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Sample records for induced diamond formation

  1. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond

  2. Anatomy of a pressure-induced, ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, Stuart A.; Egli, Ramon; Hochleitner, Rupert; Roud, Sophie C.; Volk, Michael W. R.; Le Goff, Maxime; de Wit, Maarten

    2011-10-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multidomain and single-domain pyrrhotite under nonhydrostatic pressure. Magnetic remanence in single-domain pyrrhotite is largely insensitive to pressure until 2 GPa, whereas the remanence of multidomain pyrrhotite increases 50% over that of initial conditions by 2 GPa, and then decreases until only 33% of the original remanence remains by 4.5 GPa. In contrast, magnetic coercivity increases with increasing pressure to 4.5 GPa. Below ˜1.5 GPa, multidomain pyrrhotite obeys Néel theory with a positive correlation between coercivity and remanence; above ˜1.5 GPa, it behaves single domain-like yet distinctly different from uncompressed single-domain pyrrhotite. The ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Owing to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamonds experience a confining pressure at Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used.

  3. Mechanically induced degradation of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwelen, F V

    1996-01-01

    bombardment a mechanically induced graphitisation, as opposed to a thermally activated transformation, may occur locally on collision with the CVD diamond. Two types of diamond-graphite interfaces were observed: (111) planes of diamond parallel to the a-b planes of graphite and (111) planes of diamond, smoothly within the plane, connected to a-b planes of graphite. The thesis concludes with a summary of the results, conclusions and recommendations for further work. This thesis deals with the wear of diamond occurring during frictional sliding contact between diamonds. In the introduction, a literature survey on friction, wear and polishing behaviour of diamond, with some emphasis on the anisotropy, is presented and earlier work is discussed. A review of the existing theories is given, a new hypothesis is proposed and key-experiments for verification are identified. Electron microscopical techniques such as High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) imaging and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy are described a...

  4. Thermally induced defects in industrial diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the authors make use of laser heating of HTHP industrial diamond, as well as the optically measured temperature profile of the diamond surface, to study temperature induced changes to the diamond structure, both chemically...

  5. Microinclusions in polycrystalline diamonds: insights into processes of diamond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Enzmann, F.; Schwarz, J. O.; Kronz, A.

    2009-04-01

    Polycrystalline diamond aggregates (framesites) contain silicates of eclogitic and peridotitic affinity (e.g. Kurat and Dobosi, 2000). The minerals occur mostly in interstices and are intimately intergrown with the diamonds, indicating contemporaneous crystallization within the diamond stability field in the Earth's mantle. In addition to silicates, rarer phases such as Fe-carbide can sometimes be found in framesites that record unusually low local oxygen fugacity at the time of their formation (Jacob et al., 2004). Furthermore, while most gem-sized diamonds have old, often Archaean formation ages, some polycrystalline diamond aggregates have been shown to form directly preceding the kimberlite eruption (Jacob et al., 2000). Thus, these samples may provide a unique source of information on the nature and timing of small scale processes that lead to diamond formation and complement evidence from gem-sized diamonds. Here, we present a study of micro- and nano-inclusions in diamonds from a polycrystalline diamond aggregate (framesite) from the Orapa Mine (Botswana) and combine results from TEM/FIB analyses with high-resolution computerized micro-tomography (HR-µCT) and electron microprobe analyses to further constrain the formation of diamond in the Earth's mantle. Results In total, 14 microinclusions from fifteen FIB foils were investigated. Micro- and nano-inclusions identified by TEM were smaller than 1µm down to ca. 50nm in size, and are both monomineralic and multi-phase. The cavities are often lath-shaped and oriented parallel to each other; many show lattice dislocations in the surrounding diamond. In addition, inclusions are found along open cracks within the diamond single crystals. Mineral phases in the microinclusions comprise rutile, omphacite and a FeS phase (pyrrhotite). The multiphase inclusions most often consist of cavities that are only partly occupied (less than 50% of the total space), suggesting that the empty space was originally filled by a

  6. Ion-beam-assisted hexagonal diamond formation from C sub 6 sub 0 fullerene

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X D; Naramoto, H; Narumi, K; Miyashita, A; Miyashita, K

    2003-01-01

    Ions are commonly believed to be detrimental to diamond growth because of the high degree of lattice disorder induced by ion bombardments. In this paper, we examine the possibility of preparing diamond using thermally evaporated C sub 6 sub 0 and simultaneous bombardment with Ne sup + ions. It is found that the diamonds can be grown on Si wafers in the appropriate substrate temperature and ion energy ranges. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffractometry, and scanning electronic microscopy were employed to characterize the deposited specimen. These measurements provide definite evidence of the structure of nanosized hexagonal diamond. The mechanism responsible for the diamond formation is discussed.

  7. Doping and cluster formation in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2011-09-09

    Introducing a cluster formation model, we provide a rational fundamental viewpoint for the difficulty to achieve n-type dopeddiamond. We argue that codoping is the way forward to form appropriately doped shallow regions in diamond and other forms of carbon such as graphene. The electronegativities of the codopants are an important design criterion for the donor atom to efficiently donate its electron. We propose that the nearest neighbour codopants should be of a considerably higher electronegativity compared to the donor atom. Codoping strategies should focus on phosphorous for which there are a number of appropriate codopants.

  8. Data science implications in diamond formation and craton evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F.; Huang, F.; Fox, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Diamonds are so-called "messengers" from the deep Earth. Fluid and mineral inclusions in diamonds could reflect the compositions of fluids/melts and wall-rocks in which diamond formed. Recently many diamond samples are examined to study the water content in the mantle transition zone1, the mechanism of diamond formation2 and the mantle evolution history3. However, most of the studies can only explain local activities. Therefore, an overall project of data grouping, comparison and correlation is needed, but limited progress has been made due to a lack of benchmark datasets on diamond formation and effective computing algorithms. In this study, we start by proposing the very first complete and easily-accessible dataset on mineral and fluid inclusions in diamonds. We rescue, collect and organize the data available from papers, journals and other publications resources ([2-4] and more), and then apply several state-of-the-art machine learning methods to tackle this earth science problem by clustering diamond formation process into distinct groups primarily based on the compositions, the formation temperature and pressure, the age and so on. Our ongoing work includes further data exploration and training existing models. Our preliminary results show that diamonds formed from older cratons usually have higher formation temperature. Also peridotitic diamonds take a much larger population than the ecologitic ones. More details are being discovered when we finish constructing the database and training our model. We expect the result to demonstrate the advantages of using machine learning and data science in earth science research problems. Our methodology for knowledge discovery are very general and can be broadly applied to other earth science research problems under the same framework.[1] Pearson et al, Nature (2014); [2] Tomlinson et al, EPSL (2006); [3] Weiss et al, Nature (2016); [4] Stachel and Harris, Ore Geology Reviews (2008); Weiss et al, EPSL (2013)

  9. How Plasmonic excitation influences the LIPSS formation on diamond during multipulse femtosecond laser irradiation ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmalek Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized plasmonic model is proposed to calculate the nanostructure period induced by multipulse laser femtosecond on diamond at 800 nm wavelengths. We follow the evolution of LIPSS formation by changing diamond optical parameters in function of electron plasma excitation during laser irradiation. Our calculations shows that the ordered nanostructures can be observed only in the range of surface plasmon polariton excitation.

  10. The design method of diamond bit in hardest formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Long

    2010-01-01

    In the case of diamond bit drill* 1, * 2 of formation drillability that is the hardest formation,Fine, soft matrix, the low concentration of diamond dril should be chosen by Traditional design theory .Here describes a basic design with this completely different method. Proved through practice, Good performance of this drill, the drilling in extremely hard when the only limitation is high and life expectancy has increased a lot, have a good ground for such adaptability. (authors)

  11. Origin of femtosecond laser induced periodic nanostructure on diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdelmalek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the evolution of periodic nanostructures formed on the surface of diamond by femtosecond laser irradiation delivering 230 fs pulses at 1030 nm and 515 nm wavelengths with a repetition rate of 250 kHz. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observe a change in the periodicity of the nanostructures by varying the number of pulses overlapping in the laser focal volume. We simulate the evolution of the period of the high spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structures at the two wavelengths as a function of number of pulses, accounting for the change in the optical properties of diamond via a generalized plasmonic model. We propose a hypothesis that describes the origin of the nanostructures and the principal role of plasmonic excitation in their formation during multipulse femtosecond laser irradiation.

  12. Plasma-induced transformation of carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Litao; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Zhiyuan; Zhu Dezhang; He Suixia; Wang Zhenxia

    2004-01-01

    Structural phase transformation from multiwalled carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond by hydrogen plasma post-treatment was carried out. Ultrahigh equivalent diamond nucleation density above 10 11 nuclei/cm 2 was easily obtained. The diamond formation and growth mechanism was proposed to be the consequence of the formation of sp 3 bonded amorphous carbon clusters. The hydrogen chemisorption on curved graphite network and the energy deposited on the carbon nanotubes by continuous impingement of activated molecular or atomic hydrogen are responsible for the formation of amorphous carbon matrix. The diamond nucleates and grows in the way similar to that of diamond CVD processes on amorphous carbon films. The present method of hydrogen treatment provides a controllable way for the CVD of high quality diamond films

  13. TRANSFORMATIONS IN NANO-DIAMONDS WITH FORMATION OF NANO-POROUS SILICON CARBIDE AT HIGH PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains investigations on regularities of diamond - silicon carbide composite structure formation at impact-wave excitation. It has been determined that while squeezing a porous blank containing Si (SiC nano-diamond by explosive detonation products some processes are taking place such as diamond nano-particles consolidation, reverse diamond transition into graphite, fragments formation from silicon carbide. A method for obtaining high-porous composites with the presence of ultra-disperse diamond particles has been developed. Material with three-dimensional high-porous silicon-carbide structure has been received due to nano-diamond graphitation at impact wave transmission and plastic deformation. The paper reveals nano-diamonds inverse transformation into graphite and its subsequent interaction with the silicon accompanied by formation of silicon-carbide fragments with dimensions of up to 100 nm.

  14. Highly charged ion impact induced nanodefects in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makgato, T.N., E-mail: thuto.makgato@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Microscopy and Microanalysis Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Sideras-Haddad, E. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Physics Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Shrivastava, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Schenkel, T. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ritter, R.; Kowarik, G.; Aumayr, F. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien-Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.; Bernitt, S.; Beilmann, C.; Ginzel, R. [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of slow highly charged ion (SHCI) beams with insulating type Ib diamond (1 1 1) surfaces. Bismuth and Xenon SHCI beams produced using an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and an Electron Cyclotron Resonance source (ECR) respectively, are accelerated onto type Ib diamond (1 1 1) surfaces with impact velocities up to ≈0.4 υ{sub Bohr}. SHCIs with charge states corresponding to potential energies between 4.5 keV and 110 keV are produced for this purpose. Atomic Force Microscopy analysis (AFM) of the diamond surfaces following SHCI impact reveals surface morphological modifications characterized as nanoscale craters (nano-craters). To interpret the results from Tapping Mode AFM analysis of the irradiated diamond surfaces we discuss the interplay between kinetic and potential energy in nano-crater formation using empirical data together with Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo Simulations.

  15. Thermally induced defects in a polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, B.N. [Department of Physics and Engineering, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Forbes, A., E-mail: aforbes1@csir.co.z [CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Ndwandwe, O.M. [Department of Physics and Engineering, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Hearne, G. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private bag X3, P.O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Mwakikunga, B.W. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private bag X3, P.O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Physics and Biochemical Sciences, University of Malawi-The Polytechnic, Private Bag 303, Chichiri, Blantyre 0003 (Malawi); Katumba, G. [CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    In this study we make use of laser heating of HTHP industrial diamond, to study temperature induced changes to the diamond structure, both chemically and mechanically, in the absence of mechanical forces. This has relevance to the efficacy of diamond as a hard material in such applications as rock drilling and material processing. We report on the induced defects when the diamond is irradiated with high power CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG lasers respectively, and show that the thermal induced stresses in the diamond are sufficient to radically alter its physical properties, resulting in critical fracture. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the heating does not result in graphitisation of the diamond, but rather diffusion from the non-diamond base results in cobalt and tungsten oxides forming on the diamond surface. This has a deleterious effect on the diamond performance.

  16. Metasomatic Diamond Formation revealed by X-Ray CT Scanning of Diamondiferous Eclogites from Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, S. H.; Kahle, R. L.; Shaw-Kahle, B.; Gurney, J. J.; du Plessis, A.

    2014-12-01

    mantle; Some of these metasomatic events have been diamond-friendly, whilst others have been diamond-neutral or diamond-destructive; Diamond can be present at very high concentrations along particular metasomatic fluid pathways in eclogitic mantle rocks; The absolute timing of diamond formation is still to be determined.

  17. Formation of a silicon terminated (100) diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, Alex; Sear, Michael; Pakes, Chris; Tadich, Anton; O'Donnell, Kane M.; Ley, Lothar; Stacey, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of an ordered silicon terminated diamond (100) surface with a two domain 3 × 1 reconstruction as determined by low energy electron diffraction. Based on the dimensions of the surface unit cell and on chemical information provided by core level photoemission spectra, a model for the structure is proposed. The termination should provide a homogeneous, nuclear, and electron spin-free surface for the development of future near-surface diamond quantum device architectures

  18. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  19. Upper mantle fluids evolution, diamond formation, and mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    During mantle metasomatism, fluid-rock interactions in the mantle modify wall-rock compositions. Previous studies usually either investigated mineral compositions in xenoliths and xenocrysts brought up by magmas, or examined fluid compositions preserved in fluid inclusions in diamonds. However, a key study of Panda diamonds analysed both mineral and fluid inclusions in the diamonds [1] which we used to develop a quantitative characterization of mantle metasomatic processes. In the present study, we used an extended Deep Earth Water model [2] to simulate fluid-rock interactions at upper mantle conditions, and examine the fluids and mineral assemblages together simultaneously. Three types of end-member fluids in the Panda diamond fluid inclusions include saline, rich in Na+K+Cl; silicic, rich in Si+Al; and carbonatitic, rich in Ca+Mg+Fe [1, 3]. We used the carbonatitic end-member to represent fluid from a subducting slab reacting with an excess of peridotite + some saline fluid in the host environment. During simultaneous fluid mixing and reaction with the host rock, the logfO2 increased by about 1.6 units, and the pH increased by 0.7 units. The final minerals were olivine, garnet and diamond. The Mg# of olivine decreased from 0.92 to 0.85. Garnet precipitated at an early stage, and its Mg# also decreased with reaction progress, in agreement with the solid inclusions in the Panda diamonds. Phlogopite precipitated as an intermediate mineral and then disappeared. The aqueous Ca, Mg, Fe, Si and Al concentrations all increased, while Na, K, and Cl concentrations decreased during the reaction, consistent with trends in the fluid inclusion compositions. Our study demonstrates that fluids coming from subducting slabs could trigger mantle metasomatism, influence the compositions of sub-lithospherc cratonic mantle, precipitate diamonds, and change the oxygen fugacity and pH of the upper mantle fluids. [1] Tomlinson et al. EPSL (2006); [2] Sverjensky, DA et al., GCA (2014

  20. Diamonds from the Buffalo Head Hills, Alberta: Formation in a non-conventional setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Anetta; Stachel, Thomas; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; McCandless, Tom E.

    2007-01-01

    Kimberlite pipes K11, K91 and K252 in the Buffalo Head Hills, northern Alberta show an unusually large abundance (20%) of Type II (no detectable nitrogen) diamonds. Type I diamonds range in nitrogen content from 6 ppm to 3300 ppm and in aggregation states from low (IaA) to complete (IaB). The Type IaB diamonds extend to the lowest nitrogen concentrations yet observed at such high aggregation states, implying that mantle residence occurred at temperatures well above normal lithospheric conditions. Syngenetic mineral inclusions indicate lherzolitic, harzburgitic, wehrlitic and eclogitic sources. Pyropic garnet and forsteritic olivine characterize the peridotitic paragenesis from these pipes. One lherzolitic garnet inclusion has a moderately majoritic composition indicating a formation depth of ˜ 400 km. A wehrlitic paragenesis is documented by a Ca-rich, high-chromium garnet and very CaO-rich (0.11-0.14 wt.%) olivine. Omphacitic pyroxene and almandine-rich garnet are characteristic of the eclogitic paragenesis. A bimodal δ13C distribution with peaks at - 5‰ and - 17‰ is observed for diamonds from all three kimberlite pipes. A large proportion (˜ 40%) of isotopically light diamonds ( δ13C megalith. Type IaA to IaAB diamonds indicate formation and storage under lower temperature in normal lithospheric conditions.

  1. Diamond detectors with laser induced surface graphite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komlenok, M. [A.M. Prokorhov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilova Str., 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bolshakov, A. [A.M. Prokorhov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilova Str., 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 Xidazhi Str., 150001 Harbin (China); Ralchenko, V. [A.M. Prokorhov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilova Str., 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 Xidazhi Str., 150001 Harbin (China); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Kashirskoye shosse, 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Konov, V. [A.M. Prokorhov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilova Str., 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Kashirskoye shosse, 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Conte, G. [Department of Sciences, University Roma Tre and INFN, Via Vasca Navale, 84-00148 Rome (Italy); CNR-ISM, Institute for Structure of Matter, National Research Council, Via Salaria km 29, 300, Montelibretti (Italy); Girolami, M. [CNR-ISM, Institute for Structure of Matter, National Research Council, Via Salaria km 29, 300, Montelibretti (Italy); Oliva, P. [University Niccolò Cusano, Via don Carlo Gnocchi, 3-00166 Rome (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics ‘MIFP’, Via Appia Nuova, 31-00040 Marino (Rome) (Italy); Salvatori, S. [University Niccolò Cusano, Via don Carlo Gnocchi, 3-00166 Rome (Italy)

    2016-11-21

    We report on the response of metal-less CVD polycrystalline-diamond pixel sensors under β-particles irradiation. A 21×21 array of 0.18×0.18 mm{sup 2} pixels was realized on one side of a 10.0×10.0×0.5 mm{sup 3} polycrystalline diamond substrate by means of laser induced surface graphitization. With the same technique, a large graphite contact, used for detector biasing, was fabricated on the opposite side. A coincidence detecting method was used with two other reference polycrystalline diamond detectors for triggering, instead of commonly used scintillators, positioned in the front and on the back of the sensor-array with respect to the impinging particles trajectory. The collected charge distribution at each pixel was analyzed as a function of the applied bias. No change in the pulse height distribution was recorded by inverting the bias voltage polarity, denoting contacts ohmicity and symmetry. A fairly good pixel response uniformity was obtained: the collected charge most probable value saturates for all the pixels at an electric field strength of about ±0.6 V/μm. Under saturation condition, the average collected charge was equal to =1.64±0.02 fC, implying a charge collection distance of about 285 µm. A similar result, within 2%, was also obtained for 400 MeV electrons at beam test facility at INFN Frascati National Laboratory. Experimental results highlighted that more than 84% of impinging particles involved only one pixel, with no significant observed cross-talk effects.

  2. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Strain-induced ordered structure of titanium carbide during depositing diamond on Ti alloy substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.J.; He, L.L.; Li, Y.S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2017-01-01

    During the deposition of diamond films on Ti alloy substrates, titanium carbide is a common precipitated phase, preferentially formed at the interfacial region. However, in this case, the precipitation of an ordered structure of titanium carbide has not been reported. In our work, a long periodic ordered structure of TiC has been observed at the deposited diamond film/Ti alloy interface by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The long periodic ordered structure is identified as 6H-type. The formation mechanism is revealed by comparative studies on the different structures of TiC precipitated under different diamond deposition conditions in terms of deposition time, atmosphere and temperature. A large number of carbon vacancies in the interfacial precipitated TiC phase are verified through electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) quantification analysis. However, an ordered arrangement of these carbon vacancies occurs only when the interfacial stress is large enough to induce the precipitation of 6H-type TiC. The supplementary analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) further confirms that additional diffraction peaks presented in the XRD patterns are corresponding to the precipitation of 6H-type TiC. - Highlights: •Different structures of TiC are observed during deposited diamond on Ti alloy. •One is common NaCl structure, the other is periodic structure. •The periodic structure is identified as 6H-type by HRTEM. •Carbon vacancies are verified to always exist in the TiC phase. •The precipitation of 6H-type TiC is mainly affected by interfacial stress.

  4. Decrease of FIB-induced lateral damage for diamond tool used in nano cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu, Zongwei, E-mail: zongweixu@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fang, Fengzhou, E-mail: fzfang@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Bing; Xiao, Yinjing; Chen, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Xibin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Hongzhong [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • We mainly aim to characterize and decrease the FIB-induced damage on diamond tool. • Raman and XPS methods were used to characterize the nanoscale FIB-induced damage. • Lower energy FIB can effectively lessen the FIB-induced damage on diamond tool. • The diamond tools’ performance was greatly improved after FIB process optimization. • 6 nm chip thickness of copper was achieved by diamond tool with 22 nm edge radius. - Abstract: Diamond cutting tools with nanometric edge radius used in ultra-precision machining can be fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) technology. However, due to the nanoscale effects, the diamond tools performance and the cutting edge lifetime in nano cutting would be degraded because of the FIB-induced nanoscale lateral damage. In this study, the methods of how to effectively characterize and decrease the FIB-induced lateral damage for diamond tool are intensively studied. Based on the performance optimization diamond machining tools, the controllable chip thickness of less than 10 nm was achieved on a single-crystal copper in nano cutting. In addition, the ratio of minimum thickness of chip (MTC) to tool edge radius of around 0.3–0.4 in nano cutting is achieved. Methods for decreasing the FIB-induced damage on diamond tools and adding coolant during the nano cutting are very beneficial in improving the research of nano cutting and MTC. The nano cutting experiments based on the sharp and high performance of diamond tools would validate the nano cutting mechanisms that many molecular dynamic simulation studies have put forward and provide new findings for nano cutting.

  5. Illumination-induced charge transfer in polypyrrole-diamond nanosystem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jan; Kromka, Alexander; Ledinský, Martin; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 5-8 (2009), s. 800-803 ISSN 0925-9635. [European Conference on Diamond, Diamond-Like Materials, Carbon Nanotubes, Nitrides and Silicon Carbide /19./. Sitges, 07.09.2008-11.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H003; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond * polymers * heterojunction * electronic transport Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.822, year: 2009

  6. High energy ion beam induced modifications in diamond and diamond like carbon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilawar, N.; Sah, S.; Mehta, B.R.; Vankar, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Diamond and DLC films deposited using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition technique at various parameters were irradiated with 50 MeV Si 4+ ions. The resulting microstructural changes were studied using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. All the samples showed the development of β-SiC and hexagonal carbon phases at the expense of the diamond/DLC phase. The ERD analysis was carried out to determine the hydrogen concentration and its distribution in DLC films. The absolute hydrogen concentration in DLC samples is of the order of 10 22 atoms/cm 3 which gets depleted on irradiation. The DLC samples show a clear dependence of hydrogen content on the deposition parameters. (author)

  7. Laser-induced Multi-energy Processing in Diamond Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    in which all carbon atoms are sp 3 hybridized and tetrahedrally bonded to form a cubic lattice (diamond lattice) of great rigidity and strength...combustion synthesis of diamond by etching the surface-bond hydrogen and stabilizing the sp 3 hybridized surface carbon bonds [25, 26]. The CH...exchange rates in carbon 52 monoxide”, Chemical Physics 107, 283 (1986). [17] Snail , K. A., Vardiman, R. G., Estrera, J. P., Glesener, J. W

  8. Effect of diamond-like carbon thin film coated acrylic resin on candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Fissmer, Sara Fernanda; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Salvia, Ana C R D; Massi, Marcos; Sobrinho, Argermiro Soares da Silva; Júnior, Lafayette Nogueira

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of diamond-like carbon thin films doped and undoped with silver nanoparticles coating poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on Candida albicans biofilm formation. The control of biofilm formation is important to prevent oral diseases in denture users. Forty-five PMMA disks were obtained, finished, cleaned in an ultrasonic bath, and divided into three groups: Gc, no surface coating (control group); Gdlc, coated with diamond-like carbon film; and Gag, coated with diamond-like carbon film doped with silver nanoparticles. The films were deposited using a reactive magnetron sputtering system (physical vapor deposition process). The specimens were characterized by optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy analyses that determined differences in chemical composition and morphological structure. Following sterilization of the specimens by γ-ray irradiation, C. albicans (ATCC 18804) biofilms were formed by immersion in 2 ml of Sabouraud dextrose broth inoculated with a standardized fungal suspension. After 24 hours, the number of colony forming units (cfu) per specimen was counted. Data concerning biofilm formation were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test (p 0.05). The Tukey test showed no significant difference between Gdlc and Gag. Films deposited were extremely thin (∼50 nm). The silver particles presented a diameter between 60 and 120 nm and regular distribution throughout the film surface (to Gag). Diamond-like carbon films, doped or undoped with silver nanoparticles, coating the base of PMMA-based dentures could be an alternative procedure for preventing candidosis in denture users. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2016-07-04

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics.

  10. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...... obtained by means of a single short and intensive carbon plasma deposition pulse. The deposited DLC coating was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The DLC coating process gave rise to wide potential possibilities in micro-devices manufacturing productions....

  11. Microwave PECVD of nanocrystalline diamond with rf induced bias nucleation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frgala, Z.; Jašek, O.; Karásková, M.; Zajíčková, L.; Buršíková, V.; Franta, D.; Matějková, Jiřina; Rek, Antonín; Klapetek, P.; Buršík, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, Suppl. B (2006), s. 1218-1223 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition * self- bias Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  12. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  13. Formation of nanocrystalline diamond in polymer like carbon films deposited by plasma CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, A; Chaudhuri, P

    2009-09-01

    Conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method is generally not suitable for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films. However, our study shows that conditions favourable for powder formation help to grow large amount of nanocrystallites in conventional PECVD. With CH4 as the carbon source gas, dilution with Ar and moderate (50 W) rf power enhances formations of powders (nanoparticles) and C2 dimers within the plasma. On the other hand, with pure CH4 or with hydrogen diluted CH4, powder formation as also NCD growth is hindered. It is proposed that the nanoparticles formed in the plasma act as the "islands" while the C2 dimers are the "seeds" for the NCD growth. The structure of the films deposited on the grounded anode under different conditions of dilution has been studied. It is observed that with high Ar dilution the films contain NCD embedded in polymer like carbon (PLC) matrix.

  14. The depth of sub-lithospheric diamond formation and the redistribution of carbon in the deep mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Christopher; Frost, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    Most diamonds form in the Earth's lithosphere but a small proportion contain Si-rich majoritic garnet inclusions that indicate formation in the deeper mantle. The compositions of syngenetic garnet inclusions can potential yield information on both the depth and mantle lithology in which the diamonds formed. Pressure dependent changes in garnet compositions have been calibrated using the results of experiments conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus at pressures between 6 and 16 GPa and temperatures of 1000 to 1400 °C. Using the results of these experiments a barometer was formulated based on an empirical parameterisation of the two major majoritic substitutions, referred to as majorite (Maj; Al3+ =Mg2+ +Si4+), and Na-majorite (Na-Maj; Mg2+ +Al3+ =Na+ +Si4+). Moreover, previously published experimental garnet compositions from basaltic, kimberlite, komatiite and peridotite bulk compositions were included in the calibration, which consequently covers pressures from 6 to 20 GPa and temperatures from 900 to 2100 °C. Experimental pressures are reproduced over these conditions with a standard deviation of 0.86 GPa. The barometer is used to determine equilibration pressures of approximately 500 reported garnet inclusions in diamonds from a range of localities. As the majority of these inclusions are proposed to be syngenetic this allows a detailed picture of diamond formation depths and associated source rocks to be established using inclusion chemistry. Geographic differences in diamond source rocks are mapped within the sub-lithospheric mantle to over 500 km depth. Continuous diamond formation occurs over this depth range within lithologies with eclogitic affinities but also in lithologies that appear transitional between eclogitic and peridotitic bulk compositions, with an affinity to pyroxenites. The geographic differences between eclogitic and pyroxenitic diamond source rocks are rationalised in terms of diamond formation within downwelling and upwelling regimes

  15. Lithospheric diamond formation as a consequence of methane-rich volatile flooding: An example from diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths of the Karelian craton (Finland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, K. A.; Cartigny, P.; Tappe, S.; O'Brien, H.; Klemme, S.

    2017-06-01

    A collection of 61 xenocrystic and 12 eclogite xenolith-derived diamonds from the 600 Ma Lahtojoki kimberlite in central Finland has been investigated. Calculated pressure and temperature conditions for the diamondiferous eclogites are in excess of 5.5 GPa and 1300 °C, suggesting residence depths greater than 180 km, near the base of the Karelian cratonic mantle lithosphere. Geochemically, the eclogite xenoliths have gabbroic compositions showing positive Eu and Sr anomalies, relatively low ΣREE and elevated Al2O3 contents, yet garnets have ambiguous δ18O values of 5.7‰ and 5.9‰. Gabbroic eclogite formation could therefore be linked to either subduction processes during the 1.9 Ga Svecofennian orogeny or to cumulate processes during 2.1 Ga rift-induced magmatism. Determination of the oxygen fugacity of Lahtojoki eclogite xenoliths from both this work and previous studies suggests that diamond-bearing eclogites may be more reduced (ΔFMQ-3.5) compared to barren eclogites (ΔFMQ-1.7). While recycled oceanic crust protoliths for the eclogites remain a possibility, the carbon isotopic compositions and nitrogen abundances of the Lahtojoki diamonds indicate mantle-derived volatile sources. All diamonds (i.e., loose and eclogite xenolith-derived) display a restricted range of δ13C values from -7.8‰ to -3.7‰ that overlaps with the carbon isotopic composition of Earth's mantle. The Lahtojoki diamond δ13C values form a negatively skewed distribution, indicating diamond growth from reduced mantle-derived carbon sources such as methane- (CH4) bearing fluids. Nitrogen contents of the Lahtojoki diamonds range from 40 to 1830 atomic ppm with a mean of ∼670 atomic ppm; these elevated nitrogen contents combined with the close association to eclogites suggest an eclogitic or crustal volatile source. However, the Karelian craton was periodically intruded by ultramafic alkaline magmas since at least 1.8 Ga, noting in particular the occurrence of phlogopite

  16. Pressure-induced transition in the grain boundary of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Tang, L.; Ma, C.; Fan, D.; Yang, B.; Chu, Q.; Yang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Equation of state of diamond powder with different average grain sizes was investigated using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Comparison of compression curves was made for two samples with average grain size of 50nm and 100nm. The two specimens were pre-pressed into pellets and loaded in the sample pressure chamber of the DAC separately to minimized differences of possible systematic errors for the two samples. Neon gas was used as pressure medium and ruby spheres as pressure calibrant. Experiments were conducted at room temperature and high pressures up to 50 GPa. Fitting the compression data in the full pressure range into the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yields bulk modulus (K) and its pressure derivative (K') of 392 GPa and 5.3 for 50nm sample and 398GPa and 4.5 for 100nm sample respectively. Using a simplified core-shell grain model, this result indicates that the grain boundary has an effective bulk modulus of 54 GPa. This value is similar to that observed for carbon nanotube[1] validating the recent theoretical diamond surface modeling[2]. Differential analysis of the compression cures demonstrates clear relative compressibility change at the pressure about 20 GPa. When fit the compression data below and above this pressure separately, the effect of grain size on bulk modulus reverses in the pressure range above 20 GPa. This observation indicates a possible transition of grain boundary structure, likely from sp2 hybridization at the surface[2] towards sp3like orbital structure which behaves alike the inner crystal. [1] Jie Tang, Lu-Chang Qin, Taizo Sasaki, Masako Yudasaka, Akiyuki Matsushita, and Sumio Iijima, Compressibility and Polygonization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes under Hydrostatic Pressure, Physical Review Letters, 85(9), 1187-1198, 2000. [2] Shaohua Lu, Yanchao Wang, Hanyu Liu, Mao-sheng Miao, and Yanming Ma, Self-assembled ultrathin nanotubes on diamond (100) surface, Nature

  17. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  18. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  19. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, W., E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Shikata, S. [Kwansei Gakuin Univ., 2-1, Gakuen, Mita, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Makino, T.; Koka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Hanaizumi, O. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  20. Fluctuations of electrical and mechanical properties of diamond induced by interstitial hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Chun-Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While experimental evidence demonstrates that the presence of hydrogen (H) impurities in diamond films plays a significant role in determining their physical properties, the small radius of the H atom makes detecting such impurities quite a challenging task. In the present work, first-principles calculations were employed to provide an insight into the effects of the interstitial hydrogen on the electrical and mechanical properties of diamond crystals at the atomic level. The migrated pathways of the interstitial hydrogen are dictated by energetic considerations. Some new electronic states are formed near the Fermi level. The interstitial hydrogen markedly narrows the bandgap of the diamond and weakens the diamond crystal. The obvious decrement of the critical strain clearly implies the presence of an H-induced embrittlement effect. Project supported by the Project of Construction of Innovative Teams and Teacher Career Development for Universities and Colleges under Beijing Municipality, China (Grant No. IDHT20140504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51402009), and the Foundation for Young Scholars of Beijing University of Technology, China.

  1. Cathodoluminescence study of ArF excimer laser-induced planarization of large grain diamond films

    OpenAIRE

    Cremades Rodríguez, Ana Isabel; Piqueras de Noriega, Javier; Solís, J.

    1996-01-01

    Planarization of large grain diamond films has been induced by 193 nm excimer laser irradiation. Secondary emission images and cathodoluminescence (CL) in the scanning electron microscope have been used to characterize the irradiated area. Irradiation causes changes in the structure of defects involving nitrogen and vacancies. Evolution of the CL signal with the number of pulses indicates that the luminescence intensity tends to stabilize when a smooth film surface is obtained. © 1996 America...

  2. Fluid control of deeply subducted carbonate rocks and diamond formations by Intraslab UHP metasomatism - Modeling by the Kokchetav Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Y.; Sakamaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Deep continental subductions are an input for material cycling from surface to deep mantle. The Kokchetav UHPM rocks are the best samples and evidence to understand chemical processes in subducting materials. Transportation of H2O and CO2, is the most important role of the deep continental subduction. Silicate rocks are H2O reservoirs as hydrate minerals and carbonate rocks are CO2 reservoirs during subduction. The timings of dehydrations in silicate rocks and decarbonations in carbonate rocks are different. Dehydrations precede decarbonations and H2O play as a trigger for decarbonations, which are difficult to occur under dry conditions in P-T range of UHP metamorphism. The amount of H2O infiltrating in carbonate rocks controls the amount of CO2 carried into the mantle. H2O-bearing fluid plays an important role for diamond formation during subduction of continental materials. Diamonds form and dissolve in subducting materials through H2O fluid. In UHP dolomite marble, diamonds formed at two different stages and 2nd stage growth was from H2O fluid. The diamond at 2nd stage growth has light carbon isotope compositions, -17 to -27 ‰, whereas 1st stage diamond has -8 to -15 ‰. The light carbon of 2nd stage could be organic carbon in gneisses carried by fluid; dissolution of diamond in gneisses had occurred. H2O fluid infiltration into dolomite marble caused the change of carbon solubility in fluid to precipitate abundant fine-grained (10-20 mm) diamonds quickly. During deep continental subductions, the abundant carbonate remains and are carried to the mantle. In the case of calc-silicate rocks, for example Grt-Cpx rock of the Kokchetav, the carbonate mode is small; therefore, even a small amount of H2O can decompose all amount of carbonate to form Grt and Cpx which contain several hundreds to 1,000 ppm order of water (OH and H2O), as new water reservoirs. UHP metasomatism with skarn mineral formation causes the swapping of H2O carrier from hydrate minerals in

  3. Formation of ohmic contacts to p-type diamond using carbide forming metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Jiro; Otsuki, A.; Oku, T.; Ishiwata, O.; Murakami, Masanori

    1994-08-01

    The measurement of the specific contact resistance, rho(sub C), and microstructural analysis at the metal/diamond interface were carried out for diamond with various acceptor concentrations, N(sub A), in order to understand the carrier transport mechanism at the metal/diamond interface. The rho(sub C) measurements were carried out for polycrystalline boron-doped semiconducting diamonds which were prepared by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The acceptor concentrations, estimated by the boron concentrations measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, ranged from 3 x 10(exp 18) to 3 x 10(exp 20)/cu cm. Ti and Mo films, which form carbides with diamond, were deposited on the diamonds using the electron-beam evaporation technique. The rho(sub C) values were measured by the cricular transmission line method before and after annealing at temperatures in the range of 400-600 C. The dependence of the rho(sub C) values on the acceptor concentrations suggested that the dominant transport mechanism was the field-emission for the diamond with N(sub A) around 10(exp 20)/cu cm and the thermionic-field-emission for the diamond with N(sub A) from 3 x 10(exp 18)/cu cm to 4 x 10(exp 19)/cu cm. The rho(sub C) values of the Ti contacts were observed to decrease upon annealing, whereas those of the Mo contacts decreased gradually with increasing annealing temperature. However, the rho(sub C) values of both the Ti and Mo contacts reached at the same value of approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) Ohm sq cm after annealing at 600 C for the diamonds with N(sub A) higher than 10(exp 20)/cu cm. Note that the rho(sub C) values of the Mo contact were extremely stable at high temperatures: the rho(sub C) values did not deteriorate after annealing at 600 C for more than 3 h. The thermally stable molybdenum carbide (alpha-Mo2C) and amorphous layers were observed at the Mo/diamond interface after annealing at 600 C by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction.

  4. Direct conversion of h-BN into c-BN and formation of epitaxial c-BN/diamond heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh; Xu, Weizong

    2016-01-01

    We have created a new state of BN (named Q-BN) through rapid melting and super undercooling and quenching by using nanosecond laser pulses. Phase pure c-BN is formed either by direct quenching of super undercooled liquid or by nucleation and growth from Q-BN. Thus, a direct conversion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) into phase-pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is achieved by nanosecond pulsed laser melting at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure in air. According to the P-T phase diagram, the transformation from h-BN into c-BN under equilibrium processing can occur only at high temperatures and pressures, as the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is at 3500 K/9.5 GPa or 3700 K/7.0 GPa with a recent theoretical refinement. Using nonequilibrium nanosecond laser melting, we have created super undercooled state and shifted this triple point to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. The rapid quenching from super undercooled state leads to the formation of a new phase, named as Q-BN. We present detailed characterization of Q-BN and c-BN layers by using Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, electron-back-scatter diffraction, high-resolution TEM, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and discuss the mechanism of formation of nanodots, nanoneedles, microneedles, and single-crystal c-BN on sapphire substrate. We have also deposited diamond by pulsed laser deposition of carbon on c-BN and created c-BN/diamond heterostructures, where c-BN acts as a template for epitaxial diamond growth. We discuss the mechanism of epitaxial c-BN and diamond growth on lattice matching c-BN template under pulsed laser evaporation of amorphous carbon, and the impact of this discovery on a variety of applications.

  5. End-member fluids for diamond formation and their possible sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, O.; Weiss, Y.; Klein-Bendavid, O.; Bell, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    ) suggested that a saline melt can interact with silicate minerals to form immiscible silicic melt that may later evolve into a carbonatitic HDF. In an ultramafic environment a saline melt may evolve along the array to high-Mg carbonatites without forming an immiscible silicate melt (Safonov, 2008). The source of the saline fluid is not clear. It may be present as discrete halides or as a grain-boundary phase in the carbonate-bearing rock, or it may form deeper in the mantle and migrate upwards either as a saline melt, or as a hydrous fluid that is concentrated enough to preclude interaction with the mantle rocks it traverses. A second alternative is to introduce the carbonate as the penetrating fluid in the form of carbonatitic melt. A third alternative involves the upward migration of CH4 and heavier hydrocarbons. Such a fluid should be stable in eclogitic or peridotitic environments, as long as the oxygen fugacity is low enough. During ascent, such fluids migrate to more oxidized regions and eventually will react with the mantle rocks to form C+H2O (Luth, 1993; Malkovets et al. 2007) and later CO2. In eclogitic rocks, the water will react to form a silicic HDF and the C may precipitate as diamond. In a peridotitic environment, at temperatures below the carbonate solidus, such water may leach and dissolve K and Cl from the rock and evolve into a saline HDF. Temperature increase or further diamond oxidation may initiate the formation of carbonatitic HDF's.

  6. Stochastic model explains formation of cell arrays on H/O-diamond patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ukraintsev, Egor; Brož, A.; Hubálek Kalbáčová, M.; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2015), "041006-1"-"041006-9" ISSN 1934-8630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01687S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cell migration * biofilm array * diamond surface * stochastic simulations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2015

  7. Mechanism behind the formation of self-assembled nano-sized clusters in diamond-like carbon nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Yuan Mei; Koh, Angel Ting Ting; Niu, Lifang; Chua, Daniel Hock Chuan

    2011-12-01

    Many studies have shown that Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with diversified material properties are obtainable through doping process but the presence of the dopants were reported to form independent nanoclusters within the carbon matrix. Using combined analysis from theoretical estimations (Saha's equation and coefficient of absorption, alpha(p)), Transport of Ions In Matter (TRIM) simulation and experimental results, this work examined the mechanism behind the formation of self-assembled nanoclusters in DLC nanocomposite. We showed that the presence of metal dopants increased the heat dissipation on DLC, which allowed the energetic metal species to diffuse and enhance the formation of nanoclusters that increased the surface roughness of the films. In addition, TRIM and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) hinted the presence of energetic species may force the carbon ions to react with the interface to form silicon carbide bonds, which may be a more dominant factor compared to internal stress reduction in improving the adhesion strength of DLC.

  8. Crack formation mechanisms during micro and macro indentation of diamond-like carbon coatings on elastic-plastic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, N.B.; Fischer-Cripps, A.C.; Swain, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    of cracking and the fracture mechanisms taking place. In the study various diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel were investigated. Results primarily for one DLC system will be presented here. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.......In the present study crack formation is investigated on both micro and macro scale using spherical indenter tips. in particular, systems consisting of elastic coatings that are well adhered to elastic-plastic substrates are studied. Depth sensing indentation is used on the micro scale and Rockwell...... indentation on the macro scale. The predominant driving force for coating failure and crack formation during indentation is plastic deformation of the underlying substrate. The aim is to relate the mechanisms creating both delamination and cohesive cracking on both scales with fracture mechanical models...

  9. Biomineralized diamond-like carbon films with incorporated titanium dioxide nanoparticles improved bioactivity properties and reduced biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, F S; Oliveira, J R; Milani, J; Oliveira, L D; Machado, J P B; Trava-Airoldi, V J; Lobo, A O; Marciano, F R

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the development of coatings to protect biomedical alloys from oxidation, passivation and to reduce the ability for a bacterial biofilm to form after implantation has emerged. Diamond-like carbon films are commonly used for implanted medical due to their physical and chemical characteristics, showing good interactions with the biological environment. However, these properties can be significantly improved when titanium dioxide nanoparticles are included, especially to enhance the bactericidal properties of the films. So far, the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the film surface has been studied in order to improve biocompatibility and bioactive behavior. Herein, we developed a new route to obtain a homogeneous and crystalline apatite coating on diamond-like carbon films grown on 304 biomedical stainless steel and evaluated its antibacterial effect. For this purpose, films containing two different concentrations of titanium dioxide (0.1 and 0.3g/L) were obtained by chemical vapor deposition. To obtain the apatite layer, the samples were soaked in simulated body fluid solution for up to 21days. The antibacterial activity of the films was evaluated by bacterial eradication tests using Staphylococcus aureus biofilm. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering spectroscopy, and goniometry showed that homogeneous, crystalline, and hydrophilic apatite films were formed independently of the titanium dioxide concentration. Interestingly, the diamond-like films containing titanium dioxide and hydroxyapatite reduced the biofilm formation compared to controls. A synergism between hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide that provided an antimicrobial effect against opportunistic pathogens was clearly observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Formation of continuous nanocrystalline diamond layer on glass and silicon at low temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav; Remeš, Zdeněk; Michalka, M.; Ledinský, Martin; Zemek, Josef; Potměšil, Jiří; Vaněček, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, 7-8 (2008), s. 181-186 ISSN 0948-1907 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Grant - others: Marie Curie RTN DRIVE(XE) MRTN-CT-2004-512224 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : AFM * low temperature growth * nanocrystalline diamond * SEM * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2008

  11. Study of graphitic microstructure formation in diamond bulk by pulsed Bessel beam laser writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Sotillo, B.; Chiappini, A.; Ramponi, R.; Di Trapani, P.; Eaton, S. M.; Jedrkiewicz, O.

    2017-11-01

    The advantages of using Bessel beams for the generation of graphitic structures in diamond bulk are presented. We show that by irradiating the sample with a pulsed Bessel beam whose non-diffracting zone is of the same order of the sample thickness, it is possible to produce without any sample translation straight graphitic through-microstructures, whose size depends on the input pulse energy. The microstructure growth is investigated as a function of the number of irradiating pulses, and the femtosecond and picosecond regimes are contrasted.

  12. Computer Simulation of Temperature Parameter for Diamond Formation by Using Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Weon Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the deposition parameters of diamond films, the temperature, pressure, and distance between the filament and the susceptor need to be considered. However, it is difficult to precisely measure and predict the filament and susceptor temperature in relation to the applied power in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD system. In this study, the temperature distribution inside the system was numerically calculated for the applied powers of 12, 14, 16, and 18 kW. The applied power needed to achieve the appropriate temperature at a constant pressure and other conditions was deduced, and applied to actual experimental depositions. The numerical simulation was conducted using the commercial computational fluent dynamics software ANSYS-FLUENT. To account for radiative heat-transfer in the HF-CVD reactor, the discrete ordinate (DO model was used. The temperatures of the filament surface and the susceptor at different power levels were predicted to be 2512–2802 K and 1076–1198 K, respectively. Based on the numerical calculations, experiments were performed. The simulated temperatures for the filament surface were in good agreement with the experimental temperatures measured using a two-color pyrometer. The results showed that the highest deposition rate and the lowest deposition of non-diamond was obtained at a power of 16 kW.

  13. Detecting of the processes of the diamond formation using the monomineral thermobarometry .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchepkov, Igor; Afanasiev, Valentin; Pokhilenko, Lyudmila; Logvinova, Alla; Vladykin, Nikolai

    2010-05-01

    The methods of the monomineral thermobarometry used for the reconstruction of the mantle sections beneath the kimberlite pipes (Ashchepkov et al., 2009) allow to determined PT range for the diamond inclusions (DI) and diamond bearing associations. They show various conditions for the crystallization of diamond for in mantle lithosphere beneath the Yakutia, Africa, and North America. In Yakutia most DI (Sobolev ea 1997, 2004; Logvinova ea., 2005 and ref their in) (Cr-pyropes, Mg -opx) form Mir and Udachnaya pipes are referred to the cold geotherms 35 (partly 33 mvm-2) at the pressure range from 35 to 80 kbar. Cr- pyropes (Ti-bearing) partly drops the on the heated area near convective branches 40-45 mvm-2 convective geotherms. Most Cr- rich pyroxenes refer to the coldest or heated (metasomatic type) at the deeper parts of the mantle columns while mildly Cr-rich varieties refer to the conditions of the crystallization from the melts related to the protokimberlites and associated carbonatites near the Graphite-Diamond boundary (G-D). They are more widely distributed in mantle beneath the Mir pipe where the essential part of mantle column from 50 to 35kbar was subjected to the refertilization. But chromite PT estimates mostly refer the heated conditions of the convective branch at the lithosphere base (~70-60kbar). They are most typical for the Alakite pipes. Diamond bearing eclogites show the some separate levels of crystallization with the high T-range reflecting conditions 35 to 45 mvm-2 mostly in the 60-50 kbar interval. They coincide with the levels of the intensive heating in the mantle columns. For the South Africa in the Mesozoic pipes beneath Lesotho - Jagersfontein (Viljoen ea. 2005), Finsch (Appleyard ea., 2004; Gurney, Switzer, 1973; She ea., 1983), Koffiefontein (Rickard ea., 1986), diamond bearing associations refer to three geotherm branches. The coldest (Cr-pyropes and Mg-Opx) is related to ancient subduction with the heating at 60 and 75 kbars. The 40

  14. Channeling implantation of high energy carbon ions in a diamond crystal: Determination of the induced crystal amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Fazinić, S.; Petrović, S.

    2018-02-01

    This work reports on the induced diamond crystal amorphization by 4 MeV carbon ions implanted in the 〈1 0 0〉 oriented crystal and its determination by application of RBS/C and EBS/C techniques. The spectra from the implanted samples were recorded for 1.2, 1.5, 1.75 and 1.9 MeV protons. For the two latter ones the strong resonance of the nuclear elastic scattering 12C(p,p0)12C at 1.737 MeV was explored. The backscattering channeling spectra were successfully fitted and the ion beam induced crystal amorphization depth profile was determined using a phenomenological approach, which is based on the properly defined Gompertz type dechanneling functions for protons in the 〈1 0 0〉 diamond crystal channels and the introduction of the concept of ion beam amorphization, which is implemented through our newly developed computer code CSIM.

  15. Nickel-induced transformation of diamond into graphite and carbon nanotubes and the electron field emission properties of resulting composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunlu; Deng, Zejun; Zhou, Bo; Wei, Qiuping; Long, Hangyu; Wang, Yijia; Li, Jiaxin; Hu, Naixiu; Ma, Li; Lin, Cheng-Te; Yu, Zhiming; Zhou, Kechao

    2018-01-01

    The metal-induced transformation of diamond into graphite and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was achieved by catalytic deposition with nickel as the catalyst. The quality of catalytic products was assessed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the catalytic process could be controlled by adjusting the carbonaceous concentration in the deposition atmosphere, and new information concerning the diamond/Ni/graphite multi-phase mixed interface between diamond and carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A model was put forward to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic etching and growth on the diamond surface. In addition, the resulting diamond/CNTs composite film (10% CH4) was found to exhibit the lowest turn-on field of 6.9 V/μm as well as good current emission stability compared to the other composite films.

  16. Short-pulse-laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Ziegler, Wolfgang; von der Linde, Dietrich; Siegal, Michael P.; Overmyer, D. L.

    2005-03-01

    Short-pulse-laser-induced damage and ablation of thin films of amorphous, diamond-like carbon have been investigated. Material removal and damage are caused by fracture of the film and ejection of large fragments. The fragments exhibit a delayed, intense and broadband emission of microsecond duration. Both fracture and emission are attributed to the laser-initiated relaxation of the high internal stresses of the pulse laser deposition-grown films.

  17. Ion beam induced surface graphitization of CVD diamond for x-ray beam position monitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chian; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wen, L.; Melendres, C.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at ANL is a third-generation synchrotron facility that generates powerful x-ray beams on its undulator beamlines. It is important to know the position and angle of the x- ray beam during experiments. Due to very high heat flux levels, several patented x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) exploiting chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have been developed. These XBPMs have a thin layer of low-atomic-mass metallic coating so that photoemission from the x rays generate a minute but measurable current for position determination. Graphitization of the CVD diamond surface creates a very thin, intrinsic and conducting layer that can stand much higher temperatures and minimal x-ray transmission losses compared to the coated metallic layers. In this paper, a laboratory sputter ion source was used to transform selected surfaces of a CVD diamond substrate into graphite. The effect of 1-5 keV argon ion bombardment on CVD diamond surfaces at various target temperatures from 200 to 500 C was studied using Auger electron spectroscopy and in-situ electrical resistivity measurements. Graphitization after the ion bombardment has been confirmed and optimum conditions for graphitization studied. Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the overall diamond structure in the bulk of CVD diamond substrate after the ion bombardments. It was found that target temperature plays an important role in stability and electrical conductivity of the irradiated CVD diamonds

  18. Transient current induced in thin film diamonds by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Makino, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takeshi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Kada, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Single crystal diamond is a suitable material for the next generation particle detectors because of the superior electrical properties and the high radiation tolerance. In order to investigate charge transport properties of diamond particle detectors, transient currents generated in diamonds by single swift heavy ions (26 MeV O 5+ and 45 MeV Si 7+ ) are investigated. We also measured two dimensional maps of transient currents by single ion hits. In the case of 50 μm-thick diamond, both the signal height and the collected charge are reduced by the subsequent ion hits and the charge collection time is extended. Our results are thought to be attributable to the polarization effect in diamond and it appears only when the transient current is dominated by hole current. In the case of 6 μm-thick diamond membrane, an “island” structure is found in the 2D map of transient currents. Signals in the islands shows different applied bias dependence from signals in other regions, indicating different crystal and/or metal contact quality. Simulation study of transient currents based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem clarifies that accumulation of space charges changes distribution of electric field in diamond and causes the polarization effect.

