crystallographic software. The results demonstrate the feasibility of de novo phasing of protein-protein complexes, an approach that could also be employed for other small systems beyond coiled coils.

  2. Insecticidal activity and expression of cytochrome P450 family 4 genes in Aedes albopictus after exposure to pyrethroid mosquito coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avicor, Silas W; Wajidi, Mustafa F F; El-Garj, Fatma M A; Jaal, Zairi; Yahaya, Zary S

    2014-10-01

    Mosquito coils are insecticides commonly used for protection against mosquitoes due to their toxic effects on mosquito populations. These effects on mosquitoes could induce the expression of metabolic enzymes in exposed populations as a counteractive measure. Cytochrome P450 family 4 (CYP4) are metabolic enzymes associated with a wide range of biological activities including insecticide resistance. In this study, the efficacies of three commercial mosquito coils with different pyrethroid active ingredients were assessed and their potential to induce the expression of CYP4 genes in Aedes albopictus analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Coils containing 0.3 % D-allethrin and 0.005 % metofluthrin exacted profound toxic effects on Ae. albopictus, inducing high mortalities (≥90 %) compared to the 0.2 % D-allethrin reference coil. CYP4H42 and CYP4H43 expressions were significantly higher in 0.3 % D-allethrin treated mosquitoes compared to the other treated populations. Short-term (KT50) exposure to mosquito coils induced significantly higher expression of both genes in 0.005 % metofluthrin exposed mosquitoes. These results suggest the evaluated products provided better protection than the reference coil; however, they also induced the expression of metabolic genes which could impact negatively on personal protection against mosquito.

  3. Mode conversions by a discontinuous junction of two helix loaded waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, J.Y.; Ahn, S.; Ganquly, A.K.; Uhm, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    For various reasons, it is desirable to vary the primary propagating mode from one section of the waveguide to another. We choose the base structure to be the sheath helix loaded waveguide. Specifically, we join two physically different helix loaded waveguides axisymmetrically, thereby providing the required discontinuities at the junction (Z = 0). The helix loaded waveguide is more advantageous to the simple waveguide in that the helix mode that exists uniquely in the helix waveguide in addition to the usual fast wave hybrid modes, is without cutoff and thus behaves like a transmission line. In order to obtain the mode conversion rates, we expand the waves in the both sides of the junction with its own eigenmodes including the evanescent modes, and by matching fields at the junction (Z = 0) obtain the matrix equation for the coefficients for the eigenmodes in both sides. By choosing the propagating incident wave (Z = 0) the resulting outgoing waves in the other end (Z > 0) will be computed from the matrix equation. A computer program is devised to solve the suitably truncated matrix equation, and the numerical examples for the mode conversion rates with the parameter variations will be presented. The relevant physical parameters to yield discontinuities at the junction are the radii of the outer conductor and the helix wire and the pitch angle of the helix. Special emphases are on the conversion rates from the helix mode (Z 0) for the application to the tapered gyrotron amplifier

  4. A novel method for coil efficiency estimation: Validation with a 13C birdcage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Hartwig, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Coil efficiency, defined as the B1 magnetic field induced at a given point on the square root of supplied power P, is an important parameter that characterizes both the transmit and receive performance of the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Maximizing coil efficiency will maximize also the signal......-to-noise ratio. In this work, we propose a novel method for RF coil efficiency estimation based on the use of a perturbing loop. The proposed method consists of loading the coil with a known resistor by inductive coupling and measuring the quality factor with and without the load. We tested the method...... by measuring the efficiency of a 13C birdcage coil tuned at 32.13 MHz and verified its accuracy by comparing the results with the nuclear magnetic resonance nutation experiment. The method allows coil performance characterization in a short time and with great accuracy, and it can be used both on the bench...

  5. Proto-CIRCUS tilted-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid: Design and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.W.; Doumet, M.; Hammond, K.C. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kornbluth, Y. [Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10033 (United States); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Sweeney, R. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Volpe, F.A., E-mail: fvolpe@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak-like device with tilted toroidal field (TF) coils needs less plasma current than a conventional tokamak. • Rotational transform is partly generated by external coils. Device can be considered a tokamak–torsatron hybrid. • We designed and constructed the first device of this type. • Tilted TF coils are interlinked to each other, which helps to reduce aspect ratio of plasma. • This is a six-coil generalization of CNT stellarator, also at Columbia University, which features two interlinked coils. - Abstract: We present the field-line modeling, design, and construction of a prototype circular-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid called Proto-CIRCUS. The device has a major radius R = 16 cm and minor radius a < 5 cm. The six “toroidal field” coils are planar as in a tokamak, but they are tilted. This, combined with induced or driven plasma current, is expected to generate rotational transform, as seen in field-line tracing and equilibrium calculations. The device is expected to operate at lower plasma current than a tokamak of comparable size and magnetic field, which might have interesting implications for disruptions and steady-state operation. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced than in an equivalent tokamak in which the coils are not tilted. The tilted coils are interlocked, resulting in a relatively low aspect ratio, and can be moved, both radially and in tilt angle, between discharges. This capability will be exploited for detailed comparisons between calculations and field-line mapping measurements. Such comparisons will reveal whether this relatively simple concept can generate the expected rotational transform.

  6. Quench evolution and hot spot temperature in the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Boxman, H; Broggi, F; Dolgetta, N; Juster, F P; Tetteroo, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The 9-m long superconducting model coil B0 was built to verify design parameters and exercise the construction of the Barrel Toroid magnet of ATLAS Detector. The model coil has been successfully tested at CERN. An intensive test program to study quench propagation through the coil windings as well as the temperature distribution has been carried out. The coil is well equipped with pickup coils, voltage taps, superconducting quench detectors and temperature sensors. The current is applied up to 24 kA and about forty quenches have been induced by firing internal heaters. Characteristic numbers at full current of 24 kA are a normal zone propagation of 15 m/s in the conductor leading to a turn-to-turn propagation of 0.1 m/s, the entire coil in normal state within 5.5 s and a safe peak temperature in the windings of 85 K. The paper summarizes the quench performance of the B0 coil. Based on this experience the full-size coils are now under construction and first test results are awaited by early 2004. 7 Refs.

  7. A large-stroke shape memory alloy spring actuator using double-coil configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung-Won; An, Sungmin; Cho, Kyu-Jin; Lee, Jong-Gu; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-01-01

    One way to increase the range of motion of shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators is to create displacements of the SMA associated with not only the deformation from straining but also rigid-body motion from translation and rotation. Rigid-body motion allows the SMA to create larger displacements without exceeding the maximum recovery strain so that the SMA actuators can have a larger shape recovery ratio. To improve the linear actuation stroke of SMA wire actuators, a novel SMA spring actuator is proposed that employs a double-coil geometry that allows the displacement of the SMA to be mainly induced by rigid-body motion. A double-coil SMA spring actuator is fabricated by coiling an SMA wire twice so that the double coiling results in a reduction of the initial length of the double-coil SMA spring actuator. The effects of the geometric parameters on the actuation characteristic of a double-coil SMA spring actuator are verified numerically by finite element analysis and experimentally according to a parametric study of the geometric parameters. The displacement-to-force profile of the double-coil SMA spring actuator is nonlinear, and the spring stiffness changes when the actuator transforms its configuration from a double-coil shape to a single-coil shape. According to the results of the parametric study, increasing the wire diameter increases both primary and secondary coil stiffness, and increasing the primary inner coil diameter decreases both primary and secondary coil stiffness, whereas increasing the secondary inner coil diameter decreases only the secondary coil stiffness. The result shows that one of the double-coil SMA spring actuators with an initial length of 8 mm has a recovery ratio of 1250%, while the recovery ratio of the single-coil SMA spring actuator with the same geometric parameters is 432%. (paper)

  8. Conception of Brownian coil

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a conception of Brownian coil. Brownian coil is a tiny coil with the same size of pollen. Once immersed into designed magnetic field and liquid, the coil will be moved and deformed macroscopically, due to the microscopic thermodynamic molecular collisions. Such deformation and movement will change the magnetic flux through the coil, by which an ElectroMotive Force (EMF) is produced. In this work, Brownian heat exchanger and Brownian generator are further designed to tran...

  9. Historical review: another 50th anniversary--new periodicities in coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Markus; Lupas, Andrei N

    2003-12-01

    In 1953, Francis Crick and Linus Pauling both proposed models of supercoiled alpha helices ('coiled coils') for the structure of keratin. These were the first attempts at modelling the tertiary structure of a protein. Crick emphasized the packing mode of the side-chains ('knobs-into-holes'), which required a periodicity of seven residues over two helical turns (7/2) and a supercoil in the opposite sense of the constituent helices. By contrast, Pauling envisaged a broader set of periodicities (4/1, 7/2, 18/5, 15/4, 11/3) and supercoils of both senses. Crick's model became canonical and the 'heptad repeat' essentially synonymous with coiled coils, but 50 years later new crystal structures and protein sequences show that the less common periodicities envisaged by Pauling also occur in coiled coils, adding a variant packing mode ('knobs-to-knobs') to the standard model. Pauling's laboratory notebooks suggest that he searched unsuccessfully for this packing mode in 1953.

  10. Design Optimization for a Maglev System Employing Flux Eliminating Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Kent R.

    1996-01-01

    Flux eliminating coils have received no little attention over the past thirty years as an alternative for realizing lift in a MAGLEV system. When the magnets on board the vehicle are displaced from the equilibrium or null flux point of these coils, they induce current in those coils which act to restore the coil to its null flux or centerline position. The question being addressed in this paper is that of how to choose the best coil for a given system. What appears at first glance to be an innocent question is in fact one that is actually quite involved, encompassing both the global economics and physics of the system. The real key in analyzing that question is to derive an optimization index or functional which represents the cost of the system subject to constraints, the primary constraint being that the vehicle lift itself at a certain threshold speed. Outlined in this paper is one scenario for realizing a total system design which uses sequential quadratic programming techniques.

  11. Coiled-Coil Proteins Facilitated the Functional Expansion of the Centrosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael; Hyman, Anthony A.; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing existing proteins for new cellular functions is recognized as a main mechanism of evolutionary innovation, but its role in organelle evolution is unclear. Here, we explore the mechanisms that led to the evolution of the centrosome, an ancestral eukaryotic organelle that expanded its functional repertoire through the course of evolution. We developed a refined sequence alignment technique that is more sensitive to coiled coil proteins, which are abundant in the centrosome. For proteins with high coiled-coil content, our algorithm identified 17% more reciprocal best hits than BLAST. Analyzing 108 eukaryotic genomes, we traced the evolutionary history of centrosome proteins. In order to assess how these proteins formed the centrosome and adopted new functions, we computationally emulated evolution by iteratively removing the most recently evolved proteins from the centrosomal protein interaction network. Coiled-coil proteins that first appeared in the animal–fungi ancestor act as scaffolds and recruit ancestral eukaryotic proteins such as kinases and phosphatases to the centrosome. This process created a signaling hub that is crucial for multicellular development. Our results demonstrate how ancient proteins can be co-opted to different cellular localizations, thereby becoming involved in novel functions. PMID:24901223

  12. CCBuilder 2.0: Powerful and accessible coiled-coil modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher W; Woolfson, Derek N

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of user-friendly and accessible computational tools for biomolecular modeling would expand the reach and application of biomolecular engineering and design. For protein modeling, one key challenge is to reduce the complexities of 3D protein folds to sets of parametric equations that nonetheless capture the salient features of these structures accurately. At present, this is possible for a subset of proteins, namely, repeat proteins. The α-helical coiled coil provides one such example, which represents ≈ 3-5% of all known protein-encoding regions of DNA. Coiled coils are bundles of α helices that can be described by a small set of structural parameters. Here we describe how this parametric description can be implemented in an easy-to-use web application, called CCBuilder 2.0, for modeling and optimizing both α-helical coiled coils and polyproline-based collagen triple helices. This has many applications from providing models to aid molecular replacement for X-ray crystallography, in silico model building and engineering of natural and designed protein assemblies, and through to the creation of completely de novo "dark matter" protein structures. CCBuilder 2.0 is available as a web-based application, the code for which is open-source and can be downloaded freely. http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccbuilder2. We have created CCBuilder 2.0, an easy to use web-based application that can model structures for a whole class of proteins, the α-helical coiled coil, which is estimated to account for 3-5% of all proteins in nature. CCBuilder 2.0 will be of use to a large number of protein scientists engaged in fundamental studies, such as protein structure determination, through to more-applied research including designing and engineering novel proteins that have potential applications in biotechnology. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  13. Mechanical unfolding reveals stable 3-helix intermediates in talin and α-catenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl V Mykuliak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stability is a key feature in the regulation of structural scaffolding proteins and their functions. Despite the abundance of α-helical structures among the human proteome and their undisputed importance in health and disease, the fundamental principles of their behavior under mechanical load are poorly understood. Talin and α-catenin are two key molecules in focal adhesions and adherens junctions, respectively. In this study, we used a combination of atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations, polyprotein engineering, and single-molecule atomic force microscopy (smAFM to investigate unfolding of these proteins. SMD simulations revealed that talin rod α-helix bundles as well as α-catenin α-helix domains unfold through stable 3-helix intermediates. While the 5-helix bundles were found to be mechanically stable, a second stable conformation corresponding to the 3-helix state was revealed. Mechanically weaker 4-helix bundles easily unfolded into a stable 3-helix conformation. The results of smAFM experiments were in agreement with the findings of the computational simulations. The disulfide clamp mutants, designed to protect the stable state, support the 3-helix intermediate model in both experimental and computational setups. As a result, multiple discrete unfolding intermediate states in the talin and α-catenin unfolding pathway were discovered. Better understanding of the mechanical unfolding mechanism of α-helix proteins is a key step towards comprehensive models describing the mechanoregulation of proteins.

  14. HydroCoil as an adjuvant to bare platinum coil treatment of 100 cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanning, Noel F.; Berentei, Zsolt; Brennan, Paul R.; Thornton, John

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The overall safety of the HydroCoil, an expansile hybrid hydrogel-platinum coil, is unknown. We report a prospective observational study of our first 100 cerebral aneurysms treated with HydroCoils, focusing on safety and initial efficacy.Methods Indications, procedural complications, clinical and angiographic outcomes were recorded. Packing density, number of coils deployed and angiographic results were compared with those in a matched control group of 100 aneurysms treated solely with bare platinum coils. HydroCoil complication rates were compared to bare platinum coil rates at our institution and in published series. Results Adjuvant HydroCoil treatment led to increased mean percentage aneurysm filling compared to controls (50 ± 21% versus 27 ± 13%, P < 0.001). Immediate posttreatment angiographic results showed significantly (P < 0.001) more complete occlusions and fewer incomplete (<95%) occlusions compared to controls. Intermediate follow-up angiograms (median 7.5 months) in 63 aneurysms showed a trend towards fewer incomplete occlusions with HydroCoil treatment. There were significantly fewer major recurrences with HydroCoil treatment compared to the control treatment (9.5% versus 22.6%, P 0.046). In the adjuvant HydroCoil group, major recurrent aneurysms had significantly less percentage volume packing with HydroCoils than non-recurrent aneurysms (50.3 ± 5.0% versus 65.3 ± 18.0%, P = 0.04). There was a 12% procedural complication rate, 6% procedural morbidity and 1% mortality rate, similar to institutional and reported bare platinum coil complication rates.Conclusion HydroCoils can be safely deployed with a similar complication rate to bare platinum coils. They result in improved aneurysm filling. Intermediate follow-up angiography showed significantly fewer major recurrences. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm initial improved stability. (orig.)

  15. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Gruenhagen, A.; Herz, W.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Lotz, E.; Malang, S.; Maurer, W.; Noether, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.; Horvath, I.; Kwasnitza, K.; Marinucci, C.; Pasztor, G.; Sborchia, C.; Weymuth, P.; Peters, A.; Roeterdink, A.

    1987-11-01

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb 3 Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb 3 TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.) [de

  16. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, N.J.; Hudson, C.L.

    1992-12-15

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse. 13 figs.

  17. Sample Size Induced Brittle-to-Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ARL-RP-0528 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum...originator. ARL-RP-0528 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal...Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum Nitride 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  18. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  19. Coil Migration through a Neuroform 3 Stent during Endovascular Coiling. A Case Report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, A

    2009-07-29

    Summary: A 43-year-old woman attended for stent assisted coiling. A Neuroform 30 x 4.5 mm stent had been successfully placed over the left periophthalmic aneurysm. During the coiling the first coil migrated through the crowns in the stent, lodging at the MCA bifurcation. We believe that the coil herniated through the overlying stent due to the carotid siphon curvature and the open cell design. Furthermore the distal markers of the stent impeded coil extraction with a MERCI device.

  20. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2009-01-01

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro γ-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  1. Antimicrobial Effects of Helix D-derived Peptides of Human Antithrombin III*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix d-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense. PMID:25202017

  2. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 18 0 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  3. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish M; Rushinski J; Myatt L; Brooks A; Dahlgren F; Chrzanowski J; Reiersen W; Freudenberg K.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements

  4. Concentric Titled Double-Helix Dipole Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainer Meinke, Ph.D; Carl Goodzeit; Millicent Ball, Ph.D

    2003-01-01

    The high magnetic fields required for future accelerator magnets can only be achieved with Nb3Sn, other A15 or HTS type conductors, which are brittle and sensitive to mechanical strain. The traditional ''cosine-theta'' dipole configuration has intrinsic drawbacks that make it difficult and expensive to employ such conductors in these designs. Some of these problems involve (1) difficulty in applying enough pre-stress to counteract Lorentz forces without compromising conductor performance; (2) small minimum bend radii of the conductor necessitating the intricate wind-and-react coil fabrication; (3) complex spacers in particular for coil ends and expensive tooling for coil fabrication; (4) typically only 2/3 of the coil aperture can be used with achievable field uniformity

  5. DNA-like double helix formed by peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittung, P; Nielsen, Peter E.; Buchardt, O

    1994-01-01

    Although the importance of the nucleobases in the DNA double helix is well understood, the evolutionary significance of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone and the contribution of this chemical entity to the overall helical structure and stability of the double helix is not so clear. Peptide nucleic...

  6. Four signature motifs define the first class of structurally related large coiled-coil proteins in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Iris

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and yeast proteins containing long coiled-coil domains are involved in attaching other proteins to the large, solid-state components of the cell. One subgroup of long coiled-coil proteins are the nuclear lamins, which are involved in attaching chromatin to the nuclear envelope and have recently been implicated in inherited human diseases. In contrast to other eukaryotes, long coiled-coil proteins have been barely investigated in plants. Results We have searched the completed Arabidopsis genome and have identified a family of structurally related long coiled-coil proteins. Filament-like plant proteins (FPP were identified by sequence similarity to a tomato cDNA that encodes a coiled-coil protein which interacts with the nuclear envelope-associated protein, MAF1. The FPP family is defined by four novel unique sequence motifs and by two clusters of long coiled-coil domains separated by a non-coiled-coil linker. All family members are expressed in a variety of Arabidopsis tissues. A homolog sharing the structural features was identified in the monocot rice, indicating conservation among angiosperms. Conclusion Except for myosins, this is the first characterization of a family of long coiled-coil proteins in plants. The tomato homolog of the FPP family binds in a yeast two-hybrid assay to a nuclear envelope-associated protein. This might suggest that FPP family members function in nuclear envelope biology. Because the full Arabidopsis genome does not appear to contain genes for lamins, it is of interest to investigate other long coiled-coil proteins, which might functionally replace lamins in the plant kingdom.

  7. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-07-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  8. Disorder-induced transitions in resonantly driven Floquet topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titum, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel H.; Refael, Gil

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effects of disorder in Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) occurring in semiconductor quantum wells. Such FTIs are induced by resonantly driving a transition between the valence and conduction bands. We show that when disorder is added, the topological nature of such FTIs persists as long as there is a mobility gap at the resonant quasienergy. For strong enough disorder, this gap closes and all the states become localized as the system undergoes a transition to a trivial insulator. Interestingly, the effects of disorder are not necessarily adverse: we show that in the same quantum well, disorder can also induce a transition from a trivial to a topological system, thereby establishing a Floquet topological Anderson insulator (FTAI). We identify the conditions on the driving field necessary for observing such a transition.

  9. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  10. Nature of the Charged-Group Effect on the Stability of the C-Peptide Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kevin R.; Kim, Peter S.; Brems, David N.; Marqusee, Susan; York, Eunice J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Stewart, John M.; Baldwin, Robert L.

    1985-04-01

    The residues responsible for the pH-dependent stability of the helix formed by the isolated C-peptide (residues 1-13 of ribonuclease A) have been identified by chemical synthesis of analogues and measurement of their helix-forming properties. Each of the residues ionizing between pH 2 and pH 8 has been replaced separately by an uncharged residue. Protonation of Glu-2- is responsible for the sharp decrease in helix stability between pH 5 and pH 2, and deprotonation of His-12+ causes a similar decrease between pH 5 and pH 8. Glu-9- is not needed for helix stability. The results cannot be explained by the Zimm-Bragg model and host-guest data for α -helix formation, which predict that the stability of the C-peptide helix should increase when Glu-2- is protonated or when His-12+ is deprotonated. Moreover, histidine+ is a strong helix-breaker in host-guest studies. In proteins, acidic and basic residues tend to occur at opposite ends of α -helices: acidic residues occur preferentially near the NH2-terminal end and basic residues near the COOH-terminal end. A possible explanation, based on a helix dipole model, has been given [Blagdon, D. E. & Goodman, M. (1975) Biopolymers 14, 241-245]. Our results are consistent with the helix dipole model and they support the suggestion that the distribution of charged residues in protein helices reflects the helix-stabilizing propensity of those residues. Because Glu-9 is not needed for helix stability, a possible Glu-9-\\cdots His-12+ salt bridge does not contribute significantly to helix stability. The role of a possible Glu-2-\\cdots Arg-10+ salt bridge has not yet been evaluated. A charged-group effect on α -helix stability in water has also been observed in a different peptide system [Ihara, S., Ooi, T. & Takahashi, S. (1982) Biopolymers 21, 131-145]: block copolymers containing (Ala)20 and (Glu)20 show partial helix formation at low temperatures, pH 7.5, where the glutamic acid residues are ionized. (Glu)20(Ala)20Phe forms a

  11. On modular stellarator reactor coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modular twisted coils are discussed which produce magnetic fields of the Advanced Stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS type. Reducing the number coils/FP offers advantage for maintenance of coils, but increases the magnetic ripple and B m /B o . Computation of force densities within the coils of ASR and ASB yield local maximum values of about 80 and 180 MN/m 3 , respectively. A system of mutual coil support is being developed. Twisted coils in helical arrangement provide a reactor-sized HELIAC system. In order to reduce the magnetic ripple, a large number of 14 coils/FP in special arrangement is used

  12. TEXT poloidal coil systems power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, S.H.; Brower, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    TEXT is a convertional iron core tokamak which will have a toroidal field of 3.0 Tesla produced by room temperature copper coils and a maximum plasma current pulse of 400 kA induced by a 40 turn Ohmic Heating coil. The major radius is 100 cm and the minor radius of the plasma is 28 cm. The machine is intended for basic research in tokamak plasma physics and atomic physics and is designed primarily to provide a stable hot plasma, extremely good diagnostic access, and reliable operation. The discharge pulse length will be 300 msec and the repetition period 120 seconds. Power for the toroidal field coils and for the ohmic heating supply is provided by a 100 MVA energy storage alternator. The vertical field, horizontal field, fast positioning, and discharge cleaning power supply systems are powered from the Tokamak Laboratory power mains. The ohmic heating power system consists of an SCR controlled premagnetizing supply and commutation circuit, the main ohmic heating capacitor bank to provide plasma breakdown and current rise, and an SCR controlled power supply which sustains plasma current during the 300 ms pulse. The vertical field power system uses a small capacitor bank and an SCR controlled supply. The horizontal field has a reversible SCR controlled supply, and the fast positioning coils are powered by bipolar output transistor controlled supplies. This paper describes the loads, required wave forms, and the specifications for these power supply systems

  13. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this report uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take plae in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent. An example of the detector design is given for four coils with realistic parameters. The effect on accuracy of changes in the system parameters is discussed

  14. Radiation induced currents in mineral-insulated cables and in pick-up coils: model calculations and experimental verification in the BR1 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, Ludo; Leysen, Willem; Brichard, Benoit

    2018-01-01

    Mineral-insulated (MI) cables and Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) magnetic pick-up coils are intended to be installed in various position in ITER. The severe ITER nuclear radiation field is expected to lead to induced currents that could perturb diagnostic measurements. In order to assess this problem and to find mitigation strategies models were developed for the calculation of neutron-and gamma-induced currents in MI cables and in LTCC coils. The models are based on calculations with the MCNPX code, combined with a dedicated model for the drift of electrons stopped in the insulator. The gamma induced currents can be easily calculated with a single coupled photon-electron MCNPX calculation. The prompt neutron induced currents requires only a single coupled neutron-photon-electron MCNPX run. The various delayed neutron contributions require a careful analysis of all possibly relevant neutron-induced reaction paths and a combination of different types of MCNPX calculations. The models were applied for a specific twin-core copper MI cable, for one quad-core copper cable and for silver conductor LTCC coils (one with silver ground plates in order to reduce the currents and one without such silver ground plates). Calculations were performed for irradiation conditions (neutron and gamma spectra and fluxes) in relevant positions in ITER and in the Y3 irradiation channel of the BR1 reactor at SCK•CEN, in which an irradiation test of these four test devices was carried out afterwards. We will present the basic elements of the models and show the results of all relevant partial currents (gamma and neutron induced, prompt and various delayed currents) in BR1-Y3 conditions. Experimental data will be shown and analysed in terms of the respective contributions. The tests were performed at reactor powers of 350 kW and 1 MW, leading to thermal neutron fluxes of 1E11 n/cm2s and 3E11 n/cm2s, respectively. The corresponding total radiation induced currents are ranging from

  15. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H.; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W., E-mail: mcho@iastate.edu

    2016-03-15

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; {sup 671}NWFDITNWLWYIK{sup 683}) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-∆10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies. - Highlights: • Four gp41 MPER-based immunogens that resemble fusion intermediates were generated. • C-terminal region of MPER that contains 4E10/10E8 epitopes was highly immunogenic. • Altering 6HB structure can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER. • Induced antibodies targeted multiple residues critical for 4E10/10E8 binding. • Development of immunogens based on fusion intermediates is a promising strategy.

