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Sample records for induced cranial defects

  1. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Zhu, Shaobo; Wang, Mingbo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP 2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP 2 /PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP 2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP 2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP 2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. (paper)

  2. Potential Therapeutic Use of Relaxin in Healing Cranial Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    to measure circulating concentrations of relaxin during the infusion by ELISA ; 3. sacrifice the mice at 10-12 days after cranial defect; 4. fix the...osmotic pump for 10-12 days, and to measure circulating concentrations of relaxin during the infusion by ELISA . Values of 0.35, 0.69, 1.61, 0.66, 1.99...vehicle-infused mice, because in our previous work, none was detected. This makes sense, because the ELISA we use does not detect mouse relaxin

  3. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy and its causative factors in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Lin; Zhang Youwang; Wu Yongru; Guo Xiaomao; Li Longgen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the incidence and causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 512 NPC patients who underwent radiotherapy from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1990 and from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 1995 were retrospectively analyzed. According to Fuzhou' 92 NPC Staging Classification, there are 31 patients in stage I, 212 in stage II, 198 in stage III and 71 in stage IV. All patients were treated by 60 Co or 6 MV X-ray with faciocervical fields or pre-auricular fields to primary area. Some patients were boosted by post-auricular fields or cranial fields. The median dose to the nasopharyngeal region was 7130 cGy by external beam radiotherapy. Thirty-four patients were boosted by brachytherapy. The medial dose to cervical lymph nodes was 6410 cGy as definitive treatment and 5480 cGy as prophylactic treatment. 101 patients were treated with combined chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 6.7 years . Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsies occurred in 81 among the 512 patients. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences were 10.3%, 25.4%, respectively. The most common affected nerve was XII. On multivariates analysis, cranial nerve invasion before radiation, chemotherapy, dose to the nasopharyngeal region and age were the independent factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy on nerve I-VII, while the N stage and the radiation fields were independent factors on nerve IX-XII. The cumulative incidence of cranial nerve I-VII palsies increased in patients with cranial nerve invasion, chemotherapy and the dose to the nasopharyngeal region (>7000 cGy). The cumulative incidence of cranial nerve IX- XII palsies increased in patients with advanced N stage. Patients in the first group of treatment field had the highest risk to progress cranial nerve IX-XII palsies, followed by the second group, and the third group had the lowest risk. Only 1 in 34 patients with brachytherapy

  4. Accounting for cranial vault growth in experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Stephanie M; Matic, Damir B; Holdsworth, David W

    2014-05-01

    Earlier studies have not accounted for continued growth when using the rat calvarial defect model to evaluate bone healing in vivo. The purpose of this study was: 1) to calculate rat cranial vault growth over time; and 2) to determine the effects of accounting for growth on defect healing. Bilateral parietal defects were created in 10 adult Wistar rats. Serial microscopic computerized tomography scans were performed. Bone mineral content (BMC) measured according to standard technique and repeated accounting for cranial growth over time was compared with the use of parametric and nonparametric tests. Cranial vault growth continued through 22 weeks of age, increasing 7.5% in width and 9.1% in length, and calvarial defects expanded proportionately. BMC was greater within defects accounting for growth 2-12 weeks postoperatively (P accounting for cranial growth given advances in serial imaging techniques. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Middle cranial fossa approach to repair tegmen defects assisted by three-dimensionally printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameer; VanKoevering, Kyle K; Kline, Stephanie; Green, Glenn E; Arts, H Alexander

    2017-10-01

    To explore the perioperative utility of three-dimensionally (3D)-printed temporal bone models of patients undergoing repair of lateral skull base defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks with the middle cranial fossa approach. Case series. 3D-printed temporal bone models-based on patient-specific, high-resolution computed tomographic imaging-were constructed using inexpensive polymer materials. Preoperatively, the models demonstrated the extent of temporal lobe retraction necessary to visualize the proposed defects in the lateral skull base. Also preoperatively, Silastic sheeting was arranged across the modeled tegmen, marked, and cut to cover all of the proposed defect sites. The Silastic sheeting was then sterilized and subsequently served as a precise intraoperative template for a synthetic dural replacement graft. Of note, these grafts were customized without needing to retract the temporal lobe. Five patients underwent the middle cranial fossa approach assisted by 3D-printed temporal bone models to repair tegmen defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. No complications were encountered. The prefabricated dural repair grafts were easily placed and fit precisely onto the middle fossa floor without any additional modifications. All defects were covered as predicted by the 3D temporal bone models. At their postoperative visits, all five patients maintained resolution of their spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Inexpensive 3D-printed temporal bone models of tegmen defects can serve as beneficial adjuncts during lateral skull base repair. The models provide a panoramic preoperative view of all tegmen defects and allow for custom templating of dural grafts without temporal lobe retraction. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:2347-2351, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Endoscopic transpterygoidal repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with extensive osteoradionecrosis of the skull base: case report and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Y; Lim, E; Waran, V; Prepageran, N

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic endonasal techniques have recently become the method of choice in dealing with cerebrospinal fluid leak involving the anterior cranial fossa. However, most surgeons prefer an intracranial approach when leaks involve the middle cranial fossa. This case report illustrates the possibilities of using endoscopic techniques for cerebrospinal fluid leaks involving the middle fossa. A 37-year-old male patient presented with multiple areas of cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak due to osteoradionecrosis following radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma 4 years earlier. Clinical examination showed involvement of all cranial nerves except the IInd and XIth nerves on the left side. A prior attempt to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with craniotomy was not successful. This case demonstrates the successful endoscopic repair of a large cranial defect with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  7. Bone regeneration by means of a three-dimensional printed scaffold in a rat cranial defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Doo Yeon; Park, Ji Hoon; Jang, So Hee; Park, Joon Yeong; Jang, Ju Woong; Min, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Lee, Hai Bang; Lee, Junhee; Kim, Moon Suk

    2018-02-01

    Recently, computer-designed three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques have emerged as an active research area with almost unlimited possibilities. In this study, we used a computer-designed 3D scaffold to drive new bone formation in a bone defect. Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and bioactive β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were simply mixed to prepare ink. PLLA + TCP showed good printability from the micronozzle and solidification within few seconds, indicating that it was indeed printable ink for layer-by-layer printing. In the images, TCP on the surface of (and/or inside) PLLA in the printed PLLA + TCP scaffold looked dispersed. MG-63 cells (human osteoblastoma) adhered to and proliferated well on the printed PLLA + TCP scaffold. To assess new bone formation in vivo, the printed PLLA + TCP scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect in rats. The new bone formation was monitored by microcomputed tomography and histological analysis of the in vivo PLLA + TCP scaffold with or without MG-63 cells. The bone defect was gradually spontaneously replaced with new bone tissues when we used both bioactive TCP and MG-63 cells in the PLLA scaffold. Bone formation driven by the PLLA + TCP30 scaffold with MG-63 cells was significantly greater than that in other experimental groups. Furthermore, the PLLA + TCP scaffold gradually degraded and matched well the extent of the gradual new bone formation on microcomputed tomography. In conclusion, the printed PLLA + TCP scaffold effectively supports new bone formation in a cranial bone defect. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Use of Multidirectional Cranial Distraction Osteogenesis for Cranial Expansion in Syndromic Craniosynostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataru Sunaga, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis often require a large amount of cranial expansion to avoid intracranial hypertension, but the surgical procedure remains controversial. A patient of severe syndromic craniosynostosis with multiple bony defects and anomalous venous drainage at the occipital region was treated by multidirectional cranial distraction osteogenesis (MCDO at the age of 8 months. Distraction started 5 days after surgery and ceased on postoperative day 16. The distraction devices were removed 27 days after completing distraction. After device removal, the increase of intracranial volume was 155 ml and the cephalic index was improved from 115.5 to 100.5. The resultant cranial shape was well maintained with minimal relapse at postoperative 9 months. In cases of syndromic craniosynostosis with multiple bony defects and/or anomalous venous drainage at the occipital region, expansion of the anterior cranium by MCDO is a viable alternative to conventional methods.

  9. FGF9 can induce endochondral ossification in cranial mesenchyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Paul A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flat bones of the skull (i.e., the frontal and parietal bones normally form through intramembranous ossification. At these sites cranial mesenchymal cells directly differentiate into osteoblasts without the formation of a cartilage intermediate. This type of ossification is distinct from endochondral ossification, a process that involves initial formation of cartilage and later replacement by bone. Results We have analyzed a line of transgenic mice that expresses FGF9, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family (FGF, in cranial mesenchymal cells. The parietal bones in these mice show a switch from intramembranous to endochondral ossification. Cranial cartilage precursors are induced to proliferate, then hypertrophy and are later replaced by bone. These changes are accompanied by upregulation of Sox9, Ihh, Col2a1, Col10a1 and downregulation of CbfaI and Osteocalcin. Fate mapping studies show that the cranial mesenchymal cells in the parietal region that show a switch in cell fate are likely to be derived from the mesoderm. Conclusion These results demonstrate that FGF9 expression is sufficient to convert the differentiation program of (at least a subset of mesoderm-derived cranial mesenchyme cells from intramembranous to endochondral ossification.

  10. Early effect of platelet-rich plasma on bone healing in combination with an osteoconductive material in rat cranial defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plachokova, A.S.; Dolder, J. van den; Stoelinga, P.J.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The early effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on bone regeneration in combination with dense biphasic hydroxyl apatite (HA)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles (ratio 60%/40%) was evaluated in rat cranial defects with a diameter of 6.2 mm. We hypothesize that PRP exerts its

  11. Robo signaling regulates the production of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Tan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Guang; Chuai, Manli; Münsterberg, Andrea; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-12-01

    Slit/Robo signaling plays an important role in the guidance of developing neurons in developing embryos. However, it remains obscure whether and how Slit/Robo signaling is involved in the production of cranial neural crest cells. In this study, we examined Robo1 deficient mice to reveal developmental defects of mouse cranial frontal and parietal bones, which are derivatives of cranial neural crest cells. Therefore, we determined the production of HNK1 + cranial neural crest cells in early chick embryo development after knock-down (KD) of Robo1 expression. Detection of markers for pre-migratory and migratory neural crest cells, PAX7 and AP-2α, showed that production of both was affected by Robo1 KD. In addition, we found that the transcription factor slug is responsible for the aberrant delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells induced by Robo1 KD, which also led to elevated expression of E- and N-Cadherin. N-Cadherin expression was enhanced when blocking FGF signaling with dominant-negative FGFR1 in half of the neural tube. Taken together, we show that Slit/Robo signaling influences the delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells, which is required for cranial bone development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Repair of Cranial Bone Defects Using rhBMP2 and Submicron Particle of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Ceramics with Through-Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Chul Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently a submicron particle of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP with through-hole (donut-shaped BCP (d-BCP was developed for improving the osteoconductivity. This study was performed to examine the usefulness of d-BCP for the delivery of osteoinductive rhBMP2 and the effectiveness on cranial bone regeneration. The d-BCP was soaked in rhBMP2 solution and then freeze-dried. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed that rhBMP2 was well delivered onto the d-BCP surface and the through-hole. The bioactivity of the rhBMP2/d-BCP composite was validated in MC3T3-E1 cells as an in vitro model and in critical-sized cranial defects in C57BL/6 mice. When freeze-dried d-BCPs with rhBMP2 were placed in transwell inserts and suspended above MC3T3-E1, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast-specific gene expression were increased compared to non-rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs. For evaluating in vivo effectiveness, freeze-dried d-BCPs with or without rhBMP2 were implanted into critical-sized cranial defects. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis showed that rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs significantly enhanced cranial bone regeneration compared to non-rhBMP2-containing control. These results suggest that a combination of d-BCP and rhBMP2 can accelerate bone regeneration, and this could be used to develop therapeutic strategies in hard tissue healing.

  13. Repair of Cranial Bone Defects Using rhBMP2 and Submicron Particle of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Ceramics with Through-Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Choi, Hyuck; Hur, Sung-Woong; Kim, Jung-Woo; Oh, Sin-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Song, Soo-Chang; Lee, Keun-Bae; Park, Kwang-Bum; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Recently a submicron particle of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP) with through-hole (donut-shaped BCP (d-BCP)) was developed for improving the osteoconductivity. This study was performed to examine the usefulness of d-BCP for the delivery of osteoinductive rhBMP2 and the effectiveness on cranial bone regeneration. The d-BCP was soaked in rhBMP2 solution and then freeze-dried. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed that rhBMP2 was well delivered onto the d-BCP surface and the through-hole. The bioactivity of the rhBMP2/d-BCP composite was validated in MC3T3-E1 cells as an in vitro model and in critical-sized cranial defects in C57BL/6 mice. When freeze-dried d-BCPs with rhBMP2 were placed in transwell inserts and suspended above MC3T3-E1, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast-specific gene expression were increased compared to non-rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs. For evaluating in vivo effectiveness, freeze-dried d-BCPs with or without rhBMP2 were implanted into critical-sized cranial defects. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis showed that rhBMP2-containing d-BCPs significantly enhanced cranial bone regeneration compared to non-rhBMP2-containing control. These results suggest that a combination of d-BCP and rhBMP2 can accelerate bone regeneration, and this could be used to develop therapeutic strategies in hard tissue healing.

  14. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Toru; Saito, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Nishimura, Toshirou

    1991-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author)

  15. High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo

    2005-01-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed. (author)

  16. High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo [National Hospital Organization Osaka Minami Medical Center, Kawachinagano (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed. (author)

  17. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT

  18. [Effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells homing and promoting bone defect repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Quansheng; Wang, Lingying; Zhu, Jinglin; Han, Xiaoguang; Li, Xu; Yang, Yanlin; Sun, Yan; Song, Chunli

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) homing and promoting bone defect repair, and to explore the mechanism of local implanting simvastatin in promoting bone formation. Simvastatin (50 mg) compounded with polylactic acid (PLA, 200 mg) or only PLA (200 mg) was dissolved in acetone (1 mL) to prepare implanted materials (Simvastatin-PLA material, PLA material). EPCs were harvested from bone marrow of 2 male rabbits and cultured with M199; after identified by immunohistochemistry, the cell suspension of EPCs at the 3rd generation (2 x 10(6) cells/mL) was prepared and transplanted into 12 female rabbits through auricular veins (2 mL). After 3 days, the models of cranial defect with 15 cm diameter were made in the 12 female rabbits. And the defects were repaired with Simvastatin-PLA materials (experimental group, n=6) and PLA materials (control group, n=6), respectively. The bone repair was observed after 8 weeks of operation by gross appearance, X-ray film, and histology; gelatin-ink perfusion and HE staining were used to show the new vessels formation in the defect. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to show the EPCs homing at the defect site. All experimental animals of 2 groups survived to the end of the experiment. After 8 weeks in experimental group, new bone formation was observed in the bone defect by gross and histology, and an irregular, hyperdense shadow by X-ray film; no similar changes were observed in control group. FISH showed that the male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in the wall of new vessels in the defect of experimental group, while no male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in control group. The percentage of new bone formation in defect area was 91.63% +/- 4.07% in experimental group and 59.45% +/- 5.43% in control group, showing significant difference (P < 0.05). Simvastatin can promote bone defect repair, and its mechanism is probably associated with inducing EPCs

  19. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.S.; Bataini, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  20. Interaction of alpha radiation with thermally-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Akbar; Majid, Abdul

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of radiation-induced defects created by energetic alpha particles and thermally-induced defects in silicon has been studied using a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. Two thermally-induced defects at energy positions E c -0.48 eV and E c -0.25 eV and three radiation-induced defects E2, E3 and E5 have been observed. The concentration of both of the thermally-induced defects has been observed to increase on irradiation. It has been noted that production rates of the radiation-induced defects are suppressed in the presence of thermally-induced defects. A significant difference in annealing characteristics of thermally-induced defects in the presence of radiation-induced defects has been observed compared to the characteristics measured in pre-irradiated samples

  1. Additive Manufacturing of Cranial Simulants for Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    REPORT TYPE 08/28/2017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Additive Manufacturing of Cranial Sin1ulants for Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injut’y 6... manufacturing techniques: Fused deposition modeling: ca sling molds Casting: white and gray matter Polymerization of injected solution...Sandia National Laboratories Conclusion MICHIGAN STAT[ l- I’ll I \\ I R <, I r \\ Additive manufacturrng provrdes a cost effective fabrration

  2. Morning glory disc anomaly, midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation: an association worth looking for

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quah, Boon Long; Hamilton, Jill; Blaser, Susan; Heon, Elise; Tehrani, Nasrin N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 4-year-old boy who presented to the ophthalmology department for assessment of convergent strabismus. Ophthalmic examination showed a left morning glory optic disc anomaly and retinal detachment. Plain films obtained for investigation of short stature prior to ophthalmic examination revealed delayed bone age. Ophthalmological findings prompted CT and MRI imaging and angiographic investigations. Midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation were identified. These findings may be associated with morning glory optic disc anomaly, and their association is often under-recognized. It is important that clinicians and radiologists be aware of this spectrum of disorders, as the vascular abnormalities may predispose the patient to transient ischemic attacks and strokes. Growth delay may result from hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  3. Morning glory disc anomaly, midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation: an association worth looking for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quah, Boon Long [Kandang Kerbau Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Singapore National Eye Centre, Department of Ophthalmology (Singapore); Hamilton, Jill [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Heon, Elise; Tehrani, Nasrin N. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 4-year-old boy who presented to the ophthalmology department for assessment of convergent strabismus. Ophthalmic examination showed a left morning glory optic disc anomaly and retinal detachment. Plain films obtained for investigation of short stature prior to ophthalmic examination revealed delayed bone age. Ophthalmological findings prompted CT and MRI imaging and angiographic investigations. Midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation were identified. These findings may be associated with morning glory optic disc anomaly, and their association is often under-recognized. It is important that clinicians and radiologists be aware of this spectrum of disorders, as the vascular abnormalities may predispose the patient to transient ischemic attacks and strokes. Growth delay may result from hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  4. Electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Reseach Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology

    1996-04-01

    To add information of point defects in cubic crystal SiC, polycrystal {beta}-SiC on the market was used as sample and irradiated by neutron and electron. In situ observation of neutron and electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC were carried out by ultra high-voltage electronic microscope (UHVEM) and ordinary electronic microscope. The obtained results show that the electron irradiation-induced secondary defects are micro defects less than 20 nm at about 1273K, the density of defects is from 2x10{sup 17} to 1x10{sup 18}/cc, the secondary defects may be hole type at high temperature and the preexistant defects control nuclear formation of irradiation-induced defects, effective sink. (S.Y.)

  5. Structural and mechanical characterization of custom design cranial implant created using additive manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Khaja Moiduddin; Saied Darwish; Abdulrahman Al-Ahmari; Sherif ElWatidy; Ashfaq Mohammad; Wadea Ameen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of customized cranial implants with a mesh structure using computer-assisted design and additive manufacturing improves the implant design, surgical planning, defect evaluation, implant-tissue interaction and surgeon's accuracy. The objective of this study is to design, develop and fabricate cranial implant with mechanical properties closer to that of bone and drastically decreases the implant failure and to improve the esthetic outcome in cranial surgery with preci...

  6. Direct fabrication through electron beam melting technology of custom cranial implants designed in a PHANToM-based haptic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzoli, Alida; Germani, Michele; Raffaeli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Repairing critical human skull injuries requires the production and use of customized cranial implants and involves the integration of computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD and CAM). The main causes for large cranial defects are trauma, cranial tumors, infected craniotomy bone flaps and external neurosurgical decompression. The success of reconstructive cranial surgery depends upon: the preoperative evaluation of the defect, the design and manufacturing of the implant, and the skill of the operating surgeon. Cranial implant design is usually carried out manually using CAD although this process is very time-consuming and the quality of the end product depends wholly upon the skill of the operator. This paper presents an alternative automated method for the design of custom-made cranial plates in a PHANToM ® -based haptic environment, and their direct fabrication in biocompatible metal using electron beam melting (EBM) technology.

  7. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurology; Chen, M. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  8. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y.; Chen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  9. Light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morigaki, K.; Takeda, K.; Hikita, H.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2005-01-01

    Light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is investigated from electron spin resonance measurements and is compared with that in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Light-induced defect creation occurs at room temperature similarly for both types of films prepared at 250 deg. C. Thermal annealing of light-induced defects is also investigated as a function of temperature. Different behaviours of annealing characteristics for pm-Si:H from those for a-Si:H are observed and discussed. In particular, we observed a decrease of the light-induced defect creation efficiency with repeated light-soaking-annealing cycles and discuss it with respect to the hydrogen bonding in pm-Si:H films

  10. Evaluation of the cranial base in amnion rupture sequence involving the anterior neural tube: implications regarding recurrence risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Robinson, Luther K; Benirschke, Kurt

    2006-09-01

    Amniotic bands can cause disruption of the cranial end of the developing fetus, leading in some cases to a neural tube closure defect. Although recurrence for unaffected parents of an affected child with a defect in which the neural tube closed normally but was subsequently disrupted by amniotic bands is negligible; for a primary defect in closure of the neural tube to which amnion has subsequently adhered, recurrence risk is 1.7%. In that primary defects of neural tube closure are characterized by typical abnormalities of the base of the skull, evaluation of the cranial base in such fetuses provides an approach for making a distinction between these 2 mechanisms. This distinction has implications regarding recurrence risk. The skull base of 2 fetuses with amnion rupture sequence involving the cranial end of the neural tube were compared to that of 1 fetus with anencephaly as well as that of a structurally normal fetus. The skulls were cleaned, fixed in 10% formalin, recleaned, and then exposed to 10% KOH solution. After washing and recleaning, the skulls were exposed to hydrogen peroxide for bleaching and photography. Despite involvement of the anterior neural tube in both fetuses with amnion rupture sequence, in Case 3 the cranial base was normal while in Case 4 the cranial base was similar to that seen in anencephaly. This technique provides a method for determining the developmental pathogenesis of anterior neural tube defects in cases of amnion rupture sequence. As such, it provides information that can be used to counsel parents of affected children with respect to recurrence risk.

  11. Cranioplasty as the return-to-work factor - 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Ormezowska, Elżbieta; Jaskólski, Dariusz

    2017-07-14

    The number of craniectomies and the consequent reconstructive procedures has grown during the past decades. Cranial defects and methods of their repair could have some influence on work capability of the patients and their employability. The authors analyzed a group of 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz, Poland, in the course of the katamnestic period longer than 6 months after reconstructive operation, and observed them between February 2008 and February 2015. Their work capability and employment were compared, all the patients were interviewed concerning the reasons for not working according to the Social Insurance Institution predication procedure. Before the cranioplasty, all the patients were capable of working without limitations according to biological criteria and 89 of them were employed. Twenty-three not working people consisted of 6 pupils, 7 retired and 10 not working for other reasons. During the period between the craniectomy and the cranioplasty, 88 patients were capable of working and only 2 were employed. After the reconstruction, 93 were capable of working without limitations and 16 - with limitations. Forty-seven were employed during the period of the follow-up, the rest of patients consisted of 2 pupils, 13 retired and 50 not working for various reasons. Cranioplasty is a very important factor contributing to return to work. This outcome may be seen as having a great social value and be added to the functions of cranial repair as protective, esthetic and normalizing the intracranial pressure previously described in the literature. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):803-809. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  12. A targeted sequencing panel identifies rare damaging variants in multiple genes in the cranial neural tube defect, anencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, M; Cullup, T; Boustred, C; James, C; Docker, J; English, C; Lench, N; Copp, A J; Moore, G E; Greene, N D E; Stanier, P

    2018-04-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) affecting the brain (anencephaly) are lethal before or at birth, whereas lower spinal defects (spina bifida) may lead to lifelong neurological handicap. Collectively, NTDs rank among the most common birth defects worldwide. This study focuses on anencephaly, which despite having a similar frequency to spina bifida and being the most common type of NTD observed in mouse models, has had more limited inclusion in genetic studies. A genetic influence is strongly implicated in determining risk of NTDs and a molecular diagnosis is of fundamental importance to families both in terms of understanding the origin of the condition and for managing future pregnancies. Here we used a custom panel of 191 NTD candidate genes to screen 90 patients with cranial NTDs (n = 85 anencephaly and n = 5 craniorachischisis) with a targeted exome sequencing platform. After filtering and comparing to our in-house control exome database (N = 509), we identified 397 rare variants (minor allele frequency, MAF < 1%), 21 of which were previously unreported and predicted damaging. This included 1 frameshift (PDGFRA), 2 stop-gained (MAT1A; NOS2) and 18 missense variations. Together with evidence for oligogenic inheritance, this study provides new information on the possible genetic causation of anencephaly. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Delivery of S1P receptor-targeted drugs via biodegradable polymer scaffolds enhances bone regeneration in a critical size cranial defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Tanner, Shaun; Barker, Daniel A; Green, David; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-04-01

    Biodegradable polymer scaffolds can be used to deliver soluble factors to enhance osseous remodeling in bone defects. To this end, we designed a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) microsphere scaffold to sustain the release of FTY720, a selective agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors. The microsphere scaffolds were created from fast degrading 50:50 PLAGA and/or from slow-degrading 85:15 PLAGA. Temporal and spatial regulation of bone remodeling depended on the use of appropriate scaffolds for drug delivery. The release profiles from the scaffolds were used to design an optimal delivery system to treat critical size cranial defects in a rodent model. The ability of local FTY720 delivery to maximize bone regeneration was evaluated with micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histology. Following 4 weeks of defect healing, FTY720 delivery from 85:15 PLAGA scaffolds resulted in a significant increase in bone volumes in the defect region compared to the controls. A 85:15 microsphere scaffolds maintain their structural integrity over a longer period of time, and cause an initial burst release of FTY720 due to surface localization of the drug. This encourages cellular in-growth and an increase in new bone formation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Delivery of S1P Receptor-Targeted Drugs via Biodegradable Polymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Regeneration in a Critical Size Cranial Defect*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Tanner, Shaun; Barker, Daniel A.; Green, David; Botchwey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer scaffolds can be used to deliver soluble factors to enhance osseous remodeling in bone defects. To this end, we designed a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) microsphere scaffold to sustain the release of FTY720, a selective agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors. The microsphere scaffolds were created from fast degrading 50:50 PLAGA and/or from slow-degrading 85:15 PLAGA. Temporal and spatial regulation of bone remodeling depended on the use of appropriate scaffolds for drug delivery. The release profiles from the scaffolds were used to design an optimal delivery system to treat critical size cranial defects in a rodent model. The ability of local FTY720 delivery to maximize bone regeneration was evaluated with microcomputed tomography (microCT) and histology. Following 4 weeks of defect healing, FTY720 delivery from 85:15 PLAGA scaffolds resulted in a significant increase in bone volumes in the defect region compared to the controls. 85:15 microsphere scaffolds maintain their structural integrity over a longer period of time, and cause an initial burst release of FTY720 due to surface localization of the drug. This encourages cellular in-growth and an increase in new bone formation. PMID:23640833

  15. Piezosurgery for the repair of middle cranial fossa meningoencephaloceles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Aanand N; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2015-03-01

    To describe the use of a piezosurgery medical device to perform a craniotomy and produce a split calvarial graft for the repair of middle cranial fossa meningoencephaloceles. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral hospital. Ten consecutive patients undergoing middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of meningoencephaloceles. Therapeutic. Intraoperative and postoperative complications, success rate as defined by the ability to fashion a split calvarial graft that achieves complete closure of the tegmen defect. As a secondary outcome measure, evidence of integration of the split calvarial bone graft with the adjacent skull base was assessed. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. An appropriately sized calvarial bone graft was produced, and complete closure of the tegmen defect was achieved in all 10 cases. Computed tomography demonstrated evidence of integration of the bone graft in eight cases between 4 and 9 months after surgery. The piezosurgery medical device provides a safe and effective means by which the middle fossa craniotomy and split calvarial bone graft can be produced to repair defects of the middle fossa tegmen, with integration of the bone graft in the majority of cases.

  16. "Repair of cranial bone defects using endochondral bone matrix gelatin in rat "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Sobhani A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone matrix gelatin (BMG has been used for bone induction intramuscularly and subcutaneously by many investigators since 1965. More recently, some of the researchers have used BMG particles for bone repair and reported various results. In present study for evaluation of bone induction and new bone formation in parital defects, BMG particles were used in five groups of rats. The BMG was prepared as previously described using urist method. The defects wee produced with 5 –mm diameter in pariteal bones and filled by BMG particles. No BMG was used in control group.For evaluation of new bone formation and repair, the specimens were harvested on days 7 , 14 , 21 and 28 after operation. The samples were processed histologically, stained by H& E, alizarin red S staining, and Alcian blue, and studied by a light microscope.The results are as follows:In control group: Twenty-eight days after operation a narrow rim of new bone was detectable attached to the edge of defect.In BMG groups: At day 7 after operation young chondroblast cells appeared in whole area of defect. At 14th day after operation hypertrophic chondrocytes showed by Alcian blue staining and calcified cartilage were detectable by Alizarin red S staining. The numerous trabeculae spicules, early adult osteocytes and highly proliferated red bone marrow well developed on dayd 21 . finally typic bone trabeculae with regulated osteoblast cells and some osteoclast cells were detectable at day 28 after operation. In conclusion,BMG could stimulate bone induction and new bone formation in bony defects. So, it seems that BMG could be a godd biomaterial substance for new bone inducation in bone defects

  17. Induced Magnetic Moment in Defected Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a large induced magnetic moment in defect single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) is predicted using the Green's function method. Specific to this magnetic moment of defect SWNT is its magnitude which is several orders of magnitude larger than that of perfect SWNT. The induced magnetic moment also shows certain remarkable features. Therefore, we suggest that two pair-defect orientations in SWNT can be distinguished in experiment through the direction of the induced magnetic moment at some Specific energy points

  18. Anterior Cranial Base Reconstruction with a Reverse Temporalis Muscle Flap and Calvarial Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Gee Kwon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCranial base defects are challenging to reconstruct without serious complications. Although free tissue transfer has been used widely and efficiently, it still has the limitation of requiring a long operation time along with the burden of microanastomosis and donor site morbidity. We propose using a reverse temporalis muscle flap and calvarial bone graft as an alternative option to a free flap for anterior cranial base reconstruction.MethodsBetween April 2009 and February 2012, cranial base reconstructions using an autologous calvarial split bone graft combined with a reverse temporalis muscle flap were performed in five patients. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed and postoperative computed tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and angiography findings were examined to evaluate graft survival and flap viability.ResultsThe mean follow-up period was 11.8 months and the mean operation time for reconstruction was 8.4±3.36 hours. The defects involved the anterior cranial base, including the orbital roof and the frontal and ethmoidal sinus. All reconstructions were successful. Viable flap vascularity and bone survival were observed. There were no serious complications except for acceptable donor site depressions, which were easily corrected with minor procedures.ConclusionsThe reverse temporalis muscle flap could provide sufficient bulkiness to fill dead space and sufficient vascularity to endure infection. The calvarial bone graft provides a rigid framework, which is critical for maintaining the cranial base structure. Combined anterior cranial base reconstruction with a reverse temporalis muscle flap and calvarial bone graft could be a viable alternative to free tissue transfer.

  19. Cranial implant design using augmented reality immersive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhuming; Evenhouse, Ray; Leigh, Jason; Charbel, Fady; Rasmussen, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Software tools that utilize haptics for sculpting precise fitting cranial implants are utilized in an augmented reality immersive system to create a virtual working environment for the modelers. The virtual environment is designed to mimic the traditional working environment as closely as possible, providing more functionality for the users. The implant design process uses patient CT data of a defective area. This volumetric data is displayed in an implant modeling tele-immersive augmented reality system where the modeler can build a patient specific implant that precisely fits the defect. To mimic the traditional sculpting workspace, the implant modeling augmented reality system includes stereo vision, viewer centered perspective, sense of touch, and collaboration. To achieve optimized performance, this system includes a dual-processor PC, fast volume rendering with three-dimensional texture mapping, the fast haptic rendering algorithm, and a multi-threading architecture. The system replaces the expensive and time consuming traditional sculpting steps such as physical sculpting, mold making, and defect stereolithography. This augmented reality system is part of a comprehensive tele-immersive system that includes a conference-room-sized system for tele-immersive small group consultation and an inexpensive, easily deployable networked desktop virtual reality system for surgical consultation, evaluation and collaboration. This system has been used to design patient-specific cranial implants with precise fit.

  20. Defect-induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors: A controllable approach by particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-01-01

    Making semiconductors ferromagnetic has been a long dream. One approach is to dope semiconductors with transition metals (TM). TM ions act as local moments and they couple with free carriers to develop collective magnetism. However, there are no fundamental reasons against the possibility of local moment formation from localized sp states. Recently, ferromagnetism was observed in nonmagnetically doped, but defective semiconductors or insulators including ZnO and TiO 2 . This kind of observation challenges the conventional understanding of ferromagnetism. Often the defect-induced ferromagnetism has been observed in samples prepared under non-optimized condition, i.e. by accident or by mistake. Therefore, in this field theory goes much ahead of experimental investigation. To understand the mechanism of the defect-induced ferromagnetism, one needs a better controlled method to create defects in the crystalline materials. As a nonequilibrium and reproducible approach of inducing defects, ion irradiation provides such a possibility. Energetic ions displace atoms from their equilibrium lattice sites, thus creating mainly vacancies, interstitials or antisites. The amount and the distribution of defects can be controlled by the ion fluence and energy. By ion irradiation, we have generated defect-induced ferromagnetism in ZnO, TiO 2 and SiC. In this short review, we also summarize some results by other groups using energetic ions to introduce defects, and thereby magnetism in various materials. Ion irradiation combined with proper characterizations of defects could allow us to clarify the local magnetic moments and the coupling mechanism in defective semiconductors. Otherwise we may have to build a new paradigm to understand the defect-induced ferromagnetism

  1. Cellular structure formed by ion-implantation-induced point defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, N.; Taniwaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have found that a cellular defect structure is formed on the surface of Sn + ion implanted GaSb at a low temperature and proposed its formation mechanism based on the movement of the induced point defects. This research was carried out in order to examine the validity of the mechanism by clarifying the effect of the mobility of the point defects on the defect formation. The defect structure on the GaSb surfaces implanted at cryogenic temperature and room temperature was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. In the sample implanted at room temperature, the sponge-like structure (a pileup of voids) was formed and the cellular structure, as observed at a low temperature, did not develop. This behavior was explained by the high mobility of the vacancies during implantation at room temperature, and the proposed idea that the defect formation process is dominated by the induced point defects was confirmed

  2. Cranial Defects and Cranioplasty. Part 8. Chapter 194,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    scalp incision is outlined on the skin outside the area of the defect and infiltrated with a local anesthetic containing adrenalin. (c) Margins of the...plate to repair cleft palates in the first instance of an alloplastic material to repair a defect. J. van 14eekren in 1670 is credited with the first...osteomyelitis, infected skull flaps), aseptic necrosis of skull flaps, radionecrosis and electrical burns of skull, con- genital absences of skull

  3. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  4. Study of EUV induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Rizo, P.J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, Christopher James; Banine, V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Defects in graphene greatly affect its properties1-3. Radiation induced-defects may reduce the long-term survivability of graphene-based nano-devices. Here, we expose few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5nm) radiation and show there is a power-dependent increase in defect density. We

  5. Anosmin-1 is essential for neural crest and cranial placodes formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Joon; Hong, Chang-Soo; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre

    2018-01-15

    During embryogenesis vertebrates develop a complex craniofacial skeleton associated with sensory organs. These structures are primarily derived from two embryonic cell populations the neural crest and cranial placodes, respectively. Neural crest cells and cranial placodes are specified through the integrated action of several families of signaling molecules, and the subsequent activation of a complex network of transcription factors. Here we describe the expression and function of Anosmin-1 (Anos1), an extracellular matrix protein, during neural crest and cranial placodes development in Xenopus laevis. Anos1 was identified as a target of Pax3 and Zic1, two transcription factors necessary and sufficient to generate neural crest and cranial placodes. Anos1 is expressed in cranial neural crest progenitors at early neurula stage and in cranial placode derivatives later in development. We show that Anos1 function is required for neural crest and sensory organs development in Xenopus, consistent with the defects observed in Kallmann syndrome patients carrying a mutation in ANOS1. These findings indicate that anos1 has a conserved function in the development of craniofacial structures, and indicate that anos1-depleted Xenopus embryos represent a useful model to analyze the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; VIth nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial nerve. This nerve is also called the abducens nerve. ...

  7. Luminescence Properties of Surface Radiation-Induced Defects in Lithium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Martynovich, E. F.; Novikov, A. N.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra are recorded for surface radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride at temperatures of 77 and 293 K. The presence of three bands with relatively small intensity differences is a distinctive feature of the excitation spectrum. These bands are found to belong to the same type of defects. The positions of the peaks and the widths of the absorption and luminescence bands for these defects are determined. The luminescence decay time is measured. All the measured characteristics of these surface defects differ from those of previously known defects induced by radiation in the bulk of the crystals. It is found that the luminescence of surface defects in an ensemble of nanocrystals with different orientations is not polarized. The number of anion vacancies in the surface defects is estimated using the polarization measurements. It is shown that radiative scattering distorts the intensity ratios of the luminescence excitation bands located in different spectral regions.

  8. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) (χ 2 = 34.444, p 2 = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  9. Retrospective analysis of the use of amniotic membranes and xenografts in spinal surgery and anterior cranial fossa operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafri Malim Abdullah

    1999-01-01

    To determine the suitability of amniotic membrane an bovine bone xenografts for the use in spinal surgery and anterior cranial for a generations. Fifteen patients with anterior cranial fossa defects and spinal bone fractures received bovine bone xenografts and 10 patients with meningomyeloceles received amniotic membranes (produced by the Malaysian National Tissue Bank) were analysed retrospectively. Clinical criterias like fever, signs of inflammation, breakdown of graft implant, non specific reaction to the nervous tissue were analysed haematological and radiologically. All patients who received the bovine grafts and amniotic membranes did not show any evidence of inflammation or fever. There were no graft implant breakdowns. There was no radiological or clinical evidence of specific or non specific reaction to the nervous tissue after 12-36 months followup Amniotic membranes and bovine xenografts may be used in the healing and reconstruction of spinal and cranial defects. Despite no evidence of rejection and infection after 36 months, a long term followup is still needed

  10. ADAM13 Induces Cranial Neural Crest by Cleaving Class B Ephrins and Regulating Wnt Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) are multipotent embryonic cells that contribute to craniofacial structures and other cells and tissues of the vertebrate head. During embryogenesis, CNC is induced at the neural plate boundary through the interplay of several major signaling pathways. Here we report that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 is required for early induction of CNC in Xenopus. In both cultured cells and X. tropicalis embryos, membrane-bound Ephrins (Efns) B1 and B2 were identif...

  11. Osterix-Cre transgene causes craniofacial bone development defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The Cre/loxP system has been widely used to generate tissue-specific gene knockout mice. Inducible (Tet-off) Osx-GFP::Cre (Osx-Cre) mouse line that targets osteoblasts is widely used in the bone research field. In this study, we investigated the effect of Osx-Cre on craniofacial bone development. We found that newborn Osx-Cre mice showed severe hypomineralization in parietal, frontal, and nasal bones as well as the coronal sutural area when compared to control mice. As the mice matured the intramembranous bone hypomineralization phenotype became less severe. The major hypomineralization defect in parietal, frontal, and nasal bones had mostly disappeared by postnatal day 21, but the defect in sutural areas persisted. Importantly, Doxycycline treatment eliminated cranial bone defects at birth which indicates that Cre expression may be responsible for the phenotype. In addition, we showed that the primary calvarial osteoblasts isolated from neonatal Osx-Cre mice had comparable differentiation ability compared to their littermate controls. This study reinforces the idea that Cre positive litter mates are indispensable controls in studies using conditional gene deletion. PMID:25550101

  12. The investigation of radiation induced defects in MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puetz, M.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper Frenkel defects were induced in MgO by 3 MeV electrons at low temperature. These defects were investigated by measurements of the optical absorption, by investigating the lattice parameters and Huang diffuse scattering. (WL)

  13. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  14. Verifying three-dimensional skull model reconstruction using cranial index of symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Woon-Man; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Lu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Tzu-Hsuan; Lin, Muh-Shi

    2013-01-01

    Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D) CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important to establish a symmetrically regular CAD/CAM reconstruction prior to depressing the contour. The purpose of this study is to verify the aesthetic outcomes of CAD models with regular contours using cranial index of symmetry (CIS). From January 2011 to June 2012, decompressive craniectomy (DC) was performed for 15 consecutive patients in our institute. 3-D CAD models of skull defects were reconstructed using commercial software. These models were checked in terms of symmetry by CIS scores. CIS scores of CAD reconstructions were 99.24±0.004% (range 98.47-99.84). CIS scores of these CAD models were statistically significantly greater than 95%, identical to 99.5%, but lower than 99.6% (ppairs signed rank test). These data evidenced the highly accurate symmetry of these CAD models with regular contours. CIS calculation is beneficial to assess aesthetic outcomes of CAD-reconstructed skulls in terms of cranial symmetry. This enables further accurate CAD models and CAM cranial implants with depressed contours, which are essential in patients with difficult scalp adaptation.

  15. Defects induced by helium implantation in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliviero, E.; Barbot, J.F.; Declemy, A.; Beaufort, M.F.; Oliviero, E.

    2008-01-01

    SiC is one of the considered materials for nuclear fuel conditioning and for the fabrication of some core structures in future nuclear generation reactors. For the development of this advance technology, a fundamental research on this material is of prime importance. In particular, the implantation/irradiation effects have to be understood and controlled. It is with this aim that the structural alterations induced by implantation/irradiation in SiC are studied by different experimental techniques as transmission electron microscopy, helium desorption, X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In this work, the different types of defects induced by helium implantation in SiC, point or primary defects (obtained at low energy (∼100 eV) until spread defects (obtained at higher energy (until ∼2 MeV)) are exposed. The amorphization/recrystallization and swelling phenomena are presented too. (O.M.)

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of porous titanium structures fabricated by electron beam melting for cranial implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiduddin, Khaja

    2018-02-01

    The traditional methods of metallic bone implants are often dense and suffer from adverse reactions, biomechanical mismatch and lack of adequate space for new bone tissue to grow into the implant. The objective of this study is to evaluate the customized porous cranial implant with mechanical properties closer to that of bone and to improve the aesthetic outcome in cranial surgery with precision fitting for a better quality of life. Two custom cranial implants (bulk and porous) are digitally designed based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine files and fabricated using additive manufacturing. Initially, the defective skull model and the implant were fabricated using fused deposition modeling for the purpose of dimensional validation. Subsequently, the implant was fabricated using titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V extra low interstitial) by electron beam melting technology. The electron beam melting-produced body diagonal node structure incorporated in cranial implant was evaluated based on its mechanical strength and structural characterization. The results show that the electron beam melting-produced porous cranial implants provide the necessary framework for the bone cells to grow into the pores and mimic the architecture and mechanical properties closer to the region of implantation. Scanning electron microscope and micro-computed tomography scanning confirm that the produced porous implants have a highly regular pattern of porous structure with a fully interconnected network channel without any internal defect and voids. The physical properties of the titanium porous structure, containing the compressive strength of 61.5 MPa and modulus of elasticity being 1.20 GPa, represent a promising means of reducing stiffness and stress-shielding effect on the surrounding bone. This study reveals that the use of porous structure in cranial reconstruction satisfies the need of lighter implants with an adequate mechanical strength and structural characteristics

  17. An anencephalic monocephalus diprosopus "headed twin": postmortem and CT findings with emphasis on the cranial bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Gazanfer; Balci, Sevim; Erzen, Canan

    2005-01-01

    Monocephalus diprosopus is a form of conjoined twinning characterized by a single body, one unusual head and two faces or a spectrum of duplication of the craniofacial structures. Such cases have been mainly described according to postmortem pathologic examination. This presented case is a 26-week-stillborn female fetus, with unusual facial appearance with four eyes, two mouths, two noses, two ears and a defective cranial vault. To our knowledge, a detailed computerized tomography (CT) examination of the aberrant facial and cranial bones of such a case has not been reported to date. In this reported case, we present an anencephalic monocephalus diprosopus "headed twin", and describe the CT findings with emphasis on the cranial bones.

  18. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preservation of Frontal Sinus Anatomy and Outflow Tract Following Frontal Trauma with Dural Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wei Ming Kwek, MBBS, MRCS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Our case report describes a young male mechanic who was hit in his face by a spring while repairing a car, resulting in traumatic injury to the frontal sinus, with fractures of both the anterior and the posterior tables with dural defect and cerebrospinal fluid leak. Current guidelines recommend that comminuted and/or displaced fractures of the posterior table of the frontal sinus with dural defects should be either cranialized or obliterated. In this patient, instead of cranializing or obliterating the frontal sinus, we managed to preserve the frontal sinus anatomy and its outflow tract using a combined open bicoronal and nasoendoscopic approach. This avoids the long-term complications associated with cranialization or obliteration including mucocele formation and frontocutaneous fistula.

  20. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As 2 Se 3 Bi y and (As 2 Se 3 )(Bi 2 Se 3 ) y amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co 60 gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As 2 Se 3 Bi y glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs

  1. Radiation-induced ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in patients with pituitary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaphiades, Michael S; Spencer, Sharon A; Riley, Kristen; Francis, Courtney; Deitz, Luke; Kline, Lanning B

    2011-09-01

    Radiation therapy is often used in the treatment of pituitary tumor. Diplopia due to radiation damage to the ocular motor cranial nerves has been infrequently reported as a complication in this clinical setting. Retrospective case series of 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) with pituitary adenoma, all of whom developed diplopia following transsphenoidal resection of pituitary adenoma with subsequent radiation therapy. None had evidence of tumor involvement of the cavernous sinus. Five patients developed sixth nerve palsies, 3 unilateral and 2 bilateral, and in 1 patient, a sixth nerve palsy was preceded by a fourth cranial nerve palsy. One patient developed third nerve palsy. Five of the 6 patients had a growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor with acromegaly. Following transsphenoidal surgery in all 6 patients (2 had 2 surgeries), 4 had 2 radiation treatments consisting of either radiosurgery (2 patients) or external beam radiation followed by radiosurgery (2 patients). Patients with pituitary tumors treated multiple times with various forms of radiation therapy are at risk to sustain ocular motor cranial nerve injury. The prevalence of acromegalic patients in this study reflects an aggressive attempt to salvage patients with recalcitrant growth hormone elevation and may place the patient at a greater risk for ocular motor cranial nerve damage.