  19. Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study the nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

  20. Photo-induced charge state switching of the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacquebard, Luke; Kuret, Loutfi; Childress, Lilian

    As a strong candidate for quantum computation and metrology applications, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond has gained much interest in the solid-state community. The NV center can exist in two different charge states (NV0 and NV-) which have very different optical and spin properties, where typically only the negatively charged state is desired since it provides the triplet ground state used for many experimental applications. Since most experiments involving NV centers use lasers for readout or manipulation it is important to understand the photo-induced charge state ionization and recombination processes at different wavelengths and powers. We developed a charge state readout and initialization method using a 594 nm laser with optimized duration and power, which was used to investigate the ionization and recombination processes from other laser sources. We report charge state switching data from a single NV center when illuminating with 594 nm CW, 532 nm CW, 532 nm pulsed and 766 nm pulsed lasers. We also explore the spin dependence of ionization through the use of applied microwaves. Funding from NSERC, FRQNT, CFI.

  1. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Employed as Seeds for the Induction of Microcrystalline Diamond Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resto Oscar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. X-ray diffraction, visible, and ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy , electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were employed to study the carbon bonding nature of the films and to analyze the carbon clustering around the seed nanoparticles leading to diamond synthesis. The results indicate that iron oxide nanoparticles lose the O atoms, becoming thus active C traps that induce the formation of a dense region of trigonally and tetrahedrally bonded carbon around them with the ensuing precipitation of diamond-type bonds that develop into microcrystalline diamond films under chemical vapor deposition conditions. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  2. Development of a novel diamond based detector for machine induced background and luminosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world, used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provide insight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in the universe. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton or heavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments. The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of the number of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. A measurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interesting physics processes. In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable beam conditions with almost no beam losses. So-called beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC rings to monitor beam losses around the LHC. Each experiment has in addition its own detectors to measure beam losses, hereafter called machine induced background. One such detector is installed in CMS, the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F). Based on diamond sensors it was designed and built to measure both, the luminosity and the machine induced background. BCM1F ran smoothly during the first LHC running period from 2009-2012 and delivered valuable beam loss and luminosity information to the control rooms of CMS and LHC. At the end of 2012 the LHC was shut down for an upgrade to improve the performance by increasing the proton energy from 4 TeV to 7 TeV and decreasing the proton bunch spacing from 50 ns to 25 ns. Due to the success of BCM1F an upgrade of its sensors and readout components was planned in order to fulfil the new requirements. The upgrade

  3. Development of a novel diamond based detector for machine induced background and luminosity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-07-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world, used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provide insight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in the universe. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton or heavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments. The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of the number of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. A measurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interesting physics processes. In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable beam conditions with almost no beam losses. So-called beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC rings to monitor beam losses around the LHC. Each experiment has in addition its own detectors to measure beam losses, hereafter called machine induced background. One such detector is installed in CMS, the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F). Based on diamond sensors it was designed and built to measure both, the luminosity and the machine induced background. BCM1F ran smoothly during the first LHC running period from 2009-2012 and delivered valuable beam loss and luminosity information to the control rooms of CMS and LHC. At the end of 2012 the LHC was shut down for an upgrade to improve the performance by increasing the proton energy from 4 TeV to 7 TeV and decreasing the proton bunch spacing from 50 ns to 25 ns. Due to the success of BCM1F an upgrade of its sensors and readout components was planned in order to fulfil the new requirements. The upgrade

  4. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  5. An all optical system for studying temperature induced changes in diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available process © CSIR 2010 Slide 3 We can raise the temperature of the diamond sample by laser heating it © CSIR 2010 Slide 4 Laser heating of diamond by optical absorption CO2 laser ZnSe Beam Combiner R = , Cu Mirror R = , Au Coated Mirror ZnSe Beam... splitter, Reflection 84%ZnSe lens, f = 250 mm Sample HeNe laser R = 6 m, Moly Mirror Diffractive optic element Infrared camera © CSIR 2010 Slide 5 We can engineer two boundary conditions in our experiment Insulator Water-cooled © CSIR 2010 Slide 6...

  6. Surface states and photo-induced charge transfer on oxygen-terminated chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deferme, W.; Macková, Anna; Haenen, K.; Nesladek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 6 (2011), 063701/1-063701/3 ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CRYSTAL CVD-DIAMOND * TRANSPORT * MOBILITY Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011

  7. Galaxies interactions and induced star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kennicutt Jr, Robert C; Barnes, JE

    1998-01-01

    The papers that make up this volume present a comprehensive review of the field of galaxy interaction. Galaxies are dynamic forces that evolve, interact, merge, blaze and reshape. This book offers a historical perspective and studies such topics as induced star formation.

  8. In situ x-ray observations of the diamond formation process in the C-H sub 2 O-MgO system

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, T; Shimomura, O

    2002-01-01

    The diamond formation process in aqueous fluid catalyst under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions has been observed for the first time. Quench experiments and in situ x-ray diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation have been performed upon a mixture of brucite (Mg(OH) sub 2) and graphite as the starting material. It was confirmed that brucite decomposed into periclase and H sub 2 O at 3.6 GPa and 1050 deg. C while its complete melting occurred at 6.2 GPa and 1150 deg. C, indicating that the solubility of MgO in H sub 2 O greatly increases with increasing pressure. The conversion of carbon from its graphite to its diamond form in aqueous fluid was observed at 7.7 GPa and 1835 deg. C.

  9. Turning Rough Dreams into a Polished Reality? Investigating the Formation of Human Capital in Botswana’s Diamond Cutting and Polishing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mbayi, Letsema

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates Botswana’s vision to become a downstream player in the global diamond industry by creating downstream capabilities that can continue to benefit the country when diamond mining is no longer profitable. Botswana is the largest producer of diamonds, accounting for a quarter of the world’s diamond production by value. The government has used diamond revenues to foster economic growth. The diamond-led growth has however resulted in a largely undiversified economy with limi...

  10. Coating NiTi archwires with diamond-like carbon films: reducing fluoride-induced corrosion and improving frictional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S Y; Huang, J J; Kang, T; Diao, D F; Duan, Y Z

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to coat diamond-like carbon (DLC) films onto nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic archwires. The film protects against fluoride-induced corrosion and will improve orthodontic friction. 'Mirror-confinement-type electron cyclotron resonance plasma sputtering' was utilized to deposit DLC films onto NiTi archwires. The influence of a fluoride-containing environment on the surface topography and the friction force between the brackets and archwires were investigated. The results confirmed the superior nature of the DLC coating, with less surface roughness variation for DLC-coated archwires after immersion in a high fluoride ion environment. Friction tests also showed that applying a DLC coating significantly decreased the fretting wear and the coefficient of friction, both in ambient air and artificial saliva. Thus, DLC coatings are recommended to reduce fluoride-induced corrosion and improve orthodontic friction.

  11. Surface-Induced Dissociation and Chemical Reactions of C2D4+ on Stainless Steel, Carbon (HOPG), and Two Different Diamond Surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Žabka, Ján; Zappa, F.; Grill, V.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2009), s. 927-938 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : surface-induced process * diamond surfaces * chemical reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.391, year: 2009

  12. Geomorphic Change Induced by 100 years of Flow Alteration on the Diamond Fork River, Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Belmont, P.; Wilcock, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Changes in hydrology and sediment supply affect the form of rivers. The rate of change of fluvial form is controlled by a variety of factors, including valley confinement, sediment size, and antecedent condition. The Diamond Fork River in central Utah has been altered by trans-basin flows delivered from the Colorado River system for over a century. Beginning in 1915, water used for irrigation was delivered through a tributary, Sixth Water Creek, with daily summer flows regularly exceeding the 50 - 100 year flood. Elevated flows caused drastic geomorphic change - resulting in incision and widening of the channel, and the destruction of riparian vegetation. Beginning in 1997, the outlet for the trans-basin diversion was moved downstream on Sixth Water, bypassing a large landslide, and flows were drastically reduced in 2004 through management actions. We delineated eight distinct process domains for the Sixth Water-Diamond Fork system and examined the response of each process domain to the altered flow and sediment regimes through the analysis of aerial photographs and repeat cross-sections. We measured a variety of channel metrics, including channel width, areal extent of bars and islands, and sinuosity in ArcGIS. Results indicate that unconfined reaches that were wide and braided during the period of elevated flows have narrowed to become single threaded and meandering in response to the reduced flows. Confined reaches have experienced minor changes since the reduction in flows, suggesting that confinement is a primary control on the degree of channel response. These findings and complimentary studies will provide managers of Sixth Water and Diamond Fork with a greater understanding of the physical response of the streams, and the resulting effects on ecological communities.

  13. Radiation-Induced Damage and Recovery of Ultra-Nanocrystalline Diamond: Toward Applications in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Aiden A; Filevich, Jorge; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Botman, Aurélien; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2017-11-15

    Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) is increasingly being used in the fabrication of devices and coatings due to its excellent tribological properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Here, we study its response to irradiation with kiloelectronvolt electrons as a controlled model for extreme ionizing environments. Real time Raman spectroscopy reveals that the radiation-damage mechanism entails dehydrogenation of UNCD grain boundaries, and we show that the damage can be recovered by annealing at 883 K. Our results have significant practical implications for the implementation of UNCD in extreme environment applications, and indicate that the films can be used as radiation sensors.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconductivity in CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-01

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 1020 cm-3, diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  15. Phase control of electromagnetically induced acoustic wave transparency in a diamond nanomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelou, Sofia, E-mail: Evangelousof@gmail.com

    2017-05-10

    Highlights: • A high-Q single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonator embedded with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers is studied. • A Δ-type coupling configuration is formed. • The spin states of the ground state triplet of the NV centers interact with a strain field and two microwave fields. • The absorption and dispersion properties of the acoustic wave field are controlled by the use of the relative phase of the fields. • Phase-dependent acoustic wave absorption, transparency, and gain are obtained. • “Slow sound” and negative group velocities are also possible. - Abstract: We consider a high-Q single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonator embedded with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. We study the interaction of the transitions of the spin states of the ground state triplet of the NV centers with a strain field and two microwave fields in a Δ-type coupling configuration. We use the relative phase of the fields for the control of the absorption and dispersion properties of the acoustic wave field. Specifically, we show that by changing the relative phase of the fields, the acoustic field may exhibit absorption, transparency, gain and very interesting dispersive properties.

  16. Phase control of electromagnetically induced acoustic wave transparency in a diamond nanomechanical resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelou, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A high-Q single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonator embedded with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers is studied. • A Δ-type coupling configuration is formed. • The spin states of the ground state triplet of the NV centers interact with a strain field and two microwave fields. • The absorption and dispersion properties of the acoustic wave field are controlled by the use of the relative phase of the fields. • Phase-dependent acoustic wave absorption, transparency, and gain are obtained. • “Slow sound” and negative group velocities are also possible. - Abstract: We consider a high-Q single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonator embedded with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. We study the interaction of the transitions of the spin states of the ground state triplet of the NV centers with a strain field and two microwave fields in a Δ-type coupling configuration. We use the relative phase of the fields for the control of the absorption and dispersion properties of the acoustic wave field. Specifically, we show that by changing the relative phase of the fields, the acoustic field may exhibit absorption, transparency, gain and very interesting dispersive properties.

  17. In situ study of annealing-induced strain relaxation in diamond nanoparticles using Bragg coherent diffraction imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Hruszkewycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed changes in morphology and internal strain state of commercial diamond nanocrystals during high-temperature annealing. Three nanodiamonds were measured with Bragg coherent x-ray diffraction imaging, yielding three-dimensional strain-sensitive images as a function of time/temperature. Up to temperatures of 800 °C, crystals with Gaussian strain distributions with a full-width-at-half-maximum of less than 8×10−4 were largely unchanged, and annealing-induced strain relaxation was observed in a nanodiamond with maximum lattice distortions above this threshold. X-ray measurements found changes in nanodiamond morphology at temperatures above 600 °C that are consistent with graphitization of the surface, a result verified with ensemble Raman measurements.

  18. Diamond nanophotonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Beha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition.

  19. REVISITING JOVIAN-RESONANCE INDUCED CHONDRULE FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, M. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, K. K.; Tanaka, H. [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-19, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Nakamoto, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Miura, H. [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Yamanohata, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Yamamoto, T., E-mail: nagasawa.m.ad@m.titech.ac.jp [Center for Planetary Science, Kobe University, 7-1-48 Minamimachi, Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    It is proposed that planetesimals perturbed by Jovian mean-motion resonances are the source of shock waves that form chondrules. It is considered that this shock-induced chondrule formation requires the velocity of the planetesimal relative to the gas disk to be on the order of ≳ 7 km s{sup –1} at 1 AU. In previous studies on planetesimal excitation, the effects of Jovian mean-motion resonance together with the gas drag were investigated, but the velocities obtained were at most 8 km s{sup –1} in the asteroid belt, which is insufficient to account for the ubiquitous existence of chondrules. In this paper, we reexamine the effect of Jovian resonances and take into account the secular resonance in the asteroid belt caused by the gravity of the gas disk. We find that the velocities relative to the gas disk of planetesimals a few hundred kilometers in size exceed 12 km s{sup –1}, and that this is achieved around the 3:1 mean-motion resonance. The heating region is restricted to a relatively narrowband between 1.5 AU and 3.5 AU. Our results suggest that chondrules were produced effectively in the asteroid region after Jovian formation. We also find that many planetesimals are scattered far beyond Neptune. Our findings can explain the presence of crystalline silicate in comets if the scattered planetesimals include silicate dust processed by shock heating.

  20. An all optical system for studying temperature induced changes in polycrystalline diamond deposited on a tungsten carbide substrate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this poster the authors discussed the ability to heat an industrial diamond sample by means of optical absorption of a CO2 laser beam, and then measure the resulting temperature on the surface of the diamond optically by means of radiometry...

  1. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome neutrophils have altered chemoattractant-induced F-actin polymerization and polarization characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orelio, Claudia; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2009-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a hereditary disorder characterized by pancreatic insufficiency and bone marrow failure. Most Shwachman-Diamond syndrome patients have mutations in the SBDS gene located at chromosome 7 and suffer from recurrent infections, due to neutropenia in combination with

  2. Modeling of thermal stress induced during the diamond-coating of ALGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, Vít; Ižák, Tibor; Babchenko, Oleg; Kromka, Alexander; Vanko, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2013), s. 522-526 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nano-crystalline diamond * gallium nitride * HEMT * selective diamond growth Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Diffusion of Co and W in diamond tool induced by 10.6 µm CO2 laser radiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, Bathusile N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available www.csir.co.za Experimental setup CO2 laser ZnSe lens, f = 250 mm HPHT diamond sample Infrared camera Slide 8 © CSIR 2009 www.csir.co.za Experimental setup CO2 laser ZnSe lens, f = 250 mm HPHT diamond sample Infrared camera...

  4. Optimization of black diamond films for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, Alessandro; Calvani, Paolo; Girolami, Marco [CNR-ISM—Montelibretti Sect., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Orlando, Stefano [CNR-ISM—Tito Scalo Sect., Zona Industriale, 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); Polini, Riccardo [CNR-ISM—Montelibretti Sect., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Trucchi, Daniele M., E-mail: daniele.trucchi@ism.cnr.it [CNR-ISM—Montelibretti Sect., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Black diamond films were developed by fs-laser subwavelength surface texturing. • Black diamond films can be used as photon-enhanced thermionic emission devices. • A simple method for developing a 2D periodic surface texturing is proposed. • Although not perfectly regular, the 2D texturing induced a 98% solar absorptance. • The 2D texturing enhances the photoelectronic capability of black diamond films. - Abstract: Black diamond, namely a surface textured diamond film able to absorb efficiently the sunlight, is developed by the use of ultrashort pulse laser treatments. With the aim of fabricating a 2D periodic surface structure, a double-step texturing process is implemented and compared to the single-step one, able to induce the formation of 1D periodic structures. Although the obtained sub-microstructure does not show a regular 2D periodicity, a solar absorptance of about 98% is achieved as well as a quantum efficiency enhanced of one order of magnitude with respect to the 1D periodic surface texturing.

  5. Ion induced transformation of polymer films into diamond-like carbon incorporating silver nano particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Florian P.

    2010-01-01

    Silver containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an interesting material for medical engineering from several points of view. On the one hand DLC provides high mechanical robustness. It can be used as biocompatible and wear resistant coating for joint replacing implants. On the other hand silver has antimicrobial properties, which could reduce post-operative inflammations. However conventional production of Ag-DLC by co-deposition of silver and carbon in a plasma process is problematic since it does not allow for a separate control of nano particle morphology and matrix properties. In this work an alternative production method has been developed to circumvent this problem. In metall-DLC-production by ion implantation into a nano composite, silver nano particles are initially formed in solution and then incorporated within a polymer matrix. Finally the polymer is transformed into DLC by ion implantation. The aspects and single steps of this method were investigated with regard to the resulting material's properties. The goal was to design an economically relevant deposition method. Based on experimental results a model of the transformation process has been established, which has also been implemented in a computer simulation. Finally the antibacterial properties of the material have been checked in a biomedical test. Here a bacterial killing rate of 90% could be achieved. (orig.)

  6. Mean carrier transport properties and charge collection dynamics of single-crystal, natural type IIa diamonds from ion-induced conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sung Su [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ion-induced conductivity has been used to investigate the detector characteristics of diamond detectors. Both integrated-charge, and time-resolved current measurements were performed to examine the mean carrier transport properties of diamond and the dynamics of charge collection under highly-localized and high-density excitation conditions. The integrated-charge measurements were conducted with a standard pulse-counting system with 241Am radioactivity as the excitation source for the detectors. The time-resolved current measurements were performed using a 70 GHz random sampling oscilloscope with the detectors incorporated into high-speed microstrip transmission lines and the excitation source for these measurements was an ion beam of either 5-MeV He+ or 10-MeV Si3+. The detectors used in both experiments can be described as metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) devices where a volume of the detector material is sandwiched between two metal plates. A charge collection model was developed to interpret the integrated-charge measurements which enabled estimation of the energy required to produce an electron-hole pair (ϵdi) and the mean carrier transport properties in diamond, such as carrier mobility and lifetime, and the behavior of the electrical contacts to diamond.

  7. Diamond synthesis by lasers: recent progress

    OpenAIRE

    Ristić,Gordana S.; Trtica,Milan S.; Miljanić,Šćepan S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date critical review of methods for diamond synthesis by lasers. A provisional classification of synthesizing methods is carried out, in order to present a varied and heterogeneous experimental work that is as clear as possible. Laser diamond CVD methods involve chemical processes in a carbon-containing system induced by specific absorption of laser radiation, while diamond PVD methods involve physical processes induced by an intense, highly-directed laser beam. D...

  8. Investigation of the physics of diamond MEMS : diamond allotrope lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalizniak, I.; Olivero, P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Prawer, S.; Reichart, P.; Rubanov, S.; Petriconi, S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a novel lithography process in which ion induced phase transfomations of diamond form sacrificial layers allowing the fabrication of small structures including micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). We have applied this novel lithography to the fabrication of diamond microcavities, cantilevers and optical waveguides. In this paper we present preliminary experiments directed at the fabrication of suspended diamond disks that have the potential for operation as optical resonators. Such structures would be very durable and resistant to chemical attack with potential applications as novel sensors for extreme environments or high temperature radiation detectors. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs

  9. Probing Growth-Induced Anisotropic Thermal Transport in High-Quality CVD Diamond Membranes by Multifrequency and Multiple-Spot-Size Time-Domain Thermoreflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhe; Bougher, Thomas; Bai, Tingyu; Wang, Steven Y; Li, Chao; Yates, Luke; Foley, Brian M; Goorsky, Mark; Cola, Baratunde A; Faili, Firooz; Graham, Samuel

    2018-02-07

    The maximum output power of GaN-based high-electron mobility transistors is limited by high channel temperature induced by localized self-heating, which degrades device performance and reliability. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond is an attractive candidate to aid in the extraction of this heat and in minimizing the peak operating temperatures of high-power electronics. Owing to its inhomogeneous structure, the thermal conductivity of CVD diamond varies along the growth direction and can differ between the in-plane and out-of-plane directions, resulting in a complex three-dimensional (3D) distribution. Depending on the thickness of the diamond and size of the electronic device, this 3D distribution may impact the effectiveness of CVD diamond in device thermal management. In this work, time-domain thermoreflectance is used to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of an 11.8 μm-thick high-quality CVD diamond membrane from its nucleation side. Starting with a spot-size diameter larger than the thickness of the membrane, measurements are made at various modulation frequencies from 1.2 to 11.6 MHz to tune the heat penetration depth and sample the variation in thermal conductivity. We then analyze the data by creating a model with the membrane divided into ten sublayers and assume isotropic thermal conductivity in each sublayer. From this, we observe a two-dimensional gradient of the depth-dependent thermal conductivity for this membrane. The local thermal conductivity goes beyond 1000 W/(m K) when the distance from the nucleation interface only reaches 3 μm. Additionally, by measuring the same region with a smaller spot size at multiple frequencies, the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities are extracted. Through this use of multiple spot sizes and modulation frequencies, the 3D anisotropic thermal conductivity of CVD diamond membrane is experimentally obtained by fitting the experimental data to a thermal model. This work provides an improved

  10. Short pulse laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOKOLOWSKI-TINTEN,K.; VON DER LINDE,D.; SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-02-07

    Short pulse laser damage and ablation of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films is investigated. Material removal is due to fracture of the film and ejection of large fragments, which exhibit a broadband emission of microsecond duration.

  11. Temperature effect on the formation of a relief of diamond-like carbon coatings and its modification by ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubshtein, A.P.; Trakhtenberg, I.Sh.; Yugov, V.A.; Vladimirov, A.B.; Plotnikov, S.A.; Ponosov, Yu.S

    2006-01-01

    Using the method of pulsed arc sputtering of a graphite target the diamond-like coatings (DLC) ∼1.5 μm thick are deposited on a steel R6M5 substrate. The relief of the coatings obtained under various temperature conditions is investigated. Variations of carbon DLC surfaces are followed after their bombardment with accelerated argon or chemically active oxygen ions. Argon ion bombardment is established to be preferred for producing a smoothed-out DLC relief. It is shown that a DLC relief should be taken into account when measuring microhardness. It is recommended that transformation of interatomic bonds in irradiated subsurface layers be taken into consideration if information index of methods applied constitutes several monolayers [ru

  12. Diamond synthesis by lasers: recent progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana S. Ristić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an up-to-date critical review of methods for diamond synthesis by lasers. A provisional classification of synthesizing methods is carried out, in order to present a varied and heterogeneous experimental work that is as clear as possible. Laser diamond CVD methods involve chemical processes in a carbon-containing system induced by specific absorption of laser radiation, while diamond PVD methods involve physical processes induced by an intense, highly-directed laser beam. Different methods involving coupled, simultaneous action of lasers and classic CVD agents are suggested and discussed as prospective approaches for diamond synthesis.

  13. Diamond-like carbon coating under oleic acid lubrication: Evidence for graphene oxide formation in superlow friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Bouchet, Maria Isabel; Martin, Jean Michel; Avila, José; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tsuruda, Takeshi; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-04-01

    The achievement of the superlubricity regime, with a friction coefficient below 0.01, is the Holy Grail of many tribological applications, with the potential to have a remarkable impact on economic and environmental issues. Based on a combined high-resolution photoemission and soft X-ray absorption study, we report that superlubricity can be realized for engineering applications in bearing steel coated with ultra-smooth tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) under oleic acid lubrication. The results show that tribochemical reactions promoted by the oil lubrication generate strong structural changes in the carbon hybridization of the ta-C hydrogen-free carbon, with initially high sp3 content. Interestingly, the macroscopic superlow friction regime of moving mechanical assemblies coated with ta-C can be attributed to a few partially oxidized graphene-like sheets, with a thickness of not more than 1 nm, formed at the surface inside the wear scar. The sp2 planar carbon and oxygen-derived species are the hallmark of these mesoscopic surface structures created on top of colliding asperities as a result of the tribochemical reactions induced by the oleic acid lubrication. Atomistic simulations elucidate the tribo-formation of such graphene-like structures, providing the link between the overall atomistic mechanism and the macroscopic experimental observations of green superlubricity in the investigated ta-C/oleic acid tribological systems.

  14. Anisotropic diamond etching through thermochemical reaction between Ni and diamond in high-temperature water vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiraku; Kato, Hiromitsu; Makino, Toshiharu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tsubasa; Inokuma, Takao; Tokuda, Norio

    2018-04-27

    Diamond possesses excellent physical and electronic properties, and thus various applications that use diamond are under development. Additionally, the control of diamond geometry by etching technique is essential for such applications. However, conventional wet processes used for etching other materials are ineffective for diamond. Moreover, plasma processes currently employed for diamond etching are not selective, and plasma-induced damage to diamond deteriorates the device-performances. Here, we report a non-plasma etching process for single crystal diamond using thermochemical reaction between Ni and diamond in high-temperature water vapour. Diamond under Ni films was selectively etched, with no etching at other locations. A diamond-etching rate of approximately 8.7 μm/min (1000 °C) was successfully achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this rate is considerably greater than those reported so far for other diamond-etching processes, including plasma processes. The anisotropy observed for this diamond etching was considerably similar to that observed for Si etching using KOH.

  15. Study of diamond film growth and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Sacharial

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to study diamond film growth and its properties in order to enhance the laser damage threshold of substrate materials. Calculations were performed to evaluate laser induced thermal stress parameter, R(sub T) of diamond. It is found that diamond has several orders of magnitude higher in value for R(sub T) compared to other materials. Thus, the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of diamond is much higher. Diamond films were grown using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system at various conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and substrate materials. A 0.5 percent CH4 in H2 at 20 torr were ideal conditions for growing of high quality diamond films on substrates maintained at 900 C. The diamond films were polycrystalline which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The top surface of the growing film is always rough due to the facets of polycrystalline film while the back surface of the film replicates the substrate surface. An analytical model based on two dimensional periodic heat flow was developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The effective diffusivity of diamond/silicon samples was measured using a laser pulse technique. The thermal conductivity of the films was measured to be 13.5 W/cm K, which is better than that of a type Ia natural diamond. Laser induced damage experiments were performed on bare Si substrates, diamond film coated Si, and diamond film windows. Significant improvements in the LIDT were obtained for diamond film coated Si compared to the bare Si.

  16. Optical characterization of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Li-fu; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Jun-jun; Liu, Jin-long; Li, Cheng-ming; Lü, Fan-xiu

    2017-12-01

    Optical centers of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were examined using a low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) technique. The results show that most of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes are present as NV- centers, although some H2 and H3 centers and B-aggregates are also present in the single-crystal diamond because of nitrogen aggregation resulting from high N2 incorporation and the high mobility of vacancies under growth temperatures of 950-1000°C. Furthermore, emissions of radiation-induced defects were also detected at 389, 467.5, 550, and 588.6 nm in the PL spectra. The reason for the formation of these radiation-induced defects is not clear. Although a Ni-based alloy was used during the diamond growth, Ni-related emissions were not detected in the PL spectra. In addition, the silicon-vacancy (Si-V)-related emission line at 737 nm, which has been observed in the spectra of many previously reported microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) synthetic diamonds, was absent in the PL spectra of the single-crystal diamond prepared in this work. The high density of NV- centers, along with the absence of Ni-related defects and Si-V centers, makes the single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD a promising material for applications in quantum computing.

  17. Role of the Inflammasome in Asbestos-Induced Mesothelioma Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    CRI as a potential target for the prevention or treatment of MM. 15. SUBJECT TERMS inflammasome, mesothelioma , asbestos, inflammation 16. SECURITY...AD ________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0462 TITLE: Role of the Inflammasome in Asbestos-Induced Mesothelioma Formation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of the Inflammasome in Asbestos-Induced Mesothelioma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Formation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0462

  18. New particle formation by ion-induced nucleation during dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    jess/120/05/0843-0850. Keywords. New particle formation; ion-induced nucleation; lightning intensity and rain. Abstract. A case of new particle formation observed during dissipation stage of a thunderstorm at a tropical station, Pune, India on 3 ...

  19. Chemically Induced Damage to the Hippocampal Formation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Ottersen, 0 P and Meldrum, B S (1980): The role of epileptic activity in hippocanpal and "remote" cerebral lesions induced by kainic acid, Brain Res...Neuropathol (Berl) 62, Knox, J W and Nelson, J R (1966): Permanent encephalopathy from toluene inhalation, ’ Eng J Med 275, 1494-96. Laurberg, S...neocortical electroencephalograms in the rat. Exp. Neurol. 1977, 56, 1-22. Knox, J.W. & J.R. Nelson: Permanent encephalopathy from toluene inhalation. N

  20. Laser activation of diamond surface for electroless metal plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenov, S. M.; Shafeev, G. A.; Laptev, V. A.; Loubnin, E. N.

    1994-04-01

    Selective area electroless nickel and copper deposition onto the surface of diamond single crystals and polycrystalline diamond films has been realized. Three methods of laser-assisted activation of diamond surface were applied: (i) prenucleation of diamond surface with a thin layer of palladium catalyst via laser-induced decomposition of a palladium acetyl-acetonate [Pd(acac)2] solid film; (ii) deposition of palladium by means of the decomposition of Pd(acac)2 dissolved in dimethylformamide; (iii) laser-induced damage of diamond surface.

  1. Architecting boron nanostructure on the diamond particle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, H.; Dai, D.; Yu, J.H.; Nishimura, K.; Sasaoka, S.; Jiang, N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides an efficient approach for nano-functionalization of diamond powders. Boron nanostructure can be grown on diamond particle entire surface by a simple heat-treatment process. After treatment, various boron nanoforms were grown on the diamond particle surface at different processing temperature. High-density boron nanowires (BNWs) grow on the diamond particle entire surface at 1333 K, while nanopillars cover diamond powders when the heat treatment process is performed at 1393 K. The influence of the pretreatment temperature on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of Cu/diamond composites were investigated. Cu/diamond composites with high thermal conductivity of 670 W (m K) −1 was obtained, which was achieved by the formation of large number of nanowires and nanopillars on the diamond particle surface.

  2. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kundrát

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42 substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo – tungsten (W interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  3. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly

  4. Dynamic membrane structure induces temporal pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippoldt, J; Händel, C; Dietrich, U; Käs, J A

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of temporal pattern formation in biological systems is essential for insights into regulatory processes of cells. Concerning this problem, the present work introduces a model to explain the attachment/detachment cycle of MARCKS and PKC at the cell membrane, which is crucial for signal transduction processes. Our model is novel with regard to its driving mechanism: Structural changes within the membrane fuel an activator-inhibitor based global density oscillation of membrane related proteins. Based on simulated results of our model, phase diagrams were generated to illustrate the interplay of MARCKS and PKC. They predict the oscillatory behavior in the form of the number of peaks, the periodic time, and the damping constant depending on the amounts of MARCKS and PKC, respectively. The investigation of the phase space also revealed an unexpected intermediate state prior to the oscillations for high amounts of MARCKS in the system. The validation of the obtained results was carried out by stability analysis, which also accounts for further enhanced understanding of the studied system. It was shown, that the occurrence of the oscillating behavior is independent of the diffusion and the consumption of the reactants. The diffusion terms in the used reaction-diffusion equations only act as modulating terms and are not required for the oscillation. The hypothesis of our work suggests a new mechanism of temporal pattern formation in biological systems. This mechanism includes a classical activator-inhibitor system, but is based on the modifications of the membrane structure, rather than a reaction-diffusion system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Profiling of Current Transients in Capacitor Type Diamond Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubas, Eugenijus; Ceponis, Tomas; Meskauskaite, Dovile; Kazuchits, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    The operational characteristics of capacitor-type detectors based on HPHT and CVD diamond have been investigated using perpendicular and parallel injection of carrier domain regimes. Simulations of the drift-diffusion current transients have been implemented by using dynamic models based on Shockley-Ramo’s theorem, under injection of localized surface domains and of bulk charge carriers. The bipolar drift-diffusion regimes have been analyzed for the photo-induced bulk domain (packet) of excess carriers. The surface charge formation and polarization effects dependent on detector biasing voltage have been revealed. The screening effects ascribed to surface charge and to dynamics of extraction of the injected bulk excess carrier domain have been separated and explained. The parameters of drift mobility of the electrons μe = 4000 cm2/Vs and holes μh = 3800 cm2/Vs have been evaluated for CVD diamond using the perpendicular profiling of currents. The coefficient of carrier ambipolar diffusion Da = 97 cm2/s and the carrier recombination lifetime τR,CVD ≌ 110 ns in CVD diamond were extracted by combining analysis of the transients of the sensor current and the microwave probed photoconductivity. The carrier trapping with inherent lifetime τR,HPHT ≌ 2 ns prevails in HPHT diamond. PMID:26061200

  6. Organophosphonate biofunctionalization of diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, R; Csiki, R; Wiesinger, M; Sachsenhauser, M; Stutzmann, M; Garrido, J A; Cattani-Scholz, A; Speranza, Giorgio; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K

    2014-08-27

    The modification of the diamond surface with organic molecules is a crucial aspect to be considered for any bioapplication of this material. There is great interest in broadening the range of linker molecules that can be covalently bound to the diamond surface. In the case of protein immobilization, the hydropathicity of the surface has a major influence on the protein conformation and, thus, on the functionality of proteins immobilized at surfaces. For electrochemical applications, particular attention has to be devoted to avoid that the charge transfer between the electrode and the redox center embedded in the protein is hindered by a thick insulating linker layer. This paper reports on the grafting of 6-phosphonohexanoic acid on OH-terminated diamond surfaces, serving as linkers to tether electroactive proteins onto diamond surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the formation of a stable layer on the surface. The charge transfer between electroactive molecules and the substrate is studied by electrochemical characterization of the redox activity of aminomethylferrocene and cytochrome c covalently bound to the substrate through this linker. Our work demonstrates that OH-terminated diamond functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid is a suitable platform to interface redox-proteins, which are fundamental building blocks for many bioelectronics applications.

  7. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  8. Monitoring of peptide induced disruption of artificial lipid membrane constructed on boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrák, V.; Grieten, L.; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, František; Ledvina, Miroslav; Janssens, S. D.; Nesládek, M.; Haenen, K.; Wagner, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 9 (2011), s. 2099-2103 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701; GA MŠk(CZ) LD11076 Grant - others:European RD projects(XE) 238201-MATCON Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : biosensor * boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond * electrochemical impedance spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2011

  9. Influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate tribofilm formation on the tribological performance of self-mated diamond-like carbon contacts under boundary lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah Tasdemir, H.; Tokoroyama, Takayuki; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Mabuchi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings offer excellent mechanical and tribological properties that make them suitable protective coatings for various industrial applications. In recent years, several engine and power train components in passenger cars, which work under boundary lubricated conditions, have been coated with DLC coatings. Since conventional lubricants and lubricant additives are formulated for metal surfaces, there are still controversial questions concerning chemical reactivity between DLC surfaces and common lubricant additives owing to the chemical inertness of DLC coatings. In this work, we present the influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZnDTP) anti-wear additives on the tribological performance of various self-mated DLC coatings under boundary lubrication conditions. The effects of hydrogen, doping elements, and surface morphology on the reactivity of DLC coatings to form a ZnDTP-derived tribofilm were investigated by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that ZnDTP-derived pad-like or patchy tribofilm forms on the surfaces depending on the DLC coating. It is seen that hydrogen content and doping elements increase pad-like tribofilm formation. Doped DLC coatings are found to give better wear resistance than non-doped DLC coatings. Furthermore, the addition of ZnDTP additives to the base oil significantly improves the wear resistance of hydrogenated DLC, silicon-doped hydrogenated DLC, and chromium-doped hydrogenated DLC. Hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous DLC coatings provide the lowest friction coefficient both in PAO (poly-alpha-olefin) and PAO + ZnDTP oils. - Highlights: • Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (DTP) tribofilm formation on various DLC surfaces was evidenced. • Pad-like tribofilm was found on a-C:H, a-C, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC. • Pad-like tribofilm on DLC surfaces greatly increased the wear resistance. • Hydrogenated and doped DLC coatings are

  10. Influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate tribofilm formation on the tribological performance of self-mated diamond-like carbon contacts under boundary lubrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah Tasdemir, H., E-mail: habdullah46@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tokoroyama, Takayuki; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Mabuchi, Yutaka [Nissan Motor Co. (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings offer excellent mechanical and tribological properties that make them suitable protective coatings for various industrial applications. In recent years, several engine and power train components in passenger cars, which work under boundary lubricated conditions, have been coated with DLC coatings. Since conventional lubricants and lubricant additives are formulated for metal surfaces, there are still controversial questions concerning chemical reactivity between DLC surfaces and common lubricant additives owing to the chemical inertness of DLC coatings. In this work, we present the influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZnDTP) anti-wear additives on the tribological performance of various self-mated DLC coatings under boundary lubrication conditions. The effects of hydrogen, doping elements, and surface morphology on the reactivity of DLC coatings to form a ZnDTP-derived tribofilm were investigated by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that ZnDTP-derived pad-like or patchy tribofilm forms on the surfaces depending on the DLC coating. It is seen that hydrogen content and doping elements increase pad-like tribofilm formation. Doped DLC coatings are found to give better wear resistance than non-doped DLC coatings. Furthermore, the addition of ZnDTP additives to the base oil significantly improves the wear resistance of hydrogenated DLC, silicon-doped hydrogenated DLC, and chromium-doped hydrogenated DLC. Hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous DLC coatings provide the lowest friction coefficient both in PAO (poly-alpha-olefin) and PAO + ZnDTP oils. - Highlights: • Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (DTP) tribofilm formation on various DLC surfaces was evidenced. • Pad-like tribofilm was found on a-C:H, a-C, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC. • Pad-like tribofilm on DLC surfaces greatly increased the wear resistance. • Hydrogenated and doped DLC coatings are

  11. New particle formation by ion-induced nucleation during dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ticle formation. Cluster ions can grow to form new particles and rate of such new particle forma- tion will be proportional to ion concentration or the ionization rate in the atmosphere (Dickinson. 1975). Later, many studies have identified ion- induced nucleation (IIN) as one of the most important source of atmospheric particles ...

  12. Subtotal ablation of parietal epithelial cells induces crescent formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicking, E.M.; Fuss, A.; Uhlig, S.; Jirak, P.; Dijkman, H.; Wetzels, J.; Engel, D.R.; Urzynicok, T.; Heidenreich, S.; Kriz, W.; Kurts, C.; Ostendorf, T.; Floege, J.; Smeets, B.; Moeller, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Parietal epithelial cells (PECs) of the renal glomerulus contribute to the formation of both cellular crescents in rapidly progressive GN and sclerotic lesions in FSGS. Subtotal transgenic ablation of podocytes induces FSGS but the effect of specific ablation of PECs is unknown. Here, we established

  13. Brown colour in natural diamond and interaction between the brown related and other colour-inducing defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D; Sibley, S J; Kelly, C J

    2009-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy results on a range of type II diamonds are presented which enable the electronic states associated with them to be mapped out. High pressure, high temperature treatment of brown type IIa diamonds has enabled an activation energy for the removal of the brown colour of 8.0 ± 0.3 eV to be determined and this is consistent with expectations associated with the currently accepted vacancy cluster model for the defect. Theoretical calculations suggest that this defect will generate partially filled gap states about 1 eV above the valence band. Data on the photochromic behaviour of bands producing pink colour and their relation to brown colour are presented; these suggest that the pink bands are produced from two independent transitions with ground states close to each other just below the middle of the band gap. Compensation of neutral boron by charge transfer from states associated with brown colour is demonstrated via the correlated increase in neutral boron and decrease in brown colour on high pressure, high temperature treatment to remove the defects causing the brown colour.

  14. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W., E-mail: Simon.fox@plymouth.ac.uk

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  15. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuezhang; Wei Qiuping; Yu Zhiming; Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. ► The nucleation density was increased to 10 11 cm −2 . ► Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. ► Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp 3 -bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10 11 cm −2 , and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  16. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuezhang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Wei Qiuping, E-mail: qiupwei@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yu Zhiming, E-mail: zhiming@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nucleation density was increased to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp{sup 3}-bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  17. Deterministic Nanopatterning of Diamond Using Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James; Fronzi, Marco; Elbadawi, Christopher; Nikam, Vikram; Pritchard, Joshua; Fröch, Johannes E; Duong, Ngoc My Hanh; Ford, Michael J; Aharonovich, Igor; Lobo, Charlene J; Toth, Milos

    2018-03-27

    Diamond is an ideal material for a broad range of current and emerging applications in tribology, quantum photonics, high-power electronics, and sensing. However, top-down processing is very challenging due to its extreme chemical and physical properties. Gas-mediated electron beam-induced etching (EBIE) has recently emerged as a minimally invasive, facile means to dry etch and pattern diamond at the nanoscale using oxidizing precursor gases such as O 2 and H 2 O. Here we explain the roles of oxygen and hydrogen in the etch process and show that oxygen gives rise to rapid, isotropic etching, while the addition of hydrogen gives rise to anisotropic etching and the formation of topographic surface patterns. We identify the etch reaction pathways and show that the anisotropy is caused by preferential passivation of specific crystal planes. The anisotropy can be controlled by the partial pressure of hydrogen and by using a remote RF plasma source to radicalize the precursor gas. It can be used to manipulate the geometries of topographic surface patterns as well as nano- and microstructures fabricated by EBIE. Our findings constitute a comprehensive explanation of the anisotropic etch process and advance present understanding of electron-surface interactions.

  18. Studies of defects on ion irradiated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, P.F.; Prawer, S.; Spargo, A.E.C.; Bursill, L.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    It is known that diamond is amorphized or graphitized when irradiated above a critical dose. Above this critical dose, D{sub c}, the resistance R is found to drop very rapidly due to the formation of graphite regions which overlap at D{sub c} to form a semi-continuous electrically conducting pathway through the sample. One particularly interesting method of studying this transformation is electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Using EELS, the different phases of carbon can be identified and distinguished from each other using the extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS) of the core-loss part of the spectrum. EELS is a sensitive method for determining the electronic structure of small areas of a sample. In this paper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and EELS measurements of the ion irradiated diamond were combined in an attempt to correlate the microstructural nature of the ion-beam induced damage to the changes in the electrical and other properties. 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  19. Diamond bio electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  20. Bias-enhanced post-treatment process for enhancing the electron field emission properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H.; Dong, C. L.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The electron field emission (EFE) properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond films were markedly improved via the bias-enhanced plasma post-treatment (bep) process. The bep-process induced the formation of hybrid-granular structure of the diamond (bep-HiD) films with abundant nano-graphitic phase along the grain boundaries that increased the conductivity of the films. Moreover, the utilization of Au-interlayer can effectively suppress the formation of resistive amorphous-carbon (a-C) layer, thereby enhancing the transport of electrons crossing the diamond-to-Si interface. Therefore, bep-HiD/Au/Si films exhibit superior EFE properties with low turn-on field of E 0  = 2.6 V/μm and large EFE current density of J e  = 3.2 mA/cm 2 (at 5.3 V/μm)

  1. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  2. Glucocorticoids and inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halloran, B.P.; Bikle, D.D.; Cone, C.M.; Morey-Holton, E. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA) Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (USA) NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Skeletal unloading or loss of normal weight bearing in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and reduces bone calcium. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading is a consequence of an increase in plasma glucocorticoids and/or an increase in bone sensitivity to glucocorticoids, the authors measured plasma corticosterone throughout the day in unloaded and normally loaded rats (hindlimb elevation model) and examined the effect of adrenalectomy on the response of bone to skeletal unloading. Plasma corticosterone levels were similar in normally loaded and unloaded rats at all times. Skeletal unloading in sham-adrenalectomized animals reduced tibial and vertebral calcium by 11.5 and 11.1%, respectively, and in adrenalectomized animals by 15.3 and 20.3%, respectively. Uptake of {sup 45}Ca and ({sup 3}H)proline in the tibia was reduced by 8 and 14%, respectively, in the sham-adrenalectomized animals and by 13 and 19% in the adrenalectomized animals. Bone formation and apposition rates were reduced to the same level in sham- and adrenalectomized animals. These results suggest that the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading is not a consequence of increased plasma glucocorticoids or an increase in bone sensitivity to the glucocorticoids but, rather, point to a local mediator in bone that senses mechanical load and transmits that information to the bone-forming cells directly.

  3. Pattern formation by curvature-inducing proteins on spherical membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Golestanian, Ramin

    2017-12-01

    Spatial organisation is a hallmark of all living cells, and recreating it in model systems is a necessary step in the creation of synthetic cells. It is therefore of both fundamental and practical interest to better understand the basic mechanisms underlying spatial organisation in cells. In this work, we use a continuum model of membrane and protein dynamics to study the behaviour of curvature-inducing proteins on membranes of spherical shape, such as living cells or lipid vesicles. We show that the interplay between curvature energy, entropic forces, and the geometric constraints on the membrane can result in the formation of patterns of highly-curved/protein-rich and weakly-curved/protein-poor domains on the membrane. The spontaneous formation of such patterns can be triggered either by an increase in the average density of curvature-inducing proteins, or by a relaxation of the geometric constraints on the membrane imposed by the membrane tension or by the tethering of the membrane to a rigid cell wall or cortex. These parameters can also be tuned to select the size and number of the protein-rich domains that arise upon pattern formation. The very general mechanism presented here could be related to protein self-organisation in many biological processes, ranging from (proto)cell division to the formation of membrane rafts.

  4. Modeling of thermal stress induced during the diamond-coating of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, V.; Ižák, Tibor; Babchenko, Oleg; Kromka, Alexander; Vanko, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2013), s. 522-526 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : gallium nitride * HEMT * nano-crystalline diamond * selective diamond growth Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1166/asem.2013.1324.

  5. FOXO1 mediates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Dong, Guangyu; Jeon, Hyeran Helen; Elazizi, Mohamad; La, Lan B; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Xiao, E; Tian, Chen; Alsadun, Sarah; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T

    2015-03-15

    We have previously shown that the transcription factor FOXO1 is elevated in conditions with high levels of bone resorption. To investigate the role of FOXO1 in the formation of osteoclasts, we examined mice with lineage-specific deletion of FOXO1 in osteoclast precursors and by knockdown of FOXO1 with small interfering RNA. The receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL), a principal bone-resorbing factor, induced FOXO1 expression and nuclear localization 2 d after stimulation in bone marrow macrophages and RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors. RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity was reduced in half in vivo and in vitro with lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion (LyzM.Cre(+)FOXO1(L/L)) compared with matched controls (LyzM.Cre(-)FOXO1(L/L)). Similar results were obtained by knockdown of FOXO1 in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, FOXO1-mediated osteoclast formation was linked to regulation of NFATc1 nuclear localization and expression as well as a number of downstream factors, including dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, ATP6vod2, cathepsin K, and integrin αv. Lastly, FOXO1 deletion reduced M-CSF-induced RANK expression and migration of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we provide evidence that FOXO1 plays a direct role in osteoclast formation by mediating the effect of RANKL on NFATc1 and several downstream effectors. This is likely to be significant because FOXO1 and RANKL are elevated in osteolytic conditions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Impact-Induced Clay Mineral Formation and Distribution on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Craig, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals have been identified in the central peaks and ejecta blankets of impact craters on Mars. Several studies have suggested these clay minerals formed as a result of impact induced hydrothermalism either during Mars' Noachian era or more recently by the melting of subsurface ice. Examples of post-impact clay formation is found in several locations on Earth such as the Mjolnir and Woodleigh Impact Structures. Additionally, a recent study has suggested the clay minerals observed on Ceres are the result of impact-induced hydrothermal processes. Such processes may have occurred on Mars, possibly during the Noachian. Distinguishing between clay minerals formed preor post-impact can be accomplished by studying their IR spectra. In fact, showed that the IR spectra of clay minerals is greatly affected at longer wavelengths (i.e. mid-IR, 5-25 micron) by impact-induced shock deformation while the near-IR spectra (1.0-2.5 micron) remains relatively unchanged. This explains the discrepancy between NIR and MIR observations of clay minerals in martian impact craters noted. Thus, it allows us to determine whether a clay mineral formed from impact-induced hydrothermalism or were pre-existing and were altered by the impact. Here we study the role of impacts on the formation and distribution of clay minerals on Mars via a fully 3-D Monte Carlo cratering model, including impact- melt production using results from modern hydrocode simulations. We identify regions that are conducive to clay formation and the location of clay minerals post-bombardment.

  7. An Interesting Spin-State Transition for [Fe(PPIX)OH] Induced by High Pressure in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, V. J.; Titler, P. J.; Fern, G. R.; Miller, J. R.; Silver, J.; Snowden, M. J.; McCammon, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    A high-pressure Moessbauer spectroscopic study of [ 57 Fe(PPIX)OH] is reported under conditions where the pressure is increased and then released. Data were recorded over the pressure range from room pressure to 7.1 GPa using a modified Merril-Bassett Diamond Anvil cell. [ 57 Fe(PPIX)OH] exhibits an asymmetric quadrupole doublet at room temperature and pressure, caused by population of higher energy levels known as Kramer's doublets. Under the application of pressure a S=5/2 high spin to S=5/2,3/2 admixed spin state transition of the Fe(III) site is seen to occur above pressures of 2.2 GPa. This follows a general trend observed with other porphyrin compounds. This is thought to be evidence of movement of the ligand towards the iron atom and movement of the iron atom towards the porphyrin plane. Further evidence for this motion is found in the decrease in the asymmetry of the original site, which is caused by changes in population of the energy levels of the Kramer's doublets. At the highest reported pressures a reversal in asymmetry is observed for the inner S=5/2 quadrupole doublet.

  8. Optical properties of bias-induced CH sub 4 -H sub 2 plasma for diamond film deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X D; Zhou, H Y; Wen, X H; Li, D

    2002-01-01

    Methane (CH sub 4) and hydrogen (H sub 2) reactive gas mixture has been in situ investigated in a hot filament diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor with a negatively variable biasing voltage applied to the hot filament with respect to the substrate using infrared absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that CH sub 4 converts increasingly to C sub 2 H sub 2 upon raising the filament temperature in a pure thermal activation state, no optical emission of species is observed. Upon bias application, both CH sub 4 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in infrared (IR) absorption intensity decrease with increasing bias current, even the IR absorption intensity of C sub 2 H sub 2 decreases more rapidly than that of CH sub 4. Meanwhile, the clear emission lines indexed to H, CH, and CH sup + appear in the optical emission spectrum obtained, showing that a large amount of excited radicals are produced in the gas phase after applying bias. It is believed that the further generation of activated radical...