  16. "Special Issue": Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  17. Nanostructure of self-assembled rod-coil block copolymer films for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, T.; Adamopoulos, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Giovanella, U.; Ould-Saad, S.; Brochon, C.; Wetering, K. van de; Hadziioannou, G.

    2006-01-01

    The nanostructures of a series of rod-coil block copolymers, designed for photovoltaic applications, are studied by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The copolymers are composed of a semiconducting poly-p-phenylenevinylene rod with (2'-ethyl)-hexyloxy side chains and a functionalized coil block of various length and flexibility. Both, as deposited and annealed block copolymer films were investigated. The results show that highly ordered structures are only obtained if the coil block is characterized by a glass transition temperature which is significantly lower than the melting temperature of the alkyl side chains. For this material a high molecular mobility and strong driving force for crystallization of the rigid block can be achieved simultaneously. For the smallest coil to rod length ratio, we found a lamellar morphology with perpendicularly oriented lamellae with respect to the substrate. Electron diffraction data show the presence of a periodical molecular arrangement with a characteristic distance of 0.94 nm that is attributed to the distance between conjugated chains separated by the layers of alkyl sidechains

  18. Nanostructure of self-assembled rod-coil block copolymer films for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, T. [Institut d' Electronique du Solide et des Systemes (InESS), CNRS/ULP, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: Thomas.Heiser@iness.c-strasbourg.fr; Adamopoulos, G. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Polymeres pour les Hautes Technologies (LIPHT), Ecole Europeenne de Chimie Polymeres et Materiaux (ECPM), 25, rue Becquerel, F-67087 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Brinkmann, M. [Institut Charles Sadron (ICS), CNRS, 6, rue Boussingault, F-67083 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Giovanella, U. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Polymeres pour les Hautes Technologies (LIPHT), Ecole Europeenne de Chimie Polymeres et Materiaux (ECPM), 25, rue Becquerel, F-67087 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Ould-Saad, S. [Institut d' Electronique du Solide et des Systemes (InESS), CNRS/ULP, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Brochon, C. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Polymeres pour les Hautes Technologies (LIPHT), Ecole Europeenne de Chimie Polymeres et Materiaux (ECPM), 25, rue Becquerel, F-67087 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Wetering, K. van de [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Polymeres pour les Hautes Technologies (LIPHT), Ecole Europeenne de Chimie Polymeres et Materiaux (ECPM), 25, rue Becquerel, F-67087 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Hadziioannou, G. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Polymeres pour les Hautes Technologies (LIPHT), Ecole Europeenne de Chimie Polymeres et Materiaux (ECPM), 25, rue Becquerel, F-67087 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2006-07-26

    The nanostructures of a series of rod-coil block copolymers, designed for photovoltaic applications, are studied by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The copolymers are composed of a semiconducting poly-p-phenylenevinylene rod with (2'-ethyl)-hexyloxy side chains and a functionalized coil block of various length and flexibility. Both, as deposited and annealed block copolymer films were investigated. The results show that highly ordered structures are only obtained if the coil block is characterized by a glass transition temperature which is significantly lower than the melting temperature of the alkyl side chains. For this material a high molecular mobility and strong driving force for crystallization of the rigid block can be achieved simultaneously. For the smallest coil to rod length ratio, we found a lamellar morphology with perpendicularly oriented lamellae with respect to the substrate. Electron diffraction data show the presence of a periodical molecular arrangement with a characteristic distance of 0.94 nm that is attributed to the distance between conjugated chains separated by the layers of alkyl sidechains.

  19. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wei-Hsuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C. The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6

  20. Fine-tuning of protein domain boundary by minimizing potential coiled coil regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Unzai, Satoru; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tomii, Kentaro; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    Structural determination of individual protein domains isolated from multidomain proteins is a common approach in the post-genomic era. Novel and thus uncharacterized domains liberated from intact proteins often self-associate due to incorrectly defined domain boundaries. Self-association results in missing signals, poor signal dispersion and a low signal-to-noise ratio in 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra. We have found that a putative, non-canonical coiled coil region close to a domain boundary can cause transient hydrophobic self-association and monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution. Here we propose a rational method to predict putative coiled coil regions adjacent to the globular core domain using the program COILS. Except for the amino acid sequence, no preexisting knowledge concerning the domain is required. A small number of mutant proteins with a minimized coiled coil region have been rationally designed and tested. The engineered domains exhibit decreased self-association as assessed by 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra with improved peak dispersion and sharper cross peaks. Two successful examples of isolating novel N-terminal domains from AAA-ATPases are demonstrated. Our method is useful for the experimental determination of domain boundaries suited for structural genomics studies

  1. Fine-tuning of protein domain boundary by minimizing potential coiled coil regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Unzai, Satoru; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tomii, Kentaro; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    Structural determination of individual protein domains isolated from multidomain proteins is a common approach in the post-genomic era. Novel and thus uncharacterized domains liberated from intact proteins often self-associate due to incorrectly defined domain boundaries. Self-association results in missing signals, poor signal dispersion and a low signal-to-noise ratio in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra. We have found that a putative, non-canonical coiled coil region close to a domain boundary can cause transient hydrophobic self-association and monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution. Here we propose a rational method to predict putative coiled coil regions adjacent to the globular core domain using the program COILS. Except for the amino acid sequence, no preexisting knowledge concerning the domain is required. A small number of mutant proteins with a minimized coiled coil region have been rationally designed and tested. The engineered domains exhibit decreased self-association as assessed by (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with improved peak dispersion and sharper cross peaks. Two successful examples of isolating novel N-terminal domains from AAA-ATPases are demonstrated. Our method is useful for the experimental determination of domain boundaries suited for structural genomics studies.

  2. The effects of urea and n-propanol on collagen denaturation: using DSC, circular dicroism and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usha, R.; Ramasami, T.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of urea and n-propanol on circular dichroism (CD) and viscosity of purified type1 collagen solution at various temperatures and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of rat-tail tendon (RTT) collagen fibre have been studied. CD reveals a spectrum with a positive peak at around 220 nm and a negative peak at 200 nm characteristics of collagen triple helix. The molar ellipticity decreases as the concentration of urea increases up to particular concentration (collagen solution treated with 265 μM of urea) and after that it increases (collagen solution treated with 500 μM of urea). There is a linear decrease in molar ellipticity as the concentration of n-propanol increases. Denaturation temperature of urea and n-propanol treated with purified collagen solution has been studied using viscosity method. Additives such as urea and n-propanol decrease the thermal stability of collagen triple helix in solution and in RTT collagen fibre. Thermal helix to coil transition of urea and n-propanol treated collagen depends on the degree of hydration and the concentration of these additives. Thermodynamic parameters such as the peak temperature, enthalpy of activation, and energy of activation for collagen-gelatin transition for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibre has been calculated using DSC. The change in the thermodynamic parameters has been observed for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibres. The experimental results show that the change in the water structure, dehydration and desolvation induced by different additives such as urea and n-propanol on RTT may vary with the type of denaturation

  3. Performance of Process Damping in Machining Titanium Alloys at Low Cutting Speed with Different Helix Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaharun, M A; Yusoff, A R; Reza, M S; Jalal, K A

    2012-01-01

    Titanium is a strong, lustrous, corrosion-resistant and transition metal with a silver color to produce strong lightweight alloys for industrial process, automotive, medical instruments and other applications. However, it is very difficult to machine the titanium due to its poor machinability. When machining titanium alloys with the conventional tools, the wear rate of the tool is rapidly accelerate and it is generally difficult to achieve at high cutting speed. In order to get better understanding of machining titanium alloy, the interaction between machining structural system and the cutting process which result in machining instability will be studied. Process damping is a useful phenomenon that can be exploited to improve the limited productivity of low speed machining. In this study, experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of process damping of milling under different tool helix geometries. The results showed that the helix of 42° angle is significantly increase process damping performance in machining titanium alloy.

  4. Optically induced structural phase transitions in ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horak, Peter; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures, such as b......We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures...

  5. Immunogenicity of coiled-coil based drug-free macromolecular therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kverka, Miloslav; Hartley, J.M.; Chu, T.W.; Yang, J.; Heidchen, R.; Kopeček, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2014), s. 5886-5896 ISSN 1616-0177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Grant - others:NIH(US) GM095606 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : coiled-coil * enantiomers * HPMA copolymer Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  6. Active Protection of an MgB2 Test Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Keun; Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study, experimental and computational, of a detect-and-activate-the-heater protection technique applied to a magnesium diboride (MgB2) test coil operated in semi-persistent mode. The test coil with a winding ID of 25 cm and wound with ~500-m long reacted MgB2 wire was operated at 4.2 K immersed in a bath of liquid helium. In this active technique, upon the initiation of a “hot spot” of a length ~10 cm, induced by a “quench heater,” a “protection heater” (PH) of ~600-cm long planted within the test coil is activated. The normal zone created by the PH is large enough to absorb the test coil’s entire initial stored energy and still keeps the peak temperature within the winding below ~260 K. PMID:22081754

  7. Probing α-3(10) transitions in a voltage-sensing S4 helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Lacroix, Jérôme J; Bezanilla, Francisco; Correa, Ana M

    2014-09-02

    The S4 helix of voltage sensor domains (VSDs) transfers its gating charges across the membrane electrical field in response to changes of the membrane potential. Recent studies suggest that this process may occur via the helical conversion of the entire S4 between α and 310 conformations. Here, using LRET and FRET, we tested this hypothesis by measuring dynamic changes in the transmembrane length of S4 from engineered VSDs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results suggest that the native S4 from the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) does not exhibit extended and long-lived 310 conformations and remains mostly α-helical. Although the S4 of NavAb displays a fully extended 310 conformation in x-ray structures, its transplantation in the Ci-VSP VSD scaffold yielded similar results as the native Ci-VSP S4. Taken together, our study does not support the presence of long-lived extended α-to-310 helical conversions of the S4 in Ci-VSP associated with voltage activation. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Secondary structure of cell-penetrating peptides during interaction with fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zifan; Ikonomova, Svetlana P; Karlsson, Amy J

    2018-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are peptides that cross cell membranes, either alone or while carrying molecular cargo. Although their interactions with mammalian cells have been widely studied, much less is known about their interactions with fungal cells, particularly at the biophysical level. We analyzed the interactions of seven CPPs (penetratin, Pep-1, MPG, pVEC, TP-10, MAP, and cecropin B) with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans using experiments and molecular simulations. Circular dichroism (CD) of the peptides revealed a structural transition from a random coil or weak helix to an α-helix occurs for all peptides when the solvent is changed from aqueous to hydrophobic. However, CD performed in the presence of C. albicans cells showed that proximity to the cell membrane is not necessarily sufficient to induce this structural transition, as penetratin, Pep-1, and MPG did not display a structural shift in the presence of cells. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to further probe the molecular-level interaction with the cell membrane, and these simulations suggested that pVEC, TP-10, MAP, and cecropin B strongly penetrate into the hydrophobic domain of the membrane lipid bilayer, inducing a transition to an α-helical conformation. In contrast, penetratin, Pep-1 and MPG remained in the hydrophilic region without a shift in conformation. The experimental data and MC simulations combine to explain how peptide structure affects their interaction with cells and their mechanism of translocation into cells (direct translocation vs. endocytosis). Our work also highlights the utility of combining biophysical experiments, biological experiments, and molecular modeling to understand biological phenomena. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  9. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  10. Coil measurement data acquisition and curing press control system for SSC dipole magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A coil matching program, similar in theory to the methods used to match Tevatron coils, is being developed at Fermilab. Modulus of elasticity and absolute coil size will be determined at 18-inch intervals along the coils while in the coil curing press immediately following the curing process. A data acquisition system is under construction to automatically acquire and manage the large quantities of data that result. Data files will be transferred to Fermilab's VAX Cluster for long-term storage and actual coil matching. The data acquisition system will also provide the control algorithm for the curing press hydraulic system. A description of the SSC Curing Press Data Acquisition and Controls System will be reported. 20 figs

  11. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  12. Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

  13. Open coil traction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement.

  14. Identification of basic/helix-loop-helix transcription factors reveals candidate genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis from the strawberry white-flesh mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Fengli; Li, Gang; Hu, Panpan; Zhao, Xia; Li, Liangjie; Wei, Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Zhou, Houcheng

    2018-01-01

    As the second largest transcription factor family in plant, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor family, characterized by the conserved bHLH domain, plays a central regulatory role in many biological process. However, the bHLH transcription factor family of strawberry has not been systematically identified, especially for the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Here, we identified a total of 113 bHLH transcription factors and described their chromosomal distribution and bioinformatics...

  15. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Céspedes

    Full Text Available Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum were identified in the P. vivax genome. The peptides identified in silico were chemically synthesized; circular dichroism studies indicated partial or high α-helical content. Antigenicity was evaluated using human sera samples from malaria-endemic areas of Colombia and Papua New Guinea. Eight of these fragments were selected and used to assess immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. ELISA assays indicated strong reactivity of serum samples from individuals residing in malaria-endemic regions and sera of immunized mice, with the α-helical coiled coil structures. In addition, ex vivo production of IFN-γ by murine mononuclear cells confirmed the immunogenicity of these structures and the presence of T-cell epitopes in the peptide sequences. Moreover, sera of mice immunized with four of the eight antigens recognized native proteins on blood-stage P. vivax parasites, and antigenic cross-reactivity with three of the peptides was observed when reacted with both the P. falciparum orthologous fragments and whole parasites. Results here point to the α-helical coiled coil peptides as possible P. vivax malaria vaccine candidates as were observed for P. falciparum. Fragments selected here warrant further study in humans and non-human primate models to assess their protective efficacy as single components or assembled as hybrid linear epitopes.

  16. Constitutive Overexpression of the Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Nex1/MATH-2 Transcription Factor Promotes Neuronal Differentiation of PC12 Cells and Neurite Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of the intricate transcriptional pathways leading to neural differentiation and the establishment of neuronal identity is critical to the understanding and design of therapeutic approaches. Among the important players, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors have been found to be pivotal regulators of neurogenesis. In this study, we investigate the role of the bHLH differentiation factor Nex1/MATH-2 in conjunction with the nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling pathway using the rat phenochromocytoma PC12 cell line. We report that the expression of Nex1 protein is induced after 5 hr of NGF treatment and reaches maximal levels at 24 hr, when very few PC12 cells have begun extending neurites and ceased cell division. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that Nex1 has the ability to trigger neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells in the absence of neurotrophic factor. We show that Nex1 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth and has the capacity to regenerate neurite outgrowth in the absence of NGF. These results are corroborated by the fact that Nex1 targets a repertoire of distinct types of genes associated with neuronal differentiation, such as GAP-43, βIII-tubulin, and NeuroD. In addition, our findings show that Nex1 up-regulates the expression of the mitotic inhibitor p21WAF1, thus linking neuronal differentiation to cell cycle withdrawal. Finally, our studies show that overexpression of a Nex1 mutant has the ability to block the execution of NGF-induced differentiation program, suggesting that Nex1 may be an important effector of the NGF signaling pathway. PMID:11782967

  17. Thermally induced morphological transition of silver fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey; Kébaili, Nouari

    2014-01-01

    We present both experimental and theoretical study of thermally induced morphological transition of silver nanofractals. Experimentally, those nanofractals formed from deposition and diffusion of preformed silver clusters on cleaved graphite surfaces exhibit dendritic morphologies that are highly...... sensitive to any perturbation, particularly caused by temperature. We analyze and characterize the morphological transition both in time and temperature using the recently developed Monte Carlo simulation approach for the description of nanofractal dynamics and compare the obtained results...

  18. Split coil made of (RE)BCO pancake coils for IC(B) anisotropy measurements of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolek, L; Pardo, E; Gömöry, F; Šouc, J; Pitel, J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the I c (B) anisotropy is standard characterization of superconducting tapes, wires or cables. This contribution presents a split coil consisting on two superconducting pancake coils in order to generate the magnetic field necessary for this kind of measurement. Both coils were made using (RE)BCO – based second generation (2G) coated conductor tape with cross section 0.1 mm × 12 mm. The individual turns of the tape were insulated by a fiberglass tape without impregnation. These coils have identical inner and outer diameter and number of turns. Their inner and outer diameters are 50 mm and 80 mm, respectively, and they have 62 turns. The length of conductor in each coil is approximately 13 m. The distance between both pancake coils is 22 mm. Individual coils and the complete split coil were characterized in liquid nitrogen bath. Their parameters, like the critical currents, E(I) characteristics and magnetic field of complete split coil, were measured and interpreted. The split coil can be used up to magnetic fields of 210 mT. The length between the potential taps on the sample can be up to 20 mm, while the magnetic field decrease is lower than 1% on this length.

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: Improved coil design for deep brain investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, L. J.; Marketos, P.; Williams, P. I.; Melikhov, Y.; Jiles, D. C.; Starzewski, J. H.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports on a design for a coil for transcranial magnetic stimulation. The design shows potential for improving the penetration depth of the magnetic field, allowing stimulation of subcortical structures within the brain. The magnetic and induced electric fields in the human head have been calculated with finite element electromagnetic modeling software and compared with empirical measurements. Results show that the coil design used gives improved penetration depth, but also indicates the likelihood of stimulation of additional tissue resulting from the spatial distribution of the magnetic field.

  20. Alternative power supply and dump resistor connections for similar, mutually coupled, superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Alternative methods of connecting similar mutually coupled coils to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for both operating and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the currents induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, combined resistors and series and parallel dump resistors. A new circuit that contains ''coupling'' resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed. The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are used as an example

  1. Alternative power supply and dump resistor connections for similar, mutally coupled, superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Alternative methods of connecting similar mutually coupled coils to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for both operating and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the currents induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, combined resistors and series and parallel dump resistors. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed. The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are used as an example

  2. Effects of Slip Planes on Stresses in MICE Coupling Solenoid Coil Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Cheng, Y.; Green, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The MICE superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm at room temperature. The coil is to be wound on a mandrel made of aluminum. The peak magnetic field on the conductor is about 7.3 T when fully charged at 210 A. High magnetic field and large size make the stress inside the coupling coil assembly relatively high during cool down and full energizing. The shear stress between coil winding and aluminum casing may cause premature quench. To avoid quench potential induced by stress, slip planes were designed for the coil assembly. In this paper, FE models with and without slip planes for it have been developed to simulate the stresses during the process including winding, cooling down and charging. The stress distribution in the coil assembly with and without slip planes was investigated. The results show that slip planes with low friction coefficients can improve the stress condition in the coil, especially reduce the shear stress largely so that improve the stability.

  3. Alternative generation of well-aligned uniform lying helix texture in a cholesteric liquid crystal cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hua Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates a simple approach for obtaining a well-aligned uniform lying helix (ULH texture and a tri-bistable feature at ambient temperature in a typical 90°-twisted cell filled with a short-pitch cholesteric liquid crystal. This ULH texture is obtained at room temperature from initially field-induced helix-free homeotropic state by gradually decreasing the applied voltage. Depending on the way and rate of reducing the voltage, three stable states (i.e., Grandjean planar, focal conic, and ULH are generated and switching between any two of them is realized. Moreover, the electrical operation of the cell in the ULH state enables the tunability in phase retardation via the deformation of the ULH. The observations made in this work may be useful for applications such as tunable phase modulators and energy-efficient photonic devices.

  4. The coiled coil motif in polymer drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2013), s. 90-96 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0543; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : coiled coil * hydrophilic polymer * recombinant protein Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.905, year: 2013

  5. Antimicrobial effects of helix D-derived peptides of human antithrombin III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-10-24

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix D-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. A new type of coil structure called pan-shaped coil of wireless charging system based on magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z. K.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Liang, L. H.; Cui, S.

    2017-11-01

    The problem that misalignment between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil significantly impairs the transmission power and efficiency of the system has been attached more and more attention. In order to improve the uniformity of the magnetic field between the two coils to solve this problem, a new type of coil called pan-shaped coil is proposed. Three-dimension simulation models of the planar-core coil and the pan-shaped coil are established using Ansoft Maxwell software. The coupling coefficient between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil is obtained by simulating the magnetic field with the receiving coil misalignment or not. And the maximum percentage difference strength along the radial direction which is defined as the magnetic field uniformity factor is calculated. According to the simulation results of the two kinds of coil structures, it is found that the new type of coil structure can obviously improve the uniformity of the magnetic field, coupling coefficient and power transmission properties between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil.

  7. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  8. The local phase transitions of the solvent in the neighborhood of a solvophobic polymer at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budkov, Yu. A., E-mail: urabudkov@rambler.ru [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vyalov, I. I. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Kolesnikov, A. L. [Ivanovo State University, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Institut für Nichtklassische Chemie e.V., Universitat Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Georgi, N., E-mail: bancocker@mail.ru [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Chuev, G. N. [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Science, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kiselev, M. G. [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-28

    We investigate local phase transitions of the solvent in the neighborhood of a solvophobic polymer chain which is induced by a change of the polymer-solvent repulsion and the solvent pressure in the bulk solution. We describe the polymer in solution by the Edwards model, where the conditional partition function of the polymer chain at a fixed radius of gyration is described by a mean-field theory. The contributions of the polymer-solvent and the solvent-solvent interactions to the total free energy are described within the mean-field approximation. We obtain the total free energy of the solution as a function of the radius of gyration and the average solvent number density within the gyration volume. The resulting system of coupled equations is solved varying the polymer-solvent repulsion strength at high solvent pressure in the bulk. We show that the coil-globule (globule-coil) transition occurs accompanied by a local solvent evaporation (condensation) within the gyration volume.