  2. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Transgenerational Genomic Instability and Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Gao, Yinglong; Zhang, Baodong

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to genome instability in the germline, and therefore to transgenerational genome and epigenome instability in offspring of exposed males. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced genome instability in directly exposed and in bystander organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in genome instability development. The potential of localized body-part exposures to affect the germline and thus induce genome and epigenome changes in the progeny has not been studied. To investigate whether or not the paternal cranial irradiation can exert deleterious changes in the protected germline and the offsprings, we studied the alteration of DNA methylation in the shielded testes tissue. Here we report that the localized paternal cranial irradiation results in a significant altered DNA methylation in sperm cells and leads to a profound epigenetic dysregulation in the unexposed progeny conceived 3 months after paternal exposure. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Transgenerational effect; Genomic Instability Bystander Effects; DNA methylation.

  3. Graphene defects induced by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Grzegorz; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Baranowski, Jacek; Jagielski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    The CVD graphene deposited on the glass substrate was bombarded by molecular carbon ions C3+ C6+ hydrocarbon ions C3H4+ and atomic ions He+, C+, N+, Ar+, Kr+ Yb+. Size and density of ion induced defects were estimated from evolution of relative intensities of Raman lines D (∼1350 1/cm), G (∼1600 1/cm), and D‧ (∼1620 1/cm) with ion fluence. The efficiency of defect generation by atomic ions depend on ion mass and energy similarly as vacancy generation directly by ion predicted by SRIM simulations. However, efficiency of defect generation in graphene by molecular carbon ions is essentially higher than summarized efficiency of similar group of separate atomic carbon ions of the same energy that each carbon ion in a cluster. The evolution of the D/D‧ ratio of Raman lines intensities with ion fluence was observed. This effect may indicate evolution of defect nature from sp3-like at low fluence to a vacancy-like at high fluence. Observed ion graphene interactions suggest that the molecular ion interacts with graphene as single integrated object and should not be considered as a group of atomic ions with partial energy.

  4. Mobility of point defects induced by subthreshold collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, A.; Nguyen Van Doan

    1976-01-01

    The effect of thermal vibrations on atomic collision focusing was studied with the view to demonstrate that such collisions may induce point defect migration through the crystal. The persistence of the phenomenon of focused atomic collisions in a crystal at thermal equilibrium was studied, using a computer simulation by the Molecular Dynamics Technique. In the temperature range (0 to 500K) matter and momentum transfers in c.f.c. crystals proceed mainly by focused collisions along and directions. Their contribution to the induced migration of radiation defects was determined from the threshold energy of every primary able to be involved in the process. As an example, the quantitative model is applied to electron irradiation along the crystallographic directions [fr

  5. Computed tomography angiography intraluminal filling defect is predictive of internal carotid artery free-floating thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaberi, A.; Lum, C.; Stefanski, P.; Iancu, D. [University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); The Ottawa Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Thornhill, R. [Neurosciences and Clinical Epidemiology Program/Methods Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); The Ottawa Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Petrcich, W. [Neurosciences and Clinical Epidemiology Program/Methods Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Momoli, F. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); University of Ottawa, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Torres, C.; Dowlatshahi, D. [University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); University of Ottawa, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Filling defects at the internal carotid artery (ICA) origin in the work-up of stroke or transient ischemic attack may be an ulcerated plaque or free-floating thrombus (FFT). This may be challenging to distinguish, as they can appear morphologically similar. This is an important distinction as FFT can potentially embolize distally, and its management differs. We describe a series of patients with suspected FFT and evaluate its imaging appearance, clinical features, and evolution with therapy. Between 2008 and 2013, we prospectively collected consecutive patients with proximal ICA filling defects in the axial plane surrounded by contrast on CT/MR angiography. We defined FFT as a filling defect that resolved on follow-up imaging. We assessed the cranial-caudal dimension of the filling defect and receiver operating characteristics to identify clinical and radiological variables that distinguished FFT from complex ulcerated plaque. Intraluminal filling defects were identified in 32 patients. Filling defects and resolved or decreased in 25 patients (78 %) and felt to be FFT; there was no change in 7 (22 %). Resolved defects and those that decreased in size extended more cranially than those that remained unchanged: 7.3 mm (4.2-15.9) versus 3.1 mm (2.7-3.7; p = 0.0038). Receiver operating characteristic analysis established a threshold of 3.8 mm (filling defect length), sensitivity of 88 %, specificity of 86 %, and area under the curve of 0.86 (p < 0.0001) for distinguishing FFT from plaque. Filling defects in the proximal ICA extending cranially >3.8 mm were more likely to be FFT than complex ulcerated plaque. Further studies evaluating filling defect length as a predictor for FFT are warranted. (orig.)

  6. The influence of platelet-rich fibrin on angiogenesis in guided bone regeneration using xenogenic bone substitutes: a study of rabbit cranial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong-Suk; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Yoon, Hyun-Joong

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on angiogenesis and osteogenesis in guided bone regeneration (GBR) using xenogenic bone in rabbit cranial defects. In each rabbit, 2 circular bone defects, one on either side of the midline, were prepared using a reamer drill. Each of the experimental sites received bovine bone with PRF, and each of the control sites received bovine bone alone. The animals were sacrificed at 1 week (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3) and 4 weeks (n = 3). Biopsy samples were examined histomorphometrically by light microscopy, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined by immunohistochemical staining. At all experimental time points, immunostaining intensity for VEGF was consistently higher in the experimental group than in the control group. However, the differences between the control group and the experimental group were not statistically significant in the histomorphometrical and immunohistochemical examinations. The results of this study suggest that PRF may increase the number of marrow cells. However, PRF along with xenogenic bone substitutes does not show a significant effect on bony regeneration. Further large-scale studies are needed to confirm our results. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A. [Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} and (As{sub 2}Se{sub 3})(Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}){sub y} amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co{sup 60} gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs.

  8. Verifying three-dimensional skull model reconstruction using cranial index of symmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon-Man Kung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important to establish a symmetrically regular CAD/CAM reconstruction prior to depressing the contour. The purpose of this study is to verify the aesthetic outcomes of CAD models with regular contours using cranial index of symmetry (CIS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 2011 to June 2012, decompressive craniectomy (DC was performed for 15 consecutive patients in our institute. 3-D CAD models of skull defects were reconstructed using commercial software. These models were checked in terms of symmetry by CIS scores. RESULTS: CIS scores of CAD reconstructions were 99.24±0.004% (range 98.47-99.84. CIS scores of these CAD models were statistically significantly greater than 95%, identical to 99.5%, but lower than 99.6% (p<0.001, p = 0.064, p = 0.021 respectively, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. These data evidenced the highly accurate symmetry of these CAD models with regular contours. CONCLUSIONS: CIS calculation is beneficial to assess aesthetic outcomes of CAD-reconstructed skulls in terms of cranial symmetry. This enables further accurate CAD models and CAM cranial implants with depressed contours, which are essential in patients with difficult scalp adaptation.

  9. A review of hedgehog signaling in cranial bone development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel ePan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available During craniofacial development, the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is essential for mesodermal tissue patterning and differentiation. The Hedgehog family consists of three protein ligands: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, Indian Hedgehog (IHH, and Desert Hedgehog (DHH, of which two are expressed in the craniofacial complex (IHH and SHH. Dysregulations in HH signaling are well documented to result in a wide range of craniofacial abnormalities, including holoprosencephaly, hypotelorism, and cleft lip/palate. Furthermore, mutations in HH effectors, co-receptors, and ciliary proteins result in skeletal and craniofacial deformities. Cranial suture morphogenesis is a delicate developmental process that requires control of cell commitment, proliferation and differentiation. This review focuses on both what is known and what remains unknown regarding HH signaling in cranial suture morphogenesis and intramembranous ossification. As demonstrated from murine studies, expression of both SHH and IHH is critical to the formation and fusion of the cranial sutures and calvarial ossification. SHH expression has been observed in the cranial suture mesenchyme and its precise function is not fully defined, although some postulate SHH to delay cranial suture fusion. IHH expression is mainly found on the osteogenic fronts of the calvarial bones, and functions to induce cell proliferation and differentiation. Unfortunately, neonatal lethality of deficient mice precludes a detailed examination of their postnatal calvarial phenotype. In summary, a number of basic questions are yet to be answered regarding domains of expression, developmental role, and functional overlap of HH morphogens in the calvaria. Nevertheless, SHH and IHH ligands are integral to cranial suture development and regulation of calvarial ossification. When HH signaling goes awry, the resultant suite of morphologic abnormalities highlights the important roles of HH signaling in cranial development.

  10. Vincristine-induced neuropathy in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Oman: Frequent autonomic and more severe cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Hanan F; AlFutaisi, Amna; Zacharia, Mathew; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Mevada, Surekha T; Alrawas, Abdulhakim; Khater, Doaa; Jaju, Deepali; Wali, Yasser

    2017-12-01

    Vincristine (VCR) induced peripheral neuropathy is a common complication in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A retrospective data analysis over an interval of 10 years (2006-2016) of all children with ALL seen at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital was carried out. Electronic medical records of eligible patients were reviewed. Patients with clinical evidence of neuropathy and abnormal nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were included in the study. Nineteen (nine females and 10 males) out of 103 pediatric patients developed VCR-related neuropathy, and their age ranged between 2.5 and 14 years. Symptoms started after 2-11 doses of VCR. All 19 patients had documented peripheral neuropathy on NCSs. The autonomic nervous system and cranial nerves affection was relatively common in our patients; two presented with bradycardia, two patients with unexplained tachycardia, and five had abdominal pain and constipation, complicated by typhlitis in two patients. One patient developed unilateral hearing loss. Two patients developed severe life-threatening cranial nerve involvement with bilateral ptosis and recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement presented as vocal cord paralysis, hoarseness of voice, frequent chocking, and aspiration episodes. Peripheral neuropathy was the commonest form of VCR-related neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy was relatively common in our patients. Cranial neuropathy is a serious side effect of VCR that can be severe, involving multiple cranial nerves and needs prompt recognition and management. Concomitant administration of pyridoxine and pyridostigmine does not seem to protect against further neurological damage in some patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  12. Gamma-induced defect production in ZrO2-Y2O3 crystals with different defectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurov, M.Kh.; Amonov, M.Z.; Rakov, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The defectiveness degree of ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 crystals depends on stabilizer concentration. The work is aimed at study gamma-induced defect production in crystals with different concentration of stabilizer and defects generated by neutron irradiation. Absorption spectra were measured with Specord M-40. It was found, that after gamma-irradiation of as-grown crystals up to some dose the intensity of absorption band at 420 nm reaches the maximum level of saturation. The dose of saturation depends of the concentration of stabilizer. It means that gamma-radiation does not produce any additional defects of structure. The oxygen vacancies existing in as-grown crystals are filled by the radiation induced electrons. Since the number of oxygen vacancies depends on the stabilizer concentration, then all these vacancies can be occupied by electrons at different gamma-doses. In crystals pre-irradiated with different neutron fluences followed by gamma-irradiation, the intensity of absorption bands at 420 and 530 nm increases in two stages. The gamma-dose of the second stage beginning decreases as the neutron fluence grows. The first stage of the absorption increase is due to developing of vacancies existing in as-grown crystals. The second stage is caused by generation of additional vacancies as the result of non-radiative exciton decay near the existing structure damages. The decrease of the gamma-dose, when the second stage of vacancy accumulation begins, results from the neutron induced structure damage degree

  13. Shp2 knockdown and Noonan/LEOPARD mutant Shp2-induced gastrulation defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Jopling

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shp2 is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for normal development. Activating and inactivating mutations have been identified in humans to cause the related Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes, respectively. The cell biological cause of these syndromes remains to be determined. We have used the zebrafish to assess the role of Shp2 in early development. Here, we report that morpholino-mediated knockdown of Shp2 in zebrafish resulted in defects during gastrulation. Cell tracing experiments demonstrated that Shp2 knockdown induced defects in convergence and extension cell movements. In situ hybridization using a panel of markers indicated that cell fate was not affected by Shp2 knock down. The Shp2 knockdown-induced defects were rescued by active Fyn and Yes and by active RhoA. We generated mutants of Shp2 with mutations that were identified in human patients with Noonan or LEOPARD Syndrome and established that Noonan Shp2 was activated and LEOPARD Shp2 lacked catalytic protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Expression of Noonan or LEOPARD mutant Shp2 in zebrafish embryos induced convergence and extension cell movement defects without affecting cell fate. Moreover, these embryos displayed craniofacial and cardiac defects, reminiscent of human symptoms. Noonan and LEOPARD mutant Shp2s were not additive nor synergistic, consistent with the mutant Shp2s having activating and inactivating roles in the same signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that Shp2 is required for normal convergence and extension cell movements during gastrulation and that Src family kinases and RhoA were downstream of Shp2. Expression of Noonan or LEOPARD Shp2 phenocopied the craniofacial and cardiac defects of human patients. The finding that defective Shp2 signaling induced cell movement defects as early as gastrulation may have implications for the monitoring and diagnosis of Noonan and LEOPARD syndrome.

  14. Temporalis myofascial repair of traumatic defects of the anterior fossa. Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, R P; Shagets, F W; de los Reyes, R A

    1986-06-01

    Bilateral temporalis myofascial flaps in continuity with frontal periosteum can be used in repairing extensive dural and bone defects of the anterior cranial fossa floor. The technique of preserving and using this flap is described and offers an alternative to the use of frontal pericranial tissue for repair of anterior dural defects.

  15. Radiation induced late delayed alterations in mice brain after whole body and cranial radiation: a comparative DTI analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watve, Apurva; Gupta, Mamta; Trivedi, Richa; Khushu, Subash; Rana, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Moderate dose of radiation exposure occurs during radiation accidents or radiation therapy induces pathophysiological alterations in CNS that may persist for longer duration. Studies suggest that late delayed injury is irreversible leading to metabolic and cognitive impairment. Our earlier studies have illustrated the varied response of brain at acute and early delayed phase on exposure to cranial and whole body radiation. Hence in continuation with our previous studies, present study focuses on comparative microstructural changes in brain at late delayed phase of radiation injury using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) technique. Region of interest (ROIs) were drawn on corpus callosum (CC), hippocampus (HIP), sensory-motor cortex (SMC), thalamus (TH), hypothalamus (HTH), cingulum (CG), caudeto-putamen (CUP) and cerebral peduncle (CP). The differences in FA (Fractional Anisotropy) and MD (Mean Diffusivity) values generated from these regions of all the groups were evaluated by ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Bonferroni, Post Hoc test. Maximum changes have been observed in MD values mainly in cranial group showing significantly increased MD in CC and SMC region while both the groups showed changes in TH and CUP region as compared to control. FA showed more prominent changes in whole body radiation group than cranial group by decreasing significantly in CP region while in HTH and CUP region in both the groups. Reduced FA indicates compromised structural integrity due to the loss of glial progenitor cells causing transient demyelination while increased MD has been equated with cellular membrane disruption, cell death and vasogenic edema. Thus, present study reveals late delayed CNS response after cranial and whole body radiation exposure. These findings can help us differentiate and monitor the pathophysiological changes at later stages either due to accidental or intentional exposure to ionizing radiation

  16. Cranial reconstruction: 3D biomodel and custom-built implant created using additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardini, André Luiz; Larosa, Maria Aparecida; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Zavaglia, Cecília Amélia de Carvalho; Bernardes, Luis Fernando; Lambert, Carlos Salles; Calderoni, Davi Reis; Kharmandayan, Paulo

    2014-12-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technology from engineering has helped to achieve several advances in the medical field, particularly as far as fabrication of implants is concerned. The use of AM has made it possible to carry out surgical planning and simulation using a three-dimensional physical model which accurately represents the patient's anatomy. AM technology enables the production of models and implants directly from a 3D virtual model, facilitating surgical procedures and reducing risks. Furthermore, AM has been used to produce implants designed for individual patients in areas of medicine such as craniomaxillofacial surgery, with optimal size, shape and mechanical properties. This work presents AM technologies which were applied to design and fabricate a biomodel and customized implant for the surgical reconstruction of a large cranial defect. A series of computed tomography data was obtained and software was used to extract the cranial geometry. The protocol presented was used to create an anatomic biomodel of the bone defect for surgical planning and, finally, the design and manufacture of the patient-specific implant. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metastable light induced defects in pentacene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering (DIIn), University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

  18. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10 35 cm -2 s -1 . In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E C -0.460 eV and E205a at E C -0.395 eV where E C is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V 3 ) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V 3 defect exhibits a bistability, as does the leakage current. In oxygen

  19. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  20. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions [fr

  1. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.

    1989-01-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions [fr

  2. Change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hop crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, C.

    1979-10-01

    An approximate model is developed to calculate the change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hcp metals, supposed the defect configuration is known. General expressions relating the change of elastic moduli to the final atomic coordinates and to the defect force field are derived using the specific symmetry of the defect. Explicit calculations are done for Mg. The predicted change of elastic moduli turns out to be negative for vacancies and trigonal interstitials while for hexagonal interstitials a positive change is predicted. Compatibility with experimental data would suggest that the trigonal configuration is the stable one. (author)

  3. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  4. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  5. Electron-spin-resonance study of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in oxides grown on (100) silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.Y.; Lenahan, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    We have used electron-spin resonance to investigate radiation-induced point defects in Si/SiO 2 structures with (100) silicon substrates. We find that the radiation-induced point defects are quite similar to defects generated in Si/SiO 2 structures grown on (111) silicon substrates. In both cases, an oxygen-deficient silicon center, the E' defect, appears to be responsible for trapped positive charge. In both cases trivalent silicon (P/sub b/ centers) defects are primarily responsible for radiation-induced interface states. In earlier electron-spin-resonance studies of unirradiated (100) substrate capacitors two types of P/sub b/ centers were observed; in oxides prepared in three different ways only one of these centers, the P/sub b/ 0 defect, is generated in large numbers by ionizing radiation

  6. Retinoic acid modulates chondrogenesis in the developing mouse cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Jong-Min; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Lee, Min-Jung; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2011-12-15

    The retinoic acid (RA) signaling pathway is known to play important roles during craniofacial development and skeletogenesis. However, the specific mechanism involving RA in cranial base development has not yet been clearly described. This study investigated how RA modulates endochondral bone development of the cranial base by monitoring the RA receptor RARγ, BMP4, and markers of proliferation, programmed cell death, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. We first examined the dynamic morphological and molecular changes in the sphenooccipital synchondrosis-forming region in the mouse embryo cranial bases at E12-E16. In vitro organ cultures employing beads soaked in RA and retinoid-signaling inhibitor citral were compared. In the RA study, the sphenooccipital synchondrosis showed reduced cartilage matrix and lower BMP4 expression while hypertrophic chondrocytes were replaced with proliferating chondrocytes. Retardation of chondrocyte hypertrophy was exhibited in citral-treated specimens, while BMP4 expression was slightly increased and programmed cell death was induced within the sphenooccipital synchondrosis. Our results demonstrate that RA modulates chondrocytes to proliferate, differentiate, or undergo programmed cell death during endochondral bone formation in the developing cranial base. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  7. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al_2O_3:C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyirenda, A.N.; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that when α-Al_2O_3:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al_2O_3:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of lurasidone via antagonist activities on histamine in a rat model of cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Baoming; Yu, Liang; Li, Suping; Xu, Fei; Yang, Lili; Ma, Shuai; Guo, Yi

    2018-04-01

    Cranial nerve involvement frequently involves neuron damage and often leads to psychiatric disorder caused by multiple inducements. Lurasidone is a novel antipsychotic agent approved for the treatment of cranial nerve involvement and a number of mental health conditions in several countries. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of lurasidone by antagonist activities on histamine was investigated in a rat model of cranial nerve involvement. The antagonist activities of lurasidone on serotonin 5‑HT7, serotonin 5‑HT2A, serotonin 5‑HT1A and serotonin 5‑HT6 were analyzed, and the preclinical therapeutic effects of lurasidone were examined in a rat model of cranial nerve involvement. The safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and preliminary antitumor activity of lurasidone were also assessed in the cranial nerve involvement model. The therapeutic dose of lurasidone was 0.32 mg once daily, administered continuously in 14‑day cycles. The results of the present study found that the preclinical prescriptions induced positive behavioral responses following treatment with lurasidone. The MTD was identified as a once daily administration of 0.32 mg lurasidone. Long‑term treatment with lurasidone for cranial nerve involvement was shown to improve the therapeutic effects and reduce anxiety in the experimental rats. In addition, treatment with lurasidone did not affect body weight. The expression of the language competence protein, Forkhead‑BOX P2, was increased, and the levels of neuroprotective SxIP motif and microtubule end‑binding protein were increased in the hippocampal cells of rats with cranial nerve involvement treated with lurasidone. Lurasidone therapy reinforced memory capability and decreased anxiety. Taken together, lurasidone treatment appeared to protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairment in the rat model of cranial nerve involvement, providing a basis for its use in the clinical treatment of

  9. Normal cranial CT anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    The human brain consists of well-known anatomical components. Some parts of these components have been shown to be concerned with certain functions. A complete cranial CT examination consists of a series of several slices obtained in a sequence usually from the base to the vertex of the cranial vault, in the axial mode. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to pinpoint those slices that depict a given anatomical structure or several structures that deal with a given function. To achieve this goal, the discussion of CT cranial anatomy is presented in three sections

  10. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  11. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  12. Proton irradiation induced defects in Cd and Zn doped InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, G.C.; Williams, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Proton irradiation induced defects in Zn and Cd doped InP have been studied by deep level transient spectroscopy, (DLTS). After 2 MeV proton irradiation the defects H4 and H5 were observed in lightly Zn doped InP, while the defects H3 and H5 were observed in more heavily Zn and Cd doped InP. The defect properties were not affected by the substitution of Cd for Zn, but the introduction rate of H5 was lower in Cd doped InP. The annealing rate of defects was also higher in Cd doped InP. The use of Cd doped InP may thus result in an InP solar cell with even greater radiation resistance

  13. Reconstrucción craneal con biomateriales: Revisión histórica y estado actual Cranial reconstruction with biomaterials: Historical revision and current state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zubillaga Rodríguez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available La reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales es todavía hoy día un proceso desafiante. Se define craneoplastia como la reparación de un defecto o deformidad craneal. La persistencia de traumatismos craneofaciales y procedimientos neuroquirúrgicos aporta un número importante de casos que permiten un fascinante progreso y desarrollo de nuevos materiales. El objetivo de este artículo es la revisión histórica de los distintos métodos reconstructivos craneales empleados, comentando sus ventajas e inconvenientes según el tamaño y forma del defecto a reparar. Se presentan casos clínicos recientes reconstruidos con diversos biomateriales.Craniofacial defect reconstruction is still a challenging procedure. A cranioplasty is the treatment of a cranial defect or a deformity. Cranial injuries and neurosurgical procedures provide an important group of cases that allow the development of new materials and fascinating progress. The aim of this article is a historic review of the different cranial reconstructive techniques used, describing advantages and drawbacks. The biomaterials applied in recent cases are presented.

  14. Behavior of deep level defects on voltage-induced stress of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Cho, S.E. [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Solar Cell Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of deep level defects by a voltage-induced stress for CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been investigated. CIGS solar cells were used with standard structures which are Al-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGSe{sub 2}/Mo on soda lime glass, and that resulted in conversion efficiencies as high as 16%. The samples with the same structure were isothermally stressed at 100 °C under the reverse voltages. The voltage-induced stressing in CIGS samples causes a decrease in the carrier density and conversion efficiency. To investigate the behavior of deep level defects in the stressed CIGS cells, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy was utilized, and normally 3 deep level defects (including 2 hole traps and 1 electron trap) were found to be located at 0.18 eV and 0.29 eV above the valence band maximum (and 0.36 eV below the conduction band). In voltage-induced cells, especially, it was found that the decrease of the hole carrier density could be responsible for the increase of the 0.29 eV defect, which is known to be observed in less efficient CIGS solar cells. And the carrier density and the defects are reversible at least to a large extent by resting at room-temperature without the bias voltage. From optical capture kinetics in photo-induced current transient spectroscopy measurement, the types of defects could be distinguished into the isolated point defect and the extended defect. In this work, it is suggested that the increase of the 0.29 eV defect by voltage-induced stress could be due to electrical activation accompanied by a loss of positive ion species and the activated defect gives rise to reduction of the carrier density. - Highlights: • We investigated behavior of deep level defects by voltage-induced stress. • Defect generation could affect the decrease of the conversion efficiency of cells. • Defect generation could be electrically activated by a loss of positive ion species. • Type of defects could be studied with models of point defects

  15. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  16. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  17. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  18. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed

  19. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-08-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed.

  20. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  1. N+ ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z Q; Sekiguchi, T; Yuan, X L; Maekawa, M; Kawasuso, A

    2004-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N + ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10 12 to 10 14 cm -2 . Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N + implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity

  2. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  3. CT measurements of cranial growth: microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Torkelson, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) head scans were measured to determine the cranial dimensions of four children with microcephaly. These measurements were compared with cranial dimensions of normal children. CT proved to be useful in determining the developmental status of children with neurologic problems relative to their normal counterparts on the basis on cranial dimensions

  4. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, I.J.; Smoker, W.R.; Kuta, A.J.; Felton, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  5. Bremsstrahlung-induced highly penetrating probes for nondestructive assay and defect analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Selim, F A; Harmon, J F; Kwofie, J; Spaulding, R; Erickson, G; Roney, T

    2002-01-01

    Nondestructive assay and defect analysis probes based on bremsstrahlung-induced processes have been developed to identify elements and probe defects in large volume samples. Bremsstrahlung beams from (electron accelerators) with end-point energies both above and below neutron emission threshold have been used. Below neutron emission threshold these beams (from 6 MeV small pulsed linacs), which exhibit high penetration, create positrons via pair production inside the material and produce X-ray fluorescence (XRF) radiation. Chemical assays of heavy elements in thick samples up to 10 g/cm sup 2 thick are provided by energy dispersive XRF measurements. The pair-produced positrons annihilate within the material, thereby emitting 511 keV gamma radiation. Doppler broadening spectroscopy of the 511 keV radiation can be performed to characterize the material and measure defects in samples of any desired thickness. This technique has successfully measured induced strain due to tensile stress in steel samples of 0.64 cm...

  6. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  7. ADAM13 Induces Cranial Neural Crest by Cleaving Class B Ephrins and Regulating Wnt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The cranial neural crest (CNC) are multipotent embryonic cells that contribute to craniofacial structures and other cells and tissues of the vertebrate head. During embryogenesis, CNC is induced at the neural plate boundary through the interplay of several major signaling pathways. Here we report that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 is required for early induction of CNC in Xenopus. In both cultured cells and X. tropicalis embryos, membrane-bound Ephrins (Efns) B1 and B2 were identified as substrates for ADAM13. ADAM13 upregulates canonical Wnt signaling and early expression of the transcription factor snail2, whereas EfnB1 inhibits the canonical Wnt pathway and snail2 expression. We propose that by cleaving class B Efns, ADAM13 promotes canonical Wnt signaling and early CNC induction. PMID:20708595

  8. Defect-Induced Hedgehog Polarization States in Multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linze; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Jokisaari, Jacob R.; Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Adamo, Carolina; Heikes, Colin; Schlom, Darrell G.; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2018-03-01

    Continuous developments in nanotechnology require new approaches to materials synthesis that can produce novel functional structures. Here, we show that nanoscale defects, such as nonstoichiometric nanoregions (NSNRs), can act as nano-building blocks for creating complex electrical polarization structures in the prototypical multiferroic BiFeO3 . An array of charged NSNRs are produced in BiFeO3 thin films by tuning the substrate temperature during film growth. Atomic-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging reveals exotic polarization rotation patterns around these NSNRs. These polarization patterns resemble hedgehog or vortex topologies and can cause local changes in lattice symmetries leading to mixed-phase structures resembling the morphotropic phase boundary with high piezoelectricity. Phase-field simulations indicate that the observed polarization configurations are mainly induced by charged states at the NSNRs. Engineering defects thus may provide a new route for developing ferroelectric- or multiferroic-based nanodevices.

  9. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyirenda, A.N., E-mail: anyirenda@gmail.com; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-04-15

    It is known that when α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  10. Study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaban, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This research is focused on (1) conducting detailed theoretical and experimental study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in liquid encapsulated Czohralski (LEC) grown, Zn-doped P-type indium phosphide (InP), (2) identifying the physical origin of the defects detected using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) method, and (3) and developing a second-order model to interpret the presence of nonexponential capacitance transients in DLTS method. Analysis of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in P-type InP is undertaken. The main research results are summarized as follows: (1) DLTS analysis of grown-in defects in liquid LEC-grown, Zn-doped, P-type InP is made in this study. A single-hole trap of E/sub v/ + 0.52 eV is detected with a trap density of 1.8 x 10 15 cm -3 . The physical origin of this hole trap is attributed to a phosphorus vacancy or phosphorus interstitial-related defect. (2) One-MeV electron-irradiated P-type InP introduced two new hole traps, namely E/sub v/ + 0.34 and E/sub v/ + 0.58 eV with introduction rates (dN/sub T/d phi) of 0.4 and 1.2 per electron-cm, respectively. (3) A theoretical model is developed to interpret nonexponential capacitance transients in a deep-level transient spectroscopy method when the capture process competes with the dominant thermal-emission process

  11. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  12. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yu, E-mail: tanyu2048@163.com; Fu, Runqing, E-mail: furunqing@sjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jiaqiang, E-mail: liujqmj@163.com; Wu, Yong, E-mail: wyonger@gmail.com; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wb228@126.com; Jiang, Ning, E-mail: 179639060@qq.com; Nie, Ping, E-mail: nieping1011@sina.com; Cao, Haifeng, E-mail: 0412chf@163.com; Yang, Zhi, E-mail: wcums1981@163.com; Fang, Bing, E-mail: fangbing@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-08

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  13. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Liu, Jiaqiang; Wu, Yong; Wang, Bo; Jiang, Ning; Nie, Ping; Cao, Haifeng; Yang, Zhi; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  14. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  15. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia).

  16. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia: Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Benoit

    Full Text Available Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma, has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism, its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia.

  17. N{sup +} ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z Q [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Sekiguchi, T [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Yuan, X L [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Maekawa, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Kawasuso, A [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan)

    2004-01-21

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N{sup +} ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N{sup +} implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity.

  18. Dataset of TWIST1-regulated genes in the cranial mesoderm and a transcriptome comparison of cranial mesoderm and cranial neural crest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Bildsoe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Transcriptional targets of TWIST1 in the cranial mesoderm regulate cell-matrix interactions and mesenchyme maintenance” by Bildsoe et al. (2016 [1]. The data presented here are derived from: (1 a microarray-based comparison of sorted cranial mesoderm (CM and cranial neural crest (CNC cells from E9.5 mouse embryos; (2 comparisons of transcription profiles of head tissues from mouse embryos with a CM-specific loss-of-function of Twist1 and control mouse embryos collected at E8.5 and E9.5; (3 ChIP-seq using a TWIST1-specific monoclonal antibody with chromatin extracts from TWIST1-expressing MDCK cells, a model for a TWIST1-dependent mesenchymal state.

  19. Radiation defects in lithium fluoride induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K.; Steckenreiter, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/SPMC; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-07-01

    Single crystals of lithium fluoride were irradiated with various species of heavy ions in the energy regime between 1 and 30 MeV/u. The induced radiation damage was studied with techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, chemical etching and profilometry, complemented by annealing experiments. Clear evidence is given for a complex track structure and defect morphology. Single defects such as F-centers are produced in a large halo of several tens of nanometers around the ion trajectory. The defect creation in this zone is similar to that under conventional radiation. For heavy ions above a critical energy loss of 10 keV/nm, new effects occur within a very small core region of 2-4 nm in diameter. The damage in this zone is responsible for chemical etching and for a characteristic anisotropic x-ray scattering. It is assumed that in this core, complex defect aggregates (e.g., cluster of color centers, molecular anions and vacancies) are created. Their formation is only slightly influenced by the irradiation temperature and takes place even at 15 K where diffusion processes of primary defects are frozen. Furthermore, irradiation with heavy ions leads to pronounced swelling effects which can be related to an intermediate zone of around 10 nm around the ion path. (orig.) 40 refs.

  20. Cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyar, E.; Atahan, I.L.; Akyol, F.H.; Guerkaynak, M.; Zorlu, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1989, 23 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients presenting with cranial nerve involvement (CNI) of one or more nerves at the time of diagnosis were treated and followed-up in our department. All patients were irradiated with curative intent, and total doses of 50 to 70 Gy (median 65 Gy) were delivered to the nasopharynx. Cranial nerves VI, III, V, IV, IX, and XII were the most commonly involved nerves. The total response rate of cranial nerves was 74% in a median follow-up time of 2 years, with the highest rate observed in the third and sixth cranial nerves. All complete responses except two were observed in the first month after radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Epidemiological approach to emergent cranial surgery of cranial traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülagü Kaptan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: In this study, we aim to define the emergent cranial surgery of cranial trauma cases in terms of the reason of occurance, diagnosis, prognostic factors and results. Methods: 153 cases hospitalized in our clinic during a four year period were statistically analysed in accordance with trauma etiology, age, gender, application GCS (Glascow Coma Score mortality rate, location and established patology.

    Results: 76% (116 of the 153 cases were male. The most frequent etiological reasons were, in descending order, traffic accident 52% (n = 80, fall 34% (n = 53, direct trauma to the head 14(n =20. 45% (n = 69 were diagnosed epidural haematomas, 26% (n = 40 were diagnosed depression fractures and 3% (n = 5 were diagnosed intracerebral haematomas. A meaningful statistical difference was found in the comparison of the diagnosis regarding gender (p=0,012 age group (p=0,0282 and GCS (p=0,0001.

    Conclusions: In order to prevent cranial traumas, studies aimed at minimizing traffic accidents should be undertaken. The most essential action after the accident has occured is triage, and this is of great importance in order to establish communication among the health institutions.

  2. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  3. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H.; Fontaine, J.C.; Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.)

  4. Risk factors of conventional irradiation-induced lower cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianji; Hong Jinsheng; Zhang Yu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the risk factors of radiation-induced lower cranial neuropathy (RILCN) after conventional radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and to improve the radiotherapeutic planning. Methods: A hundred cases received radical radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 200 individual matched controls on sex, age and time to start the radiotherapy were studied. Conditional logistic regression model was used to analyze 13 risk factors related to development of RILCN. Results: Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that cigarette smoking, irradiation scheme, radiation close to the superior neck, neck fibrosis and acute radiation-related dermatitis of neck were risk factors of RILCN, their relative risks were 4.594, 2.629, 1.072, 4.141 and 2.531, respectively. Among three external irradiation schemes, it is found that pre-auricular portal plus whole neck tangential portal irradiation had the highest risk of RILCN. Conclusions: The study suggested that the irradiation scheme of pre-auricular portal plus whole neck tangential portal should be no longer used. (authors)

  5. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  6. Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in lithium orthosilicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiliks, J.E.; Kizane, G.K.; Supe, A.A.; Abramenkovs, A.A.; Tiliks, J.J. (Latvian Univ., Riga (Latvia)); Vasiljev, V.G. (Acad. A.A. Bochvar Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in polycrystalline powders and ceramic pellets of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} were studied under the effect of various types of ionizing irradiation ({gamma} quants, accelerated electrons, reactor irradiation), humidity, temperature, impurities in the samples, etc. The content of radiation defects and radiolysis products poorly depends on irradiation type, dose rate, admixture elements. The concentration of defects highly depends on the temperature of irradiation, humidity, granural size. Empirical dependence of radiolysis degree {alpha} on the dose was found: {alpha}=5x10{sup -2}xD{sup 0.5} for {gamma} and electron irradiation (T{sub rad}=300-350 K) and {alpha}=5x10{sup -3}xD{sup 0.5} for reactor radiation (T{sub rad}=700-800 K); {alpha} - matrix dissociation degree (in %); D - dose (in MGy). Colloidal lithium and silicon, lithium and silicon oxides, and O{sub 2} are the final products of radiolysis. Radiation-induced defects change tritium thermo-extraction parameters, deteriorate mechanical, thermo-physical and electric properties of ceramics. (orig.).

  7. Optical coherence tomography imaging of cranial meninges post brain injury in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo June Choi; Ruikang K.Wang

    2017-01-01

    We report a new application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the cranial meninges in an animal model of brain injury in vivo.The injury is induced in a mouse due to skull thinning,in which the repeated and excessive drilling exerts mechanical stress on the mouse brain through the skull,resulting in acute and mild brain injury.Transcranial OCT imaging reveals an interesting virtual space between the cranial meningeal layers post skull thinning,which is gradually closed within hours.The finding suggests a promise of OCT as an effective tool to monitor the mechanical trauma in the small animal model of brain injury.

  8. Development and validation of technique for in-vivo 3D analysis of cranial bone graft survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Mark P.; Caldwell, Curtis B.; Antonyshyn, Oleh M.; Ma, Karen; Cooper, Perry W.; Ehrlich, Lisa E.

    1997-05-01

    Bone autografts are routinely employed in the reconstruction of facial deformities resulting from trauma, tumor ablation or congenital malformations. The combined use of post- operative 3D CT and SPECT imaging provides a means for quantitative in vivo evaluation of bone graft volume and osteoblastic activity. The specific objectives of this study were: (1) Determine the reliability and accuracy of interactive computer-assisted analysis of bone graft volumes based on 3D CT scans; (2) Determine the error in CT/SPECT multimodality image registration; (3) Determine the error in SPECT/SPECT image registration; and (4) Determine the reliability and accuracy of CT-guided SPECT uptake measurements in cranial bone grafts. Five human cadaver heads served as anthropomorphic models for all experiments. Four cranial defects were created in each specimen with inlay and onlay split skull bone grafts and reconstructed to skull and malar recipient sites. To acquire all images, each specimen was CT scanned and coated with Technetium doped paint. For purposes of validation, skulls were landmarked with 1/16-inch ball-bearings and Indium. This study provides a new technique relating anatomy and physiology for the analysis of cranial bone graft survival.

  9. Defect-impurity complex induced long-range ferromagnetism in GaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assa Aravindh, S

    2015-12-14

    Present work investigates the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Gd doped wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) oriented along the [0001] direction in presence of intrinsic defects by employing the GGA + U approximation. We find that Ga vacancy (VGa) exhibits lower formation energy compared to N vacancy. Further stabilization of point defects occurs due to the presence of Gd. The strength of ferromagnetism (FM) increases by additional positive charge induced by the VGa. Electronic structure analysis shows that VGa introduces defect levels in the band gap leading to ferromagnetic coupling due to the hybridization of the p states of the Ga and N atoms with the Gd d and f states. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of 76.4 meV is obtained in presence of Gd-VGa complex; hence, the FM is largely determined by the cation vacancy-rare earth complex defects in GaN NWs.

  10. Defect-impurity complex induced long-range ferromagnetism in GaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assa Aravindh, S; Roqan, Iman S.

    2015-01-01

    Present work investigates the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Gd doped wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) oriented along the [0001] direction in presence of intrinsic defects by employing the GGA + U approximation. We find that Ga vacancy (VGa) exhibits lower formation energy compared to N vacancy. Further stabilization of point defects occurs due to the presence of Gd. The strength of ferromagnetism (FM) increases by additional positive charge induced by the VGa. Electronic structure analysis shows that VGa introduces defect levels in the band gap leading to ferromagnetic coupling due to the hybridization of the p states of the Ga and N atoms with the Gd d and f states. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of 76.4 meV is obtained in presence of Gd-VGa complex; hence, the FM is largely determined by the cation vacancy-rare earth complex defects in GaN NWs.

  11. Transformation between divacancy defects induced by an energy pulse in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Liu, XiaoYi; Zhou, Wei; Wang, FengChao; Wu, HengAn

    2016-07-08

    The mutual transformations among the four typical divacancy defects induced by a high-energy pulse were studied via molecular dynamics simulation. Our study revealed all six possible mutual transformations and found that defects transformed by absorbing energy to overcome the energy barrier with bonding, debonding, and bond rotations. The reversibility of defect transformations was also investigated by potential energy analysis. The energy difference was found to greatly influence the transformation reversibility. The direct transformation path was irreversible if the energy difference was too large. We also studied the correlation between the transformation probability and the input energy. It was found that the transformation probability had a local maxima at an optimal input energy. The introduction of defects and their structural evolutions are important for tailoring the exceptional properties and thereby performances of graphene-based devices, such as nanoporous membranes for the filtration and desalination of water.

  12. Destruction-polymerization transformations as a source of radiation-induced extended defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, Oleh; Filipecki, Jacek; Shpotyuk, Mykhaylo

    2013-01-01

    Long-wave shift of the optical transmission spectrum in the region of fundamental optical absorption edge is registered for As 2 S 3 chalcogenide glassy semiconductors after γ-irradiation. This effect is explained in the frameworks of the destruction-polymerization transformations concept by accepting the switching of the heteropolar As-S covalent bonds into homopolar As-As ones. It is assumed that (As 4 + ; S 1 - ) defect pairs are created under such switching. Formula to calculate content of the induced defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors is proposed. It is assumed that defects concentration depends on energy of broken covalent bond, bond-switching energy balance, correlation energy, optical band-gap and energy of excitation light. It is shown that theoretically calculated maximally possible content of radiation-induced defects in As 2 S 3 is about 1.6% while concentration of native defects is negligible. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  14. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  15. Structural and defects induced phenomena in γ-rays irradiated 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibuyi, P.; Ngom, B.D.; Kotsedi, L.

    2016-01-01

    Damages and/or defects induced by γ-rays irradiation on 6H-SiC single crystals in channeled configuration towards 〈006〉/〈0012〉 crystallographic directions are reported in the range of 0–1200 kGy. Atomic force microscopy, X-rays diffraction, Raman and photoluminescence investigations were used to obtain a comprehensive set of informations on the nature and population distribution of the induced defects. Primarily, there was no carbon clusterization upon γ-rays irradiation and hence no formation of others SiC polytypes. In contrast, the γ-rays irradiation has induced an increase of the surface roughness at higher doses, which indicates a structural degradation. Larger doses induced an emergence of deeper shallow traps at energies greater than 350 meV below the bandgap. - Highlights: • No formation of others SiC polytypes. • The gamma rays irradiation has induced a slight surface amorphization. • A re-crystallization at lower and higher doses is noticed. • Larger doses induced a substantial internal stress.

  16. A molecular dynamics simulation study of irradiation induced defects in gold nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenqiang; Chen, Piheng; Qiu, Ruizhi; Khan, Maaz; Liu, Jie; Hou, Mingdong; Duan, Jinglai

    2017-08-01

    Displacement cascade in gold nanowires was studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with different kinetic energies were initiated either at the surface or at the center of the nanowires. We found three kinds of defects that were induced by the cascade, including point defects, stacking faults and crater at the surface. The starting points of PKAs influence the number of residual point defects, and this consequently affect the boundary of anti-radiation window which was proposed by calculation of diffusion of point defects to the free surface of nanowires. Formation of stacking faults that expanded the whole cross-section of gold nanowires was observed when the PKA's kinetic energy was higher than 5 keV. Increasing the PKA's kinetic energy up to more than 10 keV may lead to the formation of crater at the surface of nanowires due to microexplosion of hot atoms. At this energy, PKAs started from the center of nanowires can also result in the creation of crater because length of cascade region is comparable to diameter of nanowires. Both the two factors, namely initial positions of PKAs as well as the craters induced by higher energy irradiation, would influence the ability of radiation resistance of metal nanowires.

  17. Comparison of ossification of demineralized bone, hydroxyapatite, Gelfoam, and bone wax in cranial defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Ahmed, O F; Neth, D; Reger, S; Zins, J

    1996-09-01

    Demineralized bone allografts in the repair of calvarial defects are compared with other common bone fillers. This study uses a video-digitizing radiographic analysis of calvarial defect ossification to determine calcification of bone defects and its relation to postoperative clinical examination and regional controls. The postoperative clinical results at 3 months demonstrated that bony healing was greatest in bur holes filled with demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite. Radiographic analysis demonstrated calcification of demineralized bone-filled defects compared to bone wax- and Gelfoam-filled regions. Hydroxyapatite granules are radiographically dense, thus not allowing accurate measurement of true bone healing. The results suggest that demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite provide better structural support via bone healing to defined calvarial defects than do Gelfoam and bone wax.