  9. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  10. Friction between silicon and diamond at the nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Lichun; Srikanth, Narasimalu; Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Wang, Xu; Srolovitz, David J; Zhou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the nanoscale friction between diamond-structure silicon (Si) and diamond via molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction between the interfaces is considered as strong covalent bonds. The effects of load, sliding velocity, temperature and lattice orientation are investigated. Results show that the friction can be divided into two stages: the static friction and the kinetic friction. During the static friction stage, the load, lattice orientation and temperature dramatically affects the friction by changing the elastic limit of Si. Large elastic deformation is induced in the Si block, which eventually leads to the formation of a thin layer of amorphous Si near the Si-diamond interface and thus the beginning of the kinetic friction stage. During the kinetic friction stage, only temperature and velocity have an effect on the friction. The investigation of the microstructural evolution of Si demonstrated that the kinetic friction can be categorized into two modes (stick-slip and smooth sliding) depending on the temperature of the fracture region. (paper)

  11. Jet-induced star formation in gas-rich galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibler, V.; Khochfar, S.; Krause, M.; Silk, J.

    2012-09-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) has become a major component in simulations of galaxy evolution, in particular for massive galaxies. AGN jets have been shown to provide a large amount of energy and are capable of quenching cooling flows. Their impact on the host galaxy, however, is still not understood. Subgrid models of AGN activity in a galaxy evolution context so far have been mostly focused on the quenching of star formation. To shed more light on the actual physics of the 'radio mode' part of AGN activity, we have performed simulations of the interaction of a powerful AGN jet with the massive gaseous disc (1011 M⊙) of a high-redshift galaxy. We spatially resolve both the jet and the clumpy, multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM) and include an explicit star formation model in the simulation. Following the system over more than 107 yr, we find that the jet activity excavates the central region, but overall causes a significant change to the shape of the density probability distribution function and hence the star formation rate due to the formation of a blast wave with strong compression and cooling in the ISM. This results in a ring- or disc-shaped population of young stars. At later times, the increase in star formation rate also occurs in the disc regions further out since the jet cocoon pressurizes the ISM. The total mass of the additionally formed stars may be up to 1010 M⊙ for one duty cycle. We discuss the details of this jet-induced star formation (positive feedback) and its potential consequences for galaxy evolution and observable signatures.

  12. The formation of rats' choroidal neovascularization induced by acrolein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Feng Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the formation of rats' choroidal neovascularization(CNVinduced by acrolein. METHODS:Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups. Acrolein 200μL(2.5 mg/kg/dwas poured into the rats' stomach for 4wk as acrolein 4wk and for 8wk as acrolein 8wk group. The same volume of fresh water was also done to the rats as the control group. Remove all eye balls and embed into paraffin with HE staining.RESLUTS:The RPE-Bruch membrane was intact with no obvious abnormality in the control group and acrolein 4wk group. Lost in the continuity of RPE and the movement of choroidal neovascularization were found in the acrolein 8wk. CONCLUSION:The long time use of acrolein can induce the formation of choroial neovascularization in rats.

  13. Nanobubble induced formation of quantum emitters in monolayer semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Gabriella D.; Ajayi, Obafunso A.; Li, Xiangzhi; Zhu, X.-Y.; Hone, James; Strauf, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of exciton quantum emitters in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) has triggered renewed interest of localized excitons in low-dimensional systems. Open questions remain about the microscopic origin previously attributed to dopants and/or defects as well as strain potentials. Here we show that the quantum emitters can be deliberately induced by nanobubble formation in WSe2 and BN/WSe2 heterostructures. Correlations of atomic-force microscope and hyperspectral photoluminescence images reveal that the origin of quantum emitters and trion disorder is extrinsic and related to 10 nm tall nanobubbles and 70 nm tall wrinkles, respectively. We further demonstrate that ‘hot stamping’ results in the absence of 0D quantum emitters and trion disorder. The demonstrated technique is useful for advances in nanolasers and deterministic formation of cavity-QED systems in monolayer materials.

  14. Optical engineering of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Rabeau, James R

    2013-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on the engineering of diamond optical devices. It will give readers an up-to-date account of the properties of optical quality synthetic diamond (single crystal, nanodiamond and polycrystalline) and reviews the large and growing field of engineering of diamond-based optical devices, with applications in quantum computation, nano-imaging, high performance lasers, and biomedicine. It aims to provide scientists, engineers and physicists with a valuable resource and reference book for the design and performance of diamond-based optical devices.

  15. Diamond-cleaning investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    Four parcels of diamonds which either had or had not been cleaned using the usual techniques, chiefly involving etch in molten potassium nitrate were supplied by De Beers Diamond Research Laboratories. Each parcel contained about 40 stones, amounting to about 10 carats. Half the diamonds in each parcel were cleaned by a standard procedure involving half an hours ultrasonic agitation in a 20% solution of the commercial detergent 'Contrad' which is effectively a surfactant and chelating agent. Visual comparisons by a number of observers who were not told the stones' histories, established that these diamonds generally had a more sparkling appearance after the cleaning procedure had been applied

  16. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C–O–H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds ...

  17. Botulinum Toxin-induced Muscle Paralysis Inhibits Heterotopic Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausk, Brandon J; Gross, Ted S; Bain, Steven D

    2015-09-01

    Short-term muscle atrophy induced by botulinum toxin A (BTxA) has been observed to impair osteogenesis in a rat closed femur fracture model. However, it is unclear whether the underlying mechanism is a direct effect of BTxA on muscle-bone interactions or an indirect effect that is driven by skeletal unloading. Because skeletal trauma in the closed fracture model also leads to disuse atrophy, we sought to mitigate this confounding variable by examining BTxA effects on muscle-bone interactions in two complementary in vivo models in which osteogenesis is induced in the absence of skeletal unloading. The overall aim of this study was to identify a potential strategy to inhibit pathological bone formation and heterotopic ossification (HO). (1) Does muscle paralysis inhibit periosteal osteogenesis induced by a transcortical defect? (2) Does muscle paralysis inhibit heterotopic bone formation stimulated by intramuscular bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) injection? Focal osteogenesis was induced in the right hindlimb of mice through surgical initiation of a small transcortical defect in the tibia (fracture callus; n = 7/group) or intramuscular injection of BMP-2 (HO lesion; n = 6/group), both in the presence/absence of adjacent calf paralysis. High-resolution micro-CT images were obtained in all experimental groups 21 days postinduction and total volume (ie, perimeter of periosteal callus or HO lesion) and bone volume (calcified tissue within the total volume) were quantified as primary outcome measures. Finally, these outcome measures were compared to determine the effect of muscle paralysis on inhibition of local osteogenesis in both studies. After a transcortical defect, BTxA-treated mice showed profound inhibition of osteogenesis in the periosteal fracture callus 21 days postsurgery compared with saline-treated mice (total volume: 0.08 ± 0.06 versus 0.42 ± 0.11 mm(3), p paralysis at the same time point (total volume: 1.42 ± 0.31 versus 3.42 ± 2.11 mm(3), p = 0

  18. Study of a 3D diamond detector with photon and proton micro-beams

    OpenAIRE

    Forcolin, Giulio; Grilj, V.; Hamilton, Bruce; Li, Lin; Mcgowan, Malachy; Murphy, S. A.; Oh, Alexander; Skukan, N.; Whitehead, David; Zadoroshnyj, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    To form a 3D diamond detector electrodes were produced in diamond by a femtosecond laser-induced phase transition of diamond to graphite. The process parameters were varied to study the influence on electrode resistivity and induced stress. A technique for a relative measurement of stress induced in 3D diamond detectors is described. The detector was characterised with a 15 keV photon micro-beam (Diamond Light Source, Oxford) and a 4 MeV proton micro-beam (Ruder Bošković Institute, Zagreb). T...

  19. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Functionalized Surface Geometries Induce: “Bone: Formation by Autoinduction”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Ripamonti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of tissue formation, and the allied disciplines of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, have flooded the twenty-first century tissue biology scenario and morphed into high expectations of a fulfilling regenerative dream of molecularly generated tissues and organs in assembling human tissue factories. The grand conceptualization of deploying soluble molecular signals, first defined by Turing as forms generating substances, or morphogens, stemmed from classic last century studies that hypothesized the presence of morphogens in several mineralized and non-mineralized mammalian matrices. The realization of morphogens within mammalian matrices devised dissociative extractions and chromatographic procedures to isolate, purify, and finally reconstitute the cloned morphogens, found to be members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β supergene family, with insoluble signals or substrata to induce de novo tissue induction and morphogenesis. Can we however construct macroporous bioreactors per se capable of inducing bone formation even without the exogenous applications of the osteogenic soluble molecular signals of the TGF-β supergene family? This review describes original research on coral-derived calcium phosphate-based macroporous constructs showing that the formation of bone is independent of the exogenous application of the osteogenic soluble signals of the TGF-β supergene family. Such signals are the molecular bases of the induction of bone formation. The aim of this review is to primarily describe today's hottest topic of biomaterials' science, i.e., to construct and define osteogenetic biomaterials' surfaces that per se, in its own right, do initiate the induction of bone formation. Biomaterials are often used to reconstruct osseous defects particularly in the craniofacial skeleton. Edentulism did spring titanium implants as tooth replacement strategies. No were else that titanium surfaces require functionalized

  1. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messier, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  2. Investing in Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual nominal USD

  3. Semiconductor Diamond Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    andJ.P. Sudano Departamento de Fisica-.1*/ CTA, 12225, SdoJosd dos Campos, SP, Brazil (Received_12 September1990; accepted 26 November 1990) Experimental...that ’the deposition of diamond was a -codeposition process in 3 which both diamond bondag units and graphitic bonding units were being deposited 3

  4. STABLE DIAMOND GRINDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Gutsalenko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper generalizes on the one hand theory of kinematic-geometrical simulation of grinding processes by means of tools with working part as binding matrix with abrasive grains located in it in random manner, for example diamond grains, and on the other hand practical performance of combined grinding process, based on introduction of additional energy as electric discharges and called by the organization-developer (Kharkov Polytechnic Institute «diamond-spark grinding» as applied to processing by means of diamond wheel. Implementation of diamond-spark grinding technologies on the basis of developed generalized theoretical approach allows to use the tool with prescribed tool-life, moreover to make the most efficient use of it up to full exhausting of tool-life, determined by diamond-bearing thickness. Development is directed forward computer-aided manufacturing.

  5. Formation of Tankyrase Inhibitor-Induced Degradasomes Requires Proteasome Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Marie Pedersen

    Full Text Available In canonical Wnt signaling, the protein levels of the key signaling mediator β-catenin are under tight regulation by the multimeric destruction complex that mediates proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. In colorectal cancer, destruction complex activity is often compromised due to mutations in the multifunctional scaffolding protein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC, leading to a stabilization of β-catenin. Recently, tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi, a novel class of small molecule inhibitors, were shown to re-establish a functional destruction complex in APC-mutant cancer cell lines by stabilizing AXIN1/2, whose protein levels are usually kept low via poly(ADP-ribosylation by the tankyrase enzymes (TNKS1/2. Surprisingly, we found that for the formation of the morphological correlates of destruction complexes, called degradasomes, functional proteasomes are required. In addition we found that AXIN2 is strongly upregulated after 6 h of TNKS inhibition. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 counteracted TNKSi-induced degradasome formation and AXIN2 stabilization, and this was accompanied by reduced transcription of AXIN2. Mechanistically we could implicate the transcription factor FoxM1 in this process, which was recently shown to be a transcriptional activator of AXIN2. We observed a substantial reduction in TNKSi-induced stabilization of AXIN2 after siRNA-mediated depletion of FoxM1 and found that proteasome inhibition reduced the active (phosphorylated fraction of FoxM1. This can explain the decreased protein levels of AXIN2 after MG132 treatment. Our findings have implications for the design of in vitro studies on the destruction complex and for clinical applications of TNKSi.

  6. Mediation of inflammatory ascites formation induced by macromolecules in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baintner, Károly

    2018-02-23

    The first 60-min phase of inflammatory ascites formation was studied by intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered macromolecular inducers: yeast cell wall zymosan binds to specific macrophage receptors, polyethyleneimine (PEI) and concanavalin A (ConA), produces non-covalent cross-links on the surface of various cells, while λ-carrageenan may function as a contact activator. Depletion of peritoneal macrophages was performed by overnight pretreatment with diphtheria toxin in transgenic mice, resulting in a significant (p mediated partly (PEI, ConA, and carrageenan) or completely (zymosan) by peritoneal macrophages. Inhibition of prostanoid synthesis with indomethacine or of the kallikrein/bradykinin system with aprotinin also produced a significant (p origin of the macrophage-independent part of the induced ascites is best explained by the deformation of the mesothelial cell surface, resulting in signal transfer to the underlying endothelium and the passage of ascitic fluid in the opposite direction. The soluble mediators are represented by prostanoids, bradykinin and other, unidentified agonists.

  7. Science's gem: Diamond science 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Mainwood, A.; Newton, M. E.; Stoneham, M.

    2009-01-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and h...

  8. A Photoemission Electron Microscope Investigation of Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Films and Diamond Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congjun

    1993-01-01

    CVD diamond nucleation is investigated using the hot filament technique. The stability of CVD diamond at elevated temperatures in vacuum, O_2, and atomic hydrogen environments are studied using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) combined with in-vacuo x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Dissolution, oxidation, and atomic hydrogen etching processes of CVD diamond are observed in real-time. Low field cold electron emission from CVD diamond films has been observed for the first time by PEEM. Nucleation density Mo substrates could be increased from 10^4 to rm 10 ^8/cm^2 by polishing. Heating the substrate to 870^circC in vacuum prior to deposition, or above 1000^ circC at the beginning of deposition, reduced nucleation by more than 100-fold. Reduction in nucleation sites is attributed to annealing. Nucleation on Mo _2C substrates was found to be very poor rm (10^4/cm^2), which shows carbide alone does not promote nucleation. Carbide formation may remove nucleation sites. CVD diamond was found to dissolve into the Mo substrate in vacuum at about 1200^circ C. XPS showed formation of Mo_2 C when the diamond dissolved. Diamond oxidation to gas phase products occurred directly at about 600 ^circC, with no observable participation by the substrate. No detectable etching by atomic hydrogen at a pressure of 1times10^{-4 } torr was observed. Boron doped and "pure" CVD diamond films were found to emit electrons at room temperature under the action of the accelerating electric field of the PEEM (about 30 kV/cm) without photon excitation. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon was investigated with PEEM and by studying the emission current-vs-voltage characteristics of the CVD diamond films. Morphology and crystalline orientation were found to play only a minor role. Impurities in the CVD diamond structure lowers the potential barrier substantially; tunneling of electrons into the vacuum is facile. The effective work function of the emitting CVD diamond films is

  9. Effect of chromium underlayer on the properties of nano-crystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, E.; AlFaify, S.; Yoshitake, T.; Katamune, Y.; Bowden, M.; Nandasiri, M.; Ghantasala, M.; Mancini, D. C.; Thevuthasan, S.; Kayani, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated the effect of chromium underlayer on the structure, microstructure, and composition of the nano-crystalline diamond films. Nano-crystalline diamond thin films were deposited at high temperature in microwave-induced plasma diluted with nitrogen, on single crystal silicon substrate with a thin film of chromium as an underlayer. Characterization of the film was implemented using non-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Nanoindentation studies showed that the films deposited on chromium underlayer have higher hardness values compared to those deposited on silicon without an underlayer. Diamond and graphitic phases of the films evaluated by x-ray and optical spectroscopic analyses determined consistency between the sp2 and sp3 phases of carbon in chromium sample to that of diamond grown on silicon. Diffusion of chromium was observed using ion beam analysis which was correlated with the formation of chromium complexes by x-ray diffraction.

  10. Bases of the Mantle-Carbonatite Conception of Diamond Genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    In the mantle-carbonatite conception of diamond genesis, the results of physic-chemical experiments are coordinated with the data of analytic mineralogy of primary inclusions in natural diamonds. Generalization of the solutions of principal genetic problems constitutes the bases of the conception. The solutions are following: (1) it is grounded that diamond-parental melts of the upper mantle have peridotite/eclogite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, of the transition zone - (wadsleite↔ringwoodite) - majorite - stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, and of the lower mantle - periclase/wustite - bridgmanite - Ca-perovskite -stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions; (2) a construction of generalized diagrams for the diamond-parental media, which reveal changeable compositions of the growth melts of diamonds and associated phases, their genetic relations to the mantle substance, and classification connections of the primary inclusions in natural diamonds; (3) experimental equilibrium phase diagrams of syngenesis of diamonds and primary inclusions, which characterize the nucleation and growth conditions of diamonds and a capture of paragenetic and xenogenetic minerals by the growing diamonds; (4) a determination of the phase diagrams of diamonds and inclusions syngenesis under the regime of fractional crystallization, which discover the regularities of ultrabasic-basic evolution and paragenesis transitions in the diamond-forming systems of the upper and lower mantle. The evidence of the physic-chemically united mode of diamond genesis at the mantle depths with different mineralogy is obtained. References. Litvin Yu.A. (2007). High-pressure mineralogy of diamond genesis. In: Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy (edited by Eiji Ohtani), Geological Society of America Special paper 421, 83-103. Litvin Yu.A. (2012). Experimental study of physic-chemical conditions of natural diamond formation on an example of the eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-diamond

  11. Nucleation mechanism for the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Eshet, Hagai; Kühne, Thomas D.; Behler, Jörg; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-09-01

    Graphite and diamond have comparable free energies, yet forming diamond from graphite in the absence of a catalyst requires pressures that are significantly higher than those at equilibrium coexistence. At lower temperatures, the formation of the metastable hexagonal polymorph of diamond is favoured instead of the more stable cubic diamond. These phenomena cannot be explained by the concerted mechanism suggested in previous theoretical studies. Using an ab initio quality neural-network potential, we carried out a large-scale study of the graphite-to-diamond transition assuming that it occurs through nucleation. The nucleation mechanism accounts for the observed phenomenology and reveals its microscopic origins. We demonstrate that the large lattice distortions that accompany the formation of diamond nuclei inhibit the phase transition at low pressure, and direct it towards the hexagonal diamond phase at higher pressure. The proposed nucleation mechanism should improve our understanding of structural transformations in a wide range of carbon-based materials.

  12. Friction and wear properties of diamonds and diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of chemical vapor deposition techniques for diamond growth enables bearings to be designed which exploit diamond's low friction and extreme resistance to wear. However, currently produced diamond coatings differ from natural diamond surfaces in that they are polycrystalline and faceted, and often contain appreciable amounts of non-diamond material (i.e. graphitic or amorphous carbon). Roughness, in particular, influences the friction and wear properties; rough coatings severely abrade softer materials, and can even wear natural diamond sliders. Nevertheless, the best available coatings exhibit friction coefficients as low as those of natural diamond and are highly resistant to wear. This paper reviews the tribological properties of natural diamond, and compares them with those of chemical vapor deposited diamond coatings. Emphasis is placed on the roles played by roughness and material transfer in controlling frictional behavior. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic properties of point defects in proton irradiated diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makgato, T.N.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Ramos, M.A.; García-Hernández, M.; Climent-Font, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; Muñoz-Martin, A.; Shrivastava, S.; Erasmus, R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ultra-pure type-IIa diamond following irradiation with proton beams of ≈1–2 MeV energy. SQUID magnetometry indicate the formation of Curie type paramagnetism according to the Curie law. Raman and Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show that the primary structural features created by proton irradiation are the centers: GR1, ND1, TR12 and 3H. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo simulations together with SQUID observations show a strong correlation between vacancy production, proton fluence and the paramagnetic factor. At an average surface vacancy spacing of ≈1–1.6 nm and bulk (peak) vacancy spacing of ≈0.3-0.5 nm Curie paramagnetism is induced by formation of ND1 centres with an effective magnetic moment μ eff ~(0.1–0.2)μ B . No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. - Highlights: • Proton macro-irradiation of pure diamond creates fluence dependent paramagnetism. • The effective magnetic moment is found to be in the range μ eff ~(0.1–0.2)μ B . • No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed.

  14. Magnetic properties of point defects in proton irradiated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makgato, T.N., E-mail: Thuto.Makgato@students.wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Sideras-Haddad, E. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Center of Excellence in Strong Materials, Physics Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Ramos, M.A. [CMAM, Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); García-Hernández, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; Muñoz-Martin, A. [CMAM, Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Shrivastava, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Erasmus, R. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Center of Excellence in Strong Materials, Physics Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa)

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ultra-pure type-IIa diamond following irradiation with proton beams of ≈1–2 MeV energy. SQUID magnetometry indicate the formation of Curie type paramagnetism according to the Curie law. Raman and Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show that the primary structural features created by proton irradiation are the centers: GR1, ND1, TR12 and 3H. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo simulations together with SQUID observations show a strong correlation between vacancy production, proton fluence and the paramagnetic factor. At an average surface vacancy spacing of ≈1–1.6 nm and bulk (peak) vacancy spacing of ≈0.3-0.5 nm Curie paramagnetism is induced by formation of ND1 centres with an effective magnetic moment μ{sub eff}~(0.1–0.2)μ{sub B}. No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. - Highlights: • Proton macro-irradiation of pure diamond creates fluence dependent paramagnetism. • The effective magnetic moment is found to be in the range μ{sub eff}~(0.1–0.2)μ{sub B}. • No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed.

  15. Interaction of peridotite with Ca-rich carbonatite melt at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa: Implication for merwinite formation in upper mantle, and for the metasomatic origin of sublithospheric diamonds with Ca-rich suite of inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharygin, Igor S.; Shatskiy, Anton; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ohtani, Eiji; Pokhilenko, Nikolay P.

    2018-03-01

    We performed an experimental study, designed to reproduce the formation of an unusual merwinite + olivine-bearing mantle assemblage recently described as a part of a Ca-rich suite of inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds, through the interaction of peridotite with an alkali-rich Ca-carbonatite melt, derived from deeply subducted oceanic crust. In the first set of experiments, we studied the reaction between powdered Mg-silicates, olivine and orthopyroxene, and a model Ca-carbonate melt (molar Na:K:Ca = 1:1:2), in a homogeneous mixture, at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa. In these equilibration experiments, we observed the formation of a merwinite + olivine-bearing assemblage at 3.1 GPa and 1200 °C and at 6.5 GPa and 1300-1400 °C. The melts coexisting with this assemblage have a low Si and high Ca content (Ca# = molar 100 × Ca/(Ca + Mg) > 0.57). In the second set of experiments, we investigated reaction rims produced by interaction of the same Ca-carbonate melt (molar Na:K:Ca = 1:1:2) with Mg-silicate, olivine and orthopyroxene, single crystals at 3.1 GPa and 1300 °C and at 6.5 GPa and 1400 °C. The interaction of the Ca-carbonate melt with olivine leads to merwinite formation through the expected reaction: 2Mg2SiO4 (olivine) + 6CaCO3 (liquid) = Ca3MgSi2O8 (merwinite) + 3CaMg(CO3)2 (liquid). Thus, our experiments confirm the idea that merwinite in the upper mantle may originate via interaction of peridotite with Ca-rich carbonatite melt, and that diamonds hosting merwinite may have a metasomatic origin. It is remarkable that the interaction of the Ca-carbonate melt with orthopyroxene crystals does not produce merwinite both at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa. This indicates that olivine grain boundaries are preferable for merwinite formation in the upper mantle.

  16. Quantum sensors based on single diamond defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelezko Fedor

    2014-01-01

    NV centers in diamond are promising sensors able to detect electric and magnetic fields at nanoscale. Here we report on the detection of biomolecules using magnetic noise induced by their electron and nuclear spins. Presented results show first steps towards establishing novel sensing technology for visualizing single proteins and study of their dynamics. (author)

  17. Quantum Computing in Diamond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prawer, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is to demonstrate the key elements needed to construct a logical qubit in diamond by exploiting the remarkable quantum properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) optical centre...

  18. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.

    2014-10-21

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  19. Controlled incorporation of mid-to-high Z transition metals in CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; El-Dasher, B; Teslich, N E; Hamza, A V; Obloh, H; Mueller-Sebert, W; Wolfer, M; Fuchs, T; Grimm, M; Kriele, A; Wild, C

    2010-01-08

    We report on a general method to fabricate transition metal related defects in diamond. Controlled incorporation of Mo and W in synthetic CVD diamond was achieved by adding volatile metal precursors to the diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth process. Effects of deposition temperature, grain structure and precursor exposure on the doping level were systematically studied, and doping levels of up to 0.25 at.% have been achieved. The metal atoms are uniformly distributed throughout the diamond grains without any indication of inclusion formation. These results are discussed in context of the kinetically controlled growth process of CVD diamond.

  20. Is inflation compatible with string-induced galaxy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, M.D.

    1987-02-12

    If the formation of galaxies is due to strings produced during a phase transition in the early universe, then the temperature of that phase transition is T/sub c/ > or approx. 3x10/sup -3/ m/sub p/ approx. = 4x10/sup 16/ GeV, where m/sub p/ is the Planck mass. If there is also a preceding period of inflation with dH/dt/H/sup 2/ less than or equal to 0, then it ceases at a value of the Hubble parameter which is constrained by H/sub e//m/sub p/ < or approx. 6x10/sup -5/, which permits reheating of the universe to a temperature, T/sub r/ approx. = 2x10/sup -3/ etam/sub p/, where eta is the efficiency of reheating. Unless the 'inflaton' field phi is strongly coupled to matter, it turns out that eta<<1, which implies that T/sub r/<induced galaxy formation cannot succeed exponential or sub-exponential inflation. But if the inflation is superexponential, with dH/dt/H/sup 2/>0, then the constraint upon H/sub e/ is weakened and it is possible to have both eta<<1 and T/sub r/ > or approx. T/sub C/, thus permitting the subsequent production of strings. This idea can be realized in the higher-dimensional theory of Shafi and Wetterich, which includes higher-derivative terms R/sup 2/ and a cosmological constant ..lambda... If R/sup 2/ is proportional to the Euler-number density, as may be necessary for the theory to be free of ghosts, then no increase in T/sub r/ is possible. But a different, fine-tuned choice of parameters can cause an increase in T/sub r/ by a large factor.

  1. Biologically induced formation of realgar deposits in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahota, Petr; Mikutta, Christian; Falteisek, Lukáš; Duchoslav, Vojtěch; Klementová, Mariana

    2017-12-01

    The formation of realgar (As4S4) has recently been identified as a prominent As sequestration pathway in the naturally As-enriched wetland soil at the Mokrsko geochemical anomaly (Czech Republic). Here we used bulk soil and pore water analyses, synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy, S isotopes, and DNA extractions to determine the distribution and speciation of As as a function of soil depth and metabolic properties of microbial communities in wetland soil profiles. Total solid-phase analyses showed that As was strongly correlated with organic matter, caused by a considerable As accumulation (up to 21 g kg-1) in an organic-rich soil horizon artificially buried in 1980 at a depth of ∼80 cm. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy revealed that As in the buried organic horizon was predominantly present as realgar occurring as nanocrystallites (50-100 nm) in millimeter-scale deposits associated with particulate organic matter. The realgar was depleted in the 34S isotope by 9-12.5‰ relative to the aqueous sulfate supplied to the soil, implying its biologically induced formation. Analysis of the microbial communities by 16S rDNA sequencing showed that realgar deposits formed in strictly anaerobic organic-rich domains dominated by sulfate-reducing and fermenting metabolisms. In contrast, realgar deposits were not observed in similar domains with even small contributions of oxidative metabolisms. No association of realgar with specific microbial species was observed. Our investigation shows that strongly reducing microenvironments associated with buried organic matter are significant biogeochemical traps for As, with an estimated As accumulation rate of 61 g As m-2 yr-1. Nevertheless the production of biologically induced realgar in these microenvironments is too slow to lower As groundwater concentrations at our field site (∼6790 mg L-1). Our study demonstrates the intricate link between geochemistry and microbial community dynamics in wetland

  2. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure study for optimization of hard diamond-like carbon film formation with Ar cluster ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kitagawa, T; Kanda, K; Shimizugawa, Y; Toyoda, N; Matsui, S; Yamada, I; Tsubakino, H; Matsuo, J

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited using C sub 6 sub 0 vapor with simultaneous irradiation of an Ar cluster ion beam was characterized by a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in order to optimize the hard DLC film deposition conditions. Contents of sp sup 2 orbitals in the films, which were estimated from NEXAFS spectra, are 30% lower than that of a conventional DLC film deposited by a RF plasma method. Those contents were obtained under the flux ratio of the C sub 6 sub 0 molecules to the Ar cluster ions to range from 1 to 20, at 5keV of Ar cluster ion acceleration energy. Average hardness of the films was 50 GPa under these flux ratios. This hardness was three times higher than that of a conventional DLC film. Furthermore, the lowest sp sup 2 content and above-mentioned high hardness were obtained at room temperature of the substrate when the depositions were performed in the range of the substrate temperature from room temperature to 250degC. (author)

  3. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp 3 bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp 3 bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  4. Specific plant induced biofilm formation in Methylobacterium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Priscilla B.; Dourado, Manuella N.; Quecine, Maria C.; Andreote, Fernando D.; Araújo, Welington L.; Azevedo, João L.; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.

    2011-01-01

    Two endophytic strains of Methylobacterium spp. were used to evaluate biofilm formation on sugarcane roots and on inert wooden sticks. Results show that biofilm formation is variable and that plant surface and possibly root exudates have a role in Methylobacterium spp. host recognition, biofilm formation and successful colonization as endophytes. PMID:24031703

  5. New observations on formation of thermally induced martensite in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Early studies on the formation of martensite in different ferrous alloys revealed that the formation mecha- nism and substructure of martensite are considerably altered by ... This thermal stimulation caused martensite plates formation in figure 1(b). Martensite start temperatures (Ms) of martensite transfor- mation (γ → α ) was ...

  6. Diamond electronic properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kania, Don R

    1995-01-01

    The use of diamond in electronic applications is not a new idea, but limitations in size and control of properties restricted the use of diamond to a few specialised applications. The vapour-phase synthesis of diamond, however, has facilitated serious interest in the development of diamond-based electronic devices. The process allows diamond films to be laid down over large areas. Both intrinsic and doped diamond films have a unique combination of extreme properties for high speed, high power and high temperature applications. The eleven chapters in Diamond: Electronic Properties and Applications, written by the world's foremost experts on the subject, give a complete characterisation of the material, in both intrinsic and doped forms, explain how to grow it for electronic applications, how to use the grown material, and a description of both passive and active devices in which it has been used with success. Diamond: Electronic Properties and Applications is a compendium of the available literature on the sub...

  7. Diamond pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, K K; Robichaud, A; Potenza, R; Kuleshov, S; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Wermes, N; Dulinski, W; Eremin, V; Smith, S; Sopko, B; Olivero, P; Gorisek, A; Chren, D; Kramberger, G; Schnetzer, S; Weilhammer, P; Martemyanov, A; Hugging, F; Pernegger, H; Lagomarsino, S; Manfredotti, C; Mishina, M; Trischuk, W; Dobos, D; Cindro, V; Belyaev, V; Duris, J; Claus, G; Wallny, R; Furgeri, A; Tuve, C; Goldstein, J; Sciortino, S; Sutera, C; Asner, D; Mikuz, M; Lo Giudice, A; Velthuis, J; Hits, D; Griesmayer, E; Oakham, G; Frais-Kolbl, H; Bellini, V; D'Alessandro, R; Cristinziani, M; Barbero, M; Schaffner, D; Costa, S; Goffe, M; La Rosa, A; Bruzzi, M; Schreiner, T; de Boer, W; Parrini, G; Roe, S; Randrianarivony, K; Dolenc, I; Moss, J; Brom, J M; Golubev, A; Mathes, M; Eusebi, R; Grigoriev, E; Tsung, J W; Mueller, S; Mandic, I; Stone, R; Menichelli, D

    2011-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10(16) protons/cm(2) illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel m...

  8. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Diamond amorphization in neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Gordeev, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results on neutron irradiation of the diamond in a nuclear reactor. It is shown that the neutron irradiation stimulates the diamond transition to the amorphous state. At a temperature below 750 o K the time required for the diamond-graphite transition decreases with decreasing irradiation temperature. On the contrary, in irradiation at higher temperatures the time of diamond conversion into the amorphous state increases with decreasing but always remains shorter than in the absence of irradiation. (author)

  10. Applications Of Diamond In Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, M.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews existing and new applications of single crystal diamond, both natural and synthetic, in optical science. The traditional application is as transmissive components, making use of the very wide spectral transmission range, high thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness of diamond. Diamond windows for corrosive environments are well known; diamond surgical endoscope components are under development; and the use of sharpened diamonds as combined surgical cutting instruments and light pipes for internal illumination of the edge is commercial reality. The superb ability of diamond to conduct heat, combined with its very low thermal expansion coefficient makes it suitable for the transmission of high power laser energy, though there is a problem currently being addressed of a high surface reflection coefficient. It is very probable that CVD diamond-like films will form good anti-reflection coatings for diamond. In new applications, the technology of making diamond lenses is being developed. The use of diamond as a detector of ionising radiation is well known, but recent work shows its possibilities in thermoluminescent as well as conduction and pulse counting modes. There are further possibilities of using diamond for the detection and measurement of optical radiation. Examples are low, medium, and high intensity far ultraviolet (literature and the mechanical and thermal design of diamond "heat sink" substrates for semiconductor laser diodes is advancing rapidly.

  11. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    diamond's exceptional properties for quantum information processing [2], a topic on which there have been many recent papers, and where a diamond colour centre single photon source is already commercially available. Biomedical applications of diamond are recognised, partly tribological and partly electrochemical, but lie outside the present group of papers. Processing and controlling diamond surfaces and interfaces with other materials in their environment are critical steps en route to exploitation. Boron-doped diamond has already found application in electro-analysis and in the bulk oxidation of dissolved species in solution [3]. Energy-related applications—ranging from high-power electronics [3] to a potential first wall of fusion reactors [4]—are further exciting potential applications. Even small and ugly diamonds have value. Their mechanical properties [5] dominate, with significant niche applications such as thermal sinks. The major applications for diamond to date exploit only a fraction of diamond's special properties: visual for status diamonds, and mechanical for working diamonds. Diamond physics reaches well beyond the usual laboratory, to the geological diamond formation processes in the Earth's mantle. Characterization of natural gem diamonds [6, 7] is one part of the detective story that allows us to understand the conditions under which they formed. It was only half a century ago that the scientific and technological challenges of diamond synthesis were met systematically. Today, most of the recent research on diamond has concentrated on synthetics, whether created using high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) techniques or chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The HPHT synthesis of diamond has advanced dramatically [8, 9] to the extent that dislocation birefringence [10] can be largely eliminated. In silicon technology, the elimination of dislocations was a major step in microelectronics. Now, even diamond can be synthesised containing virtually no

  12. IR-stimulated visible fluorescence in pink and brown diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, K S; Luiten, A N; Chapman, J G

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation of natural pink and brown diamond by middle-ultraviolet light (photon energy ϵ ≥ 4.1 eV ) is seen to induce anomalous fluorescence phenomena at N3 defect centres (structure N 3 −V). When diamonds primed in this fashion are subsequently exposed to infrared light (even with a delay of many hours), a transient burst of blue N3 fluorescence is observed. The dependence of this IR-triggered fluorescence on pump wavelength and intensity suggest that this fluorescence phenomena is intrinsically related to pink diamond photochromism. An energy transfer process between N3 defects and other defect species can account for both the UV-induced fluorescence intensity changes, and the apparent optical upconversion of IR light. From this standpoint, we consider the implications of this N3 fluorescence behaviour for the current understanding of pink diamond photochromism kinetics. (paper)

  13. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-02

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  14. Formation of protein induced micro-pores in Chitosan membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Aswal, V. K.; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2017-05-01

    Polymer based nanocomposites are important class of materials and have wide applications. Blending two biopolymers can lead to the development of new materials with tailored properties. Chitosan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with useful properties such as biodegradability and excellent film forming capacity. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a abundantly available globular protein. In our research the interaction of chitosan with BSA and the effect of formation of Au nanoparticles on chitosan-BSA system were investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the films showed formation of micron sized pores and these pores were hindered with formation of Au nanoparticles. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that BSA interacts with chitosan chain and affects the Rg value of chitosan. The formation of micro pores decreases the conductivity values (σ'), while the formation of Au nanoparticles increases σ'.

  15. Native and induced triplet nitrogen-vacancy centers in nano- and micro-diamonds: Half-field electron paramagnetic resonance fingerprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shames, A. I., E-mail: sham@bgu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Osipov, V. Yu.; Vul’, A. Ya. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bardeleben, H.-J. von [Institut des Nano Sciences de Paris-INSP, Université Pierre et Marie Curie/UMR 7588 au CNRS, 7500 Paris (France); Boudou, J.-P.; Treussart, F. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud and ENS Cachan, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-02-10

    Multiple frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of small (4–25 nm) nanodiamonds obtained by various dynamic synthesis techniques reveals systematic presence in the half-field (HF) region a distinctive doublet fingerprint consisting of resolved g{sub HF1} = 4.26 and g{sub HF2} = 4.00 signals. This feature is attributed to “forbidden” ΔM{sub S} = 2 transitions in EPR spectra of two native paramagnetic centers of triplet (S = 1) origin designated as TR1 and TR2, characterized by zero field splitting values D{sub 1} = 0.0950 ± 0.002 cm{sup −1} and D{sub 2} = 0.030 ± 0.005 cm{sup −1}. Nanodiamonds of ∼50 nm particle size, obtained by crushing of Ib type nitrogen rich synthetic diamonds, show only HF TR2 signal whereas the same sample undergone high energy (20 MeV) electron irradiation and thermal annealing demonstrates rise of HF TR1 signal. The same HF TR1 signals appear in the process of fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds from micron-size synthetic diamond precursors. Results obtained allow unambiguous attribution of the half-field TR1 EPR signals with g{sub HF1} = 4.26, observed in nano- and micron-diamond powders, to triplet negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers. These signals are proposed as reliable and convenient fingerprints in both qualitative and quantitative study of fluorescent nano- and micron-diamonds.

  16. THIN DIAMOND FILMS FOR SNS H INJECTIONS STRIPPING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHAW, R.W.; HERR, A.D.; FEIGERLE, C.S.; CUTLER, R.J.; LIAW, C.J.; LEE, Y.Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the preparation and testing of thin diamond foils for use in stripping the SNS H - Linac beam. A long useful lifetime for these foils is desirable to improve operational efficiency. Preliminary data presented at PAC 2001 indicated that diamond foils were superior to conventional evaporated carbon foils, exhibiting lifetimes approximately five-fold longer [1]. That work employed a fully supported diamond foil, a format that is not acceptable for the SNS application; at least two edges of the approximately 1 x 1 cm foils must be free standing to allow for beam rastering. Residual stress in a chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond foil results in film distortion (scrolling) when the film is released from its silicon growth substrate. We have attacked this problem by initially patterning the surface of CVD growth substrates with a 50 or 100 line/inch trapezoidal grating, followed by conformal diamond film growth on the patterned substrate. Then removal of the substrate by chemical etching produced a foil that possessed improved mechanical integrity due to its corrugation. The high nucleation density required to grow continuous, pinhole free diamond foils of the desired thickness (1 (micro)m, 350 (micro)g/cm 2 ) was achieved by a combination of substrate surface scratching and seeding. A variety of diamond foils have been tested using the BNL 750 keV Radio Frequency Quadrupole H - beam to simulate energy loss in the SNS. Those include flat, corrugated, microcrystalline, and nanocrystalline foils. Foil lifetimes are reported

  17. Surface Texturing of CVD Diamond Assisted by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele M. Trucchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diamond is a wide bandgap semiconductor with excellent physical properties which allow it to operate under extreme conditions. However, the technological use of diamond was mostly conceived for the fabrication of ultraviolet, ionizing radiation and nuclear detectors, of electron emitters, and of power electronic devices. The use of nanosecond pulse excimer lasers enabled the microstructuring of diamond surfaces, and refined techniques such as controlled ablation through graphitization and etching by two-photon surface excitation are being exploited for the nanostructuring of diamond. On the other hand, ultrashort pulse lasers paved the way for a more accurate diamond microstructuring, due to reduced thermal effects, as well as an effective surface nanostructuring, based on the formation of periodic structures at the nanoscale. It resulted in drastic modifications of the optical and electronic properties of diamond, of which “black diamond” films are an example for future high-temperature solar cells as well as for advanced optoelectronic platforms. Although experiments on diamond nanostructuring started almost 20 years ago, real applications are only today under implementation.

  18. Twinning of cubic diamond explains reported nanodiamond polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Péter; Garvie, Laurence A J; Buseck, Peter R

    2015-12-16

    The unusual physical properties and formation conditions attributed to h-, i-, m-, and n-nanodiamond polymorphs has resulted in their receiving much attention in the materials and planetary science literature. Their identification is based on diffraction features that are absent in ordinary cubic (c-) diamond (space group: Fd-3m). We show, using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of natural and synthetic nanodiamonds, that the diffraction features attributed to the reported polymorphs are consistent with c-diamond containing abundant defects. Combinations of {113} reflection and rotation twins produce HRTEM images and d-spacings that match those attributed to h-, i-, and m-diamond. The diagnostic features of n-diamond in TEM images can arise from thickness effects of c-diamonds. Our data and interpretations strongly suggest that the reported nanodiamond polymorphs are in fact twinned c-diamond. We also report a new type of twin ( rotational), which can give rise to grains with dodecagonal symmetry. Our results show that twins are widespread in diamond nanocrystals. A high density of twins could strongly influence their applications.

  19. Oxidation and adduct formation of xenobiotics in a microfluidic electrochemical cell with boron doped diamond electrodes and an integrated passive gradient rotation mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Floris Teunis Gerardus; Wigger, Tina; Ma, Liwei; Odijk, Mathieu; Olthuis, Wouter; Karst, U.; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Reactive xenobiotic metabolites and their adduct formation with biomolecules such as proteins are important to study as they can be detrimental to human health. Here, we present a microfluidic electrochemical cell with integrated micromixer to study phase I and phase II metabolism as well as protein

  20. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  1. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb -1 corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the CCE in

  2. Diamond and biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebel, C.E.; Shin, D.; Rezek, Bohuslav; Tokuda, N.; Uetsuka, H.; Watanabe, H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2007), s. 439-461 ISSN 1742-5689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond * biofunctionalization * DNA hybridization detection Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.088, year: 2007

  3. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, W.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  4. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Gonon, P.; Walker, R.; Dooley, S.; Bettiol, A.; Pearce, J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Gonon, P.; Walker, R.; Dooley, S.; Bettiol, A.; Pearce, J.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs

  6. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL). TNF-α might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-κB and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed

  7. Freeze/thaw-induced embolism: probability of critical bubble formation depends on speed of ice formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna eSevanto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g. branches or outermost layer of the xylem. Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically.

  8. Argon ion beam induced surface pattern formation on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsäss, H.; Bobes, O.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    The development of self-organized surface patterns on Si due to noble gas ion irradiation has been studied extensively in the past. In particular, Ar ions are commonly used and the pattern formation was analyzed as function of ion incidence angle, ion fluence, and ion energies between 250 eV and 140 keV. Very few results exist for the energy regime between 1.5 keV and 10 keV and it appears that pattern formation is completely absent for these ion energies. In this work, we present experimental data on pattern formation for Ar ion irradiation between 1 keV and 10 keV and ion incidence angles between 50° and 75°. We confirm the absence of patterns at least for ion fluences up to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using the crater function formalism and Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate curvature coefficients of linear continuum models of pattern formation, taking into account contribution due to ion erosion and recoil redistribution. The calculations consider the recently introduced curvature dependence of the erosion crater function as well as the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer. Only when taking into account these additional contributions to the linear theory, our simulations clearly show that that pattern formation is strongly suppressed between about 1.5 keV and 10 keV, most pronounced at 3 keV. Furthermore, our simulations are now able to predict whether or not parallel oriented ripple patterns are formed, and in case of ripple formation the corresponding critical angles for the whole experimentally studied energies range between 250 eV and 140 keV.

  9. Neon ion beam induced pattern formation on amorphous carbon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Bobes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ripple pattern formation on amorphous carbon surfaces at room temperature during low energy Ne ion irradiation as a function of the ion incidence angle. Monte Carlo simulations of the curvature coefficients applied to the Bradley-Harper and Cater-Vishnyakov models, including the recent extensions by Harrison-Bradley and Hofsäss predict that pattern formation on amorphous carbon thin films should be possible for low energy Ne ions from 250 eV up to 1500 eV. Moreover, simulations are able to explain the absence of pattern formation in certain cases. Our experimental results are compared with prediction using current linear theoretical models and applying the crater function formalism, as well as Monte Carlo simulations to calculate curvature coefficients using the SDTrimSP program. Calculations indicate that no patterns should be generated up to 45° incidence angle if the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer introduced by Hofsäss is taken into account, while pattern formation most pronounced from 50° for ion energy between 250 eV and 1500 eV, which are in good agreement with our experimental data.

  10. Temperature enhancement of secondary electron emission from hydrogenated diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Akhvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the stability of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield from ∼100-nm-thick continuous diamond films is reported. At room temperature, the SEE yield was found to decay as a function of electron irradiation dose. The SEE yield is observed to increase significantly upon heating of the diamond surface. Furthermore, by employing moderate temperatures, the decay of the SEE yield observed at room temperature is inhibited, showing a nearly constant yield with electron dose at 200 deg. C. The results are explained in terms of the temperature dependence of the electron beam-induced hydrogen desorption from the diamond surface and surface band bending. These findings demonstrate that the longevity of diamond films in practical applications of SEE can be increased by moderate heating.

  11. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  12. Diagnostics in dusty C-H-O plasmas with diamond and graphitic nanoparticle generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, T; Vandenbulcke, L; De Persis, S; Rouzaud, J N

    2010-01-01

    A decrease in electron density and a strong increase of electron energy, which induce the enhancement of excitation rates, have been observed in CH 4 -CO 2 plasmas when the inlet methane concentration is high enough and the input microwave power sufficiently low. Together with the decrease in the electron density with plasma duration, they are characteristic of dust formation in these plasmas. In these conditions, the formation of hydrocarbon radicals which are well known precursors of soot and the formation of first stable aromatics are reported, as observed by molecular beam mass spectrometry. Modelling of the chemistry in the plasma is carried out, which can also predict the formation of low concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. These species could be involved in the homogeneous nucleation process of carbon. As a function of the plasma duration, various carbon nanostructures are observed in the particles collected downstream of the plasma. For short durations, nanodiamond grains are formed with the size range 15-100 nm. They are composed of diamond nanocrystals of about 2-10 nm in size; these values are generally observed for all diamond nanocrystals formed in extraterrestrial and terrestrial conditions. For longer plasma durations, sp 2 -hybridized carbons are obtained. Their structure varies from soot to more ordered graphitic carbons nearly similar to 'onions' and structures similar to those observed in tokamaks. The control of the size and the microstructure of the nanodiamond grains are especially important as this could open possibilities for applications in a wide range of fields.

  13. γIrradiation induced formation of PCB-solvent adducts in aliphatic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, F.; Milot, S.; Gagne, N.

    1990-01-01

    γIrradiation induced formation of PCB-solvent adducts was investigated as a model for PCB residues in irradiated food. Formation of cyclohexyl adducts of PCBs was found to be significant when pure PCB congeners and Aroclor mixture were irradiated in cyclohexane and cyclohexene. Reaction pathways were investigated, and the effects of oxygen and electron scavenger were studied

  14. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Spontaneous formation of optically induced surface relief gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblond, H; Barille, R; Ahmadi-Kandjani, S; Nunzi, J-M [Laboratoire POMA, Universite d' Angers, CNRS FRE 2988, 2, Bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Ortyl, E; Kucharski, S, E-mail: herve.leblond@univ-angers.f [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Polymer Engineering and Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-10-28

    We develop a model based on Fick's law of diffusion as a phenomenological description of the molecular motion, and on the coupled mode theory, to describe single-beam surface relief grating formation in azopolymer thin films. The model allows us to explain the mechanism of spontaneous patterning, and self-organization. It allows us to compute the surface relief profile and its evolution, with good agreement with experiments.

  16. Spontaneous formation of optically induced surface relief gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, H; Barille, R; Ahmadi-Kandjani, S; Nunzi, J-M; Ortyl, E; Kucharski, S

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model based on Fick's law of diffusion as a phenomenological description of the molecular motion, and on the coupled mode theory, to describe single-beam surface relief grating formation in azopolymer thin films. The model allows us to explain the mechanism of spontaneous patterning, and self-organization. It allows us to compute the surface relief profile and its evolution, with good agreement with experiments.

  17. New observations on formation of thermally induced martensite in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetical, morphological, crystallographical and thermal characteristics of thermally induced martensite in an Fe–30%Ni–1%Pd alloy has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction method. Kinetics of ...

  18. Characterisation of genes induced during memory formation in the chick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, K.A.; Luermans, J.; Gibbs, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Memory formation can be divided into short-term and long-term. Short-term memory involves electro-chemical activity in the neurons whereas long-term memory requires a permanent change that includes protein synthesis. One of the problems involved with identifying late memory related genes is determining an optimal system in which to study gene expression. We have used a discriminated passive avoidance task in chicks to identify genes that are differentially regulated during memory formation. A mRNA subtraction method was previously used to specifically identify several genes that are expressed in the chick intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) within two hours of training. Eight bands ranging in size from 400bp to 1100bp were obtained in the initially screen. We are currently cloning these PCR products into suitable vectors for further analysis. Two of these clones have been sequenced and analysed using both the blastn and blastx programs in ANGIS. The first clone was found to correspond to cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2. Cytochrome C oxidase (COX) is a transmembrane protein localized in the inner mitochondrial membrane and forms part of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. The second clone codes for the ferritin heavy chain. Ferritin is a ubiquitous protein that is involved in iron homeostasis. At present it is unclear what role these two proteins play in memory formation but further studies are being undertaken to determine the expression profiles of these genes following memory induction. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  19. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  20. Preparation of diamond like carbon thin film on stainless steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diamond-like carbon; buffer layer; plasma CVD; surface characterization; biomedical applications. Abstract. We report the formation of a very smooth, continuous and homogeneous diamond-like carbon DLC thin coating over a bare stainless steel surface without the need for a thin Si/Cr/Ni/Mo/W/TiN/TiC interfacial layer.

  1. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  2. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  3. Isotopically Enriched C-13 Diamond Anvil as a Stress Sensor in High Pressure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Yogesh; Qiu, Wei; Kondratyev, Andreiy; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Baker, Paul

    2004-03-01

    The conventional high pressure diamond anvils were modified by growing an isotopically pure C-13 diamond layer by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition using methane/hydrogen/oxygen chemistry. The isotopically pure C-13 nature of the culet of the diamond anvil was confirmed by the Raman spectroscopy measurements. This isotopically engineered diamond anvil was used against a natural abundance diamond anvil for high pressure experiments in a diamond anvil cell. Spatial resolved Raman spectroscopy was used to measure the stress induced shift in the C-13 layer as well as the undelying C-12 layer to ultra high pressures. The observed shift and splitiing of the diamond first order Raman spectrum was correlated with the stress distribution in the diamond anvil cell. The experimental results will be compared with the finite element modeling results using NIKE-2D software in order to create a mathematical relationship between sets of the following parameters: vertical (z axis) distance; horizontal (r axis) distance; max shear stress, and pressure. The isotopically enriched diamond anvils offer unique opportunities to measure stress distribution in the diamond anvil cell devices.

  4. Thin film diamond. Electronic devices for high temperature, high power and high radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, L.Y.S.