  9. The transition time induced narrow linewidth of the electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Luming; Peng Xiang; Liu Cheng; Guo Hong; Chen Xuzong

    2004-01-01

    We observed a narrow linewidth (∼60 kHz) in a Doppler-broadened system showing electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium atomic vapour. The transition time induced reduction of the linewidth is illustrated both theoretically and experimentally

  10. Nucleic acid helix structure determination from NMR proton chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werf, Ramon M. van der; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S., E-mail: S.Wijmenga@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Molecules and Materials (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    We present a method for de novo derivation of the three-dimensional helix structure of nucleic acids using non-exchangeable proton chemical shifts as sole source of experimental restraints. The method is called chemical shift de novo structure derivation protocol employing singular value decomposition (CHEOPS) and uses iterative singular value decomposition to optimize the structure in helix parameter space. The correct performance of CHEOPS and its range of application are established via an extensive set of structure derivations using either simulated or experimental chemical shifts as input. The simulated input data are used to assess in a defined manner the effect of errors or limitations in the input data on the derived structures. We find that the RNA helix parameters can be determined with high accuracy. We finally demonstrate via three deposited RNA structures that experimental proton chemical shifts suffice to derive RNA helix structures with high precision and accuracy. CHEOPS provides, subject to further development, new directions for high-resolution NMR structure determination of nucleic acids.

  11. Performance evaluation of matrix gradient coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Schultz, Gerrit; Testud, Frederik; Welz, Anna Masako; Weber, Hans; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new performance measure of a matrix coil (also known as multi-coil) from the perspective of efficient, local, non-linear encoding without explicitly considering target encoding fields. An optimization problem based on a joint optimization for the non-linear encoding fields is formulated. Based on the derived objective function, a figure of merit of a matrix coil is defined, which is a generalization of a previously known resistive figure of merit for traditional gradient coils. A cylindrical matrix coil design with a high number of elements is used to illustrate the proposed performance measure. The results are analyzed to reveal novel features of matrix coil designs, which allowed us to optimize coil parameters, such as number of coil elements. A comparison to a scaled, existing multi-coil is also provided to demonstrate the use of the proposed performance parameter. The assessment of a matrix gradient coil profits from using a single performance parameter that takes the local encoding performance of the coil into account in relation to the dissipated power.

  12. Quench detector for large pulsed coils and quench analysis for the LASL/Westinghouse 20 MJ coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessy, M.J.; Heintz, A.W.; Eckels, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A detection scheme has been devised for use in the test of the 20 Mj Induction Heating Coil. This scheme allows the sensing of plus or minus voltages less than 320 mv resistive in magnitude in coils which will have inductive voltage components as high as /plus or minus/2.5 kv. The network which achieves this sensitivity is stable to less than 12.8 ppm. This method adopted involves the bucking out of the inductive voltage with two secondary co-wound flux sensing coils tapped at locations adjacent to voltage taps in the main superconducting coil. The detection scheme is recommended if large ripple or control voltages exist subsequent to the coil pulse. The most severe event which might quench the coil and/or damage the winding is exposure of the coil to gaseous cooling through lack of proper liquid level control. The detection scheme will protect the coil against this and other abnormal conditions that could damage the coil

  13. Persistent current analysis of superconducting coils in a linear synchronous motor for maglev passenger transport system. Fujoshiki tetsudoyo linear doki motor ni okeru teijisoku mode chodendo coil denryu no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azusawa, T [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-05-20

    The simple analysis method of persistent current induced in on-board superconducting coils was proposed for the vehicle of a superconducting magnetically-suspended train which is running in the magnetic field generated by armature coil current of a linear synchronous motor installed along a guideway, and the performance of the method is discussed through calculation based on typical models. As fluctuation of persistent current due to running was calculated with various parameter values under a normal running condition, fluctuation of persistent current induced was less then 1% of an initial magnetomotive force, having no adverse effect on the stability and reliability of superconducting magnets. Electromagnetic forces under a normal running condition could be predicted accurately enough by relatively easy-to-calculate constant current mode analysis. Double-layered armature coils were preferred to single-layered ones to enhance the stability of superconducting magnets by reducing fluctuation of persistent current. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Noise-induced transition in a quantum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Barik, Debashis [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ray, Deb Shankar [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2005-07-04

    We examine the noise-induced transition in a fluctuating bistable potential of a driven quantum system in thermal equilibrium. Making use of a Wigner canonical thermal distribution for description of the statistical properties of the thermal bath, we explore the generic effects of quantization like vacuum field fluctuation and tunneling in the characteristic stationary probability distribution functions undergoing transition from unimodal to bimodal nature and in signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the cooperative effect among the noise processes and the weak periodic signal.

  15. Noise-induced transition in a quantum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2005-01-01

    We examine the noise-induced transition in a fluctuating bistable potential of a driven quantum system in thermal equilibrium. Making use of a Wigner canonical thermal distribution for description of the statistical properties of the thermal bath, we explore the generic effects of quantization like vacuum field fluctuation and tunneling in the characteristic stationary probability distribution functions undergoing transition from unimodal to bimodal nature and in signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the cooperative effect among the noise processes and the weak periodic signal

  16. Laser induced single-crystal transition in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Foti, G.; Rimini, E.

    1978-01-01

    Transition to single crystal of polycrystalline Si material underlying a Si crystal substrate of 100 orientation was obtained via laser irradiation. The changes in the structure were analyzed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and by channeling effect technique using 2.0 MeV He Rutherford scattering. The power density required to induce the transition in a 4500 A thick polycrystalline layer is about 70 MW/cm 2 (50ns). The corresponding amorphous to single transition has a threshold of about 45 MW/cm 2 . (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  17. Relating the variation of secondary structure of gelatin at fish oil-water interface to adsorption kinetics, dynamic interfacial tension and emulsion stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huihua; Wang, Bo; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relationship between secondary structure of gelatin and its adsorption at the fish-oil/water interface and to quantify the implication of the adsorption on the dynamic interfacial tension (DST) and emulsion stability. The surface hydrophobicity of the gelatin solutions decreased when the pH increased from 4.0 to 6.0, while opposite tend was observed in the viscosity of the solution. The DST values decreased as the pH increased from 4.0 to 6.0, indicating that higher positive charges (measured trough zeta potential) in the gelatin solution tended to result in higher DST values. The adsorption kinetics of the gelatin solution was examined through the calculated diffusion coefficients (Deff). The addition of acid promoted the random coil and β-turn structures at the expense of α-helical structure. The addition of NaOH decreased the β-turn and increased the α-helix and random coil. The decrease in the random coil and triple helix structures in the gelatin solution resulted into increased Deff values. The highest diffusion coefficients, the highest emulsion stability and the lowest amount of random coil and triple helix structures were observed at pH=4.8. The lowest amount of random coil and triple helix structures in the interfacial protein layer correlated with the highest stability of the emulsion (highest ESI value). The lower amount of random coil and triple helix structures allowed higher coverage of the oil-water interface by relatively highly ordered secondary structure of gelatin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On the origins of the weak folding cooperativity of a designed ββα ultrafast protein FSD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2010-11-18

    FSD-1, a designed small ultrafast folder with a ββα fold, has been actively studied in the last few years as a model system for studying protein folding mechanisms and for testing of the accuracy of computational models. The suitability of this protein to describe the folding of naturally occurring α/β proteins has recently been challenged based on the observation that the melting transition is very broad, with ill-resolved baselines. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the AMBER protein force field (ff96) coupled with the implicit solvent model (IGB = 5), we shed new light into the nature of this transition and resolve the experimental controversies. We show that the melting transition corresponds to the melting of the protein as a whole, and not solely to the helix-coil transition. The breadth of the folding transition arises from the spread in the melting temperatures (from ∼325 K to ∼302 K) of the individual transitions: formation of the hydrophobic core, β-hairpin and tertiary fold, with the helix formed earlier. Our simulations initiated from an extended chain accurately predict the native structure, provide a reasonable estimate of the transition barrier height, and explicitly demonstrate the existence of multiple pathways and multiple transition states for folding. Our exhaustive sampling enables us to assess the quality of the Amber ff96/igb5 combination and reveals that while this force field can predict the correct native fold, it nonetheless overstabilizes the α-helix portion of the protein (Tm = ∼387K) as well as the denatured structures.

  19. Solid-solid phase transitions in Fe nanowires induced by axial strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2009-01-01

    By means of classical molecular-dynamics simulations we investigate the solid-solid phase transition from a bcc to a close-packed crystal structure in cylindrical iron nanowires, induced by axial strain. The interatomic potential employed has been shown to be capable of describing the martensite-austenite phase transition in iron. We study the stress versus strain curves for different temperatures and show that for a range of temperatures it is possible to induce a solid-solid phase transition by axial strain before the elasticity is lost; these transition temperatures are below the bulk transition temperature. The two phases have different (non-linear) elastic behavior: the bcc phase softens, while the close-packed phase stiffens with temperature. We also consider the reversibility of the transformation in the elastic regimes, and the role of the strain rate on the critical strain necessary for phase transition.

  20. Supporting device for Toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the response of a toroidal coil supporting device upon earthquakes and improve the earthquake proofness in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Constitution: Structural materials having large longitudinal modulus and enduring great stresses, for example, stainless steels are used as the toroidal coil supporting legs and heat insulating structural materials are embedded in a nuclear reactor base mats below the supporting legs. Furthermore, heat insulating concretes are spiked around the heat insulating structural materials to prevent the intrusion of heat to the toroidal coils. The toroidal coils are kept at cryogenic state and superconductive state for the conductors. In this way, the period of proper vibrations of the toroidal coils and the toroidal coil supporting structures can be shortened thereby decreasing the seismic response. Furthermore, since the strength of the supporting legs is increased, the earthquake proofness of the coils can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  2. Genome-wide identification of basic helix-loop-helix and NF-1 motifs underlying GR binding sites in male rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pooley, John R.; Flynn, Ben P.; Grøntved, Lars

    2017-01-01

    linked to structural and organizational roles, an absence of major tethering partners for GRs, and little or no evidence for binding at negative glucocorticoid response elements. A basic helix-loop-helix motif closely resembling a NeuroD1 or Olig2 binding site was found underlying a subset of GR binding......Glucocorticoids regulate hippocampal function in part by modulating gene expression through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GR binding is highly cell type specific, directed to accessible chromatin regions established during tissue differentiation. Distinct classes of GR binding sites...

  3. Thermo hydraulic and quench propagation characteristics of SST-1 TF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.N., E-mail: ansharma@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Pradhan, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Duchateau, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Khristi, Y.; Prasad, U.; Doshi, K.; Varmora, P.; Patel, D.; Tanna, V.L. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Details of SST-1 TF coils, CICC. • Details of SST-1 TF coil cold test. • Quench analysis of TF magnet. • Flow changes following quench. • Predictive analysis of assembled magnet system. - Abstract: SST-1 toroidal field (TF) magnet system is comprising of sixteen superconducting modified ‘D’ shaped TF coils. During single coil test campaigns spanning from June 10, 2010 till January 24, 2011; the electromagnetic, thermal hydraulic and mechanical performances of each TF magnet have been qualified at its respective nominal operating current of 10,000 A in either two-phase or supercritical helium cooling conditions. During the current charging experiments, few quenches have initiated either as a consequence of irrecoverable normal zones or being induced in some of the TF magnets. Quench evolution in the TF coils have been analyzed in detail in order to understand the thermal hydraulic and quench propagation characteristics of the SST-1 TF magnets. The same were also simulated using 1D code Gandalf. This paper elaborates the details of the analyses and the quench simulation results. A predictive quench propagation analysis of 16 assembled TF magnets system has also been reported in this paper.

  4. Fifty years of coiled-coils and alpha-helical bundles: a close relationship between sequence and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, David A D; Fraser, R D Bruce; Squire, John M

    2008-09-01

    alpha-Helical coiled coils are remarkable for the diversity of related conformations that they adopt in both fibrous and globular proteins, and for the range of functions that they exhibit. The coiled coils are based on a heptad (7-residue), hendecad (11-residue) or a related quasi-repeat of apolar residues in the sequences of the alpha-helical regions involved. Most of these, however, display one or more sequence discontinuities known as stutters or stammers. The resulting coiled coils vary in length, in the number of chains participating, in the relative polarity of the contributing alpha-helical regions (parallel or antiparallel), and in the pitch length and handedness of the supercoil (left- or right-handed). Functionally, the concept that a coiled coil can act only as a static rod is no longer valid, and the range of roles that these structures have now been shown to exhibit has expanded rapidly in recent years. An important development has been the recognition that the delightful simplicity that exists between sequence and structure, and between structure and function, allows coiled coils with specialized features to be designed de novo.

  5. Involvement of Na,K-pump in SEPYLRFamide-mediated reduction of cholinosensitivity in Helix neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarov, Arkady S; Foreman, Richard C; Walker, Robert J

    2007-02-01

    SEPYLRFamide acts as an inhibitory modulator of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in Helix lucorum neurones. Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of Na,K-pump, (0.1 mM, bath application) decreased the ACh-induced inward current (ACh-current) and increased the leak current. Ouabain decreased the modulatory SEPYLRFamide effect on the ACh-current. There was a correlation between the effects of ouabain on the amplitude of the ACh-current and on the modulatory peptide effect. Ouabain and SEPYLRFamide inhibited the activity of Helix aspersa brain Na,K-ATPase. Activation of Na,K-pump by intracellular injection of 3 M Na acetate or 3 M NaCl reduced the modulatory peptide effect on the ACh-current. An inhibitor of Na/Ca-exchange, benzamil (25 muM, bath application), and an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-pump in the endoplasmic reticulum, thapsigargin (TG, applied intracellularly), both prevented the effect of ouabain on SEPYLRFamide-mediated modulatory effect. Another inhibitor of Ca(2+)-pump in the endoplasmic reticulum, cyclopiazonic acid (applied intracellularly), did not prevent the effect of ouabain on SEPYLRFamide-mediated modulatory effect. These results indicate that Na,K-pump is responsible for the SEPYLRFamide-mediated inhibition of ACh receptors in Helix neurons. Na/Ca-exchange and intracellular Ca(2+) released from internal pools containing TG-sensitive Ca(2+)-pump are involved in the Na,K-pump pathway for the SEPYLRFamide-mediated inhibition of ACh receptors.

  6. Flux Redux: The Spinning Coil Comes around Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Daniel; Dietz, Eric; Zou, Xueli; Ard, Christopher; Lee, Jaydie; Kaneshiro, Chris; Blanton, Robert; Sun, Steven

    2017-01-01

    An essential laboratory exercise for our lower-division electromagnetism course involves the measurement of Earth's local magnetic field from the emf induced in a rotating coil of wire. Although many methods exist for the measurement of Earth's field, this one gives our students some practical experience with Faraday's law. The apparatus we had…

  7. Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model: Setting the Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  8. Hypoxia activates muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein (MURC) expression via transforming growth factor-β in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Kou-Gi; Cheng, Wen-Pin; Wang, Bao-Wei; Chang, Hang

    2014-03-01

    The expression of MURC (muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein), a hypertrophy-regulated gene, increases during pressure overload. Hypoxia can cause myocardial hypertrophy; however, how hypoxia affects the regulation of MURC in cardiomyocytes undergoing hypertrophy is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that hypoxia induces MURC expression in cardiomyocytes during hypertrophy. The expression of MURC was evaluated in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in an in vivo model of AMI (acute myocardial infarction) to induce myocardial hypoxia in adult rats. MURC protein and mRNA expression were significantly enhanced by hypoxia. MURC proteins induced by hypoxia were significantly blocked after the addition of PD98059 or ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) siRNA 30 min before hypoxia. Gel-shift assay showed increased DNA-binding activity of SRF (serum response factor) after hypoxia. PD98059, ERK siRNA and an anti-TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) antibody abolished the SRF-binding activity enhanced by hypoxia or exogenous administration of TGF-β. A luciferase promoter assay demonstrated increased transcriptional activity of SRF in cardiomyocytes by hypoxia. Increased βMHC (β-myosin heavy chain) and BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) protein expression and increased protein synthesis was identified after hypoxia with the presence of MURC in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. MURC siRNA inhibited the hypertrophic marker protein expression and protein synthesis induced by hypoxia. AMI in adult rats also demonstrated increased MURC protein expression in the left ventricular myocardium. In conclusion, hypoxia in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes increased MURC expression via the induction of TGF-β, SRF and the ERK pathway. These findings suggest that MURC plays a role in hypoxia-induced hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes.

  9. Determination of melting curves of irradiated DNA preparations and of preparations isolated from irradiated calf lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowska, B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of melting curves enabled to establish differences of melting temperature, hyperchromic effect and breadth of the helix - coil phase transition dependent on dose of the ionizing radiation applied and on kind of the irradiated object. Changes of the investigated parameters of DNA irradiated after isolation were detectably more pronounced that of DNA from irradiated lymph nodes. The obtained results suggest a protective role of tissue to the secondary structure of DNA. (author)

  10. The normal zone propagation in ATLAS B00 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The B00 model coil has been successfully tested in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility at CERN. The coil consists of two double pancakes wound with aluminum stabilized cables of the barrel- and end-cap toroids conductors for the ATLAS detector. The magnet current is applied up to 24 kA and quenches are induced by firing point heaters. The normal zone velocity is measured over a wide range of currents by using pickup coils, voltage taps and superconducting quench detectors. The signals coming from various sensors are presented and analyzed. The results extracted from the various detection methods are in good agreement. It is found that the characteristic velocities vary from 5 to 20 m/s at 15 and 24 kA respectively. In addition, the minimum quench energies at different applied magnet currents are presented. (6 refs).

  11. Net (ERP/SAP2) one of the Ras-inducible TCFs, has a novel inhibitory domain with resemblance to the helix-loop-helix motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maira, S M; Wurtz, J M; Wasylyk, B

    1996-11-01

    The three ternary complex factors (TCFs), Net (ERP/ SAP-2), ELK-1 and SAP-1, are highly related ets oncogene family members that participate in the response of the cell to Ras and growth signals. Understanding the different roles of these factors will provide insights into how the signals result in coordinate regulation of the cell. We show that Net inhibits transcription under basal conditions, in which SAP-1a is inactive and ELK-1 stimulates. Repression is mediated by the NID, the Net Inhibitory Domain of about 50 amino acids, which autoregulates the Net protein and also inhibits when it is isolated in a heterologous fusion protein. Net is particularly sensitive to Ras activation. Ras activates Net through the C-domain, which is conserved between the three TCFs, and the NID is an efficient inhibitor of Ras activation. The NID, as well as more C-terminal sequences, inhibit DNA binding. Net is more refractory to DNA binding than the other TCFs, possibly due to the presence of multiple inhibitory elements. The NID may adopt a helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure, as evidenced by homology to other HLH motifs, structure predictions, model building and mutagenesis of critical residues. The sequence resemblance with myogenic factors suggested that Net may form complexes with the same partners. Indeed, we found that Net can interact in vivo with the basic HLH factor, E47. We propose that Net is regulated at the level of its latent DNA-binding activity by protein interactions and/or phosphorylation. Net may form complexes with HLH proteins as well as SRF on specific promotor sequences. The identification of the novel inhibitory domain provides a new inroad into exploring the different roles of the ternary complex factors in growth control and transformation.

  12. FMRFamide receptors of Helix aspersa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payza, K.

    1988-01-01

    A receptor binding assay and an isolated heart bioassay were used to identify and characterize the FMRFamide receptors in Helix. In the heart bioassay, FMRFamide increased myocardial contraction force. A potent FMRFamide analog, desaminoTyr-Phe-norLeu-arg-Phe-amide (daYFnLRFamide), was used as a radioiodinated receptor ligand. The high affinity binding of 125 I-daYFnLRFamide at 0 degree C to Helix brain membranes was reversible, saturable, pH-dependent and specific, with a K D of 13-14 nM. A lower affinity (245 nM) site was also observed. Radioligand binding sites were also identified in the heart, male reproductive organs and digestive organs. The structure-activity relations (SAR) of cardiostimulation correlated with the specificity of 125 I-daYFnLRFamide binding to brain and heart receptors. The SAR were similar to those of other molluscan FMRFamide bioassays, except that they showed a marked preference for some analogs with blocked amino-terminals

  13. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T.; Salzwedel, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of

  14. Crosslinked Aspartic Acids as Helix-Nucleating Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Qi-Song; Geng, Hao; Tian, Yuan; Cheng, Min; Jiang, Yan-Hong; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Niu, Xiao-Gang; Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Lao, Yuan-Zhi; Wu, Yun-Dong; Xu, Nai-Han; Li, Zi-Gang

    2016-09-19

    Described is a facile helix-nucleating template based on a tethered aspartic acid at the N-terminus [terminal aspartic acid (TD)]. The nucleating effect of the template is subtly influenced by the substituent at the end of the side-chain-end tether as indicated by circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations. Unlike most nucleating strategies, the N-terminal amine is preserved, thus enabling further modification. Peptidomimetic estrogen receptor modulators (PERMs) constructed using this strategy show improved therapeutic properties. The current strategy can be regarded as a good complement to existing helix-stabilizing methods. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Versatile fill coils: initial experience as framing coils for oblong aneurysms. A technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Toshiya; Bain, Mark; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2014-01-01

    Coil embolization of oblong aneurysms is difficult because the majority of commercially available coils are manufactured with a helical or spherical tertiary structure. While adopting framing strategies for oblong aneurysms (aspect ratio ≥ 2: 1), traditional coils may be undersized in the long axis but oversized in the short axis, resulting in increased aneurysmal wall stress, risk of re-rupture, and difficulty creating a basket that respects the aneurysmal neck. We review three cases in which versatile filling coils (VFCs) were used as the initial coils for embolization of oblong aneurysms and report coil distribution characteristics and clinical outcomes. Packing density after VFC implantation was assessed using the software AngioSuite-Neuro edition and AngioCalc. a 58-year-old woman experienced a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm (7.5 mm × 3.5 mm). A 3-6 mm × 15 cm VFC was selected as the first coil because the flexibility of its wave-loop structure facilitates framing of an irregularly shaped aneurysm. The loop portions of the structures tend to be pressed to the extremes of the aneurysmal sac by the wave component. The VFC was introduced smoothly into the aneurysmal sac without catheter kickback. We were then able to insert detachable filling coils without any adjunctive technique and achieved complete occlusion. Complete occlusion without severe complications was achieved in all three cases in our study. Average packing density after the first coil was 15.63%. VFC coils may have a specific role in framing oblong aneurysms given their complex loop-wave design, allowing spacing of the coils at the dome and neck while keeping sac stress to a minimum.