  18. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  19. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO 2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  20. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S.K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  1. 100 MeV silver ions induced defects and modifications in silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, Vijay S.; Deore, Avinash V.; Dahiwale, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: •Study of silver ion induced defects and modifications in silica glass. •Variation in oxygen deficiency centres (ODA-II) and nonbridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC). •Study of structural damage in terms of Urbach energy. -- Abstract: A few silica glass samples having 1 cm{sup 2} area and 0.1 cm thickness were irradiated with 100 MeV energy Ag{sup 7+} ions for the fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} to 5 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The optical properties and the corresponding induced defects were characterised by the techniques such as UV–Visible, Photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The UV–Visible absorption spectra show two peaks, one at 5 eV and another weak peak at 5.8 eV. A peak observed at 5.0 eV corresponds to B{sub 2} band (oxygen deficiency in SiO{sub 2} network) and the peak at 5.8 eV is due to the paramagnetic defects like E′ centre. The intensities of these peaks found to be increased with increase in ion fluence. It attributes to the increase in the concentration of E′ centres and B{sub 2} band respectively. In addition, the optical band gap energy, Urbach energy and the defects concentration have been calculated using Urbach plot. The optical band gap found to be decreased from 4.65 eV to 4.39 eV and the Urbach energy found to be increased from 60 meV to 162 meV. The defect concentration of nonbridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC) and E′ centres are found to be increased to 1.69 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and 3.134 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} respectively. In PL spectra, the peak appeared at 1.92 eV and 2.7 eV envisage the defects of nonbridging oxygen hole centres and B{sub 2α} oxygen deficient centres respectively. ESR spectra also confirms the existence of E′ and NBOHC centres. FTIR spectra shows scissioning of Si-O-Si bonds and the formation of Si-H and Si-OH bonds, which supports to the co-existence of the defects induced by Ag

  2. Differential radiodiagnosis of cranial lesions in hyperparathyroid and deforming asteodystrophy, fibrous osteoplasia, multiple myeloma and tumor metastases to the cranial bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuzyak, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an analysis of craniographic findings were provided for 58 patients with primary hyperparathyrosis, 12 with fibrous osteodysplasia, 6 with deforming osteodystrophy, 14 with multiple myeloma and 16 with tumor metastases to the cranial bones. A study was made of some features of roentgenological semiotics (changes in the structure thickness and shapes of the cranial bones) of cranial bone lesions in the above diseases. Differential radiodiagnosis of cranial lesions in hypeparathyroid and deforming osteodystrophy, fibrous osteodysplasia, multiple myeloma and metastatic lesions of the cranial bones should be based not on single signs but on the symptom-complex (x-ray syndrome). For each of the analysed diseases x-ray syndromes were described

  3. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  4. Identification of equilibrium and irradiation-induced defects in nuclear ceramics: electronic structure calculations of defect properties and positron annihilation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiktor, Julia

    2015-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation the fission of actinide nuclei causes the creation of large amounts of defects, which affect the physical and chemical properties of materials inside the reactor, in particular the fuel and structural materials. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) can be used to characterize irradiation induced defects, empty or containing fission products. This non-destructive experimental technique involves detecting the radiation generated during electron-positron annihilation in a sample and deducing the properties of the material studied. As positrons get trapped in open volume defects in solids, by measuring their lifetime and momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, one can obtain information on the open and the chemical environments of the defects. In this work electronic structure calculations of positron annihilation characteristics were performed using two-component density functional theory (TCDFT). To calculate the momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, we implemented the necessary methods in the open-source ABINIT program. The theoretical results have been used to contribute to the identification of the vacancy defects in two nuclear ceramics, silicon carbide (SiC) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). (author) [fr

  5. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  6. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Ruikar, Devashish; Surath, Mohandas

    2013-07-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  7. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Subrat Kumar Nanda; Sita Jayalakshmi; Devashish Ruikar; Mohandas Surath

    2013-01-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is...

  8. Transmission electron microscope study of neutron irradiation-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro; Kawano, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Ryoji

    1994-01-01

    Commercial Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) and float-zone silicon (Fz-Si) wafers were irradiated with fission neutrons at various fluences from 10 19 to 10 22 n/cm 2 at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1043 K. The irradiation induced defect structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and ultra high voltage electron microscopy, which were compared with Marlowe code computer simulation results. It was concluded that the vacancy-type damage structure formed at 473 K were initiated from collapse of vacancy-rich regions of cascades, while interstitial type defect clusters formed by irradiation above 673 K were associated with interstitial oxygen atoms and free interstitials which diffused out of the cascades. Complex defect structures were identified to consist of {113} and {111} planar faults by the parallel beam illumination diffraction analysis. (author)

  9. Cranial MR finding of reversible eclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Seok Ho; Hwang, Mi Young; Kim, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Seon Goo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Joo, Yang Goo; Suh, Soo Ji [College of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in diagnosis and for follow-up of reversible eclampsia. Cranial MRI was performed on four consecutive pregnant patients(ante-partum 3 cases, postpartum 1 cases), who had generalized tonic-clonic seizure caused by eclampsia. One of the four patients underwent follow-up MRI. Cranial MRI typically demonstrated bilateral hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images and iso-to hypointense lesions on T1-weighted images. MRI abnormalities were most commonly located in the distribution of the posterior cerebral artery circulation and were associated with symptoms of visual disturbance. Most cranial lesions of eclampsia demonstrated in MRI were reversible. MRI with its capability to detect even subtle abnormalities in the brain that are not visible on CT, and may be the technique of choice for evaluating the cerebral the pathology of pregnant women with eclampsia.

  10. Evolution of Radiation Induced Defects in SiC: A Multiscale Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao

    temperatures beyond that. Even though clusters cannot diffuse by thermal vibrations, we found they can migrate at room temperature under the influence of electron radiation. This is the first direct observation of radiation-induced diffusion of defect clusters in bulk materials. We show that the underlying mechanism of this athermal diffusion is elastic collision between incoming electrons and cluster atoms. Our findings suggest that defect clusters may be mobile under certain irradiation conditions, changing current understanding of cluster annealing process in irradiated SiC. With the knowledge of cluster diffusion in SiC demonstrated in this thesis, we now become able to predict cluster evolution in SiC with good agreement with experimental measurements. This ability can enable us to estimate changes in many properties of irradiated SiC relevant for its applications in reactors. Internal interfaces such as grain boundaries can behave as sinks to radiation induced defects. The ability of GBs to absorb, transport, and annihilate radiation-induced defects (sink strength) is important to understand radiation response of polycrystalline materials and to better design interfaces for improved resistance to radiation damage. Nowadays, it is established GBs' sink strength is not a static property but rather evolves with many factors, including radiation environments, grain size, and GB microstructure. In this thesis, I investigated the response of small-angle tilt and twist GBs to point defects fluxes in SiC. First of all, I found the pipe diffusion of interstitials in tilt GBs is slower than bulk diffusion. This is because the increased interatomic distance at dislocation cores raises the migration barrier of interstitial dumbbells. Furthermore, I show that both the annihilation of interstitials at jogs and jog nucleation from clusters are diffusion-controlled and can occur under off-stoichiometric interstitial fluxes. Finally, a dislocation line model is developed to predict the

  11. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrat Kumar Nanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth. Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  12. Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.F.; Kasprian, G.; Nemec, U.; Czerny, C.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies. (orig.) [de

  13. Contribution of Metal Defects in the Assembly Induced Emission of Cu Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zhennan

    2017-03-20

    Aggregation/assembly induced emission (AIE) has been observed for metal nanoclusters (NCs), but the origin of the enhanced emission is not fully understood, yet. In this work, the significant contribution of metal defects on AIE is revealed by engineering the self-assembly process of Cu NCs using ethanol. The presence of ethanol leads to a rapid assembly of NCs into ultrathin nanosheets, promoting the formation of metal defects-rich surface. Detailed studies and computer simulation confirm that the metal defects-rich nanosheets possess increased Cu(I)-to-Cu(0) ratio, which greatly influences ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer and therewith facilitates the radiative relaxation of excitons. Consequently, the Cu NCs self-assembly nanosheets exhibit obvious emission enhancement.

  14. Secular trends in Cherokee cranial morphology: Eastern vs Western bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, Rebecca; Ross, Ann H; Jantz, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The research objective was to examine if secular trends can be identified for cranial data commissioned by Boas in 1892, specifically for cranial breadth and cranial length of the Eastern and Western band Cherokee who experienced environmental hardships. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the degree of relationship between each of the cranial measures: cranial length, cranial breadth and cephalic index, along with predictor variables (year-of-birth, location, sex, admixture); the model revealed a significant difference for all craniometric variables. Additional regression analysis was performed with smoothing Loess plots to observe cranial length and cranial breadth change over time (year-of-birth) separately for Eastern and Western Cherokee band females and males born between 1783-1874. This revealed the Western and Eastern bands show a decrease in cranial length over time. Eastern band individuals maintain a relatively constant head breadth, while Western Band individuals show a sharp decline beginning around 1860. These findings support negative secular trend occurring for both Cherokee bands where the environment made a detrimental impact; this is especially marked with the Western Cherokee band.

  15. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Segregation of Spontaneous and Training Induced Recovery from Visual Field Defects in Subacute Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douwe P. Bergsma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether rehabilitation after stroke profits from an early start is difficult to establish as the contributions of spontaneous recovery and treatment are difficult to tease apart. Here, we use a novel training design to dissociate these components for visual rehabilitation of subacute stroke patients with visual field defects such as hemianopia. Visual discrimination training was started within 6 weeks after stroke in 17 patients. Spontaneous and training-induced recoveries were distinguished by training one-half of the defect for 8 weeks, while monitoring spontaneous recovery in the other (control half of the defect. Next, trained and control regions were swapped, and training continued for another 8 weeks. The same paradigm was also applied to seven chronic patients for whom spontaneous recovery can be excluded and changes in the control half of the defect point to a spillover effect of training. In both groups, field stability was assessed during a no-intervention period. Defect reduction was significantly greater in the trained part of the defect than in the simultaneously untrained part of the defect irrespective of training onset (p = 0.001. In subacute patients, training contributed about twice as much to their defect reduction as the spontaneous recovery. Goal Attainment Scores were significantly and positively correlated with the total defect reduction (p = 0.01, percentage increase reading speed was significantly and positively correlated with the defect reduction induced by training (epoch 1: p = 0.0044; epoch 2: p = 0.023. Visual training adds significantly to the spontaneous recovery of visual field defects, both during training in the early and the chronic stroke phase. However, field recovery as a result of training in this subacute phase was as large as in the chronic phase. This suggests that patients benefited primarily of early onset training by gaining access to a larger visual field sooner.

  17. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  18. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence

  19. Direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into cranial motor neurons using a piggyBac vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo De Santis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs are widely used for in vitro disease modeling. One of the challenges in the field is represented by the ability of converting human PSCs into specific disease-relevant cell types. The nervous system is composed of a wide variety of neuronal types with selective vulnerability in neurodegenerative diseases. This is particularly relevant for motor neuron diseases, in which different motor neurons populations show a different susceptibility to degeneration. Here we developed a fast and efficient method to convert human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into cranial motor neurons of the branchiomotor and visceral motor subtype. These populations represent the motor neuron subgroup that is primarily affected by a severe form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with bulbar onset and worst prognosis. This goal was achieved by stable integration of an inducible vector, based on the piggyBac transposon, allowing controlled activation of Ngn2, Isl1 and Phox2a (NIP. The NIP module effectively produced electrophysiologically active cranial motor neurons. Our method can be easily extended to PSCs carrying disease-associated mutations, thus providing a useful tool to shed light on the cellular and molecular bases of selective motor neuron vulnerability in pathological conditions. Keywords: Spinal motor neuron, Cranial motor neuron, Induced pluripotent stem cells, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Phox2a, piggyBac

  20. Impurity Role In Mechanically Induced Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.

    2000-01-01

    An improved understanding of dislocation dynamics and interactions is an outstanding problem in the multi scale modeling of materials properties, and is the current focus of major theoretical efforts world wide. We have developed experimental and theoretical tools that will enable us to measure and calculate quantities defined by the defect structure. Unique to the measurements is a new spectroscopy that determines the detailed elemental composition at the defect site. The measurements are based on positron annihilation spectroscopy performed with a 3 MeV positron beam [1]. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is highly sensitive to dislocations and associated defects and can provide unique elements of the defect size and structure. Performing this spectroscopy with a highly penetrating positron beam enables flexibility in sample handling. Experiments on fatigued and stressed samples have been done and in situ measurement capabilities have been developed. We have recently performed significant upgrades to the accelerator operation and novel new experiments have been performed [2-4] To relate the spectrographic results and the detailed structure of a defect requires detailed calculations. Measurements are coupled with calculated results based on a description of positions of atoms at the defect. This gives an atomistic view of dislocations and associated defects including impurity interactions. Our ability to probe impurity interactions is a unique contribution to defect understanding not easily addressed by other atomistic spectroscopies

  1. What can we learn from Raman Spectroscopy on irradiation-induced defects in UO2?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, L.; Martin, Ph.; Simon, P.; Guimbretiere, G.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results on irradiated UO 2 by Raman spectroscopy evidenced Raman lines that are characteristic of irradiation-induced defects. Three main mechanisms are identified to explain their origin: resonant Raman, formation of new molecular entities, or breakdown in symmetry. Arguments are given to consider breakdown in symmetry as the predominant mechanism. A tentative description of the defects at the origin of this symmetry breakdown is proposed in terms of coordination polyhedrons of uranium. This discussion led us to consider that the Raman defect modes could be related to area with different stoichiometry. (authors)

  2. Optical manipulation of photonic defect-modes in cholesteric liquid crystals induced by direct laser-lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Lee, Chee Heng; Miura, Yusuke; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation of photonic defect-modes in cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs), which are one-dimensional pseudo photonic band-gap materials have been demonstrated by an external optical field. A structural defect in which the pitch length of the ChLC in the bulk and the defect are different was introduced by inducing local polymerization in a photo-polymerizable ChLC material by a direct laser-lithography process, and infiltrating a different ChLC material as the defect medium. When an azobenzene dye-doped ChLC was infiltrated in the defect, the trans-cis isomerization of the dye upon ultraviolet (UV) exposure caused the pitch to shorten, changing the contrast in the pitch lengths at the bulk and the defect, leading to a consequent shifting of the defect-mode. The all-optical manipulation was reversible and had high reproducibility

  3. High resolution deep level transient spectroscopy and process-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans-Freeman, J.H.; Emiroglu, D.; Vernon-Parry, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution, or Laplace, deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) enables the identification of very closely spaced energetic levels in a semiconductor bandgap. DLTS may resolve peaks with a separation of tens of electron volts, but LDLTS can resolve defect energy separations as low as a few MeV. In this paper, we present results from LDLTS applied to ion implantation-induced defects in silicon, with particular emphasis on characterisation of end-of-range interstitial type defects. Silicon was implanted with a variety of ions from mass 28 to 166. A combination of LDLTS and direct capture cross-section measurements was employed to show that electrically active small extended defects were present in the as-implanted samples. Larger dislocations were then generated in Si by oxygenation to act as a control sample. These stacking faults had typical lengths of microns, and their electrical activity was subsequently characterised by LDLTS. This was to establish the sensitivity of LDLTS to defects whose carrier capture is characterised by a non-exponential filling process and an evolving band structure as carrier capture proceeds. The LDLTS spectra show several components in capacitance transients originating from both the end-of-range defects, and the stacking faults, and also clearly show that the carrier emission rates reduce as these extended defects fill with carriers. The end-of-range defects and the stacking faults are shown to have the same electrical behaviour

  4. Role of blink reflex in diagnosis of subclinical cranial neuropathy in diabetic mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem, Shakouri S; Behzad, Davoudi

    2006-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus. Cranial nerves III, VII, and V are among the most commonly affected in diabetic patients. Traditional electrodiagnosis (Edx) studies are a useful method for diagnosis of PN and symptomatic cranial neuropathy, and may not be useful for detecting subclinical involvement of cranial nerves. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the role of blink reflex (BR) for early diagnosis of cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients with PN. A prospective study was performed on NIDDM patients with PN. One hundred eighty-eight subjects were included in our study in which 142 acted as healthy subjects and 46 as diabetic patients. Patients were excluded with prior history of cranial nerve lesions, stroke, or any other disease with polyneuropathy or drug-induced neuropathy. Routine nerve conduction studies were performed, and only patients with PN were included in this study. Abnormalities were found in 54.4% of patients. R1, IR2, and CR2 were prolonged relative to the healthy group. Statistically there was no significant difference in R/D ratio of patients (P=0.201). Also, there was a positive correlation between R1, IR2, and CR2 latencies with duration of diabetes and severity of polyneuropathy, but not for R/D. The greatest correlation was shown in R1 latency (69.9% abnormality). BR is a noninvasive and very useful method for the evaluation and diagnosis of subclinical cranial nerve involvement in diabetic patients.

  5. Taurine protects methamphetamine-induced developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Hu, Chunyan; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan; Deng, Pengchi; Lv, Lei; Wu, Dan; Deng, Yi; Zhao, Jinxuan; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Youzhi; Yang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    Investigations have characterized addictive drug-induced developmental cardiovascular malformation in human, non-human primate and rodent. However, the underlying mechanism of malformation caused by drugs during pregnancy is still largely unknown, and preventive and therapeutic measures have been lacking. Using 1 H NMR spectroscopy, we profiled the metabolites from human embryo endothelial cells exposed to methamphetamine (METH) and quantified a total of 226 peaks. We identified 11 metabolites modified robustly and found that taurine markedly increased. We then validated the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in taurine could attribute to its effect in inhibiting METH-induced developmental angiogenesis defect. Taurine supplement showed a more significant potential than other metabolites in protecting against METH-induced injury in endothelial cells. Taurine strongly attenuated METH-induced inhibition of proliferation and migration in endothelial cells. Furthermore, death rate and vessel abnormality of zebrafish embryos treated with METH were greatly reversed by taurine. In addition, taurine supplement caused a rapid decrease in reactive oxygen species generation and strongly attenuated the excitable arise of antioxidase activities in the beginning of METH exposure prophase. Dysregulations of NF-κB, p-ERK as well as Bax, which reflect apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium, were blocked by taurine. Our results provide the first evidence that taurine prevents METH-caused developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism. Taurine could serve as a potential therapeutic or preventive intervention of developmental vascular malformation for the pregnant women with drug use. Highlights: ► Metabonomics findings. ► Abnormal development. ► Dysregulations of key proteins.

  6. Taurine protects methamphetamine-induced developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Hu, Chunyan; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Deng, Pengchi [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Lv, Lei [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, Dan [College of Basic and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Deng, Yi; Zhao, Jinxuan; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Youzhi; Yang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Yinglan [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Cen, Xiaobo, E-mail: xbcenalan@vip.sina.com [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-05-01

    Investigations have characterized addictive drug-induced developmental cardiovascular malformation in human, non-human primate and rodent. However, the underlying mechanism of malformation caused by drugs during pregnancy is still largely unknown, and preventive and therapeutic measures have been lacking. Using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, we profiled the metabolites from human embryo endothelial cells exposed to methamphetamine (METH) and quantified a total of 226 peaks. We identified 11 metabolites modified robustly and found that taurine markedly increased. We then validated the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in taurine could attribute to its effect in inhibiting METH-induced developmental angiogenesis defect. Taurine supplement showed a more significant potential than other metabolites in protecting against METH-induced injury in endothelial cells. Taurine strongly attenuated METH-induced inhibition of proliferation and migration in endothelial cells. Furthermore, death rate and vessel abnormality of zebrafish embryos treated with METH were greatly reversed by taurine. In addition, taurine supplement caused a rapid decrease in reactive oxygen species generation and strongly attenuated the excitable arise of antioxidase activities in the beginning of METH exposure prophase. Dysregulations of NF-κB, p-ERK as well as Bax, which reflect apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium, were blocked by taurine. Our results provide the first evidence that taurine prevents METH-caused developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism. Taurine could serve as a potential therapeutic or preventive intervention of developmental vascular malformation for the pregnant women with drug use. Highlights: ► Metabonomics findings. ► Abnormal development. ► Dysregulations of key proteins.

  7. Endoscopic transnasal resection of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Divitiis, Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi M; de Divitiis, Oreste; Esposito, Isabella

    2008-01-01

    The extended transnasal approach, a recent surgical advancements for the ventral skull base, allows excellent midline access to and visibility of the anterior cranial fossa, which was previously thought to be approachable only via a transcranial route. The extended transnasal approach allows early decompression of the optic canals, obviates the need for brain retraction, and reduces neurovascular manipulation. Between 2004 and 2007, 11 consecutive patients underwent transnasal resection of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas--4 olfactory groove (OGM) and 7 tuberculum sellae (TSM) meningiomas. Age at surgery, sex, symptoms, and imaging studies were reviewed. Tumor size and tumor extension were estimated, and the anteroposterior, vertical, and horizontal diameters were measred on MR images. Medical records, surgical complications, and outcomes of the patients were collected. A gross-total removal of the lesion was achieved in 10 patients (91%), and in 1 patient with a TSM only a near-total (> 90%) resection was possible. Four patients with preoperative visual function defect had a complete recovery, whereas 3 patients experienced a transient worsening of vision, fully recovered within few days. In 3 patients (2 with TSMs and 1 with an OGM), a postoperative CSF leak occurred, requiring a endoscopic surgery for skull base defect repair. Another patient (a case involving a TSM) developed transient diabetes insipidus. The operative time ranged from 6 to 10 hours in the OGM group and from 4.5 to 9 hours in the TSM group. The mean duration of the hospital stay was 13.5 and 10 days in the OGM and TSM groups, respectively. Six patients (3 with OGMs and 3 with TSMs) required a blood transfusion. Surgery-related death occurred in 1 patient with TSM, in whom the tumor was successfully removed. The technique offers a minimally invasive route to the midline anterior skull base, allowing the surgeon to avoid using brain retraction and reducing manipulation of the large vessels and

  8. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, Brett; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation

  9. Effects of point defect trapping and solute segregation on irradiation-induced swelling and creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of irradiation swelling and creep, generalized to include impurity trapping of point defects and impurity-induced changes in sink efficiencies for point defects, is reviewed. The mathematical framework is developed and significant results are described. These include the relation between vacancy and interstitial trapping and the effectiveness of trapping as compared to segregation-induced changes in sink efficiencies in modifying void nucleation, void growth, and creep. Current understanding is critically assessed. Several areas requiring further development are identified. In particular those given special attention are the treatment of nondilute solutions and the consequences of current uncertainties in fundamental materials properties whose importance has been identified using the theory

  10. Universal Effectiveness of Inducing Magnetic Moments in Graphene by Amino-Type sp3-Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inducing magnetic moments in graphene is very important for its potential application in spintronics. Introducing sp3-defects on the graphene basal plane is deemed as the most promising approach to produce magnetic graphene. However, its universal validity has not been very well verified experimentally. By functionalization of approximately pure amino groups on graphene basal plane, a spin-generalization efficiency of ~1 μB/100 NH2 was obtained for the first time, thus providing substantial evidence for the validity of inducing magnetic moments by sp3-defects. As well, amino groups provide another potential sp3-type candidate to prepare magnetic graphene.

  11. Origin of the defects-induced ferromagnetism in un-doped ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Xie, Zheng; Li, Zhengcao; Wang, Weipeng; Zhang, Zhengjun; Li, Zhuoxin; Cheng, Guodong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Baoyi; Cao, Xingzhong

    2013-02-01

    We clarified, in this Letter, that in un-doped ZnO single crystals after thermal annealing in flowing argon, the defects-induced room-temperature ferromagnetism was originated from the surface defects and specifically, from singly occupied oxygen vacancies denoted as F+, by the optical and electrical properties measurements as well as positron annihilation analysis. In addition, a positive linear relationship was observed between the ferromagnetism and the F+ concentration, which is in support with the above clarification.

  12. An investigation into the regulation of intra-cranial pressure and its influence upon the surrounding cranial bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Graham

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study is to present a rational coherent hypothesis to explain the palpable involuntary movements of the cranium. The arterial and venous anatomy inside and around the skull and spinal column presents a complete vascular system with the capacity to regulate intra-cranial pressure to a level of equilibrium slightly higher than atmospheric pressure. Variations in cerebrospinal fluid (csf) pressure control the volume of blood draining through the cavernous sinus and hence into the inter-vertebral venous plexus in relation to the jugular vein. Stable intra-cranial pressure is maintained by a controlled release of venous blood through the inter-vertebral venous plexus (slow) and the jugular vein (fast) in the cavernous sinus. Any distortion of the skull from its healthy state will lead to reduced intra-cranial volume. The process of release from the state of compression has been interpreted as "cranial rhythm" but may be a mechanical adjustment increasing the internal volume of the skull, aided by the continual maintenance of stable intracranial pressure. This involuntary movement is capable of being assisted manually.

  13. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  14. Infant Positioning, Baby Gear Use, and Cranial Asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachry, Anne H; Nolan, Vikki G; Hand, Sarah B; Klemm, Susan A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives This study aimed to identify predictors of cranial asymmetry. We hypothesize that among infants diagnosed with cranial asymmetry in the sampled region, there is an association between exposure to more time in baby gear and less awake time in prone and side-lying than in infants who do not present with this condition. Methods The study employed a cross sectional survey of caregivers of typically developing infants and infants diagnosed with cranial asymmetry. Results A mutivariable model reveals that caregivers of children who are diagnosed with cranial asymmetry report their children spending significantly less time in prone play than those children without a diagnosis of cranial asymmetry. Side-lying and time spent in baby gear did not attain statistical significance. Conclusions for Practice Occupational therapists, physical therapists, pediatricians, nurses and other health care professionals must provide parents with early education about the importance of varying positions and prone play in infancy and address fears and concerns that may serve as barriers to providing prone playtime.

  15. [Anti-emetic effect of granisetron in patients undergoing cranial and craniospinal radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke; Nosaka, Ryo; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Takayasu, Takeshi; Saito, Taiichi; Tominaga, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30-59% of patients undergoing cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy experience nausea and/or vomiting. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of granisetron for controlling emesis in patients treated with cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy. Between December 2011 and January 2013, 34 patients(19 males, 15 females;age range, 3-80 years)received cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy at our department. All but one male patient, who developed meningitis during the irradiation period were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients who experienced irradiation-induced vomiting(grade 1)or nausea(grade 2)were treated with granisetron as a rescue anti-emetic. Episodes were graded as(1)no vomiting, no nausea, no anti-emetic;(2)no vomiting, nausea, no anti-emetic;(3)no vomiting, nausea with anti-emetic;and(4)vomiting. Of the 9 patients who underwent whole-brain or whole neural-axis irradiation, 5(55.6%)experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Two of 6 patients(33.3%)treated with whole ventricle irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Three of 18 patients(16.7%)who underwent local-field irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Patients who underwent wide-field irradiation experienced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia(pgranisetron. Four of 9 patients(44.4%)treated with granisetron experienced constipation(grade 1 or 2);its administration had no major adverse effects in our study population. Rescue therapy with granisetron is safe and effective to treat nausea and vomiting in patients subjected to cranial or craniospinal irradiation.

  16. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, I; Cizek, J; Lukac, F; Melikhova, O; Valenta, J; Havranek, V; Anwand, W; Skuratov, V A; Strukova, T S

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe 26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×10 12 to 1×10 14 cm -2 . The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments. (paper)

  17. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.; Melikhova, O.; Valenta, J.; Havranek, V.; Anwand, W.; Skuratov, V. A.; Strukova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×1012 to 1×1014 cm-2. The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Cranial joint histology in the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos): new insights on avian cranial kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Witmer, Lawrence M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of avian cranial kinesis is a phenomenon in part responsible for the remarkable diversity of avian feeding adaptations observable today. Although osteological, developmental and behavioral features of the feeding system are frequently studied, comparatively little is known about cranial joint skeletal tissue composition and morphology from a microscopic perspective. These data are key to understanding the developmental, biomechanical and evolutionary underpinnings of kinesis. Therefore, here we investigated joint microstructure in juvenile and adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos; Anseriformes). Ducks belong to a diverse clade of galloanseriform birds, have derived adaptations for herbivory and kinesis, and are model organisms in developmental biology. Thus, new insights into their cranial functional morphology will refine our understanding of avian cranial evolution. A total of five specimens (two ducklings and three adults) were histologically sampled, and two additional specimens (a duckling and an adult) were subjected to micro-computed tomographic scanning. Five intracranial joints were sampled: the jaw joint (quadrate-articular); otic joint (quadrate-squamosal); palatobasal joint (parasphenoid-pterygoid); the mandibular symphysis (dentary-dentary); and the craniofacial hinge (a complex flexion zone involving four different pairs of skeletal elements). In both the ducklings and adults, the jaw, otic and palatobasal joints are all synovial, with a synovial cavity and articular cartilage on each surface (i.e. bichondral joints) ensheathed in a fibrous capsule. The craniofacial hinge begins as an ensemble of patent sutures in the duckling, but in the adult it becomes more complex: laterally it is synovial; whereas medially, it is synostosed by a bridge of chondroid bone. We hypothesize that it is chondroid bone that provides some of the flexible properties of this joint. The heavily innervated mandibular symphysis is already fused in the

  19. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, C; Nistor, L C; Vizireanu, S; Dinescu, G

    2011-01-01

    The smart-cut(TM) process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 deg. C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 deg. C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  20. Defects induced ferromagnetism in Mn doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Neogi, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sarkar, A. [Department of Physics, Bangabasi Morning College, Kolkata 700009 (India); Mukadam, M.D.; Yusuf, S.M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhaba Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Banerjee, A. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Bandyopadhyay, S., E-mail: sbaphy@caluniv.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92A P C Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Single phase Mn doped (2 at%) ZnO samples have been synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. Before the final sintering at 500 {sup o}C, the mixed powders have been milled for different milling periods (6, 24, 48 and 96 h). The grain sizes of the samples are very close to each other ({approx}32{+-}4 nm). However, the defective state of the samples is different from each other as manifested from the variation of magnetic properties and electrical resistivity with milling time. All the samples have been found to be ferromagnetic with clear hysteresis loops at room temperature. The maximum value for saturation magnetization (0.11 {mu}{sub B}/Mn atom) was achieved for 96 h milled sample. Electrical resistivity has been found to increase with increase in milling time. The most resistive sample bears the largest saturation magnetization. Variation of average positron lifetime with milling time bears a close similarity with that of the saturation magnetization. This indicates the key role played by open volume vacancy defects, presumably zinc vacancies near grain surfaces, in inducing ferromagnetic order in Mn doped ZnO. To attain optimum defect configuration favorable for ferromagnetism in this kind of samples proper choice of milling period and annealing conditions is required. - Research highlights: 2 at% Mn doped ZnO samples are single phase. All the samples exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. Correlation between saturation magnetization and positron annihilation lifetime established.

  1. Defects induced ferromagnetism in Mn doped ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Neogi, S.K.; Sarkar, A.; Mukadam, M.D.; Yusuf, S.M.; Banerjee, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2011-01-01

    Single phase Mn doped (2 at%) ZnO samples have been synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. Before the final sintering at 500 o C, the mixed powders have been milled for different milling periods (6, 24, 48 and 96 h). The grain sizes of the samples are very close to each other (∼32±4 nm). However, the defective state of the samples is different from each other as manifested from the variation of magnetic properties and electrical resistivity with milling time. All the samples have been found to be ferromagnetic with clear hysteresis loops at room temperature. The maximum value for saturation magnetization (0.11 μ B /Mn atom) was achieved for 96 h milled sample. Electrical resistivity has been found to increase with increase in milling time. The most resistive sample bears the largest saturation magnetization. Variation of average positron lifetime with milling time bears a close similarity with that of the saturation magnetization. This indicates the key role played by open volume vacancy defects, presumably zinc vacancies near grain surfaces, in inducing ferromagnetic order in Mn doped ZnO. To attain optimum defect configuration favorable for ferromagnetism in this kind of samples proper choice of milling period and annealing conditions is required. - Research highlights: → 2 at% Mn doped ZnO samples are single phase. → All the samples exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. → Correlation between saturation magnetization and positron annihilation lifetime established.

  2. Circular patterns of calcium oxalate monohydrate induced by defective Langmuir-Blodgett film on quartz substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jieyu [Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ouyang Jianming [Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)], E-mail: toyjm@jnu.edu.cn

    2009-01-01

    The defective Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on quartz injured by potassium oxalate (K{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was used as a model system to induce growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that circular defective domains with a diameter of 1-200 {mu}m existed in the LB film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed circular patterns of aggregated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallites were induced by these defective domains. It was ascribed to that the interaction between the negatively-charged oxalate ions and the phosphatidyl groups in DPPC headgroups makes the phospholipid molecules rearranged and exist in an out-of-order state in the LB film, especially at the boundaries of liquid-condensed (LC)/liquid-expanded (LE) phases, which provide much more nucleating sites for COM crystals.

  3. Edge dislocations as sinks for sub-nanometric radiation induced defects in α-iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anento, N.; Malerba, L.; Serra, A.

    2018-01-01

    The role of edge dislocations as sinks for small radiation induced defects in bcc-Fe is investigated by means of atomistic computer simulation. In this work we investigate by Molecular Statics (T = 0K) the interaction between an immobile dislocation line and defect clusters of small sizes invisible experimentally. The study highlights in particular the anisotropy of the interaction and distinguishes between absorbed and trapped defects. When the considered defect intersects the dislocation glide plane and the distance from the dislocation line to the defect is on the range between 2 nm and 4 nm, either total or partial absorption of the cluster takes place leading to the formation of jogs. Residual defects produced during partial absorption pin the dislocation. By the calculation of stress-strain curves we have assessed the strength of those residues as obstacles for the motion of the dislocation, which is reflected on the unpinning stresses and the binding energies obtained. When the defect is outside this range, but on planes close to the dislocation glide plane, instead of absorption we have observed a capture process. Finally, with a view to introducing explicitly in kinetic Monte Carlo models a sink with the shape of a dislocation line, we have summarized our findings on a table presenting the most relevant parameters, which define the interaction of the dislocation with the defects considered.

  4. In vitro chondrogenesis and in vivo repair of osteochondral defect with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Yun; Kim, Kyung-Il; Park, Siyeon; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic features of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and examine the differences in the chondrogenesis between hiPSCs and human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBMMSCs). Embryoid bodies (EBs) were formed from undifferentiated hiPSCs. After EBs were dissociated into single cells, chondrogenic culture was performed in pellets and alginate hydrogel. Chondro-induced hiPSCs were implanted in osteochondral defects created on the patellar groove of immunosuppressed rats and evaluated after 12 weeks. The ESC markers NANOG, SSEA4 and OCT3/4 disappeared while the mesodermal marker BMP-4 appeared in chondro-induced hiPSCs. After 21 days of culture, greater glycosaminoglycan contents and better chondrocytic features including lacuna and abundant matrix formation were observed from chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. The expression of chondrogenic markers including SOX-9, type II collagen, and aggrecan in chondro-induced hiPSCs was comparable to or greater than chondro-induced hBMMSCs. A remarkably low level of hypertrophic and osteogenic markers including type X collagen, type I collagen and Runx-2 was noted in chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. hiPSCs had significantly greater methylation of several CpG sites in COL10A1 promoter than hBMMSCs in either undifferentiated or chondro-induced state, suggesting an epigenetic cause of the difference in hypertrophy. The defects implanted with chondro-induced hiPSCs showed a significantly better quality of cartilage repair than the control defects, and the majority of cells in the regenerated cartilage consisted of implanted hiPSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymers under ionizing radiation: the study of energy transfers to radiation induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects created in polymers submitted to ionizing radiations, under inert atmosphere, present the same trend as a function of the dose. When the absorbed dose increases, their concentrations increase then level off. This behavior can be assigned to energy transfers from the polymer to the previously created macromolecular defects; the latter acting as energy sinks. During this thesis, we aimed to specify the influence of a given defect, namely the trans-vinylene, in the behavior of polyethylene under ionizing radiations. For this purpose, we proposed a new methodology based on the specific insertion, at various concentrations, of trans-vinylene groups in the polyethylene backbone through chemical synthesis. This enables to get rid of the variety of created defects on one hand and on the simultaneity of their creation on the other hand. Modified polyethylenes, containing solely trans-vinylene as odd groups, were irradiated under inert atmosphere, using either low LET beams (gamma, beta) or high LET beams (swift heavy ions). During irradiations, both macromolecular defects and H 2 emission were quantified. According to experimental results, among all defects, the influence of the trans-vinylene on the behavior of polyethylene is predominant. (author) [fr

  6. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  7. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs

  8. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R. (Hospital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Pediatric Endocrinology Unit and INSERM U30)

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs.

  9. Implantation processing of Si: A unified approach to understanding ion-induced defects and their impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Roth, E.G.

    1997-05-01

    A model is presented to account for the effects of ion-induced defects during implantation processing of Si. It will be shown that processing is quite generally affected by the presence of defect excesses rather than the total number of defects. a defect is considered excess if it represents a surplus locally of one defect type over its compliment. Processing spanning a wide range of implantation conditions will be presented to demonstrate that the majority of the total defects played little or no role in the process. This is a direct result of the ease with which the spatially correlated Frenkel pairs recombine either dynamically or during a post-implantation annealing. Based upon this model, a method will be demonstrated for manipulating or engineering the excess defects to modify their effects. In particular high-energy, self-ions are shown to inject vacancies into a boron implanted region resulting in suppression of transient enhanced diffusion of the dopant

  10. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  11. Effect of Osteopathic Cranial Manipulative Medicine on Visual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhouse, Mark E; Shechtman, Diana; Fecho, Gregory; Timoshkin, Elena M

    2016-11-01

    The effects of osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine (OCMM) on visual function have been poorly characterized in the literature. Based on a pilot study conducted by their research group, the authors conducted a study that examined whether OCMM produced a measurable change in visual function in adults with cranial asymmetry. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. The intervention and control (sham therapy) were applied during 8 weekly visits, and participants in both groups received 8 weekly follow-up visits. Adult volunteers aged between 18 and 35 years with unremarkable systemic or ocular history were recruited. Inclusion criteria were refractive error between 6 diopters of myopia and 5 diopters of hyperopia, regular astigmatism of any amount, and cranial somatic dysfunction. All participants were evaluated for cranial asymmetry and randomly assigned to the treatment or sham therapy group. The treatment group received OCMM to correct cranial dysfunctions, and the sham therapy group received light pressure applied to the cranium. Preintervention and postintervention ophthalmic examinations consisted of distance visual acuity testing, accommodative system testing, local stereoacuity testing, pupillary size measurements, and vergence system testing. A χ2 analysis was performed to determine participant masking. Analysis of variance was performed for all ophthalmic measures. Eighty-nine participants completed the trial, with 47 in the treatment group and 42 in the sham therapy group. A hierarchical analysis of variance revealed statistically significant within-groups effects (Psize under bright light in the left eye and in near point of convergence break. Osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine may affect visual function in adults with cranial asymmetry. Active motion testing of the cranium for somatic dysfunction may affect the cranial system to a measurable level and explain interrater reliability issues in cranial studies. (Clinical

  12. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels, I. [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-04-01

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  13. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G.; Casteels, I.

    2002-01-01

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  14. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Willems

    Full Text Available During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5 plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton.

  15. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the skull. This is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Causes may include: Brain aneurysm Infections Abnormal blood vessels (vascular malformations) Sinus thrombosis Tissue damage from loss of blood flow (infarction) Trauma (from ...

  16. E-cigarette aerosol exposure can cause craniofacial defects in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Allyson E; Kandalam, Suraj; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Dickinson, Amanda J G

    2017-01-01

    Since electronic cigarette (ECIG) introduction to American markets in 2007, vaping has surged in popularity. Many, including women of reproductive age, also believe that ECIG use is safer than traditional tobacco cigarettes and is not hazardous when pregnant. However, there are few studies investigating the effects of ECIG exposure on the developing embryo and nothing is known about potential effects on craniofacial development. Therefore, we have tested the effects of several aerosolized e-cigarette liquids (e-cigAM) in an in vivo craniofacial model, Xenopus laevis, as well as a mammalian neural crest cell line. Results demonstrate that e-cigAM exposure during embryonic development induces a variety of defects, including median facial clefts and midface hypoplasia in two of e-cigAMs tested e-cigAMs. Detailed quantitative analyses of the facial morphology revealed that nicotine is not the main factor in inducing craniofacial defects, but can exacerbate the effects of the other e-liquid components. Additionally, while two different e-cigAMs can have very similar consequences on facial appearances, there are subtle differences that could be due to the differences in e-cigAM components. Further assessment of embryos exposed to these particular e-cigAMs revealed cranial cartilage and muscle defects and a reduction in the blood supply to the face. Finally, the expression of markers for vascular and cartilage differentiation was reduced in a mammalian neural crest cell line corroborating the in vivo effects. Our work is the first to show that ECIG use could pose a potential hazard to the developing embryo and cause craniofacial birth defects. This emphasizes the need for more testing and regulation of this new popular product.

  17. Findings of cranial computerized tomography in chronic schizophrenics with and without tardive dyskinesias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.U.

    1985-11-25

    Findings of cranial computed tomography in 20 chronic schizophrenics with clinical distinct, long-dated hyperkinesias (tardive dyskinesias) are compared with those of a similar group of schizophrenics without hyperkinesias. Both groups had a long-term neuroleptic treatment. The tomograms of those patients with tardive dyskinesias showed only in two cases mild, pathological alterations. Also the tomograms of the comparative group showed no severe atrophies, defects of substance or pathological calcifications. It is concluded that there is no correlation between tardive dyskinesias in long-term neuroleptic treated schizophrenics and gross morphological alterations of the brain. Furthermore the problem of tardive dyskinesia in a general aspect is discussed. (orig.).

  18. Investigation of defect-induced abnormal body current in fin field-effect-transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kuan-Ju; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Yang, Ren-Ya; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2015-01-01

    This letter investigates the mechanism of abnormal body current at the linear region in n-channel high-k/metal gate stack fin field effect transistors. Unlike body current, which is generated by impact ionization at high drain voltages, abnormal body current was found to increase with decreasing drain voltages. Notably, the unusual body leakage only occurs in three-dimensional structure devices. Based on measurements under different operation conditions, the abnormal body current can be attributed to fin surface defect-induced leakage current, and the mechanism is electron tunneling to the fin via the defects, resulting in holes left at the body terminal

  19. Radiation-induced segregation: A microchemical gauge to quantify fundamental defect parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    Defect Kinetic are evaluated for austenitic stainless alloys by comparing model predictions to measured responses for radiation-induced grain boundary segregation. Heavy-ions, neutrons and proton irradiations having substantial statistical bases are examined. The combined modeling and measurement approach is shown to be useful for quantifying fundamental defect parameters. The mechanism evaluation indicates vacancy, migration energies of 1.15 eV or less and a vacancy formation energy at grain boundaries of 1.5 eV. Damage efficiencies of about 0.03 were established for heavy-ions and for light-water reactor neutrons. Inferred proton damage efficiencies were about 0.15. Segregation measured in an advanced gas-cooled reactor component was much greater than expected using the above parameters

  20. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented

  1. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  2. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  3. Anti-emetic effect of granisetron in patients undergoing cranial and craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke; Nosaka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30-59% of patients undergoing cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy experience nausea and/or vomiting. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of granisetron for controlling emesis in patients treated with cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy. Between December 2011 and January 2013, 34 patients (19 males, 15 females; age range, 3-80 years) received cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy at our department. All but one male patient, who developed meningitis during the irradiation period were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients who experienced irradiation-induced vomiting (grade 1) or nausea (grade 2) were treated with granisetron as a rescue anti-emetic. Episodes were graded as no vomiting, no nausea, no anti-emetic; no vomiting, nausea, no anti-emetic; no vomiting, nausea with anti-emetic; and vomiting. Of the 9 patients who underwent whole-brain or whole neural-axis irradiation, 5 (55.6%) experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Two of 6 patients (33.3%) treated with whole ventricle irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Three of 18 patients (16.7%) who underwent local-field irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Patients who underwent wide-field irradiation experienced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia (p<0.05). Complete response (no vomiting, no additional rescue anti-emetic, and no nausea) was observed in 5 of 9 patients treated with granisetron. Four of 9 patients (44.4%) treated with granisetron experienced constipation (grade 1 or 2); its administration had no major adverse effects in our study population. Rescue therapy with granisetron is safe and effective to treat nausea and vomiting in patients subjected to cranial or craniospinal irradiation. (author)

  4. Ophthalmople gic cranial neuropathy: clinical case

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Dozorova; A. S. Kotov; E. V. Mukhina

    2018-01-01

    Ophthalmoplegic cranial neuropathy (OCN) is a disease with unknown etiology, which manifests itself by episodes of intense headache, accompanied by completely or partially reversible dysfunction of the oculomotor nerve: ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia. It is assumed that the pathology is demyelinating in nature, therefore in the International classification of headaches OCN excluded from rubric migraine and related to the painful cranial neuropathies. The question of the prevention and ...

  5. Radiation induced segregation and point defects in binary copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable progress, both theoretical and experimental, has been made in establishing and understanding the influence of factors such as temperature, time, displacement rate dependence and the effect of initial solute misfit on radiation induced solute diffusion and segregation. During irradiation, the composition of the alloy changes locally, due to defect flux driven non-equilibrium segregation near sinks such as voids, external surfaces and grain boundaries. This change in composition could influence properties and phenomena such as ductility, corrosion resistance, stress corrosion cracking, sputtering and blistering of materials used in thermo-nuclear reactors. In this work, the effect of 1 MeV electron irradiation on the initiation and development of segregation and defect diffusion in binary copper alloys has been studied in situ, with the aid of a high voltage electron microscope. The binary copper alloys had Be, Pt and Sn as alloying elements which had atomic radii less than, similar and greater than that of copper, respectively. It has been observed that in a wide irradiation temperature range, stabilization and growth of dislocation loops took place in Cu-Sn and Cu-Pt alloys. Whereas in the Cu-Be alloy, radiation induced precipitates formed and transformed to the stable γ phase. (Author) [pt

  6. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of dentinal defects induced by new rotary system: "ProTaper NEXT".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa Deepak; Shenoi, Pratima Ramakrishna; Baig, Arshia R; Kubde, Rajesh; Makade, Chetana; Pandey, Swapnil

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate dentinal defects formed by new rotary system - Protaper next™ (PTN). Sixty single-rooted premolars were selected. All specimens were decoronated and divided into four groups, each group having 15 specimens. Group I specimens were prepared by Hand K-files (Mani), Group II with ProTaper Universal (PT; Dentsply Maillefer), Group III with Hero Shaper (HS; Micro-Mega, Besancon, France), and Group IV with PTN (Dentsply Maillefer). Roots of each specimen were sectioned at 3, 6, and 9mm from the apex and were then viewed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate presence or absence of dentinal defects. In roots prepared with hand files (HFs) showed lowest percentage of dentinal defects (6.7%); whereas in roots prepared with PT, HS, and PTN it was 40, 66.7, and 26.7%, respectively. There was significant difference between the HS group and the PTN group (P hand instruments induced minimal defects.