    2000-01-01

    In the ideal form diamond displays extreme physical, optical and electronic properties, making this material interesting for many device applications. However, natural or high pressure, high temperature synthesised forms of diamond are not useful since they are only available as small irregular crystallites and are expensive. The emergence of commercially accessible techniques for the formation of thin films of diamond over relatively large areas has changed this situation, enabling the prospects for the use of diamond as an electronic material to be truly evaluated. Thin film diamond is a defective polycrystalline material. It is difficult to dope n- and p-type and resists conventional chemical etching. Thus, despite the superlative properties of ideal diamond, the realisation of useful devices from this material is far from simple. This thesis considers how the problems may be overcome such that high performance diamond devices can be realised for use in high temperature, high power and high radiation environments. Following a review of the current state-of-the-art in diamond device technology the experimental techniques used throughout this study are summarised. Field effect transistors (FETs) have been designed for operation at high (>300 deg. C) temperatures. Boron-doped (p-type) diamond was used to form the active channel, with insulating diamond acting as the gate to the FET structure. Polycrystalline diamond devices with the highest yet reported transconductance values, which display full turn-off characteristics have been produced. To enable room temperature operation, where boron is an ineffective dopant, a novel doping approach has been established using hydrogen; devices with transconductance, power handling and full pinch-off characteristic have been realised for the first time with this approach. More complex devices require patterning of the diamond substrate material; reactive ion etching using oxygen and chlorinated fluorocarbons have been studied

  5. Jet-induced star formation in gas-rich galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Gaibler, Volker; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krause, Martin; Silk, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) has become a major component in simulations of galaxy evolution, in particular for massive galaxies. AGN jets have been shown to provide a large amount of energy and are capable of quenching cooling flows. Their impact on the host galaxy, however, is still not understood. Subgrid models of AGN activity in a galaxy evolution context so far have been mostly focused on the quenching of star formation. To shed more light on the actual physics of the "rad...

  6. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  7. Ion channelling in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    1978-06-01

    Diamond is one of the most extreme cases from a channelling point of view, having the smallest thermal vibration amplitude and the lowest atomic number of commonly-encountered crystals. These are the two parameters most important for determining channelling behaviour. It is of consiberable interest therefore to see how well the theories explaining and predicting the channeling properties of other substance, succeed with diamond. Natural diamond, although the best available form for these experiments, is rather variable in its physical properties. Part of the project was devoted to considering and solving the problem of obtaining reproducible results representative of the ideal crystal. Channelling studies were performed on several good crystals, using the Rutherford backscattering method. Critical angles for proton channelling were measured for incident energies from 0.6 to 4.5 MeV, in the three most open axes and three most open planes of the diamond structure, and for α-particle channelling at 0.7 and 1.0 MeV (He + ) in the same axes and planes. For 1.0 MeV protons, the crystal temperature was varied from 20 degrees Celsius to 700 degrees Celsius. The results are presented as curves of backscattered yield versus angle in the region of each axis or plane, and summarised in the form of tables and graphs. Generally the critical angles, axial minimum yields, and temperature dependence are well predicted by the accepted theories. The most valuable overall conclusion is that the mean thermal vibration amplitude of the atoms in a crytical determines the critical approach distance to the channel walls at which an ion can remain channelled, even when this distance is much smaller than the Thomas-Fermi screening distance of the atomic potential, as is the case in diamond. A brief study was made of the radiation damage caused by α-particle bombardment, via its effect on the channelling phenomenon. It was possible to hold damage down to negligible levels during the

  8. Annealing-induced change in quantum dot chain formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler D. Park

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot chains were grown using a modified Stranski-Krastanov method in which the InGaAs layer is deposited under a low growth temperature and high arsenic overpressure, which suppresses the formation of dots until a later annealing process. The dots are capped with a 100 nm GaAs layer. Three samples, having three different annealing temperatures of 460°C, 480°C, and 500°C, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Results indicate two distinct types of dot formation processes: dots in the 460°C and 480°C samples form from platelet precursors in a one-to-one ratio whereas the dots in the sample annealed at 500°C form through the strain-driven self-assembly process, and then grow larger via an additional Ostwald ripening process whereby dots grow into larger dots at the expense of smaller seed islands. There are consequently significant morphological differences between the two types of dots, which explain many of the previously-reported differences in optical properties. Moreover, we also report evidence of indium segregation within the dots, with little or no indium intermixing between the dots and the surrounding GaAs barrier.

  9. Characterization of boron doped nanocrystalline diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterlevitz, A C; Manne, G M; Sampaio, M A; Quispe, J C R; Pasquetto, M P; Iannini, R F; Ceragioli, H J; Baranauskas, V

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured diamond doped with boron was prepared using a hot-filament assisted chemical vapour deposition system fed with an ethyl alcohol, hydrogen and argon mixture. The reduction of the diamond grains to the nanoscale was produced by secondary nucleation and defects induced by argon and boron atoms via surface reactions during chemical vapour deposition. Raman measurements show that the samples are nanodiamonds embedded in a matrix of graphite and disordered carbon grains, while morphological investigations using field electron scanning microscopy show that the size of the grains ranges from 20 to 100 nm. The lowest threshold fields achieved were in the 1.6 to 2.4 V/μm range

  10. Boron Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petrák

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rise of antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria there is an increased demand for monitoring the functionality of bacteria membranes, the disruption of which can be induced by peptide-lipid interactions. In this work we attempt to construct and disrupt supported lipid membranes (SLB on boron doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS was used to study in situ changes related to lipid membrane formation and disruption by peptide-induced interactions. The observed impedance changes were minimal for oxidized B-NCD samples, but were still detectable in the low frequency part of the spectra. The sensitivity for the detection of membrane formation and disruption was significantly higher for hydrogenated B-NCD surfaces. Data modeling indicates large changes in the electrical charge when an electrical double layer is formed at the B-NCD/SLB interface, governed by ion absorption. By contrast, for oxidized B-NCD surfaces, these changes are negligible indicating little or no change in the surface band bending profile.

  11. Void formation induced electrical switching in phase-change nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Stefan; Schoen, David T; Topinka, Mark A; Minor, Andrew M; Cui, Yi

    2008-12-01

    Solid-state structural transformation coupled with an electronic property change is an important mechanism for nonvolatile information storage technologies, such as phase-change memories. Here we exploit phase-change GeTe single-nanowire devices combined with ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy to correlate directly nanoscale structural transformations with electrical switching and discover surprising results. Instead of crystalline-amorphous transformation, the dominant switching mechanism during multiple cycling appears to be the opening and closing of voids in the nanowires due to material migration, which offers a new mechanism for memory. During switching, composition change and the formation of banded structural defects are observed in addition to the expected crystal-amorphous transformation. Our method and results are important to phase-change memories specifically, but also to any device whose operation relies on a small scale structural transformation.

  12. Enhanced nucleation of diamond on three dimensional tools via stabilized colloidal nanodiamond in electrostatic self-assembly seeding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Zhang, Songquan; Zhou, Xuechang; Tang, Yongbing

    2017-11-15

    Nanocrystalline diamond particles are promising candidates for copious applications in materials science, biology and electronics. In this work, diamond nucleation density was unprecedentedly enhanced via a non-invasive electrostatic self-assembly seeding approach. By addition of glutamic acid to the nanodiamond seeding solution, the positively charged amino-group of glutamic acid, which is adsorbed on nanodiamond particles, enhances the adsorption on negative charged cemented carbide substrate. The highest nucleation density (1.0×10 10 cm -2 ) was achieved by utilizing glutamic acid at pH 4 as well as DI water at pH 2.2. This density was 20-1000 times higher than most earlier published results on WC-Co substrate. The concentration of the organic molecule, pH, concentration of ND particles and ultrasonication seeding time were found to be important for the seeding process. The colloidal stability was tweaked by pH of the dispersion and concentration of glutamic acid. The optimized parameters for nanodiamond adsorption on WC-Co substrate were found to be pH 4 at a concentration of 7×10 -5 M of glutamic acid at a nanodiamond concentration of 0.005wt%, while the seeding was conducted for 30min. The short ultrasonication time inhibits aggregation and void formation due to peeling off of nanodiamond patches at prolonged seeding times. Moreover, diamond thin films were deposited uniformly and densely on end mills made of cemented carbide. This work indicates that electrostatic induced adsorption of diamond nanoparticles is crucial for the development of ultra-high nucleation densities for the growth of high performance nanocrystalline diamond films, especially for micro sized tools with sharp cutting edges. It may serve as an approach for pinhole-free ultra-thin films deposition on micro-electromechanical system, and encapsulation coating in harsh environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp 3 (75%–85%) with the rest being threefold sp 2 bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g −1 . From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing growth times

  14. Spatial pattern formation induced by Gaussian white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; D'Odorico, Paolo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Gaussian noise to induce ordered states in dynamical systems is here presented in an overview of the main stochastic mechanisms able to generate spatial patterns. These mechanisms involve: (i) a deterministic local dynamics term, accounting for the local rate of variation of the field variable, (ii) a noise component (additive or multiplicative) accounting for the unavoidable environmental disturbances, and (iii) a linear spatial coupling component, which provides spatial coherence and takes into account diffusion mechanisms. We investigate these dynamics using analytical tools, such as mean-field theory, linear stability analysis and structure function analysis, and use numerical simulations to confirm these analytical results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ion and laser beam induced metastable alloy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westendorp, J.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with ion and laser beam induced thin film mixing. It describes the development of an Ultra High Vacuum apparatus for deposition, ion irradiation and in situ analysis of thin film sandwiches. This chamber has been developed in close collaboration with High Voltage Engineering Europa. Thin films can be deposited by an e-gun evaporator. The atom flux is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A comparison is made between ion beam and laser mixing of Cu with Au and Cu with W. The comparison provides a better understanding of the relative importance of purely collisional mixing, the role of thermodynamic effects and the contribution of diffusion due to defect generation and migration. (Auth.)

  16. Genesis of diamond inclusions: An integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study on eclogitic and peridotitic inclusions and their diamond host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Quint; Matveev, Sergei; Drury, Martyn; Gress, Michael; Chinn, Ingrid; Davies, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    Diamond inclusions are potentially fundamental to understanding the formation conditions of diamond and the volatile cycles in the deep mantle. In order to fully understand the implications of the compositional information recorded by inclusions it is vital to know whether the inclusions are proto-, syn-, or epigenetic and the extent to which they have equilibrated with diamond forming fluids. In previous studies, the widespread assumption was made that the majority of diamond inclusions are syngenetic, based upon observation of cubo-octahedral morphology imposed on the inclusions. Recent work has reported the crystallographic relationship between inclusions and the host diamond to be highly complex and the lack of crystallographic relationships between inclusions and diamonds has led some to question the significance of imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. This study presents an integrated EBSD and CL study of 9 diamonds containing 20 pyropes, 2 diopsides, 1 forsterite and 1 rutile from the Jwaneng and Letlhakane kimberlite clusters, Botswana. A new method was developed to analyze the crystallographic orientation of the host diamond and the inclusions with EBSD. Diamonds plates were sequentially polished to expose inclusions at different levels in the diamond. CL imaging at different depths was performed in order to produce a 3D view of diamond growth zones around the inclusions. Standard diamond polishing techniques proved too aggressive for silicate inclusions as they were damaged to such a degree that EBSD measurements on the inclusions were impossible. The inclusions were milled with a Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB) at a 12° angle to clean the surface for EBSD measurements. Of the 24 inclusions, 9 have an imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. Of these inclusions, 6 have faces orientated parallel to diamond growth zones and/or appear to have nucleated on a diamond growth surface, implying syngenesis. In contrast, other diamonds record resorption events such that

  17. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond has the highest thermal conductivity among known materials, and as such finds uses as an industrial tool in areas where dissipation of excess heat is a requirement. In this investigation we set up a laser system to heat a diamond sample...

  18. Agrobacteria lacking ornithine lipids induce more rapid tumour formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vences-Guzmán, Miguel Ángel; Guan, Ziqiang; Bermúdez-Barrientos, José Roberto; Geiger, Otto; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ornithine lipids (OLs) are phosphorus-free membrane lipids that are widespread among Gram-negative bacteria. Their basic structure consists of a 3-hydroxy fatty acyl group attached in amide linkage to the α-amino group of ornithine and a second fatty acyl group ester-linked to the 3-hydroxy position of the first fatty acid. It has been shown that OLs can be hydroxylated within the amide-linked fatty acyl moiety, the secondary fatty acyl moiety or within the ornithine moiety. These modifications have been related to increased stress tolerance and symbiotic proficiency in different organisms such as Rhizobium tropici or Burkholderia cenocepacia. Analysing the membrane lipid composition of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens we noticed that it forms two different OLs. In the present work we studied if OLs play a role in stress tolerance and pathogenicity in A. tumefaciens. Mutants deficient in the OLs biosynthesis genes olsB or olsE were constructed and characterized. They either completely lack OLs (ΔolsB) or only form the unmodified OL (ΔolsE). Here we present a characterization of both OL mutants under stress conditions and in a plant transformation assay using potato tuber discs. Surprisingly, the lack of agrobacterial OLs promotes earlier tumour formation on the plant host. PMID:22958119

  19. Formation of helium induced nanostructure 'fuzz' on various tungsten grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    The response of a variety of W material grades to nanostructure 'fuzz' formation is explored. W targets are exposed to He or D 2 -0.2He plasmas in PISCES-B at 900-1320 K to below sputter threshold He + ions of energy 25-60 eV for up to 2.2 x 10 4 s. SEM and XPS reveal nanoscopic reorganization of the W surface to a layer of 'fuzz' of porosity ∼90% as determined by a 'fuzz' removal/weight loss method. The variability of 'fuzz' growth is examined at 1120 K for 1 h durations: SR, SC and doped W grades - La 2 O 3 (1% wt.), Re (5% and 10% wt.), and TiC (1.5% wt.) developed 2-3 μm thick 'fuzz' layers, while a VPS grade developed a layer 4 μm thick. An RC grade revealed additional 'fuzz' at deep (>100 μm) grain boundaries. However, heat treatment up to 1900 K produced reintegration of 'fuzz' with the bulk and He release at ∼1000 K and ∼1400-1800 K due to depopulation from vacancy complexes.

  20. The LuxS based quorum sensing governs lactose induced biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eDuanis-Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2. However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilms. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway.

  1. Comparison of the Inducing Effect of Indole Compounds on Medusa Formation in Different Classes of Medusozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamori, Luna; Okuizumi, Kazuya; Sato, Chika; Ikeda, Shuhei; Toyohara, Haruhiko

    2017-06-01

    Scyphozoa, Cubozoa and Hydrozoa are classes in the phylum Cnidaria that undergo metagenesis involving a dramatic morphological transition. In Scyphozoa and Cubozoa, when exposed to species- or strain-specific transition-inducing stimuli, asexually reproducing benthic polyps transform into sexually reproducing planktonic medusae. In Hydrozoa, exposure to species- or strainspecific transition-inducing stimuli causes formation of medusa buds in the polyp's body. In Aurelia aurita (Linnaeus, 1758) (Scyphozoa, Semaeostomeae), polyp-to-jellyfish transition is induced by some simple indole compounds. However, whether indole compounds can induce polyp-to-jellyfish transition in Cubozoa and Hydrozoa remains unknown. In the present study, we show that an indole compound, 5-methoxy-2-methylindole, induces polyp-to-jellyfish transition in Scyphozoa and Cubozoa. This inducing action suggests that the downstream steps of polyp-to-jellyfish transition are regulated by the same biochemical reactions in Scyphozoa and Cubozoa, irrespective of the type of transition-inducing environmental stimuli.

  2. An optoelectronic study of diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiscock, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the characterisation of CVD diamond via spectroscopic and electrical investigations. Much of the work concentrates on the identification and the effects of defects and impurities. The bulk of the experimental results are from photoconductivity studies of CVD diamond configured as a detector of ultraviolet light. Other investigations include the annealing of radiation damage in CVD diamond and an electrical characterisation of boron-doped CVD diamond. The characterisation of some group III nitrides forms the short appendix. The work is organised into chapters which are outlined below. Chapter 1 - Introduction: This gives some background to the properties of diamond, its uses, and the different synthesis techniques. Also given is a short review of some of the optical centres in natural and CVD diamond. The kinetics of migration, which is relevant to later chapters is also discussed. Chapter 2 - Experimental Details: This chapter details the experimental techniques and apparatus used in all investigations. An outline of the electronics and data acquisition technique is also presented. Chapter 3 - The Annealing of Radiation Damage: This gives the annealing behaviour of some absorption features in natural and CVD diamond which has been irradiated with electrons. A correlation has been made between the annealing behaviour of two optical centres, and the fast and slow components of a vacancy related centre are explained. Chapter 4 - Electrical characterisation of boron-doped CVD diamond: The boron-doped diamonds studied in this chapter were intended for use as a detector of neutrons. This required a concentration of boron which is large enough for the detection process to occur but low enough for the 'leakage' current to not dominate any induced signal. This electrical characterisation measures the resistivities ( and the temperature dependence ) of the samples and compares this to other work to estimate boron concentrations. Chapter 5 - CVD

  3. Electrochemical applications of CVD diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor-Moreno, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    Diamond technology has claimed an important role in industry since non-expensive methods of synthesis such as chemical vapour deposition allow to elaborate cheap polycrystalline diamond. This fact has increased the interest in the scientific community due to the outstanding properties of diamond. Since Pleskov published in 1987 the first paper in electrochemistry, many researchers around the world have studied different aspects of diamond electrochemistry such as reactivity, electrical structure, etc. As part of this worldwide interest these studies reveal new information about diamond electrodes. These studies report investigation of diamond electrodes characterized using structural techniques like scanning electrode microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A new electrochemical theory based on surface states is presented that explains the metal and the semiconductor behaviour in terms of the doping level of the diamond electrode. In an effort to characterise the properties of diamond electrodes the band edges for hydrogen and oxygen terminated surface are located in organic solvent, hence avoiding possible interference that are present in aqueous solution. The determination of the band edges is performed by Mott-Schottky studies. These allow the calculation of the flat band potential and therefore the band edges. Additional cyclic voltammetric studies are presented for both types of surface termination. Mott-Schottky data and cyclic voltammograms are compared and explained in terms of the band edge localisation. Non-degenerately p-type semiconductor behaviour is presented for hydrogen terminated boron doped diamond. Graphitic surface states on oxidised surface boron doped diamond are responsible for the electrochemistry of redox couples that posses similar energy. Using the simple redox couple 1,4-benzoquinone effect of surface termination on the chemical behaviour of diamond is presented. Hydrogen sublayers in diamond electrodes seem to play an important role for the

  4. An overview of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) contents and isotope signals in terrestrial diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Jones, A. P.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Kelley, S. P.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-11-01

    The noble gas geochemistry of different types of terrestrial diamond including coated stones, alluvial diamonds, framesites, carbonados and impact diamonds yields a wealth of information on the sources of volatiles responsible for diamond formation. We present an illustrated compilation of published analyses of noble gases in different types of natural diamond. Noble gases in diamond record primary signatures from the mantle indicative of their integrated sources, and, the contribution of different metasomatic agents including subducting fluids and kimberlitic melt sampled during diamond growth. In addition, they show evidence of secondary processes such as resorption. Most data are available for coated stones, which trap abundant volatile-rich microscopic inclusions in their rims. While the coated stones are dominated by Mid-Oceanic-Ridge-Basalt (MORB) type noble gas signatures, the other diamond types contain predominantly crustal and atmospheric components although some mantle gases may be present, the latter indicated in elevated 20Ne/22Ne and/or 129Xe/132Xe ratios relative to atmospheric values. Some alluvial diamonds have very high 3He/4He that may represent the presence of a solar component trapped during their formation, but are just as likely to be the result of cosmogenic 3He implantation during their prolonged residence at the Earth's surface. Oceanic-Island-Basalt (OIB) type noble gases occur in nanometer sized inclusions in metamorphic diamond from Kazakhstan, yet their significance as a fingerprint of mantle processes is not fully understood. Implanted noble gases occur near the outer surfaces of individual crystals, and are generally not a major hindrance for the study of mantle signatures, except for polycrystalline diamond like framesites with small grain size. Some diamonds including the polycrystalline carbonados, are dominated by crustal noble gases with no discernible mantle component evidenced by very low 3He/4He and 20Ne/22Ne ratios, and very

  5. Gibberellin Induces Diploid Pollen Formation by Interfering with Meiotic Cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) controls many physiological processes, including cell differentiation, cell elongation, seed germination, and response to abiotic stress. In this study, we report that exogenous treatment of flowering Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with GA specifically affects the process of male meiotic cytokinesis leading to meiotic restitution and the production of diploid (2n) pollen grains. Similar defects in meiotic cell division and reproductive ploidy stability occur in Arabidopsis plants depleted of RGA and GAI, two members of the DELLA family that function as suppressor of GA signaling. Cytological analysis of the double rga-24 gai-t6 mutant revealed that defects in male meiotic cytokinesis are not caused by alterations in meiosis I (MI or meiosis II (MII) chromosome dynamics, but instead result from aberrations in the spatial organization of the phragmoplast-like radial microtubule arrays (RMAs) at the end of meiosis II. In line with a role for GA in the genetic regulation of the male reproductive system, we additionally show that DELLA downstream targets MYB33 and MYB65 are redundantly required for functional RMA biosynthesis and male meiotic cytokinesis. By analyzing the expression of pRGA::GFP-RGA in the wild-type Landsberg erecta background, we demonstrate that the GFP-RGA protein is specifically expressed in the anther cell layers surrounding the meiocytes and microspores, suggesting that appropriate GA signaling in the somatic anther tissue is critical for male meiotic cell wall formation and thus plays an important role in consolidating the male gametophytic ploidy consistency. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Mechanisms underlying the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Federico; Huangfu, Danwei

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer unique opportunities for studying human biology, modeling diseases and for therapeutic applications. The simplest approach so far to generate human PSCs lines is through reprogramming of somatic cells from an individual by defined factors, referred to simply as reprogramming. Reprogramming circumvents the ethical issues associated with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and nuclear transfer hESCs (nt-hESCs), and the resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) retain the same basic genetic makeup as the somatic cell used for reprogramming. Since the first report of iPSCs by Takahashi and Yamanaka, the molecular mechanisms of reprogramming have been extensively investigated. A better mechanistic understanding of reprogramming is fundamental not only to iPSC biology and improving the quality of iPSCs for therapeutic use, but also to our understanding of the molecular basis of cell identity, pluripotency and plasticity. Here we summarize the genetic, epigenetic and cellular events during reprogramming, and the roles of various factors identified thus far in the reprogramming process. PMID:26383234

  7. Novel Resorbable and Osteoconductive Calcium Silicophosphate Scaffold Induced Bone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ros-Tárraga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This aim of this research was to develop a novel ceramic scaffold to evaluate the response of bone after ceramic implantation in New Zealand (NZ rabbits. Ceramics were prepared by the polymer replication method and inserted into NZ rabbits. Macroporous scaffolds with interconnected round-shaped pores (0.5–1.5 mm = were prepared. The scaffold acted as a physical support where cells with osteoblastic capability were found to migrate, develop processes, and newly immature and mature bone tissue colonized on the surface (initially and in the material’s interior. The new ceramic induced about 62.18% ± 2.28% of new bone and almost complete degradation after six healing months. An elemental analysis showed that the gradual diffusion of Ca and Si ions from scaffolds into newly formed bone formed part of the biomaterial’s resorption process. Histological and radiological studies demonstrated that this porous ceramic scaffold showed biocompatibility and excellent osteointegration and osteoinductive capacity, with no interposition of fibrous tissue between the implanted material and the hematopoietic bone marrow interphase, nor any immune response after six months of implantation. No histological changes were observed in the various organs studied (para-aortic lymph nodes, liver, kidney and lung as a result of degradation products being released.

  8. Novel Resorbable and Osteoconductive Calcium Silicophosphate Scaffold Induced Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros-Tárraga, Patricia; Mazón, Patricia; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; De Aza, Piedad N.

    2016-01-01

    This aim of this research was to develop a novel ceramic scaffold to evaluate the response of bone after ceramic implantation in New Zealand (NZ) rabbits. Ceramics were prepared by the polymer replication method and inserted into NZ rabbits. Macroporous scaffolds with interconnected round-shaped pores (0.5–1.5 mm = were prepared). The scaffold acted as a physical support where cells with osteoblastic capability were found to migrate, develop processes, and newly immature and mature bone tissue colonized on the surface (initially) and in the material’s interior. The new ceramic induced about 62.18% ± 2.28% of new bone and almost complete degradation after six healing months. An elemental analysis showed that the gradual diffusion of Ca and Si ions from scaffolds into newly formed bone formed part of the biomaterial’s resorption process. Histological and radiological studies demonstrated that this porous ceramic scaffold showed biocompatibility and excellent osteointegration and osteoinductive capacity, with no interposition of fibrous tissue between the implanted material and the hematopoietic bone marrow interphase, nor any immune response after six months of implantation. No histological changes were observed in the various organs studied (para-aortic lymph nodes, liver, kidney and lung) as a result of degradation products being released. PMID:28773906

  9. Inducing circular RNA formation using the CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Erin K; Meganck, Rita M; Vincent, Heather A; Ball, Christopher B; Ramos, Silvia B V; Moorman, Nathaniel J; Marzluff, William F; Asokan, Aravind

    2017-05-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are highly stable, covalently closed RNAs that are regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and whose functions are largely unknown. These molecules have the potential to be incorporated into engineered systems with broad technological implications. Here we describe a switch for inducing back-splicing of an engineered circRNA that relies on the CRISPR endoribonuclease, Csy4, as an activator of circularization. The endoribonuclease activity and 3' end-stabilizing properties of Csy4 are particularly suited for this task. Coexpression of Csy4 and the circRNA switch allows for the removal of downstream competitive splice sites and stabilization of the 5' cleavage product. This subsequently results in back-splicing of the 5' cleavage product into a circRNA that can translate a reporter protein from an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Our platform outlines a straightforward approach toward regulating splicing and could find potential applications in synthetic biology as well as in studying the properties of different circRNAs. © 2017 Borchardt et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. TNF-α contributes to postmenopausal osteoporosis by synergistically promoting RANKL-induced osteoclast formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Li; He, Li; Liang, Yijian; Qin, Hui; Yu, Bin; Chang, Linli; Xue, Li

    2018-03-20

    Previous studies showed that inflammatory cytokines promote osteoclast formation, characterized by the function of bone resorption. However, it remains unclear whether inflammatory factors contribute to osteoporosis syndrome in postmenopausal women. Here, we found that postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (PO) had increased levels of TNF-α, compared with those without osteoporosis. TNF-α is highly correlated with the RANK and estrogen levels in PO patients. in vitro, TNF-α synergistically promotes RANKL-induced osteoclast formation by activation of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt signaling. Moreover, inhibition of PI3K/Akt totally blocked the synergistic effects of TNF-α on NF-κB activation as well as osteoclast formation. Together, these results demonstrate that TNF-α synergistically promotes RANKL-induced osteoclasts formation through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, which ultimately contributes to osteoporosis syndrome in postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Extraterrestrial diamond inclusions reveal a Mars-sized planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabiei, F.; Badro, J.; Dennenwaldt, T.; Oveisi, E.; Cantoni, M.; Hébert, C.; El Goresy, A.; Barrat, J. A.; Gillet, P.

    2017-12-01

    Ureilites are achondritic meteorites, distinct by their high carbon content. Carbon dominantly exists as graphite and diamond forming veins between olivine and pyroxene grains in the matrix. The presence of diamonds is, often, attributed to the shock-induced transformation from graphite. However, a recent study (Miyahara et al. 2016) on Almahata Sitta MS-170 mainly based on the large size of diamonds suggested their growth in the static high pressure conditions of planetary interior. We prepared five thin sections by the focused ion beam (FIB) from the diamonds in Almahatta Sitta MS-170 for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Abundance of dislocations, stacking faults and {111} twinnings indicate significant deformation. Moreover, large numbers of inclusions are found in diamonds. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) showed that when a twinning is intersected with an inclusion, it transforms to graphite. This together with other morphological and crystallographical characteristics of the graphite and diamond phases point to the shock-induced transformation of diamond to graphite. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and electron diffraction were used to chemically and structurally characterize the diamond inclusions. Most of the inclusions are Fe-Ni-S-P type up to 60 nm in diameter, each consisting of three phases: kamacite (Fe, Ni), troilite (FeS) and Schreibersite ((Fe,Ni)3P). The inclusions always have euhedral shape indicating the existence of a parent phase that later broke down. Chemical analysis of complete inclusions (identified with electron tomography) agrees with the stoichiometric (Fe0.93,Ni0.07)3(S0.88,P0.12) phase that only forms above 21 GPa (Gu et al. 2016). The ureilite parent body (UPB) needs to be at least about Mars-sized to generate such a pressure at its core-mantle boundary. This is in the same size range estimated for the planetary embryos forming early in the Solar System. Moreover, although the UPB did not go through

  12. Ciprofloxacin causes persister formation by inducing the TisB toxin in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Dörr

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria induce stress responses that protect the cell from lethal factors such as DNA-damaging agents. Bacterial populations also form persisters, dormant cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics and play an important role in recalcitrance of biofilm infections. Stress response and dormancy appear to represent alternative strategies of cell survival. The mechanism of persister formation is unknown, but isolated persisters show increased levels of toxin/antitoxin (TA transcripts. We have found previously that one or more components of the SOS response induce persister formation after exposure to a DNA-damaging antibiotic. The SOS response induces several TA genes in Escherichia coli. Here, we show that a knockout of a particular SOS-TA locus, tisAB/istR, had a sharply decreased level of persisters tolerant to ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic that causes DNA damage. Step-wise administration of ciprofloxacin induced persister formation in a tisAB-dependent manner, and cells producing TisB toxin were tolerant to multiple antibiotics. TisB is a membrane peptide that was shown to decrease proton motive force and ATP levels, consistent with its role in forming dormant cells. These results suggest that a DNA damage-induced toxin controls production of multidrug tolerant cells and thus provide a model of persister formation.

  13. Thermal applications of low-pressure diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, R.; Lux, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the last decade several applications of low-pressure diamond were developed. Main products are diamond heat-spreaders using its high thermal conductivity, diamond windows with their high transparency over a wide range of wavelengths and wear resistant tool coatings because of diamonds superhardness. A short description of the most efficient diamond deposition methods (microwave, DC-glow discharge, plasma-jet and arc discharge) is given. The production and applications of diamond layers with high thermal conductivity will be described. Problems of reproducibility of diamond deposition, the influence of impurities, the heat conductivity in electronic packages, reliability and economical mass production will be discussed. (author)

  14. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...

  15. Ion induced transformation of polymer films into diamond-like carbon incorporating silver nano particles; Ioneninduzierte Umwandlung von Polymerschichten zu diamantaehnlichem Kohlenstoff mit darin enthaltenen Silber-Nanopartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Florian P.

    2010-03-26

    Silver containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an interesting material for medical engineering from several points of view. On the one hand DLC provides high mechanical robustness. It can be used as biocompatible and wear resistant coating for joint replacing implants. On the other hand silver has antimicrobial properties, which could reduce post-operative inflammations. However conventional production of Ag-DLC by co-deposition of silver and carbon in a plasma process is problematic since it does not allow for a separate control of nano particle morphology and matrix properties. In this work an alternative production method has been developed to circumvent this problem. In metall-DLC-production by ion implantation into a nano composite, silver nano particles are initially formed in solution and then incorporated within a polymer matrix. Finally the polymer is transformed into DLC by ion implantation. The aspects and single steps of this method were investigated with regard to the resulting material's properties. The goal was to design an economically relevant deposition method. Based on experimental results a model of the transformation process has been established, which has also been implemented in a computer simulation. Finally the antibacterial properties of the material have been checked in a biomedical test. Here a bacterial killing rate of 90% could be achieved. (orig.)

  16. Diamond: a material for acoustic devices

    OpenAIRE

    MORTET, Vincent; WILLIAMS, Oliver; HAENEN, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Diamond has been foreseen to replace silicon for high power, high frequency electronic applications or for devices that operates in harsh environments. However, diamond electronic devices are still in the laboratory stage due to the lack of large substrates and the complexity of diamond doping. On another hand, surface acoustic wave filters based on diamond are commercially available. Diamond is especially suited for acoustic applications because of its exceptional mechanical properties. The ...

  17. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraimovitch, D.; Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ruzin, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz-1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  18. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraimovitch, D., E-mail: dimitryf@mail.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Lefeuvre, G. [Micron Semiconductor Ltd. Royal Buildings, Marlborough Road, Lancing Business Park, BN15 8SJ (United Kingdom); Ruzin, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2017-02-11

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz–1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  19. EPR study of N+-ion-induced free radical formation in antibiotic-producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Liqing; Zhang Yinfen; Chen Ruyi; Gao Juncheng; Zhang Peiling; Ying Hengfeng.

    1995-01-01

    Under the room temperature, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used to study free radical formation in antibiotic-producers in order to investigate antibiotic-producer mutagenic breeding, which were induced by N + ion implanting into antibiotic-producers (e.g., Streptomyces ribosidificus, Streptomyces kanamyceticus and the phage-resistant culture of Streptomyces kanamyceticus). The results show that a lot of free radicals can be induced by N + ion implanting into antibiotic-producers, and the yields of the free radicals increase with implanting dose. The death rate of antibiotic-producers rises due to the increase of N + -ion-induced free radical yields. (author)

  20. Heat-induced whey protein isolate fibrils: Conversion, hydrolysis, and disulphide bond formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Vasbinder, A.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Fibril formation of individual pure whey proteins and whey protein isolate (WPI) was studied. The heat-induced conversion of WPI monomers into fibrils at pH 2 and low ionic strength increased with heating time and protein concentration. Previous studies, using a precipitation method, size-exclusion

  1. Effect of policosanol on foam-cell formation in carrageenan-induced granulomas in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noa, M; de la Rosa, M C; Más, R

    1996-03-01

    Policosanol is a new cholesterol-lowering drug isolated and purified from sugar-cane wax, which prevents the development of lipofundin-induced lesions and foam-cell formation in New Zealand rabbits and Wistar rats. This study was conducted to examine the effects of policosanol on foam-cell formation in carrageenan-induced granulomas in rats. Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly distributed in three experimental groups which received orally for 20 days Tween 20 H2O as vehicle (control group) or policosanol at 2.5 or 25 mg kg-1. At the 11th day, lipofundin was injected intraperitoneally for 8 days to induce formation of foam cells in the granuloma. At day 13, carrageenan was injected subcutaneously for granuloma induction and seven days later animals were killed. A significant reduction of the foam-cell formation in granulomas of policosanol-treated rats was observed. It is concluded that policosanol prevents the development of foam cells in carrageenan-induced granulomas (extravascular medium) in rats.

  2. Complement Activation Induces Neutrophil Adhesion and Neutrophil-Platelet Aggregate Formation on Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Riedl

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: Therefore, our findings of (i neutrophils adhering to complement-activated endothelial cells, (ii the formation of neutrophil-platelet aggregates on endothelial cells, and (iii the ability of aHUS serum to induce similar effects identify a possible role for neutrophils in aHUS manifestation.

  3. Xanthine Oxidase Induces Foam Cell Formation through LOX-1 and NLRP3 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yao; Cao, Yongxiang; Zhang, Zhigao; Vallurupalli, Srikanth; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2017-02-01

    Xanthine oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid. This process generates excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play an important role in atherogenesis. Recent studies show that LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3), a component of the inflammasome, may be involved in the formation of foam cells, a hallmark of atherosclerosis. This study was designed to study the role of various scavenger receptors and NLRP3 inflammasome in xanthine oxidase and uric acid-induced foam cell formation. Human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and THP-1 macrophages were treated with xanthine oxidase or uric acid. Xanthine oxidase treatment (of both VSMCs and THP-1 cells) resulted in foam cell formation in concert with generation of ROS and expression of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and oxidized low density lipoprotein (lectin-like) receptor 1 (LOX-1), but not of scavenger receptor A (SRA). Uric acid treatment resulted in foam cell formation, ROS generation and expression of CD36, but not of LOX-1 or SRA. Further, treatment of cells with xanthine oxidase, but not uric acid, activated NLRP3 and its downstream pro-inflammatory signals- caspase-1, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Blockade of LOX-1 or NLRP3 inflammasome with specific siRNAs reduced xanthine oxidase-induced foam cell formation, ROS generation and activation of NLRP3 and downstream signals. Xanthine oxidase induces foam cell formation in large part through activation of LOX-1 - NLRP3 pathway in both VSMCs and THP-1 cells, but uric acid-induced foam cell formation is exclusively through CD36 pathway. Further, LOX-1 activation is upstream of NLRP3 activation. Graphical Abstract Steps in the formation of foam cells in response to xanthine oxidase and uric acid. Xanthine oxidase stimulates LOX-1 expression on the cell membrane of macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increases generation of ROS, which activate NLRP3 inflammasome and downstream pro

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid directly induces macrophage-derived foam cell formation by blocking the expression of SRBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linmu; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Xiao; Liu, Yan; Yang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Yu, Chao

    2017-09-23

    The leading cause of morbidity and mortality is the result of cardiovascular disease, mainly atherosclerosis. The formation of macrophage foam cells by ingesting ox-LDL and focal retention in the subendothelial space are the hallmarks of the early atherosclerotic lesion. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which is a low-molecular weight lysophospholipid enriched in oxidized LDL, exerts a range of effects on the cardiovascular system. Previous reports show that LPA increases the uptake of ox-LDL to promote the formation of foam cells. However, as the most active component of ox-LDL, there is no report showing whether LPA directly affects foam cell formation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of LPA on foam cell formation, as well as to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Oil red O staining and a Cholesterol/cholesteryl ester quantitation assay were used to evaluate foam cell formation in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. We utilized a Western blot and RT-PCR to investigate the relationship between LPA receptors and lipid transport related proteins. We found that LPA promoted foam cell formation, using 200 μM for 24 h. Meanwhile, the expression of the Scavenger receptor BI (SRBI), which promotes the efflux of free cholesterol, was decreased. Furthermore, the LPA 1/3 receptor antagonist Ki16425 significantly abolished the LPA effects, indicating that LPA 1/3 was involved in the foam cell formation and SRBI expression induced by LPA. Additionally, the LPA-induced foam cell formation was blocked with an AKT inhibitor. Our results suggest that LPA-enhanced foam cell formation is mediated by LPA 1/3 -AKT activation and subsequent SRBI expression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Aizawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sirolimus (SRL is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC, an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs, SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  7. Hadean diamonds in zircon from Jack Hills, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menneken, Martina; Nemchin, Alexander A; Geisler, Thorsten; Pidgeon, Robert T; Wilde, Simon A

    2007-08-23

    Detrital zircons more than 4 billion years old from the Jack Hills metasedimentary belt, Yilgarn craton, Western Australia, are the oldest identified fragments of the Earth's crust and are unique in preserving information on the earliest evolution of the Earth. Inclusions of quartz, K-feldspar and monazite in the zircons, in combination with an enrichment of light rare-earth elements and an estimated low zircon crystallization temperature, have previously been used as evidence for early recycling of continental crust, leading to the production of granitic melts in the Hadean era. Here we present the discovery of microdiamond inclusions in Jack Hills zircons with an age range from 3,058 +/- 7 to 4,252 +/- 7 million years. These include the oldest known diamonds found in terrestrial rocks, and introduce a new dimension to the debate on the origin of these zircons and the evolution of the early Earth. The spread of ages indicates that either conditions required for diamond formation were repeated several times during early Earth history or that there was significant recycling of ancient diamond. Mineralogical features of the Jack Hills diamonds-such as their occurrence in zircon, their association with graphite and their Raman spectroscopic characteristics-resemble those of diamonds formed during ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism and, unless conditions on the early Earth were unique, imply a relatively thick continental lithosphere and crust-mantle interaction at least 4,250 million years ago.

  8. Regrowth zones in laser annealed radiation damaged diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Prawer, S.; Dooley, S.P.; Kalish, R.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa

    1993-01-01

    Focused laser annealing of ion implanted diamond with a 15 μm diameter laser spot produces as variety of effects that depend on the power density of the laser. Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) provides a relatively straight forward, rapid, method to analyse the annealed regions of the diamond to characterize the effects. In order of increasing laser power density, effects that are observed include: regrowth of the end of range damage of the ion implantation, formation of a buried graphitic layer and complete graphitization of the surface of the diamond down to the bottom of the original damage layer. Information provided by CCM leads to an understanding the causes of these effects and provides insight into the carbon phase diagram in the neighbourhood of the graphite to diamond phase transition. Analysis of the effects of laser annealing by CCM are complicated by the swelling of the diamond lattice caused by the original ion implantation, compaction following regrowth and the effect of the analysis beam irradiation itself. 12 refs., 5 figs

  9. Spallation Neutron Source SNS Diamond Stripper Foil Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Robert W.; Plum, Michael A.; Wilson, Leslie L.; Feigerle, Charles S.; Borden, Michael J.; Irie, Y.; Sugai, I.; Takagi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Diamond stripping foils are under development for the SNS. Freestanding, flat 300 to 500 (micro)g/cm 2 foils as large as 17 x 25 mm 2 have been prepared. These nano-textured polycrystalline foils are grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition in a corrugated format to maintain their flatness. They are mechanically supported on a single edge by a residual portion of their silicon growth substrate; fine foil supporting wires are not required for diamond foils. Six foils were mounted on the SNS foil changer in early 2006 and have performed well in commissioning experiments at reduced operating power. A diamond foil was used during a recent experiment where 15 (micro)C of protons, approximately 64% of the design value, were stored in the ring. A few diamond foils have been tested at LANSCE/PSR, where one foil was in service for a period of five months (820 C of integrated injected charge) before it was replaced. Diamond foils have also been tested in Japan at KEK (640 keV H - ) where their lifetimes slightly surpassed those of evaporated carbon foils, but fell short of those for Sugai's new hybrid boron carbon (HBC) foils.

  10. Correlated carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds with coesite inclusions: A SIMS investigation of diamonds from Guaniamo, Argyle and Orapa mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, D. J.; Page, Z.; Harte, B.; Valley, J.; Channer, D.; Jaques, L.

    2006-12-01

    Using ion microprobes and secondary-ion mass spectrometry we have analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of eclogite-suite diamonds and their coesite inclusions, respectively, from three suites of diamonds of Proterozoic age. Extremely high (for the mantle) oxygen isotope values (delta 18O of +10.2 to +16.9 per mil VSMOW) are preserved in coesites included in eclogitic diamonds from Guaniamo, Venezuela (Schulze et al., Nature, 2003), providing compelling evidence for an origin of their eclogite hosts by subduction of sea water altered ocean floor basalts. In situ SIMS analyses of their host diamonds yield carbon isotope values (delta 13C) of -12 to -18 per mil PDB. SIMS analyses of coesite inclusions from Argyle, Australia diamonds previously analyzed by combustion methods for d13C composition (Jaques et al., Proc. 4th Kimb. Conf, 1989), also yield anomalously high d18O values (+6.8 to +16.0 per mil VSMOW), that correlate with the anomalously low carbon isotope values (-10.3 to -14.1 per mil PDB). One coesite-bearing diamond from Orapa, Botswana analyzed in situ by SIMS has a d18O value of the coesite of +8.5 per mil VSMOW and a d13C value of the adjacent diamond host of -9.0 per mil PDB. A second Orapa stone has a SIMS carbon isotope compositional range of d13C = -14 to -16 per mil PDB, but the coesite is too small for ion probe analysis. At each of these localities, carbon isotope values of coesite-bearing diamonds that are lower than typical of mantle carbon are correlated with oxygen isotope compositions of included coesites that are substantially above the common mantle oxygen isotope range. Such results are not in accord with diamond genesis models involving formation of eclogitic diamonds from igneous melts undergoing fractionation in the mantle or by crystallization from primordial inhomogeneities in Earth's mantle. By analogy with the oxygen isotope compositions of altered ocean floor basalts and Alpine (subduction zone) eclogites they are

  11. Fragment formation in GeV-energy proton and light heavy-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, T.; Haga, M.; Haseno, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated similarities and differences among the fragment formation processes in GeV-energy light-ion and light heavy-ion induced reactions. We have newly measured inclusive and exclusive energy spectra of intermediate mass fragments (3 ≤ Z ≤ 30; IMFs) for 8-GeV 16 O and 20 Ne and 12-GeV 20 Ne induced target multifragmentations (TMFs) in order to compare them with those previously measured for 8- and 12-GeV proton induced TMFs. We fond noticeable difference in their spectrum shapes and magnitudes but all of them clearly indicate the existence of sideward-peaked components, indicating fragment formations are mainly dictated not by a incident energy per nucleon but by a total energy of the projectile. (author)

  12. CVD diamond detectors and dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredotti, C.; Fizzotti, F.; LoGiudice, A.; Paolini, C.; Oliviero, P.; Vittone, E.; Torino Univ., Torino

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond, because of its well-known properties of tissue-equivalence, has recorded a wide spreading use in radiotherapy planning with electron linear accelerators. Artificial diamond dosimeters, as obtained by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) could be capable to offer the same performances and they can be prepared in different volumes and shapes. The dosimeter sensitivity per unit volume may be easily proved to be better than standard ionization microchamber. We have prepared in our laboratory CVD diamond microchamber (diamond tips) in emispherical shape with an external diameter of 200 μm, which can be used both as X-ray beam profilometers and as microdosimeters for small field applications like stereotaxy and also for in vivo applications. These dosimeters, which are obtained on a wire substrate that could be either metallic or SiC or even graphite, display good performances also as ion or synchrotron X-rays detectors

  13. DIAMONDS: Engineering Distributed Object Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Evan

    1997-01-01

    This report describes DIAMONDS, a research project at Syracuse University, that is dedicated to producing both a methodology and corresponding tools to assist in the development of heterogeneous distributed software...

  14. Fingerprinting diamonds using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, R.C.; Reihl, R.F.; Tuft, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    It is possible to ion implant patterns in diamond crystals at fluences below that which would impart visible damage and then to reveal those patterns by electrostatic charging and dusting. The charge distribution - and therefore the dust attachment - is related to the difference in electrical conductivity between the implanted region and the rest of the crystal. The technique may have applicability for ''fingerprinting'' or personalizing diamond gemstones. (author)

  15. Quantum photonic networks in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Lončar, Marko

    2013-02-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the opportunity to fabricate nanoscale optical devices and chip-scale systems in diamond that can generate, manipulate, and store optical signals at the single-photon level. In particular, nanophotonics has emerged as a powerful interface between optical elements such as optical fibers and lenses, and solid-state quantum objects such as luminescent color centers in diamond that can be used effectively to manipulate quantum information. While quantum science and technology has been the main driving force behind recent interest in diamond nanophotonics, such a platform would have many applications that go well beyond the quantum realm. For example, diamond\\'s transparency over a wide wavelength range, large third-order nonlinearity, and excellent thermal properties are of great interest for the implementation of frequency combs and integrated Raman lasers. Diamond is also an inert material that makes it well suited for biological applications and for devices that must operate in harsh environments. Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013.

  16. An Affordable Wet Chemical Route to Grow Conducting Hybrid Graphite-Diamond Nanowires: Demonstration by A Single Nanowire Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Chen, Tin Hao; Simon, Turibius; Li, Liang-Chen; Sun, Kien Wen; Ko, Fu-Hsiang

    2017-09-11

    We report an affordable wet chemical route for the reproducible hybrid graphite-diamond nanowires (G-DNWs) growth from cysteamine functionalized diamond nanoparticles (ND-Cys) via pH induced self-assembly, which has been visualized through SEM and TEM images. Interestingly, the mechanistic aspects behind that self-assembly directed G-DNWs formation was discussed in details. Notably, above self-assembly was validated by AFM and TEM data. Further interrogations by XRD and Raman data were revealed the possible graphite sheath wrapping over DNWs. Moreover, the HR-TEM studies also verified the coexistence of less perfect sp 2 graphite layer wrapped over the sp 3 diamond carbon and the impurity channels as well. Very importantly, conductivity of hybrid G-DNWs was verified via fabrication of a single G-DNW. Wherein, the better conductivity of G-DNW portion L2 was found as 2.4 ± 1.92 × 10 -6 mS/cm and revealed its effective applicability in near future. In addition to note, temperature dependent carrier transport mechanisms and activation energy calculations were reported in details in this work. Ultimately, to demonstrate the importance of our conductivity measurements, the possible mechanism behind the electrical transport and the comparative account on electrical resistivities of carbon based materials were provided.

  17. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Rong Rong; Jiang Da; Li Xiao Lin; Zhu Jie Qing

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si, GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environmental due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (approx fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond

  18. Missing ozone-induced potential aerosol formation in a suburban deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, T.; Kuruma, Y.; Matsumi, Y.; Morino, Y.; Sato, K.; Tsurumaru, H.; Ramasamy, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kato, S.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mochizuki, T.; Kawamura, K.; Sadanaga, Y.; Nakashima, Y.; Matsuda, K.; Kajii, Y.

    2017-12-01

    As a new approach to investigating formation processes of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere, ozone-induced potential aerosol formation was measured in summer at a suburban forest site surrounded by deciduous trees, near Tokyo, Japan. After passage through a reactor containing high concentrations of ozone, increases in total particle volume (average of 1.4 × 109 nm3/cm3, which corresponds to 17% that of pre-existing particles) were observed, especially during daytime. The observed aerosol formations were compared with the results of box model simulations using simultaneously measured concentrations of gaseous and particulate species. According to the model, the relative contributions of isoprene, monoterpene, and aromatic hydrocarbon oxidation to SOA formation in the reactor were 24, 21, and 55%, respectively. However, the model could explain, on average, only ∼40% of the observed particle formation, and large discrepancies between the observations and model were found, especially around noon and in the afternoon when the concentrations of isoprene and oxygenated volatile organic compounds were high. The results suggest a significant contribution of missing (unaccounted-for) SOA formation processes from identified and/or unidentified volatile organic compounds, especially those emitted during daytime. Further efforts should be made to explore and parameterize this missing SOA formation to assist in the improvement of atmospheric chemistry and climate models.

  19. A multilayer innovative solution to improve the adhesion of nanocrystalline diamond coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulon-Quintin, A., E-mail: poulon@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Faure, C.; Teulé-Gay, L.; Manaud, J.P. [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the NCD adhesion on WC-12%Co substrates for tooling applications using a multi-interlayer additional system. • Reduction of the graphite layer thickness and continuity at the interface with the diamond. • Transmission electron microscopy study for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces. - Abstract: Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films grown under negative biased substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are widely used as surface overlay coating onto cermet WC-Co cutting tools to get better performances. To improve the diamond adhesion to the cermet substrate, suitable multi-layer systems have been added. They are composed of a cobalt diffusion barrier close to the substrate (single and sequenced nitrides layers) coated with a nucleation extra layer to improve the nucleus density of diamond during CVD processing. For all systems, before and after diamond deposition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been performed for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces and to evaluate the presence of graphitic species at the interface with the diamond. Innovative multilayer system dedicated to the regulation of cobalt diffusion coated with a bilayer system optimized for the carbon diffusion control, is shown as an efficient solution to significantly reduce the graphite layer formation at the interface with the diamond down to 10 nm thick and to increase the adhesion of NCD diamond layer as scratch-tests confirm.

  20. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp 2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  1. HDAC6 deacetylase activity is required for hypoxia-induced invadopodia formation and cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Arsenault

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in the cancer field, tumor cell invasion and metastasis remain a major clinical challenge. Cell invasion across tissue boundaries depends largely on extracellular matrix degradation, which can be initiated by formation of actin-rich cell structures specialized in matrix degradation called invadopodia. Although the hypoxic microenvironment within solid tumors has been increasingly recognized as an important driver of local invasion and metastasis, little is known about how hypoxia influences invadopodia biogenesis. Here, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6, a cytoplasmic member of the histone deacetylase family, is a novel modulator of hypoxia-induced invadopodia formation. Hypoxia was found to enhance HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity through activation of the EGFR pathway. Activated HDAC6, in turn, triggered Smad3 phosphorylation resulting in nuclear accumulation. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity or knockdown of the protein inhibited both hypoxia-induced Smad3 activation and invadopodia formation. Our data provide evidence that hypoxia influences invadopodia formation in a biphasic manner, which involves the activation of HDAC6 deacetylase activity by EGFR, resulting in enhanced Smad phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation. The identification of HDAC6 as a key participant of hypoxia-induced cell invasion may have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of metastasis in cancer patients.