  16. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  17. The IEA Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, D.S.; Klose, W.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A multinational program of cooperative research, development, demonstrations, and exchanges of information on superconducting magnets for fusion was initiated in 1977 under an IEA agreement. The first major step in the development of TF magnets was called the Large Coil Task. Participants in LCT were the U.S. DOE, EURATOM, JAERI, and the Departement Federal de l'Interieur of Switzerland. The goals of LCT were to obtain experimental data, to demonstrate reliable operation of large superconducting coils, and to prove design principles and fabrication techniques being considered for the toroidal magnets of thermonuclear reactors. These goals were to be accomplished through coordinated but largely independent design, development, and construction of six test coils, followed by collaborative testing in a compact toroidal test array at fields of 8 T and higher. Under the terms of the IEA Agreement, the United States built and operated the test facility at Oak Ridge and provided three test coils. The other participants provided one coil each. Information on design and manufacturing and all test data were shared by all. The LCT team of each participant included a government laboratory and industrial partners or contractors. The last coil was completed in 1985, and the test assembly was completed in October of that year. Over the next 23 months, the six-coil array was cooled down and extensive testing was performed. Results were gratifying, as tests achieved design-point performance and well beyond. (Each coil reached a peak field of 9 T.) Experiments elucidated coil behavior, delineated limits of operability, and demonstrated coil safety. (orig./KP)

  18. Artefacts induced by coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla versus 1.5-Tesla MR angiography—An in vivo and in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D., E-mail: j.d.schaafsma@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Neurology, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Centre, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Velthuis, Birgitta K., E-mail: b.k.velthuis@umcutrecht.nl [Imaging Division, University Medical Centre, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: koen@isi.uu.nl [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Centre, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Kort, Gerard A.P. de, E-mail: g.a.p.dekort@umcutrecht.nl [Imaging Division, University Medical Centre, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Rinkel, Gabriel J.E., E-mail: g.j.e.rinkel@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Neurology, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Centre, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W., E-mail: w.bartels@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Centre, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: To compare metal-induced artefacts from coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla and 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), since concerns persist on artefact enlargement at 3.0 Tesla. Materials and methods: We scanned 19 patients (mean age 53; 16 women) with 20 saccular aneurysms treated with coils only, at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla according to standard clinical 3D TOF-MRA protocols containing a shorter echo-time but weaker read-out gradient at 3.0 Tesla in addition to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). Per modality two neuro-radiologists assessed the occlusion status, measured residual flow, and indicated whether coil artefacts disturbed this assessment on MRA. We assessed relative risks for disturbance by coil artefacts, weighted kappa's for agreement on occlusion levels, and we compared remnant sizes. For artefact measurements, a coil model was created and scanned with the same protocols followed by 2D MR scans with variation of echo-time and read-out gradient strength. Results: Coil artefacts disturbed assessments less frequently at 3.0 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla (RR: 0.3; 95%CI: 0.1–0.8). On 3.0-Tesla MRA, remnants were larger than on 1.5-Tesla MRA (difference: 0.7 mm; 95%CI: 0.3–1.1) and larger than on IA-DSA (difference: 1.0 mm; 95%CI: 0.6–1.5) with similar agreement on occlusion levels with IA-DSA for both field strengths (κ 0.53; 95%CI: 0.23–0.84 for 1.5-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA; κ 0.47; 95%CI: 0.19–0.76 for 3.0-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA). Coil model artefacts were smaller at 3.0 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla. The echo-time influenced artefact size more than the read-out gradient. Conclusions: Artefacts were not larger, but smaller at 3.0 Tesla because a shorter echo-time at 3.0 Tesla negated artefact enlargement. Despite smaller artefacts and larger remnants at 3.0 Tesla, occlusion levels were similar for both field strengths.

  19. Artefacts induced by coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla versus 1.5-Tesla MR angiography—An in vivo and in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Vincken, Koen L.; Kort, Gerard A.P. de; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Bartels, Lambertus W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare metal-induced artefacts from coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla and 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), since concerns persist on artefact enlargement at 3.0 Tesla. Materials and methods: We scanned 19 patients (mean age 53; 16 women) with 20 saccular aneurysms treated with coils only, at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla according to standard clinical 3D TOF-MRA protocols containing a shorter echo-time but weaker read-out gradient at 3.0 Tesla in addition to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). Per modality two neuro-radiologists assessed the occlusion status, measured residual flow, and indicated whether coil artefacts disturbed this assessment on MRA. We assessed relative risks for disturbance by coil artefacts, weighted kappa's for agreement on occlusion levels, and we compared remnant sizes. For artefact measurements, a coil model was created and scanned with the same protocols followed by 2D MR scans with variation of echo-time and read-out gradient strength. Results: Coil artefacts disturbed assessments less frequently at 3.0 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla (RR: 0.3; 95%CI: 0.1–0.8). On 3.0-Tesla MRA, remnants were larger than on 1.5-Tesla MRA (difference: 0.7 mm; 95%CI: 0.3–1.1) and larger than on IA-DSA (difference: 1.0 mm; 95%CI: 0.6–1.5) with similar agreement on occlusion levels with IA-DSA for both field strengths (κ 0.53; 95%CI: 0.23–0.84 for 1.5-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA; κ 0.47; 95%CI: 0.19–0.76 for 3.0-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA). Coil model artefacts were smaller at 3.0 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla. The echo-time influenced artefact size more than the read-out gradient. Conclusions: Artefacts were not larger, but smaller at 3.0 Tesla because a shorter echo-time at 3.0 Tesla negated artefact enlargement. Despite smaller artefacts and larger remnants at 3.0 Tesla, occlusion levels were similar for both field strengths

  20. Artefacts induced by coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla versus 1.5-Tesla MR angiography--An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Vincken, Koen L; de Kort, Gerard A P; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2014-05-01

    To compare metal-induced artefacts from coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla and 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), since concerns persist on artefact enlargement at 3.0Tesla. We scanned 19 patients (mean age 53; 16 women) with 20 saccular aneurysms treated with coils only, at 1.5 and 3.0Tesla according to standard clinical 3D TOF-MRA protocols containing a shorter echo-time but weaker read-out gradient at 3.0Tesla in addition to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). Per modality two neuro-radiologists assessed the occlusion status, measured residual flow, and indicated whether coil artefacts disturbed this assessment on MRA. We assessed relative risks for disturbance by coil artefacts, weighted kappa's for agreement on occlusion levels, and we compared remnant sizes. For artefact measurements, a coil model was created and scanned with the same protocols followed by 2D MR scans with variation of echo-time and read-out gradient strength. Coil artefacts disturbed assessments less frequently at 3.0Tesla than at 1.5Tesla (RR: 0.3; 95%CI: 0.1-0.8). On 3.0-Tesla MRA, remnants were larger than on 1.5-Tesla MRA (difference: 0.7mm; 95%CI: 0.3-1.1) and larger than on IA-DSA (difference: 1.0mm; 95%CI: 0.6-1.5) with similar agreement on occlusion levels with IA-DSA for both field strengths (κ 0.53; 95%CI: 0.23-0.84 for 1.5-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA; κ 0.47; 95%CI: 0.19-0.76 for 3.0-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA). Coil model artefacts were smaller at 3.0Tesla than at 1.5Tesla. The echo-time influenced artefact size more than the read-out gradient. Artefacts were not larger, but smaller at 3.0Tesla because a shorter echo-time at 3.0Tesla negated artefact enlargement. Despite smaller artefacts and larger remnants at 3.0Tesla, occlusion levels were similar for both field strengths. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Equilibrium field coil concepts for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Brown, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Methods are presented for reducing ampere-turn requirements in the EF coil system. It is shown that coil currents in an EF coil system external to the toroidal field coils can be substantially reduced by relaxing the triangularity of a D-shaped plasma. Further reductions are realized through a hybrid EF coil system using both internal and external coils. Equilibrium field coils for a poloidally asymmetric, single-null INTOR configuration are presented. It is shown that the shape of field lines in the plasma scrapeoff region and divertor channel improves as triangularity is reduced, but it does so at the possible expense of achievable stable beta values

  2. On the helix equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taouil Hajer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the helices processes, i.e. the solutions H : ℝ × Ω → ℝd, (t, ω ↦ H(t, ω of the helix equation egin{eqnarray} H(0,o=0; quad H(s+t,o= H(s,Phi(t,o +H(t,oonumber end{eqnarray} H ( 0 ,ω = 0 ;   H ( s + t,ω = H ( s, Φ ( t,ω + H ( t,ω where Φ : ℝ × Ω → Ω, (t, ω ↦ Φ(t, ω is a dynamical system on a measurable space (Ω, ℱ. More precisely, we investigate dominated solutions and non differentiable solutions of the helix equation. For the last case, the Wiener helix plays a fundamental role. Moreover, some relations with the cocycle equation defined by Φ, are investigated. Ce papier est consacré aux hélices, c’est-à-dire les solutions H : ℝ × Ω → ℝd, (t, ω ↦ H(t, ω de l’équation fonctionnelle egin{eqnarray} H(0,o=0; quad H(s+t,o= H(s,Phi(t,o +H(t,o onumber end{eqnarray} H ( 0 ,ω = 0 ;   H ( s + t,ω = H ( s, Φ ( t,ω + H ( t,ω où Φ : ℝ × Ω → Ω, (t, ω ↦ Φ(t, ω est un système dynamique défini sur un espace mesurable (Ω, ℱ. Plus présisément, nous déterminons d’abord les hélices dominées puis nous caractérisons les hélices non différentiables. Dans ce dernier cas, l’hélice de Wiener joue un rôle important. Nous précisons aussi quelques relations des hélices avec les cocycles définis par Φ.

  3. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the chicken basic helix-loop-helix factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Yi; Zhao, Chun-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors play important roles in a wide range of developmental processes. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genomic database, and identified 104 bHLH sequences belonging to 42 gene families in an effort to characterize the chicken bHLH transcription factor family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that chicken has 50, 21, 15, 4, 8, and 3 bHLH members in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively, while three members belonging to none of these groups were classified as ''orphans". A comparison between chicken and human bHLH repertoires suggested that both organisms have a number of lineage-specific bHLH members in the proteomes. Chromosome distribution patterns and phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the bHLH members should have arisen through gene duplication at an early date. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment statistics showed 51 top GO annotations of biological processes counted in the frequency. The present study deepens our understanding of the chicken bHLH transcription factor family and provides much useful information for further studies using chicken as a model system.

  4. Novel scenario of the folding transition of a single chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Unique characteristics of a single polymer chain with the effects of stiffness and charge are discussed. It has been well established that a flexible polymer chain undergoes a continuous transition from an elongated coil to a compact globule, corresponding to the transition between disordered gas-like and disordered liquid-like states. Here, we will show that a semiflexible chain exhibits a discrete transition from coil to compact states, corresponding to a disorder-order transition to an ordered crystalline state. We will propose a novel strategy to obtain various kinds of nano-ordered structures from single chains connecting a pair of chains of different stiffness. We will also discuss the effect of charge, putting emphasis on intramolecular segregation in a single polyelectrolyte chain

  5. Design and application of surface coils for MR imaging with consideration of patient safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, R.; Zabel, H.J.; Gehrig, J.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Problems concerning the safety of the patient have arisen by increasing the magnetic field for MR imaging and MR spectroscopy up to 2 T. High electric potentials result on the radio frequency (RF) that antennas in some cases are situated directly on or even inside the body. Transmit pulses can induce high voltages and currents in a separate receiver coil being resonant. Intensive RF fields emerging from the receiver coil may severely heat the conductive body tissue. Principles for suppressing the induced voltages and for detuning the antenna are described. General rules for the design of antennas and their application are discussed

  6. A genome-wide survey on basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in giant panda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwang Dang

    Full Text Available The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is a critically endangered mammalian species. Studies on functions of regulatory proteins involved in developmental processes would facilitate understanding of specific behavior in giant panda. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins play essential roles in a wide range of developmental processes in higher organisms. bHLH family members have been identified in over 20 organisms, including fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse and human. Our present study identified 107 bHLH family members being encoded in giant panda genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that they belong to 44 bHLH families with 46, 25, 15, 4, 11 and 3 members in group A, B, C, D, E and F, respectively, while the remaining 3 members were assigned into "orphan". Compared to mouse, the giant panda does not encode seven bHLH proteins namely Beta3a, Mesp2, Sclerax, S-Myc, Hes5 (or Hes6, EBF4 and Orphan 1. These results provide useful background information for future studies on structure and function of bHLH proteins in the regulation of giant panda development.

  7. Exploring the conserved water site and hydration of a coiled-coil trimerisation motif: a MD simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Baron, Riccardo; Missimer, John H; Steinmetz, Michel O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2008-07-21

    The solvent structure and dynamics around ccbeta-p, a 17-residue peptide that forms a parallel three-stranded alpha-helical coiled coil in solution, was analysed through 10 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 278 and 330 K. Comparison with two corresponding simulations of the monomeric form of ccbeta-p was used to investigate the changes of hydration upon coiled-coil formation. Pronounced peaks in the solvent density distribution between residues Arg8 and Glu13 of neighbouring helices show the presence of water bridges between the helices of the ccbeta-p trimer; this is in agreement with the water sites observed in X-ray crystallography experiments. Interestingly, this water site is structurally conserved in many three-stranded coiled coils and, together with the Arg and Glu residues, forms part of a motif that determines three-stranded coiled-coil formation. Our findings show that little direct correlation exists between the solvent density distribution and the temporal ordering of water around the trimeric coiled coil. The MD-calculated effective residence times of up to 40 ps show rapid exchange of surface water molecules with the bulk phase, and indicate that the solvent distribution around biomolecules requires interpretation in terms of continuous density distributions rather than in terms of discrete molecules of water. Together, our study contributes to understanding the principles of three-stranded coiled-coil formation.

  8. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seol Ah, E-mail: s6022029@korea.ac.kr; Choi, Young-Im, E-mail: yichoi99@forest.go.kr; Cho, Jin-Seong, E-mail: jinsung3932@gmail.com; Lee, Hyoshin, E-mail: hslee@forest.go.kr

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  9. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Seol Ah; Choi, Young-Im; Cho, Jin-Seong; Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem

  10. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this paper uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages. The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take place in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent

  11. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  12. Organizing product innovation: hierarchy, market or triple-helix networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitjar, Rune Dahl; Gjelsvik, Martin; Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés

    This paper assesses the extent to which the organization of the innovation effort in firms, as well as the geographical scale at which this effort is pursued, affects the capacity to benefit from product innovations. Three alternative modes of organization are studied: hierarchy, market and triple-helix-type networks. Furthermore, we consider triple-helix networks at three geographical scales: local, national and international. These relationships are tested on a random sample of 763 firms located in five urban regions of Norway which reported having introduced new products or services during the preceding 3 years. The analysis shows that firms exploiting internal hierarchy or triple-helix networks with a wide range of partners managed to derive a significantly higher share of their income from new products, compared to those that mainly relied on outsourcing within the market. In addition, the analysis shows that the geographical scale of cooperation in networks, as well as the type of partner used, matters for the capacity of firms to benefit from product innovation. In particular, firms that collaborate in international triple-helix-type networks involving suppliers, customers and R&D institutions extract a higher share of their income from product innovations, regardless of whether they organize the processes internally or through the network.

  13. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  14. Study on the performance improvement of the high temperature superconducting coil with several separated coils at the edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguri, S.; Oka, T.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.

    2008-01-01

    In designing high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils, it is important to secure large magnetic fields and stored energy using shorter tape length. Thus, it is necessary to improve the transport current performance of the coils. The critical current and n-value of an HTS tape depend on magnetic fields and flux angles under constant temperature. Considering these dependencies, we established a model to analyze coil critical current. This model clarifies that relatively large electric fields are generated at the coil edges. This adversely affects the transport current performance. In this study, the coil edge is separated into several coils, keeping the total tape length constant. This increases the coil critical current, stored energy, central magnetic field, and also the coil volume, which contains vacancies created by the separation. To estimate coil performance, we calculated the stored energy density, whose denominator is the increased coil volume. This stored energy density reaches its maximum value when the number of the separated coils is eight. At this optimum separation, the central magnetic field increases by 13%, and the stored energy improves by 43%, compared to a rectangular coil wound with the same tape length

  15. Structural basis and kinetics of force-induced conformational changes of an αA domain-containing integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiang

    Full Text Available Integrin α(Lβ₂ (lymphocyte function-associated antigen, LFA-1 bears force upon binding to its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 when a leukocyte adheres to vascular endothelium or an antigen presenting cell (APC during immune responses. The ligand binding propensity of LFA-1 is related to its conformations, which can be regulated by force. Three conformations of the LFA-1 αA domain, determined by the position of its α₇-helix, have been suggested to correspond to three different affinity states for ligand binding.The kinetics of the force-driven transitions between these conformations has not been defined and dynamically coupled to the force-dependent dissociation from ligand. Here we show, by steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations, that the αA domain was successively transitioned through three distinct conformations upon pulling the C-terminus of its α₇-helix. Based on these sequential transitions, we have constructed a mathematical model to describe the coupling between the αA domain conformational changes of LFA-1 and its dissociation from ICAM-1 under force. Using this model to analyze the published data on the force-induced dissociation of single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bonds, we estimated the force-dependent kinetic rates of interstate transition from the short-lived to intermediate-lived and from intermediate-lived to long-lived states. Interestingly, force increased these transition rates; hence activation of LFA-1 was accelerated by pulling it via an engaged ICAM-1.Our study defines the structural basis for mechanical regulation of the kinetics of LFA-1 αA domain conformational changes and relates these simulation results to experimental data of force-induced dissociation of single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bonds by a new mathematical model, thus provided detailed structural and kinetic characterizations for force-stabilization of LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  16. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer–monomer surface reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the dimer–monomer surface reaction model. ► We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). ► Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. ► First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer–monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker–Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  17. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaorong; He Xiaoxiao; Wang Kemin; Ren Fang; Qin Zhihe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, α-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and α-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  18. CLIQ – Coupling-Loss Induced Quench System for Protecting Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Ravaioli, E; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed Coupling-Loss-Induced Quench (CLIQ) protection system is a new method for initiating a fast and voluminous transition to the normal state for protecting high energy density superconducting magnets. Upon quench detection, CLIQ is triggered to generate an oscillating current in the magnet coil by means of a capacitive discharge. This in turn introduces a high coupling loss in the superconductor which provokes a quick transition to the normal state of the coil windings. The system is now implemented for the protection of a two meter long superconducting quadrupole magnet and characterized in the CERN magnet test facility. Various CLIQ configurations with different current injection points are tested and the results compared to similar transients lately measured with a not optimized configuration. Test results convincingly show that the newly tested design allows for a more global quench initiation and thus a faster discharge of the magnet energy. Moreover, the performance of CLIQ for reduc...

  19. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribe, N.M.; Habibi, M.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes

  20. Structural analysis for the joint of the ITER ELM coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shanwen, E-mail: zhangshanwen123@163.com [College of Mechanical Engineering Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Song, Yuntao; Wang, Zhongwei; Ji, Xiang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Zhang, Jianfeng [College of Mechanical Engineering Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The FE sub-model method is feasible and rapid for the joint design. • The components meet the static and fatigue criteria. • Nuclear heat is the key factor for the joint design. - Abstract: The joint is an important component of the Edge Localized Modes (ELM) coils in fusion reactor, which is used to connect the ELM coils. Like the ELM coils, the joints work in an environment with high radiation levels, high temperature and high magnetic field. These joints are mainly subject to nuclear heat from the plasma and cyclic electromagnetic (EM) loads induced by the interaction of ELM coil current with magnetic fields. Take the joint of ITER ELM coil for example. In order to assure the structural integrity of joints under these loads, it is necessary to estimate the strength and fatigue of the joints. As a local model, the joint without ELM coil is investigated by the sub-model method. Results show that the finite element sub-model method is feasible and rapid for the joint design. The maximum magnetic flux intensity occurs in the axial direction for the joint local reference, which parallels with the current and corresponds to the toroidal direction of the ITER. The two areas at the top of the Inconel sleeve appear high temperature. For the joint, the conductor, jacket and sleeve can meet the static and fatigue criteria and the joint design is valid and feasible. The thermal load from the nuclear heat is the key factor for the joint design.

  1. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  2. Comparison of the association of sac growth and coil compaction with recurrence in coil embolized cerebral aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Hoppe

    Full Text Available In recurrent cerebral aneurysms treated by coil embolization, coil compaction is regarded as the presumptive mechanism. We test the hypothesis that aneurysm growth is the primary recurrence mechanism. We also test the hypothesis that the coil mass will translate a measurable extent when recurrence occurs.An objective, quantitative image analysis protocol was developed to determine the volumes of aneurysms and coil masses during initial and follow-up visits from 3D rotational angiograms. The population consisted of 15 recurrence and 12 non-recurrence control aneurysms initially completely coiled at a single center. An investigator sensitivity study was performed to assess the objectivity of the methods. Paired Wilcoxon tests (p<0.05, one-tailed were performed to assess for aneurysm and coil growth. The translation of the coil mass center at follow-up was computed. A Mann Whitney U-Test (p<0.05, one-tailed was used to compare translation of coil mass centers between recurrence and control subjects.Image analysis protocol was found to be insensitive to the investigator. Aneurysm growth was evident in the recurrence cohort (p=0.003 but not the control (p=0.136. There was no evidence of coil compaction in either the recurrence or control cohorts (recurrence: p=0.339; control: p=0.429. The translation of the coil mass centers was found to be significantly larger in the recurrence cohort than the control cohort (p=0.047.Aneurysm sac growth, not coil compaction, was the primary mechanism of recurrence following successful coil embolization. The coil mass likely translates to a measurable extent when recurrence occurs and has the potential to serve as a non-angiographic recurrence marker.

  3. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  4. Condensate-induced transitions and critical spin chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Månsson, T.; Lahtinen, V.; Suorsa, J.; Ardonne, E.

    2013-01-01

    We show that condensate-induced transitions between two-dimensional topological phases provide a general framework to relate one-dimensional spin models at their critical points. We demonstrate this using two examples. First, we show that two well-known spin chains, namely, the XY chain and the

  5. Design and testing of a coil-unit barrel for helical coil electromagnetic launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Liu, Zhenxiang; Shu, Ting; Yang, Lijia; Ouyang, Jianming

    2018-01-01

    A coil-unit barrel for a helical coil electromagnetic launcher is described. It provides better features of high structural strength and flexible adjustability. It is convenient to replace the damaged coil units and easy to adjust the number of turns in the stator coils due to the modular design. In our experiments, the highest velocity measured for a 4.5-kg projectile is 47.3 m/s and the mechanical reinforcement of the launcher could bear 35 kA peak current. The relationship between the energy conversion efficiency and the inductance gradient of the launcher is also studied. In the region of low inductance gradient, the efficiency is positively correlated with the inductance gradient. However, in the region of high inductance gradient, the inter-turn arc erosion becomes a major problem of limiting the efficiency and velocity of the launcher. This modular barrel allows further studies in the inter-turn arc and the variable inductance gradient helical coil launcher.

  6. Pressure-Induced Polyamorphic Transition in Nanoscale TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, Varghese; Muddle, Barry C.

    2009-01-01

    The detection and characterization of pressure-induced amorphization in 20 GPa and ambient temperature is documented. The characterization employed in situ high-pressure angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in diamond-anvil cells. Comparative Raman spectroscopy allows the local structures of the high-density amorphous (HDA) form obtained at high pressures and its low-pressure (<10-15 GPa) low-density amorphous (LDA) analogue to be related to the baddeleyite-TiO2 and TiO2-II structures, respectively. The pressure-induced amorphization and the HDA-LDA transition in nanoscale TiO2 bear broad similarities to transitions in the Si and H2O systems.

  7. Static Measurements on HTS Coils of Fully Superconducting AC Electric Machines for Aircraft Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Hunker, Keith R.; Hartwig, Jason; Brown, Gerald V.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing the high efficiency and high-power density superconducting (SC) electric machines in full support of electrified aircraft propulsion (EAP) systems for a future electric aircraft. A SC coil test rig has been designed and built to perform static and AC measurements on BSCCO, (RE)BCO, and YBCO high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire and coils at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In this paper, DC measurements on five SC coil configurations of various geometry in zero external magnetic field are measured to develop good measurement technique and to determine the critical current (Ic) and the sharpness (n value) of the super-to-normal transition. Also, standard procedures for coil design, fabrication, coil mounting, micro-volt measurement, cryogenic testing, current control, and data acquisition technique were established. Experimentally measured critical currents are compared with theoretical predicted values based on an electric-field criterion (Ec). Data here are essential to quantify the SC electric machine operation limits where the SC begins to exhibit non-zero resistance. All test data will be utilized to assess the feasibility of using HTS coils for the fully superconducting AC electric machine development for an aircraft electric propulsion system.