  7. Secondary intracranial meningiomas after high-dose cranial irradiation: report of five cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strojan, Primoz; Popovic, Mara; Jereb, Berta

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To review cases of secondary intracranial meningiomas following high-dose cranial irradiation (≥ 10 Gy) identified in Slovenia between 1968 and 1998, to determine their histological profile and to review the literature on this topic. Methods and Materials: Personal files of patients treated for secondary intracranial meningioma during a 31-year period were reviewed. In cases which met the criteria for radiation-induced tumors, steroid hormone receptor and Ki-67 status were analyzed. For the literature review, computerized database systems and reference lists from respective publications were used. Results: Five patients (2 females, 3 males), 3-11 years old at the time of cranial irradiation, developed secondary meningioma after a latency period of 9.5-31.5 years. Three patients had multiple tumors and 2 developed recurrent disease. Of 9 histologically examined tumors, 5 were graded as benign and 4 as atypical meningiomas, with Ki-67 proliferative index 3.2 ± 3.6 and 10 ± 6, respectively. The ratio between positive and negative meningiomas regarding immunostaining for progesterone and estrogen receptors was eight-to-one and six-to-three, respectively. Cumulative actuarial risk of secondary meningioma in a cohort of 445 children 16 years or younger treated with high-dose cranial irradiation between 1968 and 1990 in Slovenia at 10, 20, and 25 years was 0.53%, 1.2%, and 8.18%, respectively. Out of 126 cases of radiation-induced meningiomas reported, 57% were females and 43% were males, with mean age at presentation 33 ± 17.3 years. The majority (68%) of patients was irradiated during childhood. The latency period was significantly shorter in those who aged 5 years or less at the time of cranial irradiation (p = 0.04), and in those with atypical/anaplastic tumor (p = 0.01). Correlation between radiation dose and latency period could not be found. Conclusion: Secondary meningiomas following high-dose cranial irradiation are characterized by younger age at

  8. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  9. Defects induced by swift heavy ions in the 18R martensite of Cu-Zn-Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelaya, Eugenia; Tolley, Alfredo; Condo, Adriana; Lovey, Francisco; Schumacher, G

    2003-01-01

    The swift heavy ion incidence over the surface of a given material produces a strong energy deposition in a nanometric scale.Swift heavy ions, of the order of one thousand of MeV, deposit their energy as electronic excitations.This highly localized deposition can induce metastable transformations within the material. For example, in martensitic NiTi alloys irradiated with swift heavy ions, it has been observed changes on the martensitic transformation temperature and amorphous areas induced by the irradiation.In this work, the effects produced by swift heavy ions on the martensitic 18R structure of Cu-Zn-Al alloy (Cu - 12.17 Zn - 17.92 Al, in %at) were analyzed.Crystalline samples were irradiated in a direction close to the [2 1 0] of 18R with Xe + 230 MeV, Au + of 350 MeV and Kr + of 200 MeV ion beams.Defects of the order of nanometers induced by the irradiation were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM).It was also observed, that the average size of the irradiation defects induced by Au + ion is larger than those induced by Xe + and Kr + ions.In this case, no relationship between the observed defects and the energy deposition was found in the 23 keV/nn to 48 keV/nn range

  10. Cranial osteopathy: its fate seems clear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartman Steve E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the original model of cranial osteopathy, intrinsic rhythmic movements of the human brain cause rhythmic fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid and specific relational changes among dural membranes, cranial bones, and the sacrum. Practitioners believe they can palpably modify parameters of this mechanism to a patient's health advantage. Discussion This treatment regime lacks a biologically plausible mechanism, shows no diagnostic reliability, and offers little hope that any direct clinical effect will ever be shown. In spite of almost uniformly negative research findings, "cranial" methods remain popular with many practitioners and patients. Summary Until outcome studies show that these techniques produce a direct and positive clinical effect, they should be dropped from all academic curricula; insurance companies should stop paying for them; and patients should invest their time, money, and health elsewhere.

  11. Literature review of cranial nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, M S; Vijaynagar, B; Singh, P; Hamilton, G

    2007-01-01

    In the recent prospective randomised trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), the incidence of cranial nerve injuries (CNI) are reported to be higher than in previously published studies. The objective of this study is to review the incidence of post CEA cranial nerve injury and to discover whether it has changed in the last 25 years after many innovations in vascular surgery. Generic terms including carotid endarterectomy, cranial nerve injuries, post CEA complications and cranial nerve deficit after neck surgery were used to search a variety of electronic databases. Based on selection criteria, decisions regarding inclusion and exclusion of primary studies were made. The incidence of CNI before and after 1995 was compared. We found 31 eligible studies from the literature. Patients who underwent CEA through any approach were included in the study. All patients had cranial nerves examined both before and after surgery. The total number of patients who had CEA before 1995 was 3521 with 10.6% CNI (352 patients) and after 1995, 7324 patients underwent CEA with 8.3% CNI (614 patients). Cranial nerves XII, X and VII were most commonly involved (rarely IX and XI). Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of CNI has decreased (X(2) = 5.89 + 0.74 = 6.63 => p-value = 0.0100). CNI is still a significant postoperative complication of carotid endarterectomy. Despite increasing use of CEA, the incidence of CNI has decreased probably because of increased awareness of the possibility of cranial nerve damage.

  12. Radiographic quantitative assessment of cranial tibial subluxation before and after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley E; Lewis, Daniel D; Pozzi, Antonio; Seibert, Rachel L; Winter, Matthew D

    2011-03-01

    To determine the influence of stifle joint flexion angle, cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) integrity, tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO), and cranial tibial subluxation on the distance between the location of the origin and insertion of the CrCL (CrCL(d)) in dogs. 4 pairs of pelvic limbs from adult dog cadavers weighing 23 to 34 kg. Procedures-Mediolateral projection radiographs of each stifle joint were obtained with the joint flexed at 90°, 105°, 120°, 135°, and 150°. Radiopaque markers were then placed at the sites of origin and insertion of the CrCL. Afterward, radiography was repeated in the same manner, before and after CrCL transection, with and without TPLO. Following CrCL transection, radiographs were obtained before and after inducing overt cranial tibial subluxation. Interobserver variation in measuring the CrCL(d) without fiduciary markers was assessed. The effect of CrCL integrity, cranial tibial subluxation, flexion angle, and TPLO on CrCL(d) was also determined. Interobserver agreement was strong, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.859. The CrCL(d) was significantly shorter (Cranial tibial subluxation caused a 25% to 40% increase in CrCL(d). No effect of TPLO on CrCL(d) was found, regardless of CrCL integrity, forced stifle joint subluxation, or flexion angle. Overt cranial tibial subluxation in CrCL-deficient stifle joints can be detected on mediolateral projection radiographs by comparing CrCL(d) on neutral and stressed joint radiographs at joint angles between 105° and 150°, regardless of whether a TPLO has been performed.

  13. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures

  14. Defect induced d0 ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    KAUST Repository

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala

    2015-12-08

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary(GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnOGB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Znvacancy (VZn) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, VZn induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μB/atom to the O sites at the GB.Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of VZn and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d0semiconductors.

  15. Defect induced d0 ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    KAUST Repository

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S.

    2015-01-01

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary(GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnOGB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Znvacancy (VZn) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, VZn induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μB/atom to the O sites at the GB.Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of VZn and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d0semiconductors.

  16. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Defect-induced Au precipitation in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Langelaan, G.; Brück, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Dijk, N.H. van

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale Au precipitation in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys has been studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering during isothermal aging at 550 °C and complementary ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The high temperature precipitation behavior in samples having received different degrees of cold deformation has been studied to explore the potential self-healing of deformation-induced defects by Au precipitation. It is found that dislocations induced by prior plastic deformation strongly facilitate the formation of Au precipitates, as no significant precipitation is observed for undeformed samples. Defect-induced Au precipitates are formed both at dislocations and along grain boundaries where the defect density is high. The fact that the Au atoms only precipitate on deformation-induced defects demonstrates that solute gold atoms act as efficient self-healing agents in the ferrous matrix. The addition of B and N is found to retard the Au precipitation

  18. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  19. Effects of plasma-induced defects on electrical characteristics of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure before and after low-temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Takuma; Takeshita, Koji; Nakamura, Seiji; Okumura, Tsugunori

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the electrical characteristics of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure exposed to Ar plasma. In the near-surface region of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure, we found that plasma-induced defects reduced the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and mobility at the AlGaN/GaN interface with increasing exposure time. The decrease in 2DEG density suggests that plasma-induced disordering partly extinguishes the piezo-polarization of the AlGaN layer, that the effective Schottky barrier height is increased by the introduction of negatively changed defects, or that the negatively charged defects induced during plasma exposure deactivate or compensate Si donors. In addition, we investigated the postannealing behavior of plasma-induced defects in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure as well as in the n-GaN layer under an applied bias voltage. - Highlights: • We have investigated the electrical characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure. • Electrons under the AlGaN/GaN interface are decreased by plasma exposure. • Post-annealing treatment with gate bias recovers the degradation caused by defects

  20. Defect-induced mix experiment for NIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt M.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME-II will measure the implosion and mix characteristics of CH capsules filled with 5 atmospheres of DT by incorporating mid-Z dopant layers of Ge and Ga. This polar direct drive (PDD experiment also will demonstrate the filling of a CH capsule at target chamber center using a fill tube. Diagnostics for these experiments include areal x-ray backlighting to obtain early time images of the implosion trajectory and a multiple-monochromatic imager (MMI to collect spectrally-resolved images of the capsule dopant line emission near bangtime. The inclusion of two (or more thin dopant layers at separate depths within the capsule shell facilitates spatial correlation of mix between the layers and the hot gas core on a single shot. The dopant layers are typically 2 μm thick and contain dopant concentrations of 1.5%. Three dimensional Hydra simulations have been performed to assess the effects of PDD asymmetry on capsule performance.

  1. Multiple cranial neuropathies without limb involvements: guillain-barre syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2013-10-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunctions. Furthermore, reported cases of the acute multiple cranial neuropathies show electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with the typical Guillain-Barre syndromes (GBS). We recently experienced a patient with a benign infectious disease who subsequently developed symptoms of variant GBS. Here, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who developed multiple symptoms of cranial neuropathy without limb weakness. His laboratory findings showed a positive result for anti-GQ1b IgG antibody. As compared with previously described variants of GBS, the patient exhibited widespread cranial neuropathy, which included neuropathies of cranial nerves III-XII, without limb involvement or ataxia.

  2. E-cigarette aerosol exposure can cause craniofacial defects in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Since electronic cigarette (ECIG introduction to American markets in 2007, vaping has surged in popularity. Many, including women of reproductive age, also believe that ECIG use is safer than traditional tobacco cigarettes and is not hazardous when pregnant. However, there are few studies investigating the effects of ECIG exposure on the developing embryo and nothing is known about potential effects on craniofacial development. Therefore, we have tested the effects of several aerosolized e-cigarette liquids (e-cigAM in an in vivo craniofacial model, Xenopus laevis, as well as a mammalian neural crest cell line. Results demonstrate that e-cigAM exposure during embryonic development induces a variety of defects, including median facial clefts and midface hypoplasia in two of e-cigAMs tested e-cigAMs. Detailed quantitative analyses of the facial morphology revealed that nicotine is not the main factor in inducing craniofacial defects, but can exacerbate the effects of the other e-liquid components. Additionally, while two different e-cigAMs can have very similar consequences on facial appearances, there are subtle differences that could be due to the differences in e-cigAM components. Further assessment of embryos exposed to these particular e-cigAMs revealed cranial cartilage and muscle defects and a reduction in the blood supply to the face. Finally, the expression of markers for vascular and cartilage differentiation was reduced in a mammalian neural crest cell line corroborating the in vivo effects. Our work is the first to show that ECIG use could pose a potential hazard to the developing embryo and cause craniofacial birth defects. This emphasizes the need for more testing and regulation of this new popular product.

  3. Cranial computerized tomography in children suffering from acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, O.

    1981-01-01

    Cranial computerized (axial) tomography permits a more complete neurologic supervision of children with acute leukemia and a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of cerebral complications in leukemia. Endocranial complications in acute leukemia are essentially infiltrative, hemorrhagic, infectious or iatrogenic. Cranial computerized tomography can demonstrate cerebral changes in meningeal leukemia, hemorrhages, calcifications, brain atrophy or leukencephalopathy. The preliminary results of cranial computerized tomography in childhood leukemia suggest that the iatrogenic main lesion of the brain due to combined radiation-chemotherapy is atrophy whereas that of the intrathecal cytostatic therapy is demyelination. Accurate diagnostics and control of possible cerebral complications in therapy of leukemia is essentially for appropriate therapeutic management. For that cranial computerized tomography is the best method to a effective supervision of the brain. (author)

  4. Irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K.; Look, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the point defects induced by 2 MeV electron irradiation (fluence 6 x 10 17 cm -2 ) in single crystal n-type ZnO samples. The positron lifetime measurements have shown that the zinc vacancies in their doubly negative charge state, which act as dominant compensating centers in the as-grown material, are produced in the irradiation and their contribution to the electrical compensation is important. The lifetime measurements reveal also the presence of competing positron traps with low binding energy and lifetime close to that of the bulk lattice. The analysis of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation line indicates that these defects can be identified as neutral oxygen vacancies. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Zebrafish Adar2 Edits the Q/R site of AMPA receptor Subunit gria2α transcript to ensure normal development of nervous system and cranial neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adar2 deaminates selective adenosines to inosines (A-to-I RNA editing in the double-stranded region of nuclear transcripts. Although the functions of mouse Adar2 and its biologically most important substrate gria2, encoding the GluA2 subunit of AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor, have been extensively studied, the substrates and functions of zebrafish Adar2 remain elusive. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of Adar2 was perturbed in the adar2 morphant (adar2MO, generated by antisense morpholio oligonucleotides. The Q/R editing of gria2α was reduced in the adar2MO and was enhanced by overexpression of Adar2, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved activity between zebrafish and mammalian Adar2 in editing the Q/R site of gria2. To delineate the role of Q/R editing of gria2α in the developmental defects observed in the adar2MO, the Q/R editing of gria2α was specifically perturbed in the gria2αQRMO, generated by a morpholio oligonucleotide complementary to the exon complementary sequence (ECS required for the Q/R editing. Analogous to the adar2-deficient and Q/R-editing deficient mice displaying identical neurological defects, the gria2αQRMO and adar2MO displayed identical developmental defects in the nervous system and cranial cartilages. Knockdown p53 abolished apoptosis and partially suppressed the loss of spinal cord motor neurons in these morphants. However, reducing p53 activity neither replenished the brain neuronal populations nor rescued the developmental defects. The expressions of crestin and sox9b in the neural crest cells were reduced in the adar2MO and gria2αQRMO. Overexpressing the edited GluA2αR in the adar2MO restored normal expressions of cresting and sox9b. Moreover, overexpressing the unedited GluA2αQ in the wild type embryos resulted in reduction of crestin and sox9b expressions. These results argue that an elevated GluA2αQ level is sufficient for generating the

  6. Formation of radiation-induced defects and their influence on tritium extraction from lithium silicates in out-of-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.A.; Tiliks, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in lithium silicates irradiated in nuclear reactor till absorbed doses 1000 MGy were studied. Radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) were qualitatively and quantitatively determinated by methods of chemical scavengers (MHS), electron-spin resonance (ESR) and optical spectroscopy. Colloidal silicon and lithium, lithium and silicon oxides, oxygen, silicon and lithium peroxides are the final products of the lithium silicates radiolysis at absorbed energy doses D abs = 1000 MGy. The concentration of radiation defects and products of radiolysis strongly depend on the temperature of irradiation, humidity, granural size. The thermostimulated extraction of tritiated water (95-98% of the released tritium is in chemical form of water) from lithium silicates ceramics proceeds according to two independent mechanisms: a) chemidesorption of surface localized tritiated water (the first order chemical reaction); b) formation of the tritium water molecules limited by triton diffusion to the near-surface layer of grains. It has been found that the concentration of radiation-induced defects considerably affects the tritium localization and releasing processes from lithium silicates. (orig.)

  7. MR imaging of cranial nerve schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Peyster, R.; Cross, R.R.; Charles, J.; Murtagh, R.; Shapiro, R.; Chyatte, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the major advantages of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over other imaging modalities is direct visualization of the cranial nerves. This is best accomplished with thin-section, contiguous T1-weighted images. They report a series of 75 cranial nerve neuromas, including 47 of the eighth nerve and a mixture of schwannomas involving all other cranial nerves (excluding the fourth). All tumors demonstrated at least some area of increased signal (equal to or greater than that of cerebrospinal fluid) on T2-weighted images. This fact enabled them to differentiate schwannomas from neoplasms (lymphoma, meningioma, sarcoma) that may be isointense on T2-weighted pulse sequences. Many of the lesions had areas of low signal intermixed with predominantly high signal (on T2-weighted images). The pathologic evaluation of these areas of decreased signal revealed predominant fibrosis. In addition, some of the neuromas had a cystic component. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging may permit detection when the nerve is still normal in size

  8. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem, E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Ebru, E-mail: ebru90@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman, E-mail: ebos90@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Tulin, E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Karaca, Sibel, E-mail: sibelkaraca@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yeral, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutyeral@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kasar, Mutlu, E-mail: mutlukasar@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozdogu, Hakan, E-mail: hakanozdogu@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  9. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Emmen (Judith); A. McLuskey; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament

  10. Positron and positronium studies of irradiation-induced defects and microvoids in vitreous metamict silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Saneyasu, M.; Tabata, M.; Tang, Z.; Nagai, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ito, Y.

    2000-01-01

    To study irradiation-induced defects and structural microvoids in vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ), positron lifetime, angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), and electron spin resonance (ESR) were measured on v-SiO 2 and quartz (c-SiO 2 ) samples irradiated with fast neutrons up to a dose of 4.1x10 20 n/cm 2 . Two kinds of positron-trapping defects have been found to form in v-SiO 2 by fast neutron irradiation: type-I and type-II defects. Similar defects also appear in the irradiated c-SiO 2 , indicating that both the defects are common in v-SiO 2 and c-SiO 2 . The detailed annealing and photo-illumination studies of positron annihilation and ESR for these two defects suggest that the type-I defects are non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), while the type-II defects are oxygen molecules which cannot be detected by ESR. Higher dose irradiation than 1.0x10 20 n/cm 2 causes c-SiO 2 to change to metamict (amorphous) phase (m-SiO 2 ). Positronium (Ps) atoms are found to form in microvoids with an average radius of about 0.3 nm in the v-SiO 2 and m-SiO 2 . This suggests that microvoids proved by Ps are structurally intrinsic open spaces and reflect the topologically disordered structure of these phases in the subnanometer scale

  11. Traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome: assessment of cranial nerve recovery in 33 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Wang, Theresa Y; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Huang, Faye; Lai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-07-01

    Superior orbital fissure syndrome is a rare complication that occurs in association with craniofacial trauma. The characteristics of superior orbital fissure syndrome are attributable to a constellation of cranial nerve III, IV, and VI palsies. This is the largest series describing traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome that assesses the recovery of individual cranial nerve function after treatment. In a review from 1988 to 2002, 33 patients with superior orbital fissure syndrome were identified from 11,284 patients (0.3 percent) with skull and facial fractures. Severity of cranial nerve injury and functional recovery were evaluated by extraocular muscle movement. Patients were evaluated on average 6 days after initial injury, and average follow-up was 11.8 months. There were 23 male patients. The average age was 31 years. The major mechanism of injury was motorcycle accident (67 percent). Twenty-two received conservative treatment, five were treated with steroids, and six patients underwent surgical decompression of the superior orbital fissure. After initial injury, cranial nerve VI suffered the most damage, whereas cranial nerve IV sustained the least. In the first 3 months, recovery was greatest in cranial nerve VI. At 9 months, function was lowest in cranial nerve VI and highest in cranial nerve IV. Eight patients (24 percent) had complete recovery of all cranial nerves. Functional recovery of all cranial nerves reached a plateau at 6 months after trauma. Cranial nerve IV suffered the least injury, whereas cranial nerve VI experienced the most neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve palsies improved to their final recovery endpoints by 6 months. Surgical decompression is considered when there is evidence of bony compression of the superior orbital fissure.

  12. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power...

  13. Cognitive effects of chemotherapy and/or cranial irradiation in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welzel, G.; Wenz, F.; Steinvorth, S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: cognitive effects after cranial radiotherapy are widely discussed, but there is growing evidence that chemotherapy may also induce changes in neuropsychological functioning. This review summarizes the published literature regarding cognitive functioning after cancer therapy in adult patients. Material and methods: 63 reports from January 1980 to July 2003 assessing objective cognitive effects of irradiation and/or chemotherapy by neuropsychologic evaluation were analyzed. 57 studies with 3,424 patients were included for evaluation. Results: the results of this review confirm that both chemotherapy and irradiation can result in cognitive deficits. No clinically relevant differences are found for cognitive deficits, cognitive impairment rate, and single cognitive domains, when chemotherapy, cranial irradiation and combined radio- and chemotherapy were compared. Only 28 trials with 1,000 patients report quantitative data on patients with cognitive deficits after therapy. There are 44.1% (range 18-75%) of 451 patients in the chemotherapy group, 44.0% (range 29-83%) of 320 patients in the radiotherapy group, and 64.5% (range 30-100%) of 229 patients in the combined irradiation and chemotherapy group with cognitive deficits. Furthermore, cognitive functioning below average before chemo- or radiotherapy is found in subgroups of cancer patients. Conclusion: there is evidence of cognitive impairment in adult tumor patients after chemotherapy similar to effects after cranial irradiation. Cognitive functioning below average before therapy may be due to paraneoplastic effects. More prospective studies with a long-term follow-up using standardized neuropsychometric testing, assessment of premorbid intelligence, and suited control groups are needed. (orig.)

  14. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of dentinal defects induced by new rotary system: “ProTaper NEXT”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa Deepak; Shenoi, Pratima Ramakrishna; Baig, Arshia R; Kubde, Rajesh; Makade, Chetana; Pandey, Swapnil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate dentinal defects formed by new rotary system — Protaper next™ (PTN). Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted premolars were selected. All specimens were decoronated and divided into four groups, each group having 15 specimens. Group I specimens were prepared by Hand K-files (Mani), Group II with ProTaper Universal (PT; Dentsply Maillefer), Group III with Hero Shaper (HS; Micro-Mega, Besancon, France), and Group IV with PTN (Dentsply Maillefer). Roots of each specimen were sectioned at 3, 6, and 9mm from the apex and were then viewed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate presence or absence of dentinal defects. Results: In roots prepared with hand files (HFs) showed lowest percentage of dentinal defects (6.7%); whereas in roots prepared with PT, HS, and PTN it was 40, 66.7, and 26.7%, respectively. There was significant difference between the HS group and the PTN group (P hand instruments induced minimal defects. PMID:26069406

  15. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Chaudhary, N.; Fareedi, S.; Woo, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality

  17. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  18. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in vanadium and vanadium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey, T.

    1996-01-01

    The annealing of defects induced by electron irradiation up to a dose of 6.10 21 m -2 at T<293 K has been investigated in single-crystals of pure vanadium and in vanadium-titanium alloys with compositions 0.3, 1 and 5 at.% Ti using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The recovery of the positron annihilation parameters in V single-crystals indicates that the defect annealing takes place in the temperature range 410-470 K without formation of microvoids for the present irradiation conditions. For the alloys the recovery onset is shifted to 460 K, the width of the annealing stage is gradually broadened with increasing Ti content, and microvoids are formed for annealing temperatures at the end of the recovery stage. The results show that the vacancy release from vacancy-interstitial impurity pairs and subsequent recombination with interstitial loops is the mechanism of the recovery in pure V. For V-Ti alloys, vacancy-Ti-interstitial impurity complexes and vacancy-Ti pairs appear to be the defects responsible for the positron trapping. The broadening of the recovery stage with increasing Ti content indicates that solute Ti is a very effective trap for vacancies in V. (orig.)

  19. Annealing study on radiation-induced defects in 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, M.V.B.; Lingner, T.; Caudepon, F.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Spaeth, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic isochronal annealing investigation of vacancy-related defects in electron-irradiated n-type 6H-SiC:N. A series of 10 samples cut from a commercial wafer and annealed up to 1200 C after electron-irradiation (1.5 x 10 18 cm -3 ) was characterized with photoluminescence (PL), Magnetic circular dichroism of the absorption (MCDA) and conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Apart from less stable triplet-related defects which vanished between 150 C and 300 C, the thermal behavior of three radiation-induced defects was studied: the silicon vacancy (V Si ), the carbon-antisite-carbon-vacancy pair (C Si -V C ) and the D1 center. Their annealing behavior showed that the destruction of the isolated V Si between 750 C and 900 C is followed by the formation of thermally more stable C Si -V C pairs, a result that has been theoretically predicted recently. By further heating the samples the C Si -V C pairs are annealed out between 900 C and 1050 C and were followed by an increase in the D1 center concentration. (orig.)

  20. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Bohndorf, W.

    1996-01-01

    To analyse if prophylactic cranial irradiation is small cell lung cancer for improved survival is indicated; if adjuvant irradiation could cure the microscopic disease; if and how late effects could be minimized. Data from randomized trials and retrospective studies are critically analysed related to the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastases in limited disease patients in complete remission with or without prophylactic cranial irradiation. The mechanisms of late effects on CNS of prophylactic cranial irradiation and combined treatment are presented. Prophylactic cranial irradiation could decrease the incidence of CNS metastases but could not improve survival. A subgroup of patients (9 to 14%) most likely to benefit from prophylactic cranial irradiation includes patients who are likely to have an isolated CNS failure. The actual used total dose in the range 30 to 40 Gy could only conditionally decrease the CNS failure. Higher total and/or daily doses and combined treatment are related with potentially devastating neurologic and intellectual disabilities. No prospective randomized trial has demonstrated a significant survival advantage for patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation. Prophylactic cranial irradiation is capable of reducing the incidence of cerebral metastases and delays CNS failure. A subgroup of patients most likely to benefit from prophylactic cranial irradiation (9 to 14%) includes patients who are likely to have an isolated CNS failure, but this had yet to be demonstrated. The toxicity of treatment is difficult to be influenced. Prophylactic cranial irradiation should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy, a larger interval after chemotherapy is indicated. The total dose should be in the range 30 to 36 Gy and the daily fraction size not larger than 2 Gy. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th) with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuha, Mitsuru; Okamura, Tomomi; Abiko, Seisho; Aoki, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    We have now used CT to evaluate the cavernous sinuses, especially the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves. adjacent to them. Twenty cases, presumably all having sellar or parasellar lesions, were examined by means of thin-slice (2-4 mm) axial and coronal (including both direct and reconstructed methods) CT studies. Moreover, three blocks of the sellar region obtained from adult cadavers were examined beforehand by CT scan, and the courses of the respective paracavernous cranial nerves were confirmed by microsurgical dissection. As a result, the following conclusions were obtained. 1. It was valuable to perform a post-enhanced direct coronal study for the definite identification of the paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th cranial nerves). 2. Also valuable was a magnified CT film of the parasellar regions, which made the identification of the parasellar cranial nerves clearer. 3. In the clinical cases showing a normal shape of the cavernous sinuses on CT, each cranial nerve was evaluated. In the axial studies (almost 10 to 15 degrees anterior to Reid's basal line), the frequencies of the identification of the 3rd, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves were 76%, 97% (as to the Gasserian ganglion), and 21% respectively. None of the 4th cranial nerve was visualized in the cases examined. On the other hand, the frequencies of the identification of the 3rd, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves were 83%, 86%, and 21% respectively in the direct coronal studies and 62%, 57%, and 4% in those of the reconstructed films. The visualization of each cranial nerve in the direct coronal study was better than when the reconstructed method was used. Finally, a schematic presentation of the cranial nerves adjacent to the cavernous sinuses was made in the axial and coronal projections. (J.P.N.)

  2. Irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology (Finland); Look, D.C. [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the point defects induced by 2 MeV electron irradiation (fluence 6 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) in single crystal n-type ZnO samples. The positron lifetime measurements have shown that the zinc vacancies in their doubly negative charge state, which act as dominant compensating centers in the as-grown material, are produced in the irradiation and their contribution to the electrical compensation is important. The lifetime measurements reveal also the presence of competing positron traps with low binding energy and lifetime close to that of the bulk lattice. The analysis of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation line indicates that these defects can be identified as neutral oxygen vacancies. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of induced color changes in chicken breast meat during simulation of pink color defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holownia, K; Chinnan, M S; Reynolds, A E; Koehler, P E

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the study was to establish a pink threshold and simulate the pink defect in cooked chicken breast meat with treatment combinations that would induce significant changes in the color of raw and cooked meat. The subjective pink threshold used in judging pink discoloration was established at a* = 3.8. Samples of three color groups (normal, lighter than normal, and darker than normal) of boneless, skinless chicken breast muscles were selected based on instrumental color values. The in situ changes were induced using sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, sodium erythorbate, and sodium nitrite at two levels: present and not present. Fillets in all treatments were subjected to individual injections, followed by tumbling, cooking, and chilling. Samples were analyzed for color [lightness (L*), red/green axis (a*), yellow/blue axis (b*)] and reflectance spectra. Simulation of the pink defect was achieved in eight of the 16 treatment combinations when sodium nitrite was present and in an additional two treatment combinations when it was absent. Pinking in cooked samples was affected (P meat color. Results confirmed that it was possible to simulate the undesired pinking in cooked chicken white meat when in situ conditions were induced by sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, and sodium nitrite. The continuation of the simulation study can aid in developing alternative processing methods to eliminate potential pink defects.

  4. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Jack C.; Merkle, Andrew C.; Carneal, Catherine M.; Voo, Liming M.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Paulson, Jeff M.; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O. Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  5. Coordination defects in vitreous As2S3 induced by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Balitska, V.

    1997-01-01

    Destruction-polymerization transformations in vitreous As 2 S 3 , associated with coordination defects formation process induced by γ-irradiation, were studied by the IR Fourier Spectroscopy method in the region of 400-100 cm -1 . All topological variants of these processes, statistically possible in the investigated samples, were taken into account for physical consideration of the real structural changes. (author)

  6. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  7. Lyophilized allogeneic bone grafts for cystic and discontinuity defects of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pill Hoon Choung; Eun Seok Kim

    1999-01-01

    Allogenic bone grafts have been used after various processing in each institute was made by lyophilized allogenic bone and used for maxillofacial reconstruction. Three types of lyophilized allogenic bone grafts as powder, chip and block form were performed to reconstruct the following defects: 1) maxillectomy, 2) mandiblectomy, 3) cystectomy, 4) cleft alveolus, 5) gap in orthognathic osteotomy, 6) peri-implant defect, 7) extraction socket, and 8) facial contouring. Above defects can be classified as cystic and discontinuity defects of the maxilia and the mandible. Because discontinuity defects have more difficult problems to reconstruct considering mechanical strength of the allogenic bone. We performed allogenic bone grafts on 50 cystic defects and 12 discontinuity defects of the jaws. Among them, 3 cases were removed due to infection, and the others had no complications. In reconstruction of cystic defects, the defects were filled with allogenic chip which were made from allogenic block bone at the surgery, which later were changed to host bone. Three cases of them showed tooth eruption through the allogenic bone grafting site, changing the eruption pathway, which was interrupted by the lesion. in reconstruction of discontinuity defects, usually allogenic bone has been used as a tray, in which PMCB or demineralized bone chips were filled. But we tried to reconstruct this discontinuity defect using allogeneic bone block without inside filling of PMCB different from tray type. We will present the results of allogenic bone grafts using cranial bone, costochondral graft, and the mandible

  8. Investigation of Near-Surface Defects Induced by Spike Rapid Thermal Annealing in c-SILICON Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guodong; Ren, Pan; Zhang, Dayong; Wang, Weiping; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The defects induced by a spike rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells were investigated by the photoluminescence (PL) technique and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Dislocation defects were found to form in the near-surface junction region of the monocrystalline Si solar cell after a spike RTA process was performed at 1100∘C. Photo J-V characteristics were measured on the Si solar cell before and after the spike RTA treatments to reveal the effects of defects on the Si cell performances. In addition, the Silvaco device simulation program was used to study the effects of defects density on the cell performances by fitting the experimental data of RTA-treated cells. The results demonstrate that there was an obvious degradation in the Si solar cell performances when the defect density after the spike RTA treatment was above 1×1013cm-3.

  9. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, M.F. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia); Probert, J.C. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zwi, L.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Medicine and Surgery

    1995-02-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, M.F.; Probert, J.C.; Zwi, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  11. Middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks to the middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuna, Xabier; Navarro, Juan José; García, Leire; Ugarte, Ane; Thomas, Izaskun

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks to the middle ear due to tegmen tympani defects can result in hearing loss or hypoacusis and predispose to meningitis as well as other neurological complications. Surgical repair of the defect can be performed through a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach or a transmastoid approach. We conducted a retrospective study of the patients in our Department due to a spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear treated using a MCF approach during a 6-year period (2009-2014). Thirteen patients with spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear were treated with this approach. The primary and first symptom in all of them was conductive hearing loss. In all cases, the defect or defects were closed in a multilayer manner using muscle, temporalis fascia and cortical bone. Minimum follow-up in this series was 14 months, with successful closure in all but one patient (who required reintervention). We found no intra- or postoperative complications due to the craniotomy, and the audiometry improved and normalised in all cases except for the failed case. The MCF approach with a multilayer closure of the defect is an effective technique for repairing spontaneous CSF leaks to the middle ear and for restoring hearing in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  12. Cranial vasculature in zebrafish forms by angioblast cluster-derived angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Kira; Lu, Annie; Sumanas, Saulius

    2010-12-01

    Formation of embryonic vasculature involves vasculogenesis as endothelial cells differentiate and aggregate into vascular cords and angiogenesis which includes branching from the existing vessels. In the zebrafish which has emerged as an advantageous model to study vasculogenesis, cranial vasculature is thought to originate by a combination of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, but how these processes are coordinated is not well understood. To determine how angioblasts assemble into cranial vasculature, we generated an etsrp:GFP transgenic line in which GFP reporter is expressed under the promoter control of an early regulator of vascular and myeloid development, etsrp/etv2. By utilizing time-lapse imaging we show that cranial vessels originate by angiogenesis from angioblast clusters, which themselves form by the mechanism of vasculogenesis. The two major pairs of bilateral clusters include the rostral organizing center (ROC) which gives rise to the most rostral cranial vessels and the midbrain organizing center (MOC) which gives rise to the posterior cranial vessels and to the myeloid and endocardial lineages. In Etsrp knockdown embryos initial cranial vasculogenesis proceeds normally but endothelial and myeloid progenitors fail to initiate differentiation, migration and angiogenesis. Such angioblast cluster-derived angiogenesis is likely to be involved during vasculature formation in other vertebrate systems as well. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Defect induced d{sup 0} ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assa Aravindh, Sasikala Devi; Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S, E-mail: iman.roqan@kaust.edu.sa [Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 2955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-12-14

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary (GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnO GB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Zn vacancy (V{sub Zn}) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, V{sub Zn} induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μ{sub B}/atom to the O sites at the GB. Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of V{sub Zn} and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d{sup 0} semiconductors.

  14. Induced membrane technique combined with two-stage internal fixation for the treatment of tibial osteomyelitis defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fei; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shulin; Fu, Jingshu; Xie, Zhao

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of induced membrane technique combined with two-stage internal fixation in the treatment of tibial osteomyelitis defects. A retrospective analyses for 67 cases of tibialosteomyelitis defects were admitted to our department between September 2012 to February 2015, which were treated with induced membrane technique. At the first stage, implanted with a PMMA cement spacer in the defects after radical debridement and fixed with reconstructive locked plate. Bone grafting and exchanged the plate with intramedullary nail at the second stage. In current study, all patients were followed up for 18-35 months. Sixty-six patients achieved bone union with the average radiographic and clinical healing times of 5.55±2.19 and 7.45±1.69months, respectively. Seven patients required a second debridement before grafting, while four patients experienced a recurrence of infection or a relapse following second stage treatment. Twelve patients experienced either knee or ankle dysfunctions and 2 patients faced delayed wound healing. Donor site complications includes pain and infection were found in 7 and 3 patients, respectively with delayed stress fracture in 1 patient only. Induced membrane technique for the treatment of tibial osteomyelitis defects, seems a reliable method. The use of reconstructive locked plate as a temporary internal fixation at the first stage and exchanged with intramedullary nail at the second stage, potentially achieves good clinical efficacy. Care should be taken to restore the joint function especially in distal tibia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Forces necessary for the disruption of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Manipulation of the cisternal segment of cranial nerves is often performed by the neurosurgeon. To date, attempts at quantifying the forces necessary to disrupt these nerves in situ, to our knowledge, has not been performed. The present study seeks to further elucidate the forces necessary to disrupt the cranial nerves while within the subarachnoid space. The cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII were exposed in six unfixed cadavers, all less than 6 hr postmortem. Forces to failure were then measured. Mean forces necessary to disrupt nerves for left sides in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, III, VIII, XI, VI, V, and II, respectively. Mean forces for right-sided cranial nerves in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, VIII, V, VI, XI, III, and II, respectively. Overall, cranial nerves requiring the least amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV, VII, and IX. Those requiring the highest amount of force included cranial nerves II, V, VI, and XI. There was an approximately ten-fold difference between the least and greatest forces required to failure. Cranial nerve III was found to require significantly (P cranial nerves II through XII. We found that cranial nerve IX consistently took the least amount of force until its failure and cranial nerve II took the greatest. Other cranial nerves that took relatively small amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV and VII. Although in vivo damage can occur prior to failure of a cranial nerve, our data may serve to provide a rough estimation for the maximal amount of tension that can be applied to a cranial nerve that is manipulated while within its cistern.

  16. Characterization of Transformation-Induced Defects in Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Matthew L.

    Shape memory alloys have remarkable strain recovery properties that make them ideal candidates for many applications that include devices in the automotive, aerospace, medical, and MEMS industries. Although these materials are widely used today, their performance is hindered by poor dimensional stability resulting from cyclic degradation of the martensitic transformation behavior. This functional fatigue results in decreased work output and cyclic accumulation of permanent strain. To date, few studies have taken a fundamental approach to investigating the interaction between plasticity and martensite growth and propagation, which is vitally important to mitigating functional fatigue in future alloy development. The current work focuses on understanding the interplay of these deformation mechanisms in NiTi-based shape memory alloys under a variety of different thermomechanical test conditions. Micron-scale compression testing of NiTi shape memory alloy single crystals is undertaken in an effort to probe the mechanism of austenite dislocation generation. Mechanical testing is paired with post mortem defect analysis via diffraction contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Accompanied by micromechanics-based modeling of local stresses surrounding a martensite plate, these results demonstrate that the previously existing martensite and resulting austenite dislocation substructure are intimately related. A mechanism of transformation-induced dislocation generation is described in detail. A study of pure and load-biased thermal cycling of bulk polycrystalline NiTi is done for comparison of the transformation behavior and resultant defects to the stress-induced case. Post mortem and in situ STEM characterization demonstrate unique defect configurations in this test mode and STEM-based orientation mapping reveals local crystal rotation with increasing thermal cycles. Changes in both martensite and austenite microstructures are explored. The results for

  17. On the diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects in the stress field of a moving dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1987-01-01

    The cellular model of a dislocation is used for an investigation of the time-dependent diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects interacting with the stress field of a moving dislocation. An analytic solution is given taking into account the elastic interaction due to the first-order size effect and the stress-induced interaction, the kinematic interaction due to the dislocation motion as well as the presence of secondary neutral sinks. The results for the space and time-dependent point defect concentration, represented in terms of Mathieu-Bessel and Mathieu-Hankel functions, emphasize the influence of the parameters which have been taken into consideration. Proceeding from these solutions, formulae for the diffusion flux reaching unit length of the dislocation, which plays an important role with regard to void swelling and irradiation-induced creep, are derived

  18. The effect of the cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shotai; Koide, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Shimote, Koichi; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro (Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The effects of the cranial size and the computed tomography (CT) numbers of the cranial bone on that of the brain were studied in 70 subjects, aged from 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and showed no abnormalities in the central nervous system upon physical examinations and a CT scan. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39 cm{sup 2}) at the bilateral thalamus and at twelve areas of the deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size, and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. The effect of the cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers was statistically significant. The brain CT numbers increased with the increase in the cranial bone CT numbers. There was, however, no significant correlation between brain CT numbers and cranial size. In measuring the brain CT numbers, it is desirable that consideration be given to the cranial bone CT numbers. (author).

  19. Mapping genetic variants for cranial vault shape in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roosenboom, Jasmien; Lee, Myoung Keun; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2018-01-01

    The shape of the cranial vault, a region comprising interlocking flat bones surrounding the cerebral cortex, varies considerably in humans. Strongly influenced by brain size and shape, cranial vault morphology has both clinical and evolutionary relevance. However, little is known about the geneti...

  20. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  1. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Akinori [Saitama Medical Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Moroyama, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  2. Significcance of cranial nerve involvement shown by the prognosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhouguang; Gao Li; Yi Junlin; Li Suyan; Jin Jing; Huang Xiaodong; Luo Jingwei; Xu Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the cranial nerve involvement in nasophryngeal carcinoma and its relationship with the prognosis with the optimal treatment for such patients studied also. Methods: 935 untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, admitted into our hospital from January 1990 to June 1999, were analyzed retrospectively. These patients were divided into cranial nerve involved group and cranial nerve un- involved group by patients symptoms signs and/or images before the treatment. SPSS10.0 soft package was used to analyze the effect of cranial nerve involvement on the prognosis. Results: The overall percentage of cranial nerve involvement was 20.0%, of which the trigeminal nerve was most common . The 5-year local recurrence rate was 20.1% and 16.8% (P=0.465) in cranial nerve involved group and un-involved group, respectively. In the patients with cranial nerve involved, the 5-year local recurrence rates of patients who received boost skull base irradiation dose <70, 70-79 and ≥80 Gy was 38.1%, 24.5% and 16.0% (P =0.082), respectively. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 31.6% and 19.5% (P=0.020) in cranial nerve involved group and un-involved group. The corresponding overall survival rates and disease-free survival rate was 62.2% and 78.1% (P=O.000) and 43.2%, 62.4% (P=0.000), respectively. By multivariate analysis, cranial nerve involvement was an independent factor both in overall survival (RR 1.62, P=0.001 ) and disease-free survival (RR=1.40, P=0.020). Conclusions: There are more distant metastasis, worse overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with cranial nerve involved. Boost irradiation to the involved skull base may improve the local control. Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for these patients may also have brighter future. (authors)

  3. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    OpenAIRE

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the ...

  4. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, Antonio; Ribes, Ramon; Riva, Andres de la; Rubio, Fernando Lopez; Sanchez, Carmen; Sancho, Jose L.

    2002-01-01

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities

  5. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi; Bollmann, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  6. Exercise-induced thallium-201 myocardial perfusion defects in angina pectoris without significant coronary artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazato, Masayasu; Maruoka, Yuji; Sunagawa, Osahiko; Kinjo, Kunihiko; Tomori, Masayuki; Fukiyama, Koshiro

    1990-01-01

    We performed exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in 32 patients with angina pectoris to study the incidence of perfusion defects, who had no significant organic stenosis on coronary angiography. None of them had myocardial infarction or cardiomyopathy. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and 12-lead ECG recording were performed during supine bicycle ergometer exercise. Perfusion defects in thallium-201 scintigrams in SPECT images were assessed during visual analysis by two observers. In the coronary angiograms obtained during intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin, the luminal diameter of 75% stenosis or less in the AHA classification was regarded as an insignificant organic stenosis. Myocardial perfusion defects in the thallium-201 scintigrams were detected in eight (25%) of the 32 patients. Six of these eight patients had variant angina documented during spontaneous attacks with ST elevations in standard 12-lead ECGs. Perfusion defects were demonstrated at the inferior or infero-posterior regions in six patients, one of whom had concomitant anteroseptal defect. The defects were not always accompanied by chest pain. All but one patient demonstrating inferior or inferoposterior defects showed ST depression in leads II, III and aV F on their ECGs, corresponding to inferior wall ischemia. The exception was a case with right bundle branch block. Thus, 25% of the patients with angina pectoris, who had no evidence of significant organic stenosis on their coronary angiograms, exhibited exercise-induced perfusion defects in their thallium-201 scintigrams. Coronary spasms might have caused myocardial ischemia in these patients. (author)

  7. Random genetic drift, natural selection, and noise in human cranial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Charles C

    2016-08-01

    This study assesses the extent to which relationships among groups complicate comparative studies of adaptation in recent human cranial variation and the extent to which departures from neutral additive models of evolution hinder the reconstruction of population relationships among groups using cranial morphology. Using a maximum likelihood evolutionary model fitting approach and a mixed population genomic and cranial data set, I evaluate the relative fits of several widely used models of human cranial evolution. Moreover, I compare the goodness of fit of models of cranial evolution constrained by genomic variation to test hypotheses about population specific departures from neutrality. Models from population genomics are much better fits to cranial variation than are traditional models from comparative human biology. There is not enough evolutionary information in the cranium to reconstruct much of recent human evolution but the influence of population history on cranial variation is strong enough to cause comparative studies of adaptation serious difficulties. Deviations from a model of random genetic drift along a tree-like population history show the importance of environmental effects, gene flow, and/or natural selection on human cranial variation. Moreover, there is a strong signal of the effect of natural selection or an environmental factor on a group of humans from Siberia. The evolution of the human cranium is complex and no one evolutionary process has prevailed at the expense of all others. A holistic unification of phenome, genome, and environmental context, gives us a strong point of purchase on these problems, which is unavailable to any one traditional approach alone. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:582-592, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  9. Ocular cranial nerve palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiman El Mograbi; Ethan Soudry

    2017-01-01

    Objective:The clinical presentation of sphenoid sinusitis can be highly variable.Rarely,sphenoid sinusitis may present with cranial nerve complications due to the proximity of these structures to the sphenoid sinus.Method:A case series from Rabin Medical Center and all cases of cranial nerves palsies secondary to sphenoid sinusitis that have been reported in the literature were reviewed.Results:Seventeen patients were identified.The abducent nerve was the most common cranial nerve affected (76%),followed by the oculomotor nerve (18%).One patient had combined oculomotor,trochlear and abducent palsies.The most common pathology was isolated purulent sphenoid sinusitis in 64% followed by allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) in 18%,and fungal infection in 18%.94% had an acute presentation.The majority (85%) received a combined intravenous antibiotics and surgical treatment.The remainder received conservative treatment alone.Complete recovery of cranial nerve palsy was noted in 82% during follow up.Conclusion:Sphenoid sinusitis presenting as diplopia and headaches is rare.A neoplastic process must be ruled out and early surgical intervention with intravenous antimicrobial therapy carry an excellent outcome with complete resolution of symptoms.