  2. Blockade of advanced glycation end product formation attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dai-Shun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced glycation end products (AGEs have been proposed to be involved in pulmonary fibrosis, but its role in this process has not been fully understood. To investigate the role of AGE formation in pulmonary fibrosis, we used a bleomycin (BLM-stimulated rat model treated with aminoguanidine (AG, a crosslink inhibitor of AGE formation. Methods Rats were intratracheally instilled with BLM (5 mg/kg and orally administered with AG (40, 80, 120 mg/kg once daily for two weeks. AGEs level in lung tissue was determined by ELISA and pulmonary fibrosis was evaluated by Ashcroft score and hydroxyproline assay. The expression of heat shock protein 47 (HSP47, a collagen specific molecular chaperone, was measured with RT-PCR and Western blot. Moreover, TGFβ1 and its downstream Smad proteins were analyzed by Western blot. Results AGEs level in rat lungs, as well as lung hydroxyproline content and Ashcroft score, was significantly enhanced by BLM stimulation, which was abrogated by AG treatment. BLM significantly increased the expression of HSP47 mRNA and protein in lung tissues, and AG treatment markedly decreased BLM-induced HSP47 expression in a dose-dependent manner (p Conclusion These findings suggest AGE formation may participate in the process of BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and blockade of AGE formation by AG treatment attenuates BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, which is implicated in inhibition of HSP47 expression and TGFβ/Smads signaling.

  3. Modelling nanoparticles formation in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Lavisse, L.; Lucas, M.C. Marco de [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Hebert, D. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles spatial localization in the plume induced by a pulsed laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma plume obtained by laser irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particles and debris formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Powder generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditions of formation. - Abstract: Nanoparticles formation in a laser-induced plasma plume in the ambient air has been investigated by using numerical simulations and physical models. For high irradiances, or for ultrashort laser pulses, nanoparticles are formed by condensation, as fine powders, in the expanding plasma for very high pairs of temperature and pressure. At lower irradiances, or nanosecond laser pulses, another thermodynamic paths are possible, which cross the liquid-gas transition curve while laser is still heating the target and the induced plasma. In this work, we explore the growth of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers as a function of the laser irradiance. Moreover, the influence of the ambient gas has also been investigated.

  4. Lipoxygenase independent hexanal formation in isolated soy proteins induced by reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Q; Boatright, W L

    2008-08-01

    Compared to corresponding controls, 6.5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) elevated headspace hexanal level over aqueous slurries of both commercial isolated soy proteins (ISP) and laboratory ISP prepared with 80 degrees C treatment. Further analysis revealed that lipoxygenase (LOX) activity was not detected from these ISP, indicating that LOX is not involved in the observed hexanal increase. Levels of the induced headspace hexanal over the ISP aqueous slurries were proportional to the amount of DTT added in the range of 0 to 65 mM. Subsequent systematic investigations with model systems revealed that iron was required for the reducing agent-induced hexanal formation from linoleic acid. Erythorbate, another reducing agent, can also induce hexanal formation in both ISP and model systems. As a comparison, the LOX activity and hexanal synthesis in defatted soy flour were examined. The corresponding results showed that defatted soy flour maintained high LOX activities and that hexanal synthesis in such sample was significantly inhibited by high concentration DTT (above 130 mM). Data from the current investigation demonstrate the existence of LOX independent hexanal formation induced by reducing agents in ISP and the potential requirement of iron as a catalyst.

  5. Influence of cytosine methylation on ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation in genomic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochette, Patrick J. [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Lacoste, Sandrine [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Therrien, Jean-Philippe [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Bastien, Nathalie [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Brash, Douglas E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Drouin, Regen, E-mail: Regen.Drouin@USherbrooke.ca [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)

    2009-06-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is the main cause of skin cancer. More than 50% of all non-melanoma skin cancers and >90% of squamous cell carcinomas in the US carry a sunlight-induced mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. These mutations have a strong tendency to occur at methylated cytosines. Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) was used to compare at nucleotide resolution DNA photoproduct formation at dipyrimidine sites either containing or lacking a methylated cytosine. For this purpose, we exploited the fact that the X chromosome is methylated in females only on the inactive X chromosome, and that the FMR1 (fragile-X mental retardation 1) gene is methylated only in fragile-X syndrome male patients. Purified genomic DNA was irradiated with UVC (254 nm), UVB (290-320 nm) or monochromatic UVB (302 and 313 nm) to determine the effect of different wavelengths on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation along the X-linked PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) and FMR1 genes. We show that constitutive methylation of cytosine increases the frequency of UVB-induced CPD formation by 1.7-fold, confirming that methylation per se is influencing the probability of damage formation. This was true for both UVB sources used, either broadband or monochromatic, but not for UVC. Our data prove unequivocally that following UVB exposure methylated cytosines are significantly more susceptible to CPD formation compared with unmethylated cytosines.

  6. Influence of cytosine methylation on ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation in genomic DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochette, Patrick J.; Lacoste, Sandrine; Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Bastien, Nathalie; Brash, Douglas E.; Drouin, Regen

    2009-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is the main cause of skin cancer. More than 50% of all non-melanoma skin cancers and >90% of squamous cell carcinomas in the US carry a sunlight-induced mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. These mutations have a strong tendency to occur at methylated cytosines. Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) was used to compare at nucleotide resolution DNA photoproduct formation at dipyrimidine sites either containing or lacking a methylated cytosine. For this purpose, we exploited the fact that the X chromosome is methylated in females only on the inactive X chromosome, and that the FMR1 (fragile-X mental retardation 1) gene is methylated only in fragile-X syndrome male patients. Purified genomic DNA was irradiated with UVC (254 nm), UVB (290-320 nm) or monochromatic UVB (302 and 313 nm) to determine the effect of different wavelengths on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation along the X-linked PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) and FMR1 genes. We show that constitutive methylation of cytosine increases the frequency of UVB-induced CPD formation by 1.7-fold, confirming that methylation per se is influencing the probability of damage formation. This was true for both UVB sources used, either broadband or monochromatic, but not for UVC. Our data prove unequivocally that following UVB exposure methylated cytosines are significantly more susceptible to CPD formation compared with unmethylated cytosines.

  7. Mössbauer spectroscopy study of surfactant sputtering induced Fe silicide formation on a Si surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, C.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Hofsäss, H., E-mail: hans.hofsaess@phys.uni-goettingen.de [2nd Institute of Physics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Brüsewitz, C.; Vetter, U. [2nd Institute of Physics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Physics Department, Durban University of Technology, Durban 4001 (South Africa)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We study the formation of self-organized nanoscale dot and ripple patterns on Si. • Patterns are created by keV noble gas ion irradiation and simultaneous {sup 57}Fe co-deposition. • Ion-induced phase separation and the formation of a-FeSi{sub 2} is identified as relevant process. - Abstract: The formation of Fe silicides in surface ripple patterns, generated by erosion of a Si surface with keV Ar and Xe ions and simultaneous co-deposition of Fe, was investigated with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. For the dot and ripple patterns studied, we find an average Fe concentration in the irradiated layer between 6 and 25 at.%. The Mössbauer spectra clearly show evidence of the formation of Fe disilicides with Fe content close to 33 at.%, but very little evidence of the formation of metallic Fe particles. The results support the process of ion-induced phase separation toward an amorphous Fe disilicide phase as pattern generation mechanism. The observed amorphous phase is in agreement with thermodynamic calculations of amorphous Fe silicides.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide acts downstream of melatonin to induce lateral root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziping; Gu, Quan; Yu, Xiuli; Huang, Liqin; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ren; Shen, Wei; Shen, Wenbiao

    2018-01-09

    Although several studies have confirmed the beneficial roles of exogenous melatonin in lateral root (LR) formation, the molecular mechanism is still elusive. Here, the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the induction of LR formation triggered by melatonin was investigated. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa 'Biaogan') and transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings were treated with or without melatonin, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, NADPH oxidase inhibitor), N,N'-dimethylthiourea (DMTU, H2O2 scavenger), alone or combined. Then, H2O2 content was determined with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA)-dependent fluorescence and spectrophotography. Transcript levels of cell cycle regulatory genes were analysed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Application of exogenous melatonin not only increased endogenous H2O2 content but also induced LR formation in alfalfa seedlings. Consistently, melatonin-induced LR primordia exhibited an accelerated response. These inducible responses were significantly blocked when DPI or DMTU was applied. Compared with the wild-type, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing alfalfa MsSNAT (a melatonin synthesis gene) increased H2O2 accumulation and thereafter LR formation, both of which were blocked by DPI or DMTU. Similarly, melatonin-modulated expression of marker genes responsible for LR formation, including MsCDKB1;1, MsCDKB2;1, AtCDKB1;1 and AtCDKB2;1, was obviously impaired by the removal of H2O2 in both alfalfa and transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Pharmacological and genetic evidence revealed that endogenous melatonin-triggered LR formation was H2O2-dependent. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Nitric oxide protects macrophages from hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by inducing the formation of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Tatsuya; Kishino, Takashi; Yamamuro, Akiko; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2006-04-15

    We investigated the cytoprotective effect of NO on H2O2-induced cell death in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264. H2O2-treated cells showed apoptotic features, such as activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, nuclear fragmentation, and DNA fragmentation. These apoptotic features were significantly inhibited by pretreatment for 24 h with NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3,3-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-1-triazene, at a low nontoxic concentration. The cytoprotective effect of NO was abrogated by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole but was not affected by a glutathione synthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine. NO donors increased the level of catalase and its activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, inhibited both the NO-induced increase in the catalase level and the cytoprotective effect of NO. These results indicate that NO at a low concentration protects macrophages from H2O2-induced apoptosis by inducing the production of catalase.

  10. Influence of the microstructure of a diamond-containing composite material on the tool cutting ability when grinding a diamond single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kuzei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the methods of electronic scanning microstructure and X-ray analysis, the influence of the structure of diamond-containing composite materials on the cutting ability of the tool for circular grinding of diamond single crystals has been studied. It is shown that the use of an oxide-hydroxide glass with a spreading temperature of 570–590 K as a precursor of the binder leads to the formation of melt films on the surface of silicon carbide and diamond particles at 600–630 K and the glass content in the batch is 10 vol. %. The conversion of oxidehydroxide glass films to oxide films proceeds at 700–775 K during the sintering of the composite material. Depending on the volume content of the glass in the charge, the porosity of the compact, three types of structure of composite materials are distinguished: a volumetric skeleton of glass-clad diamond particles and silicon carbide with pores at the sites of multiple compounds; a frame made of glass-clad diamond particles and silicon carbide with glass pores in places of multiple connections; a matrix of glass and the particles of diamond, silicon carbide and pores located in it. The maximum cutting ability of the tool for circular grinding of diamond is provided by a composite material with a structure of the first type.

  11. CuO reduction induced formation of CuO/Cu2O hybrid oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lu; Yin, Qiyue; Wang, Yiqian; Zhou, Guangwen

    2013-12-01

    Reduction of CuO nanowires results in the formation of a unique hierarchical hybrid nanostructure, in which the parent oxide phase (CuO) works as the skeleton while the lower oxide (Cu2O) resulting from the reduction reaction forms as partially embedded nanoparticles that decorate the skeleton of the parent oxide. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy observations of the reduction process of CuO nanowires, we demonstrate that the formation of such a hierarchical hybrid oxide structure is induced by topotactic nucleation and growth of Cu2O islands on the parent CuO nanowires.

  12. Light-induced pattern formation in the excitable Belousov Zhabotinsky medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichang

    2001-05-01

    Light has been known to suppress wave activity in the vast majority of studies of excitable photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) media. In this report, we uncover that light perturbation can induce pattern formation when the dynamics of the BZ system is close to a bifurcation point, though light causes an increase of bromide concentration. The minimal light intensity for initiating pattern formation increases rapidly while the system departs from the bifurcation point. Backfiring behavior was also observed when a global light perturbation was applied to propagating waves. This study was carried out with a three-variable Oregonator model, modified to describe photosensitivity.

  13. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan, E-mail: xyeypd@163.com

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.

  14. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening

  15. In situ atomic-scale observation of irradiation induced carbon nanocrystalline formation from dense carbon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbing; Li, Zhengtong; Ling, San; Lei, Tao; Su, Jinbu

    2018-03-01

    We present a direct observation of the transformation of dense amorphous carbon clusters into diamond nanocrystalline under electron beam irradiation by in situ transmission electron microscopy, where the surrounding carbon matrix did not significantly change. Our findings provide clear and convincing evidence for the diamond nanocrystalline evolving from energetic amorphous carbon sites. Furthermore, graphitization of amorphous carbons usually demands a high temperature combined with high pressure. Hence, graphitization of amorphous carbons at relatively low temperatures is highly desired. Here we offer a useful method for catalyst-free graphitization of amorphous carbons by employing moderate electron beam irradiation, without external heating being applied.

  16. Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda M; Huang, Houjin; Carlson, Cataleya; Schlager, John J; Omacr Sawa, Eiji; Hussain, Saber M; Dai, Liming

    2007-01-11

    Finely divided carbon particles, including charcoal, lampblack, and diamond particles, have been used for ornamental and official tattoos since ancient times. With the recent development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, carbon-based nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds) attract a great deal of interest. Owing to their low chemical reactivity and unique physical properties, nanodiamonds could be useful in a variety of biological applications such as carriers for drugs, genes, or proteins; novel imaging techniques; coatings for implantable materials; and biosensors and biomedical nanorobots. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the possible hazards of nanodiamonds to humans and other biological systems. We have, for the first time, assessed the cytotoxicity of nanodiamonds ranging in size from 2 to 10 nm. Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types. Furthermore, nanodiamonds did not produce significant reactive oxygen species. Cells can grow on nanodiamond-coated substrates without morphological changes compared to controls. These results suggest that nanodiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range of cell types.

  17. Inhibition of Cariogenic Plaque Formation on Root Surface with Polydopamine-Induced-Polyethylene Glycol Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Lei Mei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Root caries prevention has been a challenge for clinicians due to its special anatomical location, which favors the accumulation of dental plaque. Researchers are looking for anti-biofouling material to inhibit bacterial growth on exposed root surfaces. This study aimed to develop polydopamine-induced-polyethylene glycol (PEG and to study its anti-biofouling effect against a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on the root dentine surface. Hydroxyapatite disks and human dentine blocks were divided into four groups for experiments. They received polydopamine-induced-PEG, PEG, polydopamine, or water application. Contact angle, quartz crystal microbalance, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the wetting property, surface affinity, and an infrared spectrum; the results indicated that PEG was induced by polydopamine onto a hydroxyapatite disk. Salivary mucin absorption on hydroxyapatite disks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was confirmed using spectrophotometry. The growth of a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on dentine blocks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was assessed and monitored by colony-forming units, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that dentine with polydopamine-induced-PEG had fewer bacteria than other groups. In conclusion, a novel polydopamine-induced-PEG coating was developed. Its anti-biofouling effect inhibited salivary mucin absorption and cariogenic biofilm formation on dentine surface and thus may be used for the prevention of root dentine caries.

  18. Investigation of carbon near the graphite-diamond-liquid triple point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used to heat deeply buried damage layers in diamond. Over a small range of laser powers, damage annealing, formation of buried graphitic layers, and melting of diamond followed by its conversion upon cooling into graphite are observed. The diagnostics employed are Channeling Contrast Microscopy, optical absorption, surface profilometry, and scanning and optical microscopies. The results are explained in terms of the behaviour of carbon under high internal pressures close to the diamond-graphite-liquid carbon triple point in the phase diagram. 17 refs., 3 figs

  19. Formation region and amplitude of colour superconductivity in an instanton-induced model

    CERN Document Server

    Liao Jin Feng

    2002-01-01

    Colour superconductivity is investigated in the frame of a two flavour instanton-induced model. The ratio of diquark to quark-antiquark coupling constants is restricted to be c/(N sub c -1) with 1 <=c <=2.87 and controls the formation region and amplitude of colour superconductivity. While the finite current quark mass changes the chiral transition significantly, it does not considerably change the colour superconductivity

  20. Vaccine-induced myositis with intramuscular sterile abscess formation: MRI and ultrasound findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Bekci, Tumay; Selcuk, Mustafa Bekir [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Dabak, Nevzat [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Samsun Medical Park Hospital, Department of Radiology, Samsun (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    Although limb swelling is a well-known complication of vaccination, its rarity and wide band of differential diagnosis of limb swelling make it a diagnostic challenge. In this case report, we describe three cases of vaccine-induced myositis with intramuscular sterile abscess formation in patients with limb swelling and their magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography findings. Both radiologists and clinicians should be familiar with this rare entity, its clinical and imaging spectrum, and follow-up strategies. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen Gas Is Involved in Auxin-Induced Lateral Root Formation by Modulating Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyu Cao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2 in bacteria and algae has been widely studied, and it has attracted increasing attention in the context of animals and plants. However, the role of endogenous H2 in lateral root (LR formation is still unclear. Here, our results showed that H2-induced lateral root formation is a universal event. Naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA; the auxin analog was able to trigger endogenous H2 production in tomato seedlings, and a contrasting response was observed in the presence of N-1-naphthyphthalamic acid (NPA, an auxin transport inhibitor. NPA-triggered the inhibition of H2 production and thereafter lateral root development was rescued by exogenously applied H2. Detection of endogenous nitric oxide (NO by the specific probe 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR analyses revealed that the NO level was increased in both NAA- and H2-treated tomato seedlings. Furthermore, NO production and thereafter LR formation induced by auxin and H2 were prevented by 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO; a specific scavenger of NO and the inhibitor of nitrate reductase (NR; an important NO synthetic enzyme. Molecular evidence confirmed that some representative NO-targeted cell cycle regulatory genes were also induced by H2, but was impaired by the removal of endogenous NO. Genetic evidence suggested that in the presence of H2, Arabidopsis mutants nia2 (in particular and nia1 (two nitrate reductases (NR-defective mutants exhibited defects in lateral root length. Together, these results demonstrated that auxin-induced H2 production was associated with lateral root formation, at least partially via a NR-dependent NO synthesis.

  2. Inducing the Formation of Functional Macroscopic Assemblies Through Programmed Orthogonal Supramolecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-27

    new materials for artificial photosynthesis and organic electronics. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of...closely coupled, could lead to new materials for artificial photosynthesis and organic electronics. The views, opinions and/or findings contained in...published in peer-reviewed journals : Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals : Inducing the Formation of Functional Macroscopic

  3. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Lindroos, Jeanette; Savin, Hele

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation...

  4. Diamond growth from subducted carbon implied by correlated δ18O-δ13C variations in diamonds and garnet inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickert, R. B.; Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Much of our knowledge of the deep-Earth carbon cycle is derived from studies of diamond. The sources of carbon in the mantle and the mechanisms of transport and precipitation as diamond, however, are not entirely understood. Due to the chemical purity of diamond, scientific effort has focussed on syngenetic mineral inclusions and their relationship to their diamond hosts. For example, it is well known that, on a worldwide scale, diamonds with eclogitic inclusions have a distinct δ13C distribution when compared to more abundant peridotitic diamonds. Eclogitic diamonds have a distribution that extends from mantle-like δ13C values (ca. -5%), to very light carbon (mine (Orapa cluster, Botswana). The δ13C values of the host diamond were determined to have a wide range (-4.4% to -18%; Deines et al. 2009; Lithos v.112 p776). From 15 inclusions, the δ18O variations range from +4.8 to +8.8 %. The relative 18O abundances are negatively correlated with the δ13C of the host diamonds, suggesting a link between high δ18O host rocks and low δ13C diamonds. Although fractionation of δ13C values is possible at high temperature, δ18O values are susceptible only to very small high temperature fractionations. For example, Cartigny et al. (2001, EPSL v.185 p85) suggested that CO2 degassing from a carbonate-bearing melt prior to diamond precipitation may be responsible for a δ13C distribution of eclogitic diamonds worldwide that is skewed to 13C depleted compositions. Our data place new constraints on that model. Depending on the C/O ratio of the melt, CO2 degassing will either have a negligible effect on the δ18O of the residual melt, or (at high C/O) induce a positive correlation between δ18O and δ13C, contrary to the negative correlation documented here. We suggest instead that low δ13C diamonds at Damtshaa are associated with sources whose protoliths were exposed to low-temperature alteration (increasing their δ18O). We relate the connection between low δ13C and

  5. Ion beam induced single phase nanocrystalline TiO2 formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukade, Deepti A.; Tribedi, L. C.; Bhattacharyya, Varsha

    2014-06-01

    Single phase TiO2 nanostructures are fabricated by oxygen ion implantation (60 keV) at fluence ranging from 1×1016 ions/cm2 to 1×1017 ions/cm2 in titanium thin films deposited on fused silica substrate and subsequent thermal annealing in argon atmosphere. GAXRD and Raman spectroscopy study reveals formation of single rutile phases of TiO2. Particle size is found to vary from 29 nm to 35 nm, establishing nanostructure formation. Nanostructure formation is also confirmed by the quantum confinement effect manifested by the blueshift of the UV-vis absorption spectra. Photoluminescence spectra show peaks corresponding to TiO2 rutile phase and reveal the presence of oxygen defects due to implantation. The controlled synthesis of single phase nanostructure is attributed to ion induced defects and post-implantation annealing. It is observed that the size of the nanostructures formed is strongly dependent on the ion fluence.

  6. Oil spill dispersants induce formation of marine snow by phytoplankton-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eenennaam, Justine S; Wei, Yuzhu; Grolle, Katja C F; Foekema, Edwin M; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2016-03-15

    Unusually large amounts of marine snow, including Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS), were formed during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The marine snow settled with oil and clay minerals as an oily sludge layer on the deep sea floor. This study tested the hypothesis that the unprecedented amount of chemical dispersants applied during high phytoplankton densities in the Gulf of Mexico induced high EPS formation. Two marine phytoplankton species (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) produced EPS within days when exposed to the dispersant Corexit 9500. Phytoplankton-associated bacteria were shown to be responsible for the formation. The EPS consisted of proteins and to lesser extent polysaccharides. This study reveals an unexpected consequence of the presence of phytoplankton. This emphasizes the need to test the action of dispersants under realistic field conditions, which may seriously alter the fate of oil in the environment via increased marine snow formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transformation of shock-compressed graphite to hexagonal diamond in nanoseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turneaure, Stefan J.; Sharma, Surinder M.; Volz, Travis J.; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2017-10-01

    The graphite-to-diamond transformation under shock compression has been of broad scientific interest since 1961. The formation of hexagonal diamond (HD) is of particular interest because it is expected to be harder than cubic diamond and due to its use in terrestrial sciences as a marker at meteorite impact sites. However, the formation of diamond having a fully hexagonal structure continues to be questioned and remains unresolved. Using real-time (nanosecond), in situ x-ray diffraction measurements, we show unequivocally that highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, shock-compressed along the c axis to 50 GPa, transforms to highly oriented elastically strained HD with the (100)HD plane parallel to the graphite basal plane.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Diane D.; Cole, Nelson B.; Segal, Menahem

    1998-01-01

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons. PMID:9736750

  9. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  11. The role of ion-implantation in the realization of spintronic devices in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Rafi

    2012-02-01

    The application of single photons emitted by specific quantum systems is promising for quantum computers, cryptography and for other future nano-applications. These heavily rely on ion implantation both for selective single ion implantations as well as for the introduction of controlled damage with specific properties. Of particular promise is the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV -) defect center in diamond. This center has many desirable luminescence properties required for spintronic devices operational at room temperature, including a long relaxation time of the color center, emission of photons in the visible and the fact that it is produced in diamond, a material with outstanding mechanical and optical properties. This center is usually realized by nitrogen and/or vacancy producing ion implantations into diamond which, following annealing, leads to the formation of the desired NV - center. The single photons emitted by the decay of this center have to be transported to allow their exploitation. This can be best done by realizing very thin wave guides in single crystal diamond with/or without nano-scale cavities in the same diamond in which NV centers are produced. For this, advantage is taken of the unique property of heavily ion-damaged diamond to be converted, following annealing, to etchable graphite. Thus a free standing submicron thick diamond membrane containing the NV center can be obtained. If desirable, specific photonic crystal structures can be realized in them by the use of FIB. The various ion-implantation schemes used to produce NV centers in diamond, free standing diamond membranes, and photonic crystal structures in them are reviewed. The scientific problems and the technological challenges that have to be solved before actual practical realization of diamond based spintronic devices can be produced are discussed.

  12. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  13. Medical applications of diamond particles & surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Roger J Narayan; Ryan D. Boehm; Anirudha V. Sumant

    2011-01-01

    Diamond has been considered for use in several medical applications due to its unique mechanical, chemical, optical, and biological properties. In this paper, methods for preparing synthetic diamond surfaces and particles are described. In addition, recent developments involving the use of diamond in prostheses, sensing, imaging, and drug delivery applications are reviewed. These developments suggest that diamond-containing structures will provide significant improvements in the diagnosis and...

  14. Mechanistic constitutive model for wormlike micelle solutions with flow-induced structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sarit; Graham, Michael

    2017-11-01

    We present a tensor constitutive model for stress and flow-induced structure formation in dilute wormlike micellar solutions. The fluid is treated as a dilute suspension of rigid Brownian rods whose length varies dynamically. Consistent with the mechanism of Turner and Cates, flow-induced alignment of the rods is assumed to promote increase of rod length that corresponds to the formation of flow-induced structures observed in experiments. At very high deformation rate, hydrodynamic stresses cause the rod length to decrease. These mechanisms are implemented in a phenomenological equation governing the evolution of rod length, with the number density of rods appropriately modified to ensure conservation of surfactant mass. The model leads first to an increase in both shear and extensional viscosity as deformation rate increases and then to a decrease at higher rates. If the rate constant for flow-induced rod growth is sufficiently large, the model predicts a multivalued relation between stress and deformation rate in both shear and uniaxial extension in agreement with experimental results. By design, the model is simple enough to serve as a tractable constitutive relation for computational fluid dynamics studies.

  15. Formation of radiation induced chromosome aberrations: involvement of telomeric sequences and telomerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirzio, L.

    2004-07-15

    As telomeres are crucial for chromosome integrity; we investigated the role played by telomeric sequences in the formation and in the transmission of radio-induced chromosome rearrangements in human cells. Starting from interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) as putative region of breakage, we showed that the radiation sensitivity is not equally distributed along chromosomes and. is not affected by ITS. On the contrary, plasmid integration sites are prone to radio-induced breaks, suggesting a possible integration at sites already characterized by fragility. However plasmids do not preferentially insert at radio-induced breaks in human cells immortalized by telomerase. These cells showed remarkable karyotype stability even after irradiation, suggesting a role of telomerase in the genome maintenance despite functional telomeres. Finally, we showed that the presence of more breaks in a cell favors the repair, leading to an increase of transmissible rearrangements. (author)

  16. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  17. Formation of radiation induced chromosome aberrations: involvement of telomeric sequences and telomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirzio, L.

    2004-07-01

    As telomeres are crucial for chromosome integrity; we investigated the role played by telomeric sequences in the formation and in the transmission of radio-induced chromosome rearrangements in human cells. Starting from interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) as putative region of breakage, we showed that the radiation sensitivity is not equally distributed along chromosomes and. is not affected by ITS. On the contrary, plasmid integration sites are prone to radio-induced breaks, suggesting a possible integration at sites already characterized by fragility. However plasmids do not preferentially insert at radio-induced breaks in human cells immortalized by telomerase. These cells showed remarkable karyotype stability even after irradiation, suggesting a role of telomerase in the genome maintenance despite functional telomeres. Finally, we showed that the presence of more breaks in a cell favors the repair, leading to an increase of transmissible rearrangements. (author)

  18. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced “catapult effect”, which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ∼ 5μm to ∼500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s and a low diameter (∼5 % of the maximum bubble diameter over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9 for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  19. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Liu; Zhao, Xiong-Tao; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced "catapult effect", which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ˜ 5μm to ˜500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s) and a low diameter (˜5 % of the maximum bubble diameter) over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9) for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  20. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  1. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  2. Diamond Quantum Devices in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuzhou; Jelezko, Fedor; Plenio, Martin B; Weil, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    The currently available techniques for molecular imaging capable of reaching atomic resolution are limited to low temperatures, vacuum conditions, or large amounts of sample. Quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offer great potential to achieve single-molecule detection with atomic resolution under ambient conditions. Diamond nanoparticles could also be prepared with implanted NV centers, thereby generating unique nanosensors that are able to traffic into living biological systems. Therefore, this technique might provide unprecedented access and insight into the structure and function of individual biomolecules under physiological conditions as well as observation of biological processes down to the quantum level with atomic resolution. The theory of diamond quantum sensors and the current developments from their preparation to sensing techniques have been critically discussed in this Minireview. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Diamonds at the golden point

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Alongside the CMS Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) – installed last month (see here) – lie diamond detectors. No ordinary gems, these lab-grown diamonds will be playing a vital role in Run 2: differentiating signals from collision products with those from the beam background.   The BCM detector's green "c-shaped" printed circuit board is mounted on the PLT/BCM carbon-fibre carriage ready for installation. Earlier this year, the CMS BRIL project installed beam condition monitors (BCM) at the heart of the CMS detector. Designed to measure the online luminosity and beam background as close as possible to the LHC beam pipe, the BCMs use radiation-hard diamonds to differentiate between background and collision signals. The BCM also protects the CMS silicon trackers from damaging beam losses, by aborting the beam if the signal currents measured are above an acceptable threshold. These new BCMs are designed with Run 2 bunches in mind. &ldq...

  4. Diamonds on Diamond: structural studies at extreme conditions on the Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M I

    2015-03-06

    Extreme conditions (EC) research investigates how the structures and physical and chemical properties of materials change when subjected to extremes of pressure and temperature. Pressures in excess of one million times atmospheric pressure can be achieved using a diamond anvil cell, and, in combination with high-energy, micro-focused radiation from a third-generation synchrotron such as Diamond, detailed structural information can be obtained using either powder or single-crystal diffraction techniques. Here, I summarize some of the research drivers behind international EC research, and then briefly describe the techniques by which high-quality diffraction data are obtained. I then highlight the breadth of EC research possible on Diamond by summarizing four examples from work conducted on the I15 and I19 beamlines, including a study which resulted in the first research paper from Diamond. Finally, I look to the future, and speculate as to the type of EC research might be conducted at Diamond over the next 10 years. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptome Sequencing of Chemically Induced Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Genes Related to Agarwood Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Wu, Hongqing; He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Haohua; Fan, Yunfei; Tan, Guohui; Liu, Taomei; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood is a traditional Chinese medicine used as a clinical sedative, carminative, and antiemetic drug. Agarwood is formed in Aquilaria sinensis when A. sinensis trees are threatened by external physical, chemical injury or endophytic fungal irritation. However, the mechanism of agarwood formation via chemical induction remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of different parts of a chemically induced A. sinensis trunk sample with agarwood. The Illumina sequencing platform was used to identify the genes involved in agarwood formation. A five-year-old Aquilaria sinensis treated by formic acid was selected. The white wood part (B1 sample), the transition part between agarwood and white wood (W2 sample), the agarwood part (J3 sample), and the rotten wood part (F5 sample) were collected for transcriptome sequencing. Accordingly, 54,685,634 clean reads, which were assembled into 83,467 unigenes, were obtained with a Q20 value of 97.5%. A total of 50,565 unigenes were annotated using the Nr, Nt, SWISS-PROT, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. In particular, 171,331,352 unigenes were annotated by various pathways, including the sesquiterpenoid (ko00909) and plant-pathogen interaction (ko03040) pathways. These pathways were related to sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and defensive responses to chemical stimulation. The transcriptome data of the different parts of the chemically induced A. sinensis trunk provide a rich source of materials for discovering and identifying the genes involved in sesquiterpenoid production and in defensive responses to chemical stimulation. This study is the first to use de novo sequencing and transcriptome assembly for different parts of chemically induced A. sinensis. Results demonstrate that the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway and WRKY transcription factor play important roles in agarwood formation via chemical induction. The comparative analysis of the transcriptome data of agarwood and A. sinensis lays the foundation

  6. Rabies Virus Infection Induces the Formation of Stress Granules Closely Connected to the Viral Factories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Nikolic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are membrane-less dynamic structures consisting of mRNA and protein aggregates that form rapidly in response to a wide range of environmental cellular stresses and viral infections. They act as storage sites for translationally silenced mRNAs under stress conditions. During viral infection, SG formation results in the modulation of innate antiviral immune responses, and several viruses have the ability to either promote or prevent SG assembly. Here, we show that rabies virus (RABV induces SG formation in infected cells, as revealed by the detection of SG-marker proteins Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 1 (G3BP1, T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1 and poly(A-binding protein (PABP in the RNA granules formed during viral infection. As shown by live cell imaging, RABV-induced SGs are highly dynamic structures that increase in number, grow in size by fusion events, and undergo assembly/disassembly cycles. Some SGs localize in close proximity to cytoplasmic viral factories, known as Negri bodies (NBs. Three dimensional reconstructions reveal that both structures remain distinct even when they are in close contact. In addition, viral mRNAs synthesized in NBs accumulate in the SGs during viral infection, revealing material exchange between both compartments. Although RABV-induced SG formation is not affected in MEFs lacking TIA-1, TIA-1 depletion promotes viral translation which results in an increase of viral replication indicating that TIA-1 has an antiviral effect. Inhibition of PKR expression significantly prevents RABV-SG formation and favors viral replication by increasing viral translation. This is correlated with a drastic inhibition of IFN-B gene expression indicating that SGs likely mediate an antiviral response which is however not sufficient to fully counteract RABV infection.

  7. Highly saline fluids from a subducting slab as the source for fluid-rich diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yaakov; McNeill, John; Pearson, D Graham; Nowell, Geoff M; Ottley, Chris J

    2015-08-20

    The infiltration of fluids into continental lithospheric mantle is a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the lithospheric root, as well as diamond formation, yet the origin and composition of the fluids involved are still poorly constrained. Such fluids are trapped within diamonds when they form and so diamonds provide a unique means of directly characterizing the fluids that percolate through the deep continental lithospheric mantle. Here we show a clear chemical evolutionary trend, identifying saline fluids as parental to silicic and carbonatitic deep mantle melts, in diamonds from the Northwest Territories, Canada. Fluid-rock interaction along with in situ melting cause compositional transitions, as the saline fluids traverse mixed peridotite-eclogite lithosphere. Moreover, the chemistry of the parental saline fluids--especially their strontium isotopic compositions--and the timing of host diamond formation suggest that a subducting Mesozoic plate under western North America is the source of the fluids. Our results imply a strong association between subduction, mantle metasomatism and fluid-rich diamond formation, emphasizing the importance of subduction-derived fluids in affecting the composition of the deep lithospheric mantle.

  8. Candesartan restores pressure-induced vasodilation and prevents skin pressure ulcer formation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigo, Aurore; Nasser, Mohamad; Bessaguet, Flavien; Javellaud, James; Oudart, Nicole; Achard, Jean-Michel; Demiot, Claire

    2015-02-18

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockers have beneficial effects on neurovascular complications in diabetes and in organ's protection against ischemic episodes. The present study examines whether the AT1R blocker candesartan (1) has a beneficial effect on diabetes-induced alteration of pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV, a cutaneous physiological neurovascular mechanism which could delay the occurrence of tissue ischemia), and (2) could be protective against skin pressure ulcer formation. Male Swiss mice aged 5-6 weeks were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. In two groups, diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg.kg(-1)). After 6 weeks, control and STZ mice received either no treatment or candesartan (1 mg/kg-daily in drinking water) during 2 weeks. At the end of treatment (8 weeks of diabetes duration), C-fiber mediated nociception threshold, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV were assessed. Pressure ulcers (PUs) were then induced by pinching the dorsal skin between two magnetic plates for three hours. Skin ulcer area development was assessed during three days, and histological examination of the depth of the skin lesion was performed at day three. After 8 weeks of diabetes, the skin neurovascular functions (C-fiber nociception, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PIV) were markedly altered in STZ-treated mice, but were fully restored by treatment with candesartan. Whereas in diabetes mice exposure of the skin to pressure induced wide and deep necrotic lesions, treatment with candersartan restored their ability to resist to pressure-induced ulceration as efficiently as the control mice. Candesartan decreases the vulnerability to pressure-induced ulceration and restores skin neurovascular functions in mice with STZ-induced established diabetes.

  9. INDUCED CYTOMICTIC VARIATIONS AND SYNCYTE FORMATION DURING MICROSPOROGENESIS IN PHASEOLUS VULGARIS L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G; Chaudhary, N

    2016-01-01

    The intercellular translocation of chromatin material along with other cytoplasmic contents among the proximate meiocytes lying in close contact with each other commonly referred as cytomixis was reported during microsporogenesis in Phaseolus vulgaris L., a member of the family Fabaceae. The phenomenon of cytomixis was observed at three administered doses of gamma rays viz. 100, 200, 300 Gy respectively in the diploid plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. The gamma rays irradiated plants showed the characteristic feature of inter-meiocyte chromatin/chromosomes transmigration through various means.such as channel formation, beak formation or by direct adhesion between the PMC's (Pollen mother cells). The present study also reports the first instance of syncyte formation induced via cytomictic transmigration in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Though the frequency of syncyteformation was rather low yet these could play a significant role in plant evolution. It is speculated that syncyte enhances the ploidy level of plants by forming 2n gametes and may lead to the production ofpolyploid plants. The phenomenon of cytomixis shows a gradual inclination along with the increasing treatment doses of gamma rays. The preponderance of cytomixis was more frequent during meiosis I as compared to meiosis II. An interesting feature noticed during the present study was the channel formation among the microspores and fusion among the tetrads due to cell wall dissolution. The impact of this phenomenon is also visible on the development of post-meiotic products. The formation of heterosized pollen grains; a deviation from the normal pollen grains has also been reported. The production of gametes with unbalanced chromosomes is of utmost importance and should be given more attention in future studies as they possess the capability of inducing variations at the genomic level and can be further utilized in the improvement of germplasm.

  10. Effect of copper content on the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of Al–Cu/diamond composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhua; Zhang, Hailong; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jianwei; Wang, Xitao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Al–Cu/diamond composites have been produced by a squeeze casting method. ► Cu alloying is an effective approach to promoting interface bonding between metal matrix and diamond. ► Alloying Cu to Al matrix improves thermal conductivity and reduces coefficient of thermal expansion of the composites. -- Abstract: Al–Cu matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (Al–Cu/diamond composites) have been produced by a squeeze casting method. Cu content added to Al matrix was varied from 0 to 3.0 wt.% to detect the effect on thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the resultant Al–Cu/diamond composites. The measured thermal conductivity for the Al–Cu/diamond composites increased from 210 to 330 W/m/K with increasing Cu content from 0 to 3.0 wt.%. Accordingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was tailored from 13 × 10 −6 to 6 × 10 −6 /K, which is compatible with the CTE of semiconductors in electronic packaging applications. The enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced coefficient of thermal expansion were ascribed to strong interface bonding in the Al–Cu/diamond composites. Cu addition has lowered the melting point and resulted in the formation of Al 2 Cu phase in Al matrix. This is the underlying mechanism responsible for the strengthening of Al–Cu/diamond interface. The results show that Cu alloying is an effective approach to promoting interface bonding between Al and diamond.

  11. Diamond radiation detectors II. CVD diamond development for radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Interest in radiation detectors has supplied some of the impetus for improving the electronic properties of CVD diamond. In the present discussion, we will restrict our attention to polycrystalhne CVD material. We will focus on the evolution of these materials over the past decade and the correlation of detector performance with other properties of the material

  12. Kaempferide Prevents Titanium Particle Induced Osteolysis by Suppressing JNK Activation during Osteoclast Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zixian; Xu, Weifeng; Zheng, Jisi; Shen, Pei; Qin, An; Zhang, Shanyong; Yang, Chi

    2017-11-30

    Kaempferide (KF) is an O-methylated flavonol, a natural plant extract, which is often found in Kaempferia galanga. It has a variety of effects including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether KF effectively inhibits titanium particle induced calvarial bone loss via down regulation of the JNK signaling pathway. In the mice with titanium particle induced calvarial osteolysis, the Low dose of KF mildly reduced the resorption pits while in the high dose group, fewer scattered pits were observed on the surface of calvarium. Histological examination showed fewer osteoclasts formation in the KF group. In mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) and RAW264.7 cells, KF significantly inhibited the osteoclast formation and bone resorption at 12.5 μM. However, KF does not affect the mature osteoclast F-actin ring formation. But when being co-treated with KF and anisomycin, BMMs differentiated into mature osteoclasts. At the molecular levels, the JNK phosphorylation was inhibited and the osteoclastogenesis-related specific gene expression including V-ATPase d2, TRAP, calcitonin receptor (CTR), c-Fos and NFATc1 was markedly suppressed. In conclusion, these results indicated that KF is a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases.

  13. Radiation-induced grain subdivision and bubble formation in U3Si2 at LWR temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tiankai; Gong, Bowen; He, Lingfeng; Harp, Jason; Tonks, Michael; Lian, Jie

    2018-01-01

    U3Si2, an advanced fuel form proposed for light water reactors (LWRs), has excellent thermal conductivity and a high fissile element density. However, limited understanding of the radiation performance and fission gas behavior of U3Si2 is available at LWR conditions. This study explores the irradiation behavior of U3Si2 by 300 keV Xe+ ion beam bombardment combining with in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. The crystal structure of U3Si2 is stable against radiation-induced amorphization at 350 °C even up to a very high dose of 64 displacements per atom (dpa). Grain subdivision of U3Si2 occurs at a relatively low dose of 0.8 dpa and continues to above 48 dpa, leading to the formation of high-density nanoparticles. Nano-sized Xe gas bubbles prevail at a dose of 24 dpa, and Xe bubble coalescence was identified with the increase of irradiation dose. The volumetric swelling resulting from Xe gas bubble formation and coalescence was estimated with respect to radiation dose, and a 2.2% volumetric swelling was observed for U3Si2 irradiated at 64 dpa. Due to extremely high susceptibility to oxidation, the nano-sized U3Si2 grains upon radiation-induced grain subdivision were oxidized to nanocrystalline UO2 in a high vacuum chamber for TEM observation, eventually leading to the formation of UO2 nanocrystallites stable up to 80 dpa.

  14. Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazumasa [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); International Laboratory of Materials Science and Nanotechnology (iLMNT), Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Laboratorio di Scienz (Italy); Tokudome, Yasuaki, E-mail: masa@photomater.com; Takahashi, Masahide, E-mail: masa@photomater.com [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); International Laboratory of Materials Science and Nanotechnology (iLMNT), Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2014-10-21

    Nested wrinkle structures, hierarchical surface wrinkles of different periodicities of sub-μm and tens-μm, have been fabricated on a siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film via a photo-induced surface polymerization of acrylamide. The formation mechanism of the nested wrinkle structures is examined based on a time-dependent structure observation and chemical composition analyses. In-situ observation of the evolving surface structure showed that sub-μm scale wrinkles first formed, subsequently the tens-μm scale ones did. In-situ FT-IR analysis indicated that the nested wrinkles formation took place along with the development of siloxane network of under layer. A cross sectional observation of the film revealed that the film was composed of three layers. FT-IR spectra of the film revealed that the surface and interior layers were polyacrylamide rich layer and siloxane-polymer rich layer, respectively. The intermediate layer formed as a diffusion layer by migration of acrylamide from interior to the surface. These three layers have different chemical compositions and therefore different mechanical characteristics, which allows the wrinkle formation. Shrinkage of siloxane-polymer interior layers, as a result of polycondensation of siloxane network, induced mechanical instabilities at interlayers, to form the nested wrinkle structures.

  15. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  16. CVD diamond for electronic devices and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic diamond is diamond produced by using chemical or physical processes. Like naturally occurring diamond it is composed of a three-dimensional carbon crystal. Due to its extreme physical properties, synthetic diamond is used in many industrial applications, such as drill bits and scratch-proof coatings, and has the potential to be used in many new application areas A brand new title from the respected Wiley Materials for Electronic and Optoelectronic Applications series, this title is the most up-to-date resource for diamond specialists. Beginning with an introduction to the pr

  17. Diamond Sensors for Energy Frontier Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schnetzer, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the use of diamond sensors in high-energy, high-i ntensity collider experiments. Re- sults from diamond sensor based beam conditions monitors in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are presented and pla ns for diamond based luminosity monitors for the upcoming LHC run are described. We describe recent measurements on single crystal diamond sensors that indicate a polarization effec t that causes a reduction of charge col- lection efficiency as a function of particle flux. We conclude by describing new developments on the promising technology of 3D diamond sensors.

  18. Investigation of Applications of Diamond Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    CN /H2 Figure 10. Schematic-of DQ dlscharge CVD diamond aRoaratu. D C MICROWAVE SUBSTRATE 7UBSTRATE / GAS GAS INLET INLET REACTOR MICROWAVE EI1A~G EN...Diamond films were synthesized using a DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor developed for diamond deposition. Deposition protocol was a...a 10-fold increase in the life of steel bearings. 111 NORMALIZED RESISTANCE TO WEAR CHROMIUM == 1.0, EXTRAP TO DIAMOND Diamond 7- 6 7F z (1) 7 U N 3

  19. A multilayer innovative solution to improve the adhesion of nanocrystalline diamond coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulon-Quintin, A.; Faure, C.; Teulé-Gay, L.; Manaud, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films grown under negative biased substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are widely used as surface overlay coating onto cermet WC-Co cutting tools to get better performances. To improve the diamond adhesion to the cermet substrate, suitable multi-layer systems have been added. They are composed of a cobalt diffusion barrier close to the substrate (single and sequenced nitrides layers) coated with a nucleation extra layer to improve the nucleus density of diamond during CVD processing. For all systems, before and after diamond deposition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been performed for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces and to evaluate the presence of graphitic species at the interface with the diamond. Innovative multilayer system dedicated to the regulation of cobalt diffusion coated with a bilayer system optimized for the carbon diffusion control, is shown as an efficient solution to significantly reduce the graphite layer formation at the interface with the diamond down to 10 nm thick and to increase the adhesion of NCD diamond layer as scratch-tests confirm.

  20. Distinct Effects of Calorie Restriction and Resveratrol on Diet-Induced Obesity and Fatty Liver Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveliina Tauriainen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of resveratrol to mimic beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR was investigated. We compared the effects of both CR (70% of ad libitum energy intake or resveratrol (2 g/kg or 4 g/kg food on high-fat diet-induced obesity and fatty liver formation in C57Bl/6J mice, and we examined their effects on calorimetry, metabolic performance, and the expressions of inflammatory genes and SIRT proteins. We found that resveratrol with 4 g/kg dose partially prevented hepatic steatosis and hepatocyte ballooning and induced skeletal muscle SIRT1 and SIRT4 expression while other examined parameter were unaffected by resveratrol. In contrast, CR provided superior protection against diet-induced obesity and fatty liver formation as compared to resveratrol, and the effects were associated with increased physical activity and ameliorated adipose tissue inflammation. CR increased expressions of SIRT3 in metabolically important tissues, suggesting that the beneficial effects of CR are mediated, at least in part, via SIRT3-dependent pathways.

  1. Ammonia Released by Streptomyces aburaviensis Induces Droplet Formation in Streptomyces violaceoruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathrin; Spiteller, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Streptomyces violaceoruber grown in co-culture with Streptomyces aburaviensis produces an about 17-fold higher volume of droplets on its aerial mycelium than in single-culture. Physical separation of the Streptomyces strains by either a plastic barrier or by a dialysis membrane, which allowed communication only by the exchange of volatile compounds or diffusible compounds in the medium, respectively, still resulted in enhanced droplet formation. The application of molecular sieves to bioassays resulted in the attenuation of the droplet-inducing effect of S. aburaviensis indicating the absorption of the compound. 1 H-NMR analysis of molecular-sieve extracts and the selective indophenol-blue reaction revealed that the volatile droplet-inducing compound is ammonia. The external supply of ammonia in biologically relevant concentrations of ≥8 mM enhanced droplet formation in S. violaceoruber in a similar way to S. aburaviensis. Ammonia appears to trigger droplet production in many Streptomyces strains because four out of six Streptomyces strains exposed to ammonia exhibited induced droplet production.

  2. Ab initio theory of the N2V defect in diamond for quantum memory implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvarhelyi, Péter; Thiering, Gergő; Londero, Elisa; Gali, Adam

    2017-10-01

    The N2V defect in diamond is characterized by means of ab initio methods relying on density functional theory calculated parameters of a Hubbard model Hamiltonian. It is shown that this approach appropriately describes the energy levels of correlated excited states induced by this defect. By determining its critical magneto-optical parameters, we propose to realize a long-living quantum memory by N2V defect, i.e., H 3 color center in diamond.

  3. Nicotine drives neutrophil extracellular traps formation and accelerates collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejoon; Luria, Ayala; Rhodes, Christopher; Raghu, Harini; Lingampalli, Nithya; Sharpe, Orr; Rada, Balazs; Sohn, Dong Hyun; Robinson, William H; Sokolove, Jeremy

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of nicotine on neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation in current and non-smokers and on a murine model of RA. We compared spontaneous and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced NETosis between current and non-smokers by DNA release binding. Nicotine-induced NETosis from non-smokers was assessed by DNA release binding, NET-specific (myeloperoxidase (MPO)-DNA complex) ELISA and real-time fluorescence microscopy. We also used immunofluorescent staining to detect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on neutrophils and performed a functional analysis to assess the role of nAChRs in nicotine-induced NETosis. Finally, we investigated the effects of systemic nicotine exposure on arthritis severity and NETosis in the CIA mouse model. Neutrophils derived from current smokers displayed elevated levels of spontaneous and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced NETosis. Nicotine induced dose-dependent NETosis in ex vivo neutrophils from healthy non-smokers, and co-incubation with ACPA-immune complexes or TNF-α facilitated a synergistic effect on NETosis. Real-time fluorescence microscopy revealed robust formation of NET-like structures in nicotine-exposed neutrophils. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated the presence of the α7 subunit of the nAChR on neutrophils. Stimulation of neutrophils with an α7-specific nAChR agonist induced NETosis, whereas pretreatment with an nAChR antagonist attenuated nicotine-induced NETosis. Nicotine administration to mice with CIA exacerbated inflammatory arthritis, with higher plasma levels of NET-associated MPO-DNA complex. We demonstrate that nicotine is a potent inducer of NETosis, which may play an important role in accelerating arthritis in the CIA model. This study generates awareness of and the mechanisms by which nicotine-containing products, including e-cigarettes, may have deleterious effects on patients with RA. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written

  4. Homogenisation of sulphide inclusions within diamonds: A new approach to diamond inclusion geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Iain; Hughes, Hannah S. R.; Butler, Ian B.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Muir, Duncan

    2017-11-01

    Base metal sulphide (BMS) inclusions in diamonds provide a unique insight into the chalcophile and highly siderophile element composition of the mantle. Entombed within their diamond hosts, these provide a more robust (closed system) sample, from which to determine the trace element, Re-Os and S-isotopic compositions of the mantle than mantle xenoliths or orogenic peridotites, as they are shielded from alteration during ascent to the Earth's crust and subsequent surface weathering. However, at temperatures below 1100 °C some BMS inclusions undergo subsolidus re-equilibration from an original monosulphide solid solution (Mss) and this causes fractionation of the major and trace elements within the inclusions. Thus to study the subjects noted above, current techniques require the entire BMS inclusion to be extracted for analyses. Unfortunately, 'flaking' of inclusions during break-out is a frequent occurrence and hence the risk of accidentally under-sampling a portion of the BMS inclusion is inherent in current practices. This loss may have significant implications for Re-Os isotope analyses where incomplete sampling of a Re-rich phase, such as chalcopyrite that typically occurs at the outer margins of BMS inclusions, may induce significant bias in the Re-Os and 187Os/188Os measurements and resulting model and isochron ages. We have developed a method for the homogenisation of BMS inclusions in diamond prior to their break-out from the host stone. Diamonds are heated to 1100 °C and then quenched to chemically homogenise any sulphide inclusions for both major and trace elements. Using X-ray Computed Microtomography (μCT) we determine the shape and spatial setting of multiple inclusions within a host stone and crucially show that the volume of a BMS inclusion is the same both before and after homogenisation. We show that the homogenisation process significantly reduces the inherent variability of in situ analysis when compared with unhomogenised BMS, thereby

  5. JNK1 Mediates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced CD14 and SR-AI Expression and Macrophage Foam Cell Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Foam cell formation is the key process in the development of atherosclerosis. The uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL converts macrophages into foam cells. We recently reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced foam cell formation is regulated by CD14 and scavenger receptor AI (SR-AI. In this study, we employed pharmaceutical and gene knockdown approaches to determine the upstream molecular mediators, which control LPS-induced foam cell formation. Our results demonstrated that the specific c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway inhibitor, SP600125, but neither the specific inhibitor of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK kinase MEK1/2, U0126, nor the specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB203580, significantly blocks LPS-induced oxLDL uptake, suggesting that the JNK pathway is the upstream mediator of LPS-induced oxLDL uptake/foam cell formation. To address whether JNK pathway mediates LPS-induced oxLDL uptake is due to JNK pathway-regulated CD14 and SR-AI expression, we assessed whether the pharmaceutical inhibitor of JNK influences LPS-induced expression of CD14 and SR-AI. Our results indicate that JNK pathway mediates LPS-induced CD14 and SR-AI expression. To conclusively address the isoform role of JNK family, we depleted JNK isoforms using the JNK isoform-specific siRNA. Our data showed that the depletion of JNK1, but not JNK2 blocked LPS-induced CD14/SR-AI expression and foam cell formation. Taken together, our results reveal for the first time that JNK1 is the key mediator of LPS-induced CD14 and SR-AI expression in macrophages, leading to LPS-induced oxLDL uptake/foam cell formation. We conclude that the novel JNK1/CD14/SR-AI pathway controls macrophage oxLDL uptake/foam cell formation.

  6. CVD diamond windows for infrared synchrotron applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sussmann, R.S.; Pickles, C.S.J.; Brandon, J.R.; Wort, C.J.H.; Coe, S.E.; Wasenczuk, A.; Dodge, C.N.; Beale, A.C.; Krehan, A.J.; Dore, P.; Nucara, A.; Calvani, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the attributes that make diamond a unique material for infrared synchrotron beam experiments. New developments in diamond synthesised by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) promise to extend the range of applications which have been hitherto limited by the availability and cost of large-size single-crystal diamond. Polycrystalline CVD diamond components such as large (100 mm) diameter windows with extremely good transparency over a wide spectral range are now commercially available. Properties of CVD diamond of relevance to optical applications, such as mechanical strength, thermal conductivity and absolute bulk absorption, are discussed. It is shown that although some of the properties of CVD diamond (similar to other polycrystalline industrial ceramics) are affected by the grain structure, currently produced CVD diamond optical components have the quality and performance required for numerous demanding applications

  7. The Many Facets of Diamond Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N. Palyanov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is intended to serve as a multidisciplinary forum covering broad aspects of the science, technology, and application of synthetic and natural diamonds. This special issue contains 12 papers, which highlight recent investigations and developments in diamond research related to the diverse problems of natural diamond genesis, diamond synthesis and growth using CVD and HPHT techniques, and the use of diamond in both traditional applications, such as mechanical machining of materials, and the new recently emerged areas, such as quantum technologies. The results presented in the contributions collected in this special issue clearly demonstrate that diamond occupies a very special place in modern science and technology. After decades of research, this structurally very simple material still poses many intriguing scientific questions and technological challenges. It seems undoubted that diamond will remain the center of attraction for many researchers for many years to come.

  8. Platelet size and density affect shear-induced thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Thrombosis accounts for 80% of deaths in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients demonstrate tortuous microvessels and larger than normal platelets. Large platelets are associated with increased platelet activation and thrombosis, but the physical effects of large platelets in the microscale processes of thrombus formation are not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the physical effects of mean platelet volume (MPV), mean platelet density (MPD) and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A computational model of the transport, shear-induced activation, collision, adhesion and aggregation of individual platelets was used to simulate platelet interactions and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Our results showed that an increase in MPV resulted in a larger number of activated platelets, though MPD and level of tortuosity made little difference on platelet activation. Platelets with normal MPD yielded the lowest amount of mural thrombus. With platelets of normal MPD, the amount of mural thrombus decreased with increasing level of tortuosity but did not have a simple monotonic relationship with MPV. The physical mechanisms associated with MPV, MPD and arteriole tortuosity play important roles in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

  9. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobol, Emil [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, RussiabFederal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Baum, Olga [Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Shekhter, Anatoly [Sechenov First Medical University of Moscow, Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Moscow, Russia; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian [University of California, Center for Biophotonics, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Sacramento, California, United StateseMcGill University, Department of Bioengineering, Montreal, Canada; Shnirelman, Alexander [Concordia University, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Montreal, Canada; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, RussiabFederal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Sadovskyy, Ivan [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, Illinois, United States; Vinokur, Valerii [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, Illinois, United States

    2017-05-31

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-anderror approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  10. Studies on prostaglandin F2 alpha formation caused by pentametylenetetrazol-induced convulsions in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregi, A; Folly, G; Antal, M; Serfözö, P; Schaefer, A

    1981-02-01

    Prostaglandin F2 alpha formation caused by pentametylenetetrazol convulsions was studied as a function of the duration, the doses of the convulsant and the intensity of the seizures. It was shown by the statistical analysis of the results in the case of clonic convulsions that the amount of synthetized PGF2 alpha did not depend on the doses of convulsant, while close relation existed between the duration and the PGF2 alpha production. At the same time, during tonic convulsions lasting longer than 50 sec, no more increase in the PGF2 alpha content of the brain was observed. An experimental model is suggested to study in vivo the mechanisms regulating the brain's prostaglandin biosynthesis. Pretreatment of the animals with reserpine did not affect the rate of convulsion-induced PGF2 alpha-formation.

  11. Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook It is SUPER EASY to fundraise on facebook! You can add a "donate" button to a post to show your friends that you're raising money for the Shwachman Diamond ... more Fundraising Idea - Casual for a Cure This is a simple fundraising ... Recent News #GivingTuesday - November 28 Fundraising on Facebook Fundraising Idea - Casual for a Cure An SDS ...

  12. Recent Advances in Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Trischuk, W.

    2008-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2012, ATLAS and CMS are planning for detector upgrades for their innermost layers requiring radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is now planned for all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as an alternate sensor for use very close to the interaction region of the super LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences available. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10^16 protons/cm^2 showing that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve allowing one t...

  13. High thermal conductivity of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise were to demonstrate the high rate of heat flow from a synthetic diamond coupon and to compare it to a commonly used thermal conductor, such as copper. The principles of heat transfer by conduction and convection may also be demonstrated. A list of equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  14. Andrographolide Inhibits Oxidized LDL-Induced Cholesterol Accumulation and Foam Cell Formation in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Chih; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Chen, Hui-Chun; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Yang, Ya-Chen; Chen, Haw-Wen

    2018-01-01

    oxLDL is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions through cholesterol accumulation in macrophage foam cells. Andrographolide, the bioactive component of Andrographis paniculata, possesses several biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anticancer functions. Scavenger receptors (SRs), including class A SR (SR-A) and CD36, are responsible for the internalization of oxLDL. In contrast, receptors for reverse cholesterol transport, including ABCA1 and ABCG1, mediate the efflux of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells. Transcription factor liver X receptor [Formula: see text] (LXR[Formula: see text] plays a key role in lipid metabolism and inflammation as well as in the regulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. Because of the contribution of inflammation to macrophage foam cell formation and the potent anti-inflammatory activity of andrographolide, we hypothesized that andrographolide might inhibit oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. The results showed that andrographolide reduced oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophage foam cells. Andrographolide decreased the mRNA and protein expression of CD36 by inducing the degradation of CD36 mRNA; however, andrographolide had no effect on SR-A expression. In contrast, andrographolide increased the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, which were dependent on LXR[Formula: see text]. Andrographolide enhanced LXR[Formula: see text] nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity. Treatment with the LXR[Formula: see text] antagonist GGPP and transfection with LXR[Formula: see text] siRNA reversed the ability of andrographolide to stimulate ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression. In conclusion, inhibition of CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake and induction of ABCA1- and ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux are two working mechanisms by which andrographolide inhibits macrophage foam cell formation, which suggests that andrographolide could be a potential candidate to prevent

  15. Ferrate(VI synthesis at boron-doped diamond anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čekerevac Milan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of iron compounds from alkaline 10 M KOH electrolytes on a boron doped diamond electrode is examined by cyclic voltammetry between the potentials of hydrogen evolution reaction and oxygen evolution reaction, due to ferrate(VI electrochemical synthesis. It is shown that the anodic current peak that appears in iron free electrolyte at a less positive potential than the potential of oxygen evolution probably coincides with oxidation of hydrogen in >CH2 groups and C-sp2 graphite impurities with formation of >C=O groups at C-sp3 diamond structure. Addition of Fe(III compounds to the electrolyte provoke formation of the anodic wave on cyclic voltammograms in the potential region which correlates with generation of ferrate(VI. It is concluded that the direct electrochemical synthesis of Fe(VI at the boron doped diamond anode is possible because of the less positive potential of ferrate(VIFeO2-4 formation in respect to the potential of oxygen evolution reaction. Presence of ferrate(VI in electrolyte, formed after anodic polarization of boron electrode in 10 M KOH electrolyte saturated with Fe(III at + 0.9 V against Hg|HgO electrode, has been proven by UV-VIS spectrometry.

  16. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond nanowires with enhanced electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalini, Jayakumar; Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Ting-Hsun; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Chen, Huang-Chin; Lin, I.-Nan; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The effects of N 2 incorporation in Ar/CH 4 plasma on the electrochemical properties and microstructure of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films are reported. While the electrical conductivity of the films increased monotonously with increasing N 2 content (up to 25%) in the plasma, the electrochemical behavior was optimized for UNCD films grown in (Ar–10% N 2 )/CH 4 plasma. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the main factor resulting in high conductivity in the films was the formation of needle-like nanodiamond grains and the induction graphite layer encapsulating these grains. The electrochemical process for N 2 -incorporated UNCD films can readily be activated due to the presence of nanographite along the grain boundaries of the films. The formation of needle-like diamond grains was presumably due to the presence of CN species that adhered to the existing nanodiamond clusters, which suppressed radial growth of the nanodiamond crystals, promoting anisotropic growth and the formation of needle-like nanodiamond. The N 2 -incorporated UNCD films outperformed other electrochemical electrode materials, such as boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon, in that the UNCD electrodes could sense dopamine, urea, and ascorbic acid simultaneously in the same mixture with clear resolution

  17. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroos, J.; Savin, H.

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation is limited by copper diffusion. Finally, interface defect density measurements confirm that copper-related LID is dominated by recombination in the wafer bulk

  18. Proton recoil detector of fusion neutrons using natural diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, R. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Han, S. S.; Staples, P. A.; Wagner, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond, with its high radiation damage resistance, is an attractive alternative to silicon for neutron measurements in next step fusion experiments. A 200-μm-thick type IIa natural diamond with Ti/Au contacts was tested at the LAMPF-WNR facility by time-of-flight neutron energy identification. The crystal, having a carrier lifetime of up to 1 ns, was arranged in a low-energy-resolution, high-sensitivity proton recoil telescope consisting of a polyethylene radiator and a low-energy-proton Teflon filter. This arrangement is similar to the triton burnup monitor of Croft et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1418 (1993)], where a silicon photodiode was used as a recoil proton detector. The observed sensitivity for 14 MeV neutrons (DT) is (1.25±0.15)×10-3 counts/neutron. However, a high contribution of neutron-induced events in the diamond, mainly carbon (A=12) recoils, was observed. A one-dimensional calculation for the detector response to carbon recoil and proton deposition is compared to the measurements. Poor energy resolution of the diamond detector precludes pulse height discrimination between direct 2.5 MeV neutrons events and proton events corresponding to 14 MeV neutrons. Therefore, an overall DT/DD neutron sensitivity ratio of only ˜6.5 is achieved. This value is much lower than the ratio of 540 reported by Croft et al. in their silicon (A=28) monitor.

  19. Mast cell chymase potentiates histamine-induced wheal formation in the skin of ragweed-allergic dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinstein, I; Nadel, J A; Graf, P D; Caughey, G H

    1990-01-01

    Skin mast cells release the neutral protease chymase along with histamine during degranulation. To test the hypothesis that chymase modulates histamine-induced plasma extravasation, we measured wheal formation following intradermal injection of purified mast cell chymase and histamine into the skin of ragweed-allergic dogs. We found that chymase greatly augments histamine-induced wheal formation. The magnitude of the potentiating effect increases with increasing doses of chymase and becomes m...

  20. Investigation of γ-ray induced polymer formation in the carboranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    The γ-ray induced polymerization of a 1:3 molar solution of solid 1-vinyl-o-carborane dissolved in styrene under free-radical conditions resulted in a co-polymer containing two 1-vinyl-o-carborane molecules and nine styrene molecules per co-polymer molecule. The co-polymer was found to have a polystyrene type structure but without any unsaturated end group. Radiation induced polymerization of pure styrene under the same conditions resulted in a single polymeric product with a chain length of 12 units. The rate of formation of the 1-vinyl-o-carborane and styrene co-polymer compared to that of the pure styrene was faster by a factor of 1.4. (author)

  1. Hippocampal signaling pathways are involved in stress-induced impairment of memory formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardari, Maryam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2015-11-02

    Stress is a potent modulator of hippocampal-dependent memory formation. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of hippocampal signaling pathways in stress-induced memory impairment in male Wistar rats. The animals were exposed to acute elevated platform (EP) stress and memory formation was measured by a step-through type passive avoidance task. The results indicated that post-training or pre-test exposure to EP stress impaired memory consolidation or retrieval respectively. Using western blot analysis, it was found that memory retrieval was associated with the increase in the levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (P-CREB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets in the hippocampus. In contrast, the stress exposure decreased the hippocampal levels of these proteins. In addition, stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation or retrieval was associated with the decrease in the P-CREB/CREB ratio and the PGC-1α level in the hippocampus. On the other hand, the hippocampal level of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) which are the master regulators of defense system were decreased by the stress exposure. The increased hippocampal levels of Nrf2 and it׳s downstream was observed during memory retrieval, while stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation or retrieval inhibited this hippocampal signaling pathway. Overall, these findings suggest that down-regulation of CREB/PGC-1α signaling cascade and Nrf2 antioxidant pathways in the hippocampus may be associated with memory impairment induced by stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  3. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is key to peroxynitrite-mediated, LPS-induced protein radical formation in murine microglial BV2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chen, Shih-Heng; Kadiiska, Maria B; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Zielonka, Jacek; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Mason, Ronald P

    2014-08-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells in the brain. Microglial activation is characteristic of several inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in models of Parkinson's disease is well documented, the free radical-mediated protein radical formation and its underlying mechanism during LPS-induced microglial activation are not known. Here we have used immuno-spin trapping and RNA interference to investigate the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in peroxynitrite-mediated protein radical formation in murine microglial BV2 cells treated with LPS. Treatment of BV2 cells with LPS resulted in morphological changes, induction of iNOS, and increased protein radical formation. Pretreatments with FeTPPS (a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst), L-NAME (total NOS inhibitor), 1400W (iNOS inhibitor), and apocynin significantly attenuated LPS-induced protein radical formation and tyrosine nitration. Results obtained with coumarin-7-boronic acid, a highly specific probe for peroxynitrite detection, correlated with LPS-induced tyrosine nitration, which demonstrated involvement of peroxynitrite in protein radical formation. A similar degree of protection conferred by 1400W and L-NAME led us to conclude that only iNOS, and no other forms of NOS, is involved in LPS-induced peroxynitrite formation. Subsequently, siRNA for iNOS, the iNOS-specific inhibitor 1400W, the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC, and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 was used to inhibit iNOS directly or indirectly. Inhibition of iNOS precisely correlated with decreased protein radical formation in LPS-treated BV2 cells. The time course of protein radical formation also matched the time course of iNOS expression. Taken together, these results prove the role of iNOS in peroxynitrite-mediated protein radical formation in LPS-treated microglial BV2 cells. Copyright © 2014

  4. Muscle paralysis induces bone marrow inflammation and predisposition to formation of giant osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausk, Brandon J; Worton, Leah E; Smigiel, Kate S; Kwon, Ronald Y; Bain, Steven D; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gardiner, Edith M; Gross, Ted S

    2017-11-01

    Transient muscle paralysis engendered by a single injection of botulinum toxin A (BTxA) rapidly induces profound focal bone resorption within the medullary cavity of adjacent bones. While initially conceived as a model of mechanical disuse, osteoclastic resorption in this model is disproportionately severe compared with the modest gait defect that is created. Preliminary studies of bone marrow following muscle paralysis suggested acute upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1. We therefore hypothesized that BTxA-induced muscle paralysis would rapidly alter the inflammatory microenvironment and the osteoclastic potential of bone marrow. We tested this hypothesis by defining the time course of inflammatory cell infiltration, osteoinflammatory cytokine expression, and alteration in osteoclastogenic potential in the tibia bone marrow following transient muscle paralysis of the calf muscles. Our findings identified inflammatory cell infiltration within 24 h of muscle paralysis. By 72 h, osteoclast fusion and pro-osteoclastic inflammatory gene expression were upregulated in tibia bone marrow. These alterations coincided with bone marrow becoming permissive to the formation of osteoclasts of greater size and greater nuclei numbers. Taken together, our data are consistent with the thesis that transient calf muscle paralysis induces acute inflammation within the marrow of the adjacent tibia and that these alterations are temporally consistent with a role in mediating muscle paralysis-induced bone resorption. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Computer simulation of the mechanism for the synthesis of carbonado diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João José de Assis Rangel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis mechanism associated with the formation of carbonado type polycrystalline diamond has been analyzed. This analysis was performed by computer simulation of the field of temperature developed at the moment of graphite transformation into polycrystalline diamond. It was found that during the synthesis of this carbonado diamond, a strong non-steady thermal condition occurs, leading to changes in the thermodynamic equilibrium. As a consequence, a region comprising non-transformed graphite and carbonado with different characteristics is established. An experimental comparison was carried out between the carbonado hardness profile and the field of temperatures. The results show that the higher the temperature attained at local points inside the high-pressure chamber, the higher the hardness of the diamond. The simulation and experimental results indicated that concurrent mechanisms are acting during the carbonado synthesis.

  6. Correction method for the error of diamond tool's radius in ultra-precision cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Jing-chi

    2010-10-01

    The compensation method for the error of diamond tool's cutting edge is a bottle-neck technology to hinder the high accuracy aspheric surface's directly formation after single diamond turning. Traditional compensation was done according to the measurement result from profile meter, which took long measurement time and caused low processing efficiency. A new compensation method was firstly put forward in the article, in which the correction of the error of diamond tool's cutting edge was done according to measurement result from digital interferometer. First, detailed theoretical calculation related with compensation method was deduced. Then, the effect after compensation was simulated by computer. Finally, φ50 mm work piece finished its diamond turning and new correction turning under Nanotech 250. Testing surface achieved high shape accuracy pv 0.137λ and rms=0.011λ, which approved the new compensation method agreed with predictive analysis, high accuracy and fast speed of error convergence.

  7. Implications of diamond-turned versus diamond-ground mold fabrication techniques on precision-molded optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertus, Lou; Symmons, Alan

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the trend within the molded optics community has been an overall advancement in the capability to diamond grind molds using a variety of grinding techniques. Improvements in grinding equipment, materials and tooling have enabled higher quality ceramic and carbide molds and thereby lenses. Diamond turned molds from ductile metals are still used prevalently throughout the molding industry. Each technology presents a unique set of advantages and disadvantages whether used for precision injection molding of plastic optics or precision glass molding. This paper reviews the manufacturing techniques for each approach and applicable molding process. The advantages and disadvantages of each are compared and analyzed. The subtle differences that exist in optics molded from each technique and the impact they have on the performance in various applications is reviewed. Differences stemming from tooling material properties, material-specific minor defects, as well as cutting and grinding process-induced artifacts are described in detail as well as their influence on the roughness, waviness, and form errors present on the molded surface. A comparison with results between similar surfaces for both diamond grinding and diamond turning is presented.

  8. Fiscal 1998 international research cooperation project. Research report on development of ultra-solid lubricant with cluster diamond; 1998 nendo kokusai kenkyu kyoroku jigyo seika hokokusho. Kurasuta diamond wo riyoshita kotai junkatsu fukugo zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Study was made on cluster diamond-dispersed composite materials to develop advanced ultra-solid lubricant. As for processing technology of such composite materials, study was made on the uniform mixing condition of cluster diamond and Cu or Cu-Sn alloy by mechanical milling. The fabricated composite powder was caked by vacuum hot compressive formation technique. The production process of composite materials composed of cluster diamond and TiO{sub 2} was also developed by using sol-gel technique. As for formation of a functional layer and development of micro- formation technology, the prototype forming equipment using radial extrusion process and the mould were designed and prepared. In the preliminary experiment only for matrix, study was made on working limit, material flow, fine recrystallization and working condition during working. The friction test result showed the antifrictional property of the cluster diamond-dispersed composite materials using Cu, Cu-Sn, Al, Al-Si as matrix. (NEDO)

  9. Nanopore formation process in artificial cell membrane induced by plasma-generated reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated morphological change of an artificial lipid bilayer membrane induced by oxygen radicals which were generated by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. Neutral oxygen species, O((3)Pj) and O2((1)Δg), were irradiated of a supported lipid bilayer existing under a buffer solution at various conditions of dose time and distances, at which the dose amounts of the oxygen species were calculated quantitatively. Observation using an atomic force microscope and a fluorescence microscope revealed that dose of the neutral oxygen species generated nanopores with the diameter of 10-50 nm in a phospholipid bilayer, and finally destructed the bilayer structure. We found that protrusions appeared on the lipid bilayer surface prior to the formation of nanopores, and we attributed the protrusions to the precursor of the nanopores. We propose a mechanism of the pore formation induced by lipid oxidation on the basis of previous experimental and theoretical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physiological type I collagen organization induces the formation of a novel class of linear invadosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juin, Amélie; Billottet, Clotilde; Moreau, Violaine; Destaing, Olivier; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Rosenbaum, Jean; Génot, Elisabeth; Saltel, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Invadosomes are F-actin structures capable of degrading the matrix through the activation of matrix metalloproteases. As fibrillar type I collagen promotes pro-matrix metalloproteinase 2 activation by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, we aimed at investigating the functional relationships between collagen I organization and invadosome induction. We found that fibrillar collagen I induced linear F-actin structures, distributed along the fibrils, on endothelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and tumor cells. These structures share features with conventional invadosomes, as they express cortactin and N-WASP and accumulate the scaffold protein Tks5, which proved essential for their formation. On the basis of their ability to degrade extracellular matrix elements and their original architecture, we named these structures “linear invadosomes.” Interestingly, podosomes or invadopodia were replaced by linear invadosomes upon contact of the cells with fibrillar collagen I. However, linear invadosomes clearly differ from classical invadosomes, as they do not contain paxillin, vinculin, and β1/β3 integrins. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts and RGD peptide, we demonstrate that linear invadosome formation and activity are independent of β1 and β3 integrins. Finally, linear invadosomes also formed in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. This study demonstrates that fibrillar collagen I is the physiological inducer of a novel class of invadosomes. PMID:22114353

  11. Nitrogen remobilisation facilitates adventitious root formation on reversible dark-induced carbohydrate depletion in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerche, Siegfried; Haensch, Klaus-Thomas; Druege, Uwe; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-10-10

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in axillary shoot tip cuttings is a crucial physiological process for ornamental propagation that is utilised in global production chains for young plants. In this process, the nitrogen and carbohydrate metabolisms of a cutting are regulated by its total nitrogen content (N t ), dark exposure during transport and irradiance levels at distinct production sites and phases through a specific plasticity to readjust metabolite pools. Here, we examined how elevated N t contents with a combined dark exposure of cuttings influence their internal N-pools including free amino acids and considered early anatomic events of AR formation as well as further root development in Petunia hybrida cuttings. Enhanced N t contents of unrooted cuttings resulted in elevated total free amino acid levels and in particular glutamate (glu) and glutamine (gln) in leaf and basal stem. N-allocation to mobile N-pools increased whereas the allocation to insoluble protein-N declined. A dark exposure of cuttings conserved initial N t and nitrate-N, while it reduced insoluble protein-N and increased soluble protein, amino- and amide-N. The increase of amino acids mainly comprised asparagine (asn), aspartate (asp) and arginine (arg) in the leaves, with distinct tissue specific responses to an elevated N supply. Dark exposure induced an early transient rise of asp followed by a temporary increase of glu. A strong positive N effect of high N t contents of cuttings on AR formation after 384 h was observed. Root meristematic cells developed at 72 h with a negligible difference for two N t levels. After 168 h, an enhanced N t accelerated AR formation and gave rise to first obvious fully developed roots while only meristems were formed with a low N t . However, dark exposure for 168 h promoted AR formation particularly in cuttings with a low N t to such an extent so that the benefit of the enhanced N t was almost compensated. Combined dark exposure and low N t of

  12. Effect of radiation-induced emission of Schottky defects on the formation of colloids in alkali halides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubinko, [No Value; Vainshtein, DI; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    Formation of vacancy clusters in irradiated crystals is considered taking into account radiation-induced Schottky defect emission (RSDE) from extended defects. RSDE acts in the opposite direction compared with Frenkel pair production, and it results in the radiation-induced recovery processes. In

  13. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Zastrau, U.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  14. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zastrau, U. [High-Energy Density Science Group, Hamburg (Germany); Gauthier, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres, Dresden (Germany); Granados, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  15. Edge enhanced growth induced shape transition in the formation of GaN nanowall network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajendra; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    We address the mechanism of early stages of growth and shape transition of the unique nanowall network (NwN) of GaN by experimentally monitoring its morphological evolution and complementing it by first-principles calculations. Using atomic force and scanning electron microscopy, we observe the formation of oval shaped islands at very early stages of the growth which later transformed into tetrahedron shaped (3 faced pyramid) islands. These tetrahedron shaped islands further grow anisotropically along their edges of the (20 2 ¯ 1) facets to form the wall-like structure as the growth proceeds. The mechanism of this crystal growth is discussed in light of surface free energies of the different surfaces, adsorption energy, and diffusion barrier of Ga ad-atoms on the (20 2 ¯ 1) facets. By first-principles calculations, we find that the diffusion barrier of ad-atoms reduces with decreasing width of facets and is responsible for the anisotropic growth leading to the formation of NwN. This study suggests that formation of NwN is an archetype example of structure dependent attachment kinetic instability induced shape transition in thin film growth.

  16. Observational evidence for supernova-induced star formation: Canis Major R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, W.; Assousa, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The R association CMa R1, which contains two classical Herbig emission stars (Z CMa and HD 53367) and several other extremely young stellar objects, is found to lie at the edge of a large-scale ring of emission nebulosity. The form of the ring, which is also seen at radio wavelengths, and the absence of luminous stellar objects at its center suggest that it may be a relatively old supernova remnant (SNR). This suggestion is greatly strengthened by the discovery of an expanding H I shell coincident with the optical feature and the discovery of a runaway star, HD 54662, in CMa OB1. An age of order 5 x 10 5 years is derived for the SNR by comparing its properties with theoretical expectation based on models of SNRs evolving in a uniform medium. The close agreement between the likely ages of the stars and the age of the SNR, as well as the location of the recently formed objects with respect to the supernova shell, strongly support the hypothesis that a supernova event triggered star formation in CMa R1. Several other cases where evidence exists for supernova-induced star formation are briefly discussed, the most interesting being the Orion region where the hypothesis may provide a simple explanation for such diverse features as the runaway stars, Barnard's loop, and the gas kinematics and recent star formation in the Trapezium region

  17. Ion beam induced single phase nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukade, Deepti A. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai 400098 (India); Tribedi, L.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bhattacharyya, Varsha, E-mail: varsha.b1.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai 400098 (India)

    2014-06-15

    Single phase TiO{sub 2} nanostructures are fabricated by oxygen ion implantation (60 keV) at fluence ranging from 1×10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1×10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} in titanium thin films deposited on fused silica substrate and subsequent thermal annealing in argon atmosphere. GAXRD and Raman spectroscopy study reveals formation of single rutile phases of TiO{sub 2}. Particle size is found to vary from 29 nm to 35 nm, establishing nanostructure formation. Nanostructure formation is also confirmed by the quantum confinement effect manifested by the blueshift of the UV–vis absorption spectra. Photoluminescence spectra show peaks corresponding to TiO{sub 2} rutile phase and reveal the presence of oxygen defects due to implantation. The controlled synthesis of single phase nanostructure is attributed to ion induced defects and post-implantation annealing. It is observed that the size of the nanostructures formed is strongly dependent on the ion fluence.

  18. Crystallization-Induced Fouling during Boiling: Formation Mechanisms to Mitigation Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Susmita; Rapoport, Leonid; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2018-01-23

    Boiling is significantly altered by the presence of dissolved salts. In particular, salts whose solubility decreases with temperature have the tendency to crystallize and adhere to the heat transfer surface and adversely affect the thermal performance. Scaling due to the precipitation of such salts poses serious operational and safety challenges in several practical applications, including heat exchangers, pipelines, and desalination. Here, we study the effect of dissolved salts on the dynamics of pool boiling and its impact on the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF). We find that even undersaturated conditions can lead to crystallization and scale buildup on the boiling surface and dramatically lower heat transfer performance. For example, the CHF for a salt solution that is 75% of the saturation concentration is found to be at least 2 times lower than that for deionized water. Using simultaneous high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we determine the interdependence between crystallization-induced scale formation and bubble evolution dynamics, including bubble nucleation, growth, and departure. We find that salt crystallizes in a "coffee-ring" pattern due to evaporation at the contact line of the bubble. On the basis of the role of the microlayer and triple contact line on scale formation, we propose manipulating surface wettability as a means to avoid scale formation and the associated decrease in the heat transfer coefficient. Surfaces with hybrid wettability are demonstrated as a means to mitigate the reduction in the heat transfer coefficient and CHF in the presence of dissolved salts.

  19. Formation of high aspect ratio polyamide-6 nanofibers via electrically induced double layer during electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirmala, R.; Nam, Ki Taek; Park, Soo-Jin; Shin, Yu-Shik; Navamathavan, R.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the formation of high aspect ratio nanofibers in polyamide-6 was investigated as a function of applied voltage ranging from 15 to 25 kV using electrospinning technique. All other experimental parameters were kept constant. The electrospun polyamide-6 nanofibers were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF). FE-SEM images of polyamide-6 nanofibers showed that the diameter of the electrospun fiber was decreased with increasing applied voltage. At the critical applied voltage, the polymer solution was completely ionized to form the dense high aspect ratio nanofibers in between the main nanofibers. The diameter of the polyamide-6 nanofibers was observed to be in the range of 75-110 nm, whereas the high aspect ratio structures consisted of regularly distributed very fine nanofibers with diameters of about 9-28 nm. Trends in fiber diameter and diameter distribution were discussed for the high aspect ratio nanofibers. TEM results revealed that the formation of double layers in polyamide-6 nanofibers and then split-up into ultrafine fibers. The electrically induced double layer in combination with the polyelectrolytic nature of solution is proposed as the suitable mechanisms for the formation of high aspect ratio nanofibers in polyamide-6.

  20. Predator-induced fleeing behaviors in phytoplankton: a new mechanism for harmful algal bloom formation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Harvey

    Full Text Available In the plankton, heterotrophic microbes encounter and ingest phytoplankton prey, which effectively removes >50% of daily phytoplankton production in the ocean and influences global primary production and biochemical cycling rates. Factors such as size, shape, nutritional value, and presence of chemical deterrents are known to affect predation pressure. Effects of movement behaviors of either predator or prey on predation pressure, and particularly fleeing behaviors in phytoplankton are thus far unknown. Here, we quantified individual 3D movements, population distributions, and survival rates of the toxic phytoplankton species, Heterosigma akashiwo in response to a ciliate predator and predator-derived cues. We observed predator-induced defense behaviors previously unknown for phytoplankton. Modulation of individual phytoplankton movements during and after predator exposure resulted in an effective separation of predator and prey species. The strongest avoidance behaviors were observed when H. akashiwo co-occurred with an actively grazing predator. Predator-induced changes in phytoplankton movements resulted in a reduction in encounter rate and a 3-fold increase in net algal population growth rate. A spatially explicit population model predicted rapid phytoplankton bloom formation only when fleeing behaviors were incorporated. These model predictions reflected field observations of rapid H. akashiwo harmful algal bloom (HAB formation in the coastal ocean. Our results document a novel behavior in phytoplankton that can significantly reduce predation pressure and suggests a new mechanism for HAB formation. Phytoplankton behaviors that minimize predatory losses, maximize resource acquisition, and alter community composition and distribution patterns could have major implications for our understanding and predictive capacity of marine primary production and biochemical cycling rates.

  1. Misfit accommodation mechanism at the heterointerface between diamond and cubic boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Kato, Takeharu; Shibata, Naoya; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-02-17

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) are the top two hardest materials on the Earth. Clarifying how the two seemingly incompressible materials can actually join represents one of the most challenging issues in materials science. Here we apply the temperature gradient method to grow the c-BN single crystals on diamond and report a successful epitaxial growth. By transmission electron microscopy, we reveal a novel misfit accommodation mechanism for a {111} diamond/c-BN heterointerface, that is, lattice misfit can be accommodated by continuous stacking fault networks, which are connected by periodically arranged hexagonal dislocation loops. The loops are found to comprise six 60° Shockley partial dislocations. Atomically, the carbon in diamond bonds directly to boron in c-BN at the interface, which electronically induces a two-dimensional electron gas and a quasi-1D electrical conductivity. Our findings point to the existence of a novel misfit accommodation mechanism associated with the superhard materials.

  2. The Jahn-Teller effect and vibronic coupling at deep levels in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the vibronic properties of point defects (i.e. impurities and radiation-induced defects) in diamond. Cases discussed are: defects where the totally symmetric electron-lattice interaction dominates; cases of dynamic Jahn-Teller distortions; vibronic interactions between nearly degenerate states; and a statically deformed defect. Before discussing each of these topics the relevant theory is outlined at an introductory level with the emphasis on features relevant to understanding data. It is shown that a good understanding of the vibronic data is now available in diamond. Compared to defects in silicon, defects in diamond are less prone to static deformations, partly as a result of the high-energy transverse acoustic modes in diamond. (author)

  3. Monocytes induce STAT3 activation in human mesenchymal stem cells to promote osteoblast formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Nicolaidou

    Full Text Available A major therapeutic challenge is how to replace bone once it is lost. Bone loss is a characteristic of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Cells and cytokines of the immune system are known to regulate bone turnover by controlling the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells. However, less is known about the regulation of osteoblasts (OB, the bone forming cells. This study aimed to investigate whether immune cells also regulate OB differentiation. Using in vitro cell cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, it was shown that monocytes/macrophages potently induced MSC differentiation into OBs. This was evident by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP after 7 days and the formation of mineralised bone nodules at 21 days. This monocyte-induced osteogenic effect was mediated by cell contact with MSCs leading to the production of soluble factor(s by the monocytes. As a consequence of these interactions we observed a rapid activation of STAT3 in the MSCs. Gene profiling of STAT3 constitutively active (STAT3C infected MSCs using Illumina whole human genome arrays showed that Runx2 and ALP were up-regulated whilst DKK1 was down-regulated in response to STAT3 signalling. STAT3C also led to the up-regulation of the oncostatin M (OSM and LIF receptors. In the co-cultures, OSM that was produced by monocytes activated STAT3 in MSCs, and neutralising antibodies to OSM reduced ALP by 50%. These data indicate that OSM, in conjunction with other mediators, can drive MSC differentiation into OB. This study establishes a role for monocyte/macrophages as critical regulators of osteogenic differentiation via OSM production and the induction of STAT3 signalling in MSCs. Inducing the local activation of STAT3 in bone cells may be a valuable tool to increase bone formation in osteoporosis and arthritis, and in localised bone remodelling during fracture repair.

  4. Shock-induced kelyphite formation in the core of a complex impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseta, Natalie; Boonsue, Suporn; Gibson, Roger L.; Spray, John G.

    2017-10-01

    We present a compositional and textural analysis of shock-induced microtextures in garnet porphyroblasts in migmatitic garnet-cordierite-biotite paragneisses from the centre of the Vredefort impact structure, South Africa. Detailed imaging and major element analysis of deformation features in, and adjacent to, the garnet porphyroblasts record a complex, heterogeneous distribution of shock effects at the microscale. As the most competent silicate mineral in the assemblage, with the highest Hugoniot Elastic Limit and a wide pressure-temperature stability field, the porphyroblastic garnet preserves a more diverse shock deformation response compared to minerals such as quartz and feldspar, which underwent more comprehensive shock metamorphism and subsequent annealing. The garnet porphyroblasts display pre-impact fractures that are overprinted by later intra-granular Hertzian and distinctive planar fractures associated with the impact event. Shock-induced strain localization occurred along internal slip planes and defects, including pre-existing fractures and inclusion boundaries in the garnet. Symplectitic (kelyphitic) coronas commonly enclose the garnet porphyroblasts, and inhabit intra-granular fractures. The kelyphite assemblage in fractures with open communication beyond garnet grain boundaries is characterized by orthopyroxene—cordierite—sapphirine. Conversely, the kelyphite assemblage in closed-off intra-granular fractures is highly variable, comprising spatially restricted combinations of a secondary garnet phase with a majoritic component, Al-rich orthopyroxene, sapphirine and cordierite. The impedance contrast between garnet porphyroblasts and their inclusions further facilitated the formation of shock-induced features (Al-rich orthopyroxene coronas). Together, the textural and mineralogical data suggest that these features provide a record of oscillatory shock perturbations initiated under confining pressure beneath the transient crater floor. This

  5. Inhibition of azoxymethane-induced DNA adduct formation by Aloe arborescens var. natalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpo, Kan; Chihara, Takeshi; Beppu, Hidehiko; Ida, Chikako; Kaneko, Takaaki; Hoshino, Motoyuki; Kuzuya, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the possible mechanisms of inhibition of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the rat colorectum by freeze-dried whole leaves of Aloe arborescens var. natalensis (Kidachi aloe) (hereinafter referred to as ALOE) and commercial crude aloin (Sigma A-0451; from Curacao aloe) (hereinafter ALOIN), we studied the effects of ALOE and ALOIN on the formation of AOM-induced DNA adducts (O6-methylguanine; O6-MeG) in rats. Male F344 rats (4 weeks old) were fed a basal diet, or experimental diets containing 5%ALOE or 0.25%ALOIN for 5 weeks. All rats were injected s.c. twice with 15 mg/kg AOM, once at the end of week 1, and once at the end of week 2. The animals were sacrificed 6 hours after the second injection to analyze DNA adducts (O6-MeG) in the colorectum. Dietary administration of ALOE significantly inhibited the O6-MeG levels (50% reduction) compared with controls, whereas the O6-MeG levels in the ALOIN-fed rats showed a tendency to decrease (by 30%), although not significantly. In this study, we also measured the enzyme activity and mRNA level of cytochrome (CYP) 2E1, known to be responsible for the activation of AOM, in rat liver. ALOE-fed rats showed significantly reduced CYP2E1 enzymatic activity (27% reduction) compared with controls. On the other hand, the activity in ALOIN-fed rats tended to decrease by 11%, although not significantly. The CYP2E1 mRNA levels in ALOE- and ALOIN-fed rats were slightly reduced (9.7% and 5.2%, respectively). These results may explain, at least in part, the previously observed inhibitory effects of ALOE and ALOIN, especially ALOE on AOM-induced ACF formation in the rat colorectum.

  6. Formation and damping of a shock wave induced by laser in a metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottet, F.

    1981-01-01

    In the first part of this work, a numerical simulation of the formation and of the damping of the shock wave induced in a solid target by a laser impulse is developed. It allows to interpret the experimental obtained in the second part of the study. Two series of experiments have been realized. An iron target metallographic study is intended to verify if laser shocks produce effects comparable with conventional shocks, particularly a deformation by albite twinning the existence of which is related to the shock amplitude and its evolution during the propagation in the target. Macles observation become a possible mean to estimate the value of the induced pressures. Another experiment series has been realized to determine more directly the shock parameters. Piezoelectric cermets have been used to detect a shock-wave passage and to measure the time taken to go through targets of variable thickness. The numerical solution allows, afterwards, to deduce the maximum pressure of the induced shock. The most part of the tests have been done on copper targets, the behaviour of which is well known in a large pressure domain. Some tests have been realized on aluminium and iron targets [fr

  7. Carbon isotope fractionation during diamond growth in depleted peridotite: Counterintuitive insights from modelling water-maximum CHO fluids as multi-component systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, T.; Chacko, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2017-09-01

    Because of the inability of depleted cratonic peridotites to effectively buffer oxygen fugacities when infiltrated by CHO or carbonatitic fluids, it has been proposed recently (Luth and Stachel, 2014) that diamond formation in peridotites typically does not occur by rock-buffered redox reactions as previously thought but by an oxygen-conserving reaction in which minor coexisting CH4 and CO2 components in a water-rich fluid react to form diamond (CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O). In such fluid-buffered systems, carbon isotope fractionation during diamond precipitation occurs in the presence of two dominant fluid carbon species. Carbon isotope modelling of diamond precipitation from mixed CH4- and CO2-bearing fluids reveals unexpected fundamental differences relative to diamond crystallization from a single carbon fluid species: (1) irrespective of which carbon fluid species (CH4 or CO2) is dominant in the initial fluid, diamond formation is invariably associated with progressive minor (units), the carbon isotope composition of the first-precipitated diamond decreases by 3.7‰. The tight mode in δ13C of - 5 ± 1 ‰ for diamonds worldwide places strict constraints on the dominant range of XCO2 in water-rich fluids responsible for diamond formation. Specifically, precipitation of diamonds with δ13C values in the range -4 to -6‰ from mantle-derived fluids with an average δ13C value of -5‰ (derived from evidence not related to diamonds) requires that diamond-forming fluids were relatively reduced and had methane as the dominant carbon species (XCO2 = 0.1-0.5). Application of our model to a recently published set of in-situ carbon isotope analyses for peridotitic diamonds from Marange, Zimbabwe (Smit et al., 2016), which contain CH4 fluid inclusions, allows us to perfectly match the observed co-variations in δ13 C, δ15 N and N content and at the same time explain the previously counter-intuitive observation of progressive 13C enrichment in diamonds that appear to have

  8. Diamond nanowires: fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Wu, Liangzhuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2014-12-22

    C(sp(3) )C-bonded diamond nanowires are wide band gap semiconductors that exhibit a combination of superior properties such as negative electron affinity, chemical inertness, high Young's modulus, the highest hardness, and room-temperature thermal conductivity. The creation of 1D diamond nanowires with their giant surface-to-volume ratio enhancements makes it possible to control and enhance the fundamental properties of diamond. Although theoretical comparisons with carbon nanotubes have shown that diamond nanowires are energetically and mechanically viable structures, reproducibly synthesizing the crystalline diamond nanowires has remained challenging. We present a comprehensive, up-to-date review of diamond nanowires, including a discussion of their synthesis along with their structures, properties, and applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ultrananocrystalline diamond contacts for electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2017-12-12

    A method of forming electrical contacts on a diamond substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The mixture of gases include a source of a p-type or an n-type dopant. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the diamond substrate. The diamond substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the diamond substrate for a first time, and a UNCD film, which is doped with at least one of a p-type dopant and an n-type dopant, is disposed on the diamond substrate. The doped UNCD film is patterned to define UNCD electrical contacts on the diamond substrate.

  10. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  11. Front and back side SIMS analysis of boron-doped delta-layer in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinault-Thaury, M.-A., E-mail: marie-amandine.pinault-thaury@uvsq.fr [Groupe d’Etude de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, University of Paris Saclay, University of Versailles St Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Jomard, F. [Groupe d’Etude de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, University of Paris Saclay, University of Versailles St Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Pomorski, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Arnault, J.-C. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Front and back side SIMS analysis of delta-layer boron-doped is a first for diamond. • Combination of front and back side depth profiling improves delta-layer analyses. • Sharp interfaces are evidenced on both sides of the delta-layer boron-doped diamond. • The growth of delta-layer boron doped diamond is now well controlled. - Abstract: Nowadays the availability of very thin diamond layers in the range of nanometers as well as the possibility to characterize such delta-layer structures are required for the field of photonics and spintronics, but also for the development of next generation high power devices involving boron doping. The fabrication of diamond structures with abrupt interfaces such as superlattices and quantum wells has been recently improved. A very accurate characterization is then essential even though the analysis of such structures is arduous and challenging. SIMS analyses are commonly used to obtain depth profiles of dopants. However, below 10 nm in thickness, SIMS induced ion mixing effects which are no longer negligible. Then the raw SIMS profile might differ from the real dopant profile. In this study, we have analyzed a diamond structure containing a thin boron epilayer, especially synthesized to achieve SIMS analysis on both sides and to overcome the effects of ion mixing. We evidence the ion mixing induced by primary ions. Such a structure is a delta diamond layer, comparable to classical boron-doped delta-layer in silicon. Our results show that the growth of boron-doped delta-layer in diamond is now well controlled in terms of thickness and interfaces.

  12. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  13. Thin film diamond microstructure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roppel, T.; Ellis, C.; Ramesham, R.; Jaworske, D.; Baginski, M. E.; Lee, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Selective deposition and abrasion, as well as etching in atomic oxygen or reduced-pressure air, have been used to prepare patterned polycrystalline diamond films which, on further processing by anisotropic Si etching, yield the microstructures of such devices as flow sensors and accelerometers. Both types of sensor have been experimentally tested in the respective functions of hot-wire anemometer and both single- and double-hinged accelerometer.

  14. Morphological Features of Diamond Crystals Dissolved in Fe0.7S0.3 Melt at 4 GPa and 1400°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V. M.; Zhimulev, E. I.; Pomazanskiy, B. S.; Zemnuhov, A. L.; Chepurov, A. A.; Afanasiev, V. P.; Chepurov, A. I.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental study of the dissolution of natural and synthetic diamonds in a sulfur-bearing iron melt (Fe0.7S0.3) with high P-T parameters (4 GPa, 1400°C) was performed. The results demonstrated that under these conditions, octahedral crystals with flat faces and rounded tetrahexahedral diamond crystals are transformed into rounded octahedroids, which have morphological characteristics similar to those of natural diamonds from kimberlite. It was suggested that, taking into account the complex history of individual natural diamond crystals, including the dissolution stages, sulfur-bearing metal melts up to sulfide melts were not only diamond-forming media during the early evolution of the Earth, but also natural solvents of diamond in the mantle environment before the formation of kimberlitic melts.

  15. Diamond-like nanoparticles influence on flavonoids transport: molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastun, Inna L.; Agandeeva, Ksenia E.; Bokarev, Andrey N.; Zenkin, Nikita S.

    2017-03-01

    Intermolecular interaction of diamond-like nanoparticles and flavonoids is investigated by numerical simulation. Using molecular modelling by the density functional theory method, we analyze hydrogen bonds formation and their influence on IR - spectra and structure of molecular complex which is formed due to interaction between flavonoids and nanodiamonds surrounded with carboxylic groups. Enriched adamantane (1,3,5,7 - adamantanetetracarboxylic acid) is used as an example of diamond-like nanoparticles. Intermolecular forces and structure of hydrogen bonds are investigated. IR - spectra and structure parameters of quercetin - adamantanetetracarboxylic acid molecular complex are obtained by numerical simulation using the Gaussian software complex. Received data coincide well with experimental results. Intermolecular interactions and hydrogen bonding structure in the obtained molecular complex are examined. Possibilities of flavonoids interaction with DNA at the molecular level are also considered.

  16. Conductive diamond electrodes for water purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Martínez-Huitle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, synthetic diamond has been studied for its application in wastewater treatment, electroanalysis, organic synthesis and sensor areas; however, its use in the water disinfection/purification is its most relevant application. The new electrochemistry applications of diamond electrodes open new perspectives for an easy, effective, and chemical free water treatment. This article highlights and summarizes the results of a selection of papers dealing with electrochemical disinfection using synthetic diamond films.

  17. Modifying thin film diamond for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baral, B.

    1999-01-01

    The unique combination of properties that diamond possesses are being exploited in both electronic and mechanical applications. An important step forward in the field has been the ability to grow thin film diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods and to control parameters such as crystal orientation, dopant level and surface roughness. An extensive understanding of the surface of any potential electronic material is vital to fully comprehend its behaviour within device structures. The surface itself ultimately controls key aspects of device performance when interfaced with other materials. This study has provided insight into important chemical reactions on polycrystalline CVD diamond surfaces, addressing how certain surface modifications will ultimately affect the properties of the material. A review of the structure, bonding, properties and potential of diamond along with an account of the current state of diamond technology and CVD diamond growth is provided. The experimental chapter reviews bulk material and surface analytical techniques employed in this work and is followed by an investigation of cleaning treatments for polycrystalline CVD diamond aimed at removing non-diamond carbon from the surface. Selective acid etch treatments are compared and contrasted for efficacy with excimer laser irradiation and hydrogen plasma etching. The adsorption/desorption kinetics of potential dopant-containing precursors on polycrystalline CVD diamond surfaces have been investigated to compare their effectiveness at introducing dopants into the diamond during the growth stage. Both boron and sulphur-containing precursor compounds have been investigated. Treating polycrystalline CVD diamond in various atmospheres / combination of atmospheres has been performed to enhance electron field emission from the films. Films which do not emit electrons under low field conditions can be modified such that they emit at fields as low as 10 V/μm. The origin of this enhancement

  18. Characterization of diamond amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystal diamond has been implanted at 1 MeV with 2 x 10 20 Ar/m 2 . Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeled geometry revealed a broad amorphized region underlying a thin, partially crystalline layer. Raman spectroscopy disclosed modifications in the bonding characteristic of the appearance of non-diamond carbon. The complementary nature of the two analysis techniques is demonstrated. The Knoop hardness of the implanted diamond was reduced by implantation

  19. Mineral resource of the month: diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents information on diamond, which is regarded as the world's most popular gemstone. It states that there is strength in the covalent bonding between its carbon atoms, resulting to the strength of its physical properties. The presence of colors in diamonds may be attributed to the impurities that settle in the crystal lattice. Diamonds have been used as decorative items since the ancient era.

  20. Raffinose Induces Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans in Low Concentrations of Sucrose by Increasing Production of Extracellular DNA and Fructan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Ryo; Sato, Tsutomu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2017-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiological agent of dental caries and causes tooth decay by forming a firmly attached biofilm on tooth surfaces. Biofilm formation is induced by the presence of sucrose, which is a substrate for the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides but not in the presence of oligosaccharides. Nonetheless, in this study, we found that raffinose, which is an oligosaccharide with an intestinal regulatory function and antiallergic effect, induced biofilm formation by S. mutans in a mixed culture with sucrose, which was at concentrations less than those required to induce biofilm formation directly. We analyzed the possible mechanism behind the small requirement for sucrose for biofilm formation in the presence of raffinose. Our results suggested that sucrose contributed to an increase in bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation. Next, we examined how the effects of raffinose interacted with the effects of sucrose for biofilm formation. We showed that the presence of raffinose induced fructan synthesis by fructosyltransferase and aggregated extracellular DNA (eDNA, which is probably genomic DNA released from dead cells) into the biofilm. eDNA seemed to be important for biofilm formation, because the degradation of DNA by DNase I resulted in a significant reduction in biofilm formation. When assessing the role of fructan in biofilm formation, we found that fructan enhanced eDNA-dependent cell aggregation. Therefore, our results show that raffinose and sucrose have cooperative effects and that this induction of biofilm formation depends on supportive elements that mainly consist of eDNA and fructan. IMPORTANCE The sucrose-dependent mechanism of biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans has been studied extensively. Nonetheless, the effects of carbohydrates other than sucrose are inadequately understood. Our findings concerning raffinose advance the understanding of the mechanism underlying the joint effects of sucrose and

  1. Comparison between beryllium and diamond-backing plates in diamond-anvil cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Nestola, Fabrizio; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2011-01-01

    A direct comparison between two complete intensity datasets, collected on the same sample loaded in two identical diamond-anvil pressure cells equipped, respectively, with beryllium and diamond backing plates was performed. The results clearly demonstrate that the use of diamond-backing plates...

  2. Sulforaphane-induced transcription of thioredoxin reductase in lens: possible significance against cataract formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma SD

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shambhu D Varma, Krish Chandrasekaran, Svitlana Kovtun Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA Purpose: Sulforaphane is a phytochemically derived organic isothiocyanate 1-isothiocyanato-4-methylsulfinyl-butane present naturally in crucifers, including broccoli and cauliflower. Biochemically, it has been reported to induce the transcription of several antioxidant enzymes. Since such enzymes have been implicated in preventing cataract formation triggered by the intraocular generation of oxy-radical species, the purpose of this investigation was to examine whether it could induce the formation of antioxidant enzymes in the eye lens. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR was used as the target of such induction. Methods: Mice lenses were cultured for an overnight period of 17 hours in medium 199 fortified with 10% fetal calf serum. Incubation was conducted in the absence and presence of sulforaphane (5 µM. Subsequently, the lenses were homogenized in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, followed by centrifugation. TrxR activity was determined in the supernatant by measuring the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced (NADPH-dependent reduction of 5,5´-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB. Non-specific reduction of DTNB was corrected for by conducting parallel determinations in the presence of aurothiomalate. The reduction of DTNB was followed spectrophotometrically at 410 nm. Results: The activity of TrxR in the lenses incubated with sulforaphane was found to be elevated to 18 times of that observed in lenses incubated without sulforaphane. It was also noticeably higher in the lenses incubated without sulforaphane than in the un-incubated fresh lenses. However, this increase was much lower than that observed for lenses incubated with sulforaphane. Conclusion: Sulforaphane has been found to enhance TrxR activity in the mouse lens in culture. In view of the protective effect of the antioxidant enzymes

  3. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  4. Ultimate Atomic Bling: Nanotechnology of Diamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Jeremy

    2010-05-25

    Diamonds exist in all sizes, from the Hope Diamond to minuscule crystals only a few atoms across. The smallest of these diamonds are created naturally by the same processes that make petroleum. Recently, researchers discovered that these 'diamondoids' are formed in many different structural shapes, and that these shapes can be used like LEGO blocks for nanotechnology. This talk will discuss the discovery of these nano-size diamonds and highlight current SLAC/Stanford research into their applications in electronics and medicine.

  5. Undoped CVD diamond films for electrochemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosinska, Lidia; Fabisiak, Kazimierz; Paprocki, Kazimierz; Kowalska, Magdalena; Popielarski, Pawel; Szybowicz, Miroslaw

    2013-01-01

    By using different deposition conditions, the CVD diamond films with different qualities and orientation were grown by the hot-filament CVD technique. The object of this article is to summarize and discuss relation between structural, physical and electrochemical properties of different diamond electrodes. The physical properties of the Hot Filament CVD microcrystalline diamond films are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. In presented studies two different electrodes were used of the diamond grain sizes around 200 nm and 10 μm, as it was estimated from SEM picture. The diamond layers quality was checked on basis of FWHM (Full width at Half Maximum) of 1332 cm −1 diamond Raman peak. The ratio of sp 3 /sp 2 carbon bonds was determined by 1550 cm −1 G band and 1350 cm −1 D band in the Raman spectrum. The electrochemical properties were analyzed using (CV) cyclic voltammetry measurements in aqueous solutions. The sensitivity of undoped diamond electrodes depends strongly on diamond film quality and concentration of amorphous carbon phase in the diamond layer

  6. CVD diamond substrates for electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.

    1996-03-01

    In this study the applicability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond as a material for heat spreaders was investigated. Economical evaluations on the production of heat spreaders were also performed. For the diamond synthesis the hot-filament and microwave method were used respectively. The deposition parameters were varied in a way that free standing diamond layers with a thickness of 80 to 750 microns and different qualities were obtained. The influence of the deposition parameters on the relevant film properties was investigated and discussed. With both the hot-filament and microwave method it was possible to deposit diamond layers having a thermal conductivity exceeding 1200 W/mK and therefore to reach the quality level for commercial uses. The electrical resistivity was greater than 10 12 Ωcm. The investigation of the optical properties was done by Raman-, IR- and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Because of future applications of diamond-aluminium nitride composites as highly efficient heat spreaders diamond deposition an AIN was investigated. An improved substrate pretreatment prior to diamond deposition showed promising results for better performance of such composite heat spreaders. Both free standing layers and diamond-AIN composites could be cut by a CO2 Laser in Order to get an exact size geometry. A reduction of the diamond surface roughness was achieved by etching with manganese powder or cerium. (author)

  7. Tanshindiol C inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced macrophage foam cell formation via a peroxiredoxin 1 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuyu; Li, Xueyan; Peng, Liying; An, Lin; Sun, Ningyuan; Hu, Xuewen; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Yong; Li, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2018-03-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown to be protective in atherosclerosis. The loss of Nrf2 in macrophages enhances foam cell formation and promotes early atherogenesis. Tanshindiol C (Tan C) is isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge., a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases for many years. This study was aimed to test the potential role of Tan C against macrophage foam cell formation and to explore the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we observed that Tan C markedly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced macrophage foam cell formation. Then, we found that Tan C was an activator of both Nrf2 and Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) in macrophages. Nrf2 and Sirt1 synergistically activated the transcription of anti-oxidant peroxiredoxin 1 (Prdx1) after Tan C treatment. More important, we demonstrated that silencing of Prdx1 promoted oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Prdx1 upregulated adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and decreased intracellular lipid accumulation. Furthermore, Tan C ameliorated oxLDL induced macrophage foam cell formation in a Prdx1-dependent manner. These observations suggest that Tan C protects macrophages from oxLDL induced foam cell formation via activation of Prdx1/ABCA1 signaling and that Prdx1 may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of manganese in low-pH-induced root hair formation in Lactuca sativa cv. Grand Rapids seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Masae; Ooishi, Machiko; Inoue, Yasunori

    2003-08-01

    Root hair formation is induced by low pH in lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids) seedlings cultured in mineral medium. The role of mineral concentrations in this phenomenon was investigated, especially for manganese. When lettuce seedlings were cultured in media that were deficient in calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), boron (B) or molybdenum (Mo), morphological changes were induced in roots. Deficiency of other nutrients had little effect on root hair formation. Ca or B deficiency inhibited the growth of the main root and the formation of root hairs, regardless of pH. Mn or Mo deficiency increased root hair formation at pH 6 and suppressed main root growth slightly. In contrast, increasing the Mn concentration suppressed low-pH-induced root hair formation. The Mn content of roots grown at pH 4 was only about 15% of that at pH 6. In contrast, the Mo content of roots grown at low pH was about six times that of roots grown at neutral pH. These results suggest that root hair formation induced by low pH is at least partly mediated by decreased Mn uptake in root cells.

  9. In vitro screening of 50 highly prescribed drugs for thiol adduct formation--comparison of potential for drug-induced toxicity and extent of adduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Ruan, Qian; He, Bing; Zhu, Mingshe; Shyu, Wen C; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2009-04-01

    Reactive metabolite formation has been associated with drug-induced liver, skin, and hematopoietic toxicity of many drugs that has resulted in serious clinical toxicity, leading to clinical development failure, black box warnings, or, in some cases, withdrawal from the market. In vitro and in vivo screening for reactive metabolite formation has been proposed and widely adopted in the pharmaceutical industry with the aim of minimizing the property and thus the risk of drug-induced toxicity (DIT). One of the most common screening methods is in vitro thiol trapping of reactive metabolites. Although it is well-documented that many hepatotoxins form thiol adducts, there is no literature describing the adduct formation potential of safer drugs that are widely used. The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the thiol adduct formation potential of 50 drugs (10 associated with DIT and 40 not associated) and document apparent differences in adduct formation between toxic and safer drugs. Dansyl glutathione was used as a trapping agent to aid the quantitation of adducts following in vitro incubation of drugs with human liver microsomes in the presence and absence of NADPH. Metabolic turnover of these drugs was also monitored by LC/UV. Overall, 15 out of the 50 drugs screened formed detectable levels of thiol adducts. There were general trends toward more positive findings in the DIT group vs the non-DIT group. These trends became more marked when the relative amount of thiol adducts was taken into account and improved further when dose and total daily reactive metabolite burdens were considered. In conclusion, there appears to be a general trend between the extent of thiol adduct formation and the potential for DIT, which would support the preclinical measurement and minimization of the property through screening of thiol adduct formation as part of an overall discovery optimization paradigm.

  10. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  11. Ion beam induced surface pattern formation and stable travelling wave solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Smith, Roger

    2013-03-06

    The formation of ripple structures on ion bombarded semiconductor surfaces is examined theoretically. Previous models are discussed and a new nonlinear model is formulated, based on the infinitesimal local atomic relocation induced by elastic nuclear collisions in the early stages of collision cascades and an associated density change in the near surface region. Within this framework ripple structures are shown to form without the necessity to invoke surface diffusion or large sputtering as important mechanisms. The model can also be extended to the case where sputtering is important, and it is shown that in this case certain 'magic' angles can occur at which the ripple patterns are most clearly defined. The results are in very good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. High contrast periodic plasma pattern formation during the laser-induced breakdown in transparent dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildenburg, V. B.; Pavlichenko, I. A.

    2017-12-01

    Based on a simple 1D initial-time model, we have carried out the numerical simulation for the spatio-temporal evolution of femtosecond laser pulse induced breakdown in transparent dielectric (fused silica) at the nonlinear stage of the plasma resonance ionization instability. The instability develops from very small seed perturbations of the medium permittivity and results in, because of the strong mutual enhancement of the electric field and plasma density perturbations in the plasma resonance region, the formation of the subwavelength periodic plasma-field structure consisting of the overcritical plasma layers perpendicular to the laser polarization. The calculation of the time-course and spatial profiles of the plasma density, field amplitude, and energy deposition density in the medium during one breakdown pulse has allowed us to establish the main possible scenarios of the process considered and to found the laser intensity range where this process can underlie the nanograting modification of the medium by repeated pulses.

  13. pH-induced spontaneous vesicle formation from NaDEHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Li, Gan-Zuo; Zhou, Guo-Wei; Zhai, Li-Min; Li, Zheng-Min

    2003-06-01

    A new pH-induced vesicle composed of single surfactant, sodium bis-(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphate (NaDEHP), was prepared. Spontaneous vesicles form by varying the initial pH value from 6.0 to 3.0 in the NaDEHP aqueous solution which has been demonstrated by negative-staining transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods. The monodispersity of the vesicle system is quite well and the polydispersities are almost lower than 0.10. The vesicle formation is the consequence of charged and uncharged surfactant molecules coexisting at a certain pH values that form dimers through hydrogen bond, which have the appropriate geometry structure to engender bilayer vesicle.

  14. Locally formation of Ag nanoparticles in chalcogenide phase change thin films induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Huan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Wu, Yiqun; Zhang, Ze; Gan, Fuxi

    2012-01-01

    A simple method to optically synthesize Ag nanoparticles in Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase change matrix is described. The fine structures of the locally formed phase change chalcogenide nanocomposite are characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The formation mechanism of the nanocomposite is discussed with temperature evolution and distribution simulations. This easy-prepared metal nano-particle-embedded phase change microstructure will have great potential in nanophotonics applications, such as for plasmonic functional structures. This also provides a generalized approach to the preparation of well-dispersed nanoparticle-embedded composite thin films in principle. -- Highlights: ► We describe a method to prepare chalcogenide microstructures with Ag nanoparticles. ► We give the fine structural images of phase change nanocomposites. ► We discuss the laser-induced fusion mechanism by temperature simulation. ► This microstructure will have great potential in nanophotonics applications.

  15. Human Metapneumovirus Induces Formation of Inclusion Bodies for Efficient Genome Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Branttie, Jean; Slaughter, Kerri Beth; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-12-15

    induce the formation of large cytoplasmic granules, named inclusion bodies, for genome replication and transcription. Unlike other cytoplasmic structures, such as stress granules and processing bodies, inclusion bodies are exclusively present in infected cells and contain HMPV RNA and proteins to more efficiently transcribe and replicate the viral genome. Though inclusion body formation is nuanced, it corresponds to a more generalized strategy used by different viruses, including filoviruses and rhabdoviruses, for genome transcription and replication. Thus, an understanding of inclusion body formation is crucial for the discovery of innovative therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Numerical simulations of bubble-induced star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies with a novel stellar feedback scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Gibson, Brad K.; Barnes, David J.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Rahimi, Awat

    2014-02-01

    To study the star formation and feedback mechanism, we simulate the evolution of an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr) in a fixed dark matter halo, similar in size to Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte, using a new stellar feedback scheme. We use the new version of our original N-body/smoothed particle chemodynamics code, GCD+, which adopts improved hydrodynamics, metal diffusion between the gas particles and new modelling of star formation and stellar wind and supernovae feedback. Comparing the simulations with and without stellar feedback effects, we demonstrate that the collisions of bubbles produced by strong feedback can induce star formation in a more widely spread area. We also demonstrate that the metallicity in star-forming regions is kept low due to the mixing of the metal-rich bubbles and the metal-poor interstellar medium. Our simulations also suggest that the bubble-induced star formation leads to many counter-rotating stars. The bubble-induced star formation could be a dominant mechanism to maintain star formation in dIrrs, which is different from larger spiral galaxies where the non-axisymmetric structures, such as spiral arms, are a main driver of star formation.

  17. All diamond self-aligned thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Jennifer [Champaign, IL

    2008-07-01

    A substantially all diamond transistor with an electrically insulating substrate, an electrically conductive diamond layer on the substrate, and a source and a drain contact on the electrically conductive diamond layer. An electrically insulating diamond layer is in contact with the electrically conductive diamond layer, and a gate contact is on the electrically insulating diamond layer. The diamond layers may be homoepitaxial, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline or ultrananocrystalline in various combinations.A method of making a substantially all diamond self-aligned gate transistor is disclosed in which seeding and patterning can be avoided or minimized, if desired.

  18. Strain-Induced Martensite Formation and Recrystallization Behavior in 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fadhalah, Khaled J.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of recrystallization on the evolution of microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties has been examined in an AISI 304 stainless steel, subjected to strain-induced α '-martensite transformation and subsequent annealing. Samples were processed by cold rolling and subzero rolling to induce different amounts of α '-martensite, using three reductions of 20, 40, and 60%, and later solution annealed to ensure complete recrystallization. Large transformation to α '-martensite occurred for subzero-rolled samples at low reduction (20%), while only a gradual increase of α '-martensite in cold-rolled samples took place with the increasing rolling reduction. Results from electron back-scattered diffraction indicate that annealing of cold-rolled samples produces finer recrystallized grains with increasing rolling reduction, while the predominant formation of α '-martensite in subzero-rolled microstructures is believed to have strong effect on the production of similar grain size upon annealing. Twin-related Σ3 boundaries were formed during annealing with maximum fraction of 53%. These boundaries become longer, straighter, and less incorporated into grain boundary network with the increasing rolling reduction and/or using subzero rolling, demonstrating an indirect mechanism of grain boundary engineering. Also, annealing caused scattering around the rolling texture components (Brass, Goss, S, and Copper) and the recrystallization textures become more random with the increasing rolling reduction and/or using subzero rolling. Nevertheless, recrystallization textures of samples reduced by 60% show formation of Cube and Dillamore orientations and strengthening of Brass orientation. This is thought to contribute to the enhancement of the tensile strength and microhardness of annealed samples.

  19. Adherence of diamond films on refractory metal substrates for thermionic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, B.H.; Ramalingam, M.L.; Adams, S.F.; Cloyd, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    Diamond films are currently being considered as electrical insulation material for application in the thermionic fuel element of a power producing nuclear reactor system. The function of the diamond insulator in this application is to electrically isolate the collector of each cell in the TFE from the coolant and outer sheath. Deposition of diamond films on plane surfaces of Si/SiO 2 have already been demonstrated to be quite effective. However, the diamond films on refractory metal surfaces tend to spall off in the process of deposition revealing an inefficient adherence characteristic between the film and the substrate. This paper is geared towards explaining this deficiency by way of selected experimentation and the use of analytical tools to predict uncertainties such as the mismatch in coefficient of expansion, micrographic study of the interface between the film and the substrate and X-ray diffraction spectra. The investigation of the adherence characteristics of several diamond films on Mo and Nb substrates revealed that there was an allowable stress that resulted in the formation of the critical thickness for the diamond film

  20. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diamonds and their mineral inclusions from the Renard kimberlites in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Lucy; Stachel, Thomas; McCandless, Tom E.; Armstrong, John; Muelenbachs, Karlis

    2012-06-01

    Mineral inclusions in diamonds from the Renard kimberlites, on the eastern Superior Craton, document an almost exclusively peridotitic inclusion suite with an unusually high abundance of SiO2 phases (coesite and presumably retrograde quartz). Whilst coesite is often associated with eclogitic diamond sources, there is an almost complete absence of unequivocally eclogitic mineral inclusions at Renard. Consequently, the presence of abundant SiO2 inclusion phases is likely caused by influx of CO2 within localised regions of the lithospheric mantle with very high fluid/rock ratios. This caused a progression of carbonation reactions within the host peridotite, likely along veins, locally consuming all olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene present and producing free SiO2. Nitrogen contents and aggregation states of the diamonds indicate normal mantle residence temperatures, predominantly between 1100 and 1200 °C. Co-variations of carbon isotopic composition and nitrogen content suggest formation from both reducing (CH4) and oxidising (CO32- or CO2 bearing) melts/fluids. The observation of single diamonds with non-isothermal co-variations of nitrogen content and aggregation state, or containing disequilibrium inclusion parageneses (e.g., variations in olivine Mg# up to 0.5 within single diamonds), indicates that Renard diamonds grew during a number of precipitation events within a physically and chemically changing environment.

  2. Weertman cracks and the fast extraction of diamonds from the Earth's mantle (UNESCO IGCP 557)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Sommer, H.; Gaede, O.

    2008-12-01

    New evidence from the Jwangeng diamond mine in South Botswana reveals a possible mechanism of near- sonic speed diamond extraction. Our data support the formation of Weertman cracks as a transport mechanism for the diamond bearing kimberlitic-melt from the Earth's mantle to the surface. Weertman cracks are two-dimensional liquid-filled cracks, which can move with a velocity close to the Rayleigh-wave speed. We present new data that support the hypothesis that Weertman cracks can be responsible for the extraction of diamonds. Arguments for Weertman cracks are threefold: 1) The geometry of kimberlite pipes closely resembles the shape predicted by Weertman cracks; 2) Like Weertman cracks kimberlites themselves never develop an explosive stage besides the mechanism due to contact with groundwater; the melt often gets trapped near the Earth's surface; 3) The speed of the uplift of the diamonds from >150 km depth must be larger than 800 km/h to explain preservation of diamonds themselves and our OH-diffusion profiles in garnet recorded from quenched diamondiferous host rock.

  3. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Shekhter, Anatoly; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Shnirelman, Alexander; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia; Sadovskyy, Ivan; Vinokur, Valerii

    2017-09-01

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-and-error approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  4. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  5. Surface transition on ice induced by the formation of a grain boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pedersen

    Full Text Available Interfaces between individual ice crystals, usually referred to as grain boundaries, play an important part in many processes in nature. Grain boundary properties are, for example, governing the sintering processes in snow and ice which transform a snowpack into a glacier. In the case of snow sintering, it has been assumed that there are no variations in surface roughness and surface melting, when considering the ice-air interface of an individual crystal. In contrast to that assumption, the present work suggests that there is an increased probability of molecular surface disorder in the vicinity of a grain boundary. The conclusion is based on the first detailed visualization of the formation of an ice grain boundary. The visualization is enabled by studying ice crystals growing into contact, at temperatures between -20°C and -15°C and pressures of 1-2 Torr, using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy. It is observed that the formation of a grain boundary induces a surface transition on the facets in contact. The transition does not propagate across facet edges. The surface transition is interpreted as the spreading of crystal dislocations away from the grain boundary. The observation constitutes a qualitatively new finding, and can potentially increase the understanding of specific processes in nature where ice grain boundaries are involved.

  6. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibition attenuates cigarette smoke extract (CSE) induced-death inducing signaling complex (DISC) formation in human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Woong; Yoon, Jin Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Kyung, Sun Young; Lee, Sang Pyo; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Moon, Chanil

    2010-02-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS), a major risk factor in emphysema, causes cell death by incompletely understood mechanisms. Death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) formation is an initial event in Fas-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrated cigarette smoke extract (CSE) induced DISC formation in human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5). The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK activation in CSE induced DISC formation. Immunoprecipitation (IP) for Fas and Western Immunoblot (IB) analysis for caspase 8 were then performed to show DISC. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was measured using a cytotoxicity detection kit. MTT assay was used as a measure of cell viability. We demonstrated that CSE induces DISC formation in MRC-5 using IP for Fas and IB for caspase 8. ERK was expressed in MRC-5 exposed to CSE. MEK-1 inhibitor (PD98059) decreased DISC formation in MRC-5 exposed to 20% CSE at 1 hr, and cell viability, as assessed by colorimetric MTT assay, was increased in MEK-1 inhibitor treated MRC-5 cells after 24 hr CSE exposure compared to the control. Inhibiting ERK significantly decreased the caspase-3,-8 activity in MEK-1 inhibitor treated MRC-5 cells compared to the control.The DISC formation, initial event of extrinsic apoptotic pathway, is a primary component of CSE- induced death in MRC-5, and ERK activation plays an active role in the DISC formation and downstream pathway. These results suggest that modulation of ERK may have therapeutic potential in the prevention of smoke-related lung injury.

  7. Time resolved EUV pump-probe microscopy of fs-LASER induced nanostructure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberger, R.; Hauck, J.; Reininghaus, M.; Wortmann, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2011-05-01

    We report on our efforts in design and construction of a compact Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV)-pump-probe microscope. The goal is the observation of formation of nanostructures, induced by a femtosecond (fs)-laser pulse. The unique interaction processes of fs-laser radiation with matter open up new markets in laser material processing and, therefore, are actively investigated in the last decade. The resulting "sub 100 nm"-structures offer vast potential benefits in photonics, biotechnology, tribological surface design, plasmonic applications and production of nanoparticles. Focused fs-laser radiation causes a local modification resulting in nanostructures of high precision and reproducibility. However the formation dynamics is not well understood. Research in this field requires high temporal and spatial resolution. A combination of fs-laser and EUV-microscope provides a tool for "in situ"-observation of the formation dynamics. As exemplary structures to be investigated, we use nanojets on thin gold films and periodic surface structures (ripples) on dielectrics. In the future, the EUV-pump-probe microscope can become a versatile tool to observe physical or biological processes. Microscopy using EUV-light is capable of detecting structures on a scale down to several tens of nanometers. For detailed investigations a compact EUV-microscope has been realized utilizing OVI Balmer-alpha radiation at 17.3 nm coming from a discharge produced oxygen plasma. As optical elements a grazing incidence elliptical collector and a zone plate with a width of outermost zone of 50 nm and a spectral filter to avoid chromatic aberrations are used. The detector is a fast gated microchannel plate with a pore size of 2 microns contacted by a low impedance transmission line. The expected spatial resolution of the setup is better than 100 nm and the time resolution is better than 1 ns. The newly developed EUV-microscope is a powerful tool for a wide field of investigations that need high time

  8. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  9. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  10. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Joshua M; Gettel, Douglas L; Tabaei, Seyed R; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Groves, Jay T; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N

    2016-01-05

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  12. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  13. Sulfur mustard induces the formation of keratin aggregates in human epidermal keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, James F.; McGary, Kriston L.; Schlager, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The vesicant sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent that has the capacity to cross-link biological molecules. We are interested in identifying specific proteins that are altered upon sulfur mustard exposure. Keratins are particularly important for the structural integrity of skin, and several genetically inherited blistering diseases have been linked to mutations in keratin 5 and keratin 14. We examined whether sulfur mustard exposure alters keratin biochemistry in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. Western blotting with specific monoclonal antibodies revealed the formation of stable high-molecular-weight 'aggregates' containing keratin 14 and/or keratin 5. These aggregates begin to form within 15 min after sulfur mustard exposure. These aggregates display a complex gel electrophoresis pattern between ∼100 and ∼200 kDa. Purification and analysis of these aggregates by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of keratin 14 and keratin 5 and indicate that at least some of the aggregates are composed of keratin 14-keratin 14, keratin 14-keratin 5, or keratin 5-keratin 5 dimers. These studies demonstrate that sulfur mustard induces keratin aggregation in keratinocytes and support further investigation into the role of keratin aggregation in sulfur mustard-induced vesication

  14. Mechanism of the formation of x-ray-induced phosphenes. I. Electrophysiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doly, M.; Isabelle, D.B.; Vincent, P.; Gaillard, G.; Meyniel, G.

    1980-01-01

    To explore one possible mechanism of the formation of phosphenes detected by astronauts during space flights, the x-ray stimulation of the photoreceptor cells of the eye was investigated. The albino rat's retina, maintained in culture by perfusion, was used for this study. The electrophysiological response (ERG) induced by x rays was found to be identical to the one produced by a visible light stimulation. Under our experimental procedure, only a direct interaction between incident radiation and retina induced such as ERG. Irrespective of whether the experiment was performed using the isolated retina or the whole animal, we found that the ERG amplitude was proportional to the logarithm of the exposure on the retina. A comparative study indicated that, to obtain the same ERG amplitude, the incident energy on the retina must be about 5 x 10 6 times larger for x rays (E = 40 keV) than for visible light (lambda = 489 nm). The analysis of these results leads us to assume that the x rays act on the rod's photosensitive molecule, rhodopsin

  15. Spectral Induced Polarization Response of Biofilm Formation in Hanford Vadose Zone Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Katsenovich, Y.; Lee, B.; Whitman, D.

    2017-12-01

    As a result of the U.S. Nuclear weapons program during the second world war and the cold war, there now exists a significant amount of uranium contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site located in Washington state. In-situ immobilization of mobile uranium via injections of a soluble sodium tripolyphosphate amendment may prove effective in the formation of insoluble uranyl phosphate mineral, autunite. However, the injected polyphosphate undergoes hydrolysis in aqueous solutions to form orthophosphate, which serves as a readily available nutrient for the various microorganisms in the sediment. Sediment-filled column experiments conducted under saturated oxygen restricted conditions using geophysical Spectral Induced Polarization technique have shown the impact of microbes on the dissolution of autunite, a calcium uranyl phosphate mineral. Spectral Induced Polarization may be an effective way to track changes indicative of bacterial activities on the surrounding environment. This method can be a cost-effective alternative to the drilling of boreholes at a field scale.

  16. Jasmonates trigger prey-induced formation of ‘outer stomach’ in carnivorous sundew plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Reichelt, Michael; Mayer, Veronika E.; Mithöfer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the growth-related phytohormone auxin is the endogenous signal that initiates bending movements of plant organs. In 1875, Charles Darwin described how the bending movement of leaves in carnivorous sundew species formed an ‘outer stomach’ that allowed the plants to enclose and digest captured insect prey. About 100 years later, auxin was suggested to be the factor responsible for this movement. We report that prey capture induces both leaf bending and the accumulation of defence-related jasmonate phytohormones. In Drosera capensis fed with fruitflies, within 3 h after prey capture and simultaneous with leaf movement, we detected an increase in jasmonic acid and its isoleucine conjugate. This accumulation was spatially restricted to the bending segment of the leaves. The application of jasmonates alone was sufficient to trigger leaf bending. Only living fruitflies or the body fluids of crushed fruitflies induced leaf curvature; neither dead flies nor mechanical treatment had any effect. Our findings strongly suggest that the formation of the ‘outer stomach’ in Drosera is a chemonastic movement that is triggered by accumulation of endogenous jasmonates. These results suggest that in carnivorous sundew plants the jasmonate cascade might have been adapted to facilitate carnivory rather than to defend against herbivores. PMID:23516244

  17. Jasmonates trigger prey-induced formation of 'outer stomach' in carnivorous sundew plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Reichelt, Michael; Mayer, Veronika E; Mithöfer, Axel

    2013-05-22

    It has been widely accepted that the growth-related phytohormone auxin is the endogenous signal that initiates bending movements of plant organs. In 1875, Charles Darwin described how the bending movement of leaves in carnivorous sundew species formed an 'outer stomach' that allowed the plants to enclose and digest captured insect prey. About 100 years later, auxin was suggested to be the factor responsible for this movement. We report that prey capture induces both leaf bending and the accumulation of defence-related jasmonate phytohormones. In Drosera capensis fed with fruitflies, within 3 h after prey capture and simultaneous with leaf movement, we detected an increase in jasmonic acid and its isoleucine conjugate. This accumulation was spatially restricted to the bending segment of the leaves. The application of jasmonates alone was sufficient to trigger leaf bending. Only living fruitflies or the body fluids of crushed fruitflies induced leaf curvature; neither dead flies nor mechanical treatment had any effect. Our findings strongly suggest that the formation of the 'outer stomach' in Drosera is a chemonastic movement that is triggered by accumulation of endogenous jasmonates. These results suggest that in carnivorous sundew plants the jasmonate cascade might have been adapted to facilitate carnivory rather than to defend against herbivores.

  18. Cell colony formation induced by Xenopus egg extract as a marker for improvement of cloned blastocyst formation in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Østrup, Olga; Li, Juan

    2011-01-01

    method based on the colony formation of cells after extract treatment, and subsequent in vitro cloning efficiency using treated cells as chromatin donors. Porcine fetal fibroblasts were treated with each batch of extract, and cultured in embryonic stem cell (ES) medium for 12 days. The number of forming...

  19. Phosphate induces formation of matrix vesicles during odontoblast-initiated mineralization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Kuzynski, Maria; Bottini, Massimo; Beniash, Elia; Dokland, Terje; Mobley, Callie G; Yadav, Manisha C; Poliard, Anne; Kellermann, Odile; Millán, José Luis; Napierala, Dobrawa

    2016-01-01

    Mineralization is a process of deposition of calcium phosphate crystals within a fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In mineralizing tissues, such as dentin, bone and hypertrophic cartilage, this process is initiated by a specific population of extracellular vesicles (EV), called matrix vesicles (MV). Although it has been proposed that MV are formed by shedding of the plasma membrane, the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating formation of mineralization-competent MV are not fully elucidated. In these studies, 17IIA11, ST2, and MC3T3-E1 osteogenic cell lines were used to determine how formation of MV is regulated during initiation of the mineralization process. In addition, the molecular composition of MV secreted by 17IIA11 cells and exosomes from blood and B16-F10 melanoma cell line was compared to identify the molecular characteristics distinguishing MV from other EV. Western blot analyses demonstrated that MV released from 17IIA11 cells are characterized by high levels of proteins engaged in calcium and phosphate regulation, but do not express the exosomal markers CD81 and HSP70. Furthermore, we uncovered that the molecular composition of MV released by 17IIA11 cells changes upon exposure to the classical inducers of osteogenic differentiation, namely ascorbic acid and phosphate. Specifically, lysosomal proteins Lamp1 and Lamp2a were only detected in MV secreted by cells stimulated with osteogenic factors. Quantitative nanoparticle tracking analyses of MV secreted by osteogenic cells determined that standard osteogenic factors stimulate MV secretion and that phosphate is the main driver of their secretion. On the molecular level, phosphate-induced MV secretion is mediated through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases Erk1/2 and is accompanied by re-organization of filamentous actin. In summary, we determined that mineralization-competent MV are distinct from exosomes, and we identified a new role of phosphate in the process of ECM

  20. Numerical model of the glacially-induced intraplate earthquakes and faults formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunin, Alexey; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-04-01

    According to the plate tectonics, main earthquakes are caused by moving lithospheric plates and are located mainly at plate boundaries. However, some of significant seismic events may be located far away from these active areas. The nature of the intraplate earthquakes remains unclear. It is assumed, that the triggering of seismicity in the eastern Canada and northern Europe might be a result of the glacier retreat during a glacial-interglacial cycle (GIC). Previous numerical models show that the impact of the glacial loading and following isostatic adjustment is able to trigger seismicity in pre-existing faults, especially during deglaciation stage. However this models do not explain strong glaciation-induced historical earthquakes (M5-M7). Moreover, numerous studies report connection of the location and age of major faults in the regions undergone by glaciation during last glacial maximum with the glacier dynamics. This probably imply that the GIC might be a reason for the fault system formation. Our numerical model provides analysis of the strain-stress evolution during the GIC using the finite volume approach realised in the numerical code Lapex 2.5D which is able to operate with large strains and visco-elasto-plastic rheology. To simulate self-organizing faults, the damage rheology model is implemented within the code that makes possible not only visualize faulting but also estimate energy release during the seismic cycle. The modeling domain includes two-layered crust, lithospheric mantle and the asthenosphere that makes possible simulating elasto-plastic response of the lithosphere to the glaciation-induced loading (unloading) and viscous isostatic adjustment. We have considered three scenarios for the model: horizontal extension, compression and fixed boundary conditions. Modeling results generally confirm suppressing seismic activity during glaciation phases whereas retreat of a glacier triggers earthquakes for several thousand years. Tip of the glacier

  1. Role of dietary fiber in formation and prevention of small intestinal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic techniques such as capsule endoscopy have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause ulcers in the small intestine in humans, but there are few effective agents for treatment of small intestinal ulcers. Although the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcer has been widely studied, dietary factors have seldom been considered. In the present review, the role of dietary fiber (DF) in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcers is discussed. In previous studies, small intestinal lesions were not observed when NSAIDs were administered to fasted rats, dogs, and cats, but were observed in conventionally-fed animals, suggesting the importance of feeding in the formation of intestinal lesions induced by NSAIDs. However, in animals fed diets containing low or no DF, indomethacin (IND) did not produce lesions in the small intestine, but did produce lesions in animals fed diets supplemented with insoluble dietary fiber (IDF, cellulose). The results suggest that IDF in the diet plays an important role in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. On the other hand, addition of soluble dietary fibers (SDFs) such as pectin or mucin to regular diet markedly decreased NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. Thus, IDF and SDF have opposing effects on IND-induced intestinal lesions, i.e., IDF is harmful while SDF is protective. SDFs potentially represent a novel and safe means for protecting the small intestine against NSAID-induced intestinal lesions.

  2. Myeloperoxidase formation of PAF receptor ligands induces PAF receptor-dependent kidney injury during ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Nagy, Laura E; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction and oxidative metabolism of ethanol in hepatocytes inflame and damage liver. Chronic ethanol ingestion also induces kidney dysfunction, which is associated with mortality from alcoholic hepatitis. Whether the kidney is directly affected by ethanol or is secondary to liver damage is not established. We found that CYP2E1 was induced in kidney tubules of mice chronically ingesting a modified Lieber-deCarli liquid ethanol diet. Phospholipids of kidney tubules were oxidized and fragmented in ethanol-fed mice with accumulation of azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine (Az-PC), a nonbiosynthetic product formed only by oxidative truncation of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine. Az-PC stimulates the inflammatory PAF receptor (PTAFR) abundantly expressed by neutrophils and kidney tubules, and inflammatory cells and myeloperoxidase-containing neutrophils accumulated in the kidneys of ethanol-fed mice after significant hysteresis. Decreased kidney filtration and induction of the acute kidney injury biomarker KIM-1 in tubules temporally correlated with leukocyte infiltration. Genetic ablation of PTAFR reduced accumulation of PTAFR ligands and reduced leukocyte infiltration into kidneys. Loss of this receptor in PTAFR(-/-) mice also suppressed oxidative damage and kidney dysfunction without affecting CYP2E1 induction. Neutrophilic inflammation was responsible for ethanol-induced kidney damage, because loss of neutrophil myeloperoxidase in MPO(-/-) mice was similarly protective. We conclude that ethanol catabolism in renal tubules results in a self-perpetuating cycle of CYP2E1 induction, local PTAFR ligand formation, and neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to myeloperoxidase-dependent oxidation and damage to kidney function. Hepatocytes do not express PTAFR, so this oxidative cycle is a local response to ethanol catabolism in the kidney. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Formation of active inclusion bodies induced by hydrophobic self-assembling peptide GFIL8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Bihong; Hu, Weike; Zhao, Qing; Lin, Zhanglin

    2015-06-16

    In the last few decades, several groups have observed that proteins expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs) in bacteria could still be biologically active when terminally fused to an appropriate aggregation-prone partner such as pyruvate oxidase from Paenibacillus polymyxa (PoxB). More recently, we have demonstrated that three amphipathic self-assembling peptides, an alpha helical peptide 18A, a beta-strand peptide ELK16, and a surfactant-like peptide L6KD, have properties that induce target proteins into active IBs. We have developed an efficient protein expression and purification approach for these active IBs by introducing a self-cleavable intein molecule. In this study, the self-assembling peptide GFIL8 (GFILGFIL) with only hydrophobic residues was analyzed, and this peptide effectively induced the formation of cytoplasmic IBs in Escherichia coli when terminally attached to lipase A and amadoriase II. The protein aggregates in cells were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis and retained ~50% of their specific activities relative to the native counterparts. We constructed an expression and separation coupled tag (ESCT) by incorporating an intein molecule, the Mxe GyrA intein. Soluble target proteins were successfully released from active IBs upon cleavage of the intein between the GFIL8 tag and the target protein, which was mediated by dithiothreitol. A variant of GFIL8, GFIL16 (GFILGFILGFILGFIL), improved the ESCT scheme by efficiently eliminating interference from the soluble intein-GFIL8 molecule. The yields of target proteins at the laboratory scale were 3.0-7.5 μg/mg wet cell pellet, which is comparable to the yields from similar ESCT constructs using 18A, ELK16, or the elastin-like peptide tag scheme. The all-hydrophobic self-assembling peptide GFIL8 induced the formation of active IBs in E. coli when terminally attached to target proteins. GFIL8 and its variant GFIL16 can act as a "pull-down" tag to produce purified soluble proteins with

  4. Surface analytical investigation of diamond coatings and nucleation processes by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1993-10-01

    Imaging SIMS for the investigation of substrate surfaces: the influence of the substrate surface on diamond nucleation is a major topic in the investigation of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond. It is well known that the nucleation density can be enhanced by scratching the substrate surface with abrasive powders. Diamond can nucleate at scratches or at residues of the polishing material. In the present work the surface of refractory metals (Mo, Nb, Ta, W) polished with silicon carbide and diamond powder is studied by imaging (2- or 3-D) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In first experiments the distribution of SiC and/or diamond residues after polishing was determined. The reaction of diamond with the substrate during heating to deposition temperatures was investigated. Investigation of WC/Co hardmetal substrates: it is well known that Co contained in the binder phase of the hard metal inhibits a strong adhesion between the diamond film and the substrate, which is need for an application as cutting tool. Several attempts to improve the adhesion have been reported up to now. In this work a pre-treatment procedure leading to the formation of Co compounds (borides and silicides) which are stable under diamond deposition conditions were investigated. Furthermore, the application of intermediate sputter layers consisting of chromium and titanium were studied. Investigation of P-doped diamond coatings: in the quaternary phase diagram C-P-B-N exist some phases with diamond structure and superhard phases (e.g BP, c-BN). Also a hypothetical superhard phase of the composition C 3 N 4 is predicted. A scientific objective is the synthesis of such phases by chemical vapour deposition. An increase of the phosphorus concentration effects a distinct change in the morphology of the deposited coatings. A major advantage of SIMS is that the concentration profiles can be measured through the whole film, due to the sputter removal of the sample, and the interface

  5. Dated eclogitic diamond growth zones reveal variable recycling of crustal carbon through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, S.; Koornneef, J. M.; Chinn, I. L.; Davies, G. R.

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline diamonds commonly record complex internal structures reflecting episodic growth linked to changing carbon-bearing fluids in the mantle. Using diamonds to trace the evolution of the deep carbon cycle therefore requires dating of individual diamond growth zones. To this end Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data are presented from individual eclogitic silicate inclusions from the Orapa and Letlhakane diamond mines, Botswana. δ13 C values are reported from the host diamond growth zones. Heterogeneous 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7033-0.7097) suggest inclusion formation in multiple and distinct tectono-magmatic environments. Sm-Nd isochron ages were determined based on groups of inclusions with similar trace element chemistry, Sr isotope ratios, and nitrogen aggregation of the host diamond growth zone. Diamond growth events at 0.14 ± 0.09, 0.25 ± 0.04, 1.1 ± 0.09, 1.70 ± 0.34 and 2.33 ± 0.02 Ga can be directly related to regional tectono-magmatic events. Individual diamonds record episodic growth with age differences of up to 2 Ga. Dated diamond zones have variable δ13 C values (-5.0 to -33.6‰ vs PDB) and appear to imply changes in subducted material over time. The studied Botswanan diamonds are interpreted to have formed in different tectono-magmatic environments that involve mixing of carbon from three sources that represent: i) subducted biogenic sediments (lightest δ13 C, low 87Sr/86Sr); ii) subducted carbonate-rich sediments (heavy δ13 C, high 87Sr/86Sr) and iii) depleted upper mantle (heavy δ13 C, low 87Sr/86Sr). We infer that older diamonds from these two localities are more likely to have light δ13 C due to greater subduction of biogenic sediments that may be related to hotter and more reduced conditions in the Archaean before the Great Oxidation Event at 2.3 Ga. These findings imply a marked temporal change in the nature of subducted carbon beneath Botswana and warrant further study to establish if this is a global phenomenon.

  6. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  7. Ultrananocrystalline diamond decoration on to the single wall carbon nano tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Bhavesh; Late, Datta; Jejurikar, Suhas M.

    2017-10-01

    We have demonstrated the decoration of the ultrananocrystalline diamonds on single walled carbon nanotubes using a hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition. Study reveals the critical influence of the filament to substrate distance on the formation of ultrananocrystalline diamonds on to the single walled carbon nanotubes. It is also observed that etching of carbon nanotubes, due to the presence of unavoidable atomic hydrogen throughout the chemical vapor deposition processes, can be significantly reduced by adjusting the filament to substrate distance. Morphological and structural investigations performed using high resolution transmission electron microscope suggests the growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond is subsequent to the formation of crystalline sp2 carbon layer on the nanotube wall, enabling us to suggest a growth model. The composite synthesized can be thought not only to use as a fuel cell catalyst support but also as chemical sensors, bio-sensors and micro electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  8. Diamond film deposition on WC–Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC–Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10 −6 K −1 ) and WC–Co (5.2  ×  10 −6 K −1 ) or steel (12  ×  10 −6 K −1 ). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr–N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr–N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC–Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications. (topical review)

  9. Diamond film deposition on WC-Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10-6 K-1) and WC-Co (5.2  ×  10-6 K-1) or steel (12  ×  10-6 K-1). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr-N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr-N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC-Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications.

  10. SIRT1 prevents pulmonary thrombus formation induced by arachidonic acid via downregulation of PAF receptor expression in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hak; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Oh, Sae Ock; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-12-01

    SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, is critically involved in cellular response to stress and modulates cardiovascular risk factors. However, its role in thrombus formation is largely unknown. Thus, this study investigated the effect of SIRT1 on pulmonary thrombus formation, and then identified its role in the modulation of platelet aggregation. In isolated human platelets, cell aggregation was increased by various platelet activators, such as platelet activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA), ADP, and thrombin. AA- and PAF-mediated platelet aggregations were suppressed by WEB2086, a PAF receptor (PAFR) antagonist. Pulmonary thrombus formation induced by PAF or AA was also attenuated by WEB2086, suggesting that PAFR plays a key role in AA-induced platelet aggregation. In platelets isolated from SIRT1-TG mice as well as in platelets treated with resveratrol or reSIRT1, PAFR expression was decreased, whereas this expressional downregulation by SIRT1 activators was inhibited in platelets treated with MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor) or NH 4 Cl (a lysosome inhibitor). Furthermore, platelet aggregation induced by AA was markedly attenuated by resveratrol and reSIRT1. Likewise, the increased pulmonary thrombus formation in mice treated with AA was also attenuated by SIRT1 activators. In line with these results, pulmonary thrombus formation was markedly attenuated in SIRT1-TG mice. Taken together, this study showed that SIRT1 downregulates PAFR expression on platelets via proteasomal and lysosomal pathways, and that this downregulation inhibits platelet aggregation in vitro and pulmonary thrombus formation in vivo.

  11. Conflict diamonds — unfinished business | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-22

    Jul 22, 2011 ... In March 2002, an international meeting in Ottawa, Canada concluded a remarkable agreement to end "conflict" or "blood" diamonds. Conflict diamonds have been used by rebels in Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Angola to buy weapons and to fuel horrific wars that have so far, ...

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrovets, I.I.; Gritsyna, V.I.; Dudnik, S.F.; Opalev, O.A.; Reshetnyak, O.M.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    The brief review of the literature is devoted to synthesis of nanocrystalline diamond films. It is shown that the CVD method is an effective way for deposition of such nanostructures. The basic technological methods that allow limit the size of growing diamond crystallites in the film are studied.

  13. Diamond-based molecular platform for photoelectrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhong, Y.L.; Midya, A.; Ng, Z.; Chen, Z.; Daenen, M.; Nesládek, Miloš; Loh, K.P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 51 (2008), s. 17218-17219 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : boron doped diamond thin film * photocurrent conversion * organic/diamond interface Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 8.091, year: 2008

  14. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  15. The Returns on Investment Grade Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual

  16. Trading diamonds for guns | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Jul 15, 2011 ... Their report, The Heart of the Matter: Sierra Leone, Diamonds and Human Security, has attracted worldwide attention since it was published last year and has contributed to major changes in the international diamond industry. In 1999, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and several ...

  17. Large diamonds grown at high pressure conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, H

    2000-01-01

    A technique has been established to grow large diamonds up to 2 cm. The crystals are bulky polyhedron with yellow, blue, green or brown color as well as colorless, which depend on impurities. The impurities incorporated into the diamond are limited, i.e. nitrogen, boron, nickel, cobalt, silicon and phosphorus.

  18. Antigenotoxic potential of Asparagus racemosus root extract against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandary, B. Satheesh Kumar; Sharmila, K.P.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Bhat, Vadish S.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of Asparagus Racemosus Root ethanolic extract (ARE) against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation in Swiss albino mice. Micronucleus assay was performed in the bone marrow of Swiss albino mice according to the method of Hosseinimehr et al., 2003. The experimental animals were orally administered 200 mg/kg body weight of ARE once daily for 15 consecutive days. At the end of experimental period, the animals were euthanized and the bone marrow was collected from the femur. Control (C), Radiation control (RC) and drug control (DC) group was also maintained. The number of radiation induced Micronucleated Polychromatic Erythrocytes (MnPCE) and Micronucleated Normochromatic Erythrocytes were decreased in the ARE treated mice which was statistically significant (p<0.05) compared to radiation control group. Present findings demonstrate the antigenotoxic potential of ARE against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation which may be attributed to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals

  19. Diamond detector technology: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Harris; Artuso, M; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bartosik, M; Beacham, J; Beck, H P; Bellini,, V; Belyaev, V; Bentele, B; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bes, A; Brom, J-M; Bruzzi, M; Cerv, M; Chiodini, G; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Claus, G; Collot, J; Cumalat, J; Dabrowski, A; D'Alessandro, R; De Boer, W; Dehning, B; Dorfer, C; Dunser, M; Eremin, V; Eusebi, R; Forcolin, G; Forneris, J; Frais-Kölbl, H; Gan, K K; Gastal, M; Giroletti, C; Goffe, M; Goldstein, J; Golubev, A; Gorišek, A; Grigoriev, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grummer, A; Gui, B; Guthoff, M; Haughton, I; Hiti, B; Hits, D; Hoeferkamp, M; Hofmann, T; Hosslet, J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hügging, F; Hutton, C; Jansen, H; Janssen, J; Kanxheri, K; Kasieczka, G; Kass, R; Kassel, F; Kis, M; Kramberger, G; Kuleshov, S; Lacoste, A; Lagomarsino, S; Lo Giudice, A; Lukosi, E; Maazouzi, C; Mandic, I; Mathieu, C; Mcfadden, N; Menichelli, M; Mikuž, M; Morozzi, A; Moss, J; Mountain, R; Murphy, S; Muškinja, M; Oh, A; Oliviero, P; Passeri, D; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Picollo, F; Pomorski, M; Potenza, R; Quadt, A; Re, A; Reichmann, M; Riley, G; Roe, S; Sanz, D; Scaringella, M; Schaefer, D; Schmidt, C J; Schnetzer, S; Schreiner, T; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Seidel, S; Servoli, L; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spagnolo, S; Spanier, S; Stenson, K; Stone, R; Sutera, C; Taylor, Aaron; Traeger, M; Tromson, D; Trischuk, W; Tuve, C; Uplegger, L; Velthuis, J; Venturi, N; Vittone, E; Wagner, Stephen; Wallny, R; Wang, J C; Weingarten, J; Weiss, C; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Yamouni, M; Zavrtanik, M

    2017-01-01

    The status of material development of poly-crystalline chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident par-ticle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition the first beam test results from 3D detectors made with poly-crystalline CVD diamond are presented. Finally the first analysis of LHC data from the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) which is based on pixelated poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors bump-bonded to pixel readout elec-tronics is shown.

  20. Engineering NV centres in Synthetic Diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew Markham

    2014-01-01

    The quantum properties of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond has prompted rapid growth in diamond research. This initial growth was driven by the fact the NV centre provides an 'easy' to manipulate quantum system along with opening up the possibility of a new material to deliver a solid state quantum computer. The NV defect is now moving from a quantum curiosity to a commercial development platform for a range of application such as as gyroscopes, timing and magnetometry as well as the more traditional quantum technologies such as quantum encryption and quantum simulation. These technologies are pushing the development needs of the material, and the processing of that material. The paper will describes the advances in CVD diamond synthesis with special attention to getting NV defects close to the surface of the diamond and how to process the material for diamond quantum optical applications. (author)

  1. Nanostructured Diamond Device for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijalkowski, M; Karczemska, A; Lysko, J M; Zybala, R; KozaneckI, M; Filipczak, P; Ralchenko, V; Walock, M; Stanishevsky, A; Mitura, S

    2015-02-01

    Diamond is increasingly used in biomedical applications because of its unique properties such as the highest thermal conductivity, good optical properties, high electrical breakdown voltage as well as excellent biocompatibility and chemical resistance. Diamond has also been introduced as an excellent substrate to make the functional microchip structures for electrophoresis, which is the most popular separation technique for the determination of analytes. In this investigation, a diamond electrophoretic chip was manufactured by a replica method using a silicon mold. A polycrystalline 300 micron-thick diamond layer was grown by the microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD) technique onto a patterned silicon substrate followed by the removal of the substrate. The geometry of microstructure, chemical composition, thermal and optical properties of the resulting free-standing diamond electrophoretic microchip structure were examined by CLSM, SFE, UV-Vis, Raman, XRD and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and by a modified laser flash method for thermal property measurements.

  2. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  3. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmair, Felix, E-mail: bachmair@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-09-21

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  4. Atomic composition of WC/ and Zr/O-terminated diamond Schottky interfaces close to ideality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piñero, J.C., E-mail: josecarlos.pinero@uca.es [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz,11510 (Spain); Araújo, D. [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz,11510 (Spain); Fiori, A. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Traoré, A. [Institut Néel, CNRS-UJF, av. des Martyrs, Grenoble,38042 France (France); Villar, M.P. [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz,11510 (Spain); Eon, D.; Muret, P.; Pernot, J. [Institut Néel, CNRS-UJF, av. des Martyrs, Grenoble,38042 France (France); Teraji, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Metal/O-terminated diamond interfaces are analyzed by a variety of TEM techniques. • Thermal treatment is shown to modify structural and chemical interface properties. • Electrical behavior vs annealing is shown to be related with interface modification. • Interfaces are characterized with atomic resolution to probe inhomogeneities. • Oxide formation and modification is demonstrated in both Schottky diodes. - Abstract: Electrical and nano-structural properties of Zr and WC-based Schottky power diodes are compared and used for investigating oxide-related effects at the diamond/metal interface. Differences in Schottky barrier heights and ideality factors of both structures are shown to be related with the modification of the oxygen-terminated diamond/metal interface configuration. Oxide formation, oxide thickness variations and interfacial oxygen redistribution, associated with thermal treatment are demonstrated. Ideality factors close to ideality (n{sub WC} = 1.02 and n{sub Zr} = 1.16) are obtained after thermal treatment and are shown to be related with the relative oxygen content at the surface (OCR{sub WC} = 3.03 and OCR{sub Zr} = 1.5). Indeed, thermal treatment at higher temperatures is shown to promote an escape of oxygen for the case of the WC diode, while it generates a sharper accumulation of oxygen at the metal/diamond interface for the case of Zr diode. Therefore, the metal-oxygen affinity is shown to be a key parameter to improve diamond-based Schottky diodes.

  5. Simplified Monte Carlo simulations of chemical vapour deposition diamond growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Paul W; Allan, Neil L; Ashfold, Michael N R; Richley, James C [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Mankelevich, Yuri A, E-mail: paul.may@bris.ac.u [Skobel' tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Vorob' evy gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-09

    A simple one-dimensional Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of a diamond (100) surface. The model considers adsorption, etching/desorption, lattice incorporation, and surface migration along and across the dimer rows. The top of a step-edge is considered to have an infinite Ehrlich-Schwoebel potential barrier, so that mobile surface species cannot migrate off the edge. The reaction probabilities are taken from experimental or calculated literature values for standard CVD diamond conditions. The criterion used for the critical nucleus needed to form a new layer is considered to be two surface carbon species bonded together, which forms an immobile, unetchable step on the surface. This nucleus can arise from two migrating species meeting, or from direct adsorption of a carbon species next to a migrating species. The analysis includes film growth rate, surface roughness, and the evolving film morphology as a function of varying reaction probabilities. Using standard CVD diamond parameters, the simulations reveal that a smooth film is produced with apparent step-edge growth, with growth rates (approx1 mum h{sup -1}) consistent with experiment. The beta-scission reaction was incorporated into the model, but was found to have very little effect upon growth rates or film morphology. Renucleation events believed to be due to reactive adsorbates, such as C atoms or CN groups, were modelled by creating random surface defects which form another type of critical nucleus upon which to nucleate a new layer. These were found to increase the growth rate by a factor of approx10 when the conditions were such that the rate-limiting step for growth was new layer formation. For other conditions these surface defects led to layered 'wedding cake' structures or to rough irregular surfaces resembling those seen experimentally during CVD of nanocrystalline diamond.

  6. Microcodium: An extensive review and a proposed non-rhizogenic biologically induced origin for its formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, Pavel; Anadón, Pere; Krumbein, Wolfgang E.

    2008-04-01

    Microcodium has been previously described as a mainly Cenozoic calcification pattern ascribed to various organisms. A review of the available literature and our data reveal two peaks in Microcodium abundance; the Moscovian-early Permian and the latest Cretaceous-Paleogene. A detailed analysis of late Paleozoic and Cenozoic examples leads to the following new conclusions. Typical Microcodium-forming unilayered 'corn-cob' aggregates of elongated grains and thick multilayered (palisade) replacing structures cannot be linked to smaller-grained intracellular root calcifications, as became widely accepted after the work of Klappa [Klappa, C.F., 1979. Calcified filaments in Quaternary calcretes: organo-mineral interactions in the subaerial vadose environment. J. Sediment. Petrol. 49, 955-968.] Typical Microcodium is recognized from the early Carboniferous (with doubtful Devonian reports) to Quaternary as a biologically induced mineralization formed via dissolution/precipitation processes in various aerobic Ca-rich soil and subsoil terrestrial environments. Morphology and δ13C signatures of Microcodium suggest that neither plants, algae, or roots and root-associated mycorrhiza regulate the formation of these fossil structures. Non-recrystallized Microcodium grains basically consist of slender (1.5-4 μm) curved radiating monocrystalline prisms with occasionally preserved hyphae-like morphology. Thin (0.5-3 μm) hypha-like canals can also be observed. These supposed hyphae may belong to actinobacteria. However, thin fungal mycelia cannot be excluded. We propose a model of Microcodium formation involving a mycelial saprotrophic organism responsible for substrate corrosion and associated bacteria capable of consuming acidic metabolites and CaCO 3 reprecipitation into the Microcodium structures.

  7. Ku80 Counters Oxidative Stress-Induced DNA Damage and Cataract Formation in the Human Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew John Oliver; Ball, Simon Sidney Robert; Manzar, Kamal; Bowater, Richard Peter; Wormstone, Ian Michael

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the human lens leads to a wide range of damage including DNA strand breaks, which are likely to contribute to cataract formation. The protein Ku80 is a fundamental component of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway that repairs DNA double strand breaks. This study investigates the putative impact of Ku80 in cataract prevention in the human lens. The present study used the human lens epithelial cell line FHL124 and whole human lens organ culture. Targeted siRNA was used to deplete Ku80, with Western blot and immunocytochemistry employed to assess Ku80 expression levels. Oxidative stress was induced with hydrogen peroxide and DNA strand breaks measured by alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci counts. Visual quality of whole human lenses was measured with image analysis software. Expression of Ku80 was predominately found in the cell nucleus of both FHL124 cells and native human lens epithelium. Treatment of FHL124 cells and whole lens cultures with siRNA targeted against Ku80 resulted in a significant knockdown at the protein level. Application of oxidative stress (30 μM H2O2) created more DNA strand breaks when added to Ku80 knockdown cells than in scrambled siRNA control cells as determined by the alkaline comet assay and the number of γH2AX foci. In whole lens cultures, exposure to 1 mM H2O2 resulted in more lens opacity in Ku80 knockdown lenses than match-paired controls. Depletion of Ku80 in the lens through acute change or a consequence of aging is likely to increase levels of DNA strand breaks, which could negatively influence physiological function and promote lens opacity. It is therefore feasible that Ku80 plays a role in retarding cataract formation.

  8. Flux threshold measurements of He-ion beam induced nanofuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F W; Hijazi, H; Bannister, M E; Unocic, K A; Garrison, L M; Parish, C M

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the energy dependence of flux thresholds and incubation fluences for He-ion induced nano-fuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces at UHV conditions over a wide energy range using real-time sample imaging of tungsten target emissivity change to monitor the spatial extent of nano-fuzz growth, corroborated by ex situ SEM and FIB/SEM analysis, in conjunction with accurate ion-flux profile measurements. The measurements were carried out at the multicharged ion research facility (MIRF) at energies from 218 eV to 8.5 keV, using a high-flux deceleration module and beam flux monitor for optimizing the decel optics on the low energy MIRF beamline. The measurements suggest that nano-fuzz formation proceeds only if a critical rate of change of trapped He density in the W target is exceeded. To understand the energy dependence of the observed flux thresholds, the energy dependence of three contributing factors: ion reflection, ion range and target damage creation, were determined using the SRIM simulation code. The observed energy dependence can be well reproduced by the combined energy dependences of these three factors. The incubation fluences deduced from first visual appearance of surface emissivity change were (2–4) × 10 23 m −2 at 218 eV, and roughly a factor of 10 less at the higher energies, which were all at or above the displacement energy threshold. The role of trapping at C impurity sites is discussed. (paper)

  9. DNA radio-induced tandem lesions: formation, introduction in oligonucleotides and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdat, Anne-Gaelle

    2000-01-01

    Cell killing induced by excited photosensitizers, ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs can not be only explained by the formation of single DNA lesions. Thus, multiply damaged sites, are likely to have harmful biological consequences. One example of tandem base damage induced by . OH radical in X-irradiated aqueous solution of DNA oligomers is N-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-formyl-amine (dβF)/8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). In order to investigate the biological significance of such a tandem lesion, both 8-oxodGuo and dβF were introduced in synthetic oligonucleotides at vicinal positions using the solid phase phosphoramidite method with the 'Pac phosphoramidite' chemistry. The purity of the synthetic DNA fragments and the integrity of modified nucleosides was confirmed using different complementary techniques: HPLC, PAGE, ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS and capillary electrophoresis. Using the above synthetic substrates, investigations were carried out in order to determine the substrate specificity and the excision mechanism of three glycosylases involved in the base excision repair pathway: endonuclease III, Fpg and yOggl. Both tandem lesions were substrates for the BER enzymes. However, the tandem lesion are not completely excised by the repair enzymes. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the ratios of Vm/Km Michaelis kinetics constants were not found to be significantly affected by the presence of the tandem lesions. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotide cleavage by the BER enzymes. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment exo- and DNA polymerase β, tandem base damage were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Finally, the level of tandem base damage in the DNA exposed to γ-ray using the liquid chromatography coupled to electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was determined. Both dβF-8

  10. Tocotrienols-induced inhibition of platelet thrombus formation and platelet aggregation in stenosed canine coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papasian Christopher J

    2011-04-01

    .7 μg/mL in plasma and 3.8 vs 3.9 μg/mL in platelets. Conclusions The present results indicate that intravenously administered tocotrienols inhibited acute platelet-mediated thrombus formation, and collagen and ADP-induced platelet aggregation. α-Tocotrienols treatment induced increases in α-tocopherol levels of 4-fold and 6-fold in plasma and platelets, respectively. Interestingly, tocotrienols (TRF treatment induced a less pronounced increase in the levels of tocotrienols in plasma and platelets, suggesting that intravenously administered tocotrienols may be converted to tocopherols. Tocotrienols, given intravenously, could potentially prevent pathological platelet thrombus formation and thus provide a therapeutic benefit in conditions such as stroke and myocardial infarction.

  11. He+ and H+ microbeam damage, swelling and annealing in diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Prawer, S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of scanned 2 MeV He + and 1.4 MeV H + microbeam irradiation on unimplanted and P implanted diamond are discussed. Although diamond was found to be resistant to lattice defect production, it was found to swell very rapidly in comparison with other materials, giving rise to serious swelling induced dechanneling at scan edges at relatively low doses (10 17 /cm 2 for 2 MeV He + ). Microbeams annealed the damage due to a 1.5 μm deep Phosphorus implantation at a dose of 10 15 P + /cm 2 . The implantation damage was reduced at a dose of (1.6 x 10 17 /cm 2 ) by up to 21 % for 2 MeV He + irradiation, up to 16% for high flux 1.4 MeV H + irradiation and 12% for low flux H + irradiation. For the choice of analysis beam, all these beam effects were found to be most significant for He + microbeams, so H + microbeams should be used for analysis of diamond unless high depth resolution is required. 13 refs., 10 figs

  12. CFD-DEM simulations of current-induced dune formation and morphological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', 'small dune', 'vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver developed by the authors. This is a general-purpose solver for particle-laden flows tailed for particle transport problems. Validation tests are performed to demonstrate the capability of CFD-DEM in the full range of sediment transport regimes. Comparison of simulation results with experimental and numerical benchmark data demonstrates the merits of CFD-DEM approach. In addition, the improvements of the present simulations over existing studies using CFD-DEM are presented. The present solver gives more accurate prediction of sediment transport rate by properly accounting for the influence of particle volume fraction on the fluid flow. In summary, this work demonstrates that CFD-DEM is a promising particle-resolving approach for probing the physics of current-induced sediment transport.

  13. Traumatic injury induces stress granule formation and enhances motor dysfunctions in ALS/FTD models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric N; Gochenaur, Lauren; Singh, Aditi; Grant, Rogan; Patel, Krishani; Watkins, Simon; Wu, Jane Y; Pandey, Udai Bhan

    2018-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been predicted to be a predisposing factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurological disorders. Despite the importance of TBI in ALS progression, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still an enigma. Here, we examined the contribution of TBI as an extrinsic factor and investigated whether TBI influences the susceptibility of developing neurodegenerative symptoms. To evaluate the effects of TBI in vivo, we applied mild to severe trauma to Drosophila and found that TBI leads to the induction of stress granules (SGs) in the brain. The degree of SGs induction directly correlates with the level of trauma. Furthermore, we observed that the level of mortality is directly proportional to the number of traumatic hits. Interestingly, trauma-induced SGs are ubiquitin, p62 and TDP-43 positive, and persistently remain over time suggesting that SGs might be aggregates and exert toxicity in our fly models. Intriguingly, TBI on animals expressing ALS-linked genes increased mortality and locomotion dysfunction suggesting that mild trauma might aggravate neurodegenerative symptoms associated with ALS. Furthermore, we found elevated levels of high molecular weight ubiquitinated proteins and p62 in animals expressing ALS-causing genes with TBI, suggesting that TBI may lead to the defects in protein degradation pathways. Finally, we observed that genetic and pharmacological induction of autophagy enhanced the clearance of SGs and promoted survival of flies in vivo. Together, our study demonstrates that trauma can induce SG formation in vivo and might enhance neurodegenerative phenotypes in the fly models of ALS.

  14. Formation, Accumulation, and Hydrolysis of Endogenous and Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Hartwell, Hadley J.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Starr, Thomas B.; Swenberg, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is not only a widely used chemical with well-known carcinogenicity but is also a normal metabolite of living cells. It thus poses unique challenges for understanding risks associated with exposure. N2-hydroxymethyl-dG (N2-HOMe-dG) is the main formaldehyde-induced DNA mono-adduct, which together with DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) and toxicity-induced cell proliferation, play important roles in a mutagenic mode of action for cancer. In this study, N2-HOMe-dG was shown to be an excellent biomarker for direct adduction of formaldehyde to DNA and the hydrolysis of DPCs. The use of inhaled [13CD2]-formaldehyde exposures of rats and primates coupled with ultrasensitive nano ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry permitted accurate determinations of endogenous and exogenous formaldehyde DNA damage. The results show that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses, but not tissues distant to the site of initial contact. The amounts of exogenous adducts were remarkably lower than those of endogenous adducts in exposed nasal epithelium. Moreover, exogenous adducts accumulated in rat nasal epithelium over the 28-days exposure to reach steady-state concentrations, followed by elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 days. Additionally, we examined artifact formation during DNA preparation to ensure the accuracy of nonlabeled N2-HOMe-dG measurements. These novel findings provide critical new data for understanding major issues identified by the National Research Council Review of the 2010 Environmental Protection Agency’s Draft Integrated Risk Information System Formaldehyde Risk Assessment. They support a data-driven need for reflection on whether risks have been overestimated for inhaled formaldehyde, whereas underappreciating endogenous formaldehyde as the primary source of exposure that results in bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in susceptible humans and rodents deficient in DNA repair. PMID:25904104

  15. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  16. Formation of Shc-Grb2 complexes is necessary to induce neoplastic transformation by overexpression of Shc proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; McGlade, J; Pelicci, G

    1994-01-01

    is implicated in the regulation of Ras, suggesting that Shc is involved in the intracellular transmission of growth signals from activated tyrosine kinases to Ras. Overexpression of Shc proteins in cultured fibroblasts induces a transformed phenotype. We now report that, in vitro, the high affinity binding...... aminoterminal deletion, but retain the Tyr317 site and the SH2 domain conserve the capacity to be phosphorylated, to bind to Grb2 and to induce cell transformation. These data indicate that the formation of the Shc-Grb2 complex is a crucial event in the transformation induced by overexpression of Shc...

  17. Development of diamond coated tool and its performance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In recent years, low pressure synthesis of diamond coating from gas phase on a suitable tool substrate has opened up new opportunities to expand applications of diamond tools widely. In fact a coated diamond tool combines the strengths of both single crystal diamond and PCD compact in one cutting tool and has better.

  18. Cold cathodes on ultra-dispersed diamond base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimova, A.N.; Zhirnov, V.V.; Chubun, N.N.; Belobrov, P.I.

    1998-01-01

    Prospects of application of nano diamond powders for fabrication of cold cathodes are discussed.Cold cathodes based on silicon pointed structures with nano diamond coatings were prepared.The deposition technique of diamond coating was dielectrophoresis from suspension of nano diamond powder in organic liquids.The cathodes were tested in sealed prototypes of vacuum electronic devices

  19. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, C

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken int...

  20. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinpeng; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu S; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2012-02-24

    We report the fabrication of horizontally aligned ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) nanowires (NWs) via two different approaches. First, with the top-down approach by using electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE) with a photo resist layer as an etch mask. Using this approach, we demonstrate fabrication of 50 µm long UNCD NWs with widths as narrow as 40 nm. We further present an alternative approach to grow UNCD NWs at pre-defined positions through a selective seeding process. No RIE was needed either to etch the NWs or to remove the mask. In this case, we achieved UNCD NWs with lengths of 50 µm and smallest width of 90 nm respectively. Characterization of these nanowires by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the UNCD NWs are well defined and fully released, with no indication of residual stress. Characterization using visible and ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy indicates that in both fabrication approaches, UNCD NWs maintain their intrinsic diamond structure.

  1. Mechanisms of formation and function of eosinophil lipid bodies: inducible intracellular sites involved in arachidonic acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozza Patricia T

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies, inducible lipid-rich cytoplasmic inclusions, are characteristically abundant in cells associated with inflammation, including eosinophils. Here we reviewed the formation and function of lipid bodies in human eosinophils. We now have evidence that the formation of lipid bodies is not attributable to adverse mechanisms, but is centrally mediated by specific signal transduction pathways. Arachidonic acid and other cis fatty acids by an NSAID-inhibitable process, diglycerides, and PAF by a 5-lipoxygenase dependent pathway are potent stimulators of lipid body induction. Lipid body formation develops rapidly by processes that involve PKC, PLC, and de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. These structures clearly serve as repositoires of arachidonyl-phospholipids and are more than inert depots. Specific enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAP kinases, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, associate with lipid bodies. Lipid bodies appear to be dynamic, organelle-like structures involved in intracellular pathways of lipid mobilization and metabolism. Indeed, increases in lipid body numbers correlated with enhanced production of both lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We hypothesize that lipid bodies are distinct inducible sites for generating eicosanoids as paracrine mediators with varied activities in inflammation. The capacity of lipid body formation to be specifically and rapidly induced in leukocytes enhances eicosanoid mediator formation, and conversely pharmacologic inhibition of lipid body induction represents a potential novel and specific target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  2. The I kappa B kinase inhibitor ACHP strongly attenuates TGF beta 1-induced myofibroblast formation and collagen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mia, Masum M.; Bank, Ruud A.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) by myofibroblasts is a characteristic feature of fibrosis, a pathological state leading to serious organ dysfunction. Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF beta 1) is a strong inducer of myofibroblast formation and subsequent

  3. Normal formation and repair of γ-radiation-induced single and double strand DNA breaks in Down syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.E.; Woods, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) were examined for repair capability of γ-radiation-induced single strand and double strand DNA breaks. Formation and repair of DNA breaks were determined by DNA alkaline and non-denaturing elution techniques. Down syndrome fibroblasts were found to repair single strand and double strand breaks as well as fibroblasts from normal controls. (orig.)

  4. Enhancing the adhesion of diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrate using tungsten particles via MPCVD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Wen Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yu-Shiang, E-mail: yswu@cc.cust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, 245, Sec. 3, Yen-Chiu-Yuan Road, Nankang, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hou-Cheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Haun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-24

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > Larger particles of tungsten led to larger diamond particles with improved crystallinity, covering the specimen with increased speed. > Adhesion was indicated to be a function of the gaps between the tungsten particles. > Diamond films pretreated with tungsten particles of 2.0 {mu}m showed the highest hardness of 27.78 GPa with good crystalline. - Abstract: To increase the adhesion of diamond films and avoid the negative effects of using cobalt, previous treatments have employed tungsten particles to cover the surface of the 6 wt.% cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate. The surface of the tungsten particles is transformed into W{sub 2}C and WC, which attracts and traps carbon. Through the process of nucleation, the carbon forms around the tungsten particles, thereby satisfying the conditions necessary for the formation of diamond film. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that diamond films of good quality with excellent adhesive properties and a hardness level as high as 27.78 GPa could be produced following pretreatment with 2.0 {mu}m tungsten particles. Rockwell indentation tests indicate that addition of tungsten particles promotes the interfacial adhesion of diamond films with WC-Co substrates. We determined that using smaller tungsten particles decreased the number of gaps and cavities on the surface of the substrate, thereby enhancing the adhesion of the diamond film.

  5. The Role of Programmed Cell Death Regulator LSD1 in Nematode-Induced Syncytium Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszkiewicz, Mateusz; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Cabrera, Javier; Escobar, Carolina; Karpiński, Stanislaw; Filipecki, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Cyst-forming plant-parasitic nematodes are common pests of many crops. They inject secretions into host cells to induce the developmental and metabolic reprogramming that leads to the formation of a syncytium, which is the sole food source for growing nematodes. As in other host-parasite models, avirulence leads to rapid and local programmed cell death (PCD) known as the hypersensitive response (HR), whereas in the case of virulence, PCD is still observed but is limited to only some cells. Several regulators of PCD were analyzed to understand the role of PCD in compatible plant–nematode interactions. Thus, Arabidopsis plants carrying recessive mutations in LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) family genes were subjected to nematode infection assays with juveniles of Heterodera schachtii. LSD1 is a negative and conditional regulator of PCD, and fewer and smaller syncytia were induced in the roots of lsd1 mutants than in wild-type Col-0 plants. Mutation in LSD ONE LIKE2 (LOL2) revealed a pattern of susceptibility to H. schachtii antagonistic to lsd1. Syncytia induced on lsd1 roots compared to Col0 showed significantly retarded growth, modified cell wall structure, increased vesiculation, and some myelin-like bodies present at 7 and 12 days post-infection. To place these data in a wider context, RNA-sequencing analysis of infected and uninfected roots was conducted. During nematode infection, the number of transcripts with changed expression in lsd1 was approximately three times smaller than in wild-type plants (1440 vs. 4206 differentially expressed genes, respectively). LSD1-dependent PCD in roots is thus a highly regulated process in compatible plant–nematode interactions. Two genes identified in this analysis, coding for AUTOPHAGY-RELATED PROTEIN 8F and 8H were down-regulated in syncytia in the presence of LSD1 and showed an increased susceptibility to nematode infection contrasting with lsd1 phenotype. Our data indicate that molecular regulators belonging to the

  6. Proximal tubule proliferation is insufficient to induce rapid cyst formation after cilia disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neeraj; Malarkey, Erik B; Berbari, Nicolas F; O'Connor, Amber K; Vanden Heuvel, Gregory B; Mrug, Michal; Yoder, Bradley K

    2013-02-01

    Disrupting the function of cilia in mouse kidneys results in rapid or slow progression of cystic disease depending on whether the animals are juveniles or adults, respectively. Renal injury can also markedly accelerate the renal cyst formation that occurs after disruption of cilia in adult mice. Rates of cell proliferation are markedly higher in juvenile than adult kidneys and increase after renal injury, suggesting that cell proliferation may enhance the development of cysts. Here, we induced cilia loss in the kidneys of adult mice in the presence or absence of a Cux-1 transgene, which maintains cell proliferation. By using this model, we were able to avoid additional factors such as inflammation and dedifferentiation, which associate with renal injury and may also influence the rate of cystogenesis. After induction of cilia loss, cystic disease was not more pronounced in adult mice with the Cux-1 transgene compared with those without the transgene. In conclusion, these data suggest that proliferation is unlikely to be the sole mechanism underlying the rapid cystogenesis observed after injury in mice that lose cilia function in adulthood.

  7. Analysis on the formation condition of the algae-induced odorous black water agglomerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guofang; Li, Xianning; Fang, Yang; Huang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The algae-induced odorous black water agglomerate (OBWA) is a phenomenon in which water turns black and emits odorous gas. It is an ecological and environmental problem that has occurred several times in Taihu, a large eutrophic shallow lake in China. In this study, the collected eutrophic water with different algae densities was used to simulate OBWA. The results revealed that the massive accumulation and death of algae was the substrate source for OBWA. When the algae density reached 1.0 × 108 cells/L in the static and dark condition, at a constant high temperature (30 ± 2 °C), OBWA happened. There was a time difference between the water stinking and blackening with the stinking first. When the oxidation–reduction potential (ORP) value was between −250 and −50 mV, Dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), the main contributor to the water stinking at the initial stage, and other odorous organics were produced. Water blackening was closely related to the increases of sulfide and dissolved Fe2+ concentration. When the ORP value was between −350 and −300 mV, heavy metal containing sulfides such as FeS formed. Therefore, the condition when the water ORP value decreased to about −300 mV was considered the precursor for OBWA formation. PMID:25473369

  8. Cholesterol is essential for mitosis progression and its deficiency induces polyploid cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Carlos; Lobo, Maria del Val T.; Gomez-Coronado, Diego; Lasuncion, Miguel A.

    2004-01-01

    As an essential component of mammalian cell membranes, cells require cholesterol for proliferation, which is either obtained from plasma lipoproteins or synthesized intracellularly from acetyl-CoA. In addition to cholesterol, other non-sterol mevalonate derivatives are necessary for DNA synthesis, such as the phosphorylated forms of isopentane, farnesol, geranylgeraniol, and dolichol. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of cholesterol in mitosis. For this, human leukemia cells (HL-60) were incubated in a cholesterol-free medium and treated with SKF 104976, which inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis by blocking sterol 14α-demethylase, and the expression of relevant cyclins in the different phases of the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Prolonged cholesterol starvation induced the inhibition of cytokinesis and the formation of polyploid cells, which were multinucleated and had mitotic aberrations. Supplementing the medium with cholesterol completely abolished these effects, demonstrating they were specifically due to cholesterol deficiency. This is the first evidence that cholesterol is essential for mitosis completion and that, in the absence of cholesterol, the cells fail to undergo cytokinesis, entered G1 phase at higher DNA ploidy (tetraploidy), and then progressed through S (rereplication) into G2, generating polyploid cells

  9. Analysis on the formation condition of the algae-induced odorous black water agglomerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guofang; Li, Xianning; Fang, Yang; Huang, Rui

    2014-12-01

    The algae-induced odorous black water agglomerate (OBWA) is a phenomenon in which water turns black and emits odorous gas. It is an ecological and environmental problem that has occurred several times in Taihu, a large eutrophic shallow lake in China. In this study, the collected eutrophic water with different algae densities was used to simulate OBWA. The results revealed that the massive accumulation and death of algae was the substrate source for OBWA. When the algae density reached 1.0 × 10(8) cells/L in the static and dark condition, at a constant high temperature (30 ± 2 °C), OBWA happened. There was a time difference between the water stinking and blackening with the stinking first. When the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) value was between -250 and -50 mV, Dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), the main contributor to the water stinking at the initial stage, and other odorous organics were produced. Water blackening was closely related to the increases of sulfide and dissolved Fe(2+) concentration. When the ORP value was between -350 and -300 mV, heavy metal containing sulfides such as FeS formed. Therefore, the condition when the water ORP value decreased to about -300 mV was considered the precursor for OBWA formation.

  10. Morphology and formation mechanism in precipitation of calcite induced by Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Li, Fuchun; Lv, Jiejie

    2017-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbobate induced by microbial activities is common occurrence in controlled solution, but the formation mechanism and morphology in precipitation of calcite in solution systems is unclear, and the role of microbes is disputed. Here, culture experiment was performed for 50 days using the Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1 in a M2 culture medium, and the phase composition and morphology of the precipitates were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. We show that the precipitation processes in our experiment lead to unusual morphologies of crystals corresponding to different growth stages, and the morphologies of the precipitated crystal aggregates ranging from the main rod-, cross-, star-, cauliflower-like morphologies to spherulitic structure. The complex and unusual morphologies of the precipitated calcite by strain HJ-1 may provide a reference point for better understanding the biomineralization mechanism of calcite, moreover, morphological transition of minerals revealed that the multi-ply crystals-aggregation mechanism for calcite growth in crystallisation media.

  11. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E. [Dip. di Ingegneria Elettronica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2016-07-14

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, WO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and MoO{sub 3}. The low electron affinity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  12. Diamond like carbon nanocomposites with embedded metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Tomas; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2018-02-01

    In this work we present an overview on structure formation, optical and electrical properties of diamond like carbon (DLC) based metal nanocomposites deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering and treated by plasma and laser ablation methods. The influence of deposition mode and other technological conditions on the properties of the nanosized filler, matrix components and composition were studied systematically in relation to the final properties of the nanocomposites. Applications of the nanocomposites in the development of novel biosensors combining resonance response of wave guiding structures in DLC based nanocomposites as well as plasmonic effects are also presented.

  13. IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation through the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyomiya, Hiroyasu [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Kaneuji, Takeshi [Division of Oral Medicine, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Mitsugi, Sho [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Takuma [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral Medicine, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); and others

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family. Several studies have reported that IL-33 inhibits osteoclast differentiation. However, the mechanism of IL-33 regulation of osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of IL-33 on osteoclast formation in vitro. IL-33 suppressed osteoclast formation in both mouse bone marrow cells and monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and/or macrophage stimulating factor (M-CSF). IL-33 also inhibited the expression of RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), thereby decreasing the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including Cathepsin K, Osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Oc-stamp) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap). Blockage of IL-33-ST2 binding suppressed the IL-33-mediated inhibition of NFATc1. RANKL-induced B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) expression was also suppressed by IL-33, which was followed by the stimulation of anti-osteoclastic genes such as interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8). These results suggest that IL-33-ST2 interactions down-regulate both RANKL-induced NFATc1 activation and osteoclast differentiation via the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression. - Highlights: • IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. • IL-33 has inhibitory effect on the RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. • IL-33-induced NFATc1 suppression depends on the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8.

  14. The Geopolitical Setting of Conflict Diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    2002-05-01

    September 11, 2001 will live in infamy. Ideological differences have also led to senseless atrocities in Angola, Congo Republic, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Hundreds of thousands have died, scores mutilated, and millions displaced. These have gone virtually unnoticed for decades. Unnoticed that is until it became evident that these barbaric acts were fueled by the sale or bartering of diamonds for arms, or by more ingenious ways that are less traceable. There is no end in sight. Industry has long recognized that about 20% of diamonds reaching the open market are smuggled from operating mines, and more recently that an additional 4% originates from conflict diamond sources. Diamond identification by laser inscription, ion implantation, or certification protocols are subject to fraudulent tampering. And these applied methods are thwarted if cutting and polishing centers are infiltrated, or if terrorist facilities are independently established. Mark ups are substantial (40-60%) from raw material to finished product. Tracking the paths of rough stones from mines to faceted gems is impractical because some 30-50 million cts of top quality material, or about 100 million stones, would require branding each year. Moreover, the long standing tradition of site-holdings and the bourse system of mixing or matching diamonds, inadvertently ensures regional anonymity. Conflict diamonds are mined in primary kimberlites and from widely dispersed alluvial fields in tropical jungle. Landscapes, eroded by 1-5 vertical km over 100 Ma, have transformed low grade primary deposits into unconsolidated sedimentary bonanzas. The current value of stones retrieved, by motivated diggers and skillful jiggers, in rebel held territories, is impossible to determine, but in 1993 amounted to tens of millions USD. Diamonds over 100 cts continue to surface at premier prices. Borders are porous, diamonds flow easily, and armed networks are permeable and mobile. Diamonds form at great depths (over 200 km

  15. Thin diamond films for tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.S.; Meilunas, R.; Ong, T.P.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diamond films have been deposited on Si, Mo and many other substrates by microwave and radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Although the adhesion between the diamond film and most of the metal substrates is poor due to residual thermal stress from the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients, the authors have developed processes to promote the growth of uniform and continuous diamond films with enhanced adhesion to metal substrates for tribological applications. The tribological properties of these films are measured using a ring-on-block tribotester. The coefficients of friction of diamond films sliding against a 52100 steel ring under the same experimental conditions are found to be significantly different depending on the morphology, grain size and roughness of the diamond films. However, under all cases tested, it is found that for uniform and continuous diamond films with small grain size of 1-3 micrometers, the coefficient of friction of the diamond film sliding against a steel ring under lubrication of a jet of mineral oil is about 0.04

  16. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Guizard, B.; Marshall, R.D.; Foulon, F.

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-industrial basis, CVD diamond detectors have been fabricated for nuclear industry applications in hostile environments. Such devices can operate in harsh environments and overcome limitations encountered with the standard semiconductor materials. Of these, this paper presents devices for the monitoring of the alpha activity in corrosive nuclear waste solutions, such as those encountered in nuclear fuel assembly reprocessing facilities, as well as diamond-based thermal neutron detectors exhibiting a high neutron to gamma selectivity. All these demonstrate the effectiveness of a demanding industrial need that relies on the remarkable resilience of CVD diamond

  17. STRUCTURING OF DIAMOND FILMS USING MICROSPHERE LITHOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Domonkos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structuring of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond thin films is demonstrated. The structuring of the diamond films is performed using the technique of microsphere lithography followed by reactive ion etching. Specifically, this paper presents a four-step fabrication process: diamond deposition (microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition, mask preparation (by the standard Langmuir-Blodgett method, mask modification and diamond etching. A self-assembled monolayer of monodisperse polystyrene (PS microspheres with close-packed ordering is used as the primary template. Then the PS microspheres and the diamond films are processed in capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma  using different plasma chemistries. This fabrication method illustrates the preparation of large arrays of periodic and homogeneous hillock-like structures. The surface morphology of processed diamond films is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The potential applications of such diamond structures in various fields of nanotechnology are also briefly discussed.

  18. Superior wear resistance of aggregated diamond nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dub, Sergey; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2006-04-01

    The hardness of single-crystal diamond is superior to all other known materials, but its performance as a superabrasive is limited because of its low wear resistance. This is the consequence of diamond's low thermal stability (it graphitizes at elevated temperature), low fracture toughness (it tends to cleave preferentially along the octahedral (111) crystal plains), and large directional effect in polishing (some directions appear to be "soft", i.e., easy to abrade, because diamond is anisotropic in many of its physical properties). Here we report the results of measurements of mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus) of aggregated diamond nanorods (ADNRs) synthesized as a bulk sample. Our investigation has shown that this nanocrystalline material has the fracture toughness 11.1 +/- 1.2 MPa.m(0.5), which exceeds that of natural and synthetic diamond (that varies from 3.4 to 5.0 MPa.m(0.5)) by 2-3 times. At the same time, having a hardness and Young's modulus comparable to that of natural diamond and suppressed because of the random orientation of nanorods "soft" directions, ADNR samples show the enhancement of wear resistance up to 300% in comparison with commercially available polycrystalline diamonds (PCDs). This makes ADNRs extremely prospective materials for applications as superabrasives.

  19. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased

  20. Cathodoluminescence of natural, plastically deformed pink diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillou, E; Post, J E; Rose, T; Butler, J E

    2012-12-01

    The 49 type I natural pink diamonds examined exhibit color restricted to lamellae or bands oriented along {111} that are created by plastic deformation. Pink diamonds fall into two groups: (1) diamonds from Argyle in Australia and Santa Elena in Venezuela are heavily strained throughout and exhibit pink bands alternating with colorless areas, and (2) diamonds from other localities have strain localized near the discrete pink lamellae. Growth zones are highlighted by a blue cathodoluminescence (CL) and crosscut by the pink lamellae that emit yellowish-green CL that originates from the H3 center. This center probably forms by the recombination of nitrogen-related centers (A-aggregates) and vacancies mobilized by natural annealing in the Earth's mantle. Twinning is the most likely mechanism through which plastic deformation is accommodated for the two groups of diamonds. The plastic deformation creates new centers visible through spectroscopic methods, including the one responsible for the pink color, which remains unidentified. The differences in the plastic deformation features, and resulting CL properties, for the two groups might correlate to the particular geologic conditions under which the diamonds formed; those from Argyle and Santa Elena are deposits located within Proterozoic cratons, whereas most diamonds originate from Archean cratons.

  1. Newcastle disease virus induces stable formation ofbona fidestress granules to facilitate viral replication through manipulating host protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yingjie; Dong, Luna; Yu, Shengqing; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zheng, Hang; Zhang, Pin; Meng, Chunchun; Zhan, Yuan; Tan, Lei; Song, Cuiping; Qiu, Xusheng; Wang, Guijun; Liao, Ying; Ding, Chan

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian cells respond to various environmental stressors to form stress granules (SGs) by arresting cytoplasmic mRNA, protein translation element, and RNA binding proteins. Virus-induced SGs function in different ways, depending on the species of virus; however, the mechanism of SG regulation of virus replication is not well understood. In this study, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) triggered stable formation of bona fide SGs on HeLa cells through activating the protein kinase R (PKR)/eIF2α pathway. NDV-induced SGs contained classic SG markers T-cell internal antigen (TIA)-1, Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein (G3BP)-1, eukaryotic initiation factors, and small ribosomal subunit, which could be disassembled in the presence of cycloheximide. Treatment with nocodazole, a microtubule disruption drug, led to the formation of relatively small and circular granules, indicating that NDV infection induces canonical SGs. Furthermore, the role of SGs on NDV replication was investigated by knockdown of TIA-1 and TIA-1-related (TIAR) protein, the 2 critical components involved in SG formation from the HeLa cells, followed by NDV infection. Results showed that depletion of TIA-1 or TIAR inhibited viral protein synthesis, reduced extracellular virus yields, but increased global protein translation. FISH revealed that NDV-induced SGs contained predominantly cellular mRNA rather than viral mRNA. Deletion of TIA-1 or TIAR reduced NP mRNA levels in polysomes. These results demonstrate that NDV triggers stable formation of bona fide SGs, which benefit viral protein translation and virus replication by arresting cellular mRNA.-Sun, Y., Dong, L., Yu, S., Wang, X., Zheng, H., Zhang, P., Meng, C., Zhan, Y., Tan, L., Song, C., Qiu, X., Wang, G., Liao, Y., Ding, C. Newcastle disease virus induces stable formation of bona fide stress granules to facilitate viral replication through manipulating host protein translation. © FASEB.

  2. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induces formation of inositol-phosphates (IP's) in rat peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi-Rosso, G.; Crooke, S.T.; Mong, S.

    1986-01-01

    LTB 4 induced rapid breakdown of prelabeled inositol-phospholipids (PI) in rat PMN. Formation of [ 3 H]-inositol-trisphosphate ([ 3 H]-IP 3 ) was rapid, with a peak of 250-300% of the control level, after 5-15 sec of stimulation with LTB 4 . Accumulation of [ 3 H]-inositol-bisphosphate ([ 3 H]-IP 2 ) was rapid, peaking after 30 sec of stimulation. [ 3 H]-inositol-monophosphate ([ 3 H]-IP 1 ) accumulated gradually in the presence of LiCl. The kinetics of [ 3 H]-IP 3 , [ 3 H]-IP 2 and [ 3 H]-IP 1 accumulation suggested that LTB 4 may interact with receptors in PMNs, activate phospholipase C which, in turn, induces hydrolysis of PI. The agonist activities of several LTB 4 analogs were employed to investigate the structure activity relationship of LTB 4 receptor mediated activation of PI hydrolysis. Increases in [ 3 H]-IP 3 formation were dependent upon the concentration of LTB 4 and the agonist analogs. The rank order potency of these analogs were equivalent to that of the pharmacological activity of LTB 4 agonists in the chemotaxis assay. Furthermore, the Islet activation protein (IAP) inhibited LTB 4 induced [ 3 H]-IP 3 formation. The tumor promoting phorbomyristate ester also inhibited LTB 4 induced [ 3 H]-IP 3 formation. These results suggest LTB 4 may interact with receptors in rat PMNs, activate G/sub i/ protein regulated phospholipase C and induce [ 3 H]-IP 3 formation

  3. Orientation dependence of stress-induced martensite formation during nanoindentation in NiTi shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplanche, G.; Pfetzing-Micklich, J.; Eggeler, G.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we used nanoindentation with a spherical indenter tip to study the formation of stress-induced martensite in NiTi shape memory alloys. Prior to nanoindentation, orientation imaging was performed to select austenite grains with specific crystallographic orientations, including the principal crystallographic directions [0 0 1], [1 0 1] and [1 1 1]. We studied a material where stress-induced martensite is stable at room temperature and found surface patterns with four-, two- and threefold symmetries for the [0 0 1], [1 0 1] and [1 1 1] crystallographic indentation directions, respectively. Atomic force microscopy investigations of the topography showed that the surface patterns were associated with sink-ins. The crystallographic sink-in patterns disappeared during heating, which proved their martensitic origin. Our results provide clear experimental evidence which shows that the crystallographic anisotropy of nanoindentation is governed by the crystallographic anisotropy of the stress-induced formation of martensite

  4. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M [Downers Grove, IL

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  5. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Reinoso, M.; Huck, H.; Rosenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp 2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Physics and applications of CVD diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nesladek, Milos

    2008-01-01

    Here, leading scientists report on why and how diamond can be optimized for applications in bioelectronic and electronics. They cover such topics as growth techniques, new and conventional doping mechanisms, superconductivity in diamond, and excitonic properties, while application aspects include quantum electronics at room temperature, biosensors as well as diamond nanocantilevers and SAWs.Written in a review style to make the topic accessible for a wider community of scientists working in interdisciplinary fields with backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering, this is e

  7. Residual radioactivity of treated green diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe; Notari, Franck; Lépy, Marie-Christine; Caplan, Candice; Pierre, Sylvie; Hainschwang, Thomas; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Treated green diamonds can show residual radioactivity, generally due to immersion in radium salts. We report various activity measurements on two radioactive diamonds. The activity was characterized by alpha and gamma ray spectrometry, and the radon emanation was measured by alpha counting of a frozen source. Even when no residual radium contamination can be identified, measurable alpha and high-energy beta emissions could be detected. The potential health impact of radioactive diamonds and their status with regard to the regulatory policy for radioactive products are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. TEM and STEM/EELS Studies of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) Films and Diamond Films

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with microstructural and chemical investigations of thin layers of diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) which were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy. Practical aspects about the EELS technique of determining the fractions of sp2-hybridized carbon-atoms in DLC films are studied. The wear mechanism of diamond is proved by TEM to involve an atom-by-atom amorphization process driven by mechanical force.

  9. New Parameterizations for Neutral and Ion-Induced Sulfuric Acid-Water Particle Formation in Nucleation and Kinetic Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, Anni; Merikanto, Joonas; Henschel, Henning; Duplissy, Jonathan; Makkonen, Risto; Ortega, Ismael K.; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    We have developed new parameterizations of electrically neutral homogeneous and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water particle formation for large ranges of environmental conditions, based on an improved model that has been validated against a particle formation rate data set produced by Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiments at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The model uses a thermodynamically consistent version of the Classical Nucleation Theory normalized using quantum chemical data. Unlike the earlier parameterizations for H2SO4-H2O nucleation, the model is applicable to extreme dry conditions where the one-component sulfuric acid limit is approached. Parameterizations are presented for the critical cluster sulfuric acid mole fraction, the critical cluster radius, the total number of molecules in the critical cluster, and the particle formation rate. If the critical cluster contains only one sulfuric acid molecule, a simple formula for kinetic particle formation can be used: this threshold has also been parameterized. The parameterization for electrically neutral particle formation is valid for the following ranges: temperatures 165-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1013 cm-3, and relative humidities 0.001-100%. The ion-induced particle formation parameterization is valid for temperatures 195-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1016 cm-3, and relative humidities 10-5-100%. The new parameterizations are thus applicable for the full range of conditions in the Earth's atmosphere relevant for binary sulfuric acid-water particle formation, including both tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. They are also suitable for describing particle formation in the atmosphere of Venus.

  10. Boron doped diamond synthesized from detonation nanodiamond in a C-O-H fluid at high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhov, Fedor M.; Abyzov, Andrey M.; Takai, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    Boron doped diamond (BDD) was synthesized under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) of 7 GPa, 1230 °C in a short time of 10 s from a powder mixtures of detonation nanodiamond (DND), pentaerythritol C5H8(OH)4 and amorphous boron. SEM, TEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy indicated that BDD nano- and micro-crystals have formed by consolidation of DND particles (4 nm in size). XRD showed the enlargement of crystallites size to 6-80 nm and the increase in diamond lattice parameter by 0.02-0.07% without appearance of any microstrains. Raman spectroscopy was used to estimate the content of boron atoms embedded in the diamond lattice. It was found that the Raman diamond peak shifts significantly from 1332 cm-1 to 1290 cm-1 without appearance of any non-diamond carbon. The correlation between Raman peak position, its width, and boron content in diamond is proposed. Hydrogenated diamond carbon in significant amount was detected by IR spectroscopy and XPS. Due to the doping with boron content of about 0.1 at%, the electrical conductivity of the diamond achieved approximately 0.2 Ω-1 cm-1. Reaction mechanism of diamond growth (models of recrystallization and oriented attachment) is discussed, including the initial stages of pentaerythritol pyrolysis and thermal desorption of functional groups from the surface of DND particles with the generation of supercritical fluid of low-molecular substances (H2O, CH4, CO, CO2, etc.), as well as byproducts formation (B2O3, B4C).

  11. Influence of WC-Co substrate pretreatment on diamond film deposition by laser-assisted combustion synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veillère, Amélie; Guillemet, Thomas; Xie, Zhi Qiang; Zuhlke, Craig A; Alexander, Dennis R; Silvain, Jean-François; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Chandra, Namas; Lu, Yong Feng

    2011-04-01

    The quality of diamond films deposited on cemented tungsten carbide substrates (WC-Co) is limited by the presence of the cobalt binder. The cobalt in the WC-Co substrates enhances the formation of nondiamond carbon on the substrate surface, resulting in a poor film adhesion and a low diamond quality. In this study, we investigated pretreatments of WC-Co substrates in three different approaches, namely, chemical etching, laser etching, and laser etching followed by acid treatment. The laser produces a periodic surface pattern, thus increasing the roughness and releasing the stress at the interfaces between the substrate and the grown diamond film. Effects of these pretreatments have been analyzed in terms of microstructure and cobalt content. Raman spectroscopy was conducted to characterize both the diamond quality and compressive residual stress in the films. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, R.; Sasama, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takano, Y. [MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Fujioka, M. [MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Laboratory of Nano-Structure Physics, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Irifune, T. [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Takeya, H. [MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression.

  13. Formation, Accumulation, and Hydrolysis of Endogenous and Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Hartwell, Hadley J; Moeller, Benjamin C; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Bodnar, Wanda M; Starr, Thomas B; Swenberg, James A

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde is not only a widely used chemical with well-known carcinogenicity but is also a normal metabolite of living cells. It thus poses unique challenges for understanding risks associated with exposure. N(2-)hydroxymethyl-dG (N(2)-HOMe-dG) is the main formaldehyde-induced DNA mono-adduct, which together with DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) and toxicity-induced cell proliferation, play important roles in a mutagenic mode of action for cancer. In this study, N(2)-HOMe-dG was shown to be an excellent biomarker for direct adduction of formaldehyde to DNA and the hydrolysis of DPCs. The use of inhaled [(13)CD2]-formaldehyde exposures of rats and primates coupled with ultrasensitive nano ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry permitted accurate determinations of endogenous and exogenous formaldehyde DNA damage. The results show that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses, but not tissues distant to the site of initial contact. The amounts of exogenous adducts were remarkably lower than those of endogenous adducts in exposed nasal epithelium. Moreover, exogenous adducts accumulated in rat nasal epithelium over the 28-days exposure to reach steady-state concentrations, followed by elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 days. Additionally, we examined artifact formation during DNA preparation to ensure the accuracy of nonlabeled N(2)-HOMe-dG measurements. These novel findings provide critical new data for understanding major issues identified by the National Research Council Review of the 2010 Environmental Protection Agency's Draft Integrated Risk Information System Formaldehyde Risk Assessment. They support a data-driven need for reflection on whether risks have been overestimated for inhaled formaldehyde, whereas underappreciating endogenous formaldehyde as the primary source of exposure that results in bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in susceptible humans and rodents deficient in DNA repair. © The Author 2015

  14. ULTRAFINE FLUORESCENT DIAMONDS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyuk M. I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to summarize the literature data concerning ultrafine diamonds, namely their industrial production, as well as considerable photostability and biocompatibility that promote their use in modern visualization techniques. It is shown that due to the unique physical properties, they are promising materials for using in nanotechnology in the near future. Possibility of diverse surface modification, small size and large absorption surface are the basis for their use in different approaches for drug and gene delivery into a cell. The changes in the properties of nanodiamond surface modification methods of their creation, stabilization and applications are described. It can be said that fluorescent surface-modified nanodiamonds are a promising target in various research methods that would be widely used for labeling of living cells, as well as in the processes of genes and drugs delivery into a cell.

  15. Dechanneling of protons in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearick, R.W.; Derry, T.E.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1989-01-01

    The axial dechanneling of protons in natural diamond crystals selected for low defect levels has been studied for beam energies of 1.0--8.9 MeV and crystal temperatures from 20--600 degree C. Measurements of the dechanneled-ion yield were taken along the three major axes left-angle 110 right-angle, left-angle 111 right-angle, and left-angle 100 right-angle. The data have been analyzed in terms of the diffusion model of dechanneling and generally good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. The theory indicates that the predominant contribution to the dechanneling is from the electronic scattering. A scaling of the energy-dependent data for a given axis with a distance characteristic of the electronic scattering is observed. This scaling holds approximately for all data in the three axes considered. Measurements of the yield as a function of temperature indicate that the theory underestimates the nuclear scattering

  16. Imaging the atomic structure and local chemistry of platelets in natural type Ia diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, E J; Neethling, J H; Kroon, R E; Naidoo, S R; Allen, C S; Sawada, H; van Aken, P A; Kirkland, A I

    2018-03-01

    In the past decades, many efforts have been devoted to characterizing {001} platelet defects in type Ia diamond. It is known that N is concentrated at the defect core. However, an accurate description of the atomic structure of the defect and the role that N plays in it is still unknown. Here, by using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy we have determined the atomic arrangement within platelet defects in a natural type Ia diamond and matched it to a prevalent theoretical model. The platelet has an anisotrop