  8. Redesigning existing transcranial magnetic stimulation coils to reduce energy: application to low field magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Boshuo; Shen, Michael R.; Deng, Zhi-De; Smith, J. Evan; Tharayil, Joseph J.; Gurrey, Clement J.; Gomez, Luis J.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. To present a systematic framework and exemplar for the development of a compact and energy-efficient coil that replicates the electric field (E-field) distribution induced by an existing transcranial magnetic stimulation coil. Approach. The E-field generated by a conventional low field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) coil was measured for a spherical head model and simulated in both spherical and realistic head models. Then, using a spherical head model and spatial harmonic decomposition, a spherical-shaped cap coil was synthesized such that its windings conformed to a spherical surface and replicated the E-field on the cortical surface while requiring less energy. A prototype coil was built and electrically characterized. The effect of constraining the windings to the upper half of the head was also explored via an alternative coil design. Main results. The LFMS E-field distribution resembled that of a large double-cone coil, with a peak field strength around 350 mV m‑1 in the cortex. The E-field distributions of the cap coil designs were validated against the original coil, with mean errors of 1%–3%. The cap coil required as little as 2% of the original coil energy and was significantly smaller in size. Significance. The redesigned LFMS coil is substantially smaller and more energy-efficient than the original, improving cost, power consumption, and portability. These improvements could facilitate deployment of LFMS in the clinic and potentially at home. This coil redesign approach can also be applied to other magnetic stimulation paradigms. Finally, the anatomically-accurate E-field simulation of LFMS can be used to interpret clinical LFMS data.

  9. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiufang; Nie, Xinyi; Liang, Yilang; Lu, Falong; Yan, Zhongming; Wang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated a kind of system architecture with three coils which the repeater is copper coil or HTS coil. • We simulated the different repeater system and obtained the magnetic field distribution at different distance. • We used helical coil instead of pancake coil which does not use capacitors. • HTS intermediate coil has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance than copper intermediate coil. - Abstract: Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  10. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiufang [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Nie, Xinyi [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Liang, Yilang [School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Lu, Falong [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Yan, Zhongming, E-mail: wangxiufanghappy@163.com [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Wang, Yu [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • We investigated a kind of system architecture with three coils which the repeater is copper coil or HTS coil. • We simulated the different repeater system and obtained the magnetic field distribution at different distance. • We used helical coil instead of pancake coil which does not use capacitors. • HTS intermediate coil has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance than copper intermediate coil. - Abstract: Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  11. Field-induced valence transition in rare-earth system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhaya, A.; Ghatak, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic field-induced valence transition in rare-earth compound has been examined based on a pseudospin S=1 Ising model proposed earlier for valence transition. The model includes finite mixing between two pertinent ionic configurations (magnetic and non-magnetic) separated by an energy gap and with intersite interaction between rare-earth ions. Using the mean field approximation the magnetic behaviour and the critical field (H c ) for transition are obtained as a function of energy gap and temperature. The phase boundary defined in terms of reduced field H c /H co and reduced temperature T/T v (T v being valence transition temperature in absence of field) is nearly independent of energy gap. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental observation in Yb- and Eu-compounds

  12. Double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent swirling annular jet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanierschot, M.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the structure and dynamics of double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent annular swirling jet. Double helix breakdown has been reported previously for the laminar flow regime, but this structure has rarely been observed in turbulent flow. The flow field is

  13. Field-induced stacking transition of biofunctionalized trilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masato Nakano, C. [Flintridge Preparatory School, La Canada, California 91011 (United States); Sajib, Md Symon Jahan; Samieegohar, Mohammadreza; Wei, Tao [Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Trilayer graphene (TLG) is attracting a lot of attention as their stacking structures (i.e., rhombohedral vs. Bernal) drastically affect electronic and optical properties. Based on full-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we here predict electric field-induced rhombohedral-to-Bernal transition of TLG tethered with proteins. Furthermore, our simulations show that protein's electrophoretic mobility and diffusivity are enhanced on TLG surface. This phenomenon of controllable TLG stacking transition will contribute to various applications including biosensing.

  14. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started in aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pulsed coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  15. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1977-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started an aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pusled coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  16. Empirical Correlation of the Morphology of Coiled Carbon Nano tubes with Their Response to Axial Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, J.R.; Boyles, J.S.; Bottomley, L.A.; Ferri, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical response of thirteen different helical multi-walled carbon nano coils to axial compression is reported. Each nano coil was attached to the apex of a cantilever probe tip; its dimensions and orientation relative to the tip apex were determined with scanning electron microscopy. The atomic force microscope was employed to apply a cyclic axial load on the nano coil. Its mechanical response was determined by simultaneous collection of the thermal resonance frequency, displacement, and oscillation amplitude of the cantilever-nano tube system in real time. Depending upon compression parameters, each coil underwent buckling, bending, and slip-stick motion. Characteristic features in the thermal resonance spectrum and in the force and oscillation amplitude curves for each of these responses to induced stress are presented. Following compression studies, the structure and morphology of each nano coil were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The compression stiffness of each nano coil was estimated from the resonant frequency of the cantilever at the point of contact with the substrate surface. From this value, the elastic modulus of the nano coil was computed and correlated with the coiled carbon nano tube’s morphology.

  17. Comparison of surface coil and knee coil for evaluation of the patellar cartilage by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, M. van den; Maeseneer, M. de; Hoste, M.; Vanderdood, K.; Ridder, F. de; Osteaux, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to compare the knee coil and the surface coil for the visualisation of the patellar cartilage. Materials and methods: In 28 patients (17 women, 11 men) with an average age of 40 years (range 14-76) with knee pain MR was performed. Transverse images were obtained using a fast spin echo proton density weighted sequence on a Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 T clinical system. Transverse images were obtained at the level of the patellar cartilage using both the surface and the knee coil. All images were evaluated by consensus of two radiologists. They evaluated a number of quality criteria on a 4-point scale. Criteria for artefacts were also graded on a 4-point scale. Results: For the visualisation of fluid there was no significant difference between the knee coil and the surface coil (P=0.021). For all other criteria regarding image quality and presence of imaging artefacts there was a significant difference between both coils (P<0.001) with the surface coil obtaining the better result. Conclusion: The use of the surface coil in the visualisation of the patellar cartilage can be recommended at knee MR

  18. Structure of bacteriophage T4 fibritin: a segmented coiled coil and the role of the C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y; Strelkov, S V; Mesyanzhinov, V V; Rossmann, M G

    1997-06-15

    Oligomeric coiled-coil motifs are found in numerous protein structures; among them is fibritin, a structural protein of bacteriophage T4, which belongs to a class of chaperones that catalyze a specific phage-assembly process. Fibritin promotes the assembly of the long tail fibers and their subsequent attachment to the tail baseplate; it is also a sensing device that controls the retraction of the long tail fibers in adverse environments and, thus, prevents infection. The structure of fibritin had been predicted from sequence and biochemical analyses to be mainly a triple-helical coiled coil. The determination of its structure at atomic resolution was expected to give insights into the assembly process and biological function of fibritin, and the properties of modified coiled-coil structures in general. The three-dimensional structure of fibritin E, a deletion mutant of wild-type fibritin, was determined to 2.2 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. Three identical subunits of 119 amino acid residues form a trimeric parallel coiled-coil domain and a small globular C-terminal domain about a crystallographic threefold axis. The coiled-coil domain is divided into three segments that are separated by insertion loops. The C-terminal domain, which consists of 30 residues from each subunit, contains a beta-propeller-like structure with a hydrophobic interior. The residues within the C-terminal domain make extensive hydrophobic and some polar intersubunit interactions. This is consistent with the C-terminal domain being important for the correct assembly of fibritin, as shown earlier by mutational studies. Tight interactions between the C-terminal residues of adjacent subunits counteract the latent instability that is suggested by the structural properties of the coiled-coil segments. Trimerization is likely to begin with the formation of the C-terminal domain which subsequently initiates the assembly of the coiled coil. The interplay between the stabilizing effect of the C

  19. Unraveling the Role of the C-terminal Helix Turn Helix of the Coat-binding Domain of Bacteriophage P22 Scaffolding Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Meier, G. Pauline; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Weigele, Peter R.; Cortines, Juliana R.; Siegel, Molly; Leavitt, Justin C.; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2012-01-01

    Many viruses encode scaffolding and coat proteins that co-assemble to form procapsids, which are transient precursor structures leading to progeny virions. In bacteriophage P22, the association of scaffolding and coat proteins is mediated mainly by ionic interactions. The coat protein-binding domain of scaffolding protein is a helix turn helix structure near the C terminus with a high number of charged surface residues. Residues Arg-293 and Lys-296 are particularly important for coat protein binding. The two helices contact each other through hydrophobic side chains. In this study, substitution of the residues of the interface between the helices, and the residues in the β-turn, by aspartic acid was used examine the importance of the conformation of the domain in coat binding. These replacements strongly affected the ability of the scaffolding protein to interact with coat protein. The severity of the defect in the association of scaffolding protein to coat protein was dependent on location, with substitutions at residues in the turn and helix 2 causing the most significant effects. Substituting aspartic acid for hydrophobic interface residues dramatically perturbs the stability of the structure, but similar substitutions in the turn had much less effect on the integrity of this domain, as determined by circular dichroism. We propose that the binding of scaffolding protein to coat protein is dependent on angle of the β-turn and the orientation of the charged surface on helix 2. Surprisingly, formation of the highly complex procapsid structure depends on a relatively simple interaction. PMID:22879595

  20. High-resolution MR imaging of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC): comparison of microscopy coils and a conventional small surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, 02115, Boston, MA (United States); Ueno, Teruko; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Tanaka, Toshikazu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tsukuba Kinen Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Shindo, Masashi [Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2003-10-01

    To compare MR images of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using microscopy coils with those using a conventional surface coil qualitatively and quantitatively. Proton density-weighted images and T2*-weighted images of the TFCC from ten normal volunteers were obtained with a conventional surface coil (C4 coil; 80 mm in diameter), a 47-mm microscopy surface coil and a 23-mm microscopy surface coil at 1.5 T. Qualitative image analysis of MR images with three coils was performed by two radiologists who assigned one of five numerical scores (0, nonvisualization; 1, poor; 2, average; 3, good; 4, excellent) for five TFCC components, which were disc proper, triangular ligament, meniscus homologue, ulnotriquetral and ulnolunate ligament. Quantitative analysis included the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the disc proper of TFCC, the lunate cartilage, the lunate bone and the contrast-noise-ratio (C/N) between articular cartilage and disc proper or bone marrow were measured. All structures show higher scores qualitatively on MR with microscopy coils than those with a C4 coil, and the difference was significant with the exception of the ulnolunate ligament. MR with microscopy coils showed significantly higher S/N values than those with a conventional surface coil (P<0.05 to P<0.001). T2*-weighted images using microscopy coils showed significantly higher cartilage-disc proper C/N and cartilage-bone marrow C/N (P<0.01 to P<0.001). On proton density-weighted images, the C/N between cartilage and disc proper with two microscopy coils was significantly higher (P<0.01) than that with a conventional coil. High-resolution MR images of the normal wrist using microscopy coils were superior to those using a conventional surface coil qualitatively and quantitatively. High-resolution MR imaging with a microscopy coil would be a promising method to diagnose TFCC lesions. (orig.)

  1. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Arun Kumar Narayanan

    2014-10-07

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  2. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Arun Kumar Narayanan; Uyaver, Sahin; Sun, Shuyu

    2014-01-01

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  3. Optimal autaptic and synaptic delays enhanced synchronization transitions induced by each other in Newman–Watts neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Baoying; Gong, Yubing; Xie, Huijuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimal autaptic delay enhanced synchronization transitions induced by synaptic delay in neuronal networks. • Optimal synaptic delay enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay. • Optimal coupling strength enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autaptic or synaptic delay. - Abstract: In this paper, we numerically study the effect of electrical autaptic and synaptic delays on synchronization transitions induced by each other in Newman–Watts Hodgkin–Huxley neuronal networks. It is found that the synchronization transitions induced by synaptic delay vary with varying autaptic delay and become strongest when autaptic delay is optimal. Similarly, the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay vary with varying synaptic delay and become strongest at optimal synaptic delay. Also, there is optimal coupling strength by which the synchronization transitions induced by either synaptic or autaptic delay become strongest. These results show that electrical autaptic and synaptic delays can enhance synchronization transitions induced by each other in the neuronal networks. This implies that electrical autaptic and synaptic delays can cooperate with each other and more efficiently regulate the synchrony state of the neuronal networks. These findings could find potential implications for the information transmission in neural systems.

  4. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the Chicken Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-yi Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH family of transcription factors play important roles in a wide range of developmental processes. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey using the chicken (Gallus gallus genomic database, and identified 104 bHLH sequences belonging to 42 gene families in an effort to characterize the chicken bHLH transcription factor family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that chicken has 50, 21, 15, 4, 8, and 3 bHLH members in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively, while three members belonging to none of these groups were classified as ‘‘orphans’’. A comparison between chicken and human bHLH repertoires suggested that both organisms have a number of lineage-specific bHLH members in the proteomes. Chromosome distribution patterns and phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the bHLH members should have arisen through gene duplication at an early date. Gene Ontology (GO enrichment statistics showed 51 top GO annotations of biological processes counted in the frequency. The present study deepens our understanding of the chicken bHLH transcription factor family and provides much useful information for further studies using chicken as a model system.

  5. Endovascular rescue method for undesirably stretched coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Hoon

    2014-10-01

    Undesirable detachment or stretching of coils within the parent artery during aneurysm embolization can be related with thrombus formation, which can be caused occlusion of parent artery or embolic event(s). To escape from this situation, several rescue methods have been reported. A case with undesirably stretched coil in which another rescue method was used, is presented. When the stretched coil is still located in the coil delivery microcatheter, the stretched coil can be removed safely using a snare and a handmade monorail microcatheter. After a snare is lodged in the handmade monorail microcatheter, the snare is introduced over the coil delivery micorcatheter and located in the distal part of the stretched coil. After then, the handmade monorail microcatheter captures the stretched coil and the snare as one unit. This technique using a handmade monorail microcatheter and a snare can be a good rescue modality for the undesirably stretched coil, still remained within the coil delivery microcatheter.

  6. Stress induces pain transition by potentiation of AMPA receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Ya; Liu, Sufang; Fang, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yong; Furmanski, Orion; Skinner, John; Xing, Ying; Johns, Roger A; Huganir, Richard L; Tao, Feng

    2014-10-08

    Chronic postsurgical pain is a serious issue in clinical practice. After surgery, patients experience ongoing pain or become sensitive to incident, normally nonpainful stimulation. The intensity and duration of postsurgical pain vary. However, it is unclear how the transition from acute to chronic pain occurs. Here we showed that social defeat stress enhanced plantar incision-induced AMPA receptor GluA1 phosphorylation at the Ser831 site in the spinal cord and greatly prolonged plantar incision-induced pain. Interestingly, targeted mutation of the GluA1 phosphorylation site Ser831 significantly inhibited stress-induced prolongation of incisional pain. In addition, stress hormones enhanced GluA1 phosphorylation and AMPA receptor-mediated electrical activity in the spinal cord. Subthreshold stimulation induced spinal long-term potentiation in GluA1 phosphomimetic mutant mice, but not in wild-type mice. Therefore, spinal AMPA receptor phosphorylation contributes to the mechanisms underlying stress-induced pain transition. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413737-10$15.00/0.

  7. Gamma irradiation testing of prototype ITER in-vessel magnetic pick-up coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, Ludo; Leysen, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We tested five prototype ITER in-vessel coils up to a gamma dose of 72 MGy. ► Before and after irradiation thermal tests were also performed from 30 °C till 130 °C. ► The continuity resistances and the insulation resistances were continuously monitored. ► The observed behavior of all coils was satisfactory in all conditions. ► For the further design the mechanical robustness should be taken into account. -- Abstract: To fulfill the requirements for ITER in-vessel magnetic diagnostics, several coil prototypes have been developed, aiming at minimizing the disturbing effects of temperature gradients and radiation induced phenomena. As a first step in the radiation resistance testing of these prototypes, an in-situ high dose rate gamma radiation test on a selection of prototypes was performed. The aim of this test was to get a first experimental feedback regarding the behavior of the pick-up coil prototypes under radiation. Five prototypes (a coil wound with glass-insulated copper wire, two LTCC coils and two HTCC coils) were irradiated at a dose rate of 46 kGy/h up to a total dose of 72 MGy and at a temperature of 50 °C. During the irradiation, the continuity resistances and the insulation resistances were continuously measured. Before and after irradiation reference data were recorded as a function of temperature (from 30 °C to 130 °C). This paper includes the results of the temperature and irradiation tests and a discussion of the behavior of the prototype coils in terms of electrical and mechanical properties

  8. Dielectric relaxation in solid collagen over a wide temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Muhammad Abdullah; Rizvi, Tasneem Zahra; Janjua, Khalid Mehmood; Zaheer, Muhammad Yar

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric constant ε' and loss factor ε'' have been measured in bovine tendon collagen in the frequency range 30 Hz - 3 MHz and temperature range 30 deg. C to 200 deg. C. Frequency dependence curve of ε'' shows a low frequency strong α-dispersion attributed to phonon assisted proton hopping between localized sites and a weak high frequency. α 2 - dispersion attributed to reorientation of polar components of collagen molecules. Temperature dependence of the dielectric data show release of bound moisture as a three step process with discrete peaks at 50 deg. C, 90 deg. C and 125 deg. C. These peaks have been attributed to release of adsorbed surface water, water bound to exposed polar sites and strongly bound internal moisture respectively. A peak observed at 160 deg. C has been attributed to thermally induced helix-coil transition of collagen molecules. (author)

  9. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software's ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ''ENABLE'' and ''DISABLE'' controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords

  10. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  11. Transient thermo-structural and static magnetic characteristics of 1:1 prototype JET ELM control coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Ananya; Pradhan, Subrata, E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Ghate, Mahesh; Kanabar, Deven; Roy, Swati; Kumar, Nitish

    2017-01-15

    3D transient thermo-structural analyses and steady state magnetic field analyses of 1:1 prototyped JET Edge Localized Mode (ELM) coils have been carried out. Temperature distribution within the magnet winding as well as the temperature evolution have also been simulated as a function of pulsed transport currents in both large and small ELM coils as per the operational scenarios. The induced thermal stresses along with the shear stress components acting on the winding elements have also been analyzed. The deformations caused by thermal stresses have been calculated for the case, the conductor bundle and the insulation layers within the coils. In addition to thermo-structural analyses, steady state magnetic field analyses have also been carried out in the current carrying ELM coils. These values have been compared with the experimental values. The experimentally obtained values matches well with those obtained in simulations indicating that the prototyped ELM coils can operate successfully in JET operational scenarios. Additionally, the R & D and technologies developed in the context of JET ELM coils have also been validated with the magnet performances experimentally.

  12. On the origins of the weak folding cooperativity of a designed ββα ultrafast protein FSD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wu

    Full Text Available FSD-1, a designed small ultrafast folder with a ββα fold, has been actively studied in the last few years as a model system for studying protein folding mechanisms and for testing of the accuracy of computational models. The suitability of this protein to describe the folding of naturally occurring α/β proteins has recently been challenged based on the observation that the melting transition is very broad, with ill-resolved baselines. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the AMBER protein force field (ff96 coupled with the implicit solvent model (IGB = 5, we shed new light into the nature of this transition and resolve the experimental controversies. We show that the melting transition corresponds to the melting of the protein as a whole, and not solely to the helix-coil transition. The breadth of the folding transition arises from the spread in the melting temperatures (from ∼325 K to ∼302 K of the individual transitions: formation of the hydrophobic core, β-hairpin and tertiary fold, with the helix formed earlier. Our simulations initiated from an extended chain accurately predict the native structure, provide a reasonable estimate of the transition barrier height, and explicitly demonstrate the existence of multiple pathways and multiple transition states for folding. Our exhaustive sampling enables us to assess the quality of the Amber ff96/igb5 combination and reveals that while this force field can predict the correct native fold, it nonetheless overstabilizes the α-helix portion of the protein (Tm = ∼387K as well as the denatured structures.

  13. Coherent helix vacancy phonon and its ultrafast dynamics waning in topological Dirac semimetal C d3A s2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Wu, Q.; Wu, Y. L.; Zhao, H.; Yi, C. J.; Tian, Y. C.; Liu, H. W.; Shi, Y. G.; Ding, H.; Dai, X.; Richard, P.; Zhao, Jimin

    2017-06-01

    We report an ultrafast lattice dynamics investigation of the topological Dirac semimetal C d3A s2 . A coherent phonon beating among three evenly spaced A1 g optical phonon modes (of frequencies 1.80, 1.96, and 2.11 THz, respectively) is unambiguously observed. The two side modes originate from the counter helixes composing Cd vacancies. Significantly, such helix vacancy-induced phonon (HVP) modes experience prominent extra waning in their ultrafast dynamics as temperature increases, which is immune to the central mode. Above 200 K, the HVP becomes inactive, which may potentially affect the topological properties. Our results in the lattice degree of freedom suggest the indispensable role of temperature in considering topological properties of such quantum materials.

  14. A study on electromagnetic and mechanical characteristics of the field coil in HTS motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Kadota, T.; Joo, J.H.; Sano, H.; Murase, S.; Lee, S.H.; Hong, J.P.; Kim, H.M.; Kwon, Y.K.; Jo, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) motors electromagnetically consist of a rotator wound with HTS wires and an armature with conventional copper wires like Litz wire. The HTS rotor windings, as field coils, consist of a straight part and an end-ring part. Because a major rotation torque is induced by an interaction between magnetic fields and current-carrying conductors in the straight part, most of mechanical stresses in the motor occur at the straight part. An end-ring is placed in the edge of the straight part and used to connect to each adjacent straight-part coils. The magnetic fields by coil currents concentrate on the end-ring part, therefore, it is expected that the critical current of the entire coil, straight and end-ring, can be determined by the magnitude of the field in the end-ring. This paper deals with the overall J c degradation in the end-ring part by self-field generated from the coil. In addition to electromagnetic analyses, we have performed a numerical analysis in order to evaluate mechanical stresses in the straight part of field coil by armature reaction on steady-state operation. The analytical results will be presented in this paper.

  15. The significant impact of framing coils on long-term outcomes in endovascular coiling for intracranial aneurysms: how to select an appropriate framing coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Wataru; Sato, Masayuki; Amano, Tatsuo; Matsumaru, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The importance of a framing coil (FC)-the first coil inserted into an aneurysm during endovascular coiling, also called a lead coil or a first coil-is recognized, but its impact on long-term outcomes, including recanalization and retreatment, is not well established. The purposes of this study were to test the hypothesis that the FC is a significant factor for aneurysmal recurrence and to provide some insights on appropriate FC selection. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed endovascular coiling for 280 unruptured intracranial aneurysms and gathered data on age, sex, aneurysm location, aneurysm morphology, maximal size, neck width, adjunctive techniques, recanalization, retreatment, follow-up periods, total volume packing density (VPD), volume packing density of the FC, and framing coil percentage (FCP; the percentage of FC volume in total coil volume) to clarify the associated factors for aneurysmal recurrence. RESULTS Of 236 aneurysms included in this study, 33 (14.0%) had recanalization, and 18 (7.6%) needed retreatment during a mean follow-up period of 37.7 ± 16.1 months. In multivariate analysis, aneurysm size (odds ratio [OR] = 1.29, p < 0.001), FCP < 32% (OR 3.54, p = 0.009), and VPD < 25% (OR 2.96, p = 0.015) were significantly associated with recanalization, while aneurysm size (OR 1.25, p < 0.001) and FCP < 32% (OR 6.91, p = 0.017) were significant predictors of retreatment. VPD as a continuous value or VPD with any cutoff value could not predict retreatment with statistical significance in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS FCP, which is equal to the FC volume as a percentage of the total coil volume and is unaffected by the morphology of the aneurysm or the measurement error in aneurysm length, width, or height, is a novel predictor of recanalization and retreatment and is more significantly predictive of retreatment than VPD. To select FCs large enough to meet the condition of FCP ≥ 32% is a potential relevant factor for better

  16. Missense mutation in DISC1 C-terminal coiled-coil has GSK3β signaling and sex-dependent behavioral effects in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachtler, James; Elliott, Christina; Rodgers, R. John; Baillie, George S.; Clapcote, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The full-length DISC1 protein consists of an N-terminal ‘head’ domain and a C-terminal tail domain that contains several predicted coiled-coils, structural motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. To probe the in vivo effects of missense mutation of DISC1’s C-terminal tail, we tested mice carrying mutation D453G within a predicted α-helical coiled-coil region. We report that, relative to wild-type littermates, female DISC1D453G mice exhibited novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, an anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus-maze and open field tests, and reduced social exploration of unfamiliar mice. Male DISC1D453G mice displayed a deficit in passive avoidance, while neither males nor females exhibited any impairment in startle reactivity or prepulse inhibition. Whole brain homogenates showed normal levels of DISC1 protein, but decreased binding of DISC1 to GSK3β, decreased phospho-inhibition of GSK3β at serine 9, and decreased levels of β-catenin in DISC1D453G mice of either sex. Interrupted GSK3β signaling may thus be part of the mechanism underlying the behavioral phenotype associated with D453G, in common with the previously described N-terminal domain mutations Q31L and L100P in mice, and the schizophrenia risk-conferring variant R264Q in humans. PMID:26728762

  17. Countering the stray magnetic field of the CUSP trap by using additional coils

    CERN Document Server

    Thole, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    The ASACUSA experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN tries to measure the Hyperfine Structure (HFS) of Antihydrogen (H ̄) using a Rabi spectroscopy set-up. In measuring this HFS it will yield a very precise test of CPT-symmetry. For this set-up to work a homogeneous magnetic field is needed in the cavity where the Hyperfine transition of H ̄ occurs. Due to the stray fields from the CUSP trap, where H ̄ is produced, additional coils are needed to counter these fields. It is found, using COMSOL simulations, that two coils are suitable for this. Leading to a relative standard deviation of the magnetic field of σB/B = 1.06%.

  18. The JET divertor coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.R.; Froger, C.; Sborchia, C.

    1989-01-01

    The divertor coil is mounted inside the Jet vacuum vessel and is able to carry 1 MA turns. It is of conventional construction - water cooled copper, epoxy glass insulation -and is contained in a thin stainless steel case. The coil has to be assembled, insulated and encased inside the Jet vacuum vessel. A description of the coil is given, together with technical information (including mechanical effects on the vacuum vessel), an outline of the manufacture process and a time schedule. (author)

  19. Communication: Polarizable polymer chain under external electric field in a dilute polymer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budkov, Yu A; Kolesnikov, A L; Kiselev, M G

    2015-11-28

    We study the conformational behavior of polarizable polymer chain under an external homogeneous electric field within the Flory type self-consistent field theory. We consider the influence of electric field on the polymer coil as well as on the polymer globule. We show that when the polymer chain conformation is a coil, application of external electric field leads to its additional swelling. However, when the polymer conformation is a globule, a sufficiently strong field can induce a globule-coil transition. We show that such "field-induced" globule-coil transition at the sufficiently small monomer polarizabilities goes quite smoothly. On the contrary, when the monomer polarizability exceeds a certain threshold value, the globule-coil transition occurs as a dramatic expansion in the regime of first-order phase transition. The developed theoretical model can be applied to predicting polymer globule density change under external electric field in order to provide more efficient processes of polymer functionalization, such as sorption, dyeing, and chemical modification.

  20. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  1. Pulse coil concepts for the LCP Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Burn, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    The pulse coils described in this paper are resistive copper magnets driven by time-varying currents. They are included in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) portion of the Large Coil Program (LCP) to simulate the pulsed field environment of the toroidal coils in a tokamak reactor. Since TNS (a 150 sec, 5MA, igniting tokamak) and the Oak Ridge EPR (Experimental Power Reactor) are representative of the first tokamaks to require the technology developed in LCP, the reference designs for these machines, especially TNS, are used to derive the magnetic criteria for the pulse coils. This criteria includes the magnitude, distribution, and rate of change of pulsed fields in the toroidal coil windings. Three pulse coil concepts are evaluated on the basis of magnetic criteria and factors such as versatility of design, ease of fabrication and cost of operation. The three concepts include (1) a pair of poloidal coils outside the LCTF torus, (2) a single poloidal coil threaded through the torus, and (3) a pair of vertical axis coil windings inside the bore of one or more of the toroidal test coils

  2. Podoplanin-mediated TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its correlation with bHLH transcription factor DEC in TE-11 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunyan; Liu, Qiang; Yan, Xu; Kato, Yukio; Tanaka, Makiko; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Morohashi, Satoko; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Podoplanin is reported involved in the collective cell invasion, another tumor invasion style which is distinct from the single cell invasion, so-called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated the correlation between podoplanin and EMT-related markers in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and evaluated its linkage with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor differentiated embryonic chondrocyte (DEC) 1 and DEC2. Three ESCC cell lines and human squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells were subjected to western blot analyses for podoplanin and EMT markers, as well as the expression of DEC1 and DEC2. By RT-qPCR and western blotting, we found that TGF-β increased the expression of podoplanin and mensenchymal markers (e.g., N-cadherin and vimentin), while decreased the expression of epithelial markers (e.g., Claudin-4 and E-cadherin), accompanied by Smad2 phosphorylation and slug activation. Moreover, TGF-β has different effects on the expression of DEC1 and DEC2, that is, it upregulates DEC1, but downregulates DEC2. Capability of cell proliferation, invasion and migration were further analyzed using CCK-8 assay, Matrigel-invasion assay, and the wound-healing assay, respectively. The proliferation, invasion and migration ability were significantly lost in podoplanin-knockdown cells when compared with the scrambled siRNA group. In addition to these changes, the expression of Claudin-4, but not that of Claudin-1 or E-cadherin, was induced by the siRNA against podoplanin. On the contrary, overexpression of DEC1 and DEC2 exhibits opposite effects on podoplanin, but only slight effect on Claudin-4 was detected. These data indicated that podoplanin is significantly associated with EMT of TE-11 cells, and may be directly or indirectly regulated by bHLH transcription factors DEC1 and DEC2.

  3. Crystal structure of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) dimerization domain reveals functional organization of ING family of chromatin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culurgioni, Simone; Muñoz, Inés G; Moreno, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Villate, Maider; Palmero, Ignacio; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-03-30

    The protein ING4 binds to histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 (H3K4me3) through its C-terminal plant homeodomain, thus recruiting the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex to target promoters. The structure of the plant homeodomain finger bound to an H3K4me3 peptide has been described, as well as the disorder and flexibility in the ING4 central region. We report the crystal structure of the ING4 N-terminal domain, which shows an antiparallel coiled-coil homodimer with each protomer folded into a helix-loop-helix structure. This arrangement suggests that ING4 can bind simultaneously two histone tails on the same or different nucleosomes. Dimerization has a direct impact on ING4 tumor suppressor activity because monomeric mutants lose the ability to induce apoptosis after genotoxic stress. Homology modeling based on the ING4 structure suggests that other ING dimers may also exist.

  4. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  5. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  6. A history of detachable coils: 1987-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ferdinand K; Fiorella, David; Masaryk, Thomas J; Rasmussen, Peter A; Dion, Jacques E

    2014-03-01

    The development of detachable coils is one of the most pivotal developments in neurointervention, providing a tool that could be used to treat a wide variety of hemorrhagic stroke. From the original Guglielmi detachable coil, a number of different coil designs and delivery designs have evolved. This article reviews the history of commercially available detachable coils. A timeline of detachable coils was constructed and coil design philosophies were reviewed. A complete list of commercially available coils is presented in a timeline format. Detachable coil technology continues to evolve. Advances in construction and design have yielded products which may benefit patients in terms of safety, radiation dose reduction and cost of treatment. Continued evolution is expected, irrespective of competing disruptive technologies.

  7. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  8. The Discovery of the Double Helix

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Professor James D. Watson has kindly agreed to make a presentation on the 1953 finding of the Double Helix at the Cavendish Laboratory by Francis Crick and himself. Being one of the greatest scientific discoveries in human history, little else needs to be added.

  9. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Evans, K. Jr.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Prater, R.; Alcorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  10. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  11. Invited review the coiled coil silk of bees, ants, and hornets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Tara D; Weisman, Sarah; Walker, Andrew A; Mudie, Stephen T

    2012-06-01

    In this article, we review current knowledge about the silk produced by the larvae of bees, ants, and hornets [Apoidea and Vespoidea: Hymenoptera]. Different species use the silk either alone or in composites for a variety of purposes including mechanical reinforcement, thermal regulation, or humidification. The characteristic molecular structure of this silk is α-helical proteins assembled into tetrameric coiled coils. Gene sequences from seven species are available, and each species possesses a copy of each of four related silk genes that encode proteins predicted to form coiled coils. The proteins are ordered at multiple length scales within the labial gland of the final larval instar before spinning. The insects control the morphology of the silk during spinning to produce either fibers or sheets. The silk proteins are small and non repetitive and have been produced artificially at high levels by fermentation in E. coli. The artificial silk proteins can be fabricated into materials with structural and mechanical properties similar to those of native silks. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Protection of toroidal field coils using multiple circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Langton, W.G.; Mann, W.R.; Pillsbury, R.D.; Tarrh, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The protection of toroidal field (TF) coils using multiple circuits is described. The discharge of a single-circuit TF system is given for purposes of definition. Two-circuit TF systems are analyzed and the results presented analytically and graphically. Induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and discharge time constants are compared to the single-circuit system. Three-circuit TF systems are analyzed. In addition to induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and time constants, several different discharge scenarios are included. The impacts of having discharge rates versus final maximum coil temperatures as requirements are examined. The out-of-plane forces which occur in the three-circuit system are analyzed using an approximate model. The analysis of multiplecircuit TF systems is briefly described and results for a Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) scale device are given based on computer analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of using multiple-circuit systems are summarized and discussed. The primary disadvantages of multiple circuits are the increased circuit complexity and potential for out-of-plane forces. These are offset by the substantial reduction in maximum discharge voltages, as well as other design options which become available when using multiple circuits

  13. Determination of hyperfine-induced transition rates from observations of a planetary nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, Tomas; Judge, Philip G; Proffitt, Charles R

    2002-12-31

    Observations of the planetary nebula NGC3918 made with the STIS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the first unambiguous detection of a hyperfine-induced transition 2s2p 3P(o)(0)-->2s2 1S0 in the berylliumlike emission line spectrum of N IV at 1487.89 A. A nebular model allows us to confirm a transition rate of 4x10(-4) sec(-1)+/-33% for this line. The measurement represents the first independent confirmation of the transition rate of hyperfine-induced lines in low ionization stages, and it provides support for the techniques used to compute these transitions for the determination of very low densities and isotope ratios.

  14. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jenekhe, S

    1999-01-01

    ... the self-assembly of new rod-coil diblock, rod- coil-rod triblock, and coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers from solution and the resulting discrete and periodic mesostmctares with sizes in the 100...

  15. Modulating Transmembrane α-Helix Interactions through pH-Sensitive Boundary Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Derek P; Deber, Charles M

    2016-08-09

    Changes in pH can alter the structure and activity of proteins and may be used by the cell to control molecular function. This coupling can also be used in non-native applications through the design of pH-sensitive biomolecules. For example, the pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) can spontaneously insert into a lipid bilayer when the pH decreases. We have previously shown that the α-helicity and helix-helix interactions of the TM2 α-helix of the proteolipid protein (PLP) are sensitive to the local hydrophobicity at its C-terminus. Given that there is an ionizable residue (Glu-88) at the C-terminus of this transmembrane (TM) segment, we hypothesized that changing the ionization state of this residue through pH may alter the local hydrophobicity of the peptide enough to affect both its secondary structure and helix-helix interactions. To examine this phenomenon, we synthesized peptide analogues of the PLP TM2 α-helix (wild-type sequence (66)AFQYVIYGTASFFFLYGALLLAEGF(90)). Using circular dichroism and Förster resonance energy transfer in the membrane-mimetic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate, we found that a decrease in pH increases both peptide α-helicity and the extent of self-association. This pH-dependent effect is due specifically to the presence of Glu-88 at the C-terminus. Additional experiments in which Phe-90 was mutated to residues of varying hydrophobicities indicated that the strength of this effect is dependent on the local hydrophobicity near Glu-88. Our results have implications for the design of TM peptide switches and improve our understanding of how membrane protein structure and activity can be regulated through local molecular environmental changes.

  16. High performance 3-coil wireless power transfer system for the 512-electrode epiretinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Nandra, Mandheerej; Yu, Chia-Chen; Tai, Yu-chong

    2012-01-01

    The next-generation retinal prostheses feature high image resolution and chronic implantation. These features demand the delivery of power as high as 100 mW to be wireless and efficient. A common solution is the 2-coil inductive power link, used by current retinal prostheses. This power link tends to include a larger-size extraocular receiver coil coupled to the external transmitter coil, and the receiver coil is connected to the intraocular electrodes through a trans-sclera trans-choroid cable. In the long-term implantation of the device, the cable may cause hypotony (low intraocular pressure) and infection. However, when a 2-coil system is constructed from a small-size intraocular receiver coil, the efficiency drops drastically which may induce over heat dissipation and electromagnetic field exposure. Our previous 2-coil system achieved only 7% power transfer. This paper presents a fully intraocular and highly efficient wireless power transfer system, by introducing another inductive coupling link to bypass the trans-sclera trans-choroid cable. With the specific equivalent load of our customized 512-electrode stimulator, the current 3-coil inductive link was measured to have the overall power transfer efficiency around 36%, with 1-inch separation in saline. The high efficiency will favorably reduce the heat dissipation and electromagnetic field exposure to surrounding human tissues. The effect of the eyeball rotation on the power transfer efficiency was investigated as well. The efficiency can still maintain 14.7% with left and right deflection of 30 degree during normal use. The surgical procedure for the coils' implantation into the porcine eye was also demonstrated.

  17. Beam induced transit time signals at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Beam induced signals at frequencies related to inter-cavity transit times have been detected at SPEAR. Whether this effect enters significantly into beam instabilities has not yet been determined. Preliminary experiments suggest that under certain conditions at low energy (1.5 GeV) , when μ/sub s/, passes through one of the transit time resonances, some current is lost. Care must be taken, however, not to confuse this effect, if it exists, with synchrobetatron resonances and with an as yet unexplained vertical instability in SPEAR. At high energy (3.7 GeV), no effect has been shown to exist, though detectable signals are present. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  18. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S., E-mail: bchss@biochem.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  19. Large coil program support structure conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to perform tests on both pool boiling and force cooled superconducting toroidal field coils. The tests will attempt to approximate conditions anticipated in an ignition tokamak. The test requirements resulted in a coil support design which accommodates up to six (6) test coils and is mounted to a structure capable of resisting coil interactions. The steps leading to the present LCP coil support structure design, details on selected structural components, and the basic assembly sequence are discussed

  20. FPGA helix tracking algorithm for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yutie; Galuska, Martin; Gessler, Thomas; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soeren; Muenchow, David; Spruck, Bjoern [II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen University (Germany); Ye, Hua [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The PANDA detector is a general-purpose detector for physics with high luminosity cooled antiproton beams, planed to operate at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The central detector includes a silicon Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) and a Straw Tube Tracker (STT). Without any hardware trigger, large amounts of raw data are streaming into the data acquisition system. The data reduction task is performed in the online system by reconstruction algorithms programmed on FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) as first level and on a farm of GPUs or PCs as a second level. One important part in the system is the online track reconstruction. In this presentation, an online tracking algorithm for helix tracking reconstruction in the solenoidal field is shown. The tracking algorithm is composed by two parts, a road finding module followed by an iterative helix parameter calculation module. A performance study using C++ and the status of the VHDL implementation are presented.

  1. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  2. Regulation of TCF ETS-domain transcription factors by helix-loop-helix motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Julie; Inoue, Toshiaki; Yates, Paula; Clancy, Anne; Norton, John D; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2003-08-15

    DNA binding by the ternary complex factor (TCF) subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors is tightly regulated by intramolecular and intermolecular interactions. The helix-loop-helix (HLH)-containing Id proteins are trans-acting negative regulators of DNA binding by the TCFs. In the TCF, SAP-2/Net/ERP, intramolecular inhibition of DNA binding is promoted by the cis-acting NID region that also contains an HLH-like motif. The NID also acts as a transcriptional repression domain. Here, we have studied the role of HLH motifs in regulating DNA binding and transcription by the TCF protein SAP-1 and how Cdk-mediated phosphorylation affects the inhibitory activity of the Id proteins towards the TCFs. We demonstrate that the NID region of SAP-1 is an autoinhibitory motif that acts to inhibit DNA binding and also functions as a transcription repression domain. This region can be functionally replaced by fusion of Id proteins to SAP-1, whereby the Id moiety then acts to repress DNA binding in cis. Phosphorylation of the Ids by cyclin-Cdk complexes results in reduction in protein-protein interactions between the Ids and TCFs and relief of their DNA-binding inhibitory activity. In revealing distinct mechanisms through which HLH motifs modulate the activity of TCFs, our results therefore provide further insight into the role of HLH motifs in regulating TCF function and how the inhibitory properties of the trans-acting Id HLH proteins are themselves regulated by phosphorylation.

  3. Test facility for PLT TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearney, J.; File, J.; Dreskin, S.

    1975-01-01

    Past experience with the model C stellerator and other toroidal field devices indicates that mechanical and electrical tests of a toroidal field coil prior to maximum field operation of the device is prudent and desirable. This paper describes a test program for the PLT-TF coils. The test stand consists of one test coil, two background coils and a steel supporting structure. The three coil configuration produces a 67.5 kG field at the inner conductor (38 kG at the bore center) and simulates a 1/R field distribution in the bore of the test coil. The resolution of the field force system and resultant stresses within the test structure are discussed. A test procedure is described which maximizes the information obtained from a 100,000 pulse program

  4. Selective intercalation of six ligands molecules in a self-assembled triple helix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos timoneda, Miguel; Kerckhoffs, J.M.C.A.; Reinhoudt, David; Crego Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    The addition of a ligand molecule to an artificial self-assembled triple helix leads to the selective intercalation of two hydrogen-bonded trimers in specific binding pockets. Furthermore, the triple helix suffers large conformational rearrangements in order to accommodate the ligand molecules in a

  5. CHEMICAL COMPLEXITY IN THE HELIX NEBULA: MULTI-LINE OBSERVATIONS OF H{sub 2}CO, HCO{sup +}, AND CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zack, L. N.; Ziurys, L. M., E-mail: lziurys@email.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210041, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    Observations of CO, HCO{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO have been carried out at nine positions across the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. Measurements of the J = 1 {yields} 0, 2 {yields} 1, and 3 {yields}2 transitions of CO, two transitions of HCO{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0 and 3 {yields}2), and five lines of H{sub 2}CO (J{sub Ka,Kc} = 1{sub 0,1} {yields} 0{sub 0,0}, 2{sub 1,2} {yields} 1{sub 1,1}, 2{sub 0,2} {yields} 1{sub 0,1}, 2{sub 1,1} {yields} 1{sub 1,0}, and 3{sub 0,3} {yields}2{sub 0,2}) were conducted in the 0.8, 1, 2, and 3 mm bands toward this highly evolved planetary nebula. HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO were detected at all positions, along with three transitions of CO. From a radiative transfer analysis, the kinetic temperature was found to be T{sub K} {approx} 15-40 K across the Helix with a gas density of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.1-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. The warmer gas appears to be closer to the central star, but high density material is distributed throughout the nebula. For CO, the column density was found to be N{sub tot} {approx} 0.25-4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, with a fractional abundance of f (CO/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. Column densities for HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO were determined to be N{sub tot} {approx} 0.2-5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} and 0.2-1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, respectively, with fractional abundances of f (HCO{sup +}/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and f (H{sub 2}CO/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-several orders of magnitude higher than predicted by chemical models. Polyatomic molecules in the Helix appear to be well-protected from photodissociation and may actually seed the diffuse interstellar medium.

  6. Transition from condensation-induced counter-current flow to dispersed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; Tiselj, I.

    2004-01-01

    Model of transition from the horizontally stratified condensation-induced counter-current flow to slug flow has been analyzed with computer code WAHA and compared to the experimental data obtained in the steamline of the PMK2 test facility of Hungarian Atomic Energy Institute. The experiment was performed in the steamline initially filled with hot vapor that was gradually flooded with cold liquid. Successful simulation of the condensation-induced water hammer that follows the transition, requires accurate description of the horizontally stratified and slug flow regimes and criteria for transition between both flow regimes. Current version of the WAHA code, not verified for the condensation induced type of the water hammer, predicts the water-hammer pressure peak that exceeds 600 bar, while the measured pressure is p m = 170 ± 50 bar. Sensitivity analysis of the inter-phase exchange terms and transition conditions, pointed to the most important closure relations for heat, mass and momentum transfer. The main conclusion of the analysis is large uncertainty of the simulations: minor modification of the crucial correlations can lead to a severe water-hammer in one case, or to the 'calm' transient without pressure peaks in the other case. Large uncertainty is observed in experiments. The same simulation was performed also with RELAP5 code. However, no water hammer was predicted. (author)

  7. Transcriptional regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wels, C.

    2010-01-01

    The downregulation of epithelial markers followed by upregulation of mesenchymal characteristics is an important step in melanoma development. This process goes along with gains in cell proliferation and motility, depolarization and detachment from neighbouring cells, finally enabling melanoma cells to leave the primary site of tumor growth and to circulate through the blood or lymphatic system. The entirety of these events is referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Changes during EMT are accomplished by a set of transcription factors which share the same DNA binding site called E-box. These E-box binding transcription factors are subsumed as epithelial-mesenchymal transitions regulators (EMTRs). In this thesis, I studied the interplay of the zinc-finger transcription factors Slug and ZEB1 and the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist during melanoma progression. I demonstrate for the first time the direct and specific transcriptional upregulation of one EMTR, ZEB1, by another, Slug, using gene silencing and overexpression studies together with mobility shift and luciferase assays. The two transcription factors cooperate in repressing the epithelial adhesion molecule E-cadherin which is supposed to be a crucial step during early EMT. Further, they show additive effects in promoting detachment from neighbouring cells and cell migration. Conceptually, Slug and ZEB1 are supported by Twist, a transcription factor that might be less pivotal for E-cadherin repression but rather for inducing the expression of the mesenchymal marker N-cadherin, enabling adhesion to mesenchymal cells, thereby promoting migration and invasion of melanoma cells.Taken together, I provide a model of a hierarchical organization of EMT transcription factors, with Slug as a transcriptional activator of ZEB1, leading to cooperative effects on detachment and migration and, together with Twist, leading to EMT in melanoma. (author) [de

  8. Pressure-induced magnetic transition in CeP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Mori, N.; Okayama, Y.; Haga, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    1997-01-01

    Pressure dependence of magnetization in CeP is investigated up to 2 GPa. Multi-step transitions are induced by pressure. An antiferromagnetic transition at T N =11 K below 0.1 GPa develops into two (magnetic) transitions at T L and T H in the region of 0.1 L , T H and T d above 1.3 GPa. For decreasing temperature an abrupt increase of magnetization, M(T), has been observed below T H and a round maximum of magnetization appears at T L for P≥0.4 GPa. Above 1.3 GPa, an anomalous decrease of M(T) begins at T d =10 K. Using previously reported 31 P-NMR shift data it is shown that the pressure dependence of a characteristic temperature, which is proportional to the crystal field splitting in the paramagnetic temperature region, decreases rapidly with increasing pressure. (orig.)