  10. Cranial pole nephrectomy in the pig model: anatomic analysis of arterial injuries in tridimensional endocasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Henry, Robert W; Favorito, Luciano A; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2012-06-01

    To assess the intrarenal arteries injuries after cranial pole nephrectomy in a pig model to compare these findings with those in humans. Polyester resin was injected through the ureter and the renal artery to make three-dimensional casts of 61 pig kidneys. The cranial pole of the kidneys was sectioned at four different sites before the solidification of the resin, and the casts were examined for arterial damage. Section performed through the hilus (15 kidneys): The cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in two (13.33%) cases, the ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 13 (86.7%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 11 (73.34%) cases. Section at 0.5 cm cranial to the hilus (16 kidneys): The cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 1 (6.25%) case, the ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 14 (87.5%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 13 (81.25%) cases. Section at 1.0 cm cranial to the hilus (15 kidneys): The ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in five (33.33%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was injured in five (33.33%) cases. Section at 1.5 cm cranial to the hilus (15 kidneys): No lesions were found in the main arteries, only in the interlobular branches. As previously demonstrated in humans, sections at 1.0 cm or more cranially to the hilus in pigs also showed a significant decrease in damage to the major intrarenal arteries. Therefore, as regards arterial damage, the pig kidney is a useful model for partial nephrectomy in the cranial (upper) pole.

  11. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Dependence of hydrogen-induced lattice defects and hydrogen embrittlement of cold-drawn pearlitic steels on hydrogen trap state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshida, Tomoki; Takai, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogen state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and hydrogen-induced lattice defects were evaluated for cold-drawn pearlitic steel that absorbed hydrogen in two trapping states. Firstly, tensile tests were carried out under various conditions to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The results showed that peak 2 hydrogen, desorbed at temperatures above 200 °C as determined by thermal desorption analysis (TDA), had no significant effect on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In contrast, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased in the presence of peak 1 hydrogen, desorbed from room temperature to 200 °C as determined by TDA, at temperatures higher than −30 °C, at lower strain rates and with higher hydrogen content. Next, the same effects on hydrogen-induced lattice defects were also evaluated by TDA using hydrogen as a probe. Peak 2 hydrogen showed no significant effect on either hydrogen-induced lattice defects or hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It was found that hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed under the conditions where hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was higher under the conditions where the formation of hydrogen-induced lattice defects tended to be enhanced. Since hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed by the interaction between hydrogen and strain were annihilated by annealing at a temperature of 200 °C, they were presumably vacancies or vacancy clusters. One of the common atomic-level changes that occur in cold-drawn pearlitic steel showing higher hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility is the formation of vacancies and vacancy clusters

  13. Temporalis myofascial flap for primary cranial base reconstruction after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaly, Ahmed; Magdy, Emad A; Nour, Yasser A; Gaafar, Alaa H

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the use of the temporalis myofascial flap in primary cranial base reconstruction following surgical tumor ablation and to explain technical issues, potential complications, and donor site consequences along with their management. Retrospective case series. Tertiary referral center. Forty-one consecutive patients receiving primary temporalis myofascial flap reconstructions following cranial base tumor resections in a 4-year period. Flap survival, postoperative complications, and donor site morbidity. Patients included 37 males and 4 females ranging in age from 10 to 65 years. Two patients received preoperative and 18 postoperative radiation therapy. Patient follow-up ranged from 4 to 39 months. The whole temporalis muscle was used in 26 patients (63.4%) and only part of a coronally split muscle was used in 15 patients (36.6%). Nine patients had primary donor site reconstruction using a Medpor((R)) (Porex Surgical, Inc., Newnan, GA) temporal fossa implant; these had excellent aesthetic results. There were no cases of complete flap loss. Partial flap dehiscence was seen in six patients (14.6%); only two required surgical débridement. None of the patients developed cerebrospinal leaks or meningitis. One patient was left with complete paralysis of the temporal branch of the facial nerve. Three patients (all had received postoperative irradiation) developed permanent trismus. The temporalis myofascial flap was found to be an excellent reconstructive alternative for a wide variety of skull base defects following tumor ablation. It is a very reliable, versatile flap that is usually available in the operative field with relatively low donor site aesthetic and functional morbidity.

  14. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.; Golovchak, R.; Zurawska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of γ-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge 23.5 Sb 11.8 S 64.7 glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and sagittal craniosynostosis: three patients requiring operative cranial expansion: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczuk, Phillip; Rogers, Gary F; Guzman, Raphael; Proctor, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    A defect in a phosphate-regulating gene leads to the most common form of rickets: X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) or vitamin D-resistant rickets (VDDR). XLH has been associated with craniosynostosis, the sagittal suture being the most commonly involved. We present three patients with rickets and symptomatic sagittal suture craniosynostosis all of whom presented late (>2 years of age). Two had a severe phenotype and papilledema, while the third presented with an osseous bulging near the anterior fontanel and experienced chronic headaches. All underwent successful cranial vault expansion. Rachitic patients with scaphocephaly should be screened for craniosynostosis.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R; Yang, Peixin

    2016-09-01

    Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects. A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein; endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gene

  17. On the influence of extrinsic point defects on irradiation-induced point-defect distributions in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, J.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.

    1994-01-01

    A semi-quantitative model describing the influence of interfaces and stress fields on {113}-defect generation in silicon during 1-MeV electron irradiation, is further developed to take into account also the role of extrinsic point defects. It is shown that the observed distribution of {113}-defects in high-flux electron-irradiated silicon and its dependence on irradiation temperature and dopant concentration can be understood by taking into account not only the influence of the surfaces and interfaces as sinks for intrinsic point defects but also the thermal stability of the bulk sinks for intrinsic point defects. In heavily doped silicon the bulk sinks are related with pairing reactions of the dopant atoms with the generated intrinsic point defects or related with enhanced recombination of vacancies and self-interstitials at extrinsic point defects. The obtained theoretical results are correlated with published experimental data on boron-and phosphorus-doped silicon and are illustrated with observations obtained by irradiating cross-section transmission electron microscopy samples of wafer with highly doped surface layers. (orig.)

  18. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  19. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Hye; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  20. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  1. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  2. Reconstrução do ligamento cruzado cranial em cães, associado ou não ao sulfato de condroitina Cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction in dogs associated or not to chondroitin sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Biasi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da reconstrução do ligamento cruzado cranial, associado ou não ao sulfato de condroitina, na evolução da osteoartrite induzida experimentalmente em cães. Vinte cães hígidos, sem raça definida, machos e fêmeas, com peso corpóreo entre 19 e 25kg, foram submetidos à desmotomia do ligamento cruzado cranial. Trinta dias após, foram separados em dois grupos de 10 animais. Um grupo foi submetido à reconstrução do ligamento cruzado com uso de aloenxerto de ligamento patelar congelado, o outro não. Trinta e um dias após a desmotomia, cada grupo foi dividido em dois subgrupos de cinco animais. Um recebeu sulfato de condroitina, o outro não. Os cães foram avaliados clínica e radiograficamente antes da desmotomia e aos 30, 60 e 90 dias após a desmotomia. No último momento foram realizados exames macro e microscópico. Nos cães submetidos somente à desmotomia e tratados com sulfato de condroitina houve redução na progressão das alterações ósseas, ao exame radiográfico. A reconstrução do ligamento cruzado cranial melhorou a função do membro e, quando associada ao sulfato de condroitina, houve melhor resposta. Não houve diferença entre os subgrupos quanto aos exames macro e microscópico.The effect of cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction, associated or not to chondroitin sulfate, on the evolution of experimentally induced osteoarthritis in dogs was studied. Twenty healthy mixed dogs, weighing between 19 and 25kg were submitted to cranial cruciate desmotomy. Thirty days later, the animals were divided into two groups with ten dogs each. One was submitted to cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction using frozen patellar tendon allograft and the other received no surgical treatment. Thirty one days after desmotomy, each group was divided into two subgroups with five animals each. One subgroup for each group received chondroitin sulfate and the other received no medical treatment. The dogs were

  3. Endocrinologic complications of cranial irradiation. Complications endocriniennes de l'irradiation cranienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R. (Hopital des Enfants Malades 75 - Paris (FR))

    1989-09-01

    Cranial irradiation has become one of the leading causes of growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The risk and time of onset of GH deficiency depend mainly on the dose delivered to the hypothalamo-pituitary region: GH deficiency is infrequent after doses under 20 grays and nearly constant after doses above 45 grays. For a given dose, a younger age at the time of irradiation and administration of the dose over a shorter time period increase the risk of GH deficiency. GH secretion can be adequately evaluated using rapid stimulation tests and is usually well correlated with growth, except in patients with radiation-induced precocious puberty or growth delay due to radiation-induced cartilage lesions.

  4. Effect of hypotension and carbon dioxide changes in an improved genuine closed cranial window rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K A; Dyrby, Lone; Williamson, D

    2005-01-01

    The genuine closed cranial window model, in which the thinned parietal bone constitutes the covering of the preparation, has contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in migraine. In its present form, only measurements of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) are perf......The genuine closed cranial window model, in which the thinned parietal bone constitutes the covering of the preparation, has contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in migraine. In its present form, only measurements of the middle meningeal artery (MMA......) are performed. The aim of this study was, in addition, to measure pial artery/arteriole (PA) diameter and cortical cerebral blood flux in the same cranial window. The model was evaluated by studying the effects of hypotension and changes in arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2), because these parameters......-induced hypotension (-64+/-0.8 mmHg) caused an increase of MMA diameter of 11.8+/-8.4%, PA diameter of 61.2+/-7.7% and a decrease in LCBF(Flux) of -36.4+/-2.5%. The decrease in blood pressure did not significantly change the MMA (P=0.38); however, the PA diameter and the LCBF(Flux) were affected (P

  5. Comparison of naturally occurring and ligature-induced peri-implantitis bone defects in humans and dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, F.; Herten, M. van; Sager, M.; Bieling, K.; Sculean, A.; Becker, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare naturally occuring and ligature-induced peri-implantitis bone defects in humans and dogs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four partially and fully edentulous patients undergoing peri-implant bone augmentation procedures due to

  6. Channeling study of laser-induced defect generation in InP and InAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdel', K.K.; Kashkarov, P.K.; Timoshenko, V.Yu.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    Damage production in InP and InAs single crystals induced by a ruby-laser pulse irradiation with τ p =20 ms in the energy density region W=0.05-1.0 J/cm 2 is studied by the channeling and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The defect generation threshold was determined to be equal to 0.2 J/cm 2 and 0.55 J/cm 2 for InP and InAs crystals, respectively. Stoichiometric defects in InP crystals were observed at W>=0.5 J/cm 2 . The temperature fields in InP and InAs under laser irradiation were calculated. The experimental observations are considered as a result of a selective evaporation of the components from the melt

  7. Cranial shape variation in adult howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Luca; Bruner, Emiliano

    2018-01-01

    Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) display a distinctive cranial architecture characterized by airorhynchy (or retroflexion of the facial skeleton on the cranial base), a small braincase, and a posteriorly oriented foramen magnum. This configuration has been associated with distinct factors including a high folivory diet, locomotion, and the presence of a specialized vocal tract characterized by large hyoid bone. However, the morphological relationships between the facial and neurocranial blocks in Alouatta have been scarcely investigated. In this study we quantitatively analyzed the cranial shape variation in Alouatta seniculus, to evaluate possible influences and constraints in face and braincase associated with airorhynchy. We also considered the structural role of the pteric area within the cranial functional matrix. We applied landmark-based analysis and multivariate statistics to 31 adult crania, computing shape analyses based on 3D coordinates registration as well as the analysis of the Euclidean distance matrix to investigate patterns of intraspecific morphological variability. Our results suggest that allometry is the main source of variation involved in shaping cranial morphology in howlers, influencing the degree of facial proportions and braincase flattening, and generating the main sexual differences. Larger individuals are characterized by a higher degree of airorhynchy, neurocranial flattening, and expansion of the zygomatic arch. Allometric variations influence the skull as a whole, without distinct patterns for face and braincase, which behave as an integrated morphological unit. A preliminary survey on the pteric pattern suggests that the morphology of this area may be the result of variations in the vertical growth rates between face and braincase. Future studies should be dedicated to the ontogenetic series and focus on airorhynchy in terms of differential growth among distinct cranial districts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  10. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  11. Ionization-induced rearrangement of defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.; Manojlo, M.A.; Matvijchuk, A.S.; Strikha, V.I.; Kholodar', G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing factor effect on defect rearrangement in silicon including centers with deep local electron levels in the p-n-transition region is considered. Deep center parameters were determined using non-steady-state capacity spectroscopy of deep levels (NCDLS) method. NCDLS spectrum measurement was performed using source p + -n - diodes and after their irradiation with 15 keV energy electrons or laser pulses. It is ascertained that in silicon samples containing point defect clusters defect rearrangement under ionizing factor effect takes place, i.e. deep level spectra are changed. This mechanism is efficient in case of silicon irradiation with subthreshold energy photons and electrons and can cause degradation of silicon semiconducting structures

  12. Study of irradiation induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Gayatri; Sebastian, K.C.; Somayajulu, D.R.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    Pure high resistivity (6000 ohm-cm) silicon wafers were recoil implanted with 1.8 MeV 111 In ions. As-irradiated wafers showed a 13 MHz quadrupole interaction frequency, which was not observed earlier. The annealing behaviour of these defects in the implanted wafers was studied between room temperature and 1073 K. At different annealing temperatures two more interaction frequencies corresponding to defect complexes D2 and D3 are observed. Even though the experimental conditions were different, these are identical to the earlier reported ones. Based on an empirical point charge model calculation, an attempt is made to identify the configuration of these defect complexes. (author)

  13. Study on radiation-induced defects in germanium monocrystals by the X-ray diffusive scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinenko, I.A.; Perelygina, E.A.; Chudinova, S.A.; Shivrin, O.N.

    1979-01-01

    The method of X-ray diffusion scattering was used to study the defective structure of germanium monocrystals exposed to 750 keV proton irradiation with 3.8x10 16 -4.6x10 17 cm -2 doses and subjected to the subsequent annealing at temperatures up to 450 deg C. Detected in the crystals were the complex radiation induced structure characterized with oriented vacancy complexes and results from the both effects: irradiation and annealing. Radiation defect sizes in the section (hhO) have been determined. With increasing the annealing temperature the structure reconstruction resulting in the complex dissociation is observed

  14. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-15

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs.

  15. TEM study of radiation induced defects in baffle-former-barrel assembly from decommissioned NPP Greifswald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srba, O.; Michalicka, J.; Keilova, E.; Kocik, K.

    2013-06-01

    A complex transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of reactor vessel internal (RVI) materials from the baffle-former-barrel assembly from NPP Greifswald (VVER 440), Unit 1 decommissioned after 15 service cycles has been undertaken. All parts of the baffle-former-barrel assembly are made from Ti-stabilized austenitic stainless steel 08Ch18N10T. The materials were exposed to different dose of neutron radiation (2.4 - 11.4 dpa) at temperatures 267 - 398 deg. C depending on position in the core. Three types of radiation induced defects were identified and quantified, namely: dislocations, cavities (voids) and fine-scaled precipitated particles of Ni-Si rich phases. Black-dot type defects were observed too. Operation conditions are around ≅ 300 deg. C that is why we have observed defect typical for both low and high regions of irradiation temperatures. (authors)

  16. Response of induced bone defects in horses to collagen matrix containing the human parathyroid hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, Kristin C; Bertone, Alicia L; Wisner, Erik R; Weisbrode, Stephen E

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) gene in collagen matrix could safely promote bone formation in diaphyseal or subchondral bones of horses. 8 clinically normal adult horses. Amount, rate, and quality of bone healing for 13 weeks were determined by use of radiography, quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Diaphyseal cortex and subchondral bone defects of metacarpi were filled with hPTH(1-34) gene-activated matrix (GAM) or remained untreated. Joints were assessed on the basis of circumference, synovial fluid analysis, pain on flexion, lameness, and gross and histologic examination. Bone volume index was greater for cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM, compared with untreated defects. Bone production in cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM positively correlated with native bone formation in untreated defects. In contrast, less bone was detected in hPTH(1-34) GAM-treated subchondral bone defects, compared with untreated defects, and histology confirmed poorer healing and residual collagen sponge. Use of hPTH(1-34) GAM induced greater total bone, specifically periosteal bone, after 13 weeks of healing in cortical defects of horses. The hPTH(1-34) GAM impeded healing of subchondral bone but was biocompatible with joint tissues. Promotion of periosteal bone formation may be beneficial for healing of cortical fractures in horses, but the delay in onset of bone formation may negate benefits. The hPTH(1-34) GAM used in this study should not be placed in articular subchondral bone defects, but contact with articular surfaces is unlikely to cause short-term adverse effects.

  17. Elastic and failure response of imperfect three-dimensional metallic lattices: the role of geometric defects induced by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Kamm, Paul; García-Moreno, Francisco; Banhart, John; Pasini, Damiano

    2017-10-01

    This paper examines three-dimensional metallic lattices with regular octet and rhombicuboctahedron units fabricated with geometric imperfections via Selective Laser Sintering. We use X-ray computed tomography to capture morphology, location, and distribution of process-induced defects with the aim of studying their role in the elastic response, damage initiation, and failure evolution under quasi-static compression. Testing results from in-situ compression tomography show that each lattice exhibits a distinct failure mechanism that is governed not only by cell topology but also by geometric defects induced by additive manufacturing. Extracted from X-ray tomography images, the statistical distributions of three sets of defects, namely strut waviness, strut thickness variation, and strut oversizing, are used to develop numerical models of statistically representative lattices with imperfect geometry. Elastic and failure responses are predicted within 10% agreement from the experimental data. In addition, a computational study is presented to shed light into the relationship between the amplitude of selected defects and the reduction of elastic properties compared to their nominal values. The evolution of failure mechanisms is also explained with respect to strut oversizing, a parameter that can critically cause failure mode transitions that are not visible in defect-free lattices.

  18. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    in the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three...... and possible aura in 4 of 15 patients. Hypoxia did not change glutamate concentration in the visual cortex compared to sham, but increased lactate concentration (P = 0.028) and circumference of the cranial arteries (P ... suggests that hypoxia may provoke migraine headache and aura symptoms in some patients. The mechanisms behind the migraine-inducing effect of hypoxia should be further investigated....

  19. Hardening in AlN induced by point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Mitchell, T.E.; Iseki, T.; Yano, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressureless-sintered AIN was neutron irradiated and the hardness change was examined by Vickers indentation. The hardness was increased by irradiation. When the samples were annealed at high temperature, the hardness gradually decreased. Length was also found to increase and to change in the same way as the hardness. A considerable density of dislocation loops still remained, even after the hardness completely recovered to the value of the unirradiated sample. Thus, it is concluded that the hardening in AIN is caused by isolated point defects and small clusters of point defects, rather than by dislocation loops. Hardness was found to increase in proportion to the length change. If the length change is assumed to be proportional to the point defect density, then the curve could be fitted qualitatively to that predicted by models of solution hardening in metals. Furthermore, the curves for three samples irradiated at different temperatures and fluences are identical. There should be different kinds of defect clusters in samples irradiated at different conditions, e.g., the fraction of single point defects is the highest in the sample irradiated at the lowest temperature. Thus, hardening is insensitive to the kind of defects remaining in the sample and is influenced only by those which contribute to length change

  20. A study on induced current focusing potential drop (ICFPD) technique. Examination of the sizing accuracy of defects and its frequency dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hoon; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1994-01-01

    Aiming at nondestructive detection and size prediction of defects with high accuracy and resolution, an Induced Current Focusing Potential Drop (ICFPD) technique has been developed. This technique can be applied for determining the location and size of defects in components with not only simple shape such as plain surface but also more complex shape and geometry such as curved surface and dissimilar joint. This paper describes the basic principle of ICFPD and its probe development. In this ICFPD, current was induced in a conductive material by a straight induction wire, which is electrically isolated, placed on it. The benefits of this new technique compared with the conventional ACPD are: (1) Current is induced and focused only at an explorating region. (2) Applicable to defect detection by scanning the sensor probe in an explorating region. (3) Applicable to defect detection in a weld joint of austenitic stainless steel. As the results of the innovation in instrumentation and the improvement in evaluation procedure by use of suitable parameters, the existence of defects is clearly observed as the variation of potential drops, and the nondimensional parameter (V c,max. /V avg. ) has a direct correlation with crack depth. Especially, for the depth less than 5 mm, the ICFPD shows higher sensitivity than the conventional ACPD at the frequencies of 3, 10 and 30 kHz. (author)

  1. Flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budhani, R.C.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report some transport measurements carried out to study flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 films. Our results show that in these in situ deposited films containing a large concentration of defects frozen-in at the time of film growth, a marginal enhancement in critical current density occurs when the density of linear defects 10 /cm 2 , and their diameter of the order of coherence length. This criterion is satisfied by Ag +21 ions. The damage due to Au +24 ions is much too severe to improve the J c

  2. Vasculopathic Cranial Ocular Motor Neuropathy Following Sudden Emotional Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Purvin, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    We describe three patients who experienced onset of a microvascular ocular motor nerve palsy in the setting of sudden emotional stress. Such emotional states are accompanied by a marked increase in sympathetic tone in some individuals. Mechanisms by which these autonomic changes might produce an ischemic cranial nerve palsy include intra-cranial vasoconstriction and transient systemic hypotension due to alterations in cardiac function.

  3. [Rapidly progressive compromise of cranial pairs as neurosyphilis manifestation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaro, Fernando; Moldes, Sofía; Novelli Poisson, Paola; Arduin, Julieta; Valerga, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis remains a common disease throughout the world, being neurosyphilis a relatively common manifestation. A case of a 34 years old male with HIV and neurosyphilis is presented, characterized by a clinical course evidenced by progressive palsy of cranial nerves. This case is unusual and a rare presentation of progressive cranial involvement with swallowing deficit, have found no similar data in the literature.

  4. Effect of thermal-convection-induced defects on the performance of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Tang, Wentao; Chen, Han; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-07-01

    Thermal-convection-induced defects can cause huge loss in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processed perovskite solar cells. We investigated two types of convection in perovskite solution during the formation of perovskite films. By balancing the convection via special configurations of surface tension and boiling point in mixed γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), we removed microscopic defects such as rings, bumps, and crevices. The deposited perovskite films were smooth and dense, which enabled a high power conversion efficiency of 17.7% in a 1 cm2 cell area. We believe that the present strategy for controlling the convection can be helpful in improving the perovskite film quality for solvent-rich scalable solution processes of solar cells such as doctor blading, soft-cover deposition, printing, and slot-die coating.

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  6. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Lee, Maria Lúcia de Martino; Andreoni, Solange; Geloneze, Bruno; Lederman, Henrique; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process

  7. [Progress of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qudong; Sun, Zhenzhong; Gu, Sanjun

    2013-10-01

    To summarize the progress of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect. The recent literature concerning the application of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect was extensively reviewed and summarized. Masquelet technique involves a two-step procedure. First, bone cement is used to fill the bone defect after a thorough debridement, and an induced membrane structure surrounding the spacer formed; then the bone cement is removed after 6-8 weeks, and rich cancellous bone is implanted into the induced membrane. Massive cortical bone defect is repaired by new bone forming and consolidation. Experiments show that the induced membrane has vascular system and is also rich in vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta1, bone morphogenetic protein 2, and bone progenitor cells, so it has osteoinductive property; satisfactory results have been achieved in clinical application of almost all parts of defects, various types of bone defect and massive defect up to 25 cm long. Compared with other repair methods, Masquelet technique has the advantages of reliable effect, easy to operate, few complications, low requirements for recipient site, and wide application. Masquelet technique is an effective method to repair bone defect and is suitable for various types of bone defect, especially for bone defects caused by infection and tumor resection.

  8. Characterization of deep level defects in Tl6I4S single crystals by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J A; Liu, Z; Sebastian, M; Wessels, B W; Im, J; Freeman, A J; Nguyen, S; Kanatzidis, M G

    2015-01-01

    Defect levels in semi-insulating Tl 6 I 4 S single crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman technique have been characterized using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). These measurements revealed six electron traps located at (0.059  ±  0.007), (0.13  ±  0.012), (0.31  ±  0.074), (0.39  ±  0.019), (0.62  ±  0.110), and (0.597  ±  0.105). These defect levels are attributed to vacancies (V I , V S ) and antisite defects (I S , Tl S , Tl I ) upon comparison to calculations of native defect energy levels using density functional theory and defects recently reported from photoluminescence and photoconductivity measurements. (paper)

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Liana Macedo de

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures

  10. Ribosomal and hematopoietic defects in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Diamond Blackfan anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garçon, Loïc; Ge, Jingping; Manjunath, Shwetha H; Mills, Jason A; Apicella, Marisa; Parikh, Shefali; Sullivan, Lisa M; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Gadue, Paul; French, Deborah L; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2013-08-08

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital disorder with erythroid (Ery) hypoplasia and tissue morphogenic abnormalities. Most DBA cases are caused by heterozygous null mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Understanding how haploinsufficiency of these ubiquitous proteins causes DBA is hampered by limited availability of tissues from affected patients. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of DBA patients carrying mutations in RPS19 and RPL5. Compared with controls, DBA fibroblasts formed iPSCs inefficiently, although we obtained 1 stable clone from each fibroblast line. RPS19-mutated iPSCs exhibited defects in 40S (small) ribosomal subunit assembly and production of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Upon induced differentiation, the mutant clone exhibited globally impaired hematopoiesis, with the Ery lineage affected most profoundly. RPL5-mutated iPSCs exhibited defective 60S (large) ribosomal subunit assembly, accumulation of 12S pre-rRNA, and impaired erythropoiesis. In both mutant iPSC lines, genetic correction of ribosomal protein deficiency via complementary DNA transfer into the "safe harbor" AAVS1 locus alleviated abnormalities in ribosome biogenesis and hematopoiesis. Our studies show that pathological features of DBA are recapitulated by iPSCs, provide a renewable source of cells to model various tissue defects, and demonstrate proof of principle for genetic correction strategies in patient stem cells.

  11. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Copper, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions

  12. Annealing of the Sb-vacancy and a closely related radiation induced defect in n-type germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Abraham W.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.

    2018-04-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was used to study the defects induced by alpha-particle irradiation from an Am241 source in antimony doped n-type germanium. Previous investigations of the well know Sb-vacancy defect have led to the discovery of a second defect with very similar emission properties, referred to as the E‧. Although both defects have similar emission rates, they have very different annealing properties. In this study we further investigated these properties of the E‧ in Sb doped samples irradiated at 270 K with alpha particles from an Am241 source. Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of each defect. An isothermal annealing study of the E‧ was carried out in the temperature range 300 K to 325 K in 5 K increments, while the Sb-vacancy was annealed out completely at 410 K onwards, long after the E‧ was completely annealed out. The annealing activation energy was determined through isothermal annealing profiles for both the Sb-Vacancy and the E‧ as 1.05 eV and 0.73 eV respectively with a prefactor of 2.05 × 109 s-1 and 2.7 × 108 s-1.

  13. Isolated unilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy: A rare presentation of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liang Boo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a common mosquito-borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical countries. Neurological manifestations in dengue infection are relatively uncommon, and include encephalitis, encephalopathy, neuromuscular disorders and neuro-ocular disorders. Cranial mononeuropathy is a rare manifestation of dengue infection. A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with isolated, unilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy complicating dengue infection. The patient was managed accordingly, and full ocular recovery was observed. This was the first reported case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy associated with dengue fever in Malaysia. It is important for clinicians to consider dengue as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with fever and sixth cranial nerve palsy.

  14. Cranial nerve threshold for thermal injury induced by MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): preliminary results on an optic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnof, Sagi; Zibly, Zion; Cohen, Zvi; Shaw, Andrew; Schlaff, Cody; Kassel, Neal F

    2013-04-01

    Future clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) are moving toward the management of different intracranial pathologies. We sought to validate the production, safety, and efficacy of thermal injury to cranial nerves generated by MRgHIFU. In this study, five female domestic pigs underwent a standard bifrontal craniectomy under general anesthesia. Treatment was then given using an MRgHIFU system to induce hyperthermic ablative sonication (6 to 10 s; 50 to 2000 J.) Histological analyses were done to confirm nerve damage; temperature measured on the optic nerve was approximately 53.4°C (range: 39°C to 70°C.) Histology demonstrated a clear definition between a necrotic, transitional zone, and normal tissue. MRgHIFU induces targeted thermal injury to nervous tissue within a specific threshold of 50°C to 60°C with the tissue near the sonication center yielding the greatest effect; adjacent tissue showed minimal changes. Additional studies utilizing this technology are required to further establish accurate threshold parameters for optic nerve thermo-ablation.

  15. NDT detection and quantification of induced defects on composite helicopter rotor blade and UAV wing sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeis, Dirk; Gryzagoridis, Jasson; Musonda, Vincent

    2008-09-01

    Digital Shearography and Infrared Thermography (IRT) techniques were employed to test non-destructively samples from aircraft structures of composite material nature. Background information on the techniques is presented and it is noted that much of the inspection work reviewed in the literature has focused on qualitative evaluation of the defects rather than quantitative. There is however, need to quantify the defects if the threshold rejection criterion of whether the component inspected is fit for service has to be established. In this paper an attempt to quantify induced defects on a helicopter main rotor blade and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) composite material is presented. The fringe patterns exhibited by Digital Shearography were used to quantify the defects by relating the number of fringes created to the depth of the defect or flaw. Qualitative evaluation of defects with IRT was achieved through a hot spot temperature indication above the flaw on the surface of the material. The results of the work indicate that the Shearographic technique proved to be more sensitive than the IRT technique. It should be mentioned that there is "no set standard procedure" tailored for testing of composites. Each composite material tested is more likely to respond differently to defect detection and this depends generally on the component geometry and a suitable selection of the loading system to suit a particular test. The experimental procedure that is reported in this paper can be used as a basis for designing a testing or calibration procedure for defects detection on any particular composite material component or structure.

  16. Application of ENDOR-induced electron spin resonance to the study of point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, J.R.; Spaeth, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of ENDOR-induced ESR (EI-ESR) is applied to the investigation of several point defects in insulating crystals. It is shown that the lineshape of the EI-ESR spectrum depends on the ENDOR line used for the experiment. The EI-ESR technique allows the separation of overlapping ESR spectra in the presence of several defects. New applications are the selection of spin states and the determination of relative signs of spin-Hamiltonian parameters, the selection of centre orientations and the assignment of nuclei in complex ENDOR spectra, and the determination of quadrupole interactions which are not resolved in the ENDOR spectrum. (author)

  17. Analysis of Manufacturing-Induced Defects and Structural Deformations in Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Premature battery drain, swelling and fires/explosions in lithium-ion batteries have caused wide-scale customer concerns, product recalls, and huge financial losses in a wide range of products including smartphones, laptops, e-cigarettes, hoverboards, cars, and commercial aircraft. Most of these problems are caused by defects which are difficult to detect using conventional nondestructive electrical methods and disassembly-based destructive analysis. This paper develops an effective computed tomography (CT-based nondestructive approach to assess battery quality and identify manufacturing-induced defects and structural deformations in batteries. Several unique case studies from commercial e-cigarette and smartphone applications are presented to show where CT analysis methods work.

  18. Cranial nerve injury after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Chin, B-R; Park, H-S; Lee, S-H; Kwon, T-G

    2011-03-01

    A Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformity because it is a safe and reliable surgical method. Although rare, various complications have been reported in relation to pterygomaxillary separation. Cranial nerve damage is one of the serious complications that can occur after Le Fort I osteotomy. In this report, a 19-year-old man with unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent surgery to correct maxillary hypoplasia, asymmetry and mandibular prognathism. After the Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, the patient showed multiple cranial nerve damage; an impairment of outward movement of the eye (abducens nerve), decreased vision (optic nerve), and paraesthesia of the frontal and upper cheek area (ophthalmic and maxillary nerve). The damage to the cranial nerve was related to an unexpected sphenoid bone fracture and subsequent trauma in the cavernous sinus during the pterygomaxillary osteotomy. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. X-ray appearance of cranial lesions in hyperparathyroid osteodystuophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuzyak, M.M.; Tsarikovskaya, K.G.; Tkach, F.S.; David'yants, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Craniographic data on 58 patients with hyperparathyroid osteodystrophy weere analyzed. Cranial changes revealed in 52 patients. Some data on the nature apd frequency of X-ray signs of cranial lesion in hyperparathyroid osteodystrophy are presented. The most frequent and typical X-ray signs of cranial lesions in hyperparathyroid osteodystrophy, are granular osteoporosis of the facial tectum and bones, the blurred contour of the internal tectum plate, foci of osteoclasia, osteoporosis of the elements of the Turkish saddle, resorption of the closing plates of the dental cavities, alterration of the thickness of the vault bones, symmetrical thinning, irregularity and obscurity of the external tectum plate, subperiosteal resorption of the cortical layer of the mandible (34.5%), partial resorption of the alveolar process of the jaw and epulis of the mandible

  20. Bone regeneration of critical calvarial defect in goat model by PLGA/TCP/rhBMP-2 scaffolds prepared by low-temperature rapid-prototyping technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Li, Q; Mu, X; Chang, T; Xiong, Z

    2008-10-01

    Active artificial bone composed of poly lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA)/ tricalcium phosphate (TCP) was prefabricated using low-temperature rapid-prototyping technology so that the process of osteogenesis could be observed in it. PLGA and TCP were the primary materials, they were molded at low temperature, then recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was added to form an active artificial bone. Goats with standard cranial defects were randomly divided into experimental (implants with rhBMP-2 added) and control (implants without rhBMP-2) groups, and osteogenesis was observed and evaluated by imaging and biomechanical and histological examinations. The PLGA-TCP artificial bone scaffold (90% porosity) had large and small pores of approximately 360microm and 3-5microm diameter. Preliminary and complete repair of the cranial defect in the goats occurred 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, respectively. The three-point bending strength of the repaired defects attained that of the normal cranium. In conclusion, low-temperature rapid-prototyping technology can preserve the biological activity of this scaffold material. The scaffold has a good three-dimensional structure and it becomes an active artificial bone after loading with rhBMP-2 with a modest degradation rate and excellent osteogenesis in the goat.

  1. Metastable and bistable defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukashev, Bulat N; Abdullin, Kh A; Gorelkinskii, Yurii V

    2000-01-01

    Existing data on the properties and structure of metastable and bistable defects in silicon are analyzed. Primary radiation-induced defects (vacancies, self-interstitial atoms, and Frenkel pairs), complexes of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and other impurity atoms and defects with negative correlation energy are considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Turmeric Extract Rescues Ethanol-Induced Developmental Defect in the Zebrafish Model for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Connors, Craig T; Mohammed, Arooj S; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, Kathleen; Marrs, James A; Chism, Grady W

    2017-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes the most frequent preventable birth disorder, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The effect of turmeric extracts in rescuing an ethanol-induced developmental defect using zebrafish as a model was determined. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms underlying FASD. We hypothesize that antioxidant inducing properties of turmeric may alleviate ethanol-induced defects. Curcuminoid content of the turmeric powder extract (5 mg/mL turmeric in ethanol) was determined by UPLC and found to contain Curcumin (124.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL), Desmethoxycurcumin (43.4 ± 0.1 μg/mL), and Bisdemethoxycurcumin (36.6 ± 0.1 μg/mL). Zebrafish embryos were treated with 100 mM (0.6% v/v) ethanol during gastrulation through organogenesis (2 to 48 h postfertilization (hpf)) and supplemented with turmeric extract to obtain total curcuminoid concentrations of 0, 1.16, 1.72, or 2.32 μM. Turmeric supplementation showed significant rescue of the body length at 72 hpf compared to ethanol-treated embryos. The mechanism underlying the rescue remains to be determined. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Pathogenesis of cranial neuropathies in Moebius syndrome: Electrodiagnostic orofacial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Francis; Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Sergent, Bernard; Baudon, Jean Jacques; Aouizerate, Jessie; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Gitiaux, Cyril

    2018-02-09

    We designed a retrospective study of 59 patients with congenital sporadic nonprogressive bilateral facial and abducens palsies. Examinations included needle electromyography (EMG) of facial and oral muscles, facial nerve motor latency and conduction velocity (FNCV), and blink responses (BR). Neurogenic EMG changes were found in 1 or more muscles in 55 of 59 patients, with no abnormal spontaneous activity. EMG changes were homogeneously neurogenic in 17 patients, homogeneously myopathic in 1 patient, and heterogeneous in 41 of 59 patients. Motor latency was increased according to recordings from 52 of 137 facial muscles. An increase of motor latency was not associated with neurogenic EMG (Fischer's test: right, P = 1; left, P = 0.76). FNCV was slowed in 19 of 36 patients. BR was absent bilaterally in 35 of 58 patients; when present, R1 and R2 latencies were normal. Our results support the hypothesis of an early developmental defect localized in motor cranial nerves with spared V-VII internuclear pathways. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations

  5. Customized Polymethyl Methacrylate Implants for the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Osseous Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Fernandes da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial defects represent alterations in the anatomy and morphology of the cranial vault and the facial bones that potentially affect an individual’s psychological and social well-being. Although a variety of techniques and restorative procedures have been described for the reconstruction of the affected area, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, a biocompatible and nondegradable acrylic resin-based implant, is the most widely used alloplastic material for such craniomaxillofacial reconstruction. The aim of this study was to describe a technique for aesthetic and functional preoperative customized reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects from a small series of patients offered by the Brazilian public health system. Three adult male patients attended consultation with chief complaints directly related to their individual craniofacial bone defects. With the aid of multislice computed tomography scans and subsequent fabrication of the three-dimensional craniofacial prototype, custom-made PMMA implants were fabricated preoperatively. Under general anesthesia, with access to the craniofacial defects with a coronal approach, the PMMA implants were adapted and fixated to the facial skeleton with titanium plates and screws. Postoperative evaluation demonstrated uneventful recovery and an excellent aesthetic result. Customized prefabricated PMMA implants manufactured over the rapid prototyping models proved to be effective and feasible.

  6. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Martins, Jose Carlos Tadeu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  7. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma; Aydin, Kubilay; Aktuglu, Cigdem

    2004-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  8. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  9. Defect properties of ZnO nanopowders and their modifications induced by remote plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramo, J A; Peters, R M; Quarles, C A; Strzhemechny, Y M [Physics Department, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Vallejo, H [North Side High School, Fort Worth, TX 79129 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) and positron lifetime (LT) measurements were used on several commercial ZnO nanopowders. We observed that sample-to-sample differences in the quality of the powders overshadow any observation of probable size effects. However, the average LT for all nanocrystals is longer than in a bulk sample, consistent with the hypothesis of crystals with surface and subsurface layers rich in defects. Temperature-dependent PL spectra from the ZnO nanopowders were analyzed in detail for the bound-exciton (BEx) range and the numerical fits of the peak positions yielded activation energies that suggested different channels of recombination for the BEx. Also, fits for the full width at half maximum (FWHM) show nonlinear behavior, indicating contribution from surface phonons. We, also, used remote nitrogen and hydrogen plasma treatment on the ZnO nanosystems to manipulate their surface and subsurface defect states. We demonstrated that those plasma species induce a variety of changes in the deep defect visible emission as well as in the BEx luminescence, most likely associated with the surface/subsurface states.

  10. Defect properties of ZnO nanopowders and their modifications induced by remote plasma treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramo, J A; Peters, R M; Quarles, C A; Strzhemechny, Y M; Vallejo, H

    2009-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) and positron lifetime (LT) measurements were used on several commercial ZnO nanopowders. We observed that sample-to-sample differences in the quality of the powders overshadow any observation of probable size effects. However, the average LT for all nanocrystals is longer than in a bulk sample, consistent with the hypothesis of crystals with surface and subsurface layers rich in defects. Temperature-dependent PL spectra from the ZnO nanopowders were analyzed in detail for the bound-exciton (BEx) range and the numerical fits of the peak positions yielded activation energies that suggested different channels of recombination for the BEx. Also, fits for the full width at half maximum (FWHM) show nonlinear behavior, indicating contribution from surface phonons. We, also, used remote nitrogen and hydrogen plasma treatment on the ZnO nanosystems to manipulate their surface and subsurface defect states. We demonstrated that those plasma species induce a variety of changes in the deep defect visible emission as well as in the BEx luminescence, most likely associated with the surface/subsurface states.

  11. Optical properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanaolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan; Saleki, Z.; Madani, A.

    2015-01-01

    The transmission properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanolayers have been investigated using the transfer matrix method. It is shown that two kinds of the defect modes can be found in the band gaps of the structure. One kind is the traditional defect mode which is created in the Bragg gaps of the structure and is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the dielectric lattice. The other one is created in the graphene induced band gap. Such a defect mode which we call it the graphene induced defect mode is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the graphene lattice. However, our investigations reveal that only in the case of wide defect layers one can obtain the graphene induced defect modes. The effects of many parameters such as the incident angle, the state of polarization and the chemical potential of the graphene nanolayers on the properties of the graphene induced defect modes are discussed. Moreover, the possibility of external control of the graphene induced defect modes using a gate voltage is shown.

  12. Irradiation induced defects containing oxygen atoms in germanium crystal as studied by deep level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Kambe, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Haruo; Matsuda, Koji.

    1984-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was applied to the electron trapping levels which are associated with the irradiation induced lattice defects in germanium crystals. The germanium crystals used in the study were doped with oxygen, antimony or arsenic and the defects were formed by electron irradiation of 1.5MeV or 10MeV. The nature of so called ''thermal defect'' formed by heat treatment at about 670K was also studied. The trapping levels at Esub(c)-0.13eV, Esub(c)-0.25eV and Esub(c)-0.29eV were found to be associated with defects containing oxygen atoms. From the experimental results the Esub(c)-0.25eV level was attributed to the germanium A-center (interstitial oxygen atom-vacancy pair). Another defect associated with the 715cm -1 infrared absorption band was found to have a trapping level at the same position at Esub(c)-0.25eV. The Esub(c)-0.23eV and Esub(c)-0.1eV levels were revealed to be associated with thermal donors formed by heat treatment at about 670K. Additional two peaks (levels) were observed in the DLTS spectrum. The annealing behavior of the levels suggests that the thermal donors originate from not a single type but several types of defects. (author)

  13. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  14. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  15. Neurologic disturbances in case of breast cancer disseminated into cranial bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasyuk, S.V.; Letyagin, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents data on 52 cases of breast cancer disseminated into cranial vault bones (2 into the orbit). Metastases into the brain (2) and meninges (6) were detected in 17 cases with the aid of computerized tomography of the brain and examination of cerebrospinal fluid. The latter cases were not included into the study group. Metastases into cranial bones were identified by craniography and scanning of the skeleton. Half the patients (18 out of 35) revealed the following neurologic syndromes which were determined by the site of metastases into cranial vault bones and tumour growth pattern (into cranial cavity or soft tissues of the head): lesions in ramus primus nervi trigemini, greater occipital nerve, migraine, pseudotumorous and pseudoencephalitic syndromes. Cases of such neurologic disorders require an all-round examination including ophthalmooscopy, EEG, computerized tomography of the brain, craniography and scanning of the skeleton

  16. Characterization of radiation-induced defects in ZnO probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.; Mascher, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing of single crystals irradiated either with 3 MeV protons or with 1 or 2 MeV electrons, respectively. The investigations were performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements. The differently grown ZnO single crystals show positron bulk lifetimes in the range of 159-173 ps. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of radiation-induced defects in ZnO probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W. [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Technische Physik; Balogh, A.G. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). FB Materialwissenschaft; Mascher, P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2001-07-01

    In this study we discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing of single crystals irradiated either with 3 MeV protons or with 1 or 2 MeV electrons, respectively. The investigations were performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements. The differently grown ZnO single crystals show positron bulk lifetimes in the range of 159-173 ps. (orig.)

  18. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  19. Dexamethasone minimizes the risk of cranial nerve injury during CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Guido; Angiletta, Domenico; Impedovo, Giovanni; De Robertis, Giovanni; Fiorella, Marialuisa; Carratu', Maria Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injury during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) ranges from less than 7.6% to more than 50%. Lesions are mainly due to surgical maneuvers such as traction, compression, tissue electrocoagulation, clamping, and extensive dissections. The use of dexamethasone (DEX) and its beneficial effects in spinal cord injuries have already been described. We investigated whether DEX could also be beneficial to minimize the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injury during CEA. To evaluate whether dexamethasone is able to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve injuries. From March 1999 through April 2006, 1126 patients undergoing CEA because of high-grade carotid stenosis were enrolled and randomized by predetermined randomization tables into two groups. The first group, "A", included 586 patients that all received an intravenous administration of dexamethasone following a therapeutic scheme. The second group, "B", included 540 control subjects that received the standard pre- and postoperative therapy. All patients were submitted to a deep cervical plexus block, eversion carotid endarterectomy, and selective shunting. Three days after the operation, an independent neurologist and otorhinolaryngologist evaluated the presence of cranial nerve deficits. All patients (group A and group B) showing nerve injuries continued the treatment (8 mg of dexamethasone once in the morning) for 7 days and were re-evaluated after 2 weeks, 30 days, and every 3 months for 1 year. Recovery time took from 2 weeks to 12 months, with a mean time of 3.6 months. The chi(2) test was used to compare the two groups and to check for statistical significance. The incidence of cranial nerve dysfunction was higher in group B and the statistical analysis showed a significant effect of dexamethasone in preventing the neurological damage (P = .0081). The incidence of temporary lesions was lower in group A and the chi(2) test yielded a P value of .006. No statistically

  20. Macrostructure of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the River Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dehghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe autonomic nervous system consists of a vast range of nerves and ganglions. Anatomical studies have demonstrated that the sympathetic innervations of the head and neck are affected by the neurons that ramify from the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG. The CCG is the end of the sympathetic cervical trunk, which runs with the vagal nerve during its cervical course. In this study sixteen adult (2 - 5 year river buffalo of both sexes (eight male, eight female weighing around 250 - 450 kg were dissected to investigate the weight, situation and arrangement of nerve branches of the cranial cervical ganglion bilaterally. The ganglions showed a fusiform shape and reddish in color. The cranial cervical ganglion covered by the digastricus muscle. It lies in dorsal region of the base of epiglottic cartilage, ventromedial to tympanic bulla and ventrally to atlantic fossa, and medial of the occipital artery. This study showed that the cranial cervical ganglions in river buffalo were well-developed structure. The main branches of cranial cervical ganglion included the internal carotid, external carotid and jugular nerves.

  1. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-01-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs

  2. Defect-induced conductance oscillations in short atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawrzyniak-Adamczewska, M; Kostyrko, T

    2012-01-01

    Electronic transport through a junction made of two gold electrodes connected with a gold chain containing a silver impurity is analyzed with a tight binding model and the density-functional theory. It is shown that the conductance depends in a simple way on the position of the impurity in the chain and the parity of the total number of atoms of the chain. For an odd chain the conductance takes on a higher value when the Ag impurity substitutes an even Au atom in the chain, and a lower one for an odd position of the Ag atom. In the case of an even chain the conductance hardly depends on the position of the Ag atom. This new kind of a defect-induced parity oscillation of the conductance is significantly more prominent than the well-known even-odd effect related to the dependence of the conductance on the parity of number of atoms in perfect chains. (paper)

  3. 3D Printed, Customized Cranial Implant for Surgical Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogu, Venkata Phanindra; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Asit Kumar, Khanra

    2018-06-01

    The main objective of the present work is to model cranial implant and printed in FDM machine (printer model used: mojo). Actually this is peculiar case and the skull has been damaged in frontal, parietal and temporal regions and a small portion of frontal region damaged away from saggital plane, complexity is to fill this frontal region with proper curvature. The Patient CT-data (Number of slices was 381 and thickness of each slice is 0.488 mm) was processed in mimics14.1 software, mimics file was sent to 3-matic software and calculated thickness of skull at different sections where cranial implant is needed then corrected the edges of cranial implant to overcome CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) leakage and proper fitting. Finally the implant average thickness is decided as 2.5 mm and printed in FDM machine with ABS plastic.

  4. X-ray analysis of temperature induced defect structures in boron implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztucki, M.; Metzger, T. H.; Kegel, I.; Tilke, A.; Rouvière, J. L.; Lübbert, D.; Arthur, J.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate the application of surface sensitive diffuse x-ray scattering under the condition of grazing incidence and exit angles to investigate growth and dissolution of near-surface defects after boron implantation in silicon(001) and annealing. Silicon wafers were implanted with a boron dose of 6×1015 ions/cm2 at 32 keV and went through different annealing treatments. From the diffuse intensity close to the (220) surface Bragg peak we reveal the nature and kinetic behavior of the implantation induced defects. Analyzing the q dependence of the diffuse scattering, we are able to distinguish between point defect clusters and extrinsic stacking faults on {111} planes. Characteristic for stacking faults are diffuse x-ray intensity streaks along directions, which allow for the determination of their growth and dissolution kinetics. For the annealing conditions of our crystals, we conclude that the kinetics of growth can be described by an Ostwald ripening model in which smaller faults shrink at the expense of the larger stacking faults. The growth is found to be limited by the self-diffusion of silicon interstitials. After longer rapid thermal annealing the stacking faults disappear almost completely without shrinking, most likely by transformation into perfect loops via a dislocation reaction. This model is confirmed by complementary cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Asymptomatic cystic changes in the brain of children after cranial irradiation: frequency, latency, and relationship to age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Mika; Hirai, Toshinori; Maruyama, Natsuki; Yamura, Masayuki; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Baba, Yuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Ryuji; Korogi, Yukunori; Nakamura, Hideo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2007-01-01

    Although radiation therapy plays an important role in the management of children with brain tumors, radiation-induced brain damage sometimes occurs after radiation therapy. In some pediatric patients who had undergone cranial radiation therapy, we noticed cystic changes in the brain on follow-up MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency, latency, relationship with patient age, radiation dose, and serial change in the cystic changes in children after cranial irradiation. We retrospectively studied MRI in 33 children who had undergone cranial irradiation for their primary brain tumors. Postirradiation cystic change in the brain on follow-up MRI was defined as a well-demarcated, oval-shaped, CSF-like signal intensity area, and no contrast enhancement. Of the 33 patients, 6 (18.2%) had one or more cystic lesions. The latency of the cystic changes ranged from 1.5 to 7 years (mean 2.6 years). Cystic changes were found in the subcortical, periventricular and other deep white matter and the basal ganglia. The size of the lesions ranged from 1 to 10 mm at their first appearance; eight cystic lesions increased in size. None the cystic lesions reduced in size or resolved with time and none required intervention. All patients with cystic changes had received irradiation when they were 6 years of age or younger. The cystic changes occurred within the radiation field in patients treated with a radiation dose of 36 Gy or more. Asymptomatic brain parenchymal cystic changes appear to occur in children who have undergone cranial irradiation at 6 years of age or younger. (orig.)

  6. Electronic excitation induced defect dynamics in HfO2 based MOS devices investigated by in-situ electrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikanthababu, N.; Vajandar, S.; Arun, N.; Pathak, A. P.; Asokan, K.; Osipowicz, T.; Basu, T.; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.

    2018-03-01

    In-situ I-V and C-V characterization studies were carried out to determine the device quality of atomic layer deposited HfO2 (2.7 nm)/SiO2 (0.6 nm)/Si-based metal oxide semiconductor devices during 120 MeV Ag ion irradiation. The influence of various tunneling mechanisms has been investigated by analyzing the I-V characteristics as a function of ion fluence. The nature of the defects created is tentatively identified by the determination of the significant tunneling processes. While the ion induced annealing of defects is observed at lower fluences, ion induced intermixing and radiation damage is found to be significant at higher fluences. The C-V characteristics also reveal significant changes at the interface and oxide trap densities: an increase in the oxide layer thickness occurs through the formation of an HfSiO interlayer. The interlayer is due to the swift heavy ion induced intermixing, which has been confirmed by X-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements.

  7. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  8. New approach to neurorehabilitation: cranial nerve noninvasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Yuri P.; Tyler, Mitchel E.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Skinner, Kimberley L.

    2014-06-01

    Cranial Nerve NonInvasive NeuroModulation (CN-NINM) is a primary and complementary multi-targeted rehabilitation therapy that appears to initiate the recovery of multiple damaged or suppressed brain functions affected by neurological disorders. It is deployable as a simple, home-based device (portable neuromodulation stimulator, or PoNSTM) and training regimen following initial patient training in an outpatient clinic. It may be easily combined with many existing rehabilitation therapies, and may reduce or eliminate the need for more aggressive invasive procedures or possibly decrease total medication intake. CN-NINM uses sequenced patterns of electrical stimulation on the tongue. Our hypothesis is that CN-NINM induces neuroplasticity by noninvasive stimulation of two major cranial nerves: trigeminal (CN-V), and facial (CN-VII). This stimulation excites a natural flow of neural impulses to the brainstem (pons varolli and medulla), and cerebellum, to effect changes in the function of these targeted brain structures, extending to corresponding nuclei of the brainstem. CN-NINM represents a synthesis of a new noninvasive brain stimulation technique with applications in physical medicine, cognitive, and affective neurosciences. Our new stimulation method appears promising for treatment of a full spectrum of movement disorders, and for both attention and memory dysfunction associated with traumatic brain injury.

  9. Patient Satisfaction and Short-Term Outcome in Elective Cranial Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reponen, Elina; Tuominen, Hanna; Hernesniemi, Juha; Korja, Miikka

    2015-11-01

    Patient-reported experience is often used as a measure for quality of care, but no reports on patient satisfaction after cranial neurosurgery exist. To study the association of overall patient satisfaction and surgical outcome and to evaluate the applicability of overall patient satisfaction as a proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery. We conducted an observational study on the relationship of overall patient satisfaction at 30 postoperative days with surgical and functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score) in a prospective, consecutive, and unselected cohort of 418 adult elective craniotomy patients enrolled between December 2011 and December 2012 at Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Postoperative overall (subjective and objective) morbidity was present in 194 (46.4%) patients; yet almost 94% of all study patients reported high overall satisfaction. Low overall patient satisfaction at 30 days was not associated with postoperative major morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery. Dependent functional status (mRS score ≥3) at 30 days, minor infections, poor postoperative subjective overall health status, and patient-reported severe symptoms (double vision, poor balance) may contribute to unsatisfactory patient experience. Overall patient satisfaction with elective cranial neurosurgery is high. Even 9 of 10 patients with postoperative major morbidity rated high overall patient satisfaction at 30 days. Overall patient satisfaction may merely reflect patient experience and subjective postoperative health status, and therefore it is a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery.

  10. [Use of the induced membrane technique for the treatment of bone defects in the hand or wrist, in emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamans, B; Pauchot, J; Petite, H; Blanchet, N; Rochet, S; Garbuio, P; Tropet, Y; Obert, L

    2010-10-01

    A prospective study is reported concerning 11 cases of bone defect of the hand and wrist treated by the induced membrane technique. Ten men and one woman with an average age of 49 yrs (17-72) sustained a high-energy trauma with severe mutilation of digit and hand but with intact pulp. Eight cases of open finger fractures with composite loss of substance and three cases of bone and joint infection (thumb, wrist, fifth finger) were included. All cases were treated by the induced membrane technique which consists in stable fixation, flap if necessary, and in filling the bone defect by a cement methyl methacrylate polymere (PMMA) spacer. A secondary procedure at two months is needed where the cement is removed and the void is filled by cancellous bone. The key point of this induced membrane technique is to respect the foreign body membrane which formed around the cement spacer creating a biologic chamber. Bone union was evaluated prospectively by X-ray and CT scan by a surgeon not involved in the treatment. Failure was defined as non-union at one year, or uncontrolled sepsis at one month. Two cases failed to achieve bone union. No septic complications occurred and all septic cases were controlled. In nine cases, bone union was achieved within four months (three to 12). Evidence of osteoid formation was determined by a bone biopsy in one case. Masquelet first reported 35 cases of large tibial non-union defects treated by the induced membrane technique. The cement spacer promotes foreign body membrane induction constituting a biological chamber. Works on animal models reported by Pellissier and Viateau demonstrated membrane properties: secretion of growths factors (VEGF, TGF beta1, BMP2) and osteoinductive cellular activity. The induced membrane seems to mimic a neoperiosteum. This technique is useful in emergency or septic conditions where bone defects cannot be treated by shortening. It avoids microsurgery and is limited by availability of cancellous bone. Copyright

  11. Surface-defect induced modifications in the optical properties of α-MnO_2 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Reenu Elizabeth; Chandran, Anoop; Thomas, Marykutty; Jose, Joshy; George, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alpha-MnO_2 nanorods are prepared by chemical method. • Difference in surface defect density is achieved. • Characterized using XRD, Rietveld, XPS, EDS, HR-TEM, BET, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and PL spectroscopy. • Explains the bandstructure modification due to Jahn–Teller distortions using crystal field theory. • Modification in the intensity of optical emissions related to defect levels validates the concept of surface defect induced tuning of optical properties. - Abstract: The science of defect engineering via surface tuning opens a new route to modify the inherent properties of nanomaterials for advanced functional and practical applications. In this work, two independent synthesis methods (hydrothermal and co-precipitation) are adopted to fabricate α-MnO_2 nanorods with different defect structures so as to understand the effect of surface modifications on their optical properties. The crystal structure and morphology of samples are investigated with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Atomic composition calculated from energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirms non-stoichiometry of the samples. The surface properties and chemical environment are thoroughly studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis. Bond angle variance and bond valence sum are determined to validate distortions in the basic MnO_6 octahedron. The surface studies indicate that the concentration of Jahn–Teller manganese (III) (Mn"3"+) ion in the samples differ from each other which results in their distinct properties. Band structure modifications due to Jahn–Teller distortion are examined with the aid of ultraviolet–visible (UV) reflectance and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The dual peaks obtained in derivative spectrum conflict the current concept on the bandgap energy of MnO_2. These studies suggest that

  12. NMDA Receptor Signaling Is Important for Neural Tube Formation and for Preventing Antiepileptic Drug-Induced Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequerra, Eduardo B; Goyal, Raman; Castro, Patricio A; Levin, Jacqueline B; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2018-05-16

    Failure of neural tube closure leads to neural tube defects (NTDs), which can have serious neurological consequences or be lethal. Use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy increases the incidence of NTDs in offspring by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that during Xenopus laevis neural tube formation, neural plate cells exhibit spontaneous calcium dynamics that are partially mediated by glutamate signaling. We demonstrate that NMDA receptors are important for the formation of the neural tube and that the loss of their function induces an increase in neural plate cell proliferation and impairs neural cell migration, which result in NTDs. We present evidence that the AED valproic acid perturbs glutamate signaling, leading to NTDs that are rescued with varied efficacy by preventing DNA synthesis, activating NMDA receptors, or recruiting the NMDA receptor target ERK1/2. These findings may prompt mechanistic identification of AEDs that do not interfere with neural tube formation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural tube defects are one of the most common birth defects. Clinical investigations have determined that the use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy increases the incidence of these defects in the offspring by unknown mechanisms. This study discovers that glutamate signaling regulates neural plate cell proliferation and oriented migration and is necessary for neural tube formation. We demonstrate that the widely used antiepileptic drug valproic acid interferes with glutamate signaling and consequently induces neural tube defects, challenging the current hypotheses arguing that they are side effects of this antiepileptic drug that cause the increased incidence of these defects. Understanding the mechanisms of neurotransmitter signaling during neural tube formation may contribute to the identification and development of antiepileptic drugs that are safer during pregnancy. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/384762-12$15.00/0.

  13. Cocaine-induced encephalocele: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ladislau; DeMattia, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    The abuse of cocaine can lead to significant destruction of midline craniofacial structures. This process occurs secondary to myriad mechanisms, including ischemic necrosis, irritation by chemical adulterants, and direct trauma during its administration. Coupled with a prolonged chronic infection of intranasal and anterior skull base regions, an encephalocele can be formed. We report a case of an encephalocele secondary to cocaine use and its associated complications. A 56-year-old man presented with altered mental status and cerebritis secondary to the presence of an intranasal encephalocele. On computed tomography, extensive destruction of the anterior cranial fossa was observed. The patient had a 30-year history of intranasal cocaine abuse, and his urine tested positive for the presence of cocaine on admission. The patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics and underwent a repair of his cranial defect and resection of the encephalocele. The patient made a good recovery after treatment. Alternative causes of an encephalocele, including trauma, surgery, and congenital malformation, were ruled out in this patient. Histopathological analysis of the necrotic tissue and the absence of renal or pulmonary disease also indicated that the patient did not suffer from Wegener granulomatosis, a known cause of spontaneous intranasal lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an encephalocele likely induced solely by cocaine abuse.

  14. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comins, J.D.; Amolo, G.O.; Derry, T.E.; Connell, S.H.; Erasmus, R.M.; Witcomb, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I 3 - structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I 3 - and I 5 - aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 x 10 15 to 250 x 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  15. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comins, J. D.; Amolo, G. O.; Derry, T. E.; Connell, S. H.; Erasmus, R. M.; Witcomb, M. J.

    2009-08-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I3- structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I3- and I5- aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 × 10 15 to 250 × 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  16. [Cranial nerve palsy caused by tumours of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsing, C.P.; Verbist, B.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy is a diagnostic guiding symptom, but often goes unrecognized. The differential diagnosis includes a variety of diseases, including malignant tumours of the head and neck. Here we describe three cases of cranial nerve palsy. In two of the cases the palsy was recognized following

  17. Multi cranial nerve palsies as the presenting features of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.M.; Wynne, C.J.; Cowan, I.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cranial nerve palsies have previously been reported in metastatic prostate carcinoma, usually occurring late in the course of the disease. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man whose diagnosis of prostate cancer was made following investigation of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  18. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, J P

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved.

  19. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walmsley, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved

  20. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  1. Classification of Porcine Cranial Fracture Patterns Using a Fracture Printing Interface,.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Bucak, Serhat Selçuk; Vollner, Jennifer M; Fenton, Todd W; Jain, Anil K; Haut, Roger C

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing between accidental and abusive head trauma in children can be difficult, as there is a lack of baseline data for pediatric cranial fracture patterns. A porcine head model has recently been developed and utilized in a series of studies to investigate the effects of impact energy level, surface type, and constraint condition on cranial fracture patterns. In the current study, an automated pattern recognition method, or a fracture printing interface (FPI), was developed to classify cranial fracture patterns that were associated with different impact scenarios documented in previous experiments. The FPI accurately predicted the energy level when the impact surface type was rigid. Additionally, the FPI was exceedingly successful in determining fractures caused by skulls being dropped with a high-level energy (97% accuracy). The FPI, currently developed on the porcine data, may in the future be transformed to the task of cranial fracture pattern classification for human infant skulls. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint A. Boyd

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001. Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and ‘cheek’ tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with

  3. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Pradeep P.; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  4. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Pradeep P; Kalita, Jayantee [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Misra, Usha K. [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)], E-mail: drukmisra@rediffmail.com

    2009-06-15

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  5. Clinical treatment of traumatic brain injury complicated by cranial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai; Wang, Sumin; Hou, Lijun; Pan, Chengguang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hui; Yu, Mingkun; Lu, Yicheng

    2010-09-01

    To discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis and surgical treatment of cranial nerve injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) for the sake of raising the clinical treatment of this special category of TBI. A retrospective analysis was made of 312 patients with cranial nerve injury among 3417 TBI patients, who were admitted for treatment in this hospital. A total of 312 patients (9.1%) involving either a single nerve or multiple nerves among the 12 pairs of cranial nerves were observed. The extent of nerve injury varied and involved the olfactory nerve (66 cases), optic nerve (78 cases), oculomotor nerve (56 cases), trochlear nerve (8 cases), trigeminal nerve (4 cases), abducent nerve (12 cases), facial nerve (48 cases), acoustic nerve (10 cases), glossopharyngeal nerve (8 cases), vagus nerve (6 cases), accessory nerve (10 cases) and hypoglossal nerve (6 cases). Imaging examination revealed skull fracture in 217 cases, complicated brain contusion in 232 cases, epidural haematoma in 194 cases, subarachnoid haemorrhage in 32 cases, nasal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in 76 cases and ear CSF leakage in 8 cases. Of the 312 patients, 46 patients died; the mortality rate associated with low cranial nerve injury was as high as 73.3%. Among the 266 surviving patients, 199 patients received conservative therapy and 67 patients received surgical therapy; the curative rates among these two groups were 61.3% (122 patients) and 86.6% (58 patients), respectively. TBI-complicated cranial nerve injury is subject to a high incidence rate, a high mortality rate and a high disability rate. Our findings suggest that the chance of recovery may be increased in cases where injuries are amenable to surgical decompression. It is necessary to study all 12 pairs of cranial nerves systematically. Clinically, it is necessary to standardise surgical indications, operation timing, surgical approaches and methods for the treatment of TBI-complicated cranial nerve injury. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Impacts of reactor. Induced cladding defects on spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    Defects arise in the fuel cladding on a small fraction of fuel rods during irradiation in water-cooled power reactors. Defects from mechanical damage in fuel handling and shipping have been almost negligible. No commercial water reactor fuel has yet been observed to develop defects while stored in spent fuel pools. In some pools, defective fuel is placed in closed canisters as it is removed from the reactor. However, hundreds of defective fuel bundles are stored in numerous pools on the same basis as intact fuel. Radioactive species carried into the pool from the reactor coolant must be dealt with by the pool purification system. However, additional radiation releases from the defective fuel during storage appear tu be minimal, with the possible exception of fuel discharged while the reactor is operating (CANDU fuel). Over approximately two decades, defective commercial fuel has been handled, stored, shipped and reprocessed. (author)

  7. Defect-induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of the Al-doped and undoped ZnO rod-like nanostructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jule, L

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available : 151-155 Defect-induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of the Al-doped and undoped ZnO rod-like nanostructure Jule L Dejene F Ali AG Roro KT Mwakikunga BW ABSTRACT: In this work, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR...

  8. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  9. MRI findings in cranial eumycetoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Munawwar; Sureka, Jyoti; Chacko, Geeta; Eapen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cranial eumycetoma (CE) due to direct inoculation of Madurella grisea into the scalp is extremely rare. We describe a case of CE caused by direct inoculation of M. grisea with the characteristic MRI findings of the “dot-in-circle” sign and a conglomeration of multiple, extremely hypointense “dots.”

  10. Latitudinal variation in cranial dimorphism in Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    This study examines latitudinal and insular variation in the expression of sexual dimorphism in cranial length in three geographical groupings of Macaca fascicularis. In addition, the relationship between cranial length dimorphism (CLD) and sex-specific size is examined. The results of the study identified a significant relationship between CLD and latitude for only one of the three geographic groupings. Sex-specific relationships between cranial length and CLD were detected. The pattern of these relationships varied by geographic grouping. This study is important because it demonstrates that despite very similar levels of CLD in a single primate species, there exists important geographic variability in the correlates of that dimorphism. I suggest that geographically varying ecological factors may influence sex-specific natural selection and the intensity of CLD in M. fascicularis. Gaining a better understanding of this geographical variability will require that future research examines morphological variation, including CLD, within its corresponding ecological and social contexts. Such research should be comparative, and incorporate multiple geographically separated populations with disparate environmental settings.

  11. Defects in CdSe thin films, induced by high energy electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, L.; Antohe, S.; Tutuc, D.; Antohe, V.A.; Tazlaoanu, C.

    2004-01-01

    Defects induced in CdSe thin films by high energy electron irradiation are investigated by means of thermally stimulated currents (TSC) spectroscopy. Films were obtained by vacuum deposition from a single source and irradiated with a 5 x 10 13 electrons/cm 2 s -1 beam of 6-MeV energy. It was found that electrical properties of the films are controlled by a deep donor state, located at 0.38 eV below the bottom edge of the conduction band. Parameters of the traps responsible for the recorded TSC peaks were determined. (authors)

  12. MD simulations to evaluate effects of applied tensile strain on irradiation-induced defect production at various PKA energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashiro, S.; Fujita, S.; Okita, T.; Okuda, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strain effects on defect formation were evaluated at various PKA energies by MD. ► Radiation-induced defects were increased numerically by external strain. ► Enhanced formation of larger clusters causes the numerical increase of defects. ► Strain influence on the number of defects was greatest at about 20 keV PKA. ► Cluster size, which is mostly affected by strain, was greater with higher PKA energy. - Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of applied tensile strain on defect production during cascade damages at various Primary Knock-on Atom (PKA) energies of 1–30 keV. When 1% strain was applied, the number of surviving defects increased at PKA energies higher than 5 keV, although they did not increase at 1 keV. The rate of increase by strain application was higher with higher PKA energy, and attained the maximum at 20 keV PKA energy with a subsequent gradual decrease at 30 keV PKA energy The cluster size, mostly affected by strain, was larger with higher PKA energy, although clusters with fewer than seven interstitials did not increase in number at any PKA energy.

  13. Cervical vertebrae, cranial base, and mandibular retrognathia in human triploid fetuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Nolting, Dorrit; Engel, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    and the uppermost vertebra in the body axis. As the notochord connects the cervical column and the cranial base in early prenatal life, molecular signaling from the notochord may in future studies support the notochord as the developmental link between abnormal development in the spine and the cranial base....

  14. Positive pressure ventilation and cranial volume in newborn infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, D W

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between changes in airways pressure, pleural pressure, and cranial volume was studied in a group of sick newborn infants requiring ventilatory assistance. Cranial volume increased appreciably only when lung compliance was such that more than 20% of the applied airways pressure was transmitted to the pleural space, or if the absolute pleural pressure was greater than 4 cmH2O above atmospheric pressure. The findings stress the need for more-critical monitoring during periods of...

  15. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  16. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID:25422784

  17. Carbon nanohorns accelerate bone regeneration in rat calvarial bone defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Takao; Iizuka, Tadashi; Kanamori, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Atsuro [Department of Oral Functional Prosthodontics, Division of Oral Functional Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8586 (Japan); Matsumura, Sachiko; Shiba, Kiyotaka [Division of Protein Engineering, Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31, Ariake, koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio, E-mail: tkasai@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 5, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2011-02-11

    A recent study showed that carbon nanohorns (CNHs) have biocompatibility and possible medical uses such as in drug delivery systems. It was reported that some kinds of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes were useful for bone formation. However, the effect of CNHs on bone tissue has not been clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CNHs on bone regeneration and their possible application for guided bone regeneration (GBR). CNHs dispersed in ethanol were fixed on a porous polytetrafluoroethylene membrane by vacuum filtration. Cranial defects were created in rats and covered by a membrane with/without CNHs. At two weeks, bone formation under the membrane with CNHs had progressed more than under that without CNHs and numerous macrophages were observed attached to CNHs. At eight weeks, there was no significant difference in the amount of newly formed bone between the groups and the appearance of macrophages was decreased compared with that at two weeks. Newly formed bone attached to some CNHs directly. These results suggest that macrophages induced by CNHs are related to bone regeneration. In conclusion, the present study indicates that CNHs are compatible with bone tissue and effective as a material for GBR.

  18. Evaluation of an animation tool developed to supplement dental student study of the cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, M; McKenna, J P; Cryan, J F; Vagg, T; Toulouse, A; Downer, E J

    2017-12-30

    The structure/function of the cranial nerves is a core topic for dental students. However, due to the perceived complexity of the subject, it is often difficult for students to develop a comprehensive understanding of key concepts using textbooks and models. It is accepted that the acquisition of anatomical knowledge can be facilitated by visualisation of structures. This study aimed to develop and assess a novel cranial nerve animation as a supplemental learning aid for dental students. A multidisciplinary team of anatomists, neuroscientists and a computer scientist developed a novel animation depicting the cranial nerves. The animation was viewed by newly enrolled first-year dental students, graduate entry dental students (year 1) and dental hygiene students (year 1). A simple life scenario employing the use of the cranial nerves was developed using a cartoon-type animation with a viewing time of 3.58 minutes. The animation was developed with emphasis on a life scenario. The animation was placed online for 2 weeks with open access or viewed once in a controlled laboratory setting. Questionnaires were designed to assess the participants' attitude towards the animation and their knowledge of the cranial nerves before and after visualisation. This study was performed before the delivery of core lectures on the cranial nerves. Our findings indicate that the use of the animation can act as a supplemental tool to improve student knowledge of the cranial nerves. Indeed, data indicate that a single viewing of the animation, in addition to 2-week access to the animation, can act as a supplemental learning tool to assist student understanding of the structure and function of cranial nerves. The animation significantly enhanced the student's opinion that their cranial nerve knowledge had improved. From a qualitative point of view, the students described the animation as an enjoyable and useful supplement to reading material/lectures and indicated that the animation was a

  19. The evolution of interaction between grain boundary and irradiation-induced point defects: Symmetric tilt GB in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Yingying; Yao, Man; Wang, Xudong; Xu, Haixuan; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics method is used and scheme of calculational tests is designed. The atomic evolution view of the interaction between grain boundary (GB) and irradiation-induced point defects is given in six symmetric tilt GB structures of bcc tungsten with the energy of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) EPKA of 3 and 5 keV and the simulated temperature of 300 K. During the collision cascade with GB structure there are synergistic mechanisms to reduce the number of point defects: one is vacancies recombine with interstitials, and another is interstitials diffuse towards the GB with vacancies almost not move. The larger the ratio of the peak defect zone of the cascades overlaps with the GB region, the statistically relative smaller the number of surviving point defects in the grain interior (GI); and when the two almost do not overlap, vacancy-intensive area generally exists nearby GBs, and has a tendency to move toward GB with the increase of EPKA. In contrast, the distribution of interstitials is relatively uniform nearby GBs and is affected by the EPKA far less than the vacancy. The GB has a bias-absorption effect on the interstitials compared with vacancies. It shows that the number of surviving vacancies statistically has increasing trend with the increase of the distance between PKA and GB. While the number of surviving interstitials does not change much, and is less than the number of interstitials in the single crystal at the same conditions. The number of surviving vacancies in the GI is always larger than that of interstitials. The GB local extension after irradiation is observed for which the interstitials absorbed by the GB may be responsible. The designed scheme of calculational tests in the paper is completely applicable to the investigation of the interaction between other types of GBs and irradiation-induced point defects.

  20. Prevalence of symptomatic and silent stress-induced perfusion defects in diabetic patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, John O.; Calcagni, Maria-Lucia; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Monbaron, David; Ruiz, Juan [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Lausanne (Switzerland); Koehli, Melanie [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-01-01

    Silent myocardial ischaemia - as evaluated by stress-induced perfusion defects on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients without a history of chest pain - is frequent in diabetes and is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular events. Its prevalence has been determined in asymptomatic diabetic patients, but remains largely unknown in diabetic patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) in the clinical setting. In this study we therefore sought (a) to determine the prevalence of symptomatic and silent perfusion defects in diabetic patients with suspected CAD and (b) to characterise the eventual predictors of abnormal perfusion. The patient population comprised 133 consecutive diabetic patients with suspected CAD who had been referred for MPS. Studies were performed with exercise (41%) or pharmacological stress testing (1-day protocol, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 201}Tl or both). We used semi-quantitative analysis (20-segment polar maps) to derive the summed stress score (SSS) and the summed difference score (SDS). Abnormal MPS (SSS{>=}4) was observed in 49 (37%) patients (SSS=4.9{+-}8.4, SDS=2.4{+-}4.7), reversible perfusion defects (SDS{>=}2) in 40 (30%) patients [SSS=13.3{+-}10.9; SDS=8.0{+-}5.6; 20% moderate to severe (SDS>4), 7% multivessel] and fixed defects in 21 (16%) patients. Results were comparable between patients with and patients without a history of chest pain. Of 75 patients without a history of chest pain, 23 (31%, 95% CI=21-42%) presented reversible defects (SSS=13.9{+-}11.3; SDS=7.4{+-}1.2), indicative of silent ischaemia. Reversible defects were associated with inducible ST segment depression during MPS stress (odds ratio (OR)=3.2, p<0.01). Fixed defects were associated with erectile dysfunction in males (OR=3.7, p=0.02) and lower aspirin use (OR=0.25, p=0.02). Silent stress-induced perfusion defects occurred in 31% of the patients, a rate similar to that in patients with a history of chest pain. MPS could identify

  1. Visualization of the lower cranial nerves by 3D-FIESTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takemura, Akihiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Takada, Tadanori

    2005-01-01

    MR cisternography has been introduced for use in neuroradiology. This method is capable of visualizing tiny structures such as blood vessels and cranial nerves in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space because of its superior contrast resolution. The cranial nerves and small vessels are shown as structures of low intensity surrounded by marked hyperintensity of the CSF. In the present study, we evaluated visualization of the lower cranial nerves (glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory) by the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequence and multiplanar reformation (MPR) technique. The subjects were 8 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 21 to 76 years (average, 54 yeas). We examined the visualization of a total of 66 nerves in 11 subjects by 3D-FIESTA. The results were classified into four categories ranging from good visualization to non-visualization. In all cases, all glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were identified to some extent, while accessory nerves were visualized either partially or entirely in only 16 cases. The total visualization rate was about 91%. In conclusion, 3D-FIESTA may be a useful method for visualization of the lower cranial nerves. (author)

  2. CRANIAL OSTEOLOGY OF CYCLARHIS GUJANENSIS (AVES: VIREONIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIEGO MATIUSSI PREVIATTO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The small passerine Cyclaris gujanensis can tear into small pieces large or heavy-bodied preys that could not be swallowed whole such as frogs, snakes, bats and birds. However there are few studies on the cranial anatomy of this species. Thus, we focused on the description of the cranial osteology to contribute to the anatomical knowledge of this species and to make some assumptions about functional anatomy. The fossa temporalis is shallow but broad and the fossa of os palatinum is deepened. The os quadratum processes are long and thick. The os pterygoideum is enlarged and the upper jaw is strongly inclined ventrally (140° with reference to the skull. The rostral extremity of rhamphotheca is hooked with ventral concavity to fit the mandible (pincer form. The mandible fossae are deepened and broad and its bulky medial process probably provides mandible stability and strong support to the muscles attached on it. All these peculiar characteristics probably indicate a considerable force in the C. gujanensis jaws and partially explain its distinctive feeding habit compared with the other Vireonidae. Nevertheless, new studies with functional approaches to analysis the forces of the muscle fibers and the cranial kinesis are needed to prove the hypotheses mentioned above.

  3. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Testing the cranial evolutionary allometric 'rule' in Galliformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde-Medina, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent comparative studies have indicated the existence of a common cranial evolutionary allometric (CREA) pattern in mammals and birds, in which smaller species have relatively smaller faces and bigger braincases than larger species. In these studies, cranial allometry was tested using a multivariate regression between shape (described using landmarks coordinates) and size (i.e. centroid size), after accounting for phylogenetic relatedness. Alternatively, cranial allometry can be determined by comparing the sizes of two anatomical parts using a bivariate regression analysis. In this analysis, a slope higher or lower than one indicates the existence of positive or negative allometry, respectively. Thus, in those species that support the CREA 'rule', positive allometry is expected for the association between face size and braincase size, which would indicate that larger species have disproportionally larger faces. In this study, I applied these two approaches to explore cranial allometry in 83 Galliformes (Aves, Galloanserae), ranging in mean body weight from 30 g to 2.5 kg. The multivariate regression between shape and centroid size revealed the existence of a significant allometric pattern resembling CREA, whereas the second analysis revealed a negative allometry for beak size and braincase size (i.e. contrary to the CREA 'rule', larger galliform species have disproportionally shorter beaks than smaller galliform species). This study suggests that the presence of CREA may be overestimated when using cranium size as the standard measurement. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Adaptive repair induced by small doses of γ radiation in repair-defective human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasukhina, G.D.; L'vova, G.N.; Vasil'eva, I.M.; Sinel'shchikova, T.A.; Semyachkina, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive repair induced by small doses of gamma radiation was studied in repair-defective xeroderma pigmentosum, gout, and homocystinuria cells. The adaptation of cells induced by small doses of radiation was estimated after subsequent exposure to gamma radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine by three methods: (1) by the reduction in DNA breaks; (2) by induction of resistant DNA synthesis; and (3) by increased reactivation of vaccinia virus. The three cell types in response to the three different mutagens revealed differences in the mechanism of cell defense in excision repair, in the adaptive response, and in Weigl reactivation

  6. Measurement and simulation of the effects of ion-induced defects on ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) measurements in Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearne, S.M.; Lay, M.D.H.; Jamieson, D.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) technique is a very sensitive tool for investigating the electronic properties of semiconductor materials and devices. However, obtaining quantitative information from IBIC experiments requires an accurate model of the materials properties. The interaction of high energy ions with crystalline materials is known to create point defects within the crystal. A significant proportion of defects introduced by the interaction of the ion with the crystal are electrically active and are therefore an important consideration when undertaking an IBIC experiment. The goal of this work is to investigate the possibility of including the relevant defect parameters in computer simulations of the IBIC experiment implemented using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) software. We will present the results from an IBIC study on Si Schottky diodes using 1 MeV alphas. A reduction of greater than 50% in the detected IBIC signal was observed for fluences greater than 5x10 10 He + /cm 2 . The trap parameters following ion irradiation were determined experimentally using DLTS. Comparisons between the experimental IBIC results and TCAD simulations will be discussed

  7. The impact of cranial irradiation on the growth of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.J.; Foster, M.B.; D'Ercole, A.J.; McMillan, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Heights, height velocities, weights, and weight velocities were measured serially in 21 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had survived three to five years in continuous complete remission. These patients were assigned randomly to treatment regimens that varied according to whether cranial irradiation was used. Patients receiving cranial irradiation had lower height velocities during therapy than normal subjects and patients not receiving cranial irradiation. Twenty-two other children with ALL, who were irradiated but not randomized, exhibited similar alterations in growth. These results indicate that cranial irradiation, and not leukemia or antileukemia chemotherapy, causes reduced growth

  8. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, Antonio E-mail: acano@hrs.sas.junta-andalucia.es; Ribes, Ramon; Riva, Andres de la; Rubio, Fernando Lopez; Sanchez, Carmen; Sancho, Jose L

    2002-11-01

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities.

  9. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-01-01

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm 2 and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO 2 lasers

  10. A System for Measuring Defect Induced Beam Modulation on Inertial Confinement Fusion-class Laser Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R; Widmayer, C; Williams, W; Weinzapfel, C; Roberts, D

    2005-10-18

    A multi-wavelength laser based system has been constructed to measure defect induced beam modulation (diffraction) from ICF class laser optics. The Nd:YLF-based modulation measurement system (MMS) uses simple beam collimation and imaging to capture diffraction patterns from optical defects onto an 8-bit digital camera at 1053, 527 and 351 nm. The imaging system has a field of view of 4.5 x 2.8 mm{sup 2} and is capable of imaging any plane from 0 to 30 cm downstream from the defect. The system is calibrated using a 477 micron chromium dot on glass for which the downstream diffraction patterns were calculated numerically. Under nominal conditions the system can measure maximum peak modulations of approximately 7:1. An image division algorithm is used to calculate the peak modulation from the diffracted and empty field images after the baseline residual light background is subtracted from both. The peak modulation can then be plotted versus downstream position. The system includes a stage capable of holding optics up to 50 pounds with x and y translation of 40 cm and has been used to measure beam modulation due to solgel coating defects, surface digs on KDP crystals, lenslets in bulk fused silica and laser damage sites mitigated with CO{sub 2} lasers.

  11. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-02-22

    Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  12. The Biomechanics of Cranial Forces During Figure Skating Spinning Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David H; Kostyun, Regina O; Solomito, Matthew J

    2015-03-01

    Several facets of figure skating, such as the forces associated with jumping and landing, have been evaluated, but a comprehensive biomechanical understanding of the cranial forces associated with spinning has yet to be explored. The purpose of this case study was to quantify the cranial rotational acceleration forces generated during spinning elements. This case report was an observational, biomechanical analysis of a healthy, senior-level, female figure skating athlete who is part of an on-going study. A triaxial accelerometer recorded the gravitational forces (G) during seven different spinning elements. Our results found that the layback spin generated significant cranial force and these forces were greater than any of the other spin elements recorded. These forces led to physical findings of ruptured capillaries, dizziness, and headaches in our participant.

  13. Growth and endocrine disorders secondary to cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappaport, R; Brauner, R

    1989-06-01

    External cranial radiation for the treatment of malignant diseases has become a frequent cause of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). The timing of occurrence and the frequency of GHD were related to the hypothalamic-pituitary radiation dose. Frequency varied from 50% in leukemia (2400 cGy) to 75% in face and neck tumors or medulloblastoma (2500-4500 cGy) and up to 100% in optic glioma (greater than 4500 cGy). The significantly more severe growth deficit in patients with GHD given higher radiation doses suggests different levels of residual GH secretion according to radiation dosage. The minimum harmful radiation dose is probably close to 1800-2000 cGy. Our data show that stimulation tests remain a useful means of defining GHD and predicting growth. A fair agreement between GH secretion and growth was found in most cases, regardless of the radiation dose. The only exception was a group of leukemic children (2400 cGy) who achieved normal prepubertal growth despite a low GH response. The 24-h spontaneous plasma GH profiles and IGF-I measurements may add information if growth is retarded despite a normal GH response. We showed that growth retardation occurring after some schedules of total body irradiation was not due to GH deficiency but rather to radiation-induced skeletal lesions. Early or true precocious puberty, generally associated with GHD, was another cause of height loss. As the role of GH deficiency in the final height reduction was demonstrated in all groups of patients after cranial radiation, we suggest that hGH therapy should be considered in any child with proven GH deficiency and significant growth retardation after such radiation. 77 references.

  14. Influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and lattice defects accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Pigeon, Florent [Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire; Quey, Romain [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, CNRS, UMR5307, Laboratoire Georges Friedel, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2014-04-28

    The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.

  15. Electrical Characterisation of electron beam exposure induced Defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danga, Helga T., E-mail: helga.danga@up.ac.za; Auret, Francois D.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2016-01-01

    The defects introduced in epitaxially grown p-type silicon (Si) during electron beam exposure were electrically characterised using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and high resolution Laplace-DLTS. In this process, Si samples were first exposed to the conditions of electron beam deposition (EBD) without metal deposition. This is called electron beam exposure (EBE) herein. After 50 minutes of EBE, nickel (Ni) Schottky contacts were fabricated using the resistive deposition method. The defect level observed using the Ni contacts had an activation energy of H(0.55). This defect has an activation energy similar to that of the I-defect. The defect level is similar to that of the HB4, a boron related defect. DLTS depth profiling revealed that H(0.55) could be detected up to a depth of 0.8 μm below the junction. We found that exposing the samples to EBD conditions without metal deposition introduced a defect which was not introduced by the EBD method. We also observed that the damage caused by EBE extended deeper into the material compared to that caused by EBD.

  16. [Cranial trepanation in primitive cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Darder, José Manuel

    A review is presented on cranial trepanations performed by primitive cultures. The scientific interest in this topic began after the discovery in 1965 by Ephraim G. Squier of a pre-Columbian trepanated skull, and studied by Paul Broca in Paris. Pseudotrepanation and other types of cranial manipulation are reviewed. The techniques, technology, and instruments for every type of trepanation are well known. There are a surprisingly high percentage of cases showing signs of post-trepanation survival. Indications for trepanation are speculative, perhaps magic. Although trepanation in primitive cultures is widespread around the world, and throughout time, the main fields of interest are the Neolithic Period in Europe, the pre-Columbian Period in Andean South America, and some contemporaneous Pacific and African tribes. This particular trepanation procedure has no relationship with modern Neurosurgery, or with trepanations with therapeutic purposes performed since the Greco-Roman period in Europe, and afterwards around the world. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Problems of cranial computer-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, D [Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Abt.

    1979-07-01

    The author discusses the problems that have cropped up since the introduction of computerized tomography 5 years ago. To begin with, problems of contrast and object resolution are discussed with a special view to the importance of amipague imaging of cisterns, in particular in the detection of basal growing and displacing, intracranial processes. After this, the tasks of computerized tomography in neurological and neurosurgical emergencies, cerebrocranial injuries, cerebral circulation disturbances, inflammatory diseases of the central nervous systems, epileptic seizures, and chronical headaches are reviewed. Special regard is given to the problem of recurrent examinations and course control, especially in cerebral tumours and aresorptive hydrocephalus. Another paragraph deals with the correlation between CT findings, clinical symptoms, and clinical findings. The importance of cranial CT for neurological diagnoses is illustrated by the change of indications for conventional methods of examination. The limits of the method are shown and it is pointed out that cranial CT is not a search technique but that it requires previous examinations by a neurologist, neurosurgeon, or neuropaediatrician.