  9. An intermittency model for predicting roughness induced transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xuan; Durbin, Paul

    2014-11-01

    An extended model for roughness-induced transition is proposed based on an intermittency transport equation for RANS modeling formulated in local variables. To predict roughness effects in the fully turbulent boundary layer, published boundary conditions for k and ω are used, which depend on the equivalent sand grain roughness height, and account for the effective displacement of wall distance origin. Similarly in our approach, wall distance in the transition model for smooth surfaces is modified by an effective origin, which depends on roughness. Flat plate test cases are computed to show that the proposed model is able to predict the transition onset in agreement with a data correlation of transition location versus roughness height, Reynolds number, and inlet turbulence intensity. Experimental data for a turbine cascade are compared with the predicted results to validate the applicability of the proposed model. Supported by NSF Award Number 1228195.

  10. Large coil test facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.; Mann, T.L.

    1978-02-01

    In the development of a superconducting toroidal field (TF) magnet for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak reactor, several different TF coils, about half TNS size, will be built and tested to permit selection of a design and fabrication procedure for full-scale TNS coils. A conceptual design has been completed for a facility to test D-shaped TF coils, 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, operating at 4-6 K, cooled either by boiling helium or by forced-flow supercritical helium. Up to six coils can be accommodated in a toroidal array housed in a single vacuum tank. The principal components and systems in the facility are an 11-m vacuum tank, a test stand providing structural support and service connections for the coils, a liquid nitrogen system, a system providing helium both as saturated liquid and at supercritical pressure, coils to produce a pulsed vertical field at any selected test coil position, coil power supplies, process instrumentation and control, coil diagnostics, and a data acquisition and handling system. The test stand structure is composed of a central bucking post, a base structure, and two horizontal torque rings. The coils are bolted to the bucking post, which transmits all gravity loads to the base structure. The torque ring structure, consisting of beams between adjacent coils, acts with the bucking structure to react all the magnetic loads that occur when the coils are energized. Liquid helium is used to cool the test stand structure to 5 K to minimize heat conduction to the coils. Liquid nitrogen is used to precool gaseous helium during system cooldown and to provide thermal radiation shielding

  11. Triple helix interactions for eco-innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Roberto Rivas; Riisgaard, Henrik; Remmen, Arne

    the role of science parks in promoting eco-innovation. This study uses qualitative data gathered in two units of analysis: Panama Canal Authority and City of Knowledge Science Park. The study examines how Triple Helix interactions have built the regional system of eco-innovation at the Panama Canal...

  12. Solitons in an isolated helix chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Zolotaryuk, Alexander; Savin, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    as a generalization of the well-known one-dimensional Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model to include transverse degrees of freedom of the chain molecules. In the particular case of the alpha-helix molecular chain, the intermolecular interactions involved into the model are the point-point bonds connecting the first-, second...

  13. Shear-induced transitions in a ternary polymeric system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    The first three-dimensional simulation of shear-induced phase transitions in a polymeric system has been performed. The method is based on dynamic density-functional theory. The pathways between a bicontinuous phase with developing gyroid mesostructure and a lamellar/cylinder phase coexistence are

  14. Rope coiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitichoke Amnuanpol

    2017-10-19

    Oct 19, 2017 ... The catenary is associated with the purely imaginary wave number and the helix is associated with the real wave number. ... Rope; bending; twisting; buckling instability; Froude number. PACS Nos 46.32.+x; 46.70.Hg; 61.43 .... a laser photoelectric sensor. and moment of inertia of the cross-section I = A2/2π.

  15. Coil supporting device for a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Kazuo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To reduce a thermal stress of a coil such as a magnetic limiter to minimize stress acting on a protective tube of the coil. Structure: A coil within a protective tube has its outer periphery surrounded and supported by a heat-resisting material such as ceramic at more than two positions suitably spaced lengthwise of a coil conductor, and heat insulating members are interposed between both sides of the coil and the protective tube so that it may be retained with respect to the width of the coil. Further, a heat-resisting resilient member is inserted in a clearance between an outer circumference and an inner circumference of the coil to allow a radial displacement of the coil. As a result, elongation of the coil due to thermal expansion may be escaped at the aforesaid two supports to reduce thermal stress of the coil and protective tube to support the coil within the protective tube in positively heat-resisting and insulating manner. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  17. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  18. MicroRNA-212 post-transcriptionally regulates oocyte-specific basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor, factor in the germline alpha (FIGLA, during bovine early embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swamy K Tripurani

    Full Text Available Factor in the germline alpha (FIGLA is an oocyte-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for primordial follicle formation and expression of many genes required for folliculogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic survival. Here we report the characterization of bovine FIGLA gene and its regulation during early embryogenesis. Bovine FIGLA mRNA expression is restricted to gonads and is detected in fetal ovaries harvested as early as 90 days of gestation. FIGLA mRNA and protein are abundant in germinal vesicle and metaphase II stage oocytes, as well as in embryos from pronuclear to eight-cell stage but barely detectable at morula and blastocyst stages, suggesting that FIGLA might be a maternal effect gene. Recent studies in zebrafish and mice have highlighted the importance of non-coding small RNAs (microRNAs as key regulatory molecules targeting maternal mRNAs for degradation during embryonic development. We hypothesized that FIGLA, as a maternal transcript, is regulated by microRNAs during early embryogenesis. Computational predictions identified a potential microRNA recognition element (MRE for miR-212 in the 3' UTR of the bovine FIGLA mRNA. Bovine miR-212 is expressed in oocytes and tends to increase in four-cell and eight-cell stage embryos followed by a decline at morula and blastocyst stages. Transient transfection and reporter assays revealed that miR-212 represses the expression of FIGLA in a MRE dependent manner. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-212 mimic in bovine early embryos dramatically reduced the expression of FIGLA protein. Collectively, our results demonstrate that FIGLA is temporally regulated during bovine early embryogenesis and miR-212 is an important negative regulator of FIGLA during the maternal to zygotic transition in bovine embryos.

  19. Gradient coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, G.; Siebold, H.

    1984-01-01

    A gradient coil system for an image-generating, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographic apparatus, particularly a zeugmatographic apparatus. The gradient coil system is arranged on a support body of rotational symmetry, illustratively a hollow cylindrical support body, having an axis which extends along the z-direction of an x, y, z coordinate system which has an origin in the center of imaging region. The gradient coil system contains two pairs of toroidal individual coils which are arranged symmetrically with respect to an x-y plane which extends through the center of the imaging region and which are arranged perpendicular to the z-axis. The direction of current flow in the individual coils of a coil pair is opposite to the direction of flow in the individual coils of the other coil pair. Moreover, further sets of coils are provided for generating field gradient Gx in the x-direction, and Gy in the y-direction. The hollow cylindrical shape of the support body on which the individual coils are arranged permit an imaging region having a substantially spherical volume with a substantially constant field gradient Gz to be achieved. Each of the coils has a predetermined linkage factor which corresponds to the product of the current flowing through the number of coil turns of the coil. Those coils which are arranged further from the plane of symmetry have a substantially larger linkage factor than the coils which are nearer to the plane of symmetry

  20. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  1. Discussion of discrete D shape toroidal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiho, Katsuyuki; Ohara, Takeshi; Agatsuma, Ko; Onishi, Toshitada

    1988-01-01

    A novel design for a toroidal coil, called the D shape coil, was reported by J. File. The coil conductors are in pure tension and then subject to no bending moment. This leads to a smaller number of emf supports in a simpler configuration than that with the conventional toroidal coil of circular cross-section. The contours of the D shape are given as solutions of a differential equation. This equation includes the function of the magnetic field distribution in the conductor region which is inversely proportional to the winding radius. It is therefore important to use the exact magnetic field distribution. However the magnetic field distribution becomes complicated when the D shape toroidal coil is comprised of discrete coils and also depends on the D shape configuration. A theory and a computer program for designing the practical pure-tension toroidal coil are developed. Using this computer code, D shape conductors are calculated for various numbers of discrete coils and the results are compared. Electromagnetic forces in the coils are also calculated. It is shown that the hoop stress in the conductors depends only on the total ampere-turns of the coil when the contours of the D shape are similar. (author)

  2. Simulation study of induced EMFs and the suppression during SST-1 start-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V., E-mail: vishal@ipr.res.in; Sharma, D.; Vardhrajulu, A.; Gupta, C.N.; Srinivasan, R.; Daniel, R.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Induced EMFs study in PF coils during SST-1 start up using MATlab simulink. • Integration of wave shaping network to generate practical OT current profile. • This study would protect coil insulation with identifying RC circulating network. • Study of MOV technique for circulation of current through RC. - Abstract: Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) comprises of various copper and superconducting coils for generating magnetic field for initiation, providing equilibrium and shaping of plasma in tokamak. In this paper, an attempt is made to study the induced EMF in superconducting poloidal field coils (PF coils) due to fast ramp down of current in ohmic transformer copper coils (OT coils) for SST-1 plasma initiation. The fast ramp down of current, from few kA to zero amperes in just 50–100 ms in OT coils, is required to achieve plasma breakdown and ramp up of plasma current in tokamak. However, it induces nearly 5 kV EMF in one of the SST-1 PF coils that can damage the coil insulation and also bias negatively the electronic switching of power supply. It is necessary to maintain induced EMF below 1 kV in all PF coils for safe operation of SST-1. The induced EMF up to 1 kV can be clamped without any need of protection and circulating current. If the induced EMF is in excess of 1 kV, then it has to allow the circulation of current through RC network for coil protection from overvoltage. These circulating currents in PF coils will affect the shaping of plasma. In this paper, the induced EMF in PF coils are simulated using MATlab simulink for a typical SST-1 current profile of OT coils. Further, this simulation study is used to design the protection system for PF coils. In this paper, the worst-case induced EMF scenario is considered by excluding the effect of passive elements like vacuum vessel and cryostat on mutual coupling parameters. However, the implementation of the EMF suppression scheme need more elaborated study with considering

  3. Decoherence-induced transition from photon correlation to anti-correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q

    2014-01-01

    Decoherence tends to induce the quantum-to-classical transition, which leads to a crucial obstacle in the realization of reliable quantum information processing. Counterintuitively, we propose that the decoherence due to phase decay brings about the switch from photon correlation to anti-correlation. Stronger decoherence also gives rise to an enhancement of the transition from photon correlation to anti-correlation. This breaks the conventional correlation of strong decoherence with fast decorrelation. (letters)

  4. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Yoshikane, Asuka; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site

  5. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi, E-mail: terawaki@gunma-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yoshikane, Asuka [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Higuchi, Yoshiki [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Koto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Department of Picobiology, Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Koto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Wakamatsu, Kaori [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site.

  6. Effect of temperature on the orthodontic clinical applications of niti closed-coil springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Llamas-Carreras, José M.; Barrera-Mora, José M.; Abalos-Lasbrucci, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    NiTi spring coils were used to obtain large deformation under a constant force. The device consists on a NiTi coil spring, superelastic at body temperature, in order to have a stress plateau during the austenitic retransformation during the unloading. The temperature variations induced changes in the spring force. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the temperature variations in the spring forces and corrosion behaviour simulating the ingestion hot/cold drinks and food. Study Design: The springs were subjected to a tensile force using universal testing machine MTS-Adamel (100 N load cell). All tests were performed in artificial saliva maintained at different temperatures. The corrosion tests were performed according to the ISO-standard 10993-15:2000. Results: The increase in temperature of 18oC induced an increase in the spring force of 30%. However, when the temperature returns to 37oC the distraction force recovers near the initial level. After cooling down the spring to 15oC, the force decreased by 46%. This investigation show as the temperature increase, the corrosion potential shifts towards negative values and the corrosion density is rising. Conclusions: The changes of the temperatures do not modify the superelastic behaviour of the NiTi closed-coil springs. The corrosion potential of NiTi in artificial saliva is decreasing by the rise of the temperatures. Key words:Superelasticity, NiTi, springs, orthodontic, coils, recovery, temperature. PMID:23722142

  7. An analysis of 3D solvation structure in biomolecules: application to coiled coil serine and bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kenji; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2010-06-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) solvation structure around coiled coil serine (Coil-Ser) and inner 3D hydration structure in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were studied using a recently developed method named multicenter molecular Ornstein-Zernike equation (MC-MOZ) theory. In addition, a procedure for analyzing the 3D solvent distribution was proposed. The method enables us to calculate the coordination number of solvent water as well as the strength of hydrogen bonding between the water molecule and the protein. The results for Coil-Ser and bR showed very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Coil supporting device for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Minoru; Ando, Toshiro; Ota, Mitsuru; Ishimura, Masabumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the bending stress exerted on coils thereby preventing the coils from deformation by branching the outer circumferential support frames of coil support frames disposed at an equal pitch circumferentially to the coils into plurality, and integrally forming them to the inner circumferential support frames. Constitution: Each of the support frames for supporting poloidal coils winding around a vacuum vessel is bisected at the radial midway so that the outer circumferential branches are disposed at an equal pitch and they are formed integrally with the inner circumferential support frames. The inner circumferential support frames are fixed by support posts on a bed and the outer circumferential support frames are mounted to the outer edge of wedge-like support posts. Accordingly, if the coils expand outwardly upon increase in the temperature, the stress exerted on the support frame can be decreased. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this paper uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages. The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take place in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent. The effect on accuracy of changes in the system parameters is discussed

  10. Stochastic resonance induced by novel random transitions of motion of FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangjun; Xu Jianxue

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the previous studies which have dealt with stochastic resonance induced by random transitions of system motion between two coexisting limit cycle attractors in the FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neuron model after Hopf bifurcation and which have dealt with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance induced by external noise when the model with periodic input has only one attractor before Hopf bifurcation, in this paper we have focused our attention on stochastic resonance (SR) induced by a novel transition behavior, the transitions of motion of the model among one attractor on the left side of bifurcation point and two attractors on the right side of bifurcation point under the perturbation of noise. The results of research show: since one bifurcation of transition from one to two limit cycle attractors and the other bifurcation of transition from two to one limit cycle attractors occur in turn besides Hopf bifurcation, the novel transitions of motion of the model occur when bifurcation parameter is perturbed by weak internal noise; the bifurcation point of the model may stochastically slightly shift to the left or right when FHN neuron model is perturbed by external Gaussian distributed white noise, and then the novel transitions of system motion also occur under the perturbation of external noise; the novel transitions could induce SR alone, and when the novel transitions of motion of the model and the traditional transitions between two coexisting limit cycle attractors after bifurcation occur in the same process the SR also may occur with complicated behaviors types; the mechanism of SR induced by external noise when FHN neuron model with periodic input has only one attractor before Hopf bifurcation is related to this kind of novel transition mentioned above

  11. Impact of coil price knowledge by the operator on the cost of aneurysm coiling. A single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finitsis, Stephanos; Fahed, Robert; Gaulin, Ian; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain

    2017-09-15

    Endovascular treatment of aneurysms with coils is among the most frequent treatments in interventional neuroradiology, and represents an important expense. Each manufacturer has created several types of coils, with prices varying among brands and coil types. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of cost awareness of the exact price of each coil by the operating physician on the total cost of aneurysm coiling. This was a comparative study conducted over 1 year in a single tertiary care center. The reference cohort and the experimental cohort consisted of all aneurysm embolization procedures performed during the first 6 months and the last 6 months, respectively. During the second period, physicians were given an information sheet with the prices of all available coils and were requested to look at the sheet during each procedure with the instruction to try to reduce the total cost of the coils used. Expenses related to the coiling procedures during each period were compared. 77 aneurysms (39 ruptured) in the reference cohort and 73 aneurysms (36 ruptured) in the experimental cohort were treated, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference regarding aneurysm location and mean size. The overall cost of the coiling procedures, the mean number of coils used per procedure, and the median cost of each procedure did not differ significantly between the two cohorts. Awareness of the precise price of coils by operators without any additional measure did not have a scientifically proven impact on the cost of aneurysm embolization. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Magnetic field coil in nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Takano, Hirohisa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide an electrical-insulatively stabilized magnetic field coil in nuclear fusion device, restraining an increase in voltage when plasma current is rapidly changed. Structure: A magnetic field coil comprises coils arranged coaxial with respective vacuum vessels, said coils being wound in positive and reverse polarities so as to form a vertical magnetic field within the plasma. The coils of the positive polarity are arranged along the vacuum vessel inside of an axis vertical in section of the annular plasma and are arranged symmetrically up and down of a horizontal axis. On the other hand, the coils of the reverse polarity are arranged along the vacuum vessel outside of a vertical axis and arranged symmetrically up and down of the horizontal axis. These positive and reverse polarity coils are alternately connected in series, and lead portions of the coils are connected to a power source by means of connecting wires. In this case, lead positions of the coils are arranged in one direction, and the connecting wires are disposed in closely contact relation to offset magnetic fields formed by the connecting wires each other. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Superconducting self-correcting harmonic coils for pulsed superconducting dipole or multipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dael, A.; Kircher, F.; Perot, J.

    1975-01-01

    Due to the zero resistance of a superconducting wire, an induced current in a closed superconducting circuit is continuously exactly opposed to its cause. This phenomenon was applied to the correction of the field harmonics of a pulsed magnet by putting short-circuited superconducting coils of particular symmetry in the useful aperture of the magnet. After a review of the main characteristics of such devices, the construction of two correcting coils (quadrupole and sextupole) is described. Experimental results of magnetic efficiency and time behavior are given; they are quite encouraging, since the field harmonics were reduced by one or two orders of magnitude

  14. Coil supporting device in nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Ryo; Imura, Yasuya.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To secure intermediate fittings with a coil fixed thereon by an insulating tape to a fixed body by means of fittings, thereby supporting the coil in a narrow space. Structure: A coil is secured to intermediate fittings by means of an insulating tape, after which the intermediate fittings is mounted on a fixed body through fittings to support the coil in a narrow clearance portion between a plasma sealed vessel and a main coil. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Manufacture of the poloidal field conductor insert coil (PFCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, W. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Keefe, C. [Tesla Engineering, Storrington, Sussex (United Kingdom); Rajainmaeki, H. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: hannu.rajainmaki@tech.efda.org; Salpietro, E. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Within the framework of the R and D programme for international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) the European team European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) has been charged with the design and manufacture of the poloidal field conductor insert coil (PFCI). The purpose of the PFCI is to test and demonstrate the performance of long-length full-scale NbTi conductors in ITER-relevant conditions. The PFCI will be tested in the central solenoid model coil test facility at the JAEA, Naka, Japan. This paper details the complete manufacturing of the PFCI including development, forming machining, pre-assembly, impregnation, final assembly and testing. The PFCI is a single-layered wound solenoid of nine turns with a transition joggle in the centre section of the winding and an intermediate joint connection between the upper termination and the main coil winding. To give the required overall dimensions to fit in the testing facility, preformed and machined glass resin composite filler pieces are assembled with the winding and is finally vacuum pressure impregnated (VPI) to create a single assembly unit. The PFCI is enclosed for assembly in a support structure, which consists of an upper and lower flange, each made up of four electrically insulated machined stainless steel castings, and 12 tie rods preloading the complete assembly in the vertical direction. The upper flange is equipped with four radial restraining jacks and the lower flange is equipped with four sets of studs and shear keys to withstand the net vertical and lateral electromagnetic forces. The PFCI is equipped with inductive heaters, voltage taps, temperature transducers, strain gauges and other instrumentation as diagnostics to monitor the performance. The current status of the manufacture is that the coil has passed the final acceptance tests and it is in the support structure assembly stage.

  16. Inactivation of colicin Y by intramembrane helix–helix interaction with its immunity protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmajs, D.; Doležalová, M.; Macek, Pavel; Žídek, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 275, č. 21 (2008), s. 5325-5331 ISSN 1742-464X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colicin immunity * colicin y * helix-helix interaction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.139, year: 2008

  17. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiufang; Nie, Xinyi; Liang, Yilang; Lu, Falong; Yan, Zhongming; Wang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  18. Controlling the delocalization-localization transition of light via electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jing; Huang Guoxiang

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a transition from delocalization to localization of light waves via electromagnetically induced transparency. The system we suggested is a resonant cold atomic ensemble having N configuration, with a control field consisting of two pairs of laser beams with different cross angles, which produce an electromagnetically induced quasiperiodic waveguide (EIQPW) for the propagation of a signal field. By appropriately tuning the incommensurate rate or relative modulation strength between the two pairs of control-field components, the signal field can exhibit the delocalization-localization transition as it transports inside the atomic ensemble. The delocalization-localization transition point is determined and the propagation property of the signal field is studied in detail. Our work provides a way of realizing wave localization via atomic coherence, which is quite different from the conventional, off-resonant mechanism-based Aubry-Andre model, and the great controllability of the EIQPW also allows an easy manipulation of the delocalization-localization transition.

  19. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji

    1998-01-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  20. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  1. Remote maintenance of tandem mirror hybrid coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid Coils (superconducting coils with normal conducting inserts) are being employed with increasing frequency on Tandem Mirror Devices to obtain high field strengths. The normal conducting copper inserts are short lived in comparison to their encircling superconductors. It becomes desirable, therefore, to devise design features and maintenance procedures to replace the inner normal conducting coils without simultaneously replacing the longer lived (and significantly more costly) superconducting coils. The high neutron wall loadings require that the task be accomplished by remote control. The approach is to permanently mount the coil assemblies on track mounted carriages which serve, during machine operation merely as structural supports, but during maintenance procedures as moveable transport devices. The carriages incorporate all necessary provisions to facilitate remote maintenance operations and to adjust and align the coil assemblies with respect to adjacent machine components. The vacuum vessel is severed on both sides of the hybrid coil by means of a remote cutting machine. The entire coil is transported horizontally, normal to the machine axis to a nearby repair station. Prepositioned carriage mounted repair equipment at the repair station withdraws the damaged normal coil as a single entity and inserts a preassembled spare unit. The repaired hybrid coil is reassembled to the reactor. A cost and risk effective procedure has been evolved to maintain one of the more critical components of a Tandem Mirror Machine

  2. BI-ground microstrip array coil vs. conventional microstrip array coil for mouse imaging at 7 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ricardo; Terrones, M. A. López; Jakob, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    At high field strengths, the need for more efficient high frequency coils has grown. Since the radiation losses and the interaction between coil and sample increase proportionally to field strength, the quality factor (Q) and the sensitivity of the coil decrease as consequence of these negative effects. Since Zhang et al proposed in 2001 a new surface coil based on the microstrip transmission line for high frequency, different Tx-Rx phased arrays based on this concept have been already introduced in animal and whole body systems at high field strengths, each of them with different modifications in order to get better field homogeneity, SNR or isolation between coil elements in the array. All these arrays for animals systems have been built for rat imaging. One of these modifications is called BI-Ground Microstrip Array Coil (BIGMAC). The implementation of a smaller two-channel BIGMAC design for mouse imaging is studied and its performance compared to a two-channel conventional Microstrip array at 7 Tesla, the higher isolation by using BIGMAC elements in comparison with conventional Microstrip elements is shown in this work.

  3. Coil supporting device in a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hirohisa; Sasaki, Katsutoki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To slide a vacuum vessel in the nuclear fusion device and a coil within the vacuum vessel and to mount the coil within the vacuum vessel in a manner that it may not be moved by an electromagnetic force, thereby preventing stress from being produced in the coil. Structure: A coil supporting plate mounted at upper and lower parts prevents damage to an insulation of the coil, said coil being held in a U-shaped groove, and can be moved integral with the coil by the action of a roller bearing with a plurality of needle-like rollers arranged in parallel. The coil supporting plate has a plurality of projections disposed on the lower surface thereof, and flat springs are placed in the projections one over another so that the spring action exerted in the lower plate causes the coil to be resiliently bias in a direction of an electromagnetic force applied thereto and to support the coil. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. PH4 of petunia is an R2R3-MYB protein that activates vacuolar acidification through interactions with Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors of the anthocyanin pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quattrocchio, F.M.; Verweij, C.W.; Spelt, C.E.; Mol, J.N.M.; Koes, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    The Petunia hybrids genes ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1) and AN2 encode transcription factors with a basic-helix-loop-helix (BHLH) and a MYB domain, respectively, that are required for anthocyanin synthesis and acidification of the vacuole in petal cells. Mutation of PH4 results in a bluer flower color,

  5. Static stress analysis of coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly for muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Heng; Wang Li; Wu Hong; Guo Xinglong; Xu Fengyu

    2010-01-01

    The stresses in the coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly, which is applied in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), are critical for the structure design and mechanical stability because of a large diameter and relative high magnetic field. This paper presents an analytical stress solution for the MICE coupling coil assembly. The stress due to winding tension is calculated by assuming the coil package as a set of combined cylinders. The thermal and electromechanical stresses are obtained by solving the partial differential equations of displacement based on the power series expansion method. The analytical stress solution is proved to be feasible by calculating stresses in a tested superconducting solenoid with 2.58 m bore at room temperature. The analytical result of the MICE coupling coil is in good agreement with that of the finite element which shows that the transverse shear stress induced by Lorentz force is principally dominant to magnet instability. (authors)

  6. Status of the Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zichy, J; Benz, H.; Horvath, I.; Jakob, B.; Marinucci, C.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Swiss coil is a forced flow coil cooled by supercritical helium. A brief review of the design considerations, some of its specific features, and the progress in fabrication are described. A discussion of both the instrumentation and the cryogenic characteristics of the coil is presented

  7. Hybrid equilibrium field coils for the ORNL TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J; Dory, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    In this study, we make a comparative study of the power supplies required by interior and exterior [to the toroidal field (TF) coils] equilibrium field coils that are separately appropriate for high-β, D-shaped plasmas in TNS. It is shown that the interior coils need power supplies that are an order of magnitude below those required by the exterior coils (while the latter case is much less difficult to build than the former). A hybrid EF coil concept is proposed that combines the interior and the exterior coils to retain their advantages in avoiding large interior coils while lowering the power supplied to the exterior coils by an order of magnitude

  8. Effect of Inductive Coil Shape on Sensing Performance of Linear Displacement Sensor Using Thin Inductive Coil and Pattern Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Wakiwaka

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effect of inductive coil shape on the sensing performance of a linear displacement sensor. The linear displacement sensor consists of a thin type inductive coil with a thin pattern guide, thus being suitable for tiny space applications. The position can be detected by measuring the inductance of the inductive coil. At each position due to the change in inductive coil area facing the pattern guide the value of inductance is different. Therefore, the objective of this research is to study various inductive coil pattern shapes and to propose the pattern that can achieve good sensing performance. Various shapes of meander, triangular type meander, square and circle shape with different turn number of inductive coils are examined in this study. The inductance is measured with the sensor sensitivity and linearity as a performance evaluation parameter of the sensor. In conclusion, each inductive coil shape has its own advantages and disadvantages. For instance, the circle shape inductive coil produces high sensitivity with a low linearity response. Meanwhile, the square shape inductive coil has a medium sensitivity with higher linearity.

  9. A Thermal Performance Analysis and Comparison of Fiber Coils with the D-CYL Winding and QAD Winding Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyou Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal performance under variable temperature conditions of fiber coils with double-cylinder (D-CYL and quadrupolar (QAD winding methods is comparatively analyzed. Simulation by the finite element method (FEM is done to calculate the temperature distribution and the thermal-induced phase shift errors in the fiber coils. Simulation results reveal that D-CYL fiber coil itself has fragile performance when it experiences an axially asymmetrical temperature gradient. However, the axial fragility performance could be improved when the D-CYL coil meshes with a heat-off spool. Through further simulations we find that once the D-CYL coil is provided with an axially symmetrical temperature environment, the thermal performance of fiber coils with the D-CYL winding method is better than that with the QAD winding method under the same variable temperature conditions. This valuable discovery is verified by two experiments. The D-CYL winding method is thus promising to overcome the temperature fragility of interferometric fiber optic gyroscopes (IFOGs.

  10. Fabrication of the KSTAR toroidal field coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.H.; Sa, J.W.; Park, H.K.; Hong, K.H.; Shin, H.; Kim, H.T.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.; Kwak, J.H.; Moon, H.G.; Yoon, H.H.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, S.K.; Song, J.Y.; Nam, K.M.; Byun, S.E.; Kim, H.C.; Ha, E.T.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.S.; Park, K.H.; Hong, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR toroidal field (TF) coil structure is under fabrication upon completion of engineering design and prototype construction. The prototype TF coil structure has been fabricated within allowable tolerances. Encasing of the prototype TF coil (TF00) in the prototype structure has been carried out through major processes involving a coil encasing, an enclosing weld, a vacuum pressure impregnation, and an outer surface machining. During the enclosing weld of the TF00 coil structure, we have measured temperatures and stresses on the coil surface. Assembly test had been performed with the TF00 coil structure. We have chosen Type 316LN as material of the TF coil structure. We used the narrow-gap TIG welding method. Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Company (DHI) will complete the fabrication of the TF coil structure in Feb. 2006. (author)

  11. Golgi coiled-coil proteins contain multiple binding sites for Rab family G proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinka, Rita; Gillingham, Alison K.; Kondylis, Vangelis; Munro, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Vesicles and other carriers destined for the Golgi apparatus must be guided to the correct cisternae. Golgins, long coiled-coil proteins that localize to particular Golgi subdomains via their C termini, are candidate regulators of vesicle sorting. In this study, we report that the GRIP domain

  12. Portal Vein Embolization before Right Hepatectomy: Improved Results Using n-Butyl-Cyanoacrylate Compared to Microparticles Plus Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiu, Boris, E-mail: boris.guiu@chu-dijon.fr; Bize, Pierre; Gunthern, Daniel [Centre Hospitalo-Univeristaire Vaudois, Digestive and Oncologic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Demartines, Nicolas; Halkic, Nermin [Centre Hospitalo-Univeristaire Vaudois, Department of Visceral Surgery (Switzerland); Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalo-Univeristaire Vaudois, Digestive and Oncologic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is currently no consensus in the literature on which embolic agent induces the greatest degree of liver hypertrophy after portal vein embolization (PVE). Only experimental results in a pig model have demonstrated an advantage of n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) over 3 other embolic materials (hydrophilic gel, small and large polyvinyl alcohol particles) for PVE. Therefore, the aim of this human study was to retrospectively compare the results of PVE using NBCA with those using spherical microparticles plus coils. Methods: A total of 34 patients underwent PVE using either NBCA (n = 20), or spherical microparticles plus coils (n = 14). PVE was decided according to preoperative volumetry on the basis of contrast-enhanced CT. Groups were compared for age, sex, volume of the left lobe before PVE and future remnant liver ratio (FRL) (volume of the left lobe/total liver volume - tumor volume). The primary end point was the increase in left lobe volume 1 month after PVE. Secondary end points were procedure complications and biological tolerance. Results: Both groups were similar in terms of age, sex ratio, left lobe volume, and FRL before PVE. NBCA induced a greater increase in volume after PVE than did microparticles plus coils (respectively, +74 {+-} 69 % and +23 {+-} 14 %, p < 0.05). The amount of contrast medium used for the procedure was significantly larger when microparticles and coils rather than NBCA were used (respectively, 264 {+-} 43 ml and 162 {+-} 34 ml, p < 0.01). The rate of PVE complications as well as the biological tolerance was similar in both groups. Conclusion: NBCA seems more effective than spherical microparticles plus coils to induce left-lobe hypertrophy.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of AB-copolymers with saturating bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovich, A V; Khokhlov, A R; Bohr, J

    2003-01-01

    Structural transitions in a single AB-copolymer chain where saturating bonds can be formed between A-and B-units are studied by means of Monte Carlo computer simulations using the bond fluctuation model. Three transitions are found, coil-globule, coil-hairpin and globule-hairpin, depending on the nature of a particular AB-sequence: statistical random sequence, diblock sequence and 'random-complementary' sequence (one-half of such an AB-sequence is random with Bernoulli statistics while the other half is complementary to the first one). The properties of random-complementary sequences are closer to those of diblock sequences than to the properties of random sequences. The model (although quite rough) is expected to represent some basic features of real RNA molecules, i.e. the formation of secondary structure of RNA due to hydrogen bonding of corresponding bases and stacking interactions of the base pairs in helixes. We introduce the notation of RNA-like copolymers and discuss in what sense the sequences studie...

  14. Novel Anti-Nicotine Vaccine Using a Trimeric Coiled-Coil Hapten Carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D Miller

    Full Text Available Tobacco addiction represents one of the largest public health problems in the world and is the leading cause of cancer and heart disease, resulting in millions of deaths a year. Vaccines for smoking cessation have shown considerable promise in preclinical models, although functional antibody responses induced in humans are only modestly effective in preventing nicotine entry into the brain. The challenge in generating serum antibodies with a large nicotine binding capacity is made difficult by the fact that this drug is non-immunogenic and must be conjugated as a hapten to a protein carrier. To circumvent the limitations of traditional carriers like keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH, we have synthesized a short trimeric coiled-coil peptide (TCC that creates a series of B and T cell epitopes with uniform stoichiometry and high density. Here we compared the relative activities of a TCC-nic vaccine and two control KLH-nic vaccines using Alum as an adjuvant or GLA-SE, which contains a synthetic TLR4 agonist formulated in a stable oil-in-water emulsion. The results showed that the TCC's high hapten density correlated with a better immune response in mice as measured by anti-nicotine Ab titer, affinity, and specificity, and was responsible for a reduction in anti-carrier immunogenicity. The Ab responses achieved with this synthetic vaccine resulted in a nicotine binding capacity in serum that could prevent >90% of a nicotine dose equivalent to three smoked cigarettes (0.05 mg/kg from reaching the brain.

  15. Lysine as helix C-capping residue in a synthetic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, G; Dhanapal, B; Dumy, P; Varma, V; Mutter, M; Bodenhausen, G

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the synthetic peptide CH3CO(Leu-Ser-Leu-Leu-Leu-Ser-Leu)3Lys-NH2 in trifluoroethanol/water 60/40 (volume ratio) was characterized by two-dimensional nmr spectroscopy. The peptide, closely related to the amphiphilic helix models designed by W. F. De-Grado and co-workers to mimic protein ion channels [(1988) Science, Vol. 240, p. 1177-1181], folds into a regular helix spanning residues 1-20. Evidence for a helix C-terminal capping conformation, involving the terminal lysine residue, was observed from Overhauser effects and checked for consistency by restrained molecular dynamics simulations. The side-chain amino group of Lys22 forms a hydrogen bond with the carbonyl of Leu18, and the distorted helical geometry of the terminal dipeptide allows the inclusion of a water bridge between the backbone NH of the Lys22 residue and the carbonyls of Leu19 and Ser20.

  16. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  17. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  18. Thermodynamic Effects of Replacements of Pro Residues in Helix Interiors of Maltose-Binding Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Prajapati, RS; Lingaraju, GM; Bacchawat, Kiran; Surolia, Avadhesha; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2003-01-01

    Introduction of Pro residues into helix interiors results in protein destabilization. It is currently unclear if the converse substitution (i.e., replacement of Pro residues that naturally occur in helix interiors would be stabilizing). Maltose-binding protein is a large 370-amino acid protein that contains 21 Pro residues. Of these, three nonconserved residues (P48, P133, and P159) occur at helix interiors. Each of the residues was replaced with Ala and Ser. Stabilities were characterized by...

  19. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  20. Power loss problems in EXTRAP coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1977-02-01

    The Ohmic power loss in the coils of external ring traps is minimized with respect to the thermonuclear power production. In the case of the DT-reaction this leads to dimensions and power densities being relevant to full-scale reactors. Not only superconducting or refrigerated coil windings can thus be used, but also hot-coil systems which are operated at several hundred degrees centrigrade and form part of a steam cycle and power extraction system. For hot coils the problems of void formation and tritium regeneration have to be further examined. The high beta value leads to moderately large coil stresses. Finally, replacement and repair become simplified by the present coil geometry. (Auth.)

  1. Performance of the Conduction-Cooled LDX Levitation Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P. C.; Schultz, J. H.; Smith, B. A.; Titus, P. H.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Hwang, K. P.; Naumovich, G. J.; Camille, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) was developed to study plasma confinement in a dipole magnetic field. Plasma is confined in the magnetic field of a 680-kg Nb3Sn Floating Coil (F-coil) that is electromagnetically supported at the center of a 5-m diameter by 3-m tall vacuum chamber. The Levitation Coil (L-coil) is a 2800-turn, double pancake winding that supports the weight of the F-coil and controls its vertical position within the vacuum chamber. The use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) Bi-2223 for the L-coil minimizes the electrical and cooling power needed for levitation. The L-coil winding pack and support plate are suspended within the L-coil cryostat and cooled by conduction to a single-stage cryocooler rated for 25-W heat load at approximately 20 K. The coil current leads consist of conduction-cooled copper running from room temperature to 80 K and a pair of commercially-available, 150-A HTS leads. An automatically filled liquid-nitrogen reservoir provides cooling for the coil's radiation shield and for the leads' 80-K heat stations. This paper discusses the L-coil system design and its observed cryogenic performance.

  2. Active internal corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.

    1986-01-01

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. This paper describes some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained

  3. A novel method for coiled tubing installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Peter J. [2H Offshore, Houston, TX (United States); Tibbetts, David [Aquactic Engineering and Construction Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-19

    Installation of flexible pipe for offshore developments is costly due to the physical cost of the flexible pipe, expensive day rates and the availability of suitable installation vessels. Considering the scarcity of flexible pipe in today's increasingly demanding and busy market, operators are seeking a cost effective solution for installing piping in a range of water depths using vessels which are readily on hand. This paper describes a novel approach to installing reeled coiled tubing, from 1 inch to 5 inch diameter, from the back of a small vessel in water depths from 40 m up to around 1000 m. The uniqueness of the system is the fact that the equipment design is modular and compact. This means that when disassembled, it fits into standard 40 ft shipping containers, and the size allows it to be installed on even relatively small vessels of opportunity, such as anchor handling or installation vessels, from smaller, and cheaper quay side locations. Such an approach is the ideal solution to the problem faced by operators, in that it allows the installation of cheaper, readily available coiled tubing, from cost-effective vessels, which do not need to transit to a pick up the system. (author)

  4. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    An optimization approach of HTS coils in HTS synchronous machines (SM) is presented. The optimization is aimed at high power SM suitable for direct driven wind turbines applications. The optimization process was applied to a general radial flux machine with a peak air gap flux density of ~3T...... is suitable for which coil segment is presented. Thus, the performed study gives valuable input for the coil design of HTS machines ensuring optimal usage of HTS tapes....

  5. PspF-binding domain PspA1-144 and the PspA·F complex: New insights into the coiled-coil-dependent regulation of AAA+ proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadnik, Hendrik; Schöpfel, Michael; Heidrich, Eyleen; Mehner, Denise; Lilie, Hauke; Parthier, Christoph; Risselada, H Jelger; Grubmüller, Helmut; Stubbs, Milton T; Brüser, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Phage shock protein A (PspA) belongs to the highy conserved PspA/IM30 family and is a key component of the stress inducible Psp system in Escherichia coli. One of its central roles is the regulatory interaction with the transcriptional activator of this system, the σ(54) enhancer-binding protein PspF, a member of the AAA+ protein family. The PspA/F regulatory system has been intensively studied and serves as a paradigm for AAA+ enzyme regulation by trans-acting factors. However, the molecular mechanism of how exactly PspA controls the activity of PspF and hence σ(54) -dependent expression of the psp genes is still unclear. To approach this question, we identified the minimal PspF-interacting domain of PspA, solved its structure, determined its affinity to PspF and the dissociation kinetics, identified residues that are potentially important for PspF regulation and analyzed effects of their mutation on PspF in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that several characteristics of AAA+ regulation in the PspA·F complex resemble those of the AAA+ unfoldase ClpB, with both proteins being regulated by a structurally highly conserved coiled-coil domain. The convergent evolution of both regulatory domains points to a general mechanism to control AAA+ activity for divergent physiologic tasks via coiled-coil domains. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Experimental Study on Intelligent Control Scheme for Fan Coil Air-Conditioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An intelligent control scheme for fan coil air-conditioning systems has been put forward in order to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional proportion-integral-derivative (PID control scheme. These shortcomings include the inability of anti-interference and large inertia. An intelligent control test rig of fan coil air-conditioning system has been built, and MATLAB/Simulink dynamics simulation software has been adopted to implement the intelligent control scheme. A software for data exchange has been developed to combine the intelligence control system and the building automation (BA system. Experimental tests have been conducted to investigate the effectiveness of different control schemes including the traditional PID control, fuzzy control, and fuzzy-PID control for fan coil air-conditioning system. The effects of control schemes have been compared and analyzed in robustness, static and dynamic character, and economy. The results have shown that the developed data exchange interface software can induce the intelligent control scheme of the BA system more effectively. Among the proposed control strategies, fuzzy-PID control scheme which has the advantages of both traditional PID and fuzzy schemes is the optimal control scheme for the fan coil air-conditioning system.

  7. Conceptual Design of Alborz Tokamak Poloidal Coils System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. One of the most important parts of tokamak design is the design of the poloidal field system. This part includes the numbers, individual position, currents and number of coil turns of the magnetic field coils. Circular cross section tokamaks have Vertical Field system but since the elongation and triangularity of plasma cross section shaping are important in improving the plasma performance and stability, the poloidal field coils are designed to have a shaped plasma configuration. In this paper the design of vertical field system and the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation will be discussed. The poloidal field coils system consists of 12 circular coils located symmetrically about the equator plane, six inner PF coils and six outer PF coils. Six outer poloidal field coils (PF) are located outside of the toroidal field coils (TF), and six inner poloidal field coils are wound on the inner legs and are located outside of a vacuum vessel.

  8. Polymer cancerostatics with a coiled coil motif targeted against murine leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert; Janoušková, Olga; Sieglová, Irena; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Tomalová, Barbora; Kovář, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, 4 (Suppl) (2017), s. 36 ISSN 2325-9604. [International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery. 29.05.2017-31.05.2017, Osaka] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-17207S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : coiled coil * polymer cancerostatics * active targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; EC - Immunology (MBU-M) https://www.scitechnol.com/conference-abstracts/scientific-tracks-abstracts/nanodelivery-2017-proceedings.html

  9. Control of the Speed of a Light-Induced Spin Transition through Mesoscale Core-Shell Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Ashley C; Slimani, Ahmed; Cain, John M; Andrus, Matthew J; Ahir, Akhil R; Abboud, Khalil A; Meisel, Mark W; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Talham, Daniel R

    2018-05-02

    The rate of the light-induced spin transition in a coordination polymer network solid dramatically increases when included as the core in mesoscale core-shell particles. A series of photomagnetic coordination polymer core-shell heterostructures, based on the light-switchable Rb a Co b [Fe(CN) 6 ] c · mH 2 O (RbCoFe-PBA) as core with the isostructural K j Ni k [Cr(CN) 6 ] l · nH 2 O (KNiCr-PBA) as shell, are studied using temperature-dependent powder X-ray diffraction and SQUID magnetometry. The core RbCoFe-PBA exhibits a charge transfer-induced spin transition (CTIST), which can be thermally and optically induced. When coupled to the shell, the rate of the optically induced transition from low spin to high spin increases. Isothermal relaxation from the optically induced high spin state of the core back to the low spin state and activation energies associated with the transition between these states were measured. The presence of a shell decreases the activation energy, which is associated with the elastic properties of the core. Numerical simulations using an electro-elastic model for the spin transition in core-shell particles supports the findings, demonstrating how coupling of the core to the shell changes the elastic properties of the system. The ability to tune the rate of optically induced magnetic and structural phase transitions through control of mesoscale architecture presents a new approach to the development of photoswitchable materials with tailored properties.

  10. Solutions for Safe Hot Coil Evacuation and Coil Handling in Case of Thick and High Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieberer Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently hot rolling plants are entering the market segment for thick gauges and high strength steel grades where the elastic bending property of the strip leads to internal forces in the coil during coiling operation. The strip tends to open. Primetals is investigating several possibilities to facilitate safe coil evacuation and coil handling under spring-back conditions. The contribution includes finite element models of such mechanical solutions. Results of parameter variation and stability limits of case studies are presented in the paper.

  11. An inflatable surface coil for rectal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.F.; Hajek, P.C.; Baker, L.L.; Gylys-Morin, V.; Mattrey, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coils have become ubiquitous in MR imaging of the body because of substantial gains in signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, there are some anatomic regions, such as the prostate, for which surface coils have insufficient depth sensitivity. The authors have developed an inflatable, distributed capacitance, passively decoupled surface coil which is collapsed for insertion and reinflated for imaging. Images of the prostate are dramatically improved due to proximity of the coil. Lesions in cadaver specimens were observed which were not seen with body coil imaging. Clinical trials are expected to begin in September

  12. MURC, a muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein, is involved in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Masashi; Ueyama, Tomomi; Ogata, Takehiro; Takehara, Naofumi; Nakajima, Norio; Isodono, Koji; Asada, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-08-01

    Skeletal myogenesis is a multistep process by which multinucleated mature muscle fibers are formed from undifferentiated, mononucleated myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanisms of skeletal myogenesis have not been fully elucidated. Here, we identified muscle-restricted coiled-coil (MURC) protein as a positive regulator of myogenesis. In skeletal muscle, MURC was localized to the cytoplasm with accumulation in the Z-disc of the sarcomere. In C2C12 myoblasts, MURC expression occurred coincidentally with myogenin expression and preceded sarcomeric myosin expression during differentiation into myotubes. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of MURC impaired differentiation in C2C12 myoblasts, which was accompanied by impaired myogenin expression and ERK activation. Overexpression of MURC in C2C12 myoblasts resulted in the promotion of differentiation with enhanced myogenin expression and ERK activation during differentiation. During injury-induced muscle regeneration, MURC expression increased, and a higher abundance of MURC was observed in immature myofibers compared with mature myofibers. In addition, ERK was activated in regenerating tissue, and ERK activation was detected in MURC-expressing immature myofibers. These findings suggest that MURC is involved in the skeletal myogenesis that results from modulation of myogenin expression and ERK activation. MURC may play pivotal roles in the molecular mechanisms of skeletal myogenic differentiation.

  13. Development of Ground Coils with Low Eddy Current Loss by Applying the Compression Molding Method after the Coil Winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Aiba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Ota, Satoru; Okada, Shigenori

    In a magnetically levitated transportation (MAGLEV) system, a huge number of ground coils will be required because they must be laid for the whole line. Therefore, stable performance and reduced cost are essential requirements for the ground coil development. On the other hand, because the magnetic field changes when the superconducting magnet passes by, an eddy current will be generated in the conductor of the ground coil and will result in energy loss. The loss not only increases the magnetic resistance for the train running but also brings an increase in the ground coil temperature. Therefore, the reduction of the eddy current loss is extremely important. This s