  18. Problems of cranial computer-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, D.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the problems that have cropped up since the introduction of computerized tomography 5 years ago. To begin with, problems of contrast and object resolution are discussed with a special view to the importance of amipague imaging of cisterns, in particular in the detection of basal growing and displacing, intracranial processes. After this, the tasks of computerized tomography in neurological and neurosurgical emergencies, cerebrocranial injuries, cerebral circulation disturbances, inflammatory diseases of the central nervous systems, epileptic seizures, and chronical headaches are reviewed. Special regard is given to the problem of recurrent examinations and course control, especially in cerebral tumours and aresorptive hydrocephalus. Another paragraph deals with the correlation between CT findings, clinical symptoms, and clinical findings. The importance of cranial CT for neurological diagnoses is illustrated by the change of indications for conventional methods of examination. The limits of the method are shown and it is pointed out that cranial CT is not a search technique but that it requires previous examinations by a neurologist, neurosurgeon, or neuropaediatrician. (orig.) [de

  19. Cranial base pathology in pediatric osteogenesis imperfecta patients treated with bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arponen, Heidi; Vuorimies, Ilkka; Haukka, Jari; Valta, Helena; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna; Mäkitie, Outi

    2015-03-01

    Cranial base pathology is a serious complication of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Our aim was to analyze whether bisphosphonate treatment, used to improve bone strength, could also prevent the development of craniocervical junction pathology (basilar impression, basilar invagination, or platybasia) in children with OI. In this single-center retrospective study the authors analyzed the skull base morphology from lateral skull radiographs and midsagittal MR images (total of 94 images), obtained between the ages of 0 and 25 years in 39 bisphosphonate-treated OI patients. The results were compared with age-matched normative values and with findings in 70 OI patients who were not treated with bisphosphonates. In addition to cross-sectional data, longitudinal data were available from 22 patients with an average follow-up period of 7.6 years. The patients, who had OI types I, III, IV, VI, and VII, had been treated with zoledronic acid, pamidronate, or risedronate for 3.2 years on average. Altogether 33% of the 39 bisphosphonate-treated patients had at least 1 cranial base anomaly, platybasia being the most prevalent diagnosis (28%). Logistic regression analysis suggested a higher risk of basilar impression or invagination in patients with severe OI (OR 22.04) and/or older age at initiation of bisphosphonate treatment (OR 1.45), whereas a decreased risk was associated with longer duration of treatment (OR 0.28). No significant associations between age, height, or cumulative bisphosphonate dose and the risk for cranial base anomaly were detected. In longitudinal evaluation, Kaplan-Meier curves suggested delayed development of cranial base pathology in patients treated with bisphosphonates but the differences from the untreated group were not statistically significant. These findings indicate that cranial base pathology may develop despite bisphosphonate treatment. Early initiation of bisphosphonate treatment may delay development of craniocervical junction pathology

  20. On the roentgenomorphological correlations of cranial sutures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoglyadova, T.P.; Koval', G.Yu.; Shuaa, T.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors explain the essence of the zone of excessive transparence along the cranial sutures visualized on the X-ray pictures during the first year of life by presence of large number of rough-fiber bone in the marginal regions. The zone of ''physiological sclerosis'' is postulated as a result of summation of the bone margin shadows consisting of compact substance (osteones). Microscopic examination of skull in brain tumors revealed a delay in the formation of bone margins in the suture region with an excessive amount of connective and osteoid tissue while in craniostenosis closure of cranial sutures being with intensive bone formation as well as by closure of the bone margins by newly formed bone tissue around the vessels of the connective layer of the suture

  1. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A.Z. St. Jan Brugge Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); A.Z. St. Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2007-08-15

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  2. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  3. Clinical analysis of surgical treatment of traumatic hematomas of the posterior cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenhua; Zhou Youxin; Zhu Fengqing; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical features and surgical outcome of the traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa. Methods: Fifteen patients with traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa in authors' hospital during the period from 1995 to 1998 were reviewed. Results: Thirteen patients had an occipital skull fracture, 11 pure epidural hematomas among whom 4 had cerebellar contusion and hematomas 4 posterior cranial fossa hematoma with associated cerebral hematoma or contusion, and 5 acute hydrocephalus. Fifteen patients were treated by emergency surgery, 9 had good recovery and 1 had severe disability in GCS between 9 and 15 marking, 1 had good recovery, 1 had severe disability and 3 died in GCS between 3 and 8. Nine patients had good recovery in 11 patient having pure epidural hematoma of posterior cranial fossa. Conclusions: The clinical course of the traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa was acute and severe. The GCS value below 9 predicts the poor out-come for patients. Early diagnosis and appropriately and promptly treatment are crucial for achieving good results

  4. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  5. Annealing temperature effects on the magnetic properties and induced defects in C/N/O implanted MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Ye, Bonian; Hao, Yingping; Liu, Jiandang; Kong, Wei; Ye, Bangjiao

    2013-02-01

    Virgin MgO single crystals were implanted with 70 keV C/N/O ions at room temperature to a dose of 2 × 1017/cm2. After implantation the samples showed room temperature hysteresis in magnetization loops. The annealing effects on the magnetic properties and induced defects of these samples were determined by vibrating sample magnetometer and positron annihilation spectroscopy, respectively. The experimental results indicate that ferromagnetism can be introduced to MgO single crystals by doping with C, N or introduction of Mg related vacancy defects. However, the Mg vacancies coexistence with C or N ions in the C-/N-implanted samples may play a negative role in magnetic performance in these MgO samples. The rapid increase of magnetic moment in O-implanted sample is attributed to the formation of new type of vacancy defects.

  6. Roentgenological investigation of cavernous sinus structure with special reference to paracavernous cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuha, M.; Aoki, H.; Okamura, T.

    1987-01-01

    We have evaluated the anatomical structure of cavernous sinuses in parasellar blocks obtained from adult cadavers to gain clinically useful information. Ten microdissectional studies of parasellar blocks (20 sides of cavernous sinus) were carried out with special emphasis on the course of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th). These were also examined on plain radiographs. Secondly, CT investigations of the cavernous sinuses (notably as to paracavernous cranial nerves) were undertaken in twenty clinical cases having presumed parasellar lesions and in three parasellar blocks from cadavers. The results from microdisectional studies and plain radiographs were as follows. It was found that the 3rd cranial nerve entered the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus close to the antero-inferior part of the posterior clinoid on lateral projection. The 4th cranial nerve, on the other hand, entered near the postero-inferior portion of the posterior clinoid on the same view. Variations in Parkinson's triangle were fairly often noted, although marked asymmetry was not seen in individual cases. From CT findings, it was found that a postenhanced, magnified direct coronal study was essential for identifying paracavernous cranial nerves more clearly. The 3rd and 5th cranial nerves were fairly well identified on axial and coronal projections. Careful radiological investigation including plain skull radiographs and CT seems to be of value for those who diagnose or treat parasellar lesions. (orig.)

  7. A study of cranial variations based on craniometric indices in a South Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Krishan, Kewal; Gupta, Anadi; Acharya, Jenash

    2014-09-01

    Human skull has been the most extensively studied bone for establishing the taxonomies at evolutionary levels. Crania are also the most commonly used skeletal elements in population studies because they are known to be more genetically driven and less affected by environmental factors. The craniofacial indices are considered as clinical anthropometric parameters used in the investigation of craniofacial skeletal deformities and brain development. The present research is an attempt to study the cranial indices in the South Indian population. The sample for the study included 118 dry adult crania. All the osteometric measurements were taken using standard anthropometric instruments, and 3 indices, namely, cranial index, orbital index (OI), and index of foreman magnum (FMI), were calculated. Cranial index is calculated as (maximum cranial breadth / maximum cranial length) × 100, OI as (orbital height / orbital breadth) × 100, and FMI as (transverse diameter / anteroposterior diameter) × 100. The crania were further classified based on these indices. The cranial index ranged between 66.67 and 85.71 (mean, 78.57 [SD, 4.11]), the OI ranged between 68.89 and 102.63 (mean, 84.23 [SD, 6.64]), and the FMI ranged between 68.57 and 96.88 (mean, 79.71 [SD, 6.98]). Cranial index did not show any significant correlation with the OI (r = -0.162, P = 0.081) or the FMI (r = -0.045, P = 0.626). A statistically significant correlation was, however, observed between OI and FMI (r = -0.232, P = 0.012). The current study developed population-specific classification of crania using cranial indices. This craniometric baseline data pertaining to the craniofacial indices may be useful in presurgical planning and the postsurgical evaluation. It may also assist the forensic anthropologists in the categorization of human skulls, which may be an important component in identification of highly decomposed dead bodies and skeletal remains. More such studies need to be conducted to understand the

  8. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Cranial Capacity in Black and White Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, J. Philippe; Osborne, R. Travis

    1995-01-01

    Data from 236 pairs of black twins and white twins aged 13-17 years were used to examine genetic and environmental factors influencing cranial size, an indirect estimate of brain volume. Genetic factors are required to account for the phenotypic variance in cranial capacity. (SLD)

  9. Myological variability in a decoupled skeletal system: batoid cranial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N; Grubbs, R Dean

    2014-08-01

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) have simple feeding mechanisms owing to their relatively few cranial skeletal elements. However, the indirect association of the jaws to the cranium (euhyostylic jaw suspension) has resulted in myriad cranial muscle rearrangements of both the hyoid and mandibular elements. We examined the cranial musculature of an abbreviated phylogenetic representation of batoid fishes, including skates, guitarfishes and with a particular focus on stingrays. We identified homologous muscle groups across these taxa and describe changes in gross morphology across developmental and functional muscle groups, with the goal of exploring how decoupling of the jaws from the skull has effected muscular arrangement. In particular, we focus on the cranial anatomy of durophagous and nondurophagous batoids, as the former display marked differences in morphology compared to the latter. Durophagous stingrays are characterized by hypertrophied jaw adductors, reliance on pennate versus fusiform muscle fiber architecture, tendinous rather than aponeurotic muscle insertions, and an overall reduction in mandibular kinesis. Nondurophagous stingrays have muscles that rely on aponeurotic insertions onto the skeletal structure, and display musculoskeletal specialization for jaw protrusion and independent lower jaw kinesis, relative to durophagous stingrays. We find that among extant chondrichthyans, considerable variation exists in the hyoid and mandibular muscles, slightly less so in hypaxial muscles, whereas branchial muscles are overwhelmingly conserved. As chondrichthyans occupy a position sister to all other living gnathostomes, our understanding of the structure and function of early vertebrate feeding systems rests heavily on understanding chondrichthyan cranial anatomy. Our findings highlight the incredible variation in muscular complexity across chondrichthyans in general and batoids in particular. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombal, Manuel A; Megías, Manuel

    2018-04-16

    Lampreys, together with hagfishes, are the only extant representatives of the oldest branch of vertebrates, the agnathans, which are the sister group of gnathostomes; therefore, studies on these animals are of great evolutionary significance. Lampreys exhibit a particular life cycle with remarkable changes in their behavior, concomitant, in part, with important modifications in the head and its musculature, which might influence the development of the cranial nerves. In this context, some cranial nerves such as the optic nerve and the ocular motor nerves, which develop slowly during an extremely long larval period lasting more than five years, have been more thoroughly investigated; however, much less experimental information is available about others, such as the facial or the hypoglossal nerves. In addition, the possible existence of a "true" accessory nerve in these animals is still a matter of conjecture. Although growing in last decades, investigations on the physiology of the lamprey cranial nerves is scanty. This review focuses on past and recent findings that have contributed to characterize the anatomical organization of the cranial nerves in lampreys, including their components and nuclei, and their relations in the brain; in addition, comments on their development and functional role are also included. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The Use of Canine Stifle Orthotics for Cranial Cruciate Ligament Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Jean Carr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess weight bearing of dogs treated for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency with a custom stifle orthotic.Background: Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL insufficiency is the most common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs. While there are numerous options for surgical management, surgery is not always an option. Recently, the use of canine stifle orthotics has also emerged as a means to non-surgically manage patients with cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency.  Evidentiary value:  This is a retrospective study of ten dogs treated for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture with a stifle orthotic.Methods: Medical records (January 2005- December 2012 of ten dogs treated for unilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture with a stifle orthotic were reviewed.  Temporospatial gait analysis was performed using a pressure sensing walkway at baseline and 90 days or greater post orthotic placement to identify weight bearing with total pressure index % (TPI%.Results: TPI% improved significantly by 5.1% in the affected limb when compared to baseline (p = 0.0020. At final gait analysis, TPI% significantly improved by 3% in the affected limb with the orthotic off when compared to the unaffected limb (p = 0.0020.Conclusion: Custom canine stifle orthotics allow for improved weight bearing in the affected limb.Application: Custom canine stifle orthotics should be considered for cases with concurrent medical conditions or financial constraints that do not allow for surgical intervention.

  13. Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients on phenytoin and cranial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khafaga, Y.M.; Jamshed, A.; Allam, A.A.K.; Ezzat, A.; Gray, A.J.; Schultz, H.; Mourad, W.A.; Al Eisa, A.

    1999-01-01

    The use of phenytoin as a prophylactic anticonvulsant after brain surgery, particularly for brain tumors, is a common practice, regardless of whether the patient has a previous history of convulsions. This treatment policy assumes that the benefits exceed the risks. Four cases are described of adverse reactions of phenytoin during the cocomitant use of cranial radiotherapy. In one patient this proved fatal. There is increasing anecdotal support in the literature for a synergistic effect between phenytoin therapy and cranial radiotherapy that can result in the life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome. While the association is uncommon, four cases within 24 months in one department suggest that the routine use of postoperative phenytoin as a prophylactic anticonvulsant in the absence of a history of seizures may not be warranted, particularly if the patient is to receive cranial radiotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Intracerebral cavernous hemangioma after cranial irradiation in childhood. Incidence and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenger, V.; Sovinz, P.; Lackner, H.; Dornbusch, H.J.; Moser, A.; Urban, C. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Div. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology; Lingitz, H. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; Eder, H.G. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy is an integral part of various therapeutic regimens in pediatric and adult oncology. Endocrine dysfunction, neurologic and psychiatric deficits, secondary malignancies and radiation-induced necrosis are well-known possible late effects of cranial irradiation. However, only sporadic cases of radiation-induced cavernous hemangiomas (RICH) have been reported so far. Patients and Methods: Pediatric patients who underwent cranial radiation therapy for malignant diseases between January 1980 and December 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. After the end of therapy they entered a detailed follow-up program. Results: Of 171 patients, eight (three patients with medulloblastoma, three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and one patient each with ependymoma and craniopharyngioma) developed intracerebral cavernoma 2.9-18.4 years after irradiation representing a cumulative incidence (according to the Kaplan-Meier method) of 2.24%, 3.86%, 4.95%, and 6.74% within 5, 10, 15, and 20 years following radiation therapy, respectively. In patients treated in the first 10 years of life, RICH occurred with shorter latency and significantly more often (p = 0.044) resulting in an even higher cumulative incidence. Conclusion: These findings and previously published cases show that cavernous hemangiomas may occur after irradiation of the brain several years after the end of therapy irrespective of the radiation dose and type of malignancy. Particularly children < 10 years of age at the time of irradiation are at higher risk. Since patients with RICH frequently do not show symptoms but hemorrhage is a possible severe complication, imaging of the central nervous system should be performed routinely for longer follow- ups, particularly in patients who were treated as young children. (orig.)

  15. Multiple Cranial Neuropathies Without Limb Involvements: Guillain-Barre Syndrome Variant?

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2013-01-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunction...

  16. Surface-defect induced modifications in the optical properties of α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Reenu Elizabeth [Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College, Changanassery, Kerala 686101 (India); Chandran, Anoop [School of Pure and Applied Physics, MG University, Kottayam, Kerala 686560 (India); Thomas, Marykutty [Department of Physics, BCM College, Kottayam, Kerala 686001 (India); Jose, Joshy [Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College, Changanassery, Kerala 686101 (India); George, K.C., E-mail: drkcgeorge@gmail.com [Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College, Changanassery, Kerala 686101 (India)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alpha-MnO{sub 2} nanorods are prepared by chemical method. • Difference in surface defect density is achieved. • Characterized using XRD, Rietveld, XPS, EDS, HR-TEM, BET, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and PL spectroscopy. • Explains the bandstructure modification due to Jahn–Teller distortions using crystal field theory. • Modification in the intensity of optical emissions related to defect levels validates the concept of surface defect induced tuning of optical properties. - Abstract: The science of defect engineering via surface tuning opens a new route to modify the inherent properties of nanomaterials for advanced functional and practical applications. In this work, two independent synthesis methods (hydrothermal and co-precipitation) are adopted to fabricate α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods with different defect structures so as to understand the effect of surface modifications on their optical properties. The crystal structure and morphology of samples are investigated with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Atomic composition calculated from energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirms non-stoichiometry of the samples. The surface properties and chemical environment are thoroughly studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis. Bond angle variance and bond valence sum are determined to validate distortions in the basic MnO{sub 6} octahedron. The surface studies indicate that the concentration of Jahn–Teller manganese (III) (Mn{sup 3+}) ion in the samples differ from each other which results in their distinct properties. Band structure modifications due to Jahn–Teller distortion are examined with the aid of ultraviolet–visible (UV) reflectance and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The dual peaks obtained in derivative spectrum conflict the current concept on the bandgap energy of MnO{sub 2}. These

  17. [Involvement of cranial pairs as manifestation of prostatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa Saldias, L M; Ayuso Blanco, T; Delpon Pérez, E; Sarria Octavio de Toledo, L

    1994-10-01

    Two cases of prostate cancer (PC) which presented clinically with affectation of the cranial pairs due to skull base metastasis. In both cases, existence of intraparenchimatous brain metastasis was excluded. Initial improvement with hormonal therapy was followed by clinical, analytical and radiological relapse due to spread of process until death, at 11 and 36 months from diagnosis. Although PC's bone metastasis are frequent, their location at the skull base is uncommon. Even more rare are the cases which present with changes in the cranial pairs in the absence of signs and symptoms of prostatism.

  18. Dynamics of defect-induced dark solitons in an exciton-polariton condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opala, Andrzej; Pieczarka, Maciej; Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2018-04-01

    We study theoretically the emission of dark solitons induced by a moving defect in a nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensate. The number of created dark solitons per unit of time is found to be strongly dependent on the pump power. We relate the observed dynamics of this process to the oscillations of the drag force experienced by the condensate. We investigate the stability of the polariton quantum fluid and present various types of dynamics depending on the condensate and moving obstacle parameters. Furthermore, we provide analytical expressions for dark soliton dynamics using the variational method adapted to the nonequilibrium polariton system. The determined dynamical equations are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  19. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  20. Prevalence of symptomatic and silent stress-induced perfusion defects in diabetic patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, John O.; Calcagni, Maria-Lucia; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Monbaron, David; Ruiz, Juan; Koehli, Melanie

    2005-01-01

    Silent myocardial ischaemia - as evaluated by stress-induced perfusion defects on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients without a history of chest pain - is frequent in diabetes and is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular events. Its prevalence has been determined in asymptomatic diabetic patients, but remains largely unknown in diabetic patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) in the clinical setting. In this study we therefore sought (a) to determine the prevalence of symptomatic and silent perfusion defects in diabetic patients with suspected CAD and (b) to characterise the eventual predictors of abnormal perfusion. The patient population comprised 133 consecutive diabetic patients with suspected CAD who had been referred for MPS. Studies were performed with exercise (41%) or pharmacological stress testing (1-day protocol, 99m Tc-sestamibi, 201 Tl or both). We used semi-quantitative analysis (20-segment polar maps) to derive the summed stress score (SSS) and the summed difference score (SDS). Abnormal MPS (SSS≥4) was observed in 49 (37%) patients (SSS=4.9±8.4, SDS=2.4±4.7), reversible perfusion defects (SDS≥2) in 40 (30%) patients [SSS=13.3±10.9; SDS=8.0±5.6; 20% moderate to severe (SDS>4), 7% multivessel] and fixed defects in 21 (16%) patients. Results were comparable between patients with and patients without a history of chest pain. Of 75 patients without a history of chest pain, 23 (31%, 95% CI=21-42%) presented reversible defects (SSS=13.9±11.3; SDS=7.4±1.2), indicative of silent ischaemia. Reversible defects were associated with inducible ST segment depression during MPS stress (odds ratio (OR)=3.2, p<0.01). Fixed defects were associated with erectile dysfunction in males (OR=3.7, p=0.02) and lower aspirin use (OR=0.25, p=0.02). Silent stress-induced perfusion defects occurred in 31% of the patients, a rate similar to that in patients with a history of chest pain. MPS could identify these patients with a

  1. Invasive cranial mycosis our experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumbhkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi can cause serious cranial infections in immunocompromised and diabetic patients. Common pathogens mainly include Aspergillus and Mucor. These organisms cause tissue invasion and destruction of adjacent structures (e.g. orbit, ethmoid, sphenoid, maxillary & cavernous sinuses. Mortality and morbidity rate is high despite combined surgical, antifungal and antidiabetic treatment. We present our experience of six cases with such infection.

  2. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2007-01-01

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  3. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Radiology Department, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  4. Excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy contribute to developmental testicular toxicity induced by fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shun; Niu, Qiang; Gao, Hui; Ma, Rulin; Lei, Rongrong; Zhang, Cheng; Xia, Tao; Li, Pei; Xu, Chunyan; Wang, Chao; Chen, Jingwen; Dong, Lixing; Zhao, Qian; Wang, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to impair testicular functions and fertility; however the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, we used a rat model to mimic human exposure and sought to investigate the roles of apoptosis and autophagy in testicular toxicity of fluoride. Sprague–Dawley rats were developmentally exposed to 25, 50, or 100 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF) via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to post-puberty, and then the testes of offspring were excised on postnatal day 56. Our results demonstrated that developmental NaF exposure induced an enhanced testicular apoptosis, as manifested by a series of hallmarks such as caspase-3 activation, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Further study revealed that fluoride exposure elicited significant elevations in the levels of cell surface death receptor Fas with a parallel increase in cytoplasmic cytochrome c, indicating the involvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Intriguingly, fluoride treatment also simultaneously increased the number of autophagosomes and the levels of autophagy marker LC3-II but not Beclin1. Unexpectedly, the expression of p62, a substrate that is degraded by autophagy, was also significantly elevated, suggesting that the accumulated autophagosomes resulted from impaired autophagy degradation rather than increased formation. Importantly, these were associated with marked histopathological lesions including spermatogenic failure and germ cell loss, along with severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our findings provide deeper insights into roles of excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy in the aggravation of testicular damage, which could contribute to a better understanding of fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity. - Highlights: • Rats were developmentally exposed to fluoride from pre-pregnancy to post-puberty. • Both excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy are involved in

  5. An Inherited Platelet Function Defect in Basset Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, I. B.; Lotz, F.

    1979-01-01

    An inherited platelet function defect occurring in a family of basset hounds has been described. The trait is transmitted as an autosomal characteristic and appears to be expressed clinically only in the homozygous state. The characteristics of this platelet defect include: 1) marked bleeding tendencies and prolonged skin bleeding times in either male or female dogs. 2) normal blood coagulation mechanism. 3) adequate numbers of circulating platelets which appear morphologically normal by light microscopy. 4) normal whole blood clot retraction. 5) deficient in vivo platelet consumption and in vitro platelet retention in glass bead columns. 6) defective ADP-induced platelet aggregation in homozygotes, apparently normal ADP response in heterozygotes, and defective collagen-induced platelet aggregation in both. PMID:509382

  6. Subtotal resection for management of large jugular paragangliomas with functional lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanna, George B; Sweeney, Alex D; Carlson, Matthew L; Latuska, Richard F; Rivas, Alejandro; Bennett, Marc L; Netterville, James L; Haynes, David S

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate tumor control following subtotal resection of advanced jugular paragangliomas in patients with functional lower cranial nerves and to investigate the utility of salvage radiotherapy for residual progressive disease. Case series with planned chart review. Tertiary academic referral center. Patients who presented with advanced jugular paragangliomas and functional lower cranial nerves were analyzed. Primary outcome measures included extent of resection, long-term tumor control, need for additional treatment, and postoperative lower cranial nerve function. Twelve patients (mean age, 46.2 years; 7 women, 58.3%) who met inclusion criteria were evaluated between 1999 and 2013. The mean postoperative residual tumor volume was 27.7% (range, 3.5%-75.0%) of the preoperative volume. When the residual tumor volume was less than 20% of the preoperative volume, no tumor growth occurred over an average of 44.6 months of follow-up (P cranial neuropathy as a result of surgery. Subtotal resection of jugular paragangliomas with preservation of the lower cranial nerves is a viable management strategy. If more than 80% of the preoperative tumor volume is resected, the residual tumor seems less likely to grow. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  7. Defect production and subsequent effects induced by electronic energy loss of swift heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Mingdong; Liu Jie; Sun Youmei; Yin Jingmin; Yao Huijun; Duan Jinglai; Mo Dan; Zhang Ling; Chen Yanfeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2008-01-01

    Swift heavy ion in matter is one of forfront fields of nuclear physics in the world. A series of new phenomena were discovered in recent years. The history and sta- tus on the development of this field were reviewed. Electronic energy loss effects induced by swift heavy ion irradiation, such as defect production and evolution, ion latent track formation, phase transformation and anisotropy plastic deformation were introduced emphatically. A trend of future investigation was explored. (authors)

  8. Thin-plate spline analysis of the cranial base in subjects with Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G D; McNamara, J A; Lozanoff, S

    1997-08-01

    The role of the cranial base in the emergence of Class III malocclusion is not fully understood. This study determines deformations that contribute to a Class III cranial base morphology, employing thin-plate spline analysis on lateral cephalographs. A total of 73 children of European-American descent aged between 5 and 11 years of age with Class III malocclusion were compared with an equivalent group of subjects with a normal, untreated, Class I molar occlusion. The cephalographs were traced, checked and subdivided into seven age- and sex-matched groups. Thirteen points on the cranial base were identified and digitized. The datasets were scaled to an equivalent size, and statistical analysis indicated significant differences between average Class I and Class III cranial base morphologies for each group. Thin-plate spline analysis indicated that both affine (uniform) and non-affine transformations contribute toward the total spline for each average cranial base morphology at each age group analysed. For non-affine transformations, Partial warps 10, 8 and 7 had high magnitudes, indicating large-scale deformations affecting Bolton point, basion, pterygo-maxillare, Ricketts' point and articulare. In contrast, high eigenvalues associated with Partial warps 1-3, indicating localized shape changes, were found at tuberculum sellae, sella, and the frontonasomaxillary suture. It is concluded that large spatial-scale deformations affect the occipital complex of the cranial base and sphenoidal region, in combination with localized distortions at the frontonasal suture. These deformations may contribute to reduced orthocephalization or deficient flattening of the cranial base antero-posteriorly that, in turn, leads to the formation of a Class III malocclusion.

  9. Long-term imaging in awake mice using removable cranial windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickfeld, Lindsey L.; Kerlin, Aaron M.; Reid, R. Clay; Bonin, Vincent; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Andermann, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial window implants in head-fixed rodents are becoming a preparation of choice for stable optical access to large areas of cortex over extended periods of time. Here, we provide a highly detailed and reliable surgical protocol for a cranial window implantation procedure for chronic widefield and cellular imaging in awake, head-fixed mice, which enables subsequent window removal and replacement in the weeks and months following the initial craniotomy. This protocol has facilitated awake, chronic imaging in adolescent as well as adult mice over several months from a large number of cortical brain regions; targeted virus and tracer injections from data obtained using prior awake functional mapping; and functionally-targeted two-photon imaging across all cortical layers in awake mice using a microprism attachment to the cranial window. Collectively, these procedures extend the reach of chronic imaging of cortical function and dysfunction in behaving animals. PMID:25275789

  10. Schwannoma of the facial nerve involving the middle cranial fossa:case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SAI Ke; CHEN Zhong-ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ Facial nerve schwannoma involving the middle cranial fossa is quite rare,and its accurate diagnosis is very difficult before SUrgery.Here we present a case of schwannoma of the facial nerve at the middle cranial fossa that was misdiagnosed previously at a local hospital and then cured in our hospital.

  11. Radiation induced defect flux behaviors at zirconium based component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kwon, Jun Hyun; Lee, Gyeong Geun

    2013-01-01

    In commercial reactor core, structure materials are located in high temperature and high pressure environment. Therefore, main concern of structure materials is corrosion and mechanical properties change than radiation effects on materials. However, radiation effects on materials become more important phenomena because research reactor condition is different from commercial reactor. The temperature is lower than 100 .deg. C and radiation dose is much higher than that of commercial reactor. Among the radiation effect on zirconium based metal, radiation induced growth (RIG), known as volume conservative distortion, is one of the most important phenomena. Recently, theoretical RIG modeling based on radiation damage theory (RDT) and balance equation are developed. However, these growth modeling have limited framework of single crystal and high temperature. To model theoretical RIG in research reactor, qualitative mechanism must be set up. Therefore, this paper intent is establishing defect flux mechanism of zirconium base metal in research reactor for RIG modeling. After than theoretical RIG work will be expanded to research reactor condition

  12. Moderate climate signature in cranial anatomy of late holocene human populations from Southern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Menéndez, Lumila

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the association between cranial variation and climate in order to discuss their role during the diversification of southern South American populations. Therefore, the specific objectives are: (1) to explore the spatial pattern of cranial variation with regard to the climatic diversity of the region, and (2) to evaluate the differential impact that the climatic factors may have had on the shape and size of the diverse cranial structures studied. The variation in shape and size of 361 crania was studied, registering 62 3D landmarks that capture shape and size variation in the face, cranial vault, and base. Mean, minimum, and maximum annual temperature, as well as mean annual precipitation, but also diet and altitude, were matched for each population sample. A PCA, as well as spatial statistical techniques, including kriging, regression, and multimodel inference were employed. The facial skeleton size presents a latitudinal pattern which is partially associated with temperature diversity. Both diet and altitude are the variables that mainly explain the skull shape variation, although mean annual temperature also plays a role. The association between climate factors and cranial variation is low to moderate, mean annual temperature explains almost 40% of the entire skull, facial skeleton and cranial vault shape variation, while annual precipitation and minimum annual temperature only contribute to the morphological variation when considered together with maximum annual temperature. The cranial base is the structure less associated with climate diversity. These results suggest that climate factors may have had a partial impact on the facial and vault shape, and therefore contributed moderately to the diversification of southern South American populations, while diet and altitude might have had a stronger impact. Therefore, cranial variation at the southern cone has been shaped both by random and nonrandom factors. Particularly, the

  13. Inductively coupled plasma-induced defects in n-type GaN studied from Schottky diode characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, W.; Tokuda, Y.; Ueda, H.; Kachi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-(ICP-)induced defects in n-type GaN have been studied from current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) for Schottky diodes fabricated on etched surfaces. The samples after ICP etching show the ohmic I-V characteristics. Schottky characteristics are obtained after annealing at 600 and 800 deg. C in N 2 , but are not restored to that of the control samples. DLTS shows that the effect of ICP etching is small on the region beyond 80 nm from the surface. These results suggest that there remain ICP-induced damage in the near-surface region after thermal annealing

  14. Cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda ( Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirido, Borja; Palmqvist, Paul; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; Dong, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In this study, landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics are used for investigating the main aspects of cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Specifically, we explore if the highly derived cranial adaptations for bamboo feeding of the living panda were developed early in the panda's lineage. Results obtained show that the overall cranial morphologies of the oldest known panda, the "pygmy" Ailuropoda microta, and the late Pleistocene Ailuropoda baconi are both very similar to that of their closest living relative, A. melanoleuca, which agrees with a previous proposal based on qualitative criteria. However, we also describe several differences between the crania of A. microta, A. baconi, and A. melanoleuca, including the development of the postorbital process, the orientation of the occipital region, and the expansion of the braincase. As a result, the cranial morphology of A. microta shows a less specialized morphology toward a fibrous and durophagous diet compared to the giant panda. These results are confirmed by a comparative analysis of the dimensions of the upper teeth in bears, which has revealed differences in relative tooth size between A. microta and A. melanoleuca, most probably as a result of mosaic evolution. Therefore, we conclude that cranial shape did not remain essentially uniform in the Ailuropoda lineage, as previously thought, but underwent a number of changes during more than 2 Myr.

  15. Ophthalmoplegic and lower cranial nerve variants merge into each other and into classical Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Bruggen, JP; van der Meche, FGA; de Jager, AEJ; Polman, CH

    We delineated the place of cranial nerve variants within the concept of clinically defined Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), In the ophthalmoplegic variant (n = 7) the oculomotor nerves were early involved, In a lower cranial nerve variant (n = 9) the cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were early involved.

  16. Temporalis Myofascial Flap for Primary Cranial Base Reconstruction after Tumor Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Eldaly, Ahmed; Magdy, Emad A.; Nour, Yasser A.; Gaafar, Alaa H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of the temporalis myofascial flap in primary cranial base reconstruction following surgical tumor ablation and to explain technical issues, potential complications, and donor site consequences along with their management. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Participants: Forty-one consecutive patients receiving primary temporalis myofascial flap reconstructions following cranial base tumor resections in a 4-year period. Main Out...

  17. Neurophysiological Identification of Cranial Nerves During Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors: Pilot Study Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, Alexey Nikolaevich; Chernov, Ilia Valerievich; Ogurtsova, Anna Anatolievna; Moshchev, Dmitry Aleksandrovich; Lubnin, Andrew Jurievich; Andreev, Dmitry Nicolaevich; Koval, Konstantin Vladimirovich

    2017-02-01

    Intraoperative identification of cranial nerves is crucial for safe surgery of skull base tumors. Currently, only a small number of published papers describe the technique of trigger electromyography (t-EMG) in endoscopic endonasal removal of such tumors. To assess the effectiveness of t-EMG in preventing intraoperative cranial nerve damage in endoscopic endonasal surgery of skull base tumors. Nine patients were operated on using the endoscopic endonasal approach within a 1-year period. The tumors included large skull base chordomas and trigeminal neurinomas localized in the cavernous sinus. During the surgical process, cranial nerve identification was carried out using monopolar and bipolar t-EMG methods. Assessment of cranial nerve functional activity was conducted both before and after tumor removal. We mapped 17 nerves in 9 patients. Third, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves were identified intraoperatively. There were no cases of postoperative functional impairment of the mapped cranial nerves. In one case we were unable to get an intraoperative response from the fourth cranial nerve and observed its postoperative transient plegia (the function was normal before surgery). t-EMG allows surgeons to control the safety of cranial nerves both during and after skull base tumor removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. α-Synuclein fibril-induced paradoxical structural and functional defects in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, Jessica M; Henderson, Benjamin W; Gonzalez, Jose Carlos; Vaden, Jada H; Mclean, John W; Wu, Yumei; Banumurthy, Gokulakrishna; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A

    2018-05-01

    Neuronal inclusions composed of α-synuclein (α-syn) characterize Parkinson's Disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Cognitive dysfunction defines DLB, and up to 80% of PD patients develop dementia. α-Syn inclusions are abundant in the hippocampus, yet functional consequences are unclear. To determine if pathologic α-syn causes neuronal defects, we induced endogenous α-syn to form inclusions resembling those found in diseased brains by treating hippocampal neurons with α-syn fibrils. At seven days after adding fibrils, α-syn inclusions are abundant in axons, but there is no cell death at this time point, allowing us to assess for potential alterations in neuronal function that are not caused by neuron death. We found that exposure of neurons to fibrils caused a significant reduction in mushroom spine densities, adding to the growing body of literature showing that altered spine morphology is a major pathologic phenotype in synucleinopathies. The reduction in spine densities occurred only in wild type neurons and not in neurons from α-syn knockout mice, suggesting that the changes in spine morphology result from fibril-induced corruption of endogenously expressed α-syn. Paradoxically, reduced postsynaptic spine density was accompanied by increased frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and presynaptic docked vesicles, suggesting enhanced presynaptic function. Action-potential dependent activity was unchanged, suggesting compensatory mechanisms responding to synaptic defects. Although activity at the level of the synapse was unchanged, neurons exposed to α-syn fibrils, showed reduced frequency and amplitudes of spontaneous Ca 2+ transients. These findings open areas of research to determine the mechanisms that alter neuronal function in brain regions critical for cognition at time points before neuron death.

  19. Effect of Unshaven Hair with Absorbable Sutures and Early Postoperative Shampoo on Cranial Surgery Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Oak; Yeom, Insun; Kim, Dong-Seok; Park, Eun-Kyung; Shim, Kyu-Won

    2018-01-01

    Cranial surgical site infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitals. Preoperative hair shaving for cranial neurosurgical procedures is performed traditionally in an attempt to protect patients against complications from infections at cranial surgical sites. However, preoperative shaving of surgical incision sites using traditional surgical blades without properly washing the head after surgery can cause infections at surgical sites. Therefore, a rapid protocol in which the scalp remains unshaven and absorbable sutures are used for scalp closure with early postoperative shampooing is examined in this study. A retrospective comparative study was conducted from January 2008 to December 2012. A total of 2,641 patients who underwent unshaven cranial surgery with absorbable sutures for scalp closure were enrolled in this study. Data of 1,882 patients who underwent surgery with the traditional protocol from January 2005 to December 2007 were also analyzed for comparison. Of 2,641 patients who underwent cranial surgery with the rapid protocol, all but 2 (0.07%) patients experienced satisfactory wound healing. Of 1,882 patients who underwent cranial surgery with the traditional protocol, 3 patients (0.15%) had infections. Each infection occurred at the superficial incisional surgical site. Unshaven cranial surgery using absorbable sutures for scalp closure with early postoperative shampooing is safe and effective in the cranial neurosurgery setting. This protocol has a positive psychological effect. It can help patients accept neurosurgical procedures and improve their self-image after the operation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Dark current spectroscopy of space and nuclear environment induced displacement damage defects in pinned photodiode based CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are envisioned for an increasing number of high-end scientific imaging applications such as space imaging or nuclear experiments. Indeed, the performance of high-end CMOS image sensors has dramatically increased in the past years thanks to the unceasing improvements of microelectronics, and these image sensors have substantial advantages over CCDs which make them great candidates to replace CCDs in future space missions. However, in space and nuclear environments, CMOS image sensors must face harsh radiation which can rapidly degrade their electro-optical performances. In particular, the protons, electrons and ions travelling in space or the fusion neutrons from nuclear experiments can displace silicon atoms in the pixels and break the crystalline structure. These displacement damage effects lead to the formation of stable defects and to the introduction of states in the forbidden bandgap of silicon, which can allow the thermal generation of electron-hole pairs. Consequently, non ionizing radiation leads to a permanent increase of the dark current of the pixels and thus a decrease of the image sensor sensitivity and dynamic range. The aim of the present work is to extend the understanding of the effect of displacement damage on the dark current increase of CMOS image sensors. In particular, this work focuses on the shape of the dark current distribution depending on the particle type, energy and fluence but also on the image sensor physical parameters. Thanks to the many conditions tested, an empirical model for the prediction of the dark current distribution induced by displacement damage in nuclear or space environments is experimentally validated and physically justified. Another central part of this work consists in using the dark current spectroscopy technique for the first time on irradiated CMOS image sensors to detect and characterize radiation-induced silicon bulk defects. Many types of defects are detected and two of them are identified

  1. Phylogeny, diet, and cranial integration in australodelphian marsupials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Goswami

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of morphological integration provide valuable information on the correlated evolution of traits and its relationship to long-term patterns of morphological evolution. Thus far, studies of morphological integration in mammals have focused on placentals and have demonstrated that similarity in integration is broadly correlated with phylogenetic distance and dietary similarity. Detailed studies have also demonstrated a significant correlation between developmental relationships among structures and adult morphological integration. However, these studies have not yet been applied to marsupial taxa, which differ greatly from placentals in reproductive strategy and cranial development and could provide the diversity necessary to assess the relationships among phylogeny, ecology, development, and cranial integration. This study presents analyses of morphological integration in 20 species of australodelphian marsupials, and shows that phylogeny is significantly correlated with similarity of morphological integration in most clades. Size-related correlations have a significant affect on results, particularly in Peramelia, which shows a striking decrease in similarity of integration among species when size is removed. Diet is not significantly correlated with similarity of integration in any marsupial clade. These results show that marsupials differ markedly from placental mammals in the relationships of cranial integration, phylogeny, and diet, which may be related to the accelerated development of the masticatory apparatus in marsupials.

  2. Cranial neuronavigation with functional monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, V.; Oberle, J.; Kretschmer, T.; Richter, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    Minimise the risks is an essential objective of neurosurgery. The technological progress achieved in the last few years, especially regarding imaging methods and image processing capabilities, offers the tools to manage the risks. The authors explain initial experience obtained with microscope-based cranial neuronavigation systems combined with direct cortical monitoring methods and give an outlook on expected devlopments in the future. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation of visible emitting defects induced by electron beam lithography in LIF films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bigotta, S.; Pace, A.; Piccinini, M.; Burattini, E.; Grilli, A.; Raco, A.; Giammatteo, M.; L'Aquila Univ., L'Aquila; Picozzi, P.; Santucci, S.; L'Aquila Univ., L'Aquila

    2000-01-01

    Low energy electron irradiation of lithium fluoride (LiF), in the form of bulk crystals and films, gives rise to the stable formation of primary F defects and aggregated color centers in a thin layer located at the surface of the investigated material. For the first time a confocal light scanning microscope (CLSM) in fluorescence mode was used to reconstruct the depth distribution of efficiently emitting laser active color centers in a stripe-like region induced by 12 and 16 keV electrons on LiF films thermally evaporated on glass. The formation of the F3+ and F2 aggregated defects appears restricted to the electron penetration and proportional to their energy depth profile, as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations [it

  4. Triptans and CGRP blockade - impact on the cranial vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benemei, Silvia; Cortese, Francesca; Labastida-Ramírez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    and vascular tone. Thirty years after discovery of agonists for serotonin 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors (triptans) and less than fifteen after the proof of concept of the gepant class of CGRP receptor antagonists, we are still a long way from understanding their precise site and mode of action in migraine....... The effect on cranial vasculature is relevant, because all specific anti-migraine drugs and migraine pharmacological triggers may act in perivascular space. This review reports the effects of triptans and CGRP blocking molecules on cranial vasculature in humans, focusing on their specific relevance...

  5. Defect-induced transitions in synchronous asymmetric exclusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Mingzhe; Wang Ruili; Jiang Rui; Hu Maobin; Gao Yang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a single local defect in synchronous asymmetric exclusion processes are investigated via theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations. Our theoretical analysis shows that there are four possible stationary phases, i.e., the (low density, low density), (low density, high density), (high density, low density) and (high density, high density) in the system. In the (high density, low density) phase, the system can reach a maximal current which is determined by the local defect, but independent of boundary conditions. A phenomenological domain wall approach is developed to predict dynamic behavior at phase boundaries. The effects of defective hopping probability p on density profiles and currents are investigated. Our investigation shows that the value of p determines phase transitions when entrance rate α and exit rate β are fixed. Density profiles and currents obtained from theoretical calculations are in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations

  6. Preoperative surgical planning and simulation of complex cranial base tumors in virtual reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zhi-qiang; LI Liang; MO Da-peng; ZHANG Jia-yong; ZHANG Yang; BAO Sheng-de

    2008-01-01

    @@ The extremely complex anatomic relationships among bone,tumor,blood vessels and cranial nerves remains a big challenge for cranial base tumor surgery.Therefore.a good understanding of the patient specific anatomy and a preoperative planning are helpful and crocial for the neurosurgeons.Three dimensional (3-D) visualization of various imaging techniques have been widely explored to enhance the comprehension of volumetric data for surgical planning.1 We used the Destroscope Virtual Reality (VR) System (Singapore,Volume Interaction Pte Ltd,software:RadioDexterTM 1.0) to optimize preoperative plan in the complex cranial base tumors.This system uses patient-specific,coregistered,fused radiology data sets that may be viewed stereoscopically and can be manipulated in a virtual reality environment.This article describes our experience with the Destroscope VR system in preoperative surgical planning and simulation for 5 patients with complex cranial base tumors and evaluates the clinical usefulness of this system.

  7. A revised cranial description of Massospondylus carinatus Owen (Dinosauria: Sauropodomorpha based on computed tomographic scans and a review of cranial characters for basal Sauropodomorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley E.J. Chapelle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Massospondylus carinatus is a basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the early Jurassic Elliot Formation of South Africa. It is one of the best-represented fossil dinosaur taxa, known from hundreds of specimens including at least 13 complete or nearly complete skulls. Surprisingly, the internal cranial anatomy of M. carinatus has never been described using computed tomography (CT methods. Using CT scans and 3D digital representations, we digitally reconstruct the bones of the facial skeleton, braincase, and palate of a complete, undistorted cranium of M. carinatus (BP/1/5241. We describe the anatomical features of the cranial bones, and compare them to other closely related sauropodomorph taxa such as Plateosaurus erlenbergiensis, Lufengosaurus huenei, Sarahsaurus aurifontanalis and Efraasia minor. We identify a suite of character states of the skull and braincase for M. carinatus that sets it apart from other taxa, but these remain tentative due to the lack of comparative sauropodomorph braincase descriptions in the literature. Furthermore, we hypothesize 27 new cranial characters useful for determining relationships in non-sauropodan Sauropodomorpha, delete five pre-existing characters and revise the scores of several existing cranial characters to make more explicit homology statements. All the characters that we hypothesized or revised are illustrated. Using parsimony as an optimality criterion, we then test the relationships of M. carinatus (using BP/1/5241 as a specimen-level exemplar in our revised phylogenetic data matrix.

  8. Microstructural evolution of radiation induced defects in ZnO during isochronal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the authors discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing. The nominally undoped samples were irradiated either with 3 MeV protons to a fluence of 1.2 x 10 18 p/cm 2 or with 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 1 x 10 18 e/cm 2 . The investigation was performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-Broadening measurements. The measurements were done at room temperature and in some cases down to 10 K to investigate the thermal dependence of the trapping characteristics of the positrons

  9. Imaging characteristics of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wai-Yung; Saunders, Dawn E.; Brock, Penelope

    2005-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma accounts for 10-15% of all childhood malignant bone tumours and is second in prevalence to osteosarcoma. The skull bones are an unusual site of origin of primary Ewing sarcoma in children. Previous reports concentrate on the neurosurgical aspects and relatively good outcome compared to other bone tumours of the calvarium. Reported cases mainly describe the imaging characteristics on CT. To describe the MRI and CT features of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma. The neuroimaging of three cases of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma are reviewed. Our three cases show an extra-axial mass that is high attenuation on CT and low signal on T2-weighted MRI. Haemorrhagic components, dural extension and contrast enhancement are also characteristic features. CT attenuation and magnetic resonance signal characteristics reflect sheets of densely packed cells seen in Ewing sarcoma. (orig.)

  10. Raman investigation of lattice defects and stress induced in InP and GaN films by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.P. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, J., E-mail: J.Liu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S.X. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Maaz, K. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 45650 Islamabad (Pakistan); Zeng, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Zhai, P.F.; Duan, J.L.; Sun, Y.M.; Hou, M.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-04-01

    InP crystals and GaN films were irradiated by swift heavy ions {sup 86}Kr and {sup 209}Bi with kinetic energies of 25 and 9.5 MeV per nucleon and ion fluence in the range 5 × 10{sup 10} to 3.6 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The characteristic optical bands were studied by Raman spectroscopy to reveal the disorder and defects induced in the samples during the irradiation process. The crystallinity of InP and GaN was found to be deteriorated after irradiation by the swift heavy ions and resulted in the amorphous nature of the samples along the ion tracks. The amorphous tracks observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of lattice defects. In typical F{sub 2}(LO) mode, in case of InP, the spectra shifted towards the lower wavenumbers with a maximum shift of 7.6 cm{sup −1} induced by 1030 MeV Bi ion irradiation. While in case of GaN, the typical E{sub 2}(high) mode shifted towards the higher wavenumbers, with maximum shift of 5.4 cm{sup −1} induced by 760 MeV Bi ion irradiation at ion fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The observed Raman shifts reveal the presence of lattice defects and disorder induced in the samples after irradiation by the swift heavy ions. This irradiation also generated lattice stress in the samples, which has been investigated and discussed in detail in this work.

  11. Long-term consequences of growth hormone replacement and cranial radiation on pituitary function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This thesis covers the consequences of cranial irradiation of non-pituitary tumors, eg nasopharyngeal carcinoma, on pituitary function. In chapter 2 we have performed a meta-analysis of available data reported in literature on pituitary function after cranial radiotherapy for head and neck and

  12. Alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in SiO2 films of Si-SiO2 structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koman, B.P.; Gal'chynskyy, O.V.; Kovalyuk, R.O.; Shkol'nyy, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in Si-SiO 2 structures by means of the thermostimulated discharge currents (TSDC) analysis. The object of investigation were (p-Si)-SiO 2 structures formed by a combined oxidation of the industrial p-Si wafers in dry and wet oxygen at temperature of 1150 C. The TSD currents were investigated in the temperature range between 90 and 500 K under linear heating rate. Pu 238 isotopes were the source of alpha-particles with an energy of 4-5 MeV and a density of 5.10 7 s -1 cm -2 . The TSD current curves show two peculiar maxima at about 370 and 480 K. Alpha-particle irradiation doesn't affect the general shape of the TSDC curves but leads to a shift of the maximum at 370 K and reduces the total electret charge which is accumulated in the Si-SiO 2 structures during polarization. The energy distribution function of the defects which are involved in SiO 2 polarization has been calculated. It showes that defects with activation energies of about 0.8 and 1.0 eV take part in forming the electret state, and these activation energies have certain energy distributions. It has been found that the TSDC maximum at 370 K has space charge nature and is caused by migration of hydrogen ions. In irradiated samples hydrogen and natrium ions localize on deeper trapping centres induced by alpha-particle irradiation. (orig.)

  13. Curvature-induced defect unbinding and dynamics in active nematic toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Perry W.; Pearce, Daniel J. G.; Chang, Ya-Wen; Goldsztein, Guillermo; Giomi, Luca; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Nematic order on curved surfaces is often disrupted by the presence of topological defects, which are singular regions in which the orientational order is undefined. In the presence of force-generating active materials, these defects are able to migrate through space like swimming microorganisms. We use toroidal surfaces to show that despite their highly chaotic and non-equilibrium dynamics, pairs of defects unbind and segregate in regions of opposite Gaussian curvature. Using numerical simulations, we find that the degree of defect unbinding can be controlled by tuning the system activity, and even suppressed in strongly active systems. Furthermore, by using the defects as active microrheological tracers and quantitatively comparing our experimental and theoretical results, we are able to determine material properties of the active nematic. Our results illustrate how topology and geometry can be used to control the behaviour of active materials, and introduce a new avenue for the quantitative mechanical characterization of active fluids.

  14. Effectiveness of ultrasonographic evaluation of the cranial sutures in children with suspected craniosynostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith; Koplewitz, Benjamin; Rozovsky, Katya

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the 'gold standard' for evaluation of the cranial sutures. While prenatal cranial suture evaluation with ultrasound (US) is common, US has not been established as a postnatal screening tool. We evaluated the effectiveness of US for diagnosis of craniosynostosis (CS). During 2006, 24 infants with questionable CS were assessed with US of the sagittal, metopic, and bilateral coronal and lambdoid sutures. US findings and clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Sixteen boys and eight girls (ages 1-11 months, mean 4.3) underwent US. The correct diagnosis was provided in 23 (95%), with equivocal findings in one patient. Cranial sutures appeared normal in 15 infants, who had normal clinical presentation at mean 5.8 months follow-up; CT confirmation was obtained in two. In eight children, US identified premature closure of one or more cranial sutures. Three-dimensional CT was performed as a preparation for surgery in four, with classical CS findings. In one case with inconclusive US findings, CT showed narrow but open sutures. Sonographic examination of cranial sutures may serve as a first imaging tool for evaluation of craniosynostosis. CT may be reserved for children with abnormal or equivocal ultrasound and for preoperative planning. (orig.)

  15. Effectiveness of ultrasonographic evaluation of the cranial sutures in children with suspected craniosynostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith; Koplewitz, Benjamin; Rozovsky, Katya [Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount, Scopus, P.O. Box 24035, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2009-03-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is the 'gold standard' for evaluation of the cranial sutures. While prenatal cranial suture evaluation with ultrasound (US) is common, US has not been established as a postnatal screening tool. We evaluated the effectiveness of US for diagnosis of craniosynostosis (CS). During 2006, 24 infants with questionable CS were assessed with US of the sagittal, metopic, and bilateral coronal and lambdoid sutures. US findings and clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Sixteen boys and eight girls (ages 1-11 months, mean 4.3) underwent US. The correct diagnosis was provided in 23 (95%), with equivocal findings in one patient. Cranial sutures appeared normal in 15 infants, who had normal clinical presentation at mean 5.8 months follow-up; CT confirmation was obtained in two. In eight children, US identified premature closure of one or more cranial sutures. Three-dimensional CT was performed as a preparation for surgery in four, with classical CS findings. In one case with inconclusive US findings, CT showed narrow but open sutures. Sonographic examination of cranial sutures may serve as a first imaging tool for evaluation of craniosynostosis. CT may be reserved for children with abnormal or equivocal ultrasound and for preoperative planning. (orig.)

  16. Normal cranial bone marrow MR imaging pattern with age-related ADC value distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Pan Shinong; Yin Yuming; Li Wei; Chen Zhian; Liu Yunhui; Wu Zhenhua; Guo Qiyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine MRI appearances of normal age-related cranial bone marrow and the relationship between MRI patterns and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Five hundred subjects were divided into seven groups based on ages. Cranial bone marrow MRI patterns were performed based on different thickness of the diploe and signal intensity distribution characteristics. ADC values of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal bones on DWI were measured and calculated. Correlations between ages and ADC values, between patterns and ADC values, as well as the distribution of ADC values were analyzed. Results: Normal cranial bone marrow was divided into four types and six subtypes, Type I, II, III and IV, which had positive correlation with age increasing (χ 2 = 266.36, P 0.05). In addition, there was significant negative correlation between the ADC values and MRI patterns in the normal parietal and occipital bones (r = -0.691 and -0.750, P < 0.01). Conclusion: The combination of MRI features and ADC values changes in different cranial bones showed significant correlation with age increasing. Familiar with the MRI appearance of the normal bone marrow conversion pattern in different age group and their ADC value will aid the diagnosis and differential of the cranial bone pathology.

  17. Methotrexate Toxicity in Growing Long Bones of Young Rats: A Model for Studying Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Bone Growth Defects in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaming Fan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement and intensive use of chemotherapy in treating childhood cancers has led to a growing population of young cancer survivors who face increased bone health risks. However, the underlying mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced skeletal defects remain largely unclear. Methotrexate (MTX, the most commonly used antimetabolite in paediatric cancer treatment, is known to cause bone growth defects in children undergoing chemotherapy. Animal studies not only have confirmed the clinical observations but also have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced skeletal damage. These models revealed that high-dose MTX can cause growth plate dysfunction, damage osteoprogenitor cells, suppress bone formation, and increase bone resorption and marrow adipogenesis, resulting in overall bone loss. While recent rat studies have shown that antidote folinic acid can reduce MTX damage in the growth plate and bone, future studies should investigate potential adjuvant treatments to reduce chemotherapy-induced skeletal toxicities.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal schwannomas extending into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐启武; 车晓明; 胡杰; 杨伯捷

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal schwannomas (TSs) account for 0.1%-0.4% of all intracranial tumors and 1%-8% of intracranial schwannomas.1,2 Yoshida and Kawase3 classified TSs into 6 types according to their locations: M (TS involving the middle cranial fossa), P (TS involving the posterior cranial fossa), E (TS located at extracranial space), MP (TS involving both the middle and the posterior cranial fossa), ME (TS involving the middle cranial fossa and the extracranial space), and MPE (TS involving the the middle and the posterior cranial fossa and the extracranial space). Of these types, MP is the commonest, but is difficult to be totally removed. Between January 1984 and June 2003, we surgically treated 28 patients with TSs of type MP and obtained satisfactory results. To make a correct diagnosis of TS, to select appropriate surgical approach, and to improve surgical outcome of TS of type MP, we analysed the related clinical data and experiences.

  19. Preventing lower cranial nerve injuries during fourth ventricle tumor resection by utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Minhas, Mazhar; Jane, John

    2012-12-01

    We present two cases illustrating the benefit of utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for prevention of injuries to the lower cranial nerves during fourth ventricle tumor resection surgeries. Multiple cranial nerve nuclei are located on the floor of the fourth ventricle with a high risk of permanent damage. Two male patients (ages 8 and 10 years) presented to the emergency department and had brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showing brainstem/fourth ventricle tumors. During surgery, bilateral posterior tibial and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); four-limb and cranial nerves transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs); brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs); and spontaneous electromyography (s-EMG) were recorded. Electromyography (EMG) was monitored bilaterally from cranial nerves V VII, IX, X, XI, and XII. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. Neuromuscular blockade was used only for initial intubation. Pre-incision baselines were obtained with good morphology of waveforms. After exposure the floor of the fourth ventricle was mapped by triggered-EMG (t-EMG) using 0.4 to 1.0 mA. In both patients the tumor was entangled with cranial nerves VII to XII on the floor of the fourth ventricle. The surgeon made the decision not to resect the tumor in one case and limited the resection to 70% of the tumor in the second case on the basis of neurophysiological monitoring. This decision was made to minimize any post-operative neurological deficits due to surgical manipulation of the tumor involving the lower cranial nerves. Intraoperative spontaneous and triggered EMG was effectively utilized in preventing injuries to cranial nerves during surgical procedures. All signals remained stable during the surgical procedure. Postoperatively both patients were well with no additional cranial nerve weakness. At three months follow-up, the patients continued to have no deficits.

  20. Correlation between morphological defects, electron beam-induced current imaging, and the electrical properties of 4H-SiC Schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Ali, G.N.; Mikhov, M.K.; Vaidyanathan, V.; Skromme, B.J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Defects in SiC degrade the electrical properties and yield of devices made from this material. This article examines morphological defects in 4H-SiC and defects visible in electron beam-induced current (EBIC) images and their effects on the electrical characteristics of Schottky diodes. Optical Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the morphological defects, which are classified into 26 types based on appearance alone. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics were used to extract barrier heights, ideality factors, and breakdown voltages. Barrier heights decrease about linearly with increasing ideality factor, which is explained by discrete patches of low barrier height within the main contact. Barrier height, ideality, and breakdown voltage all degrade with increasing device diameter, suggesting that discrete defects are responsible. Electroluminescence was observed under reverse bias from microplasmas associated with defects containing micropipes. EBIC measurements reveal several types of features corresponding to recombination centers. The density of dark spots observed by EBIC correlates strongly with ideality factor and barrier height. Most morphological defects do not affect the reverse characteristics when no micropipes are present, but lower the barrier height and worsen the ideality factor. However, certain multiple-tailed defects, irregularly shaped defects and triangular defects with 3C inclusions substantially degrade both breakdown voltage and barrier height, and account for most of the bad devices that do not contain micropipes. Micropipes in these wafers are also frequently found to be of Type II, which do not run parallel to the c axis

  1. Cranial nerve palsy in Wegener's granulomatosis--lessons from clinical cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowack, Rainer; Wachtler, Paul; Kunz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    The problem of diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is discussed based on case reports of two patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. Brain imaging...... by the overall clinical presentations. Cranial neuropathy may be the first obvious vasculitic manifestation preceding other organ disease, and since single reliable tests for its diagnosis are lacking, a multidisciplinary approach is advocated here to detect vasculitic manifestations in other organs....

  2. Clinical significance of neonatal parafrontal horn cysts detected by cranial sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Jeong Joo; Jung, Myung Ja; Kim, Eun Ryung

    2005-01-01

    The describe the significance, incidence and characteristics of sonographic findings and long term outcomes of parafrontal horn cysts detected by screening cranial sonography done within the first week following birth. 2122 first cranial ultrasound scans performed over a five year period were retrospectively evaluated and 23 neonates with parafrontal horn cysts were found (which are different from secondary cystic lesions). 17 cases had a birth weight of 2400 gm with gestation between 34 and 41 weeks. The size, shape and location of the parafrontal horn cysts and other associated abnormalities shown on the cranial sonogram were evaluated and sequential ultrasound study, maternal records, neonatal events and neurodevelopmental evaluations were retrospectively assessed. Of the 23 subjects, 21 had isolated parafrontal horn cysts and 2 had subependymal hemorrhages. There was no record of any abnormal perinatal history. The cysts were bilateral in 20 neonates and unilateral in the others. The size of the cysts ranged from 3 to 18 mm in diameter (mean 9 mm). Sonographic features of the parafrontal horn cysts were distinctive morphology (elliptical, thin walled) and location (adjacent to the tip of the frontal horn). In 17 of the cases a follow-up cranial sonography was performed, and all parafrontal horn cysts disappeared within 3 to 6 months. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were normal in those 17 cases. Screening cranial sonography of neonates discovers isolated parafrontal horn cyst. The incidence of parafrontal horn cysts in neonates in our study was 1.1%. They are present in the first week following birth and resolve themselves without medical treatment within a few months. In addition, they show normal neurodevelopment. The parafrontal cysts are suspected to be a benign variant of normal neurodevelopment

  3. Development and Tissue Origins of the Mammalian Cranial Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, S.; Bamforth, S. D.; Olsen, B. R.; Morriss-Kay, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate cranial base is a complex structure composed of bone, cartilage and other connective tissues underlying the brain; it is intimately connected with development of the face and cranial vault. Despite its central importance in craniofacial development, morphogenesis and tissue origins of the cranial base have not been studied in detail in the mouse, an important model organism. We describe here the location and time of appearance of the cartilages of the chondrocranium. We also examine the tissue origins of the mouse cranial base using a neural crest cell lineage cell marker, Wnt1-Cre/R26R, and a mesoderm lineage cell marker, Mesp1-Cre/R26R. The chondrocranium develops between E11 and E16 in the mouse, beginning with development of the caudal (occipital) chondrocranium, followed by chondrogenesis rostrally to form the nasal capsule, and finally fusion of these two parts via the midline central stem and the lateral struts of the vault cartilages. X-Gal staining of transgenic mice from E8.0 to 10 days post-natal showed that neural crest cells contribute to all of the cartilages that form the ethmoid, presphenoid, and basisphenoid bones with the exception of the hypochiasmatic cartilages. The basioccipital bone and non-squamous parts of the temporal bones are mesoderm derived. Therefore the prechordal head is mostly composed of neural crest-derived tissues, as predicted by the New Head Hypothesis. However, the anterior location of the mesoderm-derived hypochiasmatic cartilages, which are closely linked with the extra-ocular muscles, suggests that some tissues associated with the visual apparatus may have evolved independently of the rest of the “New Head”. PMID:18680740

  4. Insulating Behavior in Graphene with Irradiation-induced Lattice Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Hao; Williams, Ellen; Fuhrer, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We irradiated cleaned graphene on silicon dioxide in ultra-high vacuum with low energy inert gas ions to produce lattice defects [1], and investigated in detail the transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence of the conductivity as a function of defect density. We measured the low field magnetoresistance and temperature-dependent resistivity in situ and find that weak localization can only account for a small correction of the resistivity increase with decreasing temperature. We will discuss possible origins of the insulating temperature dependent resistivity in defected graphene in light of our recent experiments. [4pt] [1] Jian-Hao Chen, W. G. Cullen, C. Jang, M. S. Fuhrer, E. D. Williams, PRL 102, 236805 (2009)

  5. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  6. Bilateral involvement of a single cranial nerve: analysis of 578 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James R

    2005-09-27

    The author reviewed 34 years of personal experience with inpatients in a large municipal hospital to analyze the seats and causes of involvement of single pairs of cranial nerves. Among 578 cases, the sixth (n = 234) and second (211) nerves predominated, followed by the fourth (48), seventh (30), third (27), and eighth (18) cranial nerves. Trauma (99), infection (94), tumor (92), increased intracranial pressure (85), vascular disease (74), and demyelination (66) were common causes.

  7. Tay-Sachs disease with conspicuous cranial computerized tomographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kishichiro; Mukawa, Akio; Muto, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Jiro; Takahashi, Shigeko.

    1985-01-01

    An autopsy case of a 3-year-old female infant with Tay-Sachs disease was presented. A cherry red spot in the fundus and a deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase A in the white blood cells were revealed soon after admission at the age of one year. Her parents and sister were found to be healthy carriers. The patient showed a typical clinical course with marked cranial swelling. In addition to the marked ballooning of neurons on light microscope, membranous cytoplasmic body (MCB) on electron microscope and abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex by thin layer chromatography were confirmed in the autopsy specimens. In the late stage of her clinical course, the cranial computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated symmetric and deep-wavy hyperdense cerebral cortical zones, diffuse hypodensity and diminished volume of cerebral white matter, mild to moderate ventricular dilatation, and a small cerebellum and brainstem. These conspicuous appearances of the cranial CT seem to be characteristic of Tay-Sachs disease in the late stage, and they are derived from abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex, and diffuse intense demyelination (dysmyelinating demyelination) of the cerebral white matter. (author)

  8. Ophthalmople gic cranial neuropathy: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Dozorova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmoplegic cranial neuropathy (OCN is a disease with unknown etiology, which manifests itself by episodes of intense headache, accompanied by completely or partially reversible dysfunction of the oculomotor nerve: ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia. It is assumed that the pathology is demyelinating in nature, therefore in the International classification of headaches OCN excluded from rubric migraine and related to the painful cranial neuropathies. The question of the prevention and treatment of this disease is still controversial, the issue of the appointment of corticosteroids, calcium channel blockers and β-blockers, methods of surgical correction of strabismus and botulin therapy.The article describes OCN in an 11-year-old boy. In the clinical picture headache attacks were observed. These attacks were with signs of selective lesions of the oculomotor nerve on one side. These functional changes are recurrent, and fully regress between attacks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations revealed no pathology that could cause this symptom, including myasthenia. The described case demonstrates the classical picture of OCN with a favorable course and the partial damage of the oculomotor nerve on one side.

  9. Laser radiation effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.N.; Zhiryakov, B.M.; Kushin, V.V.; Lyapidevskij, V.K.; Khokhlov, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Possibility of laser radiation resonance effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectric materials is investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared, visible and ultraviolet ranges for cellulose nitrate samples irradiated by 6 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni ions and reactor gamma radiation are measured. Absorption spectra for irradiated and reference samples are presented. Two absorption bands λ 1 =0.33 μm (E 1 =3.9 eV) and λ 2 =0.72 μm (E 2 =1.7 eV) are detected. Etching rate decrease in a track under laser radiation effect is noticed. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Cranial computed tomography in patients with Bourneville-Pringle phacomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Minoru; Kurata, Yukio; Hirone, Takae

    1987-01-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) was undertaken in 17 patients (0 - 38 years) with Bourneville-Pringle phacomatosis, some of whom presented with epilepsy episodes and mental retardation. Intracranial calcification was seen on CT in 10 patients (59 %), including a 2-month-old baby. This suggests the potential of CT in the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis for infants, which has been considered difficult by conventional roentgenography. The most frequent site of calcilfication was ventricular wall. High incidences of eye lesions (67 %), psycho-neurologic symptoms (80 %), and abnormal EEG (50 %) were found in patients with cranial calficication on CT, in contrast to patients without it (0 %, 0 %, and 40 %, respectively). (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  12. Oxygen defects in Fe-substituted Tl-system superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳; 曹国辉; 王耘波; 马庆珠; 熊小涛; 陈宁; 马如璋; 郭应焕; 许祝安; 王劲松; 张小俊; 焦正宽; 彭获田; 周思海

    1996-01-01

    For Fe-doped T1-1223 phase,the excess oxygen defects induced by Fe dopants are studied by means of Hall coefficient,thermogravimetric measurements,Mossbauer spectroscopy,and the model calculation of the effective bond valence.The extra oxygen defects have effects on carrier density and microstructure of the superconductors.In the light doping level of Fe (x=0-0.05),the superconducting transition and carrier density have significant corresponding relation--the zero resistance temperature Tco and carrier densities decrease linearly with Fe dopants increasing.The thermogravimetric measurements show that the Fe3+ ions’ substituting for Cu2+ ions can bring the extra oxygen into the lattice to form extra oxygen defects.The calculation of the effective bond valence shows that the decrease of carrier density originates the strongly localized binding of the extra oxygen defects.The distortion of Cu-O layer induced by the extra oxygen defects decreases the superconductive transition temperature.The microstructure

  13. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M.; Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  14. Meckel’s and condylar cartilages anomalies in achondroplasia result in defective development and growth of the mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosse Duplan, Martin; Komla-Ebri, Davide; Heuzé, Yann; Estibals, Valentin; Gaudas, Emilie; Kaci, Nabil; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Zerah, Michel; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Porta, Diana Grauss; Di Rocco, Federico; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Activating FGFR3 mutations in human result in achondroplasia (ACH), the most frequent form of dwarfism, where cartilages are severely disturbed causing long bones, cranial base and vertebrae defects. Because mandibular development and growth rely on cartilages that guide or directly participate to the ossification process, we investigated the impact of FGFR3 mutations on mandibular shape, size and position. By using CT scan imaging of ACH children and by analyzing Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice, a model of ACH, we show that FGFR3 gain-of-function mutations lead to structural anomalies of primary (Meckel’s) and secondary (condylar) cartilages of the mandible, resulting in mandibular hypoplasia and dysmorphogenesis. These defects are likely related to a defective chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and pan-FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-BGJ398 corrects Meckel’s and condylar cartilages defects ex vivo. Moreover, we show that low dose of NVP-BGJ398 improves in vivo condyle growth and corrects dysmorphologies in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice, suggesting that postnatal treatment with NVP-BGJ398 mice might offer a new therapeutic strategy to improve mandible anomalies in ACH and others FGFR3-related disorders. PMID:27260401

  15. Posterior cranial fossa dimensions in the Chiari I malformation: relation to pathogenesis and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovner, L.J.; Bergan, U.; Nilsen, G.; Sjaastad, O.

    1993-01-01

    Skull dimensions were measured on lateral skull radiographs in 33 adult patients with MRI-verified Chiari I malformations and in 40 controls. The posterior cranial fossa was significantly smaller and shallower in patients than in controls. In the patients, there was a positive correlation between posterior fossa size and the degree of the cerebellar ectopia, which might indicate that a posterior cranial fossa which was originally too small had been expanded by the herniation of hindbrain structures at an early stage. No special clinical presentation was associated with a very small posterior cranial fossa, which may indicate that a small posterior cranial per se has little or no clinical significance, although it may be the primary developmental anomaly. (orig./GD)

  16. Effect of random inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of radiation-induced defect clusters on carrier transport through the thin base of a heterojunction bipolar transistor upon neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V., E-mail: obolensk@rf.unn.ru; Kozlov, V. A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (NNSU) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    We analyze the electron transport through the thin base of a GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor with regard to fluctuations in the spatial distribution of defect clusters induced by irradiation with a fissionspectrum fast neutron flux. We theoretically demonstrate that the homogeneous filling of the working region with radiation-induced defect clusters causes minimum degradation of the dc gain of the heterojunction bipolar transistor.

  17. Defects introduced by Ar plasma exposure in GaAs probed by monoenergetic positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kawano, Takao; Wada, Kazumi; Nakanishi, Hideo

    1994-10-01

    Ar-plasma-induced defects in n-type GaAs were probed by a monoenergetic positron beam. The depth distribution of the defects was obtained from measurements of Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation as a function of incident positron energy. The damaged layer induced by the exposure was found to extend far beyond the stopping range of Ar ions, and the dominant defects were identified as interstitial-type defects. After 100degC annealing, such defects were annealed. Instead, vacancy-type defects were found to be the dominant defects in the subsurface region. (author).

  18. Defect properties from X-ray scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peisl, H.

    1976-01-01

    Lattice distortions due to defects in crystals can be studied most directly by elastic X-ray or neutron scattering experiments. The 'size' of the defects can be determined from the shift of the Bragg reflections. Defect induced diffuse scattering intensity close to and between Bragg reflections gives information on the strength and symmetry of the distortion fields and yields the atomic structure of point defects (interstitials, vacancies, small aggregates). Diffuse scattering is a very sensitive method to decide whether defects are present as isolated point defects or have formed aggregates. X-ray scattering has been used to study defects produced in various ionic crystals by γ- and neutron irradiation. After an introduction to the principles of the method the experimental results will be reviewed and discussed in some detail. (orig.) [de

  19. Clinical significance of neonatal parafrontal horn cysts detected by cranial sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Joo [Eulji University of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Myung Ja [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ryung [Sungae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    The describe the significance, incidence and characteristics of sonographic findings and long term outcomes of parafrontal horn cysts detected by screening cranial sonography done within the first week following birth. 2122 first cranial ultrasound scans performed over a five year period were retrospectively evaluated and 23 neonates with parafrontal horn cysts were found (which are different from secondary cystic lesions). 17 cases had a birth weight of < 2400 gm with gestation between 30 and 35 weeks, 6 cases had a birth weight of > 2400 gm with gestation between 34 and 41 weeks. The size, shape and location of the parafrontal horn cysts and other associated abnormalities shown on the cranial sonogram were evaluated and sequential ultrasound study, maternal records, neonatal events and neurodevelopmental evaluations were retrospectively assessed. Of the 23 subjects, 21 had isolated parafrontal horn cysts and 2 had subependymal hemorrhages. There was no record of any abnormal perinatal history. The cysts were bilateral in 20 neonates and unilateral in the others. The size of the cysts ranged from 3 to 18 mm in diameter (mean 9 mm). Sonographic features of the parafrontal horn cysts were distinctive morphology (elliptical, thin walled) and location (adjacent to the tip of the frontal horn). In 17 of the cases a follow-up cranial sonography was performed, and all parafrontal horn cysts disappeared within 3 to 6 months. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were normal in those 17 cases. Screening cranial sonography of neonates discovers isolated parafrontal horn cyst. The incidence of parafrontal horn cysts in neonates in our study was 1.1%. They are present in the first week following birth and resolve themselves without medical treatment within a few months. In addition, they show normal neurodevelopment. The parafrontal cysts are suspected to be a benign variant of normal neurodevelopment.

  20. Reconstruction of the cranial base in surgery for jugular foramen tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramina, Ricardo; Maniglia, Joao J; Paschoal, Jorge R; Fernandes, Yvens B; Neto, Mauricio Coelho; Honorato, Donizeti C

    2005-04-01

    The surgical removal of a jugular foramen (JF) tumor presents the neurosurgeon with a complex management problem that requires an understanding of the natural history, diagnosis, surgical approaches, and postoperative complications. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is one of the most common complications of this surgery. Different surgical approaches and management concepts to avoid this complication have been described, mainly in the ear, nose, and throat literature. The purpose of this study was to review the results of CSF leakage prevention in a series of 66 patients with JF tumors operated on by a multidisciplinary cranial base team using a new technique for cranial base reconstruction. We retrospectively studied 66 patients who had JF tumors with intracranial extension and who underwent surgical treatment in our institutions from January 1987 to December 2001. Paragangliomas were the most frequent lesions, followed by schwannomas and meningiomas. All patients were operated on using the same multidisciplinary surgical approach (neurosurgeons and ear, nose, and throat surgeons). A surgical strategy for reconstruction of the cranial base using vascularized flaps was carried out. The closure of the surgical wound was performed in three layers. A specially developed myofascial flap (temporalis fascia, cervical fascia, and sternocleidomastoid muscle) associated to the inferior rotation of the posterior portion of the temporalis muscle was used to reconstruct the cranial base with vascularized flaps. In this series of 66 patients, postoperative CSF leakage developed in three cases. These patients presented with very large or recurrent tumors, and the postoperative CSF fistulae were surgically closed. The cosmetic result obtained with this reconstruction was classified as excellent or good in all patients. Our results compare favorably with those reported in the literature. The surgical strategy used for cranial base reconstruction presented in this article has

  1. A CLINICAL STUDY ON EXTRA CRANIAL COMPLICATIONS OF CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Prasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : The Objective is to study the risk of extra - cranial complications in cases of CSOM and to study the common extra - cranial complications of CSOM with respect to age , sex and socio - economic status . METHODS: The present study comprises of 60 patients with extra - cranial complications secondary to Chronic Suppurative Otitis media who attended to the Dept . o f E. N. T S rivenkateswara G overnment General Hospital, T irupathi . An analysis was made regarding the demographic profile , clinical features , surgical techniques , operative findings , and the outcome of the study . RESULTS : In this study of 60 cases , the most common ext racranial complication of CSOM is Postauralabscess . These extra cranial complications are associated with 15% of intracranial complications of which Meningitis is most common . The complications are more commonly seen in the younger population in second to third decades of life with Male predominance . The duration of ear discharge is not associated with the increasing number of complications . Cholesteatoma is commonly responsible for the development of Extracranial complications of CSOM . Pseudomonas aerugino sa is the commonest organism found in the complications . Canal wall down surgery is the main mode of treatment in this category of patients . The Facial canal dehiscence is associated with a poor outcome in the cases of Facial nerve paralysis . CONCLUSION: The extra - cranial complications of CSOM pose a great challenge to the Developing countries despite its declining incidence . It is in this situation that early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention are most important for the decreased morbidity and mor tality of patients .

  2. Prevention of congenital defects induced by prenatal alcohol exposure (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Megan M.; Karunamuni, Ganga; Pedersen, Cameron J.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2017-02-01

    Nearly 2 million women in the United States alone are at risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy, including more than 600,000 who binge drink. Even low levels of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can lead to a variety of birth defects, including craniofacial and neurodevelopmental defects, as well as increased risk of miscarriages and stillbirths. Studies have also shown an interaction between drinking while pregnant and an increase in congenital heart defects (CHD), including atrioventricular septal defects and other malformations. We have previously established a quail model of PAE, modeling a single binge drinking episode in the third week of a woman's pregnancy. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), we quantified intraventricular septum thickness, great vessel diameters, and atrioventricular valve volumes. Early-stage ethanol-exposed embryos had smaller cardiac cushions (valve precursors) and increased retrograde flow, while late-stage embryos presented with gross head/body defects, and exhibited smaller atrio-ventricular (AV) valves, interventricular septum, and aortic vessels. We previously showed that supplementation with the methyl donor betaine reduced gross defects, improved survival rates, and prevented cardiac defects. Here we show that these preventative effects are also observed with folate (another methyl donor) supplementation. Folate also appears to normalize retrograde flow levels which are elevated by ethanol exposure. Finally, preliminary findings have shown that glutathione, a crucial antioxidant, is noticeably effective at improving survival rates and minimizing gross defects in ethanol-exposed embryos. Current investigations will examine the impact of glutathione supplementation on PAE-related CHDs.

  3. Electron irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Sakai, S.; Naramoto, H.

    2006-01-01

    ZnO crystals were subjected to 3 MeV electron irradiation up to a high dose of 5.5x10 18 cm -2 . The production and recovery of vacancy defects were studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The increase of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening S parameter after irradiation indicates introduction of V Zn related defects. Most of these vacancies are annealed at temperatures below 200 o C. However, after annealing at around 400 o C, secondary defects are produced. All the vacancy defects are annealed out at around 700 o C

  4. Prophylactic CNS therapy in childhood leukemia. Randomized controlled study of high-dose intravenous methotrexate and cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiko [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Fujimoto, Takeo

    1982-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose methotrexate (MTX). Seventy children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) entered to this study between July 1978 and December 1980. According to initial white blood count (WBC), they were stratified to induce remission with; vincristine and prednine in low initial WBC ( lt 25,000/mm/sup 3/) group and these two agents plus adriamycin in high initial WBC ( gt 25,000/mm/sup 3/) group. After inducing remission, 62 children who achieved CR, received different CNS-prophlaxis; using a regimen of three doses of weekly high-dose MTX (1,000 mg/m/sup 2/) 6-hour infusion, which was repeated every 12 weeks-Group A (n = 14); high-dose MTX followed by 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MT X-Group B (n = 15), 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX-Group C (n = 16), and in 17 patients with high initial WBC, same as in Group A-Group D (n = 17). During an intravenous 6-h infusion of MTX at a dose of 1,000 mg/m/sup 2/, the CSF concentration of MTX rose to 2.3 +- 2.4 x 10/sup -6/M after initiation of infusion and remained in 10/sup -7/ M level for 48 hours. CNS-leukemia terminated complete remission in one of 14 children in Group A, two of 15 in Group B, two of 16 in Group C and two of 17 in Group D. The cumulative incidence of CNS-leukemia at 20 months calculated by the technique of Kaplan and Meier was 0% in Group A, 18.1% in Group B, 7.1% in Group C and 50.8% in Group D. There was no statistical difference among Groups A, B and C. These data suggested that CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose intravenous MTX was effective as well as 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX in childhood ALL with low initial WBC.

  5. Role of growth hormone in stunted head growth after cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, P E; Shalet, S M; Price, D A; Surtees, R A; Pearson, D

    1987-10-01

    The head sizes of 38 patients, growth hormone (GH) deficient following craniospinal (n = 26) or cranial irradiation (n = 12), have been assessed before (n = 38) and on completion of GH therapy (n = 15) or at the end of a similar period of observation without GH (n = 7). These results were compared to the change in head size seen in idiopathic GH deficiency following GH therapy (n = 14). Before GH therapy, the latter had small heads (mean occipitofrontal circumference SD score (SDS) -1), which were relatively large compared to the height deficit (height SDS (CA) -4.7), and they exhibited catch-up growth with GH (delta occipitofrontal circumference SDS + 0.7, final occipitofrontal circumference SDS -0.2). In contrast, over a similar period all patients, who previously had received cranial irradiation in the dosage range 2700-4750 centi-Geigy, irrespective of the radiation schedule or GH treatment, showed a decrease in occipitofrontal circumference SDS (mean delta -0.9), a significant difference to the expected head growth of normal children over a similar period (p less than 0.01). We have noted that restricted head growth occurs in the years following cranial irradiation and is unaffected by GH therapy. Earlier work has shown that cranial irradiation may impair intelligence. The exact relationship between intellectual impairment and stunted head growth remains to be determined.

  6. Imaging of cranial nerves with three-dimensional high resolution diffusion-weighted MR sequence based on SSFP technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongwei; Chen Yingming; Meng Quanfei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To depict the normal anatomy of cranial nerves in detail and define the exact relationships between cranial nerves and adjacent structures with three-dimensional high resolution diffusion-weighted MR sequence based on SSFP technique (3D DW-SSFP). Methods: 3D DW- SSFP sequence was performed and axial images were obtained in 12 healthy volunteers Post-processing techniques were used to generate images of cranial nerves, and the images acquired were compared with anatomical sections and diagrams of textbook. Results: In all subjects, 3D DW-SSFP sequence could produce homogeneous images and high contrast between the cranial nerves and other solid structures. The intracranial portions of all cranial nerves except olfactory nerve were identified; the extracranial portions of nerve Ⅱ-Ⅻ were identified in all subjects bilaterally. Conclusion: The 3D DW-SSFP sequence can characterize the normal MR appearance of cranial nerves and its branches and the ability to define the nerves may provide greater sensitivity and specificity in detecting abnormalities of craniofacial structure. (authors)

  7. The cranial-spinal junction in medulloblastoma: does it matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, Ashwatha; Jeswani, Sam; Paulino, Arnold C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Late effects of treatment in children and young adults with medulloblastoma can be influenced by the technique employed in radiating the craniospinal axis. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the placement of the cranial-spinal junction has an impact on dose to the cervical spinal cord and surrounding organs. Methods and Materials: Five patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation in the prone position for craniospinal irradiation. A dose of 36 Gy was prescribed to the entire neuraxis. The doses to the cervical spinal cord and surrounding organs were calculated using a cranial-spinal junction at the C1-C2 vertebral interspace (high junction) or at the lowest point in the neck, with exclusion of the shoulders in the lateral cranial fields (low junction).The volume of critical organs at risk, as well as dose to these structures using the cranial and spinal field(s) were outlined and calculated using the CMS FOCUS 3-dimensional treatment planning system. Results: The average dose to the cervical spinal cord was 11.9% higher than the prescribed dose with the low junction, and 6.7% higher with the high junction. However, doses to the thyroid gland, mandible, pharynx, and larynx were increased by an average of 29.6%, 75.8%, 70.6%, and 227.7%, respectively, by the use of the high junction compared to the low junction. Conclusion: A higher dose to the cervical spinal cord can be minimized by using a high junction. However, this would be at the cost of substantially increased doses to surrounding organs such as the thyroid gland, mandible, pharynx, and larynx. This can be critical in children and young adults, where hypothyroidism, mandibular hypoplasia, and development of second malignancies may be a late sequela of radiation therapy

  8. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of light atoms is considered since decades as an unlimited, safe and reliable source of energy that could eventually replace classical sources based on fossil fuel or nuclear fuel. Fusion reactor technology and materials studies are important parts of the fusion energy development program. For the time being, the most promising materials for structural applications in the future fusion power reactors are the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels for which the greatest technology maturity has been achieved, i.e., qualified fabrication routes, welding technology and a general industrial experience are almost available. The most important issues concerning the future use of RAFM steels in fusion power reactors are derived from their irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons that are the product, together with 3.5 MeV helium ions, of the envisaged fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium nuclei. Indeed, exposure of metallic materials to intense fluxes of 14 MeV neutrons will result in the formation of severe displacement damage (about 20-30 dpa per year) and high amounts of helium, which are at the origin of significant changes in the physical and mechanical properties of materials, such as hardening and embrittlement effects. This PhD Thesis work was aimed at investigating how far the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique could be used for detecting and characterizing nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in RAFM steels. Indeed, the resolution limit of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is about 1 nm in weak beam TEM imaging, and it is usually thought that a large number of irradiation-induced effects have a size below 1 nm in RAFM steels and that these very small defects actually contribute to the irradiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of RAFM steels occurring at irradiation temperatures below about 400 °C. The aim of this work was achieved by combining SANS experiments on unirradiated and irradiated specimens

  9. The defect-induced changes of the electronic and magnetic properties in the inverse Heusler alloy Ti{sub 2}CoAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ychenjz@163.com [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Wu, Bo [Department of Physics, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi 563002 (China); Yuan, Hongkuan; Feng, Yu [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: chenh@swu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The first-principles calculations are performed to investigate the effect of swap, antisite and vacancy defects of three classes on the electronic and magnetic properties in the inverse Heusler alloy Ti{sub 2}CoAl of half-metallicity. Our calculations reveal that Ti(A/B)–Co and Co–Al swaps, Ti(A/B) and Al vacancy defects as well as Co{sub Ti(A)/Al} and Al{sub Ti(A)/Ti(B)} antisite defects are likely to form in a concentration as high as 12.5%. Among them, Co{sub Ti(A)} antisite is detected to be the most probable defect. It is shown that the spin polarizations of Ti{sub 2}CoAl are considerably reduced by the Ti(A/B)–Co swap and Ti(B)/Al vacancy defects, while a quite high spin polarization around 95% is observed in Co–Al swap as well as Ti(A) vacancy. Remarkably, all the likely antisite defects almost retain the half-metallic character in a concentration of 12.5% even if they have the possibility to form. However, induced by antisites, the Fermi levels shift to the edge of band gap with small peaks arising just above the Fermi level, which may destroy the half-metallicity by spin-flip excitation. - Graphical abstract: The spin polarization and formation energy of various possible defects in inverse Heusler alloy Ti{sub 2}CoAl. The triangle, star and square represent the swap, antisite and vacancy defects, respectively. - Highlights: • The swap, antisite, and vacancy defects are studied in half-metallic Ti{sub 2}CoAl. • The Co{sub Ti(A)} antisite is the most probable among the studied defects. • The antisite defects almost retain the half-metallicity. • Most of swap and vacancy defects have degraded the half-metallicity. • High spin polarizations are detected in Co–Al swap and Ti(A) vacancy defects.

  10. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalm, Marie, E-mail: marie.kalm@neuro.gu.se [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Abel, Edvard [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wasling, Pontus [Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nyman, Jan [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hietala, Max Albert [Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars [Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elam, Mikael [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Blennow, Kaj [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); Björk-Eriksson, Thomas [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zetterberg, Henrik [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  11. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalm, Marie; Abel, Edvard; Wasling, Pontus; Nyman, Jan; Hietala, Max Albert; Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars; Elam, Mikael; Blennow, Kaj; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments

  12. The Role of Hydrogen-Enhanced Strain-Induced Lattice Defects on Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of X80 Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, M.; Suzuki, H.; Seko, Y.; Takai, K.

    2017-08-01

    Studies to date have not completely determined the factors influencing hydrogen embrittlement of ferrite/bainite X80 pipeline steel. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was evaluated based on fracture strain in tensile testing. We conducted a thermal desorption analysis to measure the amount of tracer hydrogen corresponding to that of lattice defects. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and the amount of tracer hydrogen significantly increased with decreasing crosshead speed. Additionally, a significant increase in the formation of hydrogen-enhanced strain-induced lattice defects was observed immediately before the final fracture. In contrast to hydrogen-free specimens, the fracture surface of the hydrogen-charged specimens exhibited shallower dimples without nuclei, such as secondary phase particles. These findings indicate that the presence of hydrogen enhanced the formation of lattice defects, particularly just prior to the occurrence of final fracture. This in turn enhanced the formation of shallower dimples, thereby potentially causing premature fracture of X80 pipeline steel at lower crosshead speeds.

  13. Investigation of UFO defect on DUV CAR and BARC process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yet, Siew Ing; Ko, Bong Sang; Lee, Soo Man; May, Mike

    2004-05-01

    Photo process defect reduction is one of the most important factors to improve the process stability and yield in sub-0.18um DUV process. In this paper, a new approach to minimize the Deep-UV (DUV) Chemically Amplified Resist (CAR) and Bottom Anti-Reflective Coating (BARC) induced defect known as UFO (UnidentiFied Object) defect will be introduced. These defects have mild surface topography difference on BARC; it only exists on the wide exposed area where there is no photoresist pattern. In this test, Nikon KrF Stepper & Scanner and TEL Clean track were used. Investigation was carried out on the defect formulation on both Acetal and ESCAP type of photoresist while elemental analysis was done by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) & Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Result indicated that both BARC and photoresist induce this UFO defect; total defect quantity is related with Post Exposure Bake (PEB) condition. Based on the elemental analysis and process-split test, we can conclude that this defect is caused by lack of acid amount and low diffusivity which is related to PAG (Photo Acid Generator) and TAG (Thermal Acid Generator) in KrF photoresist and BARC material. By optimizing photoresist bake condition, this UFO defect as well as other related defect such as Satellite defect could be eliminated.

  14. Novel Cranial Implants of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia as Acoustic Windows for Ultrasonic Brain Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Mario I; Penilla, Elias H; Leija, Lorenzo; Vera, Arturo; Garay, Javier E; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2017-11-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound can induce changes in tissues by means of thermal and nonthermal effects. It is proposed for treatment of some brain pathologies such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's diseases, and cancer. However, cranium highly absorbs ultrasound reducing transmission efficiency. There are clinical applications of transcranial focused ultrasound and implantable ultrasound transducers proposed to address this problem. In this paper, biocompatible materials are proposed for replacing part of the cranium (cranial implants) based on low porosity polycrystalline 8 mol% yttria-stabilized-zirconia (8YSZ) ceramics as acoustic windows for brain therapy. In order to assess the viability of 8YSZ implants to effectively transmit ultrasound, various 8YSZ ceramics with different porosity are tested; their acoustic properties are measured; and the results are validated using finite element models simulating wave propagation to brain tissue through 8YSZ windows. The ultrasound attenuation is found to be linearly dependent on ceramics' porosity. Results for the nearly pore-free case indicate that 8YSZ is highly effective in transmitting ultrasound, with overall maximum transmission efficiency of ≈81%, compared to near total absorption of cranial bone. These results suggest that 8YSZ polycrystals could be suitable acoustic windows for ultrasound brain therapy at 1 MHz. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Cranial nerves in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil relatives (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A

    2017-02-01

    Three systems, two sensory and one protective, are present in the skin of the living Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil lungfish, and the arrangement and innervation of the sense organs is peculiar to lungfish. Peripheral branches of nerves that innervate the sense organs are slender and unprotected, and form before any skeletal structures appear. When the olfactory capsule develops, it traps some of the anterior branches of cranial nerve V, which emerged from the chondrocranium from the lateral sphenotic foramen. Cranial nerve I innervates the olfactory organ enclosed within the olfactory capsule and cranial nerve II innervates the eye. Cranial nerve V innervates the sense organs of the snout and upper lip, and, in conjunction with nerve IX and X, the sense organs of the posterior and lateral head. Cranial nerve VII is primarily a motor nerve, and a single branch innervates sense organs in the mandible. There are no connections between nerves V and VII, although both emerge from the brain close to each other. The third associated system consists of lymphatic vessels covered by an extracellular matrix of collagen, mineralised as tubules in fossils. Innervation of the sensory organs is separate from the lymphatic system and from the tubule system of fossil lungfish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserv