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Sample records for individual evaluation test

  1. Parking and routing information system phase 1 evaluation -- Individual evaluation test plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    A parking and routing information system (PARIS) is being designed and deployed at a test site on the Mountain Home Veterans Administration campus in Johnson City, Tennessee using three sensor technologies. The purpose of the PARIS project is to demonstrate innovative integration of vehicle sensing technologies with parking management strategies to improve mobility and relieve congestion associated with a growing medical/technology complex. This technical memorandum presents the four individual evaluation test plans, System Performance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, User Acceptance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, Institutional and Business Issues Individual Evaluation Test Plan, and Transportation Systems Individual Evaluation Test Plan, which were developed to support ORNL`s responsibilities and functions during the four studies. The plans define the level of effort required to satisfy the data collection, processing, and analysis requirements for the assessment of the system performance, user acceptance, institutional and business issues, and transportation systems components of the PARIS phase 1 evaluation. Each plan is divided into three subsections: executive summary, detailed study design, and study management.

  2. Enlisted Personnel Individualized Career System (EPICS) Test and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    shipboard test environment. Researchers (Cronbach, Ambron, Dornbusch , Hess, Hornik, Phillips, Walker, & Weiner, 1980; Patton, 1978) have maintained that...Note 79-1). San Diego: Navy Personnel Research and Development Center, October 1978. Cronbach, L. 3., Ambron, S. R., Dornbusch , S. M., Hess, R. D

  3. Evaluation of the Glittre-ADL test as an instrument for classifying functional capacity of individuals with cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Andrade, Aline A; Britto, Raquel R; Soares, Daniele C M; Velloso, Marcelo; Pereira, Danielle A G

    2017-07-03

    The assessment of functional capacity in individuals with cardiovascular disease is closely related to lower limb function. The Glittre-ADL test is a global test to evaluate this patients. We aimed to verify whether the Glittre-ADL test discriminates functional status while evaluating individuals with cardiovascular disease. A total of 42 participants were evaluated using the Glittre-ADL test Incremental Shuttle Walking Test (shuttle test), Human Activity Profile, and Duke Activity Status Index. Data from the shuttle test, Human Activity Profile, and DASI were divided into tertiles for statistical analysis. The time required to complete the Glittre-ADL test was compared among tertiles of the shuttle test, Duke Activity Status Index and Human Activity Profile using analysis of variance. There were significant differences between the tertiles of the shuttle test. Tertile 1 was different from tertiles 2 (mean difference, 47.63; 95% CI, 19.86-75.39) and 3 (mean difference, 67.15; 95% CI, 41.25-93.05). For the Duke Activity Status Index there were significant between-group differences. Tertile 1 was different from tertiles 2 (mean difference, 42.45; 95% CI, 8.82-76.09) and 3 (mean difference, 43.56; 95% CI, 13.68-73.44). For the Human Activity Profile there were significant between-group differences. Tertile 3 was different from tertiles 1 (mean difference, 51.46; 95% CI, 21.27-81.64) and 2 (mean difference, 33.01; 95% CI, 3.52-62.51). The Glittre-ADL test is able to discriminate the functional status in individuals with cardiovascular disease, most of whom have hypertension. The Glittre-ADL test was sensitive to discriminate more functionally affected individuals. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of performance of electronic dosimeters for individual monitoring: tests in laboratory; Avaliacao do desempenho de dosimetros eletronicos para monitoracao individual: testes em laboratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, W.J.; Khoury, H.J.; Barros, V.S.M. de, E-mail: wjaramig@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear. Laboratorio de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes; Medeiros, R.B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2015-07-01

    Electronic dosimeters based on direct ion storage technology are being widely used in many countries for individual monitoring in many applications of ionizing radiation. However, their use as routine dosimeter has been established in a few countries due to lack of accreditation or intercomparison programs. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of two direct íon storage dosimeters model available in the international market: the Miriom-Instadose-1 and RADOS DIS-1 to be eventually accepted for individual monitoring in Brazil. (author)

  5. Validity of the Wonderlic Personnel Test as a brief measure of intelligence in individuals referred for evaluation of head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J; Strauss, E; Hunter, M; Spellacy, F

    1998-10-01

    Some have argued that the Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT) may represent a brief and efficient measure of intellectual functioning (e.g., Dodrill, 1980). The present study investigated the validity of the WPT as such a measure, in individuals with head injury. The findings suggested that, although the WPT showed relatively high agreement with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) in the whole group, it did not have good agreement with WAIS-R scores on an individual case basis. Since clinical practice typically seeks to evaluate individual performance, it is suggested that the WPT is not a suitable tool for psychological assessment of individuals with known or suspected head injury.

  6. New Statistical Techniques to Evaluate Criterion-Referenced Tests Used in Individually Prescribed Instruction. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Melvin R.

    This project is concerned with the development and implementation of some new statistical techniques that will facilitate a continuing input of information about the student to the instructional manager so that individualization of instruction can be managed effectively. The source of this informational input is typically a short…

  7. Psychometric Evaluation of the Life Orientation Test-Revised in Treated Opiate Dependent Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Britton, Peter C.; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    We examined internal consistency and test-retest reliability of a measure of dispositional optimism, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, in 121 opiate-dependent patients seeking methadone treatment. Internal consistency was adequate at baseline (alpha = 0.69) and follow-up (alpha = 0.72). Low socioeconomic status and being on disability were…

  8. Validity and Reproducibility of an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test for Evaluating Anaerobic Threshold in Young, Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nakamura, Masayoshi Ohira, Yoshiharu Yokokawa, Yuya Nagasawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sit-to-stand exercise (STS is a common activity of daily living. The objectives of the present study were: 1 to assess the validity of aerobic fitness measurements based on anaerobic thresholds (ATs, during incremental sit-to-stand exercise (ISTS with and without arm support compared with an incremental cycle-ergometer (CE test; and 2 to examine the reproducibility of the AT measured during the ISTSs. Twenty-six healthy individuals randomly performed the ISTS and CE test. Oxygen uptakes at the AT (AT-VO2 and heart rate at the AT (AT-HR were determined during the ISTSs and CE test, and repeated-measures analyses of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used to evaluate the differences between these variables. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the strength of the relationship between AT-VO2 and AT-HR during the ISTSs and CE test. Data analysis yielded the following correlations: AT-VO2 during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.77 (p < 0.05; AT-VO2 during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.70 (p < 0.05; AT-HR during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.80 (p < 0.05; and AT-HR during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.66 (p < 0.05. The AT-VO2 values during the ISTS with arm support (18.5 ± 1.9 mL·min-1·kg-1 and the CE test (18.4 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1 were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (16.6 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1; p < 0.05. The AT-HR values during the ISTS with arm support (126 ± 10 bpm and the CE test (126 ± 13 bpm were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (119 ± 9 bpm; p < 0.05. The ISTS with arm support may provide a cardiopulmonary function load equivalent to the CE test; therefore, it is a potentially valid test for evaluating AT-VO2 and AT-HR in healthy, young adults.

  9. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – effective method for evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to emphasize the role of cardiopulmonary exercise training (CPET in evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with a metabolic syndrome. Methods: We performed a prospective longitudinal study of 9 months. The study group consisted of 28 young patients (21.3±3.1 years old without contraindications to exercise, previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATPIII criteria. All patients were evaluating at baseline and after 3 months of intervention and at the end of the study (after 9 months. The evaluation consists in performing a CPET on bicycle ergometer in which subjects were monitored in terms of cardiac and respiratory parameters. The CPET results allow us to establish the range of effort intensity in which the patient should exercise in order to burn calories and achieve the maximum fat oxidation rate. All patients benefit from an intensive interval exercise training programme, supervised and guided by a physical therapist. Exercise training consisted in 50 minutes sessions, 3 times per week, at intensive endurance training zone (in the range of anaerobic threshold, completed by 1 minute interval in the range between anaerobic threshold (AT and respiratory compensation point (RCP, for every 5 minutes of training. Results: After 9 months of intervention we noticed an improvement of abdominal obesity (waist circumference decreased from 98.98±10.14 cm to 89.54±12.32 cm, p<0.001, physical fitness (V’O2peak increased from 1.83±0.33 l/min to 2.13±0.4 l/min, p<0.001 and endurance (Oxygen uptake in the range of anaerobic treshold increase from 1.27±0.27 l/min to 1.55±0.31 l/min, p<0.001. Conclusions: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing together with training zones determinations is a useful tool for assessing the exercise capacity and drawing up individual workouts. Active and closely monitored intervention by individualized exercise training programmes leads to

  10. Psychometric properties of Brief-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Brief-BESTest) in evaluating balance performance in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meizhen; Pang, Marco Y C

    2017-03-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the Brief-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Brief-BESTest) in individuals with chronic stroke. This was an observational study with repeated measurements involving 50 participants with chronic stroke [mean (SD) age: 59.2 (7.3) years]. Each participant with stroke was evaluated with the Brief-BESTest, Berg balance scale (BBS), Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS), Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA), Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Two raters (rater 1 and 2) provided the Brief-BESTest scores of the first 27 participants independently to establish inter-rater reliability. After 15 min of rest, the same 27 participants were evaluated with the Brief-BESTest again by rater 1 to establish intra-rater reliability. The Brief-BESTest scores of the stroke group were also compared with those of the control group [n = 27, mean (SD) age: 56.7 (7.7) years]. The Brief-BESTest had no substantial floor and ceiling effects, good intra-rater (ICC 2,1 = 0.974) and inter-rater (ICC 2,1 = 0.980) reliability and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.818). The minimal detectable change at 95% confidence level was 2 points. The Brief-BESTest showed moderate to very strong correlations with other balance (BBS and PASS) and motor impairment (FMA, CMSA) measures (rs = .547-.911, p Brief-BESTest was effective in distinguishing participants with stroke from controls (cutoff score: Brief-BESTest has good reliability and validity in assessing balance function in individuals with chronic stroke.

  11. Evaluation of the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test for Use in States' Child Outcomes Measurement Systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Batya; Gattamorta, Karina A.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test (BDI-2 ST) for use in states' child outcomes accountability systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Complete Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition (BDI-2), assessment data were obtained for 142 children, ages 2 to 62 months, who…

  12. Is the Cloze Procedure Appropriate to Evaluate Health Literacy in Older Individuals? Age Effects in the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, Raymond L.; Acevedo, Amarilis; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Jacobs, Robin J.

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy has received increasing attention because of its importance for older individuals' health, as studies have shown a close relation between older individuals' health literacy and their health. Research also suggests that older individuals have low levels of health literacy, but this finding is variable and may depend on which health literacy test is used. Older individuals assessed with the Test of Functional Health Literacy (TOFHLA) score lower than younger individuals, but a previous study suggested that this may result from age-related differential item functioning (DIF) on the TOFHLA. The study reported here assessed age-related DIF in a sample of community-dwelling volunteers. Twenty-two percent of items were differentially more difficult for older individuals independent of their overall ability, and when these items were eliminated from the total score, age differences were no longer found. Performance on a working memory task predicted older but not younger individuals' performance on the age-related items. At least part of older individuals' apparent deficits in health literacy when assessed by the TOFHLA may be related to DIF on its items. The TOFHLA, and any measure that employs the cloze procedure to evaluate reading comprehension, should be used cautiously in older individuals. PMID:25295191

  13. An Evaluation of a Self-Instructional Manual for Teaching Individuals How to Administer the Revised ABLA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, Ashley L.; Awadalla, Nardeen; Martin, Toby L.; Martin, Garry L.; Kaminski, Lauren; Miljkovic, Morena

    2015-01-01

    The Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities (ABLA) is a tool that is used to assess the learning ability of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and children with autism. The ABLA was recently revised and is now referred to as the ABLA-Revised (ABLA-R). A self-instructional manual was prepared to teach individuals how to administer the…

  14. Is the Cloze Procedure Appropriate to Evaluate Health Literacy in Older Individuals? Age Effects in the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. Ownby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Health literacy has received increasing attention because of its importance for older individuals’ health, as studies have shown a close relation between older individuals’ health literacy and their health. Research also suggests that older individuals have low levels of health literacy, but this finding is variable and may depend on which health literacy test is used. Older individuals assessed with the Test of Functional Health Literacy (TOFHLA score lower than younger individuals, but a previous study suggested that this may result from age-related differential item functioning (DIF on the TOFHLA. The study reported here assessed age-related DIF in a sample of community-dwelling volunteers. Twenty-two percent of items were differentially more difficult for older individuals independent of their overall ability, and when these items were eliminated from the total score, age differences were no longer found. Performance on a working memory task predicted older but not younger individuals’ performance on the age-related items. At least part of older individuals’ apparent deficits in health literacy when assessed by the TOFHLA may be related to DIF on its items. The TOFHLA, and any measure that employs the cloze procedure to evaluate reading comprehension, should be used cautiously in older individuals.

  15. Team-Based Testing Improves Individual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Jane S.; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    In two experiments, 90 undergraduates took six tests as part of an educational psychology course. Using a crossover design, students took three tests individually without feedback and then took the same test again, following the process of team-based testing (TBT), in teams in which the members reached consensus for each question and answered…

  16. Evaluation and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... University of Utah Research News Make a Difference Evaluation + Tests Print This Page Before diagnosing peripheral neuropathy, ... from any type of neuropathy or neurological disorder. Evaluation A neurological evaluation consists of a physical exam ...

  17. Performance, requirements and testing in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julius, H.W.; Christensen, P.; Marshall, T.O.

    1990-01-01

    monitoring, and in particular of those related to the energy and angular dependences of the dosemeters. These data are important for the testing of the dosimetry systems. Finally testing programmes in individual monitoring are discussed and four categories of testing are proposed.......For implementation of the ICRP requirements in practical routine monitoring, a specification is needed with respect to specific performance criteria of the dosimetry system. This includes the dosemeters, and procedures for initial and on-going testing of the dosimetry systems to ensure...... that the specified criteria are continuously met. Methods are here specified for establishing performance criteria, and satisfying the ICRP overall accuracy requirements for individual monitoring. Furthermore, procedures are given for obtaining numerical values of the uncertainties connected with individual...

  18. Ada Test and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Lady Lovelace , the daughter of the poet, Lord Byron. Ada was Charles Babbage’s programmer, Babbage being the inventor of the first mechanical...34 O-07 0 ARFOCERIGTAEOAUIAL LABS RIGHTPATTERSON AFB OH F/G 9/2 ADA TEST AND EVALUATION.(U) MAY BO A J SCARPELLI UNCLASSIFIED AFWAL-TR-BO-1024 NL E...llEllllEIlE III HA i28 5__ BIH~~ ~ 2 __I.,11 LZ AFAL-TR-80-1024 Ada TEST AND EVALUATION Alfred J. Scarpelli System Technology Branch Systen Avionics

  19. Teste de condutividade elétrica individual na avaliação da qualidade fisiológica de sementes de café (Coffea arabica L. Individual electrical conductivity test for evaluation of the physiological quality of coffee seeds (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula de Souza Cabral Costa

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available O teste de condutividade elétrica é usado para medir os exsudatos das sementes, que certamente refletem a integridade do sistema de membranas. O teste é rápido e de operação simples, mas a metodologia necessita ser testada para cada espécie individualmente para obter uma melhor precisão e exatidão dos resultados. Este trabalho foi conduzido visando determinar o ponto de partição na realização do teste de condutividade elétrica em sementes de café. Dez lotes de sementes de Coffea arabica sem pergaminho, cultivar Acaiá foram usados nesse estudo. Para a avaliação do ponto de partição as sementes foram embebidas por 96 horas e submetidas ao teste de germinação, correlacionando os valores de condutividade observados com os valores obtidos no teste de germinação. O ponto de partição é de 120,5µS.cm-1, considerando 70% de germinação.The conductivity test is used to measure the leaches from the seeds, which certaintily reflect the membrane system integrity. The test is rapid and it is of simple operation, but the methodology needs to be tested for each individual species in order to reach a better precision and accuracy. This work was conducted to determinate the partition point for the realization of electrical conductivity test in coffee seeds. Ten seed lots of Coffea arabica, cultivar Acaiá, without parchment, were used in this study. For the evaluation of the partition point, seeds were imbibed for 96 hours and submitted to the germination test, with the correlation between the conductivity values and those obtained in the germination test being evaluated. The partition point is 120,5µS.cm-1, considering 70% of germination.

  20. [Evaluating individual occupational risk in teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, E G; Ishmukhametov, I B

    2012-01-01

    The authors analyzed work conditions of comprehensive school teachers according to workplace assessment. Additional studies covered opportunistic pathogens content of air in classrooms. Auxiliary medical examination evaluated health state of the teachers. Individual occupational risk was calculated with consideration of actual work conditions and health state. Comprehensive school teacher's work is characterized by constant or transitory influence by complex of occupational and work hazards that are mostly (according to to workplace assessment) increased work intensity, noise and inadequate illumination parameters. Ambient air of classrooms constantly contains high number of opportunistic pathogens, that could decrease immune system parameters and cause more droplet infections. Individual occupational risk of teachers, calculated with consideration of work conditions and health state parameters, appears to be high and proves high possibility of teachers' health damage at work. Recommendations cover evaluation of biologic factors within the workplace assessment, obligatory preliminary (before employment) and periodic medical examinations for comprehensive school teachers as for workers exposed to occupational hazards.

  1. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China's autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approach, the test content is designed to be stage by stage, moving from simplicity to complexity and from individual modules to the entire vehicle. The hierarchical test environment is established according to the levels of test content. The test method based on multilevel platforms and sensors is put forward to ensure the accuracy of test results. A fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method combined with analytic hierarchy process (AHP is used for the comprehensive evaluation which can quantitatively evaluate the individual module and the overall technical performance of autonomous ground vehicles. The proposed test and evaluation system has been successfully applied to real autonomous ground vehicle competitions.

  2. Program Evaluation: An Empirical Study of Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhardt, Gaea

    The results of three years of evaluative investigation of the University of Pittsburgh Learning Research and Development Center's program of individualized education are described. The study was conducted in seven Follow Through sites and three Pittsburgh area schools. Standardized tests were used as input and outcome measures; questionnaires and…

  3. Evaluation and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other reflexes. Sensations in the feet and hands will be evaluated with a pin. Since some neuropathies are hereditary, you doctor will ask if other members of your family have suffered from any type of neuropathy or neurological disorder. Evaluation A neurological evaluation consists of a ...

  4. Online Reading Test Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷鸣

    2011-01-01

    Language test has been used as a scientific assessment tool in providing valuable information for teaching and learning. In fact,lots of online reading tests are not designed with validity. This paper analyzes those online reading tests from the aspects o

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and analysis of the psychometric properties of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test and MiniBESTest in the elderly and individuals with Parkinson's disease: application of the Rasch model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica C. Maia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Older adults and individuals with neurological problems such as Parkinson's disease (PD exhibit balance deficits that might impair their mobility and independence. The assessment of balance must be useful in identifying the presence of instability and orient interventions. OBJECTIVE: To translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest and MiniBESTest to Brazilian Portuguese and analyze its psychometric properties. METHOD: The tests were translated and adapted to Portuguese according to a standard method and then subjected to a test-retest reliability assessment (10 older adults; 10 individuals with PD. The psychometric properties were assessed by the Rasch model (35 older adults; 35 individuals with PD. RESULTS: The reliability coefficient of the tests relative to the items and subjects varied from 0.91 and 0.98, which is indicative of the stability and reproducibility of the measures. In the BESTest, the person (4.19 and item (5.36 separation index established six balance ability levels and seven levels of difficulty, respectively. In the MiniBESTest, the person (3.16 and item (6.41 separation index established four balance ability levels and nine levels of difficulty, respectively. Two items in the BESTest did not fit with the model expectations, but the construct validity was not compromised. No item in the MiniBESTest was erratic. CONCLUSIONS: The results corroborate the diagnostic and screening functions of the BESTest and MiniBESTest, respectively, and indicate that the Brazilian versions exhibit adequate reliability, construct validity, response stability, and capacity to distinguish among various balance ability levels in older adults and individuals with PD.

  6. Test & Evaluation Management Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    conducted, using munitions likely to be encountered in combat, on a complete system loaded or equipped with all the dangerous materials that normally would...systems, work scope, contracting approaches, efficiency, requirements creep , and risk management. 15.11.3 Agile Development and Testing Testing within an...White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, aerodynamic simulations of the proposed test were run on a computer during actual firings so that real-time

  7. N-Back auditory test performance in normal individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Tomé Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract The working memory construct refers to the capacity to maintain information for a limited time. Objectives: To devise stimuli and adapt the 5-back test and to verify the effect of age in normal Brazilian individuals. Methods: 31 healthy adults (15 young adults and 16 older adults were evaluated by batteries of auditory stimuli to verify the inter-group differences (age effect in working memory span, total correct answers and intrusions, and the intra-group effect of type of stimulus. Results: There was no intra-group stimulus effect. Individuals from both groups processed di and tri-syllables similarly. No difference between groups (no age effect was observed for any N-Back parameters: total score, span, number of intrusions, in either di or tri-syllable presentation. Conclusion: the processing capacity of 5 elements in phonological working memory was not affected by age.

  8. Identification of individuals at risk for Lynch syndrome using targeted evaluations and genetic testing: National Society of Genetic Counselors and the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer joint practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Scott M; Burt, Randall; Church, James; Erdman, Steve; Hampel, Heather; Holter, Spring; Jasperson, Kory; Kalady, Matt F; Haidle, Joy Larsen; Lynch, Henry T; Palaniappan, Selvi; Wise, Paul E; Senter, Leigha

    2012-08-01

    Identifying individuals who have Lynch syndrome (LS) involves a complex diagnostic work up that includes taking a detailed family history and a combination of various genetic and immunohistochemical tests. The National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CGA-ICC) have come together to publish this clinical practice testing guideline for the evaluation of LS. The purpose of this practice guideline is to provide guidance and a testing algorithm for LS as well as recommendations on when to offer testing. This guideline does not replace a consultation with a genetics professional. This guideline includes explanations in support of this and a summary of background data. While this guideline is not intended to serve as a review of LS, it includes a discussion of background information on LS, and cites a number of key publications which should be reviewed for a more in-depth understanding of LS. These guidelines are intended for genetic counselors, geneticists, gastroenterologists, surgeons, medical oncologists, obstetricians and gynecologists, nurses and other healthcare providers who evaluate patients for LS.

  9. Individual Evaluation of Judges in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Riedel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Germany, with the exception of the five federal supreme courts, court organization is a responsibility of the Länder (federal states. In some of the Länder, so-called employee profiles (“Anforderungsprofile“ have been established for judicial office. These lists attempt to describe criteria for certain judicial positions. They are applied in the process of promotion but also serve as an indicator for initial appointment.The European picture with respect to individual evaluation of judges is extremely diverse. In preparation for this paper, the author attempted to ascertain the situation in the Council of Europe member states. The results of this survey (to which 23 members of the CCJE have replied are listed in Appendix I.The general difficulty of professional evaluation of judges lies in the limits that have to be observed for constitutional reasons. In Germany, the overall rule of every evaluation is that there has to be a reliable factual basis. The evaluator is under a duty not to omit relevant aspects, to consider all the facts that make part of the picture, not to select arbitrarily but to try to paint a true and full picture of the person who is being evaluated. In the case of judges, it is unacceptable to comment on the core of judicial decision-making. Evaluations may be challenged in the administrative court on grounds of fact as well as on grounds of law. En Alemania, con la excepción de las cinco cortes supremas federales, la organización judicial es responsabilidad de los Länder (estados federales. En algunos de estos Länder, se han establecido los denominados perfiles de empleados (“Anforderungsprofile” para la oficina judicial. Estas listas pretenden describir los criterios para determinados cargos judiciales. Se aplican en los procesos de promoción, pero también sirven como un indicador para el nombramiento inicial.El panorama europeo respecto a la evaluación individual de los jueces es muy diverso. Preparando

  10. The picture test of separation and individuation - preliminary research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Žvelc

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors introduce a new instrument, which they developed for measuring separation and individuation process and attachment in adolescence and adulthood. The Picture Test of Separation and Individuation (PTSI is a semi–projective test. It consists of various pictures, which represent relationships with significant others. PTSI is divided into three subtests: Relationship with Mother, Relationship with Father and Attachment. In a preliminary research on a sample of college and university students authors studied basic properties of the test. The results of the research indicate that PTSI is consistent with theoretical background, has good sensitivity and is economical. The Picture Test of Separation and Individuation enables quick but complex insight into individual's relationships with significant others as well as into his/her stage of separation and individuation process. Considering satisfying results of pilot study, authors suggest further research for validation of the test.

  11. Days on radiosensitivity: individual variability and predictive tests; Radiosensibilite: variabilite individuelle et tests predictifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The radiosensitivity is a part of usual clinical observations. It is already included in the therapy protocols. however, some questions stay on its individual variability and on the difficulty to evaluate it. The point will be stocked on its origin and its usefulness in predictive medicine. Through examples on the use of predictive tests and ethical and legal questions that they raise, concrete cases will be presented by specialists such radio biologists, geneticists, immunologists, jurists and occupational physicians. (N.C.)

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garetson, Thomas [The Clarity Group, Incorporated, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations.Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing.

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garetson, Thomas [The Clarity Group, Incorporated, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations.Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing.

  14. Test and Evaluation Management Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    requirements and specifications of the contract. (2) Identify operational deficiencies; Postproduction testing requirements may (3) Recommend and evaluate...objectives to evaluateTHE PRODUCTION AND DE PRODMENTIOHAND postproduction logistics readiness and sup- DEPLOYMENT PHASE port are to:(MS III to MS IV) After...does, however, in- grated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP), etc.) clude a requirement for postproduction that are also in early stages of develop- test

  15. Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.B. Skorska

    2002-01-02

    The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

  16. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  17. Language Test Construction and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, J. Charles; And Others

    The guide is intended for teachers who must construct language tests and for other professionals who may need to construct, evaluate, or use the results of language tests. Most examples are drawn from the field of English-as-a-Second-Language instruction in the United Kingdom, but the principles and practices described may be applied to the…

  18. The picture test of separation and individuation - preliminary research

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor Žvelc; Maša Žvelc

    2000-01-01

    Authors introduce a new instrument, which they developed for measuring separation and individuation process and attachment in adolescence and adulthood. The Picture Test of Separation and Individuation (PTSI) is a semi–projective test. It consists of various pictures, which represent relationships with significant others. PTSI is divided into three subtests: Relationship with Mother, Relationship with Father and Attachment. In a preliminary research on a sample of college and university...

  19. An evaluation of the somatosensory profile of hemiparetic individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Mota

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the somatosensory profile of 18 hemiparetic spastic victims of stroke with and without blocking vision. Maximal isometric contraction test was used for flexor and extensor muscles of the hip and knee, and flexor plantar muscles. The number of cycles per minute on stationary bike was also measured with eyes opened and closed. Significant differences were found suggesting the existence of miscommunication between sensory-motor neural mechanisms responsible for voluntary motor actions in these individuals.

  20. An evaluation of the somatosensory profile of hemiparetic individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Sousa Mota

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the somatosensory profile of 18 hemiparetic spastic victims of stroke with and without blocking vision. Maximal isometric contraction test was used for flexor and extensor muscles of the hip and knee, and flexor plantar muscles. The number of cycles per minute on stationary bike was also measured with eyes opened and closed. Significant differences were found suggesting the existence of miscommunication between sensory-motor neural mechanisms responsible for voluntary motor actions in these individuals.

  1. An Unassisted Method of Psychological Testing of Visually Impaired Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation of a testing technique which might meet the need for a standardized, validated, and objective means of psychologically testing people with visual or reading impairments is reported. The test is intended to be administered via an audiocassette, with identical administration and response procedures for totally and partially…

  2. A neural network evaluation model for individual thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lian, Zhiwei; Zhao, Bo [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2007-10-15

    An evaluation model for individual thermal comfort is presented based on the BP neural network. The train data came from a thermal comfort survey. The evaluation results of the model showed a good match with the subject's real thermal sensation, which indicated that the model can be used to evaluate individual thermal comfort rightly. Taken a room air conditioner as an example, the application of the NNEM in creating a microenvironment for individual was discussed. The result showed that the NNEM can play an important role of connecting individual thermal comfort with the control on the air conditioner. (author)

  3. The evaluation of olfactory function in individuals with chronic halitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Cayonu, Melih; Kayabasoglu, Gurkan; Salihoglu, Murat; Tekeli, Hakan; Cayonu, Sibel; Akpinar, Meltem Esen; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Halitosis and olfactory dysfunction may disrupt an individual's quality of life remarkably. One may ask whether halitosis has effects on olfactory functions or not? Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the olfactory abilities of subjects with chronic halitosis evaluated using the measurements of volatile sulfur compounds. This study was carried out in 77 subjects, with a mean age of 40.1±13.3 years, ranging from 18 to 65 years. Forty-three participants were diagnosed as halitosis according to the gas chromatography results and constituted the halitosis group. Also, a control group was created from individuals without a complaint of halitosis and also who had normal values for volatile sulfur compounds. Each subject's orthonasal olfactory and retronasal olfactory functions were assessed using "Sniffin' Sticks" and retronasal olfactory testing. The results showed that odor threshold scores were lower in participants with halitosis compared with controls. Also, hyposmia was seen more common in the halitosis group than in controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation was found between odor threshold scores and volatile sulfur compounds levels, particularly with hydrogen sulfide and dimethyl sulfide levels. The results suggest that the chronic presence of volatile sulfur compounds may have a negative effect on olfactory function.

  4. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  5. Pharmacogenomic testing and the prospect of individualized treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Daniel E; Wines, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics offers the hope of greater individualization of treatment. Therapies that exemplify the promise of pharmacogenomics include anticoagulation with warfarin and the use of antiplatelet medications (eg, clopidogrel) for secondary prevention after acute coronary syndrome. Good evidence of clinical utility must be obtained before pharmacogenomic testing is widely implemented.

  6. Paired comparison product testing when individual preferences are stochastic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractThe preference of an individual in a paired comparison product test is stochastic, i.e. the probability p, that he will prefer one of the two alternatives, is not 0 or 1, but lies somewhere between these values. It is shown that the distribution of p, when approximated by a beta distribu

  7. Analysis of Individual "Test Of Astronomy STandards" (TOAST) Item Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Stephanie J.; Schleigh, Sharon Price; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of valid and reliable strategies to efficiently determine the knowledge landscape of introductory astronomy college students is an effort of great interest to the astronomy education community. This study examines individual item response rates from a widely used conceptual understanding survey, the Test Of Astronomy Standards…

  8. Reliability of 16 balance tests in individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamonte, Romina; Vehrs, Pat R; Feland, J Brent; Johnson, A Wayne; Seeley, Matthew K; Eggett, Dennis

    2010-10-01

    To assess test-retest reliability scores on 16 balance tests of 21 individuals with Down syndrome whose ages ranged from 5 to 31 yr., participants performed a standing test on firm and soft surfaces with the eyes open and closed, the balance subset of the Bruininks-Oseretsky test, full turn, timed-up-and-go test, forward reach, and sit-to-stand. Each participant completed all 16 tests twice in one day and then again on a subsequent day for a total of 4 sessions. The interclass reliability correlation coefficients (ICC) value for each measure of balance varied considerably by age and sex. Based on having an ICC > .50, only 3 tests were reliable in young males and young females, whereas 5 tests could reliably be used in adult females and 9 tests could reliably be used in adult males. The results of this study raise suspicions as to the reliability of tests commonly used to assess balance and differences in reliability due to age and sex. Results of balance tests should be interpreted with caution in males and females with Down syndrome across the age span.

  9. Session: Test and Evaluation (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, B.; Hanley, C.

    2008-04-01

    The overall goal of this presentation is: (1) provide test and evaluation of PV cells/modules/systems to TPP participants, other PV industry, labs, and universities in support of technology optimization efforts sponsored by DOE's Solar Program and the SAI; (2) support commercial and emerging technology development; (3) provide component and system performance data to improve and validate system performance models; (4) provide T and E support for reliability activities; and (5) priority is placed on TPP's and other solicitations.

  10. Molecular test to assign individuals within the Cacopsylla pruni complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Peccoud

    Full Text Available Crop protection requires the accurate identification of disease vectors, a task that can be made difficult when these vectors encompass cryptic species. Here we developed a rapid molecular diagnostic test to identify individuals of Cacopsyllapruni (Scopoli, 1763 (Hemiptera: Psyllidae, the main vector of the European stone fruit yellows phytoplasma. This psyllid encompasses two highly divergent genetic groups that are morphologically similar and that are characterized by genotyping several microsatellite markers, a costly and time-consuming protocol. With the aim of developing species-specific PCR primers, we sequenced the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2 on a collection of C. pruni samples from France and other European countries. ITS2 sequences showed that the two genetic groups represent two highly divergent clades. This enabled us to develop specific primers for the assignment of individuals to either genetic group in a single PCR, based on ITS2 amplicon size. All previously assigned individuals yielded bands of expected sizes, and the PCR proved efficient on a larger sample of 799 individuals. Because none appeared heterozygous at the ITS2 locus (i.e., none produced two bands, we inferred that the genetic groups of C. pruni, whose distribution is partly sympatric, constitute biological species that have not exchanged genes for an extended period of time. Other psyllid species (Cacopsylla, Psylla, Triozidae and Aphalaridae failed to yield any amplicon. These primers are therefore unlikely to produce false positives and allow rapid assignment of C. pruni individuals to either cryptic species.

  11. State of the art in non-animal approaches for skin sensitization testing: from individual test methods towards testing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezendam, Janine; Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Vandebriel, Rob J

    2016-12-01

    The hazard assessment of skin sensitizers relies mainly on animal testing, but much progress is made in the development, validation and regulatory acceptance and implementation of non-animal predictive approaches. In this review, we provide an update on the available computational tools and animal-free test methods for the prediction of skin sensitization hazard. These individual test methods address mostly one mechanistic step of the process of skin sensitization induction. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for skin sensitization describes the key events (KEs) that lead to skin sensitization. In our review, we have clustered the available test methods according to the KE they inform: the molecular initiating event (MIE/KE1)-protein binding, KE2-keratinocyte activation, KE3-dendritic cell activation and KE4-T cell activation and proliferation. In recent years, most progress has been made in the development and validation of in vitro assays that address KE2 and KE3. No standardized in vitro assays for T cell activation are available; thus, KE4 cannot be measured in vitro. Three non-animal test methods, addressing either the MIE, KE2 or KE3, are accepted as OECD test guidelines, and this has accelerated the development of integrated or defined approaches for testing and assessment (e.g. testing strategies). The majority of these approaches are mechanism-based, since they combine results from multiple test methods and/or computational tools that address different KEs of the AOP to estimate skin sensitization potential and sometimes potency. Other approaches are based on statistical tools. Until now, eleven different testing strategies have been published, the majority using the same individual information sources. Our review shows that some of the defined approaches to testing and assessment are able to accurately predict skin sensitization hazard, sometimes even more accurate than the currently used animal test. A few defined approaches are developed to provide an

  12. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Sun; Guangming Xiong; Weilong Song; Jianwei Gong; Huiyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China’s autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approac...

  13. Development of a new instrument for evaluating individuals' dietary intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Hong; Kogashiwa, Michiko; Kira, Shohei

    2006-10-01

    With the aim of developing a new dietary instrument for assessing an individual's usual intakes, we evaluated a hand-held personal digital assistant with camera and mobile telephone card, called Wellnavi (Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Twenty-eight college students majoring in food and nutrition in Okayama University of Japan voluntarily participated in this study. Applying a cross-sectional study design, participants were asked to keep 1-day weighed food records. Digital images of all recorded foods were obtained simultaneously and sent to registered dietitians by a mobile telephone card. The following day, a 24-hour recall was obtained. These procedures were repeated after 6 months. Participants' opinions about the three methods were determined using a questionnaire. Differences in estimated median nutrient intake among the three methods were compared by Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. Relationships among the nutrient estimates by each method were evaluated using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. We found no significant differences between the Wellnavi method when compared with food records for most nutrients, except zinc, manganese, vitamin E, saturated fatty acid, polyunsaturated fatty acid, and dietary fiber. The median correlation coefficients for the nutrient estimates were 0.66 between the Wellnavi method and the food records. The survey showed that 57.1% of subjects considered the Wellnavi method the least burdensome of the three methods and the least time consuming (16 minutes) to record daily diet. About half of participants indicated that they would be willing to use the Wellnavi for 1 month to record their diet. This study suggests that a hand-held digital assistant may be a valid and convenient instrument for evaluating dietary intake.

  14. The Evaluator Effect in Usability Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Ebbe; Hertzum, Morten; John, Bonnie E.

    1998-01-01

    Usability tests are applied in industry to evaluate systems and in research as a yardstick for other usability evaluation methods. However, one potential threat to the reliability of usability tests has been left unaddressed: the evaluator effect. In this study, four evaluators analyzed four...... videotaped usability test sessions. Only 20% of the 93 unique problems were detected by all four evaluators and 46% were detected by only a single evaluator. Severe problems were detected more often by all four evaluators (41%) and less often by only one evaluator (22%) but a substantial evaluator effect...

  15. Evaluation of the Individualized Study Program: Early Warning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    The Early Warning System (EWS) of the Individualized Study Program (ISP) at the University of California, Davis, was evaluated. Disadvantaged students who have not met the university's entrance requirements are tracked by the EWS during their first year in order to identify academic problems and provide advising and support. Findings include: EWS…

  16. Evaluation of College English Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭奕奕

    2003-01-01

    There has been much heated discussion on College English Test for non-English majors Band 4 and Band 6 because it has exerted great influence on English teaching in Chinese universities. This essay is intended to explore the reliability, validity,practicality and washback of this large-scale test by focusing on CET Band 4. The author of this report discusses the merits as well as some existing problems of this test and offers some suggestions at the end of the essay.

  17. Aircraft Test & Evaluation Facility (Hush House)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Test and Evaluation Facility (ATEF), or Hush House, is a noise-abated ground test sub-facility. The facility's controlled environment provides 24-hour...

  18. On individual preferences and aggregation in economic evaluation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljas, B; Lindgren, B

    2001-01-01

    For practical reasons, in order to carry out economic evaluations of collective decisions, total costs will generally be compared with total benefits; hence, individuals' willingness to pay (WTP) or quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) have to be estimated at an aggregate level. So far, aggregation has usually been done by taking the individuals' mean WTP or the unweighted number of QALYs. Since the aggregation process is closely related to the way that income, health and/or utility of different individuals are compared and weighted, it also has significant equity implications. Thus. the explicit (or, more often, implicit) assumptions behind the aggregation process will largely affect how health and welfare are distributed is society. The aggregation problem in economic evaluation is certainly not trivial, but is seldom addressed in current practice. This paper shows the underlying assumptions of aggregate cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and cost-effectiveness analysis/cost-utility analysis (CEA/CUA), and it emphasises the particularly strong assumptions which have to be made when QALYs are interpreted as utilities in the welfare economics sense. Naturally, the appropriate method to choose depends on what is to be maximised: welfare or health. If decisions of resource allocation are to be based on economic welfare theory, then CBA should be preferred. However, if QALYs are interpreted as measures of health, rather than as utilities, then CEA/CUA would be appropriate.

  19. Weapon Simulator Test Methodology Investigation: Comparison of Live Fire and Weapon Simulator Test Methodologies and the Effects of Clothing and Individual Equipment on Marksmanship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    marksmanship performance) mirror those which would be captured in a live fire evaluation . 1 WEAPON SIMULATOR TEST METHODOLOGY INVESTIGATION ...METHODOLOGY INVESTIGATION : COMPARISON OF LIVE FIRE AND WEAPON SIMULATOR TEST METHODOLOGIES AND THE EFFECTS OF CLOTHING AND INDIVIDUAL EQUIPMENT ON...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2014 – August 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE WEAPON SIMULATOR TEST METHODOLOGY INVESTIGATION

  20. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation and treadmill exercise test responses in individuals without overt heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Giampaoli, Viviana; de Freitas, Humberto Felício Gonçalves; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Araújo, Fernando; Correia, Gustavo Ferreira; Rondon, Maria Urbana Pinto Brandão; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Mansur, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of exercise on cardiovascular health may be related to the improvement in several physiologic pathways, including peripheral vascular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular responses during the treadmill exercise test and exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation in individuals without overt heart disease. The study included 796 asymptomatic subjects (431 females and 365 males) without overt heart disease. We evaluated the heart rate (chronotropic reserve and heart rate recovery), blood pressure (maximum systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as systolic blood pressure recovery) and exercise capacity during symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was studied with venous occlusion plethysmography and estimated by forearm blood flow and vascular conductance responses during a 3-min handgrip maneuver. Forearm blood flow increase during the handgrip exercise was positively associated with heart rate recovery during treadmill exercise testing (p exercise was inversely associated with exercise diastolic blood pressure during exercise treadmill testing (p = 0.038). No significant association was found between exercise capacity and exercise-induced muscle vasodilation. In a sample of individuals without overt heart disease, exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was associated with heart rate and blood pressure responses during treadmill exercise testing, but was not associated with exercise capacity. These findings suggest that favorable hemodynamic and chronotropic responses are associated with better vasodilator capacity, but exercise capacity does not predict muscle vasodilatation.

  1. Face recognition performance of individuals with Asperger syndrome on the Cambridge Face Memory Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Darren; Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn

    2011-12-01

    Although face recognition deficits in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome (AS), are widely acknowledged, the empirical evidence is mixed. This in part reflects the failure to use standardized and psychometrically sound tests. We contrasted standardized face recognition scores on the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) for 34 individuals with AS with those for 42, IQ-matched non-ASD individuals, and age-standardized scores from a large Australian cohort. We also examined the influence of IQ, autistic traits, and negative affect on face recognition performance. Overall, participants with AS performed significantly worse on the CFMT than the non-ASD participants and when evaluated against standardized test norms. However, while 24% of participants with AS presented with severe face recognition impairment (>2 SDs below the mean), many individuals performed at or above the typical level for their age: 53% scored within +/- 1 SD of the mean and 9% demonstrated superior performance (>1 SD above the mean). Regression analysis provided no evidence that IQ, autistic traits, or negative affect significantly influenced face recognition: diagnostic group membership was the only significant predictor of face recognition performance. In sum, face recognition performance in ASD is on a continuum, but with average levels significantly below non-ASD levels of performance.

  2. Evaluating a Bayesian approach to improve accuracy of individual photographic identification methods using ecological distribution data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stafford

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photographic identification of individual organisms can be possible from natural body markings. Data from photo-ID can be used to estimate important ecological and conservation metrics such as population sizes, home ranges or territories. However, poor quality photographs or less well-studied individuals can result in a non-unique ID, potentially confounding several similar looking individuals. Here we present a Bayesian approach that uses known data about previous sightings of individuals at specific sites as priors to help assess the problems of obtaining a non-unique ID. Using a simulation of individuals with different confidence of correct ID we evaluate the accuracy of Bayesian modified (posterior probabilities. However, in most cases, the accuracy of identification decreases. Although this technique is unsuccessful, it does demonstrate the importance of computer simulations in testing such hypotheses in ecology.

  3. Evaluation of the World Health Organisation' antibody-testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (WHO) antibody testing strategy for the individual patient diagnosis ... antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. The WHO ... evaluated various kits as part of a selection process. The .... Abbott HIV AG-1 Monoclonal Kit (Abbott Diagnostic ..... characterization of an unusual human immunodeficiency retravirus from two persons.

  4. The Evaluation of Diagnostic Tests for Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Chernesky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic tests should receive method- and use-effectiveness evaluations. Method-effectiveness evaluations determine sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for new tests. Use-effectiveness evaluations determine how practical or convenient a new test will be in a specific setting and may not be performed in a formal way in North American laboratories. To perform a clinical method evaluation of diagnostic tests, a good relationship between laboratory and clinical personnel is essential. Studies are usually conducted separately on populations of men and women, and should include sampling from different prevalence groups. Test performance comparisons may be made on a single specimen type or on more than one specimen from the same patient, which allows for the expansion of a reference standard and includes the ability of a particular assay, performed on a specimen type to diagnose an infected individual. The following components of the evaluation should be standardized and carefully followed: specimen identification; collection; transportation; processing; quality control; reading; proficiency testing; confirmatory testing; discordant analysis -- sensitivity, specificity and predictive value calculations; and record keeping. Methods are available to determine whether sample results are true or false positives or negatives. Use-effectiveness evaluations might determine the stability or durability of supplies and equipment; the logistics of shipping, receiving and storing supplies; the clarity and completeness of test instructions; the time and effort required to process and read results; the subjectivity factors in interpretation and reporting; and the costs. These determinations are usually more apparent for commercial assays than for homemade tests.

  5. The evaluation of diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernesky, Max A

    2005-03-01

    Diagnostic tests should receive method- and use-effectiveness evaluations. Method-effectiveness evaluations determine sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for new tests. Use-effectiveness evaluations determine how practical or convenient a new test will be in a specific setting and may not be performed in a formal way in North American laboratories. To perform a clinical method evaluation of diagnostic tests, a good relationship between laboratory and clinical personnel is essential. Studies are usually conducted separately on populations of men and women, and should include sampling from different prevalence groups. Test performance comparisons may be made on a single specimen type or on more than one specimen from the same patient, which allows for the expansion of a reference standard and includes the ability of a particular assay, performed on a specimen type to diagnose an infected individual. The following components of the evaluation should be standardized and carefully followed: specimen identification; collection; transportation; processing; quality control; reading; proficiency testing; confirmatory testing; discordant analysis - sensitivity, specificity and predictive value calculations; and record keeping. Methods are available to determine whether sample results are true or false positives or negatives. Use-effectiveness evaluations might determine the stability or durability of supplies and equipment; the logistics of shipping, receiving and storing supplies; the clarity and completeness of test instructions; the time and effort required to process and read results; the subjectivity factors in interpretation and reporting; and the costs. These determinations are usually more apparent for commercial assays than for homemade tests.

  6. Effort Analysis: Individual Score Validation of Achievement Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Whenever the purpose of measurement is to inform an inference about a student's achievement level, it is important that we be able to trust that the student's test score accurately reflects what that student knows and can do. Such trust requires the assumption that a student's test event is not unduly influenced by construct-irrelevant factors…

  7. Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

    2011-10-01

    The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

  8. Integrated patient and tumor genetic testing for individualized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, D L; McLeod, H L

    2016-02-01

    Tumor genome analysis is transforming cancer treatment by enabling identification of specific oncogenic drivers and selection of effective targeted agents. Meanwhile, patient genome analysis is being employed across therapeutic areas to inform selection of appropriate drugs and doses for treatment safety. Integration of patient genome analysis concurrent with preemptive tumor genetic testing will enable oncologists to make informed treatment decisions to select the right dose of the right drug for each patient and their tumor.

  9. Cognitive Functional Evaluation (CFE) Process for Individuals with Suspected Cognitive Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman-Maeir, Adina; Katz, Noomi; Baum, Carolyn M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the evaluation process for individuals with suspected cognitive disabilities. The Cognitive Functional Evaluation (CFE) process yields a comprehensive profile of the clients' cognitive strengths and weaknesses in occupational performance. The components of the CFE are outlined in six stages as a decision tree with examples of standardized instruments from which to choose the assessments for each client evaluated: (1) interview and background information; (2) cognitive screening and baseline status tests; (3) general measures of cognition and executive functions in occupation; (4) cognitive tests for specific domains; (5) measures of specific cognitive domains in occupations; and (6) environmental assessment. The first three stages are required to ascertain basic cognitive abilities underlying occupational performance. Tests for each stage can be chosen from the ones listed according to the client characteristics and the theory utilized, there is no need to use all of them. Once this data is available a further decision is made whether a more in-depth assessment is needed (stages (4) and (5)). The environmental component is evaluated in all instances with at least one of the assessments. The CFE process for individuals with suspected cognitive disabilities is recommended to be used by occupational therapists as a common ground for evaluation, documentation, and communicating information.

  10. Individual prognosis regarding effectiveness of a therapeutic intervention using pre-therapeutic "kinesiology muscle test".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxenegger, Ingrid; Endler, P Christian; Wulkersdorfer, Beatrix; Spranger, Heinz

    2007-10-22

    Since a therapy's full positive effect and possible adverse effects are individual and not predictable for every single patient, scientists have been searching for methods to predict optimal effects of a therapy. This pilot study investigated the applicability of the "kinesiology muscle test" as a prognostic tool regarding effectiveness in a defined therapeutic procedure. Each of 11 test persons with elevated total cholesterol values received a naturopathic drug supposed to lower cholesterol level on a daily basis for eight consecutive weeks. Prior to treatment the "kinesiology muscle test" was performed, where the patients' ability to maintain a flexed position in a selected joint was evaluated. The resistance created by the patient against the tester's pressure was monitored. Being in touch with healthful or unhealthful chemical substances may, according to the kinesiology literature, increase or decrease this resistance. For testing purposes, the drug was placed onto the patients' skin. The ability of the brachioradial muscle to resist the tester's pressure was determined on a subjective scale (0-100%). The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient between four variables (total cholesterol value before therapy, total cholesterol value after therapy, difference of total cholesterol values before and after therapy, prior to treatment kinesiology testing) was chosen. A significant correlation between the difference of total cholesterol values before-after and the prior to treatment test was found, as well as a significant correlation between the total cholesterol values after therapy and the prior to treatment kinesiology test.

  11. FORMATIVE ADAPTIVE TESTING SERVICE WEB TO INDIVIDUALIZE ELEARNING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOUR-EDDINE El FADDOULI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In most of the existing E-learning systems, the content and the order of activities are presented in a static manner without taking into consideration the learner’s characteristics. Therefore, customizing and adapting the environment to the learner’s profile has shown important improvement in education quality. There are several adaptation approaches of E-learning environments, such as, adaptive hypermedia system, semantic web, etc. In our proposed system (RIMEV, we adopted a Competency Based Approach (CBA, and we found that a welladapted system depends mainly on the adequacy of the information collected through a personal diagnostic. This diagnostic takes place via an adaptive test using the Item Response Theory (IRT in a formative approach. This Intelligent test administers optimal items in an appropriate order in a short time and produces a goodassessment of the learner’s skills with accurate results. Thus the e-learning systems can lead the learner to gradually acquire a skill by taking into account his/her characteristics and predispositions.Concerning the technological aspect, the system is implemented as a composed web service, which calls several basic services that coordinate according to an orchestration plan. This allows interoperability with heterogeneous learning systems.

  12. AN INDIVIDUALIZED APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF CUSHING SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Susmeeta T

    2017-06-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is caused by chronic exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Early recognition and treatment of hypercortisolemia can lead to decreased morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of CS and thereafter, establishing the cause can often be difficult, especially in patients with mild and cyclic hypercortisolism. Surgical excision of the cause of excess glucocorticoids is the optimal treatment for CS. Medical therapy (steroidogenesis inhibitors, medications that decrease adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] levels or glucocorticoid antagonists) and pituitary radiotherapy may be needed as adjunctive treatment modalities in patients with residual, recurrent or metastatic disease, in preparation for surgery, or when surgery is contraindicated. A multidisciplinary team approach, individualized treatment plan and long-term follow-up are important for optimal management of hypercortisolemia and the comorbidities associated with CS. ACTH = adrenocorticotropic hormone; BIPSS = bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling; CBG = corticosteroid-binding globulin; CD = Cushing disease; CRH = corticotropin-releasing hormone; CS = Cushing syndrome; Dex = dexamethasone; DST = dexamethasone suppression test; EAS = ectopic ACTH syndrome; FDA = U.S. Food & Drug Administration; HDDST = high-dose DST; IPS/P = inferior petrosal sinus to peripheral; MRI = magnetic resonance imaging; NET = neuroendocrine tumor; PET = positron emission tomography; UFC = urinary free cortisol.

  13. 49 CFR 1546.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals... Carrier Conducts Screening § 1546.407 Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform... test prescribed by TSA. (f) Knowledge requirements. Each foreign air carrier must ensure...

  14. Evaluation of a new rapid plasma reagin card test as a screening test for syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    This study evaluates the American Dade (Biokit Laboratories) rapid plasma reagin (Dade RPR) card test, currently used in Spain for the diagnosis of syphilis, which has been recently released to the U.S. market. Used as a basis for comparison with the Dade card test were the 18-mm standard rapid plasma reagin (standard RPR) card test and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) slide test, using both fresh sera obtained from 505 individuals and paired serum-plasma specimens from 174 ind...

  15. Data Testing CIELO Evaluations with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, Albert Comstock [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-09

    We review criticality data testing performed at Los Alamos with a combination of ENDF/B-VII.1 + potential CIELO nuclear data evaluations. The goal of CIELO is to develop updated, best available evaluated nuclear data files for 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U and 239Pu. because the major international evaluated nuclear data libraries don’t agree on the internal cross section details of these most important nuclides.

  16. Testing and Evaluation of Multifunctional Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    A smart coating system, based on pH sensitive microcontainers (microparticles and microcapsules) has been developed. Various corrosion inhibitors have been encapsulated and incorporated into commercial and formulated coatings to test the functionality imparted on the coating by the incorporation of the inhibitor microcontainers. Coated carbon steel and aluminum alloy panels were tested using salt immersion, salt fog, and coastal atmospheric exposure conditions. This paper provides the details on coating sample preparation, evaluation methods, as well as test results of the inhibiting function of smart coatings.

  17. Fatigue Sensor Evaluation Program Laboratory Test Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Evaluation Program - laboratory Test Report, " by John Y. Kaufman, Design Engineer, and it was prepared for publication by Sue Bardsley, Technical Aid ...fatigue sensor as an aid to this purpose. The laboratory test effort was based on collection of data from six types of tests and thirty-three...34 ’: « •IIIS ......... li : « rtrtintr : •* M» c f M i H ::::::;:• ;:« ...j . .... ..:. •f’ ::.::::: ^::|:::: n» VH ft;; ** ViH ! * 1 - •• •-•• ; i

  18. Children's cycling skills: Development of a test and determination of individual and environmental correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducheyne, Fabian; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Lenoir, Matthieu; Spittaels, Heleen; Cardon, Greet

    2013-01-01

    Children's ability to perform cycling skills was found to play an important role in cycling accidents. Therefore, this study developed a test to gain a detailed insight into the cycling skills of 9-10 year old children and evaluated individual and physical environmental correlates of cycling skills. Children (n=93) took a cycling test consisting of 13 test stations. In addition, parents completed a questionnaire on school commuting behavior. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to investigate the factor structure of the cycling test and ICC's were calculated to examine interrater reliability. Descriptive statistics were executed on children's cycling skill scores. Regression analyses were conducted to evaluate individual and environmental correlates of cycling skills. Three factors were extracted: the 'during-cycling skills', the 'before/after-cycling skills' and a 'transitional-cycling skills' factor. These factors accounted for 56.74% of the total variance. Furthermore, intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.75 to 0.98. For all cycling skill, except two, 50% of children scored higher than 7.5/10. Additionally, 18.4% of children scored lower than 3/10 on at least two cycling skills. Parental perceived motor competence of the child explained 10% of the variance in cycling skills (β=0.33), residential density explained 12% of the variance (β=-0.37). In order to get an overall picture of the cycling skills of children, the 'during-cycling skills', the 'before/after-cycling skills' and the 'transitional-cycling skills' need to be examined. Furthermore, Flemish children of the 4th grade scored well on cycling skills. However, cycle training programs should focus more on one-handed skills and those children scoring lower than 3/10 on one or more cycling skills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Waste Handling Equipment Devleopment Test and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Tome

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify candidate Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface waste handling equipment for development testing. This study will also identify strategies for performing the development tests. Development testing shall be implemented to support detail design and reduce design risks. Development testing shall be conducted to confirm design concepts, evaluate alternative design concepts, show the availability of needed technology, and provide design documentation. The candidate equipment will be selected from MGR surface waste handling equipment that is the responsibility of the Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) Surface Design Department. The equipment identified in this study is based on Viability Assessment (VA) design. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test and Evaluation Plan'' (MGR T&EP), Reference 5.1, was used as a basis for this study. The MGR T&EP reflects the extent of test planning and analysis that can be conducted, given the current status of the MGR requirements and latest VA design information. The MGR T&EP supports the appropriate sections in the license application (LA) in accordance with 10 CFR 60.2 1(c)(14). The MGR T&EP describes the following test activities: site characterization to confirm, by test and analysis, the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for housing a geologic repository; development testing to investigate and document design concepts to reduce risk; qualification testing to verify equipment compliance with design requirements, specifications, and regulatory requirements; system testing to validate compliance with MGR requirements, which include the receipt, handling, retrieval, and disposal of waste; periodic performance testing to verify preclosure requirements and to demonstrate safe and reliable MGR operation; and performance confirmation modeling, testing, and analysis to verify adherence to postclosure regulatory requirements. Development test activities can be

  20. CMOS test and evaluation a physical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Manjul

    2015-01-01

    This book extends test structure applications described in Microelectronic Test Struc­tures for CMOS Technology (Springer 2011) to digital CMOS product chips. Intended for engineering students and professionals, this book provides a single comprehensive source for evaluating CMOS technology and product test data from a basic knowledge of the physical behavior of the constituent components. Elementary circuits that exhibit key properties of complex CMOS chips are simulated and analyzed, and an integrated view of design, test and characterization is developed. Appropriately designed circuit monitors embedded in the CMOS chip serve to correlate CMOS technology models and circuit design tools to the hardware and also aid in test debug. Impact of silicon process variability, reliability, and power and performance sensitivities to a range of product application conditions are described. Circuit simulations exemplify the methodologies presented, and problems are included at the end of the chapters.

  1. Interbull validation test for genomic evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic evaluations (GEBV) can be validated by comparing GEBVs of bulls in the youngest age classes to the daughter yield deviations (DYD) that the bulls will receive later. The GEBV are calculated from truncated data where the last four years of phenotypic data are removed. The test consists of w...

  2. Power Evaluation of Focused Cluster Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Rc; Lawson, Ab; Clark, Ab; Hebert, Jr; Kulldorff, M

    2010-09-01

    Many statistical tests have been developed to assess the significance of clusters of disease located around known sources of environmental contaminants, also known as focused disease clusters. The majority of focused-cluster tests were designed to detect a particular spatial pattern of clustering, one in which the disease cluster centers around the pollution source and declines in a radial fashion with distance. However, other spatial patterns of environmentally related disease clusters are likely given that the spatial dispersion patterns of environmental contaminants, and thus human exposure, depend on a number of factors (i.e., meteorology and topography). For this study, data were simulated with five different spatial patterns of disease clusters, reflecting potential pollutant dispersion scenarios: 1) a radial effect decreasing with increasing distance, 2) a radial effect with a defined peak and decreasing with distance, 3) a simple angular effect, 4) an angular effect decreasing with increasing distance and 5) an angular effect with a defined peak and decreasing with distance. The power to detect each type of spatially distributed disease cluster was evaluated using Stone's Maximum Likelihood Ratio Test, Tango's Focused Test, Bithell's Linear Risk Score Test, and variations of the Lawson-Waller Score Test. Study findings underscore the importance of considering environmental contaminant dispersion patterns, particularly directional effects, with respect to focused-cluster test selection in cluster investigations. The effect of extra variation in risk also is considered, although its effect is not substantial in terms of the power of tests.

  3. Patch testing with a new fragrance mix - reactivity to the individual constituents and chemical detection in relevant cosmetic products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosch, Peter J; Rastogi, Suresh C; Pirker, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    A new fragrance mix (FM II), with 6 frequently used chemicals not present in the currently used fragrance mix (FM I), was evaluated in 6 dermatological centres in Europe, as previously reported. In this publication, test results with the individual constituents and after repeated open application...

  4. Accuracy of individual rapid tests for serodiagnosis of gambiense sleeping sickness in West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Jamonneau

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Individual rapid tests for serodiagnosis (RDT of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT are particularly suited for passive screening and surveillance. However, so far, no large scale evaluation of RDTs has been performed for diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT in West Africa. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 2 commercial HAT-RDTs on stored plasma samples from West Africa.SD Bioline HAT and HAT Sero-K-Set were performed on 722 plasma samples originating from Guinea and Côte d'Ivoire, including 231 parasitologically confirmed HAT patients, 257 healthy controls, and 234 unconfirmed individuals whose blood tested antibody positive in the card agglutination test but negative by parasitological tests. Immune trypanolysis was performed as a reference test for trypanosome specific antibody presence. Sensitivities in HAT patients were respectively 99.6% for SD Bioline HAT, and 99.1% for HAT Sero-K-Set, specificities in healthy controls were respectively 87.9% and 88.3%. Considering combined positivity in both RDTs, increased the specificity significantly (p ≤ 0.0003 to 93.4%, while 98.7% sensitivity was maintained. Specificities in controls were 98.7-99.6% for the combination of one or two RDTs with trypanolysis, maintaining a sensitivity of at least 98.1%.The observed specificity of the single RDTs was relatively low. Serial application of SD Bioline HAT and HAT Sero-K-Set might offer superior specificity compared to a single RDT, maintaining high sensitivity. The combination of one or two RDTs with trypanolysis seems promising for HAT surveillance.

  5. Predicted values of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in healthy individuals (a pilot study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Majid Malek; Dadashpour, Shahdak; Adimi, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing evaluates the ability of one's cardiovascular and respiratory system in maximal exercise. This was a descriptive cross-sectional pilot study conducted at Masih Daneshvari Hospital in order to determine predicted values of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in individuals with normal physical activity patterns. Thirty four individuals (14 women, 20 men) between 18-57 years of age were chosen using simple sampling method and evaluated with an incremental progressive cycle-ergometer test to a symptom-limited maximal tolerable work load. Subjects with a history of ischemic heart disease, pulmonary disease or neuromuscular disease were excluded from the study. Smokers were included but we made sure that all subjects had normal FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. This study aimed to compare measured values of VO2, VCO2, VO2/Kg, RER, O2pulse, HRR, HR, Load, Ant, BF, BR, VE, EQCO2, and EQO2 with previously published predicted values. We found that our obtained values for VO2 max, HRR max and HR max were different from standard tables but such difference was not observed for other understudy variables. Multiple linear regression analysis was done for height, weight and age (due to the small number of samples, no difference was detected between males and females). VO2 max and load max had reverse correlation with age and direct correlation with weight and height (P < 0.05) but the greatest correlation was observed for height. Due to the small number of samples and poor correlations it was not possible to do regression analysis for other variables. In the next study with a larger sample size predicted values for all variables will be calculated. If the future study also indicates a significant difference between the predicted values and the reference values, we will need standard tables made specifically for our own country, Iran.

  6. Hydrogen and methane breath tests for evaluation of resistant carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    This review considers in detail the background, principles, techniques, limitations and advantages of the hydrogen and methane breath tests. Resistant food carbohydrates, defined as dietary carbohydrates partly or totally escaping small intestinal assimilation, are fermented in the human colon...... carbohydrates. Methane breath tests may supplement the information gained from hydrogen measurements, but further evaluations are needed. The hydrogen breath technique is rapid, simple and non-invasive as well as non-radioactive. It may be carried out in a large number of intact individuals under physiological...

  7. 25th Test and Evaluation National Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-05

    Auditory Displays Tactile / Haptic Displays Input Devices & Controls State Dependent Design Human Factors Engineering Taxonomy Visual and Auditory...Charles McQueary, Director, Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E) ROUNDTABLE : REALITIES FACING THE WORLD OF DEFENSE AND HOMELAND SECURITY T&E...aM roundtable: realitieS facing the World of defenSe and homeland Security t&e Moderator: Maj Gen Steve Sargeant, USAF, Commander AFOTEC MG

  8. Individually Guided Education (IGE) Program. 1973-1974 Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    This report presents data gathered during the 1973-74 school year on the Austin Independent School District (Austin, Texas) implementation of the Individually Guided Education Program (IGE). Classroom observation indicates on the whole that the 11 schools identified as IGE exhibit greater degrees of implementation of characteristics associated…

  9. Patch test dose-response study: polysensitized individuals do not express lower elicitation thresholds than single/double-sensitized individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, B C; Fischer, L A; Sosted, H; Vølund, A; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2009-01-01

    It is not known if reduced elicitation thresholds are evident among polysensitized individuals when using allergens to which the patients are already sensitized. Reduced elicitation thresholds may be an expression of increased reactivity in this patient group. To examine and compare elicitation dose-response curves and elicitation thresholds in a polysensitized vs. a single/double-sensitized group for allergens to which the test subjects were already sensitized. Fifty-one patients (13 polysensitized and 38 single/double-sensitized) were patch tested with nickel sulphate, methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDBGN) and p-phenylenediamine (PPD) in dilution series. The ratio between the doses eliciting a response in 50% of patients in the two groups was used as the measure for relative sensitivity. The dose-response curves of the polysensitized group for MDBGN and PPD were shifted to the right, and for nickel sulphate shifted to the left, compared with the single/double-sensitized group. The relative sensitivity for each of the three allergens and a combined relative sensitivity for all three allergens were not significantly different when comparing the polysensitized and single/double-sensitized groups. No increased sensitivity, in the form of distinct elicitation thresholds, could be demonstrated in polysensitized individuals compared with individuals with one or two contact allergies.

  10. The Fragility of Individual-Based Explanations of Social Hierarchies: A Test Using Animal Pecking Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Ivan D; Lindquist, W Brent

    2016-01-01

    The standard approach in accounting for hierarchical differentiation in biology and the social sciences considers a hierarchy as a static distribution of individuals possessing differing amounts of some valued commodity, assumes that the hierarchy is generated by micro-level processes involving individuals, and attempts to reverse engineer the processes that produced the hierarchy. However, sufficient experimental and analytical results are available to evaluate this standard approach in the case of animal dominance hierarchies (pecking orders). Our evaluation using evidence from hierarchy formation in small groups of both hens and cichlid fish reveals significant deficiencies in the three tenets of the standard approach in accounting for the organization of dominance hierarchies. In consequence, we suggest that a new approach is needed to explain the organization of pecking orders and, very possibly, by implication, for other kinds of social hierarchies. We develop an example of such an approach that considers dominance hierarchies to be dynamic networks, uses dynamic sequences of interaction (dynamic network motifs) to explain the organization of dominance hierarchies, and derives these dynamic sequences directly from observation of hierarchy formation. We test this dynamical explanation using computer simulation and find a good fit with actual dynamics of hierarchy formation in small groups of hens. We hypothesize that the same dynamic sequences are used in small groups of many other animal species forming pecking orders, and we discuss the data required to evaluate our hypothesis. Finally, we briefly consider how our dynamic approach may be generalized to other kinds of social hierarchies using the example of the distribution of empty gastropod (snail) shells occupied in populations of hermit crabs.

  11. The Fragility of Individual-Based Explanations of Social Hierarchies: A Test Using Animal Pecking Orders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan D Chase

    Full Text Available The standard approach in accounting for hierarchical differentiation in biology and the social sciences considers a hierarchy as a static distribution of individuals possessing differing amounts of some valued commodity, assumes that the hierarchy is generated by micro-level processes involving individuals, and attempts to reverse engineer the processes that produced the hierarchy. However, sufficient experimental and analytical results are available to evaluate this standard approach in the case of animal dominance hierarchies (pecking orders. Our evaluation using evidence from hierarchy formation in small groups of both hens and cichlid fish reveals significant deficiencies in the three tenets of the standard approach in accounting for the organization of dominance hierarchies. In consequence, we suggest that a new approach is needed to explain the organization of pecking orders and, very possibly, by implication, for other kinds of social hierarchies. We develop an example of such an approach that considers dominance hierarchies to be dynamic networks, uses dynamic sequences of interaction (dynamic network motifs to explain the organization of dominance hierarchies, and derives these dynamic sequences directly from observation of hierarchy formation. We test this dynamical explanation using computer simulation and find a good fit with actual dynamics of hierarchy formation in small groups of hens. We hypothesize that the same dynamic sequences are used in small groups of many other animal species forming pecking orders, and we discuss the data required to evaluate our hypothesis. Finally, we briefly consider how our dynamic approach may be generalized to other kinds of social hierarchies using the example of the distribution of empty gastropod (snail shells occupied in populations of hermit crabs.

  12. 49 CFR 1544.407 - Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals who perform screening functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training, testing, and knowledge of individuals... Qualifications When the Aircraft Operator Performs Screening § 1544.407 Training, testing, and knowledge of... on-the-job training test prescribed by TSA. (f) Knowledge requirements. Each aircraft operator...

  13. [Neuropad test in evaluation of diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieru, Alexandra; Niţă, Otilia; Graur, Lidia Iuliana; Mazilu, Georgiana; Mihalache, Laura; Popescu, Raluca Maria; Graur, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the main cause of foot ulceration. One of the earliest modifications is the loss of normal sudomotor function, a sign of autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study is to evaluate sudomotor dysfunction using a new tool (Neuropad) in diabetic patients with foot ulceration. We included 58 diabetic patients with foot ulceration admitted in 2010 in the Clinical Center for Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases. We collected data regarding age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), history of amputations and duration of hospital admission. Peripheral neuropathy was evaluated through the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) and autonomic neuropathy was tested through Neuropad. 95% of patients had NDS > or = 6, among which 76% had also positive Neuropad test. Patients with both peripheral and autonomic neuropathy had longer duration of diabetes (p = 0.027) but similar HbA1c as patients with only peripheral neuropathy (p = 0.09). The former also had longer duration of current admission (p = 0.022) and a higher percentage of these patients had history of amputations (p = 0.041). Neuropad is a reliable, easy to use test for the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy, which puts patients at greater risk for foot ulceration and amputation.

  14. Applicability of slug interference tests under Hanford Site test conditions: Analytical assessment and field test evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Slug interference testing may be a useful technique for characterizing the hydraulic properties of high conductivity formations where problems associated with disposal of contaminated ground water make pumping tests undesirable. The suitability of the slug interference method for characterizing the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site was evaluated in a two-phase investigation. The first phase consisted of an analytical assessment. Slug interference responses were predicted over the range of conditions expected for the aquifer. The effects of partial penetration, delayed-yield and aquifer anisotropy on expected test results were also evaluated and possible analytical corrections are presented. The field test evaluation was conducted at a site with two observation wells and a stress well. Results verified the analytical evaluation and gave reasonable values of hydraulic conductivity and storativity. Test design considerations that optimize the observed response are discussed.

  15. Planning and Logistics Issues raised by the Individual System Tests during the Installation of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, S; Foraz, K; Rodríguez-Mateos, F

    2006-01-01

    The running of individual system tests has to fit within tight constraints of the LHC installation planning and of CERN's accelerator activity in general. For instance, the short circuit tests of the power converters that are performed in-situ restrict the possibility to work in neighbouring areas; much in the same way, the cold tests of the cryogenic distribution line involve safety access restrictions that are not compatible with the transport and installation of cryo-magnets or interconnect activities in the sector considered. Still, these individual system tests correspond to milestones that are required to insure that we can continue with the installation of machine elements. This paper reviews the conditions required to perform the individual system tests and describe how the general LHC installation planning is organised to allocate periods for these tests.

  16. Hydraulic test for evaluation of hydrophone VSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Koide, Kaoru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Toki, Gifu (Japan). Tono Geoscience Center

    1997-12-01

    This hydraulic test was carried out at the test site of Tono Geoscience Center, Mizunami-shi, Gifu Pref. in order to evaluate the reliability of the hydraulic conductivity estimated from hydrophone VSP experiment. From March to April 1997, we carried out measurements of pore-water pressure at five depths and permeability tests at seven depths down to G.L.-300m, within a borehole drilled in granitic rock. We compared the results of hydraulic test with hydrophone VSP experiment on condition that a single open fracture existed, and we obtained two notable results. First, for the granitic rock at which a single open fracture was found by BTV and also detected by hydrophone VSP experiment, the hydraulic conductivity was 1.54 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec, while for the same granitic rock at which another single open fracture was found by BTV but not detected by hydrophone VSP experiment, the hydraulic conductivity was less than 6 x 10{sup -10} cm/sec. Second, we converted the hydraulic conductivity of 1.54 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec which was obtained in a hydraulic test section of length 2.5 m into an equivalent value for a single open fracture of width 1 mm. The converted value (3.8 x 10{sup -4} cm/sec) was similar to the hydraulic conductivity estimated from hydrophone VSP experiment. In conclusion, the hydraulic test result shows that hydrophone VSP is useful to estimate an approximate hydraulic conductivity of a single open fracture. (author)

  17. Risk evaluation methods at individual ship and company level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Heij (Christiaan); S. Knapp (Sabine)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSafety management and risk profiling to identify substandard ships are of importance to the shipping industry. Whereas current methods rely heavily on detention risk and flag state performance, we extend the risk assessment by considering various risk dimensions and by evaluating a wide

  18. Development and evaluation of the herd dynamic milk model with focus on the individual cow component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelle, E; Delaby, L; Wallace, M; Shalloo, L

    2016-12-01

    The herd dynamic milk (HDM) model is a dynamic model capable of simulating the performance of individual dairy animals (from birth to death), with a daily time step. Within this study, the HDM model is described and evaluated in relation to milk production, body condition score (BCS) and BCS change throughout lactation by comparing model simulations against data from published experimental studies. The model's response to variation in genetic potential, herbage allowance and concentrate supplementation was tested in a sensitivity analysis. Data from experiments in Ireland and France over a 3-year period (2009-11) were used to complete the evaluation. The aim of the Irish experiment was to determine the impact of different stocking rates (SRs) (SR1: 3.28 cow/ha, SR2: 2.51 cow/ha) on key physical, biological and economic performance. The aim of the French experiment was to evaluate over a prolonged time period, the ability of two breeds of dairy cows (Holstein and Normande) to produce and to reproduce under two feeding strategies (high level and low level) in the context of compact calving. The model evaluation was conducted at the herd level with separate evaluations for the primiparous and multiparous cows. The evaluation included the two extreme SRs for the Irish experiment, and an evaluation at the overall herd and individual animal level for the different breeds and feeding levels for the French data. The comparison of simulation and experimental data for all scenarios resulted in a relative prediction error, which was consistently model responded in a realistic fashion to variation in genetic potential for milk production, herbage allowance and concentrate supplementation.

  19. Cross-National Logo Evaluation Analysis: An Individual Level Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.A. van der Lans (Ralf); J.A. Cote (Joseph); C.A. Cole (Catherine); S.M. Leong (Siew Meng); A. Smidts (Ale); P.W. Henderson (Pamela); C. Bluemelhuber (Christian); P.A. Bottomley (Paul); J.R. Doyle (John); A.S. Fedorikhin (Alexander); M. Janakiraman (M.); B. Ramaseshan (Balasubramanian); B.H. Schmitt (Bernd)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe universality of design perception and response is tested using data collected from ten countries: Argentina, Australia, China, Germany, Great Britain, India, the Netherlands, Russia, Singapore, and the United States. A Bayesian, finite-mixture, structural-equation model is developed

  20. The role of cardiopulmonary exercise test for individualized exercise training recommendation in young obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hoble

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is affecting a growing segment of the population and should be considered a serious health problem which will lead to medical complications and decreased life span. Lifestyle changes by adopting healthy food and increase energy consumption through physical activity is the most important treatment for obesity. Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is considered the gold standard for exercise capacity assessment. Purpose: This study is aiming to demonstrate that individualized exercise training programs, designed using CPET results, leads to increase of physical fitness, aerobic capacity, ventilatory and cardiac exercise performance in young obese subjects.Material and method:We performed a prospective research study of 6 months. 43 sedentary subjects without contraindications to exercise, 21.3±3.1 years old, 93% female were included in the study. Assessments were made at baseline and after six months of intervention and consists of cardiopulmonary exercise test on bicycle ergometer. After we recorded oxygen uptake at aerobic threshold (AT, anaerobic threshold (in the range of respiratory compensation point – RCP and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max we designed the training program according to these parameters and individualized heart rate training zones of each subject. Exercise training (60 minutes/session, 3 sessions/week was performed taking in consideration the training zones and using a circuit on cardio devices. Each subject was supervised by a physiotherapist and using heart rate monitors. The number of subjects evaluated at the end of the study was 27 (dropout rate 37%.Results:After six months of intervention we noticed an improvement of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max (from 22.7±3.69 to 27.44±5.55, aerobic threshold (VO2_AT (from 15.48±2.66 to 20.07±4.64 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001 and anaerobic threshold (VO2_RCP (from 20.3±3.66 to 25.11±5.84 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001, cardiac performance during exercise evaluated trough maximal oxygen

  1. Normative values for the Timed 'Up and Go' test in children and adolescents and validation for individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini-Panisson, Renata D'Agostini; Donadio, Márcio V F

    2014-05-01

    To determine normative values for the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test in typically developing children and adolescents and to validate its use in individuals with Down syndrome. Participants in this cross-sectional study were South Brazilian schoolchildren aged 3 to 18 years. In phase 1, 459 typically developing individuals (227 males, 232 females; mean age 10 y 8 mo (SD 4 y 4 mo) were included; and in phase 2, 40 individuals with Down syndrome (16 males, 24 females; mean age 10 y 6 mo (SD 4 y 4 mo). Anthropometric measurements, real leg length, TUG test scores, and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) scores were evaluated. The association between the TUG test and possible predictive variables was analyzed. In phase 1, the mean time to perform the TUG test was 5.61 seconds (SD 1.06). Values were stratified in age groups that served as normative data for both sexes. A multiple linear regression analysis was conducted and the best variables to predict TUG scores were age and weight. The best model obtained presented an R(2) of 0.25 and a standard error of the estimate of 0.92. Excellent intrasession reliability in the three tests performed (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] of 0.93, 0.94, and 0.95) and between the sessions (both with an ICC of 0.95) was demonstrated. In phase 2, the test also showed excellent reproducibility (ICC=0.82 between the two tests performed). The performance time was significantly longer (ptest. This study provides normative values for the TUG test and shows that TUG scores can be predicted as a function of age and weight in typically developing individuals. The test can also be used for assessment of functional mobility in individuals with Down syndrome. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  2. Barriers to HIV testing in Cote d'Ivoire: the role of individual characteristics and testing modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kévin Jean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expanding HIV testing requires a better understanding of barriers to its uptake. We investigated barriers to HIV testing in Côte d'Ivoire, taking into account test circumstances (client vs. provider-initiated. METHODS: We used data from the 2005 nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey conducted in Côte d'Ivoire. Socio-demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS associated with recent (<2 years HIV testing were identified using gender-specific univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Among women, differential effects of barriers to testing according to test circumstance (whether they have been offered for a prenatal test or not were assessed through interaction tests. RESULTS: Recent HIV testing was reported by 6.1% of men and 9.5% of women (including 4.6% as part of antenatal care. Among men, having a low socioeconomic status, having a low HIV-related knowledge level and being employed [compared to those inactive: adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.25-0.87] were associated with lower proportions of recent HIV testing. Among women without a prenatal HIV testing offer, living outside the capital (aOR 0.38; CI 0.19-0.77 and reporting a unique lifetime sexual partner constituted additional barriers to HIV testing. By contrast, among women recently offered to be tested in prenatal care, none of these variables was found to be associated with recent HIV testing. CONCLUSIONS: Various dimensions of individuals' characteristics constituted significant barriers to HIV testing in Côte d'Ivoire in 2005, with gender specificities. Such barriers are substantially reduced when testing was proposed in the framework of antenatal care. This suggests that provider-initiated testing strategies may help overcome individual barriers to HIV testing.

  3. Criteria evaluation for cleanliness testing phase 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meltzer, Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Koester, Carolyn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stefanni, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-04

    The Boeing Company (Boeing) contracted with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop criteria for evaluating the efficacy of its parts cleaning processes. In particular, LLNL and Boeing are attempting to identify levels of contamination that lead to parts failures. Sufficient contamination to cause impairment of anodizing, alodining, painting, or welding operations is considered a "part failure." In the "Phase 0" part of the project that was recently completed, preliminary analyses of aluminum substrates were performed as a first step in determining suitable cleanliness criteria for actual Boeing parts made from this material. A wide spread of contamination levels was specified for the Phase 0 test coupons, in the hopes of finding a range in which an appropriate cleanliness specification might lie. It was planned that, based on the results of the Phase 0 testing, further more detailed analyses ("Phase 1 testing") would be performed in order to more accurately identify the most appropriate criteria. For the Phase 0 testing, Boeing supplied LLNL with 3" x 6" and 3" x 10" aluminum test panels which LLNL contaminated with measured amounts of typical hydrocarbon substances encountered in Boeing' s fabrication operations. The panels were then subjected by Boeing to normal cleaning procedures, after which they went through one of the following sets of operations: l anodizing and primer painting . alodining (chromating) and primer painting l welding The coatings or welds were then examined by both Boeing and LLNL to determine whether any of the operations were impaired, and whether there was a correlation between contamination level and damage to the parts. The experimental approach and results are described in detail.

  4. Electromyographic evaluation of mastication and swallowing in elderly individuals with mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giédre Berretin-Felix

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the mandible on the electromyographic activity during mastication and swallowing in edentulous elderly individuals. Fifteen patients aged more than 60 years were evaluated, being 10 females and 5 males. All patients were edentulous, wore removable complete dentures on both dental arches, and had the mandibular dentures replaced by implant-supported prostheses. All patients were submitted to electromyographic evaluation of the masseter, superior orbicularis oris muscles, and the submental muscles, before surgery and 3, 6 and 18 months postoperatively, using foods of different textures. The results obtained at the different periods were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Statistical analysis showed that only the masseter muscle had a significant loss in electromyographic activity (p<0.001, with a tendency of similar response for the submental muscles. Moreover, there was an increase in the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during rubber chewing after treatment, yet without statistically significant difference. Mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses in elderly individuals revealed a decrease in electromyographic amplitude for the masseter muscles during swallowing, which may indicate adaptation to new conditions of stability provided by fixation of the complete denture in the mandibular arch.

  5. The Cognitive Evaluation of Elderly Individuals in Family Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Family Health Centers serve elderly people with a variety of health problems. Family physicians frequently encounter patients with cognitive problems during home visits or outpatient examinations. The view of accompanying person is sought to establish communication and to manage health problems appropriately. Dementia and delirium are common reasons for cognitive problems. During screening of dementia one or more cognitive domains are examined. The Mini Mental State Examination scale should be utilized and family physicians should establish a geriatric assessment if time is available. The Elderly Friendly Family Health Center Instrument is an appropriate tool for home visits and outpatient office and delirium or dementia should be ruled out after examination. Further evaluation needed to be initiated after scoring positive for dementia and delirium. The second part of the Elderly Friendly Family Health Center Instrument should be recommended for this step.

  6. Evaluation of the lipid profile between individuals with hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Tita Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiles correlate with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and are prognostic for the viral response. However, little is known about the association between lipid profiles and viral load in chronic patients carrying HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the viremia and viral genotype on lipid metabolism by observing the variations in serum lipoprotein and apolipoprotein B, to assess whether HCV predisposes individuals to lipid imbalance and favors the appearance of vascular complications. A sample group of 150 chronic HCV patients with viral genotypes 1, 2 or 3 and a control group of 20 healthy adults (10 men and 10 women, all aged from 20 to 50 years were studied. The serum lipid profile of the chronic patients was analyzed and compared to that of the control group. The highdensity lipoprotein (HDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and triglyceride levels of the sample group were lower than those of the control group, while the low-density lipoprotein (LDL and apolipoprotein B levels of the patients were higher. These differences were more significant in patients carrying genotype 3a. There was a positive correlation between the viremia and the changes in apolipoprotein B levels in patients carrying genotype 1b. It was inferred that the risk of developing vascular complications raised in HCV patients. As 90% of LDL protein is composed of apolipoprotein B, the plasmatic concentration of the latter indicates the number of potentially atherogenic particles. Therefore, the lipid profile monitoring may aid in the diagnosis of hepatic infection severity and equally act as a good prognostic marker.

  7. Cognitive evaluation of patients with glaucoma and its comparison with individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurano, Stephanie Toledo Piza; da Silva, Delson José; Ávila, Marcos P; Magacho, Leopoldo

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the cognitive performance of patients with glaucoma and compare it to individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This is a prospective, cross-sectional and case-control study. All subjects were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and its subtests verbal fluency, word list memory, delayed recall of the word list, word list recognition test, Boston naming and constructive praxis from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD). The results were compared among the groups. A total of 50 healthy elderly with a mean age of 71.2 ± 5.2 years; 41 patients with glaucoma (72.2 ± 4.4 years); and 21 patients with AD (79.0 ± 7.6 years) were included. There was a reduction in all cognitive assessment tests evaluated, both for patients with glaucoma, and for those with AD compared with controls (p < 0.001 for all). Comparing the patients with glaucoma and AD, it was noted that the last had lower cognitive function (p < 0.001), except for the CERAD tests Boston (p = 0.1) and praxis (p = 0.6). Glaucoma patients, however, presented results of cognitive tests similar to those described for patients with mild AD, including lower values for MMSE (21.9 ± 3.7), Boston (10.6 ± 2.6) and praxis (5.9 ± 2.3). Glaucoma patients had reduction in cognition when compared to normal individuals. They were similar to the values reported in the literature for patients with mild AD, mostly, and also in some subjects with the presence of advanced AD.

  8. The diagnostic testing as means of exposure of students' individual peculiarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ирина Михайловна Жаворонкова

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article they offer a test methodology of the investigation of students' intellectual and creative abilities. There is a test of different types of tasks verbal not verbal and numerical. A strong attention is paid to the necessity to take into consideration all the individual peculiarities during the learning process.

  9. On the Interchangeability of Individually Administered and Group Administered Ability Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Baruch; Sela, Roni

    2003-01-01

    This research studied the interchangeability of individually administered and group administered cognitive tests. Seventy undergraduate students took the Hebrew version of the WAIS-R (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised), and their IQs were measured. They also took the IPET (Israeli Psychometric Entrance Test) and their IPET scores were…

  10. SuperTools Test and Evaluation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannos, Tom J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mixed Signal ASIC Design

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting electronics (SCE) represents a potential path to efficient exascale computing for HPC and data center applications, but SCE-based circuit design lags far behind its CMOS equivalent. IARPA’s ongoing C3 program and its developing SuperTools program aim to jumpstart SCE R&D with the near-term goal of producing a high-speed, low-energy, 64-bit RISC processor using Josephson Junction based logic cells. SuperTools performers will develop software tools for efficient SCE design and accurate simulation and characterization of JJ-based circuits, which include the RSFQ, RQL, and AQFP logic families. T&E teams from NIST, MIT Lincoln Lab, Berkeley Lab, and Sandia National Labs will evaluate the tools and fabricate test circuits to compare with simulated results. The five-year, three-phase program includes 48 performer deliverables, three annual technical exchange meetings, and annual site visits.

  11. Audiologic and otoacoustic emission evaluation in individuals exposed to noise and plaguecides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morini, Renata Graziele

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The noise induced hearing loss (NIHL has been studied for many years and today the specialized literature also studies the synergic action of chemicals. Objective: To research the audiologic findings and DPOAE in workers exposed to occupational noise and plaguecides and to compare them with data obtained in individuals without exposure to these harmful elements. Method: 51 individuals were evaluated (102 ears, divided into three groups. Group I was composed by 17 workers with exposure to noise and plaguecides, all with neurosensorial auditory loss; group II was composed by 17 workers with exposure to noise and plaguecides with audiometric thresholds within normality standards (up to 25 dBNA and group III by 17 healthy individuals without auditory alterations and without exposure to noise and plaguecides, control group. Results: In the audiologic anamnesis, as for groups I and II, we observed that the main auditory complaints presented by the workers were those of recruitment (29.5%, tinnitus (26.5%, allergy (23.5% and arterial hypertension (12%. The findings of the audiometry appointed that the research's individuals did not present with auditory losses in the frequencies of 500 Hz, 1 and 2 kHz, the losses occurred in the frequencies of 3 and 8 kHz. As for the distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs, we observed that the individuals in group III had a major incidence of responses when compared to those of groups I and II. Conclusion: The results analysis allowed us to conclude that the DPOAE test represents an important tool for follow up and prevention of NIHL.

  12. A Dutch Achievement Testing Program for Guidance and Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnstra, Johan M.

    1984-01-01

    The Eindtoets Basisonderwijs (final primary school test) is a Dutch national achievement test taken annually by 90,000 pupils. This article overviews the Dutch educational system and describes this testing program, emphasizing test equating methods. Evaluation findings from 1980 and resulting changes in test content and evaluation reports are also…

  13. Test and evaluation capabilities at NAVELEXCEN Charleston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalvey, T.W.; Anderson, G.B.; Hinson, T.L. [Naval Electronic Systems Engineering Center, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Systems and Instrumentation Engineering Department is located within the Special Programs Directorate of the Naval Electronic Systems Engineering Center (NAVELEXCEN Charleston). This Center is an echelon 4 Command under the Naval Command Control and Ocean Surveillance Center, San Diego (NCCOSC). NCCOSC is an echelon 3 Command under the Space and Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) which is located in Washington DC. Radiation Detection, Indication and Computation (RDIAC) equipment life-cycle management for the entire Navy falls under the auspices of the Naval Sea Systems Command (SEA 04R). The RADIAC Program provides centralized management for the execution of research, development, test, evaluation, maintenance, procurement, allowance, and equipment support for all Navy RADIAC instrumentation and assigned special monitoring equipments. RADIAC equipment is used throughout the Navy to support various functions associated with radioactivity, potential contamination, and personnel exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. Common sources in today`s Navy include nuclear reactors, nuclear weapons, industrial radiography, and nuclear medicine. Types of radiation includes gamma, x-ray, alpha, and beta.

  14. Finds in Testing Experiments for Model Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ji; JIA Xiaoxia; LIU Chang; YANG Haiyan; LIU Chao

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the fault location and the failure prediction models, simulation-based and code-based experiments were conducted to collect the required failure data. The PIE model was applied to simulate failures in the simulation-based experiment. Based on syntax and semantic level fault injections, a hybrid fault injection model is presented. To analyze the injected faults, the difficulty to inject (DTI) and difficulty to detect (DTD) are introduced and are measured from the programs used in the code-based experiment. Three interesting results were obtained from the experiments: 1) Failures simulated by the PIE model without consideration of the program and testing features are unreliably predicted; 2) There is no obvious correlation between the DTI and DTD parameters; 3) The DTD for syntax level faults changes in a different pattern to that for semantic level faults when the DTI increases. The results show that the parameters have a strong effect on the failures simulated, and the measurement of DTD is not strict.

  15. Development and psychometric testing of a barriers to HIV testing scale among individuals with HIV infection in Sweden; The Barriers to HIV testing scale-Karolinska version

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiklander et al. Background: Barriers to HIV testing experienced by individuals at risk for HIV can result in treatment delay and further transmission of the disease. Instruments to systematically measure barriers are scarce, but could contribute to improved strategies for HIV testing. Aims of this study were to develop and test a barriers to HIV testing scale in a Swedish context. Methods: An 18-item scale was developed, based on an existing scale with addition of six new it...

  16. The evaluation of diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections

    OpenAIRE

    Chernesky, Max A.

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic tests should receive method- and use-effectiveness evaluations. Method-effectiveness evaluations determine sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for new tests. Use-effectiveness evaluations determine how practical or convenient a new test will be in a specific setting and may not be performed in a formal way in North American laboratories. To perform a clinical method evaluation of diagnostic tests, a good relationship between laboratory and clinical personnel is essential...

  17. Individual electrical conductivity test for the assessment of soybean seed germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Matheus Mattioni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Soybean seed quality is affected by many factors, which may occur during the production, processing, and storage phases. To ensure the quality of seeds, the adoption of fast and efficient methods to estimate seed viability in quality control programs is important. This study aimed to determine a partition point of the individual electrical conductivity test to predict soybean seed germination. Three lots each of five different soybean cultivars (Fundacep 57 RR, BMX Potência RR, BMX Força RR, BMX Turbo RR, and Nidera 7321 RG were used. Seed quality was assessed through the mass of 1,000 seeds (MTS, moisture content (MC, germination test (G, bulk electrical conductivity (BEC, individual electrical conductivity (IEC, accelerated ageing (AA, and field seedling emergence (FSE. To determine a partition point in the IEC test for predicting germination, seeds were subjected to the germination test in the same position used for the IEC test. The accuracy of the partition point was tested by comparing predicted germination with the standard germination test. The partition point obtained for normal seeds was 130 ?S .cm-1.seed-1. The IEC test, however, had limitations in predicting soybean seed germination. The data for predicted germination were different from those obtained by the standard test, because the characteristics of each lot led to differences in the electrical conductivity values.

  18. Group discussions and test-enhanced learning: individual learning outcomes and personality characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik; Jonsson, Bert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N?=?98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions benefit learning when compared to test-enhanced learning over time. The results showed that feedback does not seem to have any effect if provid...

  19. 30 CFR 15.3 - Observers at tests and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Observers at tests and evaluation. 15.3 Section 15.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION... General Provisions § 15.3 Observers at tests and evaluation. Only personnel of MSHA, designees of...

  20. Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT) performance of individuals with central auditory processing disorders from 5 to 25 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Karin Ziliotto; Jutras, Benoît; Acrani, Isabela Olszanski; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo

    2012-02-01

    other reduced capacities might influence their performance. Also, Random Gap Detection Test assesses a specific auditory ability, different than the one evaluated with the other auditory tests. Finally, it is suggested to test individuals at only one frequency of the Random Gap Detection Test because results provide similar information than when assessing them on all subtests. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Evaluation of hearing aid rehabilitation using the Freiburg Monosyllabic Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, U

    2016-08-01

    The benefit of hearing aids is not always directly subjectively perceivable. Therefore, objective and quantifiable speech audiometric measurements are required. Beside acoustic gain measurements and structured interviews, speech audiometry in quiet and in noise is one of the three pillars of hearing aid evaluation.The Freiburg monosyllabic test has been used for decades for hearing aid prescription and evaluation in German speaking countries. Relative and absolute targets can be individually defined for the rehabilitation of speech perception by hearing aids as assessed by the Freiburg monosyllabic test in quiet and at conversational levels.The general applicability of speech audiometric measurements in noise is limited. Alternative ("modern") methods and the definitions of noise situations relevant to everyday life have been discussed for years. However, the introduction of these methods into everyday use has proven difficult. On one hand, there is comparatively little practical experience; on the other, it has not yet been demonstrated what additional benefits these more complicated measurements might have for standard hearing aid evaluations and hearing aid users.

  2. Technical Evaluation of Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kriskovich, J R

    2002-01-01

    Two evaluations of the Oak Ridge Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Facility (FTF) were performed on December 11 and 12, 2001, and consisted of a quality assurance and a technical evaluation. This report documents results of the technical evaluation.

  3. Test-Retest Reproducibility of Two Short-Form Balance Measures Used in Individuals with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Lih-Jiun; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Jau-Hong; Lo, Sing-Kai

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the test-retest reproducibility of the seven-item Short-Form Berg Balance Scale (SFBBS) and the five-item Short-Form Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (SFPASS) in individuals with chronic stroke. Fifty-two chronic stroke patients from two rehabilitation departments were included in the study. Both…

  4. Group Discussions and Test-Enhanced Learning: Individual Learning Outcomes and Personality Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U.; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions…

  5. Group Discussions and Test-Enhanced Learning: Individual Learning Outcomes and Personality Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U.; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions…

  6. Razor UAS Test and Evaluation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Adsys Controls' Razor UAS Test System is a high fidelity simulation and Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) test system. Razor provides extensive existing capability for high...

  7. An Evaluation of the IELTS Speaking Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈国梁

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of the IELTS Speaking Test against the requirements for effective testing in Bachman and Palmer’s (1996) test usefulness framework, which include the six qualities of reliability, validity, authenticity, inter-activeness, practicality and impact. In particular, it examines the test on criteria including fluency and coherence;lexical resource;grammatical range and accuracy;and pronunciation (IETLS official website). It includes a judgment about its value.

  8. Classification and prognosis evaluation of individual teeth--a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet, Nachum; Jotkowitz, Anna

    2009-05-01

    Following a complete evaluation of the patient, treatment planning requires the analysis of individual teeth, accurate diagnosis, and prognosis evaluation. Currently, there is no accepted comprehensive, standardized, and meaningful classification system for the evaluation of individual teeth that offers a common language for dental professionals. A search was conducted reviewing existing literature relating to classification and prognostication of individual teeth. The dimensions determined to be of importance to gain an overall perspective of the individual relative tooth prognosis were the periodontal, restorative, endodontic, and occlusal plane perspectives. The authors present a comprehensive classification system by conjugating the literature and currently accepted concepts in dentistry. This easy-to-use system assesses the condition of individual teeth and enables a relative prognostic value to be attached to those teeth based on tooth condition and patient-level factors.

  9. The Evaluation of BEC Vantage (Oral Test)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    昌根花; 廖海红

    2012-01-01

      The validity and reliability of BEC Vantage are the key factors to the success and failure of oral test. This paper evalu⁃ates the speaking test of BEC Vantage by analyzing the reliability, authenticity, validity and the assessment of the test.

  10. Individual Differences in Male Rats in a Behavioral Test Battery: A Multivariate Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Daniel D.; Aher, Yogesh D.; Engidawork, Ephrem; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert; Korz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Animal models for anxiety, depressive-like and cognitive diseases or aging often involve testing of subjects in behavioral test batteries. The large number of test variables with different mean variations and within and between test correlations often constitute a significant problem in determining essential variables to assess behavioral patterns and their variation in individual animals as well as appropriate statistical treatment. Therefore, we applied a multivariate approach (principal component analysis) to analyse the behavioral data of 162 male adult Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent a behavioral test battery including commonly used tests for spatial learning and memory (holeboard) and different behavioral patterns (open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim test) as well as for motor abilities (Rota rod). The high dimensional behavioral results were reduced to fewer components associated with spatial cognition, general activity, anxiety-, and depression-like behavior and motor ability. The loading scores of individual rats on these different components allow an assessment and the distribution of individual features in a population of animals. The reduced number of components can be used also for statistical calculations like appropriate sample sizes for valid discriminations between experimental groups, which otherwise have to be done on each variable. Because the animals were intact, untreated and experimentally naïve the results reflect trait patterns of behavior and thus individuality. The distribution of animals with high or low levels of anxiety, depressive-like behavior, general activity and cognitive features in a local population provides information of the probability of their appeareance in experimental samples and thus may help to avoid biases. However, such an analysis initially requires a large cohort of animals in order to gain a valid assessment.

  11. The Convergent Validity of the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills for Individuals with Severe Retardation (MESSIER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Bamburg, Jay W.; Carlisle, Carla Beth

    1998-01-01

    A study administered the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills for Individuals with Severe Retardation (MESSIER) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) to 892 individuals with severe mental retardation residing in a residential state facility. Significant positive correlations were found between corresponding MESSIER subscales and VABS…

  12. You can pool faecal samples from individual pigs to test for Porcine Circovirus Type 2 and Lawsonia intracellularis using real-time PCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holyoake, Patricia K.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    Introduction Real-time PCR tests have been developed to detect and quantify Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Lawsonia intracellularis in pigs’ faeces. Pooling of individual faecal samples is often used to reduce the costs of diagnostic testing. The objective of this study was to evaluate any ...

  13. Heel-rise test in the assessment of individuals with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro DP

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Débora Pantuso Monteiro,1 Raquel Rodrigues Britto,2 Ana Clara Ribeiro Lages,3 Marluce Lopes Basílio,3 Monize Cristine de Oliveira Pires,3 Maria Luiza Vieira Carvalho,1 Ricardo Jayme Procópio,4 Danielle Aparecida Gomes Pereira21Rehabilitation Sciences of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil; 2Physiotherapy Department of the School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil; 3Private Practice, Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil; 4Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte-MG, BrazilIntroduction: The Heel-Rise Test (HRT is a clinical instrument relevant to vascular rehabilitation that has been proposed to assess the function of the triceps surae muscle. To use HRT in the assessment of individuals with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD, its ability to detect differences in the functional performance of patients with PAOD must be verified.Aim: To verify whether the test is sensitive in differentiating between individuals with PAOD with distinct functional capacities.Materials and methods: A transversal study in which individuals with PAOD were assessed using the HRT, the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ, and the Shuttle Walk Test. The following variables were analyzed: number of plantar flexions performed in the HRT (time in seconds and velocity (plantar flexions per second when performing plantar flexions up to the point of volunteer fatigue, maximum distance walked in the Shuttle Walk Test, and scores obtained in each WIQ domain.Results: Twenty-five individuals (14 male were included in the study, with a mean age of 63.36 ± 9.83 years. The variables number of plantar flexions and time to perform the HRT were sensitive enough to differentiate between distinct functional capacities in individuals with PAOD (P = 0.003 and P = 0.009, respectively. However, this result was not found

  14. Attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing for Treacher Collins syndrome among affected individuals and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rebecca L; Lawson, Cathleen S; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Sanderson, Saskia C

    2012-07-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a craniofacial syndrome that is both phenotypically variable and heterogeneous, caused by mutations in the TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D genes. We examined attitudes towards TCS prenatal genetic testing among affected families using a telephone questionnaire. Participants were 31 affected adults and relatives recruited primarily through families cared for in the mid-Atlantic region. Nineteen participants (65%) reported that they would take a TCS prenatal genetic test which could not predict degree of disease severity. Interest in TCS genetic testing was associated with higher income, higher concern about having a child with TCS, lower religiosity, lower concern about genetic testing procedures, and having a sporadic rather than familial mutation. Over half reported that their decision to have TCS genetic testing would be influenced a great deal by their desire to relieve anxiety and attitudes toward abortion. Ten participants (32%) reported that they would be likely to end the pregnancy upon receiving a positive test result; this was lower amongst TCS affected individuals and higher amongst participants with children with TCS. Genetics healthcare providers need to be aware of affected individuals' and families' attitudes and interest in prenatal genetic testing for TCS, and the possible implications for other craniofacial disorders, so that patients' information needs can be met.

  15. Sex-Dependent Individual Differences and the Correlational Relationship Between Proprioceptive and Verbal Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liutsko Liudmila

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between proprioceptive and verbal tests on personality in both sexes separately due to existing proprioceptive differences in fine motor behavior between men and women in our previous studies [1, 2, 3]. Material and methods. 114 middle-aged participants from Belarus completed verbal tests (personality: Eysenck's EPQ, Big Five in Hromov's Russian adaptation, and Rosenberg's Self-esteem together with Proprioceptive Diagnostics of Temperament and Character (by Tous. Complementary information, such as tests of time perception, was collected and used in correlative and ANOVA analyses with the use of SPSS v.19. Results. The relationship between proprioceptive variables in personality and individual differences, time perception and the results of verbal tests were determined for each sex subgroup and discussed. ANOVA results reflected the corresponding differences and similarities between men and women in the variables of each test. Time perception was found to be significantly correlated to all five dimensions of the Big Five Test in both sexes, and both had a significant relationship to the same variables of the DP-TC test. Conclusions. Time perception can be used as an indirect indicator of personality. Existing individual and personality differences should be taken into account in coaching and education to obtain more effective results.

  16. 40 CFR 63.5850 - How do I conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... test, performance evaluation, and design evaluation in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, that applies to you..., performance evaluations, and design evaluations? 63.5850 Section 63.5850 Protection of Environment... conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations? (a) If you are using any...

  17. Using eye tracking to test for individual differences in attention to attractive faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eValuch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed individual differences in visual attention toward faces in relation to their attractiveness via saccadic reaction times (SRTs. Motivated by the aim to understand individual differences in attention to faces, we tested three hypotheses: (a Attractive faces hold or capture attention more effectively than less attractive faces; (b men show a stronger bias toward attractive opposite-sex faces than women; and (c blue-eyed men show a stronger bias toward blue-eyed than brown-eyed feminine faces. The latter test was included because prior research suggested a high effect size. Our data supported hypotheses (a and (b but not (c. By conducting separate tests for disengagement of attention and attention capture, we found that individual differences exist at distinct stages of attentional processing but these differences are of varying robustness and importance. In our conclusion, we also advocate the use of linear mixed effects models as the most appropriate statistical approach toward studying inter-individual differences in visual attention with naturalistic stimuli.

  18. Assessing bias against overweight individuals among nursing and psychology students: an implicit association test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Tabitha; Lampman, Claudia; Lupfer-Johnson, Gwen

    2012-12-01

    To determine the implicit or unconscious attitudes of Nursing and Psychology majors towards overweight individuals in medical and non-medical contexts. Obesity is a leading health concern today, which impacts both physical and psychological health. Overweight individuals confront social biases in many aspects of their lives including health care. Examining the views of Nursing and Psychology students may reveal implicit attitudes towards overweight individuals that may lead to prejudiced behaviours. A mixed design experiment with one between-subjects variable (student major: Nursing or Psychology) and one within-subjects variable (condition: congruent or incongruent) was used to assess implicit attitudes in two convenience samples of Nursing and Psychology students. A computerised implicit association test was used to determine implicit attitudes towards overweight individuals in medical and non-medical contexts. A total of 90 students from Nursing (n= 45) and Psychology (n = 45) were recruited to complete an implicit association test. Reaction times in milliseconds between the congruent trials (stereotype consistent) and incongruent trials (stereotype inconsistent) were compared with determine adherence to social stereotypes or weight bias. A statistically significant implicit bias towards overweight individuals was detected in both subject groups and in both target settings (medical vs. non-medical). Stronger weight bias was found when the stimulus targets were female than male. Findings from this study expand understanding of the implicit attitudes and social biases of Nursing and Psychology students. The views held by these future healthcare professionals may negatively impact patient care. Providing education and support to overweight individuals is central to Nursing practice in a society struggling to manage obesity. Negative stereotypes or beliefs about these individuals may result in poor patient care. Therefore, nurses and other healthcare professionals

  19. Empirical Evaluation of Directional-Dependence Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Testing of directional dependence is a method to infer causal direction that recently has attracted some attention. Previous examples by e.g. von Eye and DeShon (2012a) and extensive simulation studies by Pornprasertmanit and Little (2012) have demonstrated that under specific assumptions, directional-dependence tests can recover the true causal…

  20. Evaluating Test Validity: Reprise and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    2016-01-01

    The AERA, APA, NCME Standards define validity as "the degree to which evidence and theory support the interpretations of test scores for proposed uses of tests". A century of disagreement about validity does not mean that there has not been substantial progress. This consensus definition brings together interpretations and use so that it…

  1. Minimum Competency Testing--Grading or Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Madhu Suri

    The consequences of the minimum competency testing movement may bring into question the basic assumptions, goals, and expectations of our school system. The intended use of these tests is the assessment of students; the unintended consequence may be the assessment of the school system. There are two ways in which schools may fail in the context of…

  2. Utilizing the reaction of degeneration test for individuals with focal paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland Thomas J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES is a modality sometimes used to help strengthen weak muscles. On occasion, however, the targeted muscles do not respond to the current delivered. No response to electrical stimulation should raise the consideration of unsuspected peripheral nerve damage. Two case studies are presented showing how absence of response was due to unsuspected peripheral neuropathy, which had not been considered in either of the original referral diagnoses. Case descriptions The first individual sustained head trauma and did not respond to NMES to facilitate finger flexor contractions in the left hand. This prompted a reaction of degeneration test (R/D test which revealed evidence of a median nerve lesion. The second individual presented with right ankle dorsiflexor and evertor paralysis following a right total hip replacement. The R/D test helped rule out a central nervous system lesion by revealing evidence of right peroneal nerve degeneration. Conclusion The case reports show how clinical suspicion followed by simple R/D testing can be used to screen for nerve damage, prompting further electrodiagnostic work up of individuals with profound weakness and or paralysis.

  3. Intraindividual neuropsychological test variability in healthy individuals with high average intelligence and educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyanka, Daniel J; Holster, Jessica L; Golden, Charles J

    2013-08-01

    Knowledge of patterns of neuropsychological performance among normal, healthy individuals is integral to the practice of clinical neuropsychology, because clinicians may not always account for intraindividual variability (IIV) before coming to diagnostic conclusions. The IIV was assessed among a sample of 46 healthy individuals with high average intelligence and educational attainment, utilizing a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition (WMS-IV). The data indicated substantial variability in neurocognitive abilities. All participants were found to demonstrate scores considered impaired by at least 2 standard deviations (SDs). Despite adjusting for outliers, no participant produced a "normal" testing profile with an intraindividual maximum discrepancy (MD) of less than 1 SD in either direction. When WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) was considered, participants generally demonstrated cognitive test scores ranging from 2 SDs less than to 1.5 SDs greater than their FSIQ. Furthermore, after demographic corrections, the majority (59%) of participants demonstrated at least 1 impaired cognitive test score, as defined by being 1 to 1.5 SDs below the mean. Overall, results substantiate the need for clinicians to consider FSIQ and educational attainment in interpretation of neuropsychological testing results, given the relevant commonality of "abnormal" test scores within this population. This may ultimately reduce the likelihood of making false-positive conclusions of impairment when educational attainment and intelligence are high, thus improving diagnostic accuracy.

  4. Detailed Test Plan Redundant Sensor Strapdown IMU Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, T.; Miyatake, Y.; Wedekind, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    The test plan for a redundant sensor strapdown inertial measuring unit evaluation program is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) test philosophy and limitations, (2) test sequence, (3) equipment specifications, (4) general operating procedures, (5) calibration procedures, (6) alignment test phase, and (7) navigation test phase. The data and analysis requirements are analyzed.

  5. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wessel

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598 were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%, online registry (37% and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%. Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%, female (69%, college educated (46%, with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%. Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52% and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7] and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  6. Costs and benefits of individuals conceived after IVF : a net tax evaluation in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenaar, L. M.; Connolly, M.; Huisman, B.; Postma, M. J.; Hompes, P. G. A.; van der Veen, F.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the lifetime future net tax revenues from individuals conceived after IVF relative to those naturally conceived. A model based on the method of generational accounting was developed to evaluate investments in IVF. Calculations were based on average investments paid and received

  7. Evaluation of the Leadership Institute: A Program to Build Individual and Organizational Capacity through Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Yueh-Ti; King, Jeff; Cochran, Graham R.; Argabright, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to evaluate the impact of Leadership Institute, a program designed to strengthen leadership capacity through developing individuals' emotional intelligence (EQ). A pre-and posttest approach was used to collect data from two workshops with identical EQ content, program structure, and evaluation.…

  8. Development and evaluation of a health promotion group for individuals with severe psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Subotnik, Kenneth L; Kite, Robin E; Alarcon, Evelyn; Nuechterlein, Keith H

    2009-01-01

    A six-step program development and evaluation method integrating recovery principles of empowerment and choice in healthcare decisions with theory driven research from the fields of health promotion and psychiatric rehabilitation is presented. A pilot wellness program that taught basic nutrition, exercise, and stress management skills to individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia demonstrates how to complete each step. Pre-post pilot data are analyzed using paired-sample t tests. Nine people diagnosed with schizophrenia participated in the pilot program. Despite a small sample size and limited statistical power, a paired-sample t test suggested that the program appeared to increase participants' self-efficacy for health practices (p<.05), specifically in the domains of psychological well-being (p<.01) and health responsibility (p<.05), while decreasing their perceptions of the overall amount of stress in their life (p<.01). Treatment providers are encouraged to use the six-step method to create programs that successfully blend empirical research methodology with consumer-centered participation.

  9. SDU6 Interior Liner Testing & Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-14

    Two liner materials (Marseal® M-3500 and REMA Chemoline® 4CN) proposed for use as a liner inside the Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 (SDU6) were subjected to specific ASTM tests (tensile and lap-shear) after immersion in 50% and 100% simulant solutions for 1000 hours at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Both liner materials exhibited good resistance to the simulant chemistry, at least based on the tests performed and the test duration/conditions imposed. In lap-shear tests, both materials failed in the base material rather than peeling apart, confirming good adhesion. The REMA 4CN bromobutyl elastomer showed superior bonding characteristics and absence of warping or delamination at the conditions tested. The Marseal M-3500 material (PVC/EVA blend with polyester reinforcement) exhibited deformation and debonding in some locations. The cause of the deformation and delamination observed in the Marseal M-3500 material is not fully known, but possibly attributed to thermomechanical stress at immersion temperatures, and the thermoplastic nature of the material. The immersion temperature (68 °C) is slightly greater than the maximum use temperature limit quoted for the Marseal M- 3500 liner (65 °C), though the basis for the service limit is unknown. The testing performed was limited in scope and only for these two liner materials. These tests were primarily performed to screen for severe incompatibility or short-term degradation in Saltstone bleedwater simulants at bounding solution temperatures. Additional testing is recommended to assess long-term performance and the overall service life of the liner.

  10. 30 CFR 14.3 - Observers at tests and evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Observers at tests and evaluations. 14.3 Section 14.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... General Provisions § 14.3 Observers at tests and evaluations. Representatives of the applicant and...

  11. Reliability and validity of the Tinetti Mobility Test for individuals with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegelmeyer, Deb A; Kloos, Anne D; Thomas, Karen M; Kostyk, Sandra K

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the interrater and intrarater reliability, concurrent validity, and criterion validity of the Tinetti Mobility Test (TMT) as a fall risk screening tool in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). Thirty individuals with PD voluntarily participated in the study, and data from a retrospective review of 126 patient records were included. Physical therapists and physical therapist students rated live and videotaped performances of the TMT. Tinetti Mobility Test scores were correlated with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores and comfortable gait speed. The ability of the TMT to accurately assess fall risk was determined. Interrater and intrarater reliability was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient of >.80). Tinetti Mobility Test scores correlated with UPDRS motor scores (r(s)=-.45) and gait speed (r(s)=.53). The sensitivity and specificity of the TMT to identify fallers were 76% and 66%, respectively. The TMT is a reliable and valid tool for assessing the mobility status of and fall risk for individuals with PD.

  12. Using monolingual neuropsychological test norms with bilingual Hispanic americans: application of an individual comparison standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard; Gonzalez, Cassandra Dayanira

    2012-05-01

    Conventional neuropsychological norms developed for monolinguals likely overestimate normal performance in bilinguals on language but not visual-perceptual format tests. This was studied by comparing neuropsychological false-positive rates using the 50th percentile of conventional norms and individual comparison standards (Picture Vocabulary or Matrix Reasoning scores) as estimates of preexisting neuropsychological skill level against the number expected from the normal distribution for a consecutive sample of 56 neurologically intact, bilingual, Hispanic Americans. Participants were tested in separate sessions in Spanish and English in the counterbalanced order on La Bateria Neuropsicologica and the original English language tests on which this battery was based. For language format measures, repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance showed that individual estimates of preexisting skill level in English generated the mean number of false positives most approximate to that expected from the normal distribution, whereas the 50th percentile of conventional English language norms did the same for visual-perceptual format measures. When using conventional Spanish or English monolingual norms for language format neuropsychological measures with bilingual Hispanic Americans, individual estimates of preexisting skill level are recommended over the 50th percentile.

  13. 40 CFR 63.2354 - What performance tests, design evaluations, and performance evaluations must I conduct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluations, and performance evaluations must I conduct? 63.2354 Section 63.2354 Protection of Environment... tests, design evaluations, and performance evaluations must I conduct? (a)(1) For each performance test... procedures specified in subpart SS of this part. (3) For each performance evaluation of a continuous...

  14. [Postcoital test evaluated in peritoneal fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, J; Bielak, A; Niwald, W; Pawlicki, J; Banaszczyk, R; Makuła, D

    1995-04-01

    The role of the peritoneal fluid in the physiology of reproduction, as well as in the transportation and survival of gametes, is little recognized. Taking this into consideration, the authors have examined the occurrence of spermatozoa in the peritoneal fluid, collected from patients during diagnostic laparoscopies, following intrauterine insemination with husband's sperm, in, so-called, Templeton's Test. In the group of patients with cervical factor six (6) mobile spermatozoa (85%) were observed, in the group with male factor -- three (3) (42%) and in the group with idiopathic infertility -- 1 (25%). A high utility of this test has been indicated, especially in infertility caused by the male factor and in endometriosis.

  15. An Evaluation of Saxon's Algebra Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dale M.; Smith, Blaine

    1987-01-01

    John Saxon's incremental development model has been proclaimed as a superior teaching strategy for mathematics. This study evaluated the Saxon approach and textbook using 276 Algebra I students in experimental and control groups. The groups were compared in cognitive and affective areas. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  16. An Evaluation of Saxon's Algebra Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dale M.; Smith, Blaine

    1987-01-01

    John Saxon's incremental development model has been proclaimed as a superior teaching strategy for mathematics. This study evaluated the Saxon approach and textbook using 276 Algebra I students in experimental and control groups. The groups were compared in cognitive and affective areas. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  17. Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Fuel Evaluations HMMWV Test Track Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    FBP Final boiling point FTM Federal Test Method FTP Federal Test Procedure g/kw-h Grams per kilowatt-hour g/mi Grams per...frequency reciprocating rig Hr Hour HMMWV High Mobility Medium Wheeled Vehicle IBP Initial boiling point Kg Kilo-gram L Liter Lbs...Standard deviation SwRI Southwest Research Institute TFLRF U.S. Army TARDEC Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility THC Total hydrocarbons

  18. Test and Evaluation (T&E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 28 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a...412 TW Edwards AFB Bistatic Radar Cross-Section Benefield Anechoic Chamber test PI Tony Quach AFRL/RY TCTTA Ed Utt 96 TW Eglin AFB High Power

  19. 40 CFR 610.25 - Evaluation of test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effects on fuel economy, and on emissions, with statistical or other caveats as established by the data... ECONOMY RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Evaluation Criteria for the Preliminary...

  20. Preappointment testing for BRAF/KIT mutation in advanced melanoma: a model in molecular data delivery for individualized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounajjed, Taofic; Brown, Char L; Stern, Therese K; Bjorheim, Annette M; Bridgeman, Andrew J; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; McWilliams, Robert R; Flotte, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of individualized medicine is driven by developments in precision diagnostics, epitomized by molecular testing. Because treatment decisions are being made based on such molecular data, data management is gaining major importance. Among data management challenges, creating workflow solutions for timely delivery of molecular data has become pivotal. This study aims to design and implement a scalable process that permits preappointment BRAF/KIT mutation analysis in melanoma patients, allowing molecular results necessary for treatment plans to be available before the patient's appointment. Process implementation aims to provide a model for efficient molecular data delivery for individualized medicine. We examined the existing process of BRAF/KIT testing in melanoma patients visiting our institution for oncology consultation. We created 5 working groups, each designing a specific segment of an alternative process that would allow preappointment BRAF/KIT testing and delivery of results. Data were captured and analyzed to evaluate the success of the alternative process. For 1 year, 35 (59%) of 55 patients had prior BRAF/KIT testing. The remaining 20 patients went through the new process of preappointment testing; results were available at the time of appointment for 12 patients (overall preappointment results availability, 85.5%). The overall process averaged 13.4 ± 4.7 days. In conclusion, we describe the successful implementation of a scalable workflow solution that permits preappointment BRAF/KIT mutation analysis and result delivery in melanoma patients. This sets the stage for further applications of this model to other conditions, answering an increasing demand for robust delivery of molecular data for individualized medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patch test dose-response study: polysensitized individuals do not express lower elicitation thresholds than single/double-sensitized individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, B C; Fischer, Louise Arup; Sosted, H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is not known if reduced elicitation thresholds are evident among polysensitized individuals when using allergens to which the patients are already sensitized. Reduced elicitation thresholds may be an expression of increased reactivity in this patient group. OBJECTIVES: To examine a...

  2. The Evaluation of Noise Spectroscopy Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Fiala

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses mathematical tools to evaluate novel noise spectroscopy based analysis and describes, via physical similarity, the mathematical models expressing the quantitative character of the modeled task. Using the Stefan–Boltzmann law, the authors indicate finding the spectral density of the radiated power of a hemisphere, and, for the selected frequency interval and temperature, they compare the simplified models with the expression of noise spectral density according to the Johnson–Nyquist formula or Nyquist’s expression of the function of spectral density based on a derivation of Planck’s law. The related measurements and evaluations, together with analyses of the noise spectroscopy of periodic resonant structures, are also outlined in the given context.

  3. ASTM test methods for composite characterization and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the American Society for Testing and Materials is given. Under the topic of composite materials characterization and evaluation, general industry practice and test methods for textile composites are presented.

  4. The Evaluation of Noise Spectroscopy Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Fiala; Petr Drexler; Dusan Nespor; Zoltan Szabo; Jan Mikulka; Jiri Polivka

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses mathematical tools to evaluate novel noise spectroscopy based analysis and describes, via physical similarity, the mathematical models expressing the quantitative character of the modeled task. Using the Stefan–Boltzmann law, the authors indicate finding the spectral density of the radiated power of a hemisphere, and, for the selected frequency interval and temperature, they compare the simplified models with the expression of noise spectral density according to the Johnso...

  5. Aerobic capacity testing with inactive individuals: the role of subjective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Renee E; Kwan, Bethany M; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Gurney, Burke; Mermier, Christine M; Bryan, Angela D

    2013-02-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), an assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness, is regularly used as the primary outcome in exercise interventions. Many criteria have been suggested for validating such tests-most commonly, a plateau in oxygen consumption. The current study investigated the proportion of inactive individuals who reached a plateau in oxygen uptake and who achieved a valid test as assessed by secondary criteria (RERmax ≥ 1.1; RPEmax ≥ 18; age predicted HRmax ±10bpm), and the correlates of a successful plateau or achievement of secondary criteria during a VO2max session. Participants (n = 240) were inactive individuals who completed VO2max assessments using an incremental treadmill test. We explored physical, behavioral, and motivational factors as predictors of meeting criteria for meeting a valid test. Approximately 59% of the sample achieved plateau using absolute (increase of VO2 of 150ml O2 or less) and 37% achieved plateau using relative (increase of VO2 of 1.5ml/kg O2 or less) criteria. Being male, having a higher BMI, a greater waist-to-hip ratio, and increased self-efficacy were associated with lower odds of achieving an absolute plateau, whereas none of these factors predicted odds of achieving relative plateau. Findings raise questions about the validity of commonly used criteria with less active populations.

  6. Use of Individual-level Covariates to Improve Latent Class Analysis of Trypanosoma Cruzi Diagnostic Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Aaron W; Small, Dylan S; Delgado, Stephen; Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Verastegui, Manuela R; Ancca Juárez, Jenny M; Quispe Machaca, Víctor R; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z

    2012-08-01

    Statistical methods such as latent class analysis can estimate the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests when no perfect reference test exists. Traditional latent class methods assume a constant disease prevalence in one or more tested populations. When the risk of disease varies in a known way, these models fail to take advantage of additional information that can be obtained by measuring risk factors at the level of the individual. We show that by incorporating complex field-based epidemiologic data, in which the disease prevalence varies as a continuous function of individual-level covariates, our model produces more accurate sensitivity and specificity estimates than previous methods. We apply this technique to a simulated population and to actual Chagas disease test data from a community near Arequipa, Peru. Results from our model estimate that the first-line enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a sensitivity of 78% (95% CI: 62-100%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 99-100%). The confirmatory immunofluorescence assay is estimated to be 73% sensitive (95% CI: 65-81%) and 99% specific (95% CI: 96-100%).

  7. Tests for evaluating the physiological quality of pitaya seeds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thiago Alberto Ortiz; Aline Moritz; Lúcia Sadayo Assari Takahashi; Mariana Ragassi Urbano

    2015-01-01

    .... Thus, this study aimed to develop methodologies for conducting tests of germination, accelerated aging, and electrical conductivity for the evaluation of the physiological quality of pitaya seeds...

  8. Performance on Tests of Central Auditory Processing by Individuals Exposed to High-Intensity Blasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    this research at the (former) WRAMC. Drs. Frank Musiek and Richard Wilson generously provided essential testing materials. Dr. David Lilly...wnl.0000230197.40410.db 18. Humes LE, Coughlin M, Talley L. Evaluation of the use of a new compact disc for auditory perceptual assessment in the

  9. The Operational Testing Effectiveness Evaluation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    compared, testing methods improved, and critics silenced . Given that checking IOT&E assessments against operational data seemed to be common sense, was...history of OT&E, discussing the poasibility that the record of frequent convulsive organizational change is related to the lack of adequate feedback on... silence the critics, and ultimately ensure that the weapons reaching the ramp really are effective and suitable. 30 ~• x , .-.-. I- BIBLIOGRAPH d Books

  10. Evaluation of the performance of tests for spatial randomness on prostate cancer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Changhong

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial global clustering tests can be used to evaluate the geographical distribution of health outcomes. The power of several of these tests has been evaluated and compared using simulated data, but their performance using real unadjusted data and data adjusted for individual- and area-level covariates has not been reported previously. We evaluated data on prostate cancer histologic tumor grade and stage of disease at diagnosis for incident cases of prostate cancer reported to the Maryland Cancer Registry during 1992–1997. We analyzed unadjusted data as well as expected counts from models that were adjusted for individual-level covariates (race, age and year of diagnosis and area-level covariates (census block group median household income and a county-level socioeconomic index. We chose 3 spatial clustering tests that are commonly used to evaluate the geographic distribution of disease: Cuzick-Edwards' k-NN (k-Nearest Neighbors test, Moran's I and Tango's MEET (Maximized Excess Events Test. Results For both grade and stage at diagnosis, we found that Cuzick-Edwards' k-NN and Moran's I were very sensitive to the percent of population parameter selected. For stage at diagnosis, all three tests showed that the models with individual- and area-level adjustments reduced clustering the most, but did not reduce it entirely. Conclusion Based on this specific example, results suggest that these tests provide useful tools for evaluating spatial clustering of disease characteristics, both before and after consideration of covariates.

  11. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Barneveld, S.; van der Palen, J.; van Putten, M. J. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a useful test fo

  12. Do QEEG topographic map data have a multivariate normal distribution? Implications for tests of individual maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, J S; Adams, S J; Brunet, D G; Criollo, M; Galin, H; MacCrimmon, D J

    1998-01-01

    The study was designed to test whether topographic map data expressed in log power units have a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution in a healthy population, and to determine if any deviation from normality poses serious difficulties for the use of standard multivariate statistical tests in assessing the significance of deformations of the map in individual cases. Data on 361 healthy adults using 20 electrodes in the classic 10/20 configuration were recorded in six frequency bands. The log-transformed power data were shown to deviate markedly from MVN. The actual distributions of multivariate tests were computed for the sample using the 'jackknife' method, and shown to deviate markedly from the F-distributions that would be expected for MVN data. These 'jackknife' sampling distributions were then used to demonstrate significant deformations in the topographic maps of a patient who had sustained traumatic head injury.

  13. Smart Dynamic Monitoring and Tracking of Individual Sediment Grains: Design Framework and Experimental Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, G.; Hoey, T.; Sventek, J.; Drysdale, T.; Markham, A.; Hodge, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Contemporary sensing equipment is miniaturized to scales that enable implementation of dynamic micro-sensors within natural sediment particles (>c.80mm diameter) containing artificial enclosures. The resulting mobile sensing units record the dynamics of sediment transport from the inertial frame of individual particles, giving an insight on how individual grains experience transporting forces. However, it remains difficult to obtain accurate real-time positional information which is critical for understanding the dynamic data. We have developed a sensing system optimized for monitoring the movement of sediment grains in rivers, which comprises a high-frequency 3-D force unit and an external magnetic telemetry system for accurate positional information. Here we present results from the experimental evaluation of two prototype mobile sensors: the first prototype is a spherically enclosed wireless accelerometer platform (± 6g range) tested through a series of incipient motion experiments under varying slope conditions (0.8 m x 5 m flume, slope range: 0.026 to 0.57, flow increase: 0.037 l.s-2, University of British Columbia). The second prototype is a complete Inertial Measurement Unit (assembly of a 3-axis micro-accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer capable of resolving 9 Degrees Of Freedom for the movement of the unit), enhanced with a 3-axis high-resolution impact sensor calibrated for low frequency/high magnitude impacts (±150g range) and equipped with a system of magnetic coil receivers permitting telemetric tracking of the unit with a 4 Hz frequency. This unit was tested through experiments of sequential displacements under varying flow increase (gradual increase: 0.04 l.s-2, episodic increase: 0.1 l.s-2, 0.9 m x 7.5 m flume, slope: 0.02, University of Glasgow). The position was recorded from a lab-scale Magneto-Inductive tracking system and the positional accuracy was tested by cross-comparison with a video recording. Along with the presented results we

  14. Individual differences in left parietal white matter predict math scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejko, Anna A; Price, Gavin R; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Mathematical skills are of critical importance, both academically and in everyday life. Neuroimaging research has primarily focused on the relationship between mathematical skills and functional brain activity. Comparatively few studies have examined which white matter regions support mathematical abilities. The current study uses diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test whether individual differences in white matter predict performance on the math subtest of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT). Grades 10 and 11 PSAT scores were obtained from 30 young adults (ages 17-18) with wide-ranging math achievement levels. Tract based spatial statistics was used to examine the correlation between PSAT math scores, fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AD). FA in left parietal white matter was positively correlated with math PSAT scores (specifically in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, left superior corona radiata, and left corticospinal tract) after controlling for chronological age and same grade PSAT critical reading scores. Furthermore, RD, but not AD, was correlated with PSAT math scores in these white matter microstructures. The negative correlation with RD further suggests that participants with higher PSAT math scores have greater white matter integrity in this region. Individual differences in FA and RD may reflect variability in experience dependent plasticity over the course of learning and development. These results are the first to demonstrate that individual differences in white matter are associated with mathematical abilities on a nationally administered scholastic aptitude measure.

  15. THE EFFECT OF CAFFEINE SUPPLEMENTATION ON TRAINED INDIVIDUALS SUBJECTED TO MAXIMAL TREADMILL TEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicio, Viviane Martins Mana; Fett, Carlos Alexandre; Salicio, Marcos Adriano; Brandäo, Camila Fernanda Costa Cunha Moraes; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrizio; Fett, Waléria Christiane Rezende; Botelho, And Clovis

    2017-01-01

    Intense physical training increases oxidative stress and inflammation, resulting into muscle and cellular damage. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of caffeine supplementation on trained young individuals subjected to two treadmill maximal tests. It was a double-blind and crossover study comprising 24 active individuals within the age group 18-30 years. The comparisons were conducted: the effect of exercise (week 1 x 2) and caffeine intake (GC x GP) on thiobarbituric acid (TBARS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) variables during pre-exercise time (30 min. after caffeine or placebo intake) and post-exercise (5 min after treadmill test). The comparison between weeks 1 and 2 showed increase in the first week, in the following items: TBARS, IL-6 and IL-10 in the GC and GP groups. The comparison within the same week showed that GC individuals presented lower post-exercise TBARS values in the first and second weeks; IL- 6 presented higher post-exercise values in the GC group in both weeks. The paired analysis comparing pre- and post-exercise, with and without caffeine showed that IL-6 presented higher post-exercise values in the GC group. Caffeine used by athletes can decrease oxidative stress. The increased IL-6 suggest that this ergogenic supplement may stimulate muscle hypertrophy, since IL-6 has myokine effect. However, the caffeine effect on IL-6 level and muscle hypertrophy increase should be better investigated in future studies.

  16. Testability integrated evaluation method based on testability virtual test data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Guanjun; Zhao Chenxu; Qiu Jing; Zhang Yong

    2014-01-01

    Testability virtual test is a new test method for testability verification, which has the advantages such as low cost, few restrictions and large sample of test data. It can be used to make up the deficiency of testability physical test. In order to take the advantage of testability virtual test data effectively and to improve the accuracy of testability evaluation, a testability integrated eval-uation method is proposed in this paper based on testability virtual test data. Considering the char-acteristic of testability virtual test data, the credibility analysis method for testability virtual test data is studied firstly. Then the integrated calculation method is proposed fusing the testability vir-tual and physical test data. Finally, certain helicopter heading and attitude system is presented to demonstrate the proposed method. The results show that the testability integrated evaluation method is feasible and effective.

  17. Evaluating carbon fluxes of global forest ecosystems by using an individual tree-based model FORCCHN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianyong; Shugart, Herman H; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Cougui; Wu, Shuang; Fang, Jing

    2017-02-14

    The carbon budget of forest ecosystems, an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle, needs to be accurately quantified and predicted by ecological models. As a preamble to apply the model to estimate global carbon uptake by forest ecosystems, we used the CO2 flux measurements from 37 forest eddy-covariance sites to examine the individual tree-based FORCCHN model's performance globally. In these initial tests, the FORCCHN model simulated gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem production (NEP) with correlations of 0.72, 0.70 and 0.53, respectively, across all forest biomes. The model underestimated GPP and slightly overestimated ER across most of the eddy-covariance sites. An underestimation of NEP arose primarily from the lower GPP estimates. Model performance was better in capturing both the temporal changes and magnitude of carbon fluxes in deciduous broadleaf forest than in evergreen broadleaf forest, and it performed less well for sites in Mediterranean climate. We then applied the model to estimate the carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale over 1982-2011. This application of FORCCHN gave a total GPP of 59.41±5.67 and an ER of 57.21±5.32PgCyr(-1) for global forest ecosystems during 1982-2011. The forest ecosystems over this same period contributed a large carbon storage, with total NEP being 2.20±0.64PgCyr(-1). These values are comparable to and reinforce estimates reported in other studies. This analysis highlights individual tree-based model FORCCHN could be used to evaluate carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale.

  18. Costs and benefits of individuals conceived after IVF: a net tax evaluation in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolenaar, L M; Connolly, M; Huisman, B; Postma, M J; Hompes, P G A; van der Veen, F; Mol, B W J

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the lifetime future net tax revenues from individuals conceived after IVF relative to those naturally conceived. A model based on the method of generational accounting was developed to evaluate investments in IVF. Calculations were based on average investments paid and received from the government by an individual. All costs were discounted to their net present values and adjusted for survival. The lifetime net present value of IVF-conceived individuals was -€81,374 (the minus sign reflecting negative net present value). The lifetime net present value of IVF-conceived men and women were -€47,091 and -€123,177, respectively. The lifetime net present value of naturally conceived individuals was -€70,392; respective amounts for men and women were -€36,109 and -€112,195. The model was most sensitive to changes in the growth of healthcare costs, economic growth and the discount rate. Therefore, it is concluded that, similarly to naturally conceived individuals in the Netherlands, IVF-conceived individuals have negative discounted net tax revenue at the end of life. The analytic framework described here undervalues the incremental value of an additional birth because it only considers the fiscal consequences of life and does not take into consideration broader macroeconomic benefits. This study evaluated the lifetime future net tax revenues from individuals conceived after IVF relative those naturally conceived. A model based on the method of generational accounting to evaluate investments in IVF was used. Calculations were based on average investments paid and received from the government by an individual. The lifetime net present value of IVF-conceived individuals was -€81,374 (the minus sign reflecting negative net present value). The lifetime net present value of IVF-conceived men and women were -€47,091 and -€123,177, respectively. The lifetime net present value of naturally conceived individuals was -€70,392; respective

  19. Patch Testing In Soldiers : An Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walia N. S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study concerns contact sensitization in soldiers, the frequency of which is poorly documented. During a six-year period, 128 patients of age range 17-50 years were patch tested with the Indian standard battery of 30 allergens. We obtained a reaction in 23 (18% of our patients. Nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, wool alcohol and parthenium induced most of the positive responses. In addition, an irritant reaction was seen in 16 (12.5% of our patients. Patients of atopic dermatitis and hand/foot dermatoses evoked a high sensitivity response. Adverse effects were seen in 15 patients.

  20. Development and construct validation of the Individuation Test for Emerging Adults (ITEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komidar, Luka; Zupančič, Maja; Sočan, Gregor; Puklek Levpušček, Melita

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the construction, exploratory dimensionality analysis (Study 1), and validation (Study 2) of the self-report and 36-item Individuation Test for Emerging Adults (ITEA). It is the first instrument to measure different aspects of individuation (in relation to mother and father) specifically in emerging adulthood. The construct validity of the final 5-factor structure (Support Seeking, Connectedness, Intrusiveness, Self-Reliance, and Fear of Disappointing the Parent) was satisfactory. The results of multigroup analyses demonstrated that the factor structure is stable across male and female emerging adults for ITEA assessments in relation to both mother and father. The ITEA scales also show good internal consistency and concurrent validity against Emotional, Conflictual, and Functional Dependence scales of the Psychological Separation Inventory.

  1. Resting and post bronchial challenge testing carbon dioxide partial pressure in individuals with and without asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Miedinger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is conflicting evidence about resting carbon dioxide levels in asthmatic individuals. We wanted to determine if transcutaneously measured carbon dioxide levels prior and during bronchial provocation testing differ according to asthma status reflecting dysfunctional breathing. METHODS: We investigated active firefighters and policemen by means of a validated questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, spirometry, bronchial challenge testing with methacholine (MCT and measurement of transcutaneous blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO(2 at rest prior performing spirometry, one minute and five minutes after termination of MCT. A respiratory physician blinded to the PtcCO(2 results assigned a diagnosis of asthma after reviewing the available study data and the files of the workers medical screening program. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 128 male and 10 female individuals. Fifteen individuals (11% had physician-diagnosed asthma. There was no clinically important difference in median PtcCO(2 at rest, one and five minutes after recovery from MCT in asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics (35.6 vs 35.7 mmHg, p = 0.466; 34.7 vs 33.4 mmHg, p = 0.245 and 37.4 vs 36.4 mmHg, p = 0.732. The median drop in PtcCO(2 during MCT and the increase after MCT was lower in asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics (0.1 vs 3.2 mmHg, p = 0.014 and 1.9 vs 2.9 mmHg, p = 0.025. CONCLUSIONS: PtcCO(2 levels at rest prior and during recovery after MCT do not differ in individuals with or without physician diagnosed asthma. The fall and subsequent increase in PtcCO(2 levels are higher in non-asthmatics than in asthmatics and seems to be related with increased number of respiratory maneuvers during MCT.

  2. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests.

  3. Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT can be used to assess individual patients over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Joao A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT10 has been proposed as the first tool to implement the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma initiative guidelines in clinical practice. To serve this purpose, it must have adequate properties to assess the control of an individual over time. This study aimed to prospectively assess the test-retest reliability, responsiveness and longitudinal validity of CARAT10. Methods Adults with asthma and allergic rhinitis were enrolled at 4 outpatient clinics of Portuguese central hospitals. At each of the two visits, 4 to 6 weeks apart, patients filled out CARAT10 and additional questionnaires, followed by a medical evaluation blinded to the questionnaires’ answers. Results From the 62 patients included, 51 patients completely filled out CARAT10 at both visits. The test-retest reliability, computed as an intra-class correlation coefficient, was 0.82. Regarding responsiveness, a significant change (p = 0.002 of CARAT10 score in clinically unstable patients was observed (95%CI -5.08; -1.31 and the Guyatt’s responsiveness index was 1.54. As for the longitudinal validity assessment, the correlation coefficients of the changes of CARAT10 scores with those of ACQ5 and symptoms VAS ranged from 0.49 to 0.65, while with the physician assessment of control they ranged from 0.31 to 0.41. Conclusion CARAT10 has good test-retest reliability, responsiveness and longitudinal validity. It can be used to assess control of allergic rhinitis and asthma, both to compare groups in clinical studies and to evaluate individual patients in clinical practice.

  4. The Dangers of Failing One or More Performance Validity Tests in Individuals Claiming Mild Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Postconcussive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proto, Daniel A.; Pastorek, Nicholas J.; Miller, Brian I.; Romesser, Jennifer M.; Sim, Anita H.; Linck, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating performance validity is important in any neuropsychological assessment, and prior research recommends a threshold for invalid performance of two or more performance validity test (PVT) failures. However, extant findings also indicate that failing a single PVT is associated with significant changes in neuropsychological performance. The current study sought to determine if there is an appreciable difference in neuropsychological testing results between individuals failing different numbers of PVTs. In a sample of veterans with reported histories of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI; N =178), analyses revealed that individuals failing only one PVT performed significantly worse than individuals failing no PVTs on measures of verbal learning and memory, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility. Additionally, individuals failing one versus two PVTs significantly differed only on delayed free recall scores. The current findings suggest that failure of even one PVT should elicit consideration of performance invalidity, particularly in individuals with histories of mTBI. PMID:25252598

  5. The dangers of failing one or more performance validity tests in individuals claiming mild traumatic brain injury-related postconcussive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proto, Daniel A; Pastorek, Nicholas J; Miller, Brian I; Romesser, Jennifer M; Sim, Anita H; Linck, John F

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating performance validity is important in any neuropsychological assessment, and prior research recommends a threshold for invalid performance of two or more performance validity test (PVT) failures. However, extant findings also indicate that failing a single PVT is associated with significant changes in neuropsychological performance. The current study sought to determine if there is an appreciable difference in neuropsychological testing results between individuals failing different numbers of PVTs. In a sample of veterans with reported histories of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI; N =178), analyses revealed that individuals failing only one PVT performed significantly worse than individuals failing no PVTs on measures of verbal learning and memory, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility. Additionally, individuals failing one versus two PVTs significantly differed only on delayed free recall scores. The current findings suggest that failure of even one PVT should elicit consideration of performance invalidity, particularly in individuals with histories of mTBI.

  6. Individual differences in the forced swimming test and neurochemical kinetics in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira-Cordero, Andrey; Mora-Gallegos, Andrea; Cuenca-Berger, Patricia; Fornaguera-Trías, Jaime

    2014-04-10

    Individual differences in the forced swimming test (FST) could be associated with differential temporal dynamics of gene expression and neurotransmitter activity. We tested juvenile male rats in the FST and classified the animals into those with low and high immobility according to the amount of immobility time recorded in FST. These groups and a control group which did not undergo the FST were sacrificed either 1, 6 or 24 h after the test. We analyzed the expression of the CRF, CRFR1, BDNF and TrkB in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens as well as norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, GABA and glutamine in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. Animals with low immobility showed significant reductions of BDNF expression across time points in both the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens when compared with non-swim control. Moreover, rats with high immobility only showed a significant decrease of BDNF expression in the prefrontal cortex 6h after the FST. Regarding neurotransmitters, only accumbal dopamine turnover and hippocampal glutamate content showed an effect of individual differences (i.e. animals with low and high immobility), whereas nearly all parameters showed significant differences across time points. Correlational analyses suggest that immobility in the FST, probably reflecting despair, is related to prefrontal cortical BDNF and to the kinetics observed in several other neurochemical parameters. Taken together, our results suggest that individual differences observed in depression-like behavior can be associated not only with changes in the concentrations of key neurochemical factors but also with differential time courses of such factors.

  7. Economic evaluations and diagnostic testing: an illustrative case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Sabina; Orlando, Rosanna; Roberts, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a clear process of synthesizing test accuracy data when conducting economic evaluations of diagnostic tests for health technology assessment (HTA) assessors and health economists. We appraised the methods advocated for using diagnostic test accuracy data in economic evaluations. We used a case study of fetal anemia in which data from a screening test are used in combination with a confirmatory test. We developed a step-by-step guide and consider two scenarios: when data on test accuracy from several studies are based on (i) the same test threshold for positivity and (ii) different test thresholds. We conclude that each approach has its strengths and limitations. We show that the optimal operating point of the test should be identified to determine the true cost-effectiveness of the test. We advocate that these issues require a multidisciplinary team of health economists, decision modelers and statisticians.

  8. Software Test And Evaluation Center Of CASC Established

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The software Test and Evaluation Center of CASC(CASC-STEC) was established recently.The establishment of the CASC-STEC is an important measure to strengthen the capability of software test and evaluation,to ensure the quality of software products and improve the level of software engineering.

  9. Evaluation of exercise on individuals with dementia and their carers: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Claire

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost all of the 820,000 people in the UK with dementia will experience Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD. However, research has traditionally focused on treating cognitive symptoms, thus neglecting core clinical symptoms that often have a more profound impact on living with dementia. Recent evidence (Kales et al, 2007; Ballard et al, 2009 indicates that the popular approach to managing BPSD - prescription of anti-psychotic medication - can increase mortality and the risk of stroke in people with dementia as well as impair quality of life and accelerate cognitive decline. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate the impact that non-pharmacological interventions have on BPSD; we believe physical exercise is a particularly promising approach. Methods/Design We will carry out a pragmatic, randomised, single-blind controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise (planned walking on the behavioural and psychological symptoms of individuals with dementia. We aim to recruit 146 people with dementia and their carers to be randomized into two groups; one will be trained in a structured, tailored walking programme, while the other will continue with treatment as usual. The primary outcome (BPSD will be assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI along with relevant secondary outcomes at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Designing this study has been challenging both ethically and methodologically. In particular to design an intervention that is simple, measurable, safe, non-invasive and enjoyable has been testing and has required a lot of thought. Throughout the design, we have attempted to balance methodological rigour with study feasibility. We will discuss the challenges that were faced and overcome in this paper. Trial Registration ISRCTN01423159

  10. Measuring individuals' response quality in self-administered psychological tests: an introduction to Gendre's functional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Marc; Meier, Emanuele; Capel, Roland; Gendre, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The functional method is a new test theory using a new scoring method that assumes complexity in test structure, and thus takes into account every correlation between factors and items. The main specificity of the functional method is to model test scores by multiple regression instead of estimating them by using simplistic sums of points. In order to proceed, the functional method requires the creation of hyperspherical measurement space, in which item responses are expressed by their correlation with orthogonal factors. This method has three main qualities. First, measures are expressed in the absolute metric of correlations; therefore, items, scales and persons are expressed in the same measurement space using the same single metric. Second, factors are systematically orthogonal and without errors, which is optimal in order to predict other outcomes. Such predictions can be performed to estimate how one would answer to other tests, or even to model one's response strategy if it was perfectly coherent. Third, the functional method provides measures of individuals' response validity (i.e., control indices). Herein, we propose a standard procedure in order to identify whether test results are interpretable and to exclude invalid results caused by various response biases based on control indices.

  11. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David F.; Allen, George C.; Shipers, Larry R.; Dobranich, Dean; Ottinger, Cathy A.; Harmon, Charles D.; Fan, Wesley C.; Todosow, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  12. Human brain structure predicts individual differences in preconscious evaluation of facial dominance and trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getov, Spas; Kanai, Ryota; Bahrami, Bahador; Rees, Geraint

    2015-05-01

    Social cues conveyed by the human face, such as eye gaze direction, are evaluated even before they are consciously perceived. While there is substantial individual variability in such evaluation, its neural basis is unknown. Here we asked whether individual differences in preconscious evaluation of social face traits were associated with local variability in brain structure. Adult human participants (n = 36) monocularly viewed faces varying in dominance and trustworthiness, which were suppressed from awareness by a dynamic noise pattern shown to the other eye. The time taken for faces to emerge from suppression and become visible (t2e) was used as a measure of potency in competing for visual awareness. Both dominant and untrustworthy faces resulted in slower t2e than neutral faces, with substantial individual variability in these effects. Individual differences in t2e were correlated with gray matter volume in right insula for dominant faces, and with gray matter volume in medial prefrontal cortex, right temporoparietal junction and bilateral fusiform face area for untrustworthy faces. Thus, individual differences in preconscious social processing can be predicted from local brain structure, and separable correlates for facial dominance and untrustworthiness suggest distinct mechanisms of preconscious processing. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. The study of inheritance analysis and evaluation of lip prints in individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Devi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Identification of an individual is a pre-requisite for certification of death and for personal, social, and legal reasons. The study of lip prints (cheiloscopy was thought as a method for identification of a person. It is safe to assume that cheiloscopy, in its present stage of development, has become a means of criminalistic identification dealing with lip prints. Aim: The first aim of the study was to evaluate the visible lip patterns in Rajasthan population in relation to the gender and to ascertain the existence of hereditary pattern followed among parents and offsprings. The second aim was to compare visible and latent lip print patterns on non-biological materials like tracing paper, microscopic glass slides and stainless steel tumblers. Materials and Methods: The lip prints of 300 subjects including 25 families were obtained using lipstick. Out of these 300 individuals, 60 were selected for latent lip prints. In order to prevent any intra- and inter-observer variability single observer carried out all the observations. The lip prints were analyzed using magnifying lens and were classified using the criteria given by Suzuki and Tsuchihashi. The determination of the pattern in each segment of the lip was based on the numerical superiority of properties of the lines on the fragment. Statistical Analysis Used: After recording all the values for various parameters, data obtained were statistically analyzed with the help of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software version-13 using independent t-test. For all the tests, a P value of 0.05 or less was considered. Results: In the present study, most predominant pattern in the entire study population among upper and lower lips considering both males and females was type III lip pattern. Hereditary resemblance was observed between parents and offsprings in 37.66%. The latent lip prints were better visualized on microscopic glass slide when compared to stainless steel tumblers

  14. Quantitative sensory testing measures individual pain responses in emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy KJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kevin J Duffy, Katharyn L Flickinger, Jeffrey T Kristan, Melissa J Repine, Alexandro Gianforcaro, Rebecca B Hasley, Saad Feroz, Jessica M Rupp, Jumana Al-Baghli, Maria L Pacella, Brian P Suffoletto, Clifton W Callaway Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Background: Refining and individualizing treatment of acute pain in the emergency department (ED is a high priority, given that painful complaints are the most common reasons for ED visits. Few tools exist to objectively measure pain perception in the ED setting. We speculated that variation in perception of fixed painful stimuli would explain individual variation in reported pain and response to treatment among ED patients. Materials and methods: In three studies, we 1 describe performance characteristics of brief quantitative sensory testing (QST in 50 healthy volunteers, 2 test effects of 10 mg oxycodone versus placebo on QST measures in 18 healthy volunteers, and 3 measure interindividual differences in nociception and treatment responses in 198 ED patients with a painful complaint during ED treatment. QST measures adapted for use in the ED included pressure sensation threshold, pressure pain threshold (PPT, pressure pain response (PPR, and cold pain tolerance (CPT tests. Results: First, all QST measures had high inter-rater reliability and test–retest reproducibility. Second, 10 mg oxycodone reduced PPR, increased PPT, and prolonged CPT. Third, baseline PPT and PPR revealed hyperalgesia in 31 (16% ED subjects relative to healthy volunteers. In 173 (88% ED subjects who completed repeat testing 30 minutes after pain treatment, PPT increased and PPR decreased (Cohen’s dz 0.10–0.19. Verbal pain scores (0–10 for the ED complaint decreased by 2.2 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.9, 2.6 (Cohen’s dz 0.97 but did not covary with the changes in PPT and PPR (r=0.05–0.13. Treatment effects were greatest in ED subjects

  15. Test definitions for the evaluation of digital waveform recorders.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kromer, Richard Paul (R.P. Kromer Consulting, Albuquerque, NM); Hart, Darren M.; Harris, James Mark

    2007-07-01

    This Test Definition for the Evaluation of Digitizing Waveform Recorders (DWR) defines the process that can be performed as part of the evaluation and testing of geophysical sensors, digitizers, sensor subsystems and geophysical station/array systems. The objectives are to (1) evaluate the overall technical performance of the DWR, measure the distortions introduced by the high resolution digitizers and provide a performance check of the internal calibrator if provided and (2) evaluate the technical performance of the DWR for a specific sensor application. The results of these evaluations can be compared to the manufacturer's specifications and any relevant application requirements or specifications.

  16. Toward Fairness in Assessing Student Groupwork: A Protocol for Peer Evaluation of Individual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellenz, Martin R.

    2006-01-01

    A key challenge for management instructors using graded groupwork with students is to find ways to maximize student learning from group projects while ensuring fair and accurate assessment methods. This article presents the Groupwork Peer-Evaluation Protocol (GPEP) that enables the assessment of individual contributions to graded student…

  17. Social Evaluation Fear in Childhood and Adolescence: Normative Developmental Course and Continuity of Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, P. Michiel; Gullone, Eleonora; Bokhorst, Caroline L.; Heyne, David A.; King, Neville J.

    2007-01-01

    Using cross-sectional (N=910) and longitudinal (N = 261) data from Gullone and King's (1993,1997) studies of normal fear in children and adolescents aged 7 to 18 years, the normative developmental pattern of social evaluation fear and the continuity of individual differences were investigated. Participants' responses were analysed according to two…

  18. An Evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention: A Mentoring Program for Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Abbott-Shim, Martha; VandeWiele, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the results of an evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention (ILI), a mentoring program for early childhood educators that is built upon adult self-directed learning experiences and the collaborative support of others. Sixteen Mentor and 16 Protege teachers in Head Start classrooms were selected for participation…

  19. An Evaluation of a Behaviorally Based Social Skills Group for Individuals Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Jeremy A.; Milne, Christine; Taubman, Mitchell; Oppenheim-Leaf, Misty; Torres, Norma; Townley-Cochran, Donna; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Yoder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In this study we evaluated a social skills group which employed a progressive applied behavior analysis model for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. A randomized control trial was utilized; eight participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group and seven participants were randomly assigned to a waitlist control group. The…

  20. Evaluation of the Individualized Study Program: Reduced Study Load Option and Basic Skills Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Celeste M.

    The Individualized Study Program (ISP) at the University of California, Davis, which is designed to enhance retention of students with academic skill deficiencies, was evaluated. The target group was disadvantaged students who had not met the university's entrance requirements. Attention was focused on two aspects of the program: allowing students…

  1. Fenestration System Performance Research, Testing, and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jim Benney

    2009-11-30

    The US DOE was and is instrumental to NFRC's beginning and its continued success. The 2005 to 2009 funding enables NFRC to continue expanding and create new, improved ratings procedures. Research funded by the US DOE enables increased fenestration energy rating accuracy. International harmonization efforts supported by the US DOE allow the US to be the global leader in fenestration energy ratings. Many other governments are working with the NFRC to share its experience and knowledge toward development of their own national fenestration rating process similar to the NFRC's. The broad and diverse membership composition of NFRC allows anyone with a fenestration interest to come forward with an idea or improvement to the entire fenestration community for consideration. The NFRC looks forward to the next several years of growth while remaining the nation's resource for fair, accurate, and credible fenestration product energy ratings. NFRC continues to improve its rating system by considering new research, methodologies, and expanding to include new fenestration products. Currently, NFRC is working towards attachment energy ratings. Attachments are blinds, shades, awnings, and overhangs. Attachments may enable a building to achieve significant energy savings. An NFRC rating will enable fair competition, a basis for code references, and a new ENERGY STAR product category. NFRC also is developing rating methods to consider non specular glazing such as fritted glass. Commercial applications frequently use fritted glazing, but no rating method exists. NFRC is testing new software that may enable this new rating and contribute further to energy conservation. Around the world, many nations are seeking new energy conservation methods and NFRC is poised to harmonize its rating system assisting these nations to better manage and conserve energy in buildings by using NFRC rated and labeled fenestration products. As this report has shown, much more work needs to be

  2. The relation between BMI with exercise test in individuals with cardiac ischemic pains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravanbakhsh Esmaeili1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 19 Nov, 2008; Accepted 28 Jan, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Prevalence of over weight and obesity is increasing in the world. Those over weight are more susceptible to cardiovascular diseases than other individual's. Studies indicate that body fat distribution has a determining role in the identification of risk factors. Also, the relation between BMI, cardiac ischemic pains and exercise test condition in such patients, is in need further investigation. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between BMI with exercise tolerance test in patients with cardiac ischemic pains, who were referred to the Cardiac Center of Mazandaran Province, in Sari Township.Materials and methods: In this case control study considering the BMI in ischemic patients, 65 were selected as case and 65 persons as control using Tread mill and according to Bruce Protocol, results and tolerance test time was recorded. Independent T test was used for comparison of quantitative indexes mean, while x2 test using SPSS soft ware was used for comparison of the ratio of persons with the qualitative features.Results: Data indicated mean weight of 57.1 kg and height of 1.64m in the case group. Also, 58.5% had history of hyperlipidemia (Cholesterol higher than 200mg/dl and 78.8% with history of blood sugar (higher than 120mg/dl (P<0.001. Even 63.6% had hypertension of 140/9o mm Hg. Our findings showed that BMI in the case and control groups were (26.95±3.94 and (25.95±3.49 respectively. Moreover, a significant relationship between high BMI with cardiac ischemic pains and exercise tolerance test (P<0.001 were demonstrated.Conclusion: Cardiac ischemic pains in individuals with high BMI is common. Exercise tolerance test as one of the non invasive and less expensive procedures, can be an indicator of cardiac ischemic disease.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(68: 64-69 (Persian

  3. Human precision-cut liver tumor slices as a tumor patient-individual predictive test system for oncolytic measles vaccine viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, Martina; Armeanu, Sorin; Smirnow, Irina; Kupka, Susan; Wagner, Silvia; Wehrmann, Manfred; Rots, Marianne G.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Weiss, Thomas S.; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Gregor, Michael; Bitzer, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M.

    2009-01-01

    Availability of an individualized preselection of oncolytic viruses to be used for virotherapy of tumor patients would be of great help. Using primary liver tumor resection specimens we evaluated the precision-cut liver slice (PCLS) technology as a novel in vitro test system for characterization of

  4. Colorimetric evaluation of iPhone apps for colour vision tests based on the Ishihara test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dain, Stephen J; AlMerdef, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ...) providing colour vision testing would appear as an option. In this study, the colorimetric characteristics of five available iPhone apps for colour vision testing are assessed as a prequel to possible clinical evaluation...

  5. Test and evaluation of a solar-heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Report documents results of evaluation tests performed on components of commerical solar heating and hot water system. Subsystems tested include flat plate solar collector, energy transport module, and control panel. Tests conducted include snow and wind loads, flame spread, and smoke classification as well as solar heating operation.

  6. Evaluation of the finger wrinkling test: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barneveld, van S.; Palen, van der J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tilt table testing mainly evaluates the systemic cardiovascular part of the autonomic nervous system, while it is assumed that the finger wrinkling test assesses the peripheral part of the autonomic nervous system. In this study we explored whether the finger wrinkling test could be a usefu

  7. Marking Strategies in Metacognition-Evaluated Computer-Based Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ju; Ho, Rong-Guey; Yen, Yung-Chin

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of marking and metacognition-evaluated feedback (MEF) in computer-based testing (CBT) on student performance and review behavior. Marking is a strategy, in which students place a question mark next to a test item to indicate an uncertain answer. The MEF provided students with feedback on test results…

  8. A Communicative Approach to Second Language Testing and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    CUNLIFFE, Brenda

    2002-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the communicative approach to second language teaching and discusses testing students' communicative performance. It is of primary importance that testing should reflect the approach to teaching that has been adopted; hence, this paper includes a brief description of the communicative approach to second language instruction. This approach is then related to testing procedures used to evaluate students' communicative performance.

  9. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric test results in individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujeet, Kumar Sinha; Niraj, Kumar Singh; Animesh, Barman; Rajeshwari, G; Sharanya, R

    2014-01-01

    Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder is a type of hearing loss where outer hair cell function are normal (as evidenced by the preservation of OAEs and cochlear microphonics), whereas auditory nerve functions are abnormal (as evidenced by abnormal auditory brainstem evoked potentials beginning with wave I of the ABR) and acoustic reflexes to ipsilateral and contralateral tones are absent. It is likely that in cases with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder not only the cochlear nerve, but also the vestibular nerves might get involved. The present study was conducted with an aim of finding out the inferior and superior vestibular nerve involvement through cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and Caloric test results respectively in individuals with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorders. Total 26 participants who fulfilled the criteria of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder participated for the study. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials results showed absence of responses from most of the subjects also caloric responses showed bilateral hypofunctional responses in most of the participants, which is suggestive of involvement of both the inferior as well as superior vestibular nerve in individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders. Additionally there was no association between the pattern and degree of hearing loss to caloric test results and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials results findings.

  10. Forensic individual age estimation with DNA: From initial approaches to methylation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Aradas, A; Phillips, C; Lareu, M V

    2017-07-01

    Individual age estimation is a key factor in forensic science analysis that can provide very useful information applicable to criminal, legal, and anthropological investigations. Forensic age inference was initially based on morphological inspection or radiography and only later began to adopt molecular approaches. However, a lack of accuracy or technical problems hampered the introduction of these DNA-based methodologies in casework analysis. A turning point occurred when the epigenetic signature of DNA methylation was observed to gradually change during an individual´s lifespan. In the last four years, the number of publications reporting DNA methylation age-correlated changes has gradually risen and the forensic community now has a range of age methylation tests applicable to forensic casework. Most forensic age predictor models have been developed based on blood DNA samples, but additional tissues are now also being explored. This review assesses the most widely adopted genes harboring methylation sites, detection technologies, statistical age-predictive analyses, and potential causes of variation in age estimates. Despite the need for further work to improve predictive accuracy and establishing a broader range of tissues for which tests can analyze the most appropriate methylation sites, several forensic age predictors have now been reported that provide consistency in their prediction accuracies (predictive error of ±4 years); this makes them compelling tools with the potential to contribute key information to help guide criminal investigations. Copyright © 2017 Central Police University.

  11. Fall risk assessment using the Tinetti mobility test in individuals with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, Anne D; Kegelmeyer, Deb A; Young, Gregory S; Kostyk, Sandra K

    2010-12-15

    The Tinetti Mobility Test (TMT) is a clinical balance and gait test that predicts fall risk in the elderly. This study examined the concurrent validity, usefulness of the TMT as a fall risk screening tool, and the potential ability of the TMT to predict falls in individuals with Huntington's disease (HD). Data from a retrospective review of 94 patient records were used. TMT scores were correlated with Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor scores. The ability of the TMT to accurately assess fall risk was determined using validity index measures. Logistic regression was used to assess the ability of the TMT to predict falls. TMT scores correlated with UHDRS motor scores (r(s) = -0.751, P < 0.0001). Using a cutoff value of 21, the TMT had a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 60% to identify fallers. Lower TMT scores and younger age were significant predictors of falls. The TMT is a valid tool for assessing balance and gait status and fall risk of individuals with HD.

  12. Motor dual-task Timed Up & Go test better identifies prefrailty individuals than single-task Timed Up & Go test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Fang; Yang, Hao-Jan; Peng, Ya-Chi; Chen, Hui-Ya

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated whether dual-task Timed Up & Go tests (TUG) could identify prefrail individuals more sensitively than the single-task TUG (TUGsingle ) in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. This cross-sectional study recruited adults aged 50 years and older who actively participated in local community programs. Time taken to complete single-task TUG and dual-task TUG, carrying a cup of water (TUGmanual ) or carrying out serial-3 subtraction (TUGcognitive ) while executing TUG, was measured. Prefrailty status was defined based on Fried's phenotypic definition. Of the 65 participants (mean age 71.5±8.1 years), 33.3% of the 12 middle-aged (50-64 years) and 62.3% of the 53 older (≥65 years) adults were prefrail, mainly as a result of weak grip strength. The receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for differentiating prefrailty from non-frailty showed that the area under the curve (AUC) for TUGmanual (0.73, 95% CI 0.60-0.86) was better than that for TUGsingle (0.67, 95% CI 0.54-0.80), whereas the AUC value was not significant for TUGcognitive (0.60, 95% CI 0.46-0.74). The optimal cut-off points for detecting prefrailty using TUGsingle , TUGmanual and TUGcognitive were 7.7 s (sensitivity 68%), 8.2 s (sensitivity 83%), and 14.3 s (sensitivity 29%), respectively. After adjusting for age, logistic regression analyses showed that individuals with TUGmanual 8.2 s or slower were 7.2-fold more likely to have prefrailty than those with TUGmanual faster than 8.2 s. TUGmanual is more valid and sensitive than TUGsingle in identifying prefrail individuals. The TUGmanual thus could serve as a screening tool for early detection of individuals with prefrailty in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Group discussions and test-enhanced learning: individual learning outcomes and personality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-02-07

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions benefit learning when compared to test-enhanced learning over time. The results showed that feedback does not seem to have any effect if provided to a discussion group, and that test-enhanced learning leads to better learning than the discussion groups, independent of retention interval. Moreover, we examined whether memory and learning might be influenced by the participants' need for cognition (NFC). The results showed that those scoring high on NFC remembered more than those who scored low. To conclude, testing trumps discussion groups from a learning perspective, and the discussion groups were also the least beneficial learning context for those scoring low on NFC.

  14. The long-term reliability of static and dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Anna; Wrigley, Paul J; Dean, Catherine M; Adams, Roger; Hush, Julia M

    2017-03-21

    Quantitative sensory tests (QST) have been increasingly used to investigate alterations in somatosensory function in a wide range of painful conditions. The interpretation of these findings is based on the assumption that the measures are stable and reproducible. To date, reliability of QST has been investigated for short test-retest intervals. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term reliability of a multimodal QST assessment in healthy people, with testing conducted on three occasions over 4-months. Forty-two healthy people were enrolled in the study. Static and dynamic tests were performed, including cold and heat pain threshold (CPT, HPT), mechanical wind up (WUR), pressure pain threshold (PPT), two-point discrimination (TPD) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Systematic bias, relative reliability and agreement were analysed using repeated measure ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs3,1) and standard error of the measurement (SEM), respectively. Static QST (CPT, HPT, PPT and TPD) showed good to excellent reliability (ICCs: 0.68 to 0.90). Dynamic QST (WUR and CPM) showed poor to good reliability (ICCs: 0.35 to 0.61). A significant linear decrease over time was observed for mechanical QST at the back (PPT and TPD) and for CPM (p<0.01). Static QST were stable over a period of 4 months; however, a small systematic decrease over time has been observed for mechanical QST. Dynamic QST showed considerable variability over time; in particular, CPM using PPT as the test stimulus did not show adequate reliability, suggesting that this test paradigm may be less useful for monitoring individuals over time.

  15. Development of a submaximal treadmill jogging test for fit college-aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J D; Vehrs, P R; Allsen, P E; Fellingham, G W; Fisher, A G

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a single-stage submaximal treadmill jogging test for the estimation of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). VO2max was measured in 129 relatively fit individuals (males = 84, females = 45), 18-29 yr, using a maximal treadmill protocol (mean +/- SD; VO2max = 48.3 +/- 6.2 ml.kg-1 x min-1, range = 35.6 to 62.3 ml.kg-1 x min-1). The treadmill test required subjects to sustain a comfortable, submaximal jogging pace (4.3-7.5 mph; level grade) until a steady-state heart rate was achieved (approximately 3 min). To help ensure that a submaximal level of exertion was realized for the treadmill jogging test, treadmill speed and exercise HR criteria were established that restricted treadmill speed to test yielded the following validation (V) model (r(adj) = 0.84, SEE = 3.2 ml.kg-1 x min-1): VO2max = 54.07 + 7.062 * GENDER (0 = female; 1 = male) - 0.1938 * WEIGHT (kg) + 4.47* SPEED (miles.h-1) - 0.1453 * HEART RATE (bpm). Cross-validation (CV) of the treadmill jogging test comparing observed and estimated VO2max (N = 63) resulted in r(adj) = 0.88, SEE = 3.1 ml.kg-1 x min-1. The results indicate that this submaximal single-stage treadmill jogging test based on multiple linear regression provides a valid and convenient method for estimating VO2max.

  16. The effects of whole-body vibration on the Wingate test for anaerobic power when applying individualized frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Rachel K; Wang, Henry; Nagelkirk, Paul R; Frame, Jeffrey W; Dickin, D Clark

    2014-07-01

    Recently, individualized frequency (I-Freq) has been introduced with the notion that athletes may elicit a greater reflex response at differing levels (Hz) of vibration. The aim of the study was to evaluate acute whole-body vibration as a feasible intervention to increase power in trained cyclists and evaluate the efficacy of using I-Freq as an alternative to 30Hz, a common frequency seen in the literature. Twelve highly trained, competitive male cyclists (age, 29.9 ± 10.0 years; body height, 175.4 ± 7.8 cm; body mass, 77.3 ± 13.9 kg) participated in the study. A Wingate test for anaerobic power was administered on 3 occasions: following a control of no vibration, 30 Hz, or I-freq. Measures of peak power, average power (AP), and the rate of fatigue were recorded and compared with the vibration conditions using separate repeated measures analysis of variance. Peak power, AP, and the rate of fatigue were not significantly impacted by either the 30 Hz or I-Freq vibration interventions (p > 0.05). Given the trained status of the individuals in this study, the ability to elicit an acute response may have been muted. Future studies should further refine the vibration parameters used and assess changes in untrained or recreationally trained populations.

  17. Stem analysis program (GOAP for evaluating of increment and growth data at individual tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafura Aylak Özdemir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stem analysis is a method evaluating in a detailed way data of increment and growth of individual tree at the past periods and widely used in various forestry disciplines. Untreated data of stem analysis consist of annual ring count and measurement procedures performed on cross sections taken from individual tree by section method. The evaluation of obtained this untreated data takes quite some time. Thus, a computer software was developed in this study to quickly and efficiently perform stem analysis. This computer software developed to evaluate untreated data of stem analysis as numerical and graphical was programmed as macro by utilizing Visual Basic for Application feature of MS Excel 2013 program currently the most widely used. In developed this computer software, growth height model is formed from two different approaches, individual tree volume depending on section method, cross-sectional area, increments of diameter, height and volume, volume increment percent and stem form factor at breast height are calculated depending on desired period lengths. This calculated values are given as table. Development of diameter, height, volume, increments of these variables, volume increment percent and stem form factor at breast height according to periodic age are given as chart. Stem model showing development of diameter, height and shape of individual tree in the past periods also can be taken from computer software as chart.

  18. A simple test for thermomechanical evaluation of ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1992-01-01

    A simple bend stress relaxation (BSR) test was developed to measure the creep related properties of ceramic fibers and whiskers. The test was applied to a variety of commercial and developmental Si based fibers to demonstrate capabilities and to evaluate the relative creep resistance of the fibers at 1200 to 1400 C. The implications of these results and the advantages of the BSR test over typical tensile creep tests are discussed.

  19. A 45-Second Self-Test for Cardiorespiratory Fitness: Heart Rate-Based Estimation in Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Matteo; Papini, Gabriele; Bosio, Andrea; Mohammed, Rahil A.; Bonomi, Alberto G.; Moore, Jonathan P.; Merati, Giampiero; La Torre, Antonio; Kubis, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) is a widespread essential indicator in Sports Science as well as in Sports Medicine. This study aimed to develop and validate a prediction model for CRF based on a 45 second self-test, which can be conducted anywhere. Criterion validity, test re-test study was set up to accomplish our objectives. Data from 81 healthy volunteers (age: 29 ± 8 years, BMI: 24.0 ± 2.9), 18 of whom females, were used to validate this test against gold standard. Nineteen volunteers repeated this test twice in order to evaluate its repeatability. CRF estimation models were developed using heart rate (HR) features extracted from the resting, exercise, and the recovery phase. The most predictive HR feature was the intercept of the linear equation fitting the HR values during the recovery phase normalized for the height2 (r2 = 0.30). The Ruffier-Dickson Index (RDI), which was originally developed for this squat test, showed a negative significant correlation with CRF (r = -0.40), but explained only 15% of the variability in CRF. A multivariate model based on RDI and sex, age and height increased the explained variability up to 53% with a cross validation (CV) error of 0.532 L ∙ min-1 and substantial repeatability (ICC = 0.91). The best predictive multivariate model made use of the linear intercept of HR at the beginning of the recovery normalized for height2 and age2; this had an adjusted r2 = 0. 59, a CV error of 0.495 L·min-1 and substantial repeatability (ICC = 0.93). It also had a higher agreement in classifying CRF levels (κ = 0.42) than RDI-based model (κ = 0.29). In conclusion, this simple 45 s self-test can be used to estimate and classify CRF in healthy individuals with moderate accuracy and large repeatability when HR recovery features are included. PMID:27959935

  20. Electromyographic and ultrasonographic evaluation of the masseter muscle individuals with unilateral peripheral facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Individuals with peripheral Facial Paralysis (FP show conditions that lead to unilateral mastication, performed by the non-affected side, mainly due to the difficulty of action of the buccinator muscle. Objectives: characterize the motor control and morphology of the masseter muscle in individuals with unilateral peripheral FP through electromyographic and ultrasonographic evaluation. Method: 16 participants, of both sexes, with ages superior to 18 years old. The study group (SG consisted of 8 individuals who'd had idiopathic unilateral peripheral FP for more than 6 months; the control group (CG consisted of 8 normal individuals. All the subjects were submitted to the masseter muscle evaluation through surface electromyography (sEMG and ultrasonography (USG during the following tasks: rest, clenching with cotton roller between the teeth (CT and clenching with maximum intercuspation (MIC. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in comparisons within and between the groups concerning the hemifacial asymmetry, both for the sEMG and for the USG. Also there were no significant differences in the activation of the masticatory muscles (masseter and temporal in the sEMG. Conclusions: Both the motor control and the morphology of the masseter muscles in individuals with unilateral peripheral FP were similar to those of normal individuals. Although literature suggests that the demand of functional adaptations made by FP individuals could exceed the structural and functional tolerance of the temporomandibular joints, the results indicate that the length of analyzed patient's FP was not enough to generate anatomical and physiological differences in the masticatory muscles.

  1. Overall test evaluation based on trajectory tracking data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正明; 段晓君

    2001-01-01

    According to the trajectory characteristics of ballistic missile, a reduced parameter model is constructed based on difference between telemetry trajectory and trajectory tracking data. By virtue of Bayesian theory and data fusion technique, a new test evaluation method is put forth, which can make full use of the trajectory tracking data, shooting range test data and relevant information. Since the impact point can be derived from trajectory difference and its kinetic characteristics, evaluation of the impact point is a special case of this method. The accurate evaluation and the accuracy of evaluation results can be provided by the new method.

  2. Dichotic words listening test: technical aspects and results in normal right-handed individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Regina Caner-Cukiert

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Dichotic listening tests have been being used in an increasing frequency to determine in a non-invasive way the cerebral dominance in right- and left-handed patients. This is especially relevant when surgery in eloquent brain areas is being contemplated. A Portuguese version of the dichotic words listening test was developed based mainly on Wexler's protocol. It consisted of 15 pairs of words with a stimulus dominance lower than 50%. They were recorded using natural voice and time and intensity synchronization by means of a specialized software. Each pair of words was presented twice in different channels within each block. The items were randomized and presented with a 300 msec interval between each trial. Four blocks of 30 pairs of words each were created, totalizing 120 trials. In the scoring process, the words heard over the right and left ears were wrote down. The number of times each word was heard over each ear was computed and their values subtracted yielding a partial score for each specific word pair. This process was repeated for all stimuli pair and a final score for right and left predominance was then reached. Thirty-two right handed normal individuals underwent the test 93.8% showed a right ear advantage. These results are very similar to the actual left hemisphere dominance rate in a right-handed population.

  3. DETERMINATION OF INDIVIDUAL FEATURES OF BALANCE RETAINING IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY USING STABILOMETRY TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Davydov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The practical aim of the research is to develop a methodology for assessing the functional state of the musculoskeletal system in the case of complex human pathologies and associated injuries with the objective distinction of interdependent anatomical and functional disorders in the osteoarticular system, nervous and muscular subsystems, identification pathology severity in the separate subsystems and the degree of influence for each of them on the movement organization as a whole. In patients with cerebral palsy the neurological movement disturbance is a priority component, differentiation of which may by difficult due to lack of tools to evaluate objectively and display the features of functioning nervous system in normal and pathological conditions. The authors propose a set of interval indicators of stabilometric study and method to use it providing the more qualitative consideration individual characteristics and the formation of clinically interpretable representation of a visual results image as compared with the standard vector and frequency indicators.

  4. Test-retest reliability of a continuous glucose monitoring system in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tasuku; Loehr, Sarah; Guigard, Emmanuel; McCargar, Linda J; Bell, Gordon J; Senior, Peter; Boulé, Normand G

    2014-08-01

    This study determined the test-retest reliability of a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) (iPro™2; Medtronic, Northridge, CA) under standardized conditions in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Fourteen individuals with T2D spent two nonconsecutive days in a calorimetry unit. On both days, meals, medication, and exercise were standardized. Glucose concentrations were measured continuously by CGMS, from which daily mean glucose concentration (GLU(mean)), time spent in hyperglycemia (t(>10.0 mmol/L)), and meal, exercise, and nocturnal mean glucose concentrations, as well as glycemic variability (SD(w), percentage coefficient of variation [%cv(w)], mean amplitude of glycemic excursions [MAGEc, MAGE(ave), and MAGE(abs.gos)], and continuous overlapping net glycemic action [CONGA(n)]) were estimated. Absolute and relative reliabilities were investigated using coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation, respectively. Relative reliability ranged from 0.77 to 0.95 (Pmeal, exercise, and nocturnal glycemia with CV ranging from 3.9% to 11.7%. Despite significant relative reliability (R=0.93; P10.0 mmol/L) showed larger CV (54.7%). Among the different glycemic variability measures, a significant between-day difference was observed in MAGEc, MAGE(ave), CONGA6, and CONGA12. The remaining measures (i.e., SD(w), %cv(w), MAGE(abs.gos), and CONGA1-4) indicated no between-day differences and significant relative reliability. In individuals with T2D, CGMS-estimated glycemic profiles were characterized by high relative and absolute reliability for both daily and shorter-term measurements as represented by GLUmean and meal, exercise, and nocturnal glycemia. Among the different methods to calculate glycemic variability, our results showed SD(w), %cv(w), MAGE(abs.gos), and CONGAn with n ≤ 4 were reliable measures. These results suggest the usefulness of CGMS in clinical trials utilizing repeated measured.

  5. Testing the health promotion model for adherence and quality of life in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Lewis, Kimberly; Valvano, Abbey; Smith, Suzanne; Rahn, Rebecca; Stepleman, Lara

    2017-02-01

    The nature of multiple sclerosis (MS) presents challenges to health-promoting behaviors (e.g. adherence) and quality of life. The Health Promotion Model (HPM) proposes that these outcomes are explained by individual characteristics (i.e. biological, social, psychological) and behavior-specific cognitions (e.g. self-efficacy). The current study sought to test the HPM in explaining self-reported adherence and MS quality of life among 121 MS patients receiving care in an MS clinic in the southeastern United States. Hierarchical regression models partially supported the HPM for adherence (R(2) = .27) and more fully for quality of life (QoL) (R(2) = .64). Depression and stigma were among the variables most strongly related to both adherence and QoL; contrary to HPM theory, self-efficacy was not significantly related to adherence but was to QoL. Thus, the HPM may help to guide strategies used to improve QoL among individuals living with MS; however, the model may need further refinement to be used with adherence.

  6. Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance Problems Diabetes Fainting (Syncope) Foot Problems Fractures Osteoporosis Physical Activity Prevention Sleep Problems Stroke Join our e- ... medications reveals possible toxic levels Detailed memory testing Physical therapy assessment A home safety evaluation. Updated: March 2012 ...

  7. Evaluation criteria and test methods for electrochromic windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czanderna, A.W. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Lampert, C.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Report summarizes the test methods used for evaluating electrochromic (EC) windows, and summarizes what is known about degradation of their performance, and recommends methods and procedures for advancing EC windows for buildings applications. 77 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Testing moderation in network meta-analysis with individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Getachew A; Brown, C Hendricks; Howe, George; Kellam, Sheppard G; Liu, Lei

    2016-07-10

    Meta-analytic methods for combining data from multiple intervention trials are commonly used to estimate the effectiveness of an intervention. They can also be extended to study comparative effectiveness, testing which of several alternative interventions is expected to have the strongest effect. This often requires network meta-analysis (NMA), which combines trials involving direct comparison of two interventions within the same trial and indirect comparisons across trials. In this paper, we extend existing network methods for main effects to examining moderator effects, allowing for tests of whether intervention effects vary for different populations or when employed in different contexts. In addition, we study how the use of individual participant data may increase the sensitivity of NMA for detecting moderator effects, as compared with aggregate data NMA that employs study-level effect sizes in a meta-regression framework. A new NMA diagram is proposed. We also develop a generalized multilevel model for NMA that takes into account within-trial and between-trial heterogeneity and can include participant-level covariates. Within this framework, we present definitions of homogeneity and consistency across trials. A simulation study based on this model is used to assess effects on power to detect both main and moderator effects. Results show that power to detect moderation is substantially greater when applied to individual participant data as compared with study-level effects. We illustrate the use of this method by applying it to data from a classroom-based randomized study that involved two sub-trials, each comparing interventions that were contrasted with separate control groups. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in Revascularized Individuals Submitted to an Anaerobic Potency Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Mendes Gutian Jr

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the behavior of autonomic modulation before, during and after the Modified Wingate Test (WanMT, through the analysis of Heart Rate Variability (HRV. Six volunteers between the ages of 40 and 70, post-revascularization procedures (angioplasty and/or surgery, mean duration 10 months, were submitted to supervised training for at least 10 to 14 months. The following protocol, divided into 5 phases, was used: 1 Rest Phase (RP: 180 seconds; 2 Submaximum Phase (SP: 30 seconds; 3 Maximum Phase (MP: 30 seconds; 4 Active Recuperation Phase (ARP; 120 seconds and; 5 Passive Recuperation Phase (PRP: 180 seconds. For the WanMT Test, we selected the load of 3.75% of corporal weight for all volunteers. To analyze the HRV, we used the following parameters: the interval RRr, MNN, SDNN, RMSSD and PNN50. We only observed results for the group according to RMSSD parameters during the rest phase of the test protocol in which the group remained in vagal presence and during all other phases in vagal depression. However, when we analyzed the PNN50, we observed that the group was in medium vagal presence during all of the phases of the test though there was no statistically significant difference (p> 0.05 between the phases. Therefore, we can say that all of the individuals had a similar profile in the autonomic response to the WanMT, confirmed by the parameters studied in the analysis of the HRV in the time domain.

  10. A Study on College English Test Construction and Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄雅彬

    2008-01-01

    Testing is a universal feature of social life.Throughout history people have been put to the test to prove their capabilities or to establish qualifications.Language tests play an important role in many people’s lives,acting as gateways at important transitional moments in education.The college English test paper was reviewed and checked against the test specifications to see its content coverage and representative.To evaluate the test,this includes item analysis,descriptive statistics,validity,and what we see as the strong points and the weaknesses of the test based on the analysis and the testing conditions,both of which provided validity evidence.In order to gather details of the test items,item analysis was done to find out the difficulty and discrimination of each item and identify misfit items for further discussion.

  11. Financial evaluation of introduction of the electronic prescription for Latvian individual pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namatevs I.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Presently, there is a new paradigm for pharmacy practice defined and a concept of the “seven-star pharmacist”given. The establishment of a new pharmacy system is looking for introduction and development of the electronic prescription. The aim of the study: to provide a sound research for individual pharmacies on the bases of discovering necessary financials for introduction of the electronic prescription. Results of the study: Financial aspects of the research have been evaluated by calculating payback time, ROI, NPV, and IRR. On the bases of financial calculations, the primary investment for initial costs for hardware and software has been estimated. Finally, express evaluation model for possible introduction of the electronic prescription at individual pharmacies without additional investment has been created.

  12. Feature Extraction for Mental Fatigue and Relaxation States Based on Systematic Evaluation Considering Individual Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lanlan; Sugi, Takenao; Shirakawa, Shuichiro; Zou, Junzhong; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    Feature extraction for mental fatigue and relaxation states is helpful to understand the mechanisms of mental fatigue and search effective relaxation technique in sustained work environments. Experiment data of human states are often affected by external and internal factors, which increase the difficulties to extract common features. The aim of this study is to explore appropriate methods to eliminate individual difference and enhance common features. Mental fatigue and relaxation experiments are executed on 12 subjects. An integrated and evaluation system is proposed, which consists of subjective evaluation (visual analogue scale), calculation performance and neurophysiological signals especially EEG signals. With consideration of individual difference, the common features of multi-estimators testify the effectiveness of relaxation in sustained mental work. Relaxation technique can be practically applied to prevent accumulation of mental fatigue and keep mental health. The proposed feature extraction methods are widely applicable to obtain common features and release the restriction for subjection selection and experiment design.

  13. Evaluating Decision Making Capacity in Older Individuals: Does the Law Give a Clue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall B. Kapp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate cognitive and emotional capacity is essential to autonomous decision making by adult medical patients. Society often attaches legal consequences to decisional capacity evaluations. Even when the legal system is not formally involved in the competency evaluation of a particular individual, clinical practice and ethical conduct occur within and are informed by legal parameters. Using relevant statutory, court rule, and judicial opinion examples from a representative jurisdiction within the United States, this article argues that the law seldom provides much meaningful guidance to health care and human services providers to assist them regarding the content of capacity evaluation. The article concludes by asking how society ought to respond to the paucity of helpful guidance provided by the law in the decisional capacity evaluation context.

  14. Why do Firms Evaluate Individually their Employees : The Team Work Case

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Crifo; Marc-Arthur Diaye; Nathalie Greenan

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims at analyzing the relationships between teamwork, autonomy and individual evaluation interviews. Within an agency model with teamwork, we show that a production technology characterized by strong horizontal interdependencies and super-modularity does not ensure coordination within a team. Such technological characteristics seem more frequent when firms use new organizational devices favoring quality, time or cost cuts targets. In such organizations, the monetary cost of coordin...

  15. Short-Form Philadelphia Naming Test: Rationale and Empirical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Grant M.; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To create two matched short forms of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996) that yield similar results to the PNT for measuring anomia. Method: In Study 1, archived naming data from 94 individuals with aphasia were used to identify which PNT items should be included in the short forms. The 2…

  16. Offering Parents Individualized Feedback on the Results of Psychological Testing Conducted for Research Purposes with Children: Ethical Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaivre, Marie-josee; Chambers, Christine T.; Fernandez, Conrad V.

    2007-01-01

    Research protocols involving children often include psychological testing as part of an assessment battery. Inclusion of such testing raises the question of whether parents (or others) should be offered the individualized results of their children's psychological testing conducted for research purposes. The purpose of this article is to provide a…

  17. In situ tensile testing of individual Co nanowires inside a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Dongfeng; Breguet, Jean-Marc; Clavel, Reymond [Laboratory of Robotic Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Phillippe, Laetitia; Utke, Ivo; Michler, Johann [Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures Laboratory, EMPA-Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2009-09-09

    Uniaxial quasi-static tensile testing on individual nanocrystalline Co nanowires (NWs), synthesized by electrochemical deposition process (EDP) in porous templates, was performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) using a microfabricated tensile stage consisting of a comb drive actuator and a clamped-clamped beam force sensor. A 'three-beam structure' was fabricated by focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID) on the stage, from which the specimen elongation and the tensile force could be measured simultaneously from SEM images at high magnification. A novel strategy of modifying device topography, e.g. in the form of trenches and pillars, was proposed to facilitate in situ SEM pick-and-place nanomanipulation, which could achieve a high yield of about 80% and reduce the difficulties in specimen preparation for tensile testing at the nanoscale. The measured apparent Young's modulus (75.3 {+-} 14.6) GPa and tensile strength (1.6 {+-} 0.4) GPa are significantly lower than the bulk modulus and the theoretical strength of monocrystalline samples, respectively. This result is important for designing Co NW-based devices. The origins of these distinctions are discussed in terms of the stiffnesses of the soldering portions, specimen misalignment, microstructure of the NWs and the experimental measurement uncertainty.

  18. Challenges of Pre- and Post-Test Counseling for Orthodox Jewish Individuals in the Premarital Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bajaj, K; Klugman, S; Goldwaser, T

    2016-02-01

    The Jewish community has traditionally taken ownership of its health, and has taken great strides to raise awareness about genetic issues that affect the community, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome. Thanks in part to these heightened awareness efforts, many Orthodox Jewish individuals are now using genetics services as they begin to plan their families. Due to unique cultural and religious beliefs and perceptions, the Orthodox Jewish patients who seek genetic counseling face many barriers to a successful counseling session, and often seek the guidance of programs such as the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH). In this article, we present clinical vignettes from the PJGH's clinical affiliate, the Reproductive Genetics practice at the Montefiore Medical Center. These cases highlight unique features of contemporary premarital counseling and screening within the Orthodox Jewish Community, including concerns surrounding stigma, disclosure, "marriageability," the use of reproductive technologies, and the desire to include a third party in decision making. Our vignettes demonstrate the importance of culturally-sensitive counseling. We provide strategies and points to consider when addressing the challenges of pre- and post-test counseling as it relates to genetic testing in this population.

  19. Evaluation of virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive individuals using HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Menezes, Ralciane; de Melo Riceto, Érika Bezerra; Borges, Aércio Sebastião; de Brito Röder, Denise Von Dolingër; dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo

    2016-06-01

    The colonization by Candida species is one of the most important factors related to the development of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate and discuss the phospholipase, proteinase, DNAse and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV individuals with high efficiency antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-five isolates of C. albicans obtained from saliva samples of patients with HIV and 41 isolates from HIV-negative individuals were studied. Haemolytic activity was determined in Sabouraud dextrose agar plates containing 3% glucose and 7% sheep red cells. Culture medium containing DNA base-agar, egg yolk, and bovine albumin were used to determine DNase, phospholipase and proteinase activities, respectively. All isolates from the HIV patients group had haemolytic activity, 98% showed phospholipase activity, 92% were positive for proteinase and 32% DNAse activity. Regarding the group of indivídios HIV negative, all 41 isolates presented hemolytic activity, 90.2% showed phospholipase and proteinase activity and 12.2% were positive for DNAse. The phospholipase activity was more intense for the group of HIV positive individuals. DNase production was more frequently observed in the group of HIV-positive individuals. The percentage of isolates having DNAse activity was also significantly different between the groups of patients not using any antiretroviral therapy, those using transcriptase inhibitors and those using transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor in combination.

  20. The Test and Evaluation of Unmanned and Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    SUBTITLE The Test and Evaluation of Unmanned and Autonomous Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...adaptive behavior. Only by instituting positive feedback and negative feedback test frameworks, can these systems be sustained through intergenerational

  1. DITCM roadside facilities for cooperative systems testing and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, I.; Netten, B.D.; Wedemeijer, H.; Maas, S.M.P.; Leeuwen, C.J. van; Schackmann, P.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative systems are being developed for large scale deployment in the near future. Validation of the performance of cooperative systems, and evaluation of the impact of cooperative applications is crucial before large scale deployment can proceed. The DITCM test site facilitates testing, evaluat

  2. Remote control circuit breaker evaluation testing. [for space shuttles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemko, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Engineering evaluation tests were performed on several models/types of remote control circuit breakers marketed in an attempt to gain some insight into their potential suitability for use on the space shuttle vehicle. Tests included the measurement of several electrical and operational performance parameters under laboratory ambient, space simulation, acceleration and vibration environmental conditions.

  3. Remote control circuit breaker evaluation testing. [for space shuttles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemko, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Engineering evaluation tests were performed on several models/types of remote control circuit breakers marketed in an attempt to gain some insight into their potential suitability for use on the space shuttle vehicle. Tests included the measurement of several electrical and operational performance parameters under laboratory ambient, space simulation, acceleration and vibration environmental conditions.

  4. Developing a Test Collection for the Evaluation of Integrated Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Larsen, Birger; Lund, Haakon

    2010-01-01

    he poster discusses the characteristics needed in an information retrieval (IR) test collection to facilitate the evaluation of integrated search, i.e. search across a range of different sources but with one search box and one ranked result list, and describes and analyses a new test collection...

  5. An Evaluation of "Dialogue Completion" in English Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵阳

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the validity of "dialogue completion" item in the language testing,this article explores three contradictions by analyzing aspects of its characters,content,validity and reliability.The finding is that "dialogue completion" patten has unpredicted answer and should be avoided in the testing as much as possible.

  6. 500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

    1981-10-01

    Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

  7. Counter unmanned aerial system testing and evaluation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhestani, C.; Woo, B.; Birch, G.

    2017-05-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are increasing in flight times, ease of use, and payload sizes. Detection, classification, tracking, and neutralization of UAS is a necessary capability for infrastructure and facility protection. We discuss test and evaluation methodology developed at Sandia National Laboratories to establish a consistent, defendable, and unbiased means for evaluating counter unmanned aerial system (CUAS) technologies. The test approach described identifies test strategies, performance metrics, UAS types tested, key variables, and the necessary data analysis to accurately quantify the capabilities of CUAS technologies. The tests conducted, as defined by this approach, will allow for the determination of quantifiable limitations, strengths, and weaknesses in terms of detection, tracking, classification, and neutralization. Communicating the results of this testing in such a manner informs decisions by government sponsors and stakeholders that can be used to guide future investments and inform procurement, deployment, and advancement of such systems into their specific venues.

  8. Development and Operation of an Automatic Rotor Trim Control System for the UH-60 Individual Blade Control Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Tischler, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    An automatic rotor trim control system was developed and successfully used during a wind tunnel test of a full-scale UH-60 rotor system with Individual Blade Control (IBC) actuators. The trim control system allowed rotor trim to be set more quickly, precisely and repeatably than in previous wind tunnel tests. This control system also allowed the rotor trim state to be maintained during transients and drift in wind tunnel flow, and through changes in IBC actuation. The ability to maintain a consistent rotor trim state was key to quickly and accurately evaluating the effect of IBC on rotor performance, vibration, noise and loads. This paper presents details of the design and implementation of the trim control system including the rotor system hardware, trim control requirements, and trim control hardware and software implementation. Results are presented showing the effect of IBC on rotor trim and dynamic response, a validation of the rotor dynamic simulation used to calculate the initial control gains and tuning of the control system, and the overall performance of the trim control system during the wind tunnel test.

  9. Methods Used in Economic Evaluations of Chronic Kidney Disease Testing — A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Andrew J.; Breheny, Katie; Deeks, Jon; Khunti, Kamlesh; Sharpe, Claire; Ottridge, Ryan S.; Stevens, Paul E.; Cockwell, Paul; Kalra, Philp A.; Lamb, Edmund J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high in general populations around the world. Targeted testing and screening for CKD are often conducted to help identify individuals that may benefit from treatment to ameliorate or prevent their disease progression. Aims This systematic review examines the methods used in economic evaluations of testing and screening in CKD, with a particular focus on whether test accuracy has been considered, and how analysis has incorporated issues that may be important to the patient, such as the impact of testing on quality of life and the costs they incur. Methods Articles that described model-based economic evaluations of patient testing interventions focused on CKD were identified through the searching of electronic databases and the hand searching of the bibliographies of the included studies. Results The initial electronic searches identified 2,671 papers of which 21 were included in the final review. Eighteen studies focused on proteinuria, three evaluated glomerular filtration rate testing and one included both tests. The full impact of inaccurate test results was frequently not considered in economic evaluations in this setting as a societal perspective was rarely adopted. The impact of false positive tests on patients in terms of the costs incurred in re-attending for repeat testing, and the anxiety associated with a positive test was almost always overlooked. In one study where the impact of a false positive test on patient quality of life was examined in sensitivity analysis, it had a significant impact on the conclusions drawn from the model. Conclusion Future economic evaluations of kidney function testing should examine testing and monitoring pathways from the perspective of patients, to ensure that issues that are important to patients, such as the possibility of inaccurate test results, are properly considered in the analysis. PMID:26465773

  10. Methods Used in Economic Evaluations of Chronic Kidney Disease Testing - A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Sutton

    Full Text Available The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is high in general populations around the world. Targeted testing and screening for CKD are often conducted to help identify individuals that may benefit from treatment to ameliorate or prevent their disease progression.This systematic review examines the methods used in economic evaluations of testing and screening in CKD, with a particular focus on whether test accuracy has been considered, and how analysis has incorporated issues that may be important to the patient, such as the impact of testing on quality of life and the costs they incur.Articles that described model-based economic evaluations of patient testing interventions focused on CKD were identified through the searching of electronic databases and the hand searching of the bibliographies of the included studies.The initial electronic searches identified 2,671 papers of which 21 were included in the final review. Eighteen studies focused on proteinuria, three evaluated glomerular filtration rate testing and one included both tests. The full impact of inaccurate test results was frequently not considered in economic evaluations in this setting as a societal perspective was rarely adopted. The impact of false positive tests on patients in terms of the costs incurred in re-attending for repeat testing, and the anxiety associated with a positive test was almost always overlooked. In one study where the impact of a false positive test on patient quality of life was examined in sensitivity analysis, it had a significant impact on the conclusions drawn from the model.Future economic evaluations of kidney function testing should examine testing and monitoring pathways from the perspective of patients, to ensure that issues that are important to patients, such as the possibility of inaccurate test results, are properly considered in the analysis.

  11. Development and testing of a portfolio evaluation scoring tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowicz, Karen A

    2010-02-01

    This study focused on development of a portfolio evaluation tool to guide the assignment of valid and reliable scores. Tool development was facilitated by a literature review, guidance of a faculty committee, and validation by content experts. Testing involved a faculty team that evaluated 60 portfolios. Calculation of interrater reliability and a paired-samples t test were used to judge effectiveness. Interrater reliability was 0.78 for overall scores, 0.81 for the seven program outcomes criteria scores, and more than 0.65 for scores assigned by 11 of 13 pairs of raters. There were no significant differences between raters' scores in 10 of 13 pairs. The portfolio evaluation tool demonstrated high reliability and should be tested by other schools using portfolio evaluation.

  12. Consumer evaluation and satisfaction with individual versus group parent training for children with hyperkinetic disorder (HKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heubeck, Bernd G; Otte, Thomas A; Lauth, Gerhard W

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the social validity of cognitive-behavioural parent training (CBPT) delivered in two formats to parents who have children with hyperkinetic disorder (HKD) with and without medication. Compared individual with group treatment as part of a multicentre randomized controlled trial. Obtained a broad range of evaluations and satisfaction ratings post-treatment and related them to pre-treatment and treatment factors. Attendance rates were high in the individual and slightly less in the group training. Levels of satisfaction were high in both treatment arms with large numbers rating the outcomes, the trainers and the overall training very favourably. Medication showed no effect on parental evaluations. Evaluation of outcomes and satisfaction with the trainer emerged as strong predictors of overall programme satisfaction. The social validity of cognitive-behavioural parent training for hyperkinetic children was supported by high levels of treatment acceptability across a range of indicators and for children with and without medication. Both forms of treatment delivery lead to high rates of consumer satisfaction. Consumer evaluations of CBPT appear independent of medication for HKD. Course satisfaction is clearly associated with two factors that trainers can affect: The parent-trainer relationship and parents' sense of achievement. Far more mothers than fathers attended the trainings. Attitudes may differ in other cultures. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Principles of Work Sample Testing. 3. Construction and Evaluation of Work Sample Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    validity. Personnel Psychology , 1975, 28, 563-575. Livingston, S. A. A criterion-referenced application of classical test theory. Journal of Educational ...Perfor ance Evaluation, San Antonio, Texas, 23-24 June, 1977. Wesman, A. G. Writing the test item. In R. L. Thorndike (Ed.), Educational measurement...and-pencil tests, was widespread. The Aviation Psychological Program (Guilford, 1947) used a few apparatus tests, such as measures of coor- dination

  14. Isokinetic Testing in Evaluation Rehabilitation Outcome After ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvjetkovic, Dragana Dragicevic; Bijeljac, Sinisa; Palija, Stanislav; Talic, Goran; Radulovic, Tatjana Nozica; Kosanovic, Milkica Glogovac; Manojlovic, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous rehab protocols have been used in rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. Isokinetic testing is an objective way to evaluate dynamic stability of the knee joint that estimates the quality of rehabilitation outcome after ACL reconstruction. Our investigation goal was to show importance of isokinetic testing in evaluation thigh muscle strength in patients which underwent ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation protocol. Subjects and methods: In prospective study, we evaluated 40 subjects which were divided into two groups. Experimental group consisted of 20 recreational males which underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon and rehabilitation protocol 6 months before isokinetic testing. Control group (20 subjects) consisted of healthy recreational males. In all subjects knee muscle testing was performed on a Biodex System 4 Pro isokinetic dynamo-meter et velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s. We followed average peak torque to body weight (PT/BW) and classic H/Q ratio. In statistical analysis Student’s T test was used. Results: There were statistically significant differences between groups in all evaluated parameters except of the mean value of PT/BW of the quadriceps et velocity of 60°/s (p>0.05). Conclusion: Isokinetic testing of dynamic stabilizers of the knee is need in diagnostic and treatment thigh muscle imbalance. We believe that isokinetic testing is an objective parameter for return to sport activities after ACL reconstruction. PMID:25870471

  15. Positive patch test reactions in older individuals: retrospective analysis from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1994-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Erin M; Raju, Srihari I; Fowler, Joseph F; Maibach, Howard I; Belsito, Donald V; Zug, Kathryn A; Rietschel, Robert L; Taylor, James S; Mathias, C G Toby; Fransway, Anthony F; DeLeo, Vincent A; Marks, James G; Storrs, Frances J; Pratt, Melanie D; Sasseville, Denis

    2012-02-01

    Relatively little is known about the epidemiology of allergic contact dermatitis in older individuals. We sought to determine the frequency of positive and clinically relevant patch test reactions in older individuals (≥ 65 years old) referred for patch testing, and to compare these results with those of adults (≤ 64-19 years) and children (methyldibromo glutaronitrile, methyldibromo glutaronitrile/phenoxyethanol, ethyleneurea melamine formaldehyde mix, and carba mix (P values < .0004). Patch test reaction rates that were significantly lower in older individuals than both comparison groups included: nickel, thimerosal, and cobalt (P values < .0001). Referral population was a limitation. Older individuals were more likely to have at least one positive patch test reaction as compared with children, but had similar rates to adults. The frequency of positive reactions to specific allergens differed by age group, most likely as a result of exposures. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Individual housing and handling procedures modify anxiety levels of Tg2576 mice assessed in the zero maze test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Luis; Torrente, Margarita; Domingo, José L; Colomina, María T

    2012-09-10

    The zero maze is an unconditioned anxiety test for mice, in which a number of environmental variables can modify the anxiety levels of the animals. In the present study, we have assessed how individual housing, handling procedure and interaction between individual housing and handling procedure affect the baseline anxiety of mice. Thirty-seven wild type mice and eighteen Tg2576 mice were used (obtained from crossing APPSWE hemizygous male C57BL6/SJL background with C57BL6/SJL female). Wild type mice were randomly assigned to four experimental groups: 1) group housed and unhandled, 2) group housed but handled, 3) individually housed, unhandled, and 4) individually housed and handled. In turn, Tg2576 mice were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: 1) individually housed, unhandled, and 2) individually housed and handled. The results show that individually housed mice exhibited more anxiety-related behaviors over a 5 min testing period than the other experimental groups. Use of the handling procedure was associated with a statistically significant reduction in anxiety-related behaviors among individually housed mice. No effects on anxiety-related behavior levels were observed when group housed animals were handled. When activity levels were significantly increased, a new parameter, "Time by Entries", helped to prevent activity from influencing anxiety parameters such as time in the open section of the zero maze test. This knowledge can help to design more efficient experiments without bias from data obtained by means of unconditioned tests.

  17. The Evaluation of Flammability Properties Regarding Testing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldová Linda Makovická

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the historical comparison methods with current methods for the assessment of flammability characteristics for materials an especially for wood, wood components and wooden buildings. Nowadays in European Union brings harmonization in evaluated of standards into each European country and try to make one concept of evaluated the flammability properties. In each European country to the one standard level which will be used by evaluation of materials regarding flammability. In our article we focused mainly on improving the evaluation methods in terms of flammability characteristics of using materials at building industry. In the article we present examples of different assessment methods at their own test methods in terms of fire prevention. On the base of old compared of materials by STN, BS and DIN methods for testing materials on fire and new methods of evaluating the flammability properties regarding EU standards before and after starting the flash over.

  18. Evaluation of upper limb sense of position in healthy individuals and patients after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusmano, I; Sterpi, I; Mazzone, A; Ramat, S; Delconte, C; Pisano, F; Colombo, R

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate reliability of a quantitative assessment tool for upper limb sense of position on the horizontal plane. We evaluated 15 healthy individuals (controls) and 9 stroke patients. A robotic device passively moved one arm of the blindfolded participant who had to actively move his/her opposite hand to the mirror location in the workspace. Upper-limb's position was evaluated by a digital camera. The position of the passive hand was compared with the active hand's 'mirror' position. Performance metrics were then computed to measure the mean absolute errors, error variability, spatial contraction/expansion, and systematic shifts. No significant differences were observed between dominant and non-dominant active arms of controls. All performance parameters of the post-stroke group differed significantly from those of controls. This tool can provide a quantitative measure of upper limb sense of position, therefore allowing detection of changes due to rehabilitation.

  19. Evaluating genomic tests from bench to bedside: a practical framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jennifer S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of genomic tests is one of the most significant technological advances in medical testing in recent decades. As these tests become increasingly available, so does the need for a pragmatic framework to evaluate the evidence base and evidence gaps in order to facilitate informed decision-making. In this article we describe such a framework that can provide a common language and benchmarks for different stakeholders of genomic testing. Each stakeholder can use this framework to specify their respective thresholds for decision-making, depending on their perspective and particular needs. This framework is applicable across a broad range of test applications and can be helpful in the application and communication of a regulatory science for genomic testing. Our framework builds upon existing work and incorporates principles familiar to researchers involved in medical testing (both diagnostic and prognostic generally, as well as those involved in genomic testing. This framework is organized around six phases in the development of genomic tests beginning with marker identification and ending with population impact, and highlights the important knowledge gaps that need to be filled in establishing the clinical relevance of a test. Our framework focuses on the clinical appropriateness of the four main dimensions of test research questions (population/setting, intervention/index test, comparators/reference test, and outcomes rather than prescribing a hierarchy of study designs that should be used to address each phase.

  20. The Effect of a Physiological Evaluation Program on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores for Sedentary Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenberg, Mel; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary heart disease (CHD) probability estimates of a group of sedentary males involved in an exercise stress test program from 1968 through 1974 with those of a comparison group of sedentary males not involved in the program. The program was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function and improve…

  1. Implementing an HIV Rapid Testing-Linkage-to-Care Project Among Homeless Individuals in Los Angeles County: A Collaborative Effort Between Federal, County, and City Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Henry D; Butler, Jaimi N; Knapp, Herschel; Chan, Kee; Conners, Erin E; Rumanes, Sophia F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We developed and implemented an HIV rapid testing-linkage-to-care initiative between federal and local government. Methods. We used mixed methodology; HIV testing data were collected on-site, and qualitative data were collected via telephone. We used postintervention stakeholder and staff interviews to evaluate barriers and facilitators to this initiative. Results. We tested 817 individuals. We identified and confirmed 7 preliminary HIV positive individuals (0.86% seropositivity), 5 of whom were linked to care. Mean testing cost was $48.95 per client; cost per positive result was $5714. Conclusions. This initiative can be used as a template for other health departments and research teams focusing on homelessness and mitigation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

  2. Using Tests Designed to Measure Individual Sensorimotor Subsystem Perfomance to Predict Locomotor Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, B. T.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Guined, J. R.; DeDios, Y. E.; Stepanyan, V.; Gadd, N. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readapation phase following a return to a gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functions during and after these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The way each individual's brain synthesizes the available visual, vestibular and somatosensory information is likely the basis for much of the variation. Identifying the presence of biases in each person's use of information available from these sensorimotor subsystems and relating it to their ability to adapt to a novel locomotor task will allow us to customize a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Eight tests are being used to measure sensorimotor subsystem performance. Three of these use measures of body sway to characterize balance during varying sensorimotor challenges. The effect of vision is assessed by repeating conditions with eyes open and eyes closed. Standing on foam, or on a support surface that pitches to maintain a constant ankle angle provide somatosensory challenges. Information from the vestibular system is isolated when vision is removed and the support surface is compromised, and it is challenged when the tasks are done while the head is in motion. The integration and dominance of visual information is assessed in three additional tests. The Rod & Frame Test measures the degree to which a subject's perception of the visual vertical is affected by the orientation of a tilted frame in the periphery. Locomotor visual dependence is determined by assessing how much an oscillating virtual visual world affects a treadmill-walking subject. In the third of the visual manipulation tests, subjects walk an obstacle course while wearing up-down reversing prisms. The two remaining tests include direct

  3. Evaluation of semiautonomous navigation assistance system for power wheelchairs with blindfolded nondisabled individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Sharma, PhD

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Some individuals with disabilities are denied powered mobility because they lack the visual, motor, and/or cognitive skills required to safely operate a power wheelchair. The Drive-Safe System (DSS is an add-on, distributed, shared-control navigation assistance system for power wheelchairs intended to provide safe and independent mobility to such individuals. The DSS is a human-machine system in which the user is responsible for high-level control of the wheelchair, such as choosing the destination, path planning, and basic navigation actions, while the DSS overrides unsafe maneuvers through autonomous collision avoidance, wall following, and door crossing. In this project, the DSS was clinically evaluated in a controlled laboratory with blindfolded, nondisabled individuals. Further, these individuals' performance with the DSS was compared with standard cane use for navigation assistance by people with visual impairments. Results indicate that compared with a cane, the DSS significantly reduced the number of collisions. Users rated the DSS favorably even though they took longer to navigate the same obstacle course than they would have using a standard long cane. Participants experienced less physical demand, effort, and frustration when using the DSS as compared with a cane. These findings suggest that the DSS can be a viable powered mobility solution for wheelchair users with visual impairments.

  4. Evaluation of EEG Features in Decoding Individual Finger Movements from One Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in modern signal processing techniques, the field of brain-computer interface (BCI is progressing fast towards noninvasiveness. One challenge still impeding these developments is the limited number of features, especially movement-related features, available to generate control signals for noninvasive BCIs. A few recent studies investigated several movement-related features, such as spectral features in electrocorticography (ECoG data obtained through a spectral principal component analysis (PCA and direct use of EEG temporal data, and demonstrated the decoding of individual fingers. The present paper evaluated multiple movement-related features under the same task, that is, discriminating individual fingers from one hand using noninvasive EEG. The present results demonstrate the existence of a broadband feature in EEG to discriminate individual fingers, which has only been identified previously in ECoG. It further shows that multiple spectral features obtained from the spectral PCA yield an average decoding accuracy of 45.2%, which is significantly higher than the guess level (P<0.05 and other features investigated (P<0.05, including EEG spectral power changes in alpha and beta bands and EEG temporal data. The decoding of individual fingers using noninvasive EEG is promising to improve number of features for control, which can facilitate the development of noninvasive BCI applications with rich complexity.

  5. Evaluation of Postprandial Total Antioxidant Activity in Normal and Overweight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Arslan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Postprandial changes acutely alter some mechanisms in body. There are many studies showing blood oxidative status changes after food intake, and supplementation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized meal on serum total antioxidant activity (TAA in normal weight and overweight individuals. Material and Method: Fourteen normal weight and twelve overweight individuals were given a standardized meal in the morning after an overnight fast. Serum TAA, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured at baseline, 3rd hour, and 6th hour after the meal in both groups.Results: In both normal and overweight groups, the difference between baseline and 3rd hour was significant for TAA. The TAA of the overweight group was also significantly lower than the TAA of the normal weight group at 3rd hour. However, there was no significant correlation between lipid parameters and TAA levels. Discussion: The present study shows that postprandial oxidative damage occurs more prominently in overweight individuals than in normal weight individuals. Postprandial changes acutely induce oxidative stress and impair the natural antioxidant defense mechanism. It should be noted that consuming foods with antioxidants in order to avoid various diseases and complications is useful, particularly in obese subjects.

  6. Feedback-Based Coverage Directed Test Generation: An Industrial Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Charalambos; Barrett, Geoff; Eder, Kerstin

    Although there are quite a few approaches to Coverage Directed test Generation aided by Machine Learning which have been applied successfully to small and medium size digital designs, it is not clear how they would scale on more elaborate industrial-level designs. This paper evaluates one of these techniques, called MicroGP, on a fully fledged industrial design. The results indicate relative success evidenced by a good level of code coverage achieved with reasonably compact tests when compared to traditional test generation approaches. However, there is scope for improvement especially with respect to the diversity of the tests evolved.

  7. Statistical Evaluation of Molecular Contamination During Spacecraft Thermal Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Philip; Hedgeland, Randy; Montoya, Alex; Roman-Velazquez, Juan; Dunn, Jamie; Colony, Joe; Petitto, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the statistical molecular contamination data with a goal to improve spacecraft contamination control. The statistical data was generated in typical thermal vacuum tests at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The magnitude of material outgassing was measured using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCNO device during the test. A solvent rinse sample was taken at the conclusion of each test. Then detailed qualitative and quantitative measurements were obtained through chemical analyses. All data used in this study encompassed numerous spacecraft tests in recent years.

  8. Automation and Evaluation of the SOWH Test with SOWHAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Samuel H.; Ryan, Joseph F.; Dunn, Casey W.

    2015-01-01

    The Swofford–Olsen–Waddell–Hillis (SOWH) test evaluates statistical support for incongruent phylogenetic topologies. It is commonly applied to determine if the maximum likelihood tree in a phylogenetic analysis is significantly different than an alternative hypothesis. The SOWH test compares the observed difference in log-likelihood between two topologies to a null distribution of differences in log-likelihood generated by parametric resampling. The test is a well-established phylogenetic method for topology testing, but it is sensitive to model misspecification, it is computationally burdensome to perform, and its implementation requires the investigator to make several decisions that each have the potential to affect the outcome of the test. We analyzed the effects of multiple factors using seven data sets to which the SOWH test was previously applied. These factors include a number of sample replicates, likelihood software, the introduction of gaps to simulated data, the use of distinct models of evolution for data simulation and likelihood inference, and a suggested test correction wherein an unresolved “zero-constrained” tree is used to simulate sequence data. To facilitate these analyses and future applications of the SOWH test, we wrote SOWHAT, a program that automates the SOWH test. We find that inadequate bootstrap sampling can change the outcome of the SOWH test. The results also show that using a zero-constrained tree for data simulation can result in a wider null distribution and higher p-values, but does not change the outcome of the SOWH test for most of the data sets tested here. These results will help others implement and evaluate the SOWH test and allow us to provide recommendations for future applications of the SOWH test. SOWHAT is available for download from https://github.com/josephryan/SOWHAT. PMID:26231182

  9. Diagnosing prosopagnosia in East Asian individuals: Norms for the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKone, Elinor; Wan, Lulu; Robbins, Rachel; Crookes, Kate; Liu, Jia

    2017-09-14

    The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) is widely accepted as providing a valid and reliable tool in diagnosing prosopagnosia (inability to recognize people's faces). Previously, large-sample norms have been available only for Caucasian-face versions, suitable for diagnosis in Caucasian observers. These are invalid for observers of different races due to potentially severe other-race effects. Here, we provide large-sample norms (N = 306) for East Asian observers on an Asian-face version (CFMT-Chinese). We also demonstrate methodological suitability of the CFMT-Chinese for prosopagnosia diagnosis (high internal reliability, approximately normal distribution, norm-score range sufficiently far above chance). Additional findings were a female advantage on mean performance, plus a difference between participants living in the East (China) or the West (international students, second-generation children of immigrants), which we suggest might reflect personality differences associated with willingness to emigrate. Finally, we demonstrate suitability of the CFMT-Chinese for individual differences studies that use correlations within the normal range.

  10. Evaluation of the Lipid Profile of Hypertensive Patients Compared to Non- Hypertensive Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnoosh Ghooshchi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was designed to compare the lipid profiles of hypertensive and non-hypertensive cases. Materials and Methods:In this case-control study, we assessed 200 hypertensive patients alongside 200 healthy individuals who were referred to our cardiology clinics from 2007 to 2008, in Mashhad, Iran. Blood pressure and serum lipids profile including total cholesterol, triglyceride, High-density lipoprotein (HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL were evaluated in both the case and control group. Results: Total cholesterol and the mean of serum LDL level were significantly higher in the hypertensive patients compared to non-hypertensive cases (P=0.001, while the mean of serum triglyceride levels was higher in the case group compared to the control group (P= 0.001. Conclusion: We concluded that only the serum triglyceride levels were significantly different between the hypertensive and non-hypertensive individuals.

  11. Evaluation of muscle activity during a standardized shoulder resistance training bout in novice individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2012-01-01

    training bout. The purpose of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during a shoulder resistance training bout with 15 repetitions maximum (RM) loadings in novice individuals. Twelve healthy sedentary women (age = 27-58 years; weight = 54-85 kg; height = 160-178 cm) were recruited for this study...... to the third set (averaged for all muscles: 38.1 ± 23.6 vs. 47.6 ± 28.8% and 88.4 ± 21.3 vs. 82.1 ± 18.1 Hz, respectively). In conclusion, during a shoulder resistance training bout in novice individuals using 15RM loading muscle activity of the upper, medial, and lower trapezius, the medial deltoid...... of exercises, nEMG activity was high (>60% of maximal isometric contractions). From the first to the last repetition of each set nEMG-averaged for all muscles-increased 10. 0 ± 0.4% (p

  12. Evaluation of an e-PBL model to promote individual reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2013-01-01

    Medical educators should promote the development of student clinical reasoning toward independence in clinical settings. The objective of this study was to evaluate an online problem-based learning (e-PBL) model designed to promote student individual reasoning in supplement to traditional PBL. Twelve e-PBL modules were added to the fully problem-based curriculum for Year 2 at Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (SKKUSOM). In this e-PBL, students worked on the problems individually in an online setting, followed by face-to-face discussions in a colloquium. The cases were presented using interactive multimedia to enhance the authenticity of the case and stimulate student interest in learning. A formative evaluation study was conducted to determine student satisfaction with e-PBL and its effectiveness as perceived by the students using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A cohort of Year 2 students at SKKUSOM (n = 38) took part in this study. Students perceived e-PBL significantly more positively after they had taken a module in terms of its ability to foster problem-solving skills and its ability to allow them to learn in ways suited to individual learning styles. Additionally, student survey and interview revealed that a vast majority of students were satisfied with the overall learning process in e-PBL and perceived it positively in fostering knowledge acquisition and clinical reasoning. Moreover, students found the cases realistic and engaging. The results show the potential of e-PBL to enhance traditional PBL by promoting the development of individual reasoning in a flexible online-learning environment and offering cases in an interactive multimedia format, which warrants further investigation into its impact on student learning outcomes.

  13. [The functional ability and efficiency of motor skills evaluation of individuals admitted into nursing homes in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszyński, Jacek J; Cicha-Mikołajczyk, Alicja; Gebska-Kuczerowska, Anita

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the functional ability and efficiency of motor skills of Individuals admitted into nursing homes. The study took place between the years of 1997-2004 in a group of 122 individuals. The evaluation was based on two scales: ADL and IADL. The fall-related injury scale was used to evaluate the functionality ability and efficiency of motor skills. The Tinneti Scale of fall-related accident risk assessment was used to evaluate the functional ability and efficiency of motor skills. The study concluded that a majority of the individuals revealed a decrease in their functional ability and efficiency of motor skills. This is most relevant to individuals admitted directly from hospitals. The organization and development of new nursing home facilities must meet the needs of the individuals. The individuals admitted directly from the hospital require the best care due to their critical health status.

  14. Evaluation of the face and dental morphologic alterations in adult individuals with labial incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Cristina Valdrighi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate certain facial and dental characteristics by comparing individuals with labial incompetence and individuals withpassive labial sealing. Method: The study analyzed fifty lateral teleradiographs of which 25 were of subjects with labial incompetence, with minimum opening of 4 mm, and 25 of subjects with labial sealing, none of the subjects having undergone orthodontic treatment, all being between 15 and 30 years of age, irrespective of gender and malocclusion, with slight tendency towards vertical growth. The following cephalometric variables were used: Nfp – Nfa with the objective of determining the width of the upper airway, Sn – St to measure the length of the upper lip, Sn –IIs for the vertical length of the maxilla and 1.NA to determine the inclination of the maxillary incisor. Results: The measurements obtained in the group of passive lip sealing (G1 and labial incompetence (G2 respectively, were as follows: 14.12 mm (G1 and 12.76 mm (G2 for width of the upper airway; 24.24 mm (G1 and 23.80 mm (G2 for the length of the upper lip; 26.92 mm (G1 and 28.64 mm (G2 for the vertical length of the maxilla and 26.76º (G1 and 30.76º (G2 for the inclination of themaxillary incisor. Conclusion: The results allowed one to conclude that the individual with labial incompetence presented width of the upper airway similar to that of the individual with passive lip sealing. Individuals with labial incompetence presented increased vertical length of the maxilla and not shortening of the upper lip. The presence of vestibularized maxillary incisors is a condition inherent to the subject with labial incompetence, who will consequently present hypotonicity of the upper lip.

  15. The 2007 Census Test: evaluation of key objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Garnett

    2008-01-01

    The Office for National Statistics conducted a major census field test in May and June 2007 as part of the planning and preparation for the next census of population and housing in England and Wales in 2011. The 2007 Census Test was a large scale test covering approximately 100,000 household in five local authorities (LAs) selected to reflect a range of geographic conditions and social characteristics. Within England the Test covered parts of Bath and North East Somerset, Camden, Liverpool and Stoke on Trent. In Wales the Test took place in Carmarthenshire. The selected LAs were chosen to provide a varied cross section of the population and types of housing that would be covered in a full census. This article summarises the evaluation results and, where decided, decisions for 2011 on four key aspects of the Test: delivery method - post-out compared with hand delivery; inclusion of an income question; outsourcing recruitment, training and pay; and liaison with LAs.

  16. Testes orais individuais e em pares: um estudo das diferenças de desempenho Individual and pair speaking test formats: a study of differences in performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Barbosa Marochi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi verificar se há diferença no desempenho caso os candidatos façam o teste oral sozinhos ou em pares. Duas versões do First Certificate in English foram aplicadas para dez alunos em duas situações diferentes (examinadorcandidato e candidato-candidato-examinador. Todos os testes foram gravados, transcritos e analisados estatisticamente. Após o segundo teste, os participantes responderam a um questionário para informar suas opiniões sobre os testes. Apesar de haver uma tendência em falar mais, usar uma maior diversidade de vocabulário e uma maior complexidade gramatical quando em pares, oito dos dez candidatos manifestaram uma preferência pela realização do teste individual.This research is aimed at checking whether there are differences or not on the candidates' test performances in case the test is taken individually or in pairs. Two versions of the First Certificate in English were applied on ten students in two different occasions (examiner-candidate and candidate-candidate-examiner. All tests were recorded, transcribed and statistically analyzed. After the second test, the participants answered a questionnaire to give their opinion about the tests. Although there is a bias to speak more, use a more diverse vocabulary and when in pairs, eight out of ten candidates revealed they would rather take the test individually.

  17. From individual behaviors to an evaluation of the collective evolution of crowds along footbridges

    CERN Document Server

    Corbetta, Alessandro; Bruno, Luca

    2012-01-01

    In the present work a mathematical model aimed at evaluating the dynamics of crowds is derived and discussed. In particular, on the basis of some phenomenological considerations focused on pedestrians' individual behavior, a model dealing with the collective evolution of the crowd, formalized in terms of a conservation law for a crowding measure, is obtained. To suit engineering needs, modeling efforts are made toward the simulation of real world crowd events specifically happening along pedestrian walkways. The response of the model as well as its tunability are studied in some computational domains inspired by existing footbridges.

  18. Developing a Test Collection for the Evaluation of Integrated Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Larsen, Birger; Lund, Haakon;

    2010-01-01

    he poster discusses the characteristics needed in an information retrieval (IR) test collection to facilitate the evaluation of integrated search, i.e. search across a range of different sources but with one search box and one ranked result list, and describes and analyses a new test collection...... constructed for this purpose. The test collection consists of approx. 18,000 monographic records, 160,000 papers and journal articles in PDF and 275,000 abstracts with a varied set of metadata and vocabularies from the physics domain, 65 topics based on real work tasks and corresponding graded relevance...... assessments. The test collection may be used for systems- as well as user-oriented evaluation....

  19. Test Method for Compression Resilience Evaluation of Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-yuan Hong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A test method was proposed and a measurement system was developed to characterize the compression resilience properties of textiles based on the mechanical device, microelectronics, sensors and control system. Derived from the typical pressure-displacement curve and test data, four indices were defined to characterize the compression performance of textiles. The test principle and the evaluation method for compression resilience of textiles were introduced. Twelve types of textile fabrics with different structural features and made from different textile materials were tested. The one-way ANOVA analysis was carried out to identify the significance of the differences of the evaluation indices among the fabrics. The results show that each index is significantly different among different fabrics. The denim has the maximum compressional resilience and the polar fleece has the minimum compressional resilience.

  20. Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    it can be used as an additional glass characterization method . If the SOC of a glass sample is known, the stress state of a glass specimen can be...evaluated through photoelastic methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 11 8...ARL-TN-0756 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation

  1. Criminal law and HIV testing: empirical analysis of how at-risk individuals respond to the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Goo

    2014-01-01

    This Note assesses the effect of laws that specifically criminalize behaviors that expose others to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This Note examines the relationship between HIV testing decisions by high-risk individuals and the existence of these HIV-specific statutes, as well as the amount of media coverage related to them. One of the main reasons public health experts criticize criminalization of HIV-exposing behavior is that it may discourage at-risk individuals from undergoing HIV testing. This argument, however, remains empirically untested to date. This study quantitatively examines whether at-risk individuals living in jurisdictions with HIV-specific statutes are less likely to report having been tested for HIV in the past year compared to those living in jurisdictions without HIV-specific statutes. Regression analysis is conducted using data collected in the United States over a seven-year span. The results show that at-risk individuals residing in states with HIV-specific statutes are no less likely to report having been tested for HIV than those who live in other states. However, the number of people who reported that they had been tested for HIV is inversely correlated with the frequency of newspaper coverage of criminalization of HIV-exposing behavior. These findings imply that at-risk individuals' HIV testing is associated with media coverage of criminalizing HIV-exposing behavior. The negative impact that criminal law has on HIV testing rates could be a serious public health threat. Testing is often the initial step in public health interventions that most effectively modify the risky behavior of HIV-positive individuals. The adverse consequence of criminalization should weigh heavily in the design and application of criminal sanctions for HIV-exposing behavior. In addition, future research should further explore the relationships between criminalization, media coverage of criminalization, and HIV testing decisions for a more nuanced

  2. Review: J-integral resistance curve testing and evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-kui ZHU

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a critical review is presented of the history and current state of the art of J-integral resistance curve testing and experimental evaluation methods in conjunction with a discussion of the development of the plane strain fracture toughness test standard ASTM E 1820 developed by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Early research efforts on this topic are reviewed first. These include the J-integral concept, experimental estimates of the J-integral for stationary cracks, load line displacement (LLD) and crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) based η factor equations, different formulations of J-integral incremental equations for growing cracks, crack growth corrected J-R curve determination, and experimental test methods. Recent developments in J-R curve testing and evaluation are then described, with emphasis on accurate J-integral incremental equations,a normalization method, a modified basic method, a CMOD direct method with use of incremental equations, relationships of plastic geometry factors, constraint-dependent J-R curve testing and correction approaches. An overview of the present fracture toughness test standard ASTM E1820-08a is then presented. The review shows that after more than 40 years of investigation and development, the J-integral resistance curve test methods in ASTM E 1820 have become simpler, more cost-effective and more accurate.

  3. General test plan redundant sensor strapdown IMU evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, T.; Irwin, H. A.; Miyatake, Y.; Wedekind, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    The general test plan for a redundant sensor strapdown inertial measuring unit evaluation program is presented. The inertial unit contains six gyros and three orthogonal accelerometers. The software incorporates failure detection and correction logic and a land vehicle navigation program. The principal objective of the test is a demonstration of the practicability, reliability, and performance of the inertial measuring unit with failure detection and correction in operational environments.

  4. Director, Operational Test and Evaluation FY 2014 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    training continues at Eglin AFB, Florida , and expanded in September 2014 when additional F-35B training began at MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina...sensor from a shore base at the contractor’s facility in West Palm Beach, Florida . A third phase of testing described by the RMS Test and Evaluation...Martin – West Palm Beach, Florida • AN/AQS-20A: Raytheon Corporation – Portsmouth, Rhode Island the LCS MCM mission package and therefore would not

  5. Wartime Test and Evaluation; Initiatives Lead to Cultural Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-14

    Realignment and Closure (BRAC) decision; Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona; and White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico , and each specializes in...MRTFBs, led to the “ Uber Lean” process of evaluating each test center’s mission, functions and core competencies. That analysis identified each test...facilities that could be eliminated. The outcome led to the development of investment strategies from a holistic DTC perspective. The DTC “ Uber Lean

  6. Evaluation of the individual hydrogen bonding energies in N-methylacetamide chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The individual hydrogen bonding energies in N-methylacetamide chains were evaluated at the MP2/6-31+G** level including BSSE correction and at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level including BSSE and van der Waals correction.The calculation results indicate that compared with MP2 results,B3LYP calculations without van der Waals correction underestimate the individual hydrogen bonding energies about 5.4 kJ m ol-1 for both the terminal and central hydrogen bonds,whereas B3LYP calculations with van der Waals correction produce almost the same individual hydrogen bonding energies as MP2 does for those terminal hydrogen bonds,but still underestimate the individual hydrogen bonding energies about 2.5 kJ mol-1 for the hydrogen bonds near the center.Our calculation results show that the individual hydrogen bonding energy becomes more negative (more attractive) as the chain becomes longer and that the hydrogen bonds close to the interior of the chain are stronger than those near the ends.The weakest individual hydrogen bonding energy is about-29.0 kJ m ol-1 found in the dimer,whereas with the growth of the N-methylacetamide chain the individual hydrogen bonding energy was estimated to be as large as-62.5 kJ mol-1 found in the N-methylacetamide decamer,showing that there is a significant hydrogen bond cooperative effect in N-methylacetamide chains.The natural bond orbital analysis indicates that a stronger hydrogen bond corresponds to a larger positive charge for the H atom and a larger negative charge for the O atom in the N-H···O=C bond,corresponds to a stronger second-order stabilization energy between the oxygen lone pair and the N-H antibonding orbital,and corresponds to more charge transfer between the hydrogen bonded donor and acceptor molecules.

  7. Inter- and intra-individual variation in tests of cell-mediated immunity in young and old women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molls, Roshni R; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Fick, Tara; Mastro, Andrea M; Wagstaff, David; Handte, Gordon; Ball, Rick

    2003-05-01

    Exploring means to maintain or improve immunity in older persons has been receiving attention. To establish relationships between immune function and variables of interest, it is important to determine these variables accurately and precisely. Precision relates to the degree of variation in the laboratory test. The nature and magnitude of variability in tests of immune function has not been described extensively. We examined inter- and intra-individual variation in tests of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in generally healthy and well-nourished young (20-40 years; n=15) and old (60-80 years; n=15) women. Subjects provided blood samples on 2 days within a week to determine leukocyte subsets, T-cell proliferation response to phytohemagglutinin A and concanavalin A, and interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2 and IL-6 production by stimulated mononuclear cells. Intra-individual variation was partitioned into day-to-day biological and analytical variation. Inter-individual variation was greater than intra-individual variability for most tests of CMI for both age groups. Furthermore, all CMI tests exhibited large day-to-day intra-individual variation (CV approximately 15% or greater) which was primarily due to biological rather than analytical sources, for both age groups. In conclusion, both age groups showed large between-person and considerable within-person variation in CMI tests. Therefore, assessment of CMI based on a single blood draw may not provide a reliable estimate of immune function.

  8. Evaluating functional clothing in climatic chamber tests versus field tests: a comparison of quantitative and qualitative methods in product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, I C; Rosenblad, E F

    1998-10-01

    For the evaluation of clothing by human beings, two different approaches can be identified--laboratory tests (i.e. climatic chamber tests) or field trials/wear trials. It has been suggested that the performance of clothing can be adequately predicted on the basis of the data obtained from climatic chamber tests and that field trials may be expendable altogether. From a product development perspective, this paper discusses the information provided by standard data collection methods and tools for the assessment of thermal comfort used in laboratory settings and compares this information with that acquired in field trials. When assessing the information provided in the laboratory test against those questions posed in a development process, the results highlight the insufficiency of objectively measurable criteria. Therefore, objective measurements alone cannot verify the adequacy of stated requirements for thermal comfort. The use of appropriate and sensitive tools for collecting subjective votes should also be noted, since small differences in thermal sensation affected the individual's preference for clothing. Exposed differences between subjects, in terms of thermophysiological as well as subjective responses, illustrate the importance of studying individual values and deviations as opposed to strict mean values for large populations in order to satisfy a potential user group. It is argued that complementary interviews form a basis for further understanding of ratings and preferences and that they should also be included in the climatic chamber evaluation 'tool box'. User satisfaction is based on a simultaneous assessment of partly opposing properties into a satisfying use value. Although laboratory test procedures can be developed and improved in relation to design issues, field evaluations must be regarded as an integrated part of an iterative development process. Only the actual use situation can provide the total spectrum of conditions on which basis

  9. Three dimensional hemispherical test development to evaluate detonation wave breakout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, E. G.; Morris, J. S.; Lieber, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Onionskin test has been the standard test to evaluate detonation wave breakout over a hemispherical surface for decades. It has been an effective test used in a variety of applications to qualify main charge materials, evaluate different boosters, and compare different detonators. It is not without its shortfalls however. It only images a small portion of the explosive and requires very precise alignment and camera requirements to make sense of the results. Asymmetry in explosive behavior cannot be pinpointed or evaluated effectively. We have developed a new diagnostic using fiber optics covering the surface of the explosive to yield a 3D representation of the detonation wave behavior. Precise timing mapping of the detonation over the hemispherical surface is generated which can be converted to detonation wave breakout behavior using Huygens' wave reconstruction. This report will include the results of a recent suite of tests on PBX 9501, and discussion of how the test was developed for this explosive and contrasting previous work on PBX 9502. The results of these tests will describe the effects on detonation wave breakout symmetry when Sylgard 184 is placed between the detonator and booster. The effects on symmetry and timing when the Sylgard gap thickness is increased and the detonator is canted will be shown.

  10. [Evaluation of latex agglutination test for anti-treponemal antibody in comparison with chemical luminescence tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Nagatomo, Ritsuko; Okubo, Shigeo; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2011-02-01

    The performance of a latex agglutination test (Mediace TPLA) in the detection of anti-treponemal antibody was evaluated in comparison with chemical luminescence tests (LumipulsII-N and Architect TPAb) in 346 cases. Anti-treponemal antibody was further determined by immunochromatography and immunoblotting tests and additionally evaluated by a serological test for syphilis with lipoidal antigens. The total concordance rate between the latex agglutination test and chemical luminescence tests ranged from 96% to 97%: the positive concordance rate ranged from 96% to 97%, and the negative concordance rate, from 97% to 98%. The latex agglutination test showed two false positive cases, and each chemical luminescence test showed two false positive cases, respectively. In eight cases, only the latex agglutination test showed negative results; all specimens contained anti-treponemal antibodies. However, none of these was considered to be a false positive and each was treated as syphilis based on the results of confirmatory analysis with immunochromatography and immunoblotting tests and a serological test for syphilis. The discordant results in the latex agglutination test and chemical luminescence tests may be caused by the different antigenisity of each test. With detailed analysis of those sera treated as syphilis, each specimen was found to contain various antibodies against syphilitic antigens, suggesting that there was a different specificity of native and recombinant antigens. Based on the present results for the comparison between the latex agglutination test and chemical luminescence tests, it was considered that further investigation is necessary to clarify the anti-treponemal antibody profile of syphilis at the disease stage.

  11. Analytical evaluation of five oral fluid drug testing devices

    OpenAIRE

    Isalberti, Cristina; Van Stechelman, Sylvie; Legrand, Sara-Ann; Van der Linden, Gertrude; Verstraete, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The correlation with blood drug presence and the easiness of sample collection make oral fluid an ideal matrix for roadside drug tests targeting impaired drivers. Aim: To evaluate the reliability of five oral fluid testing devices: Varian OraLab®6, Dräger DrugTest® 5000, Cozart® DDS 806, Mavand RapidSTAT® and Innovacon OrAlert. Method: More than 760 samples were collected from volunteers either at drug addiction treatment centres or during roadside sessions. Target drug ...

  12. Development and evaluation of an Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM) for randomized controlled trials in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Francesca; Williams, Julie; Bird, Victoria; Freidl, Marion; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Macpherson, Rob; Slade, Mike

    2015-12-01

    Pre-defined, researcher-selected outcomes are routinely used as the clinical end-point in randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, individualized approaches may be an effective way to assess outcome in mental health research. The present study describes the development and evaluation of the Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM), which is a patient-specific outcome measure to be used for RCTs of complex interventions. IOM was developed using a narrative review, expert consultation and piloting with mental health service users (n = 20). The final version of IOM comprises two components: Goal Attainment (GA) and Personalized Primary Outcome (PPO). For GA, patients identify one relevant goal at baseline and rate its attainment at follow-up. For PPO, patients choose an outcome domain related to their goal from a pre-defined list at baseline, and complete a standardized questionnaire assessing the chosen outcome domain at baseline and follow-up. A feasibility study indicated that IOM had adequate completion (89%) and acceptability (96%) rates in a clinical sample (n = 84). IOM was then evaluated in a RCT (ISRCTN02507940). GA and PPO components were associated with each other and with the trial primary outcome. The use of the PPO component of IOM as the primary outcome could be considered in future RCTs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evaluation and Comparison of Individual and Group Sports in the Social Adjustment of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Mousavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the role of sports in youth social adjustment and social skills in their interpersonal relationships and social skills associated with academic achievement and their role in reducing mental and psychological problems ,we conducted this study to examine the role of physical activity in different sport fields. In order to compare the social skills of male students participating in the team and individual sports in Islamic Azad University of Zanjan, we chose 30 randomly as the sample size. In order to gather information, two questionnaires-i-e-demographic questionnaire and social skills questionnaire (social adjustment section Albert J. Petitpas F (2004 with a reliability of 0.90 were used. For data analysis, descriptive statistics and T-test were used. Results showed significant differences between team and individual sports athletes with the soccer ranking higher than the rest of the field. Gymnastics athletes would have better social adjustment than the rest of athletes and the rowing athletes had less social adjustment, but this difference was not statistically significant and the results showed no significant relationship between age and marital status with the Social Adjustment. The results of this study confirm a considerable effect of team sports on levels of social adjustment compared with individual sports.

  14. Dredged Material Evaluations: Review of Zooplankton Toxicity Test Methods for Marine Water Quality Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    for elutriate toxicity tests are fish , invertebrates (crustaceans), and zooplankton. Freshwater evaluations (following CWA regulations) use standard...is not a limiting factor in cultures. However, it is appropriate to investigate lower feeding rations, or absence of food, in toxicity testing to...2012. Standard guide for selection of resident species as test organisms for aquatic and sediment toxicity tests. Designation: E1850 − 04.West

  15. Evaluation of ID-PaGIA syphilis antibody test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaber, Paul; Makoid, Ene; Aus, Anneli; Loivukene, Krista; Poder, Airi

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis is usually accomplished by serology. There are currently a large number of different commercial treponemal tests available that vary in format, sensitivity and specificity. To evaluate the ID-PaGIA Syphilis Antibody Test as an alternative to other specific treponemal tests for primary screening or confirmation of diagnosis. Serum samples from healthy adults (n = 100) were used for detection of specificity of ID-PaGIA. To evaluate sensitivity of ID-PaGIA serum samples (n = 101) from patients with confirmed or suspected syphilis were tested for syphilis antibodies with FTA-Abs IgM, ID-PaGIA, ELISA IgM and TPHA tests. No false-positive results were found with ID-PaGIA. Sensitivity of various treponemal tests was the following: FTA-Abs IgM: 95.5%, ID-PaGIA and ELISA IgM: 94%, and TPHA 75%. The positive and negative predictive values of ID-PaGIA were 100 and 89.5%, respectively. Compared with other treponemal tests ID-PaGIA has excellent sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Efficient p-value evaluation for resampling-based tests

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, K.

    2011-01-05

    The resampling-based test, which often relies on permutation or bootstrap procedures, has been widely used for statistical hypothesis testing when the asymptotic distribution of the test statistic is unavailable or unreliable. It requires repeated calculations of the test statistic on a large number of simulated data sets for its significance level assessment, and thus it could become very computationally intensive. Here, we propose an efficient p-value evaluation procedure by adapting the stochastic approximation Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. The new procedure can be used easily for estimating the p-value for any resampling-based test. We show through numeric simulations that the proposed procedure can be 100-500 000 times as efficient (in term of computing time) as the standard resampling-based procedure when evaluating a test statistic with a small p-value (e.g. less than 10( - 6)). With its computational burden reduced by this proposed procedure, the versatile resampling-based test would become computationally feasible for a much wider range of applications. We demonstrate the application of the new method by applying it to a large-scale genetic association study of prostate cancer.

  17. Review of the efficacy of individualized chemotherapy selected by in vitro drug sensitivity testing for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, P; Johnson, B E

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the potential efficacy of individualized chemotherapy selected by in vitro drug sensitivity testing (DST) compared with empiric regimens for patients with cancer. MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched for articles published (in English) about prospective clinical trials in which patients were treated with chemotherapy that was selected with the use of in vitro DST. We identified 12 prospective studies that examined the benefit of chemotherapy selected by DST. Five hundred six patients (33%) were treated with chemotherapy that was selected with the use of in vitro DST. The mean response rate for patients treated with in vitro-selected therapy was 27% (range, 10% to 100%; n = 12 studies) compared with 18% (range, 0% to 100%; n = 7 studies) for patients treated with empiric therapy. Five studies (only one randomized) evaluated the impact of chemotherapy selected by in vitro DST on patient survival. Three studies showed that survival was 1 to 4 months longer for the 238 patients treated with empiric chemotherapy compared with that of the 65 patients treated with chemotherapy that was selected by in vitro testing. Two nonrandomized studies showed that survival was 4 or 19 months longer for 27 patients treated with chemotherapy selected by in vitro testing compared with that of 80 patients who were treated with empiric chemotherapy. Only one third of patients entered in prospective trials of in vitro DST were actually treated with an in vitro best regimen. The response rates seem to be better with in vitro selected chemotherapy regimens than with empiric regimens, but the impact on survival has not been adequately addressed.

  18. Evaluating the Predictive Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, Stephen G.; Talento-Miller, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    Admissions data and first-year grade point average (GPA) data from 11 graduate management schools were analyzed to evaluate the predictive validity of Graduate Management Admission Test[R] (GMAT[R]) scores and the extent to which predictive validity held across sex and race/ethnicity. The results indicated GMAT verbal and quantitative scores had…

  19. Evaluating the Predictive Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, Stephen G.; Talento-Miller, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    Admissions data and first-year grade point average (GPA) data from 11 graduate management schools were analyzed to evaluate the predictive validity of Graduate Management Admission Test[R] (GMAT[R]) scores and the extent to which predictive validity held across sex and race/ethnicity. The results indicated GMAT verbal and quantitative scores had…

  20. Novel speed test for evaluation of badminton specific movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Møller; Karlsen, Anders; Nybo, Lars

    2015-01-01

    in badminton players. Thus, the BST appears to be sport specific as it may discriminate between groups (elite, less trained players and non-badminton players) with similar sprinting performance and the low test-retest variation may allow for using the BST to evaluate longitudinal changes e.g. training effects...

  1. Moving beyond traditional null hypothesis testing: evaluating expectations directly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, R.; Hoijtink, H.J.A.; Romeijn, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review illustrates that testing the traditional null hypothesis is not always the appropriate strategy. Half in jest, we discuss Aristotle's scientific investigations into the shape of the earth in the context of evaluating the traditional null hypothesis. We conclude that Aristotle was ac

  2. In vitro tests to evaluate immunotoxicity: A preliminary study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carfi', M; Gennari, A; Malerba, I; Corsini, E; Pallardy, M; Pieters, R; Loveren, Henk van; Vohr, H W; Hartung, T; Gribaldo, L

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of new and existing Chemicals (REACH) will increase the number of laboratory animals used, if alternative methods will not be available. In the meantime, REACH promotes the use of in vitro tests and, therefore, a set of appropriated al

  3. Aging evaluation of class 1E batteries: Seismic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edson, J.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a seismic testing program on naturally aged class 1E batteries obtained from a nuclear plant. The testing program is a Phase 2 activity resulting from a Phase 1 aging evaluation of class 1E batteries in safety systems of nuclear power plants, performed previously as a part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program and reported in NUREG/CR-4457. The primary purpose of the program was to evaluate the seismic ruggedness of naturally aged batteries to determine if aged batteries could have adequate electrical capacity, as determined by tests recommended by IEEE Standards, and yet have inadequate seismic ruggedness to provide needed electrical power during and after a safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) event. A secondary purpose of the program was to evaluate selected advanced surveillance methods to determine if they were likely to be more sensitive to the aging degradation that reduces seismic ruggedness. The program used twelve batteries naturally aged to about 14 years of age in a nuclear facility and tested them at four different seismic levels representative of the levels of possible earthquakes specified for nuclear plants in the United States. Seismic testing of the batteries did not cause any loss of electrical capacity. 19 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Evaluation of VDRL test in Sudanese blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, E F; El Sheikh, F S; Khalil, I A

    1982-04-01

    2201 blood donors and 199 patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STD) were tested with the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) and the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) tests. The VDRL test was found positive in 30 (1.36%) of the blood donors and 11 (5.5%) of the patients. Syphilis was confirmed by FTA-ABS test in one patient (0.5%) but not in blood donors. The biological false positive (BFP) reactions were 1.36% in blood donors and 5.0% in control patients. The place of VDRL test as a screening test for syphilis and the low rate of its seroreactivity among blood donors was discussed. The BFP reactions were reviewed to assist in the interpretation of the VDRL test which was evaluated on the basis of the control specimens. It was concluded that syphilis should be excluded before blood is transfused and the VDRL test should remain the screening test of choice in the blood transfusion service.

  5. Individual Differences in Gender Role Beliefs Influence Spatial Ability Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Laura J.; Mayer, Richard E.; Bohon, Lisa M.

    2005-01-01

    The gender role hypothesis posits that performance on a cognitive ability test is influenced by whether the test instructions frame the test as measuring a skill that is consistent or inconsistent with the test taker's gender role beliefs. The Bem sex role inventory was used to measure the gender role of female college students, and the group…

  6. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  7. Evaluation of a virucidal quantitative carrier test for surface disinfectants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger F Rabenau

    Full Text Available Surface disinfectants are part of broader preventive strategies preventing the transmission of bacteria, fungi and viruses in medical institutions. To evaluate their virucidal efficacy, these products must be tested with appropriate model viruses with different physico-chemical properties under conditions representing practical application in hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate a quantitative carrier assay. Furthermore, different putative model viruses like adenovirus type 5 (AdV-5 and different animal parvoviruses were evaluated with respect to their tenacity and practicability in laboratory handling. To evaluate the robustness of the method, some of the viruses were tested in parallel in different laboratories in a multi-center study. Different biocides, which are common active ingredients of surface disinfectants, were used in the test. After drying on stainless steel discs as the carrier, model viruses were exposed to different concentrations of three alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA, with a fixed exposure time of 5 minutes. Residual virus was determined after treatment by endpoint titration. All parvoviruses exhibited a similar stability with respect to GDA, while AdV-5 was more susceptible. For PAA, the porcine parvovirus was more sensitive than the other parvoviruses, and again, AdV-5 presented a higher susceptibility than the parvoviruses. All parvoviruses were resistant to alcohols, while AdV-5 was only stable when treated with 2-propanol. The analysis of the results of the multi-center study showed a high reproducibility of this test system. In conclusion, two viruses with different physico-chemical properties can be recommended as appropriate model viruses for the evaluation of the virucidal efficacy of surface disinfectants: AdV-5, which has a high clinical impact, and murine parvovirus (MVM with the highest practicability among the parvoviruses tested.

  8. Comparative evaluation of Rose Bengal plate agglutination test, mallein test, and some conventional serological tests for diagnosis of equine glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naureen, Abeera; Saqib, Muhammad; Muhammad, Ghulan; Hussain, Muhammad H; Asi, Muhammad N

    2007-07-01

    The Rose Bengal plate agglutination test (RBT) was evaluated for the diagnosis of equine glanders, and its diagnostic efficiency was compared with that of mallein and other serological tests, including indirect hemagglutination test (IHAT), complement fixation test (CFT), and modified counter immunoelectrophoresis test (mCIET). Sera from 70 naturally infected culture-positive, 96 potentially exposed cohorts, and 110 healthy equines were tested. All tests but mCIET showed 100% specificity when testing the sera from glanders-negative equines. The calculated sensitivities of RBT, IHAT, CFT, mCIET, and mallein test when testing culture-positive equines were 90.0, 97.1, 91.4, 81.4, and 75.7%, respectively. The RBT was significantly (P glandered and nonglandered animals, the highest agreement (0.987) was found between RBT and CFT followed by RBT and IHAT (0.940), RBT and mallein test (0.871), and RBT and mCIET (0.852). Because the RBT is simpler and rapid to perform, the inclusion of the test as a supplementary test for the diagnosis of glanders in field conditions is recommended.

  9. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models;  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36

  10. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  11. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE I TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Miller, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Lambert, D.

    2014-04-22

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further evaluation of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid1, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters for the melter flammability models o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species Prior to startup, a number of improvements and modifications were made to the CEF, including addition of cameras, vessel support temperature measurement, and a heating

  12. An implicit test of UX: individuals differ in what they associate with computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmettow, M.; Noordzij, M.L.; Mundt, M.

    2013-01-01

    User experience research has made considerable progress in understanding subjective experience with interactive technology. Nevertheless, we argue, some blind spots have remained: individual differences are frequently ignored, the prevalent measures of self-report rarely undergo verification, and ov

  13. Ability evaluation by binary tests: Problems, challenges & recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkansky, E.; Turetsky, V.

    2016-11-01

    Binary tests designed to measure abilities of objects under test (OUTs) are widely used in different fields of measurement theory and practice. The number of test items in such tests is usually very limited. The response to each test item provides only one bit of information per OUT. The problem of correct ability assessment is even more complicated, when the levels of difficulty of the test items are unknown beforehand. This fact makes the search for effective ways of planning and processing the results of such tests highly relevant. In recent years, there has been some progress in this direction, generated by both the development of computational tools and the emergence of new ideas. The latter are associated with the use of so-called “scale invariant item response models”. Together with maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach, they helped to solve some problems of engineering and proficiency testing. However, several issues related to the assessment of uncertainties, replications scheduling, the use of placebo, as well as evaluation of multidimensional abilities still present a challenge for researchers. The authors attempt to outline the ways to solve the above problems.

  14. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  15. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Chen

    Full Text Available Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications.

  16. Evaluation of behavioral states among morning and evening active healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Hidalgo

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The Horne-Östberg questionnaire partly covers some factors that may be important determinants of peak time and characterize patterns of behavior. We conducted a study for the evaluation of self-reported behavioral states (hunger sensation, availability for study, physical exercise, solving daily problems, and time preferences as expressions of underlying cyclic activity. Three hundred and eighteen community subjects without history of medical, psychiatric, or sleep disorders were evaluated in a cross-sectional design. A self-report about daily highest level of activity was used to categorize individuals into morning, evening, and indifferently active. Time-related behavioral states were evaluated with 23 visual analog questions. The responses to most analogic questions were significantly different between morning and evening active subjects. Logistic regression analysis identified a group of behaviors more strongly associated with the self-reported activity pattern (common wake up time, highest subjective fatigue, as well as wake up, bedtime, exercise and study preferences. These findings suggested that the patterns of activity presented by normal adults were related to specific common behavioral characteristics that may contribute to peak time.

  17. Evaluation of Upper Limb Sense of Position in Healthy Individuals and Patients after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cusmano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate reliability of a quantitative assessment tool for upper limb sense of position on the horizontal plane. We evaluated 15 healthy individuals (controls and 9 stroke patients. A robotic device passively moved one arm of the blindfolded participant who had to actively move his/her opposite hand to the mirror location in the workspace. Upper-limb's position was evaluated by a digital camera. The position of the passive hand was compared with the active hand's ‘mirror’ position. Performance metrics were then computed to measure the mean absolute errors, error variability, spatial contraction/expansion, and systematic shifts. No significant differences were observed between dominant and non-dominant active arms of controls. All performance parameters of the post-stroke group differed significantly from those of controls. This tool can provide a quantitative measure of upper limb sense of position, therefore allowing detection of changes due to rehabilitation.

  18. Rapid HIV Testing for Individuals on Probation/Parole: Outcomes of an Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; McKenzie, Michelle; Wilson, Monique E.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2013-01-01

    Many probationers and parolees do not receive HIV testing despite being at increased risk for obtaining and transmitting HIV. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted between April, 2011 and May, 2012 at probation/parole offices in Baltimore, Maryland and Providence/Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Male and female probationers/parolees were interviewed (N=1263) and then offered HIV testing based on random assignment to one of two conditions: 1) On-site rapid HIV testing conducted at the probation/parole office; or 2) Referral for rapid HIV testing off site at a community HIV testing clinic. Outcomes were: 1) undergoing HIV testing; and 2) receipt of HIV testing results. Participants were significantly more likely to be tested onsite at a probation/parole office versus off-site at a HIV testing clinic (p < .001). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of receiving HIV testing results. Findings indicate that probationers/ parolees are willing to be tested on-site and, independent of testing location, are equally willing to receive their results. Implications for expanding rapid HIV testing to more criminal justice related locations and populations are discussed. PMID:23536140

  19. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  20. Testing and Measurement Potentials of Microcomputers for Cognitive Style Research and Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroway, Robert L.

    Microcomputer versions of three commonly used cognitive style measurement instruments are described and demonstrated: the Leveling-Sharpening House Test (LSHT) (Santostefano, 1964); Lowenfeld's Successive Impressions Test I (SIT-I) (1945); and the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (Witkin, Oltman, Ruskin, and Karp, 1971). At present, many…

  1. Testing and Measurement Potentials of Microcomputers for Cognitive Style Research and Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroway, Robert L.

    Microcomputer versions of three commonly used cognitive style measurement instruments are described and demonstrated: the Leveling-Sharpening House Test (LSHT) (Santostefano, 1964); Lowenfeld's Successive Impressions Test I (SIT-I) (1945); and the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (Witkin, Oltman, Ruskin, and Karp, 1971). At present, many…

  2. Evaluation of nine HIV rapid test kits to develop a national HIV testing algorithm in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orji Bassey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-cold chain-dependent HIV rapid testing has been adopted in many resource-constrained nations as a strategy for reaching out to populations. HIV rapid test kits (RTKs have the advantage of ease of use, low operational cost and short turnaround times. Before 2005, different RTKs had been used in Nigeria without formal evaluation. Between 2005 and 2007, a study was conducted to formally evaluate a number of RTKs and construct HIV testing algorithms. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess and select HIV RTKs and develop national testing algorithms. Method: Nine RTKs were evaluated using 528 well-characterised plasma samples. These comprised 198 HIV-positive specimens (37.5% and 330 HIV-negative specimens (62.5%, collected nationally. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with 95% confidence intervals for all nine RTKs singly and for serial and parallel combinations of six RTKs; and relative costs were estimated. Results: Six of the nine RTKs met the selection criteria, including minimum sensitivity and specificity (both ≥ 99.0% requirements. There were no significant differences in sensitivities or specificities of RTKs in the serial and parallel algorithms, but the cost of RTKs in parallel algorithms was twice that in serial algorithms. Consequently, three serial algorithms, comprising four test kits (BundiTM, DetermineTM, Stat-Pak® and Uni-GoldTM with 100.0% sensitivity and 99.1% – 100.0% specificity, were recommended and adopted as national interim testing algorithms in 2007. Conclusion: This evaluation provides the first evidence for reliable combinations of RTKs for HIV testing in Nigeria. However, these RTKs need further evaluation in the field (Phase II to re-validate their performance.

  3. Longitudinal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging CO2 Stress Testing in Individual Adolescent Sports-Related Concussion Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan C; Ellis, Michael J; Ryner, Lawrence N; Morissette, Marc P; Pries, Philip J; Dufault, Brenden; Essig, Marco; Mikulis, David J; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced neuroimaging studies in concussion have been limited to detecting group differences between concussion patients and healthy controls. In this small pilot study, we used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CO2 stress testing to longitudinally assess cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) in individual sports-related concussion (SRC) patients. Six SRC patients (three males and three females; mean age = 15.7, range = 15-17 years) underwent longitudinal brain MRI CO2 stress testing using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and model-based prospective end-tidal CO2 targeting under isoxic conditions. First-level and second-level comparisons were undertaken using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to score the scans and compare them to an atlas of 24 healthy control subjects. All tests were well tolerated and without any serious adverse events. Anatomical MRI was normal in all study participants. The CO2 stimulus was consistent between the SRC patients and control subjects and within SRC patients across the longitudinal study. Individual SRC patients demonstrated both quantitative and qualitative patient-specific alterations in CVR (p correlated strongly with clinical findings, and that persisted beyond clinical recovery. Standardized brain MRI CO2 stress testing is capable of providing a longitudinal assessment of CVR in individual SRC patients. Consequently, larger prospective studies are needed to examine the utility of brain MRI CO2 stress testing as a clinical tool to help guide the evaluation, classification, and longitudinal management of SRC patients.

  4. Ecotoxicological evaluation of propranolol hydrochloride and losartan potassium to Lemna minor L. (1753) individually and in binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Aline A; Kummrow, Fábio; Pamplin, Paulo Augusto Z

    2015-07-01

    Antihypertensive pharmaceuticals, including the beta-blockers, are one of the most detected therapeutic classes in the environment. The ecotoxicity of propranolol hydrochloride and losartan potassium was evaluated, both individually and combined in a binary mixture, by using the Lemna minor growth inhibition test. The endpoints evaluated in the single-pharmaceutical tests were frond number, total frond area and fresh weight. For the evaluation of the mixture toxicity, the selected endpoint was frond number. Water quality criteria values (WQC) were derived for the protection of freshwater and saltwater pelagic communities regarding the effects induced by propranolol and losartan using ecotoxicological data from the literature, including our data. The risks associated with both pharmaceutical effects on non-target organisms were quantified through the measured environmental concentration (MEC)/predicted-no-effect concentration (PNEC) ratios. For propranolol, the total frond area was the most sensitive endpoint (EC50 = 77.3 mg L(-1)), while for losartan there was no statistically significant difference between the endpoints. Losartan is only slightly more toxic than propranolol. Both concentration addition and independent action models overestimated the mixture toxicity of the pharmaceuticals at all the effect concentration levels evaluated. The joint action of both pharmaceuticals showed an antagonistic interaction to L. minor. Derived WQC assumed lower values for propranolol than for losartan. The MEC/PNEC ratios showed that propranolol may pose a risk for the most sensitive aquatic species, while acceptable risks posed by losartan were estimated for most of aquatic matrices. To the authors knowledge these are the first data about losartan toxicity for L. minor.

  5. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    2002-07-22

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  6. Alternatives to animal testing in the safety evaluation of products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Derek J; Breheny, Damien

    2002-01-01

    The conventional method for assessing the safety of products, ranging from pharmaceuticals to agrochemicals, biocides and industrial and household chemicals - including cosmetics - involves determining their toxicological properties by using experimental animals. The aim is to identify any possible adverse effects in humans by using these animal models. Providing safe products is undoubtedly of the utmost importance but, over the last decade or so, this aim has come into conflict with strong public opinion, especially in Europe, against animal testing. Industry, academia and the regulators have worked in partnership to find other ways of evaluating the safety of products, by non-animal testing, or at least by reducing the numbers of animals required and the severity of the tests in which they are used. There is a long way to go before products can be evaluated without any animal studies, and it may be that this laudable aim is an impossible dream. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made by using a combination of in vitro tests and the prediction of properties based on chemical structure. The aim of this review is to describe these important and worthwhile developments in various areas of toxicological testing, with a focus on the European regulatory framework for general industrial and household chemicals.

  7. Deriving utility scores for co-morbid conditions: a test of the multiplicative model for combining individual condition scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Petit Christel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-morbidity of health conditions is becoming a significant health issue, particularly as populations age, and presents important methodological challenges for population health research. For example, the calculation of summary measures of population health (SMPH can be compromised if co-morbidity is not taken into account. One popular co-morbidity adjustment used in SMPH computations relies on a straightforward multiplicative combination of the severity weights for the individual conditions involved. While the convenience and simplicity of the multiplicative model are attractive, its appropriateness has yet to be formally tested. The primary objective of the current study was therefore to examine the empirical evidence in support of this approach. Methods The present study drew on information on the prevalence of chronic conditions and a utility-based measure of health-related quality of life (HRQoL, namely the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3, available from Cycle 1.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS; 2000–01. Average HUI3 scores were computed for both single and co-morbid conditions, and were also purified by statistically removing the loss of functional health due to health problems other than the chronic conditions reported. The co-morbidity rule was specified as a multiplicative combination of the purified average observed HUI3 utility scores for the individual conditions involved, with the addition of a synergy coefficient s for capturing any interaction between the conditions not explained by the product of their utilities. The fit of the model to the purified average observed utilities for the co-morbid conditions was optimized using ordinary least squares regression to estimate s. Replicability of the results was assessed by applying the method to triple co-morbidities from the CCHS cycle 1.1 database, as well as to double and triple co-morbidities from cycle 2.1 of the CCHS (2003–04. Results

  8. Evaluating the psychological effects of genetic testing in symptomatic patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansenne, Fleur; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; de Borgie, Corianne A J M

    2009-10-01

    Most research on the effects of genetic testing is performed in individuals at increased risk for a specific disease (presymptomatic subjects) but not in patients already affected by disease. If results of these studies in presymptomatic subjects can be applied to patients is unclear. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the effects of genetic testing in patients and describe the methodological instruments used. About 2611 articles were retrieved and 16 studies included. Studies reported great variety in designs, methods, and patient outcomes. In total, 2868 participants enrolled of which 62% were patients. Patients appeared to have a lower perceived general health and higher levels of anxiety and depression than presymptomatic subjects before genetic testing. In the long term no psychological impairment was shown. We conclude that patients differ from presymptomatic subjects and may be more vulnerable to negative effects of genetic testing. Conclusions from earlier research on presymptomatic genetic testing cannot be generalized to patients, and more standardized research is needed.

  9. Evaluating the sensitivity and predictive value of tests of recent infection: toxoplasmosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ades, A E

    1991-12-01

    The diagnosis of maternal infection in early pregnancy depends on tests which are sensitive to recent infection, such as specific IgM. Two types of test are considered: those where the response persists for a period following infection and then declines, such as IgM, and those whose response increases with time since infection, such as IgG-avidity. However, individuals vary in their response to infection, and it may not always be possible to determine whether an infection occurred during pregnancy or before it. Mathematical methods are developed to evaluate the performance of these tests, and are applied to the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in pregnancy. It is shown that, based on existing information, tests of recent infection are unlikely to be both sensitive and predictive. More data on these tests are required, before they can be reliably used to determine whether infection has occurred during pregnancy or before it.

  10. Clinical evaluation of semiautonomous smart wheelchair architecture (Drive-Safe System with visually impaired individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Sharma, PhD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonambulatory, visually impaired individuals mostly rely on caregivers for their day-to-day mobility needs. The Drive-Safe System (DSS is a modular, semiautonomous smart wheelchair system aimed at providing independent mobility to people with visual and mobility impairments. In this project, clinical evaluation of the DSS was performed in a controlled laboratory setting with individuals who have visual impairment but no mobility impairment. Their performance using DSS was compared with their performance using a standard cane for navigation assistance. Participants rated their subjective appraisal of the DSS by using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index inventory. DSS significantly reduced the number and severity of collisions compared with using a cane alone and without increasing the time required to complete the task. Users rated DSS favorably; they experienced less physical demand when using the DSS, but did not feel any difference in perceived effort, mental demand, and level of frustration when using the DSS alone or along with a cane in comparison with using a cane alone. These findings suggest that the DSS can be a safe, reliable, and easy-to-learn and operate independent mobility solution for visually impaired wheelchair users.

  11. INEL test plan for evaluating waste assay systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandler, J.W.; Becker, G.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Menkhaus, D.E.; Clements, T.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    A test bed is being established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These tests are currently focused on mobile or portable radioassay systems. Prior to disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), radioassay measurements must meet the quality assurance objectives of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. This test plan provides technology holders with the opportunity to assess radioassay system performance through a three-tiered test program that consists of: (a) evaluations using non-interfering matrices, (b) surrogate drums with contents that resemble the attributes of INEL-specific waste forms, and (c) real waste tests. Qualified sources containing a known mixture and range of radionuclides will be used for the non-interfering and surrogate waste tests. The results of these tests will provide technology holders with information concerning radioassay system performance and provide the INEL with data useful for making decisions concerning alternative or improved radioassay systems that could support disposal of waste at WIPP.

  12. Evaluating alternative strategies for minimizing unintended fitness consequences of cultured individuals on wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, Marissa L; Waples, Robin S

    2013-02-01

    Artificial propagation strategies often incur selection in captivity that leads to traits that are maladaptive in the wild. For propagation programs focused on production rather than demographic contribution to wild populations, effects on wild populations can occur through unintentional escapement or the need to release individuals into natural environments for part of their life cycle. In this case, 2 alternative management strategies might reduce unintended fitness consequences on natural populations: (1) reduce selection in captivity as much as possible to reduce fitness load (keep them similar), or (2) breed a separate population to reduce captive-wild interactions as much as possible (make them different). We quantitatively evaluate these 2 strategies with a coupled demographic-genetic model based on Pacific salmon hatcheries that incorporates a variety of relevant processes and dynamics: selection in the hatchery relative to the wild, assortative mating based on the trait under selection, and different life cycle arrangements in terms of hatchery release, density dependence, natural selection, and reproduction. Model results indicate that, if natural selection only occurs between reproduction and captive release, the similar strategy performs better. However, if natural selection occurs between captive release and reproduction, the different and similar strategies present viable alternatives to reducing unintended fitness consequences because of the greater opportunity to purge maladaptive individuals. In this case, the appropriate approach depends on the feasibility of each strategy and the demographic goal (e.g., increasing natural abundance, or ensuring that a high proportion of natural spawners are naturally produced). In addition, the fitness effects of hatchery release are much greater if hatchery release occurs before (vs. after) density-dependent interactions. Given the logistical challenges to achieving both the similar and different strategies

  13. Tests for evaluating the physiological quality of pitaya seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Alberto Ortiz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Germination test is used to assess the physiological quality of seeds; however, since it is carried out under ideal conditions, this test has not been shown sufficient for this purpose. Instead, it is possible to use vigor tests, although the lack of standardized methodologies has reduced their applicability and reproducibility. Thus, this study aimed to develop methodologies for conducting tests of germination, accelerated aging, and electrical conductivity for the evaluation of the physiological quality of pitaya seeds. For this purpose, seeds from ripe Hylocereus undatus fruits were used. A completely randomized experimental design was used with four replications. The physiological quality of the seeds was assessed using germination, accelerated aging, and electrical conductivity tests, and the speed of germination index (SGI and mean germination time (MGT were determined for both the germination test and accelerated aging test. For the statistical analysis, we performed regression model adjustments and calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient (p < 0.05. The germination test for H. undatus seeds can be performed at 25 °C, with the aim of reaching the highest SGI and lowest MGT values. The accelerated aging test can be conducted at 43 °C for 48 h, because combining these factors favors the expression of seed vigor, allowing seeds to achieve the maximum SGI and minimum MGT, while reducing the time of the assay. The electrical conductivity test can be performed using 25 seeds at a temperature of 30 °C and a water volume of 10 mL, since under these conditions there is less interference from external factors on the leachate content of the solution.

  14. Effectiveness evaluation of several cattle anthelmintics via the fecal egg count reduction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazwinski, T A; Tucker, C A; Hornsby, J A; Powell, J G; Reynolds, J L; Johnson, Z B; Lindsey, W; Silver, T K

    2009-07-01

    Utilizing groups of cograzed, naturally infected beef-type heifers, three fecal egg count reduction tests were conducted in the later months of 2007 at the University of Arkansas. Each test was 28 days in length consisting of individual animal fecal nematode egg counts and coprocultures. Both original and generic ivermectin injectable formulations were used in two of the tests at 0.2 mg/kg BW, with FECR percentages never exceeding 90% in either test. Oral fenbendazole was evaluated at 5 and 10 mg/kg BW, with FECR%'s exceeding 90% on all occasions, but with a precipitous drop when recently treated animals were treated at the lower dose. Evaluated in one test, injectable moxidectin given at 0.2 mg/kg BW resulted in egg count reductions of 96-92% (days 7 to 28). Also evaluated in one test, albendazole delivered orally at 10 mg/kg BW was 98% and 97% effective at 17 and 28 days post-treatment. For all tests, coprocultures conducted post-treatment contained only Cooperia spp. larvae (benzimidazole use), relatively unmodified percentages of Cooperia spp. and Haemonchus spp. larvae (ivermectin use), and primarily Cooperia spp. larvae with a small percentage of Haemonchus spp. larvae (moxidectin use).

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus testing behaviors among US adults: the roles of individual factors, legislative status, and public health resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ping; Camacho, Fabian; Zurlo, John; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2011-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended an "opt-out" human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing strategy in 2006 for all persons aged 13 to 64 years at healthcare settings. We conducted this study to identify individual, health, and policy factors that may be associated with HIV testing in US adults. The 2008 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System data were utilized. Individuals' residency states were classified into 4 categories based on the legislation status to HIV testing laws in 2007 and HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome morbidity. A multivariate logistic regression adjusting for survey designs was performed to examine factors associated with HIV testing. A total of 281,826 adults aged 18 to 64 years answered HIV testing questions in 2008. The proportions of US adults who had ever been tested for HIV increased from 35.9% in 2006 to 39.9% in 2008. HIV testing varied across the individual's characteristics including sociodemographics, access to regular health care, and risk for HIV infection. Compared with residents of "high morbidity-opt out" states, those living in "high morbidity-opt in" states with legislative restrictions for HIV testing had a slightly lower odds of being tested for HIV (adjusted odds ratio = 0.96; 95% confidence interval = 0.92, 1.01). Adults living in "low morbidity" states were significantly less likely to be tested for HIV, regardless of legislative status. To implement routine HIV testing in the general population, the role of public health resources should be emphasized and legislative barriers should be further reduced. Strategies need to be developed to reach people who do not have regular access to health care.

  16. Evaluation criteria of the individual motor predisposition of female sport gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczynski T.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper were presented the results of research, aimed to improve criteria for assessing the motor predisposition of girls in sports gymnastics at the initial stage of training. The studies included 24 gymnasts divided into two age groups: A 6,0-7,5 years of age and B (8,3-13,0. The level of physical fitness was assessed with the use of the EUROFIT battery tests. easurements of the maximum moment of muscle strength in the bending forearm in the elbow joint in terms of isometric contraction were also performed. Assessment f the level of individual strengthspeed and coordination abilities and physical fitness structure including the pace of biological development were the basis for the development of objective criteria for assessing the sports predispositions of young gymnasts at the initial stage of training. Our results provide the basis for improving the control system and optimization of assessment criteria in women gymnastics, including age, training experience and sports level. The results presented in this paper demonstrated the usefulness of the research methodology used to assess the physical fitness and predispositions of gymnasts at the initial stage of training, what enables individualization of training process.

  17. Performance Evaluation Tests for Environmental Research (PETER) Evaluation of 112 Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    experimental design. 2nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 1971. 111. Wonderlic EF. Wonderlic Personnel Test Manual. Northfield, IL: Wonderlic , 1978. 112...Mackaman SM, Bittner AC Jr, Harbeson MM, Kennedy RS, Stone D A. Performance Evaluation Tests for Environmental Research (PETER): Wonderlic Personnel...GENERAL C 12 G 48(ɚ) 0.34 MACKAMAIN, BITTNER, PERSONNEL INTELLIGENCE HARBESON, KENNEDY. & STONE TEST ( WONDERLIC , 1978) (1982); WONOERLIC (1978) 24 X3

  18. Evaluation of the screening test results before marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Durmaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C viruses and Treponema pallidum are parenterally and sexually transmitted infection agents. Screening test is made before marriage to pre-marital couples legally under the relevant legislation and legal procedures in our country; applicants are evaluated in terms of sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate pre-marital test results for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV I/II and Treponema pallidum.Materials and methods: To make screening test before marriage, randomized 117 patients who were applied to Kızıltepe General Hospital of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, were included in this study between January 2011 and March 2011. Of these patients, 64 were women (average age 24.7±5.7, and 55 were males (mean age 24.7±4.7. HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV I/II tests of the patients were studied by macro-ELISA device (ECIQ Vitros, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, USA, screening of anti-Treponema pallidum IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were studied by immunochromatographic rapid test (syphilis syphilis 3.0, Standard Diagnostics, inc. Korea.Results: Of the 119 patients, five patients (4.2% were positive for HBsAg (3 male and 2 female. Anti-HCV, anti-HIV I/II and anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies were negative in all patients.Conclusion: HBsAg test result which was obtained in present study has been found consistent with HBsAg positivity rate in our region. As a result of screening test that was done before marriage will continue to believe that the increased importance of the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 292-294.

  19. LSP Composite Susbtrate Destructive Evaluation Test Assessment Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Daniel J.; Erickson, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    This document specifies the processes to perform post-strike destructive damage evaluation of tested CFRP panels.It is recognized that many factors besides lightning damage protection are involved in the selection of an appropriate Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) for a particular system (e.g., cost, weight, corrosion resistance, shielding effectiveness, etc.). This document strives primarily to address the standardized generation of damage protection performance data.

  20. Testing cognition in the wild: factors affecting performance and individual consistency in two measures of avian cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rachael C

    2017-01-01

    Developing cognitive tasks to reliably quantify individual differences in cognitive ability is critical to advance our understanding of the fitness consequences of cognition in the wild. Several factors may influence individual performance in a cognitive task, with some being unrelated to the cognitive ability that is the target of the test. It is therefore essential to assess how extraneous factors may affect task performance, particularly for those tasks that are frequently used to quantify individual differences in cognitive ability. The current study therefore measured the performance of wild North Island robins in two tasks commonly used to measure individual differences in avian cognition: a novel motor task and a detour reaching task. The robins' performance in the motor task was affected by prior experience; individuals that had previously participated in a similar task that required a different motor action pattern outperformed naïve subjects. By contrast, detour reaching performance was influenced by an individual's body condition, suggesting that energetic state may affect inhibitory control in robins. Designing tasks that limit the influence of past experience and developing means of standardising motivation across animals tested in the wild remain key challenges to improving current measurements of cognitive ability in birds.

  1. Evaluation tests of early renal injury in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Coelho Freitas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The identification of kidney injury is an important measure that aims to prevent the installation of irreversible changes, such as chronic kidney disease, seen most frequently in dogs and cats. Serum urea and creatinine parameters are routinely assessed, when searching renal failure. However, these values are only changed when 66 to 75% of glomerular filtration rate has been lost. In many situations, an attack of this magnitude may be enough to cause the animal’s death. Evaluations that identify the aggression, even before the functions themselves are altered, have been studied and shown to be important early evaluators, signaling prior to possible irreversible damage. The quantification of urinary enzymes, urinary protein, fractional excretion of electrolytes, glomerular filtration rate and urinary sediment, have shown great value as sensitive tests of renal injury. There is the need of the use of tests that assists in early diagnosis and also determines the progression of disease and efficacy of the treatment. The present review aims to describe the laboratory tests that may be performed to evaluate early kidney injury in dogs and cats.

  2. Evaluating the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for pesticide hazard screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Padilla, Stephanie; Barron, Mace G

    2016-10-04

    Given the numerous chemicals used in society, it is critical to develop tools for accurate and efficient evaluation of potential risks to human and ecological receptors. Fish embryo acute toxicity tests are 1 tool that has been shown to be highly predictive of standard, more resource-intensive, juvenile fish acute toxicity tests. However, there is also evidence that fish embryos are less sensitive than juvenile fish for certain types of chemicals, including neurotoxicants. The utility of fish embryos for pesticide hazard assessment was investigated by comparing published zebrafish embryo toxicity data from pesticides with median lethal concentration 50% (LC50) data for juveniles of 3 commonly tested fish species: rainbow trout, bluegill sunfish, and sheepshead minnow. A poor, albeit significant, relationship (r(2 ) = 0.28; p zebrafish embryo and juvenile fish toxicity when pesticides were considered as a single group, but a much better relationship (r(2)  = 0.64; p pesticide mode of action was factored into an analysis of covariance. This discrepancy is partly explained by the large number of neurotoxic pesticides in the dataset, supporting previous findings that commonly used fish embryo toxicity test endpoints are particularly insensitive to neurotoxicants. These results indicate that it is still premature to replace juvenile fish toxicity tests with embryo-based tests such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity Test for routine pesticide hazard assessment, although embryo testing could be used with other screening tools for testing prioritization. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. Norm Block Sample Sizes: A Review of 17 Individually Administered Intelligence Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfolk, Philip A.; Farmer, Ryan L.; Floyd, Randy G.; Woods, Isaac L.; Hawkins, Haley K.; Irby, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    The representativeness, recency, and size of norm samples strongly influence the accuracy of inferences drawn from their scores. Inadequate norm samples may lead to inflated or deflated scores for individuals and poorer prediction of developmental and academic outcomes. The purpose of this study was to apply Kranzler and Floyd's method for…

  4. Perceived Need for Change: A Test of Individual Emotion and Contextual Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    This belief, called perceived organizational support, causes individual employees to judge their organizations to determine if additional workplace ... conflicts with pre-existing schemas. For example, if the service provider encounters negative feedback from a customer, and this feedback conflicts ...2004). Lastly, the present study found minimal intergroup variance between geographic locations. This finding suggests that with regards to the

  5. In vitro evaluation of Bacopa monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant monoamine oxidase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajbir; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2014-09-01

    Bacopa monniera is a traditional Ayurvedic medicinal plant that has been used worldwide for its nootropic action. Chemically standardized extract of B. monniera is now available as over the counter herbal remedy to enhance memory in children and adults. Considering the nootropic action of B. monniera, we evaluated the effect of clinically available B. monniera extract and six of B. monniera constituents (bacoside A3, bacopaside I, bacopaside II, bacosaponin C, bacosine, and bacoside A mixture) on recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The effect of B. monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes was evaluated using MAO-Glo(TM) assay kit (Promega Corporation, USA), following the instruction manual. IC50 and mode of inhibition were measured for MAO enzymes. Bacopaside I and bacoside A mixture inhibited the MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes. Bacopaside I exhibited mixed mode of inhibition with IC50 and Ki values of 17.08 ± 1.64 and 42.5 ± 3.53 µg/mL, respectively, for MAO-A enzyme. Bacopaside I is the major constituent of B. monniera, which inhibited the MAO-A enzyme selectively.

  6. Colorimetric evaluation of iPhone apps for colour vision tests based on the Ishihara test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Stephen J; AlMerdef, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Given the versatility of smart phone displays, it was inevitable that applications (apps) providing colour vision testing would appear as an option. In this study, the colorimetric characteristics of five available iPhone apps for colour vision testing are assessed as a prequel to possible clinical evaluation. The colours of the displays produced by the apps are assessed with reference to the colours of a printed Ishihara test. The visual task is assessed on the basis of the colour differences and the alignment to the dichromatic confusion lines. The apps vary in quality and while some are colorimetrically acceptable, there are also some problems with their construction in making them a clinically useful app rather than curiosity driven self-testing. There is no reason why, in principle, a suitable test cannot be designed for smart phones.

  7. [The MMPI-2 test in the evaluation of the mobbing syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, P; Santalucia, L; Del Castello, E; De Maino, V; Garofalo, E; Cappelluccio, R; Feola, D; Ruberto, M; Liotti, F

    2007-01-01

    MMPI-2 test is widely used in psychodiagnostic evaluation as well as in the evaluation of psychic pathologies related to psychosocial adversative events in working activities. A more efficacious use of MMPI-2 test in the working context can be achieved by the individuation of indexes able to facilitate the evaluation of mobbing syndrome. This work is based on the analysis of 150 cases (39.7% women and 60.7% men, 30 to 60 years of age), evaluated through an accurate examination of working history and a series of clinic conversations, followed by psychodiagnostic evaluation. The average of T-scores on the clinical scale, the content scale, the PK addition scale and the validation scale were calculated from tests. Pathologic high T-scores on the scales Hs, D. Hy e Pa were found in subjects having positive mobbing anamnesis. These results strongly indicate the presence of clinical specificities in workers exposed to working harassments, and that these specificities can be efficaciously evidenced by the MMPI-2 test.

  8. Evaluation Of Algorithms Of Anti- HIV Antibody Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paranjape R.S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: Can alternate algorithms be used in place of conventional algorithm for epidemiological studies of HIV infection with less expenses? Objective: To compare the results of HIV sero- prevalence as determined by test algorithms combining three kits with conventional test algorithm. Study design: Cross â€" sectional. Participants: 282 truck drivers. Statistical analysis: Sensitivity and specificity analysis and predictive values. Results: Three different algorithms that do not include Western Blot (WB were compared with the conventional algorithm, in a truck driver population with 5.6% prevalence of HIV â€"I infection. Algorithms with one EIA (Genetic Systems or Biotest and a rapid test (immunocomb or with two EIAs showed 100% positive predictive value in relation to the conventional algorithm. Using an algorithm with EIA as screening test and a rapid test as a confirmatory test was 50 to 70% less expensive than the conventional algorithm per positive scrum sample. These algorithms obviate the interpretation of indeterminate results and also give differential diagnosis of HIV-2 infection. Alternate algorithms are ideally suited for community based control programme in developing countries. Application of these algorithms in population with low prevalence should also be studied in order to evaluate universal applicability.

  9. Introducing a Third Timed Up & Go Test Trial Improves Performances of Hospitalized and Community-Dwelling Older Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Mette L; Jønsson, Line R; Kristensen, Morten T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Originally, the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test was described as including a practice trial before a timed trial, but recent studies in individuals with hip fracture have reported that performance improved with a third trial and that high intertester reliability was achieved when...

  10. A Validity Study of the Working Group's Autobiographical Memory Test for Individuals with Moderate to Severe Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Geunyeong; Ala, Tom; Kyrouac, Gregory A.; Verhulst, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the validity of the Working Group's Autobiographical Memory Test as a dementia screening tool for individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities (ID). Twenty-one participants with Dementia of Alzheimer's Type (DAT) and moderate to severe ID and 42 controls with similar levels of ID…

  11. 77 FR 68133 - Guidance for Industry: Use of Nucleic Acid Tests on Pooled and Individual Samples From Donors of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Nucleic Acid Tests on Pooled and Individual Samples from Donors of Whole Blood and Blood Components, including Source Plasma, to Reduce the Risk of Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus,'' dated October 2012. The guidance document provides recommendations on the use of FDA-......

  12. 76 FR 72950 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Nucleic Acid Tests on Pooled and Individual Samples From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Nucleic Acid Tests (NAT) on Pooled and Individual Samples from Donors of Whole Blood and Blood Components (including Recovered Plasma, Source Plasma and Source Leukocytes) to Adequately and Appropriately Reduce the Risk of Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV),......

  13. The Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities : test-retest reliability and comparison with an accelerometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Streppel, Kitty R M; van der Beek, Allard J; van der Woude, Luc H V; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam; van Mechelen, Willem; van der Woude, Lucas

    BACKGROUND: The objective was to determine the test-retest reliability and criterion validity of the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD). METHODS: Forty-five non-wheelchair dependent subjects were recruited from three Dutch rehabilitation centers. Subjects'

  14. Evaluation of two sterility testing methods for intravenous admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condella, F; Eichelberger, K; Foote, L C; Griffin, R E

    1980-06-01

    The Addi-Chek Quality Control System (Millipore Corporation) and Ivex-2 Filterset (Abbott Laboratories) were evaluated to determine their effectiveness, applicability, and cost as part of a pharmacy quality-control program. Each method was tested using 50 solutions, 25 of which had been contaminated by inoculation with one of five micro-organisms; the other 25 solutions were used as controls. Aseptic technique was used, and procedures were carried out in a laminar air flow hood. Contaminated solutions were blinded from the person performing the tests. Addi-Chek detected contamination in all the inoculated solutions and in three of the uninoculated solutions. The latter may have been a result of adventitious contamination during the testing procedure. Ivex-2 detected contamination in 24 of the 25 inoculated solutions; no other contamination was found. The effectiveness of the methods in detecting low-level microbial contamination appears comparable. Both methods have been shown to be useful in the pharmacy setting, but Ivex-2 could be used to test for contamination when used as an in-line filter at the patient level. Ivex-2 is less expensive and warrants further evaluation in monitoring for microbial contamination during preparation and administration of intravenous solutions.

  15. Evaluation test of ALIS in Cambodia for humanitarian demining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motoyuki

    2010-04-01

    ALIS is a hand-held dual sensor developed by Tohoku University, Japan since 2002. Dual sensor is a general name of sensor for humanitarian demining, which are equipped with metal detector and GPR. ALIS is only one hand-held dual sensor, which can record the sensor position with sensor signals. Therefore, the data can be processed after data acquisition, and can increase the imaging capability. ALIS has been tested in some mine affected courtiers including Afghanistan (2004), Egypt(2005), Croatia(2006-) and Cambodia(2007-). Mine fields at each country has different conditions and soil types. Therefore testes at the real mine fields are very important. ALIS has detected more than 30 AP-Mines in evaluation test in Cambodia held in 2009.

  16. Electrophysiological and auditory behavioral evaluation of individuals with left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Caroline Nunes; Miziara, Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego; Manreza, Maria Luiza Giraldes de; Schochat, Eliane

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the repercussions of left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) for subjects with left mesial temporal sclerosis (LMTS) in relation to the behavioral test-Dichotic Digits Test (DDT), event-related potential (P300), and to compare the two temporal lobes in terms of P300 latency and amplitude. We studied 12 subjects with LMTS and 12 control subjects without LMTS. Relationships between P300 latency and P300 amplitude at sites C3A1,C3A2,C4A1, and C4A2, together with DDT results, were studied in inter-and intra-group analyses. On the DDT, subjects with LMTS performed poorly in comparison to controls. This difference was statistically significant for both ears. The P300 was absent in 6 individuals with LMTS. Regarding P300 latency and amplitude, as a group, LMTS subjects presented trend toward greater P300 latency and lower P300 amplitude at all positions in relation to controls, difference being statistically significant for C3A1 and C4A2. However, it was not possible to determine laterality effect of P300 between affected and unaffected hemispheres.

  17. Unambiguous test results or individual independence? The role of clients and families in predictive BRCA-testing in the Netherlands compared to the USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    It has been frequently acknowledged that results of predictive genetic tests may have implications for relatives as well as for the individual client. Ethicists have noted that an individual’s right to know her genetic risk may conflict with a relative’s right not to know this risk. It is hardly rec

  18. Molecular testing for Lynch syndrome in people with colorectal cancer: systematic reviews and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowsill, Tristan; Coelho, Helen; Huxley, Nicola; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Briscoe, Simon; Frayling, Ian M; Hyde, Chris

    2017-09-01

    Inherited mutations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair (MMR) genes lead to an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), gynaecological cancers and other cancers, known as Lynch syndrome (LS). Risk-reducing interventions can be offered to individuals with known LS-causing mutations. The mutations can be identified by comprehensive testing of the MMR genes, but this would be prohibitively expensive in the general population. Tumour-based tests - microsatellite instability (MSI) and MMR immunohistochemistry (IHC) - are used in CRC patients to identify individuals at high risk of LS for genetic testing. MLH1 (MutL homologue 1) promoter methylation and BRAF V600E testing can be conducted on tumour material to rule out certain sporadic cancers. To investigate whether testing for LS in CRC patients using MSI or IHC (with or without MLH1 promoter methylation testing and BRAF V600E testing) is clinically effective (in terms of identifying Lynch syndrome and improving outcomes for patients) and represents a cost-effective use of NHS resources. Systematic reviews were conducted of the published literature on diagnostic test accuracy studies of MSI and/or IHC testing for LS, end-to-end studies of screening for LS in CRC patients and economic evaluations of screening for LS in CRC patients. A model-based economic evaluation was conducted to extrapolate long-term outcomes from the results of the diagnostic test accuracy review. The model was extended from a model previously developed by the authors. Ten studies were identified that evaluated the diagnostic test accuracy of MSI and/or IHC testing for identifying LS in CRC patients. For MSI testing, sensitivity ranged from 66.7% to 100.0% and specificity ranged from 61.1% to 92.5%. For IHC, sensitivity ranged from 80.8% to 100.0% and specificity ranged from 80.5% to 91.9%. When tumours showing low levels of MSI were treated as a positive result, the sensitivity of MSI testing increased but specificity fell. No end

  19. Origin of Individual Differences in Importance Attached to Work: A Model and a Contribution to Its Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverko, Branimir

    1989-01-01

    Tested model proposing that importance of work for individual depends on individual's perception of possibilities for attainment of personal salient work values through working. Responses from 1,872 high school students, 348 university students, and 344 adults to measures on importance of 20 work values, perceptions of their attainment…

  20. A modular mind? A test using individual data from seven primate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Amici

    Full Text Available It has long been debated whether the mind consists of specialized and independently evolving modules, or whether and to what extent a general factor accounts for the variance in performance across different cognitive domains. In this study, we used a hierarchical Bayesian model to re-analyse individual level data collected on seven primate species (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, spider monkeys, brown capuchin monkeys and long-tailed macaques across 17 tasks within four domains (inhibition, memory, transposition and support. Our modelling approach evidenced the existence of both a domain-specific factor and a species factor, each accounting for the same amount (17% of the observed variance. In contrast, inter-individual differences played a minimal role. These results support the hypothesis that the mind of primates is (at least partially modular, with domain-specific cognitive skills undergoing different evolutionary pressures in different species in response to specific ecological and social demands.

  1. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Grahm C.; Edke, Mangesh; Griffin, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle dat...

  2. Motivation to pursue genetic testing in individuals with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Kathleen E; Hidayatallah, Nadia Z; Walsh, Christine A; McDonald, Thomas V; Cohen, Lilian; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2014-10-01

    Genetic testing is becoming increasingly available for cardiac channelopathies, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, which can lead to sudden cardiac death. Test results can be used to shape an individual's medical management and to identify at-risk family members. In our qualitative study, all participants had a personal or family history of a diagnosed cardiac arrhythmia syndrome or sudden cardiac death. Open-ended interviews were conducted individually and in focus groups. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a qualitative grounded-theory approach. Of 50 participants, 37 described their motivations for pursuing genetic testing for long QT syndrome or another cardiac channelopathy. Participants' motivations included: to find an explanation for a family member's sudden death, to relieve uncertainty regarding a diagnosis, to guide future medical management, to allay concern about children or other family members, and to comply with recommendations of physicians or family members. Perceived reasons not to pursue genetic testing included denial, fear, and lack of information. The genetic counseling and informed consent process can be enhanced by understanding and addressing an individual's internal and external motivations either for or against pursuing genetic testing.

  3. Quantitative and Qualitative Responses to Topical Cold in Healthy Caucasians Show Variance between Individuals but High Test-Retest Reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Moss

    Full Text Available Increased sensitivity to cold may be a predictor of persistent pain, but cold pain threshold is often viewed as unreliable. This study aimed to determine the within-subject reliability and between-subject variance of cold response, measured comprehensively as cold pain threshold plus pain intensity and sensation quality at threshold. A test-retest design was used over three sessions, one day apart. Response to cold was assessed at four sites (thenar eminence, volar forearm, tibialis anterior, plantar foot. Cold pain threshold was measured using a Medoc thermode and standard method of limits. Intensity of pain at threshold was rated using a 10cm visual analogue scale. Quality of sensation at threshold was quantified with indices calculated from subjects' selection of descriptors from a standard McGill Pain Questionnaire. Within-subject reliability for each measure was calculated with intra-class correlation coefficients and between-subject variance was evaluated as group coefficient of variation percentage (CV%. Gender and site comparisons were also made. Forty-five healthy adults participated: 20 male, 25 female; mean age 29 (range 18-56 years. All measures at all four test sites showed high within-subject reliability: cold pain thresholds r = 0.92-0.95; pain rating r = 0.93-0.97; McGill pain quality indices r = 0.87-0.85. In contrast, all measures showed wide between-subject variance (CV% between 51.4% and 92.5%. Upper limb sites were consistently more sensitive than lower limb sites, but equally reliable. Females showed elevated cold pain thresholds, although similar pain intensity and quality to males. Females were also more reliable and showed lower variance for all measures. Thus, although there was clear population variation, response to cold for healthy individuals was found to be highly reliable, whether measured as pain threshold, pain intensity or sensation quality. A comprehensive approach to cold response testing therefore may add

  4. Can testing of six individual muscles represent a screening approach to upper limb neuropathic conditions?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2014-01-01

    ... is reliable and that the outcome reflects symptoms. Since this approach may appear complicated and time consuming, this study deals with the value of an examination limited to manual testing of only six muscles...

  5. The use of ROC curves in testing the proficiency of individuals in classifying pneumoconiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, D J

    1975-02-01

    During a test of the ability to classify the profusion characteristics of pneumoconiosis recorded in chest radiographs, a constant decision criterion level needs to be maintained or false conclusions regarding the observer's receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve may result.

  6. Analysis of Tests Evaluating Sport Climbers’ Strength and Isometric Endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozimek Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to determine which types of specific tests provide an effective evaluation of strength and endurance in highly trained competitive sport climbers. The research process consisted of three basic components: the measurement of selected somatic characteristics of the climbers, the assessment of their physical conditioning, and a search for correlations between the anthropometric and “conditioning” variables on the one hand, and climber’s performance on the other. The sample of subjects consisted of 14 experienced volunteer climbers capable of handling 7a- 8a+/b on-sight rock climbing grades. The strongest correlations (Spearman’s rank were found between climber’s competence and the relative results of the finger strength test (r = 0.7; much lower, but still statistically significant coefficients were found between the level of competence and the results of the muscle endurance tests (r = 0.53 – 0.57. Climbers aspiring to attain an elite level must have strong finger and forearm muscles, but most of all, they must be capable of releasing their potential during specific motor capability tests engaging these parts of the body. The forearm muscles of elite climbers must also be very resistant to fatigue. Since highly trained athletes vary only slightly in body mass, this variable does not have a major effect on their performance during strength and endurance tests.

  7. Evaluation of genotoxicity testing of FDA approved large molecule therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Satin G; Fielden, Mark R; Black, Kurt A

    2014-10-01

    Large molecule therapeutics (MW>1000daltons) are not expected to enter the cell and thus have reduced potential to interact directly with DNA or related physiological processes. Genotoxicity studies are therefore not relevant and typically not required for large molecule therapeutic candidates. Regulatory guidance supports this approach; however there are examples of marketed large molecule therapeutics where sponsors have conducted genotoxicity studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on genotoxicity studies of United States FDA approved large molecule therapeutics since 1998 identified through the Drugs@FDA website. This information was used to provide a data-driven rationale for genotoxicity evaluations of large molecule therapeutics. Fifty-three of the 99 therapeutics identified were tested for genotoxic potential. None of the therapeutics tested showed a positive outcome in any study except the peptide glucagon (GlucaGen®) showing equivocal in vitro results, as stated in the product labeling. Scientific rationale and data from this review indicate that testing of a majority of large molecule modalities do not add value to risk assessment and support current regulatory guidance. Similarly, the data do not support testing of peptides containing only natural amino acids. Peptides containing non-natural amino acids and small molecules in conjugated products may need to be tested.

  8. Thermionic Technology Program: A, Insulator test and evaluation: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, J.C.; Witt, T.

    1987-11-30

    The Thermionic Technology Program (TTP) consisted of two major efforts, evaluation of insulators and evaluation of thermionic converters. This report details the work performed on the insulator phase of the program. Efforts were made to better understand the mechanisms involved in the electrochemistry of insulators at elevated temperatures by modelling the ionic transport through the various layers of the insulator package. Although rigorous analytic solutions could not be obtained owing to a lack of detailed data, a simplified model indicated that alumina should not fail by depletion of aluminum for thousands of years, whereas calculations for yttria revealed a far more rapid depletion of oxygen and consequently earlier failure. Methods for microscopic and electrical testing of cylindrical insulator samples were developed, and an improved test oven design was initiated. Testing of alumina/niobium cermet samples revealed rapid failure contrary to the theoretical predictions for alumina. Large discrepancies in the initial conduction activation energy among the various samples suggested that different mechanisms could have controlled the conduction and hence the failure in different samples, although all had undergone nominally identical processing. The short lifetimes reveal how rapidly ambient conditions in thermionic power conversion can degrade the performance of insulating oxides. It was concluded that minor dopants could have been responsible for the early breakdowns. Thus, high purity materials with precise quality control will be necessary for trilayer package development. 35 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of Interforaminal Mandible Region of Individuals With Pierre Robin Sequence and Treacher Collins Syndrome Through the Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucunduva, Rosana Mara Adami; Imada, Thaís Sumie Nozu; Lopes, Ivna Albano; Rubira-Bullen, Izabel Regina Fischer; de Carvalho, Izabel Maria Marchi

    2016-01-01

    The Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) and the Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) are conditions that cause significant abnormalities of jaw. This study was conducted in anticipation of evaluating the morphology of interforaminal region and identify the anatomic variations: anterior loop and mandibular incisive canal, in individuals with PRS and TCS by cone-beam computed tomography and compare them with individuals without craniofacial anomalies. By applying the t-test, the results showed no statistically significant difference, allowing to infer that there are no significant differences in interforaminal mandible morphology between groups and indicated that the prevalence and location of the studied anatomic variations are consistent with those described in literature.

  10. Evaluation of Allen's test in both arms and arteries of left and right-handed people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettlé, A C; van Niekerk, A; Boon, J M; Meiring, J H

    2006-03-01

    The Allen's test as described in 1929 by Edgar V. Allen has been modified, adapted and complemented by other newer modalities but remains a first line standard test to evaluate the arterial supply of the hand. In this study an attempt has been made to add more information regarding the arterial supply of the hand, in left- and right-handed individuals, left and right hands and the ulnar and radial arteries, when doing the Allen's test. A modified Allen's test using an oxygen saturation monitor was used. The sample group consisted of 80 (30 left-handed and 50 right-handed) students. No significant differences between the Allen's test of the left and right hands in the left and right-handed individuals were found. There was a marginal but not significant difference between the two arteries. The ulnar artery took slightly longer to reach baseline values as compared to the radial artery. The results suggest that a positive Allen's test can be found in both left and right-handed people, with regard to the left and right hands and both radial and ulnar arteries may be implicated. This information should be kept in mind when selecting either the radial or ulnar artery for grafting purposes (e.g. coronary angiosurgery) and forearm artery cannulation.

  11. The use of molecular markers for individual identification, paternity test and daily rob cases

    OpenAIRE

    Giovambattista, Guillermo; Ripoli, María Verónica; Lirón, Juan Pedro; Kienast, Mariana E.; Villegas Castagnasso, Egle Etel; Dulout, Fernando; Peral García, Pilar

    2001-01-01

    La tipificación de los grupos sanguíneos y polimorfismos bioquímicos a partir de muestras de sangre y suero sigue siendo el estándar internacional para la certificación de paternidad. En la actualidad, las mencionadas técnicas pueden ser suplementadas con marcadores moleculares de herencia mendeliana codominante, que permiten por primera vez contar con pruebas de inclusión. El objetivo del presente trabajo consistió en resolver casos de identificación individual, paternidad y abigeato, a part...

  12. Structure and mechanism of diet specialisation: testing models of individual variation in resource use with sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker Tim, M.; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Novak, Mark; Marquitti, Flavia Maria Darcie; Bodkin, James L.; Staedler, Michelle; Bentall, Gena B.; Estes, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of consumer-resource interactions suggest that individual diet specialisation is empirically widespread and theoretically important to the organisation and dynamics of populations and communities. We used weighted networks to analyze the resource use by sea otters, testing three alternative models for how individual diet specialisation may arise. As expected, individual specialisation was absent when otter density was low, but increased at high-otter density. A high-density emergence of nested resource-use networks was consistent with the model assuming individuals share preference ranks. However, a density-dependent emergence of a non-nested modular network for ‘core’ resources was more consistent with the ‘competitive refuge’ model. Individuals from different diet modules showed predictable variation in rank-order prey preferences and handling times of core resources, further supporting the competitive refuge model. Our findings support a hierarchical organisation of diet specialisation and suggest individual use of core and marginal resources may be driven by different selective pressures.

  13. An observational study to evaluate three pilot programmes of retesting chlamydia-positive individuals within 6 months in the South West of England

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate 3 pilot chlamydia retesting programmes in South West England which were initiated prior to the release of new National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) guidelines recommending retesting in 2014.METHODS: Individuals testing positive between August 2012 and July 2013 in Bristol (n=346), Cornwall (n=252) and Dorset (n=180) programmes were eligible for inclusion in the retesting pilots. The primary outcomes were retest within 6 months (yes/no) and repeat diagnosis at r...

  14. Evaluation And Comparison Of Serum Melatonin Determination In Normal Individuals And Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fooladsaz K

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a chronic hereditary and relapsing headache. With regard to the prevalence of this ancient disease and its economic complications in country, in this study , nocturnal serum melatonin of migraine patients and control subjects have been evaluated and compared by ELISA kit. Materials and Methods: Fifty migraine patients (mostly women were compared to a control group (mostly men matched according to age. Results: Statistical analysis revealed a decrease in nocturnal serum melatonin levels for migraine patients (32.9 28.4 compared to the control one (75.6 56.8. With using of t-test by ELISA kit showed significant difference (p=0.0064. Conclusion: With regard to this, the pineal gland has the main role in the synchronization of the organism with the environmental conditions and migrainous headaches.

  15. Performance on Selected Candidate Screening Test Procedures Before and After Army Basic and Advanced Individual Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM MOS Cluster Lifting Capacity Aerobic Capacity ALPHA >40 kg >2.25 1/min BRAVO >40 kg 1.5 -2.25 1/min CHARLIE >40 kg ə.50 1/min...between tests. Isometric Handgrip Strength (HG) The handgrip apparatus and procedure was that of Knapik and Ramos (17). This test was selected because it...endurance training programs. In: Exercise and Sport Science Reviews. J.H.Wilmore (Ed). Academic Press, NY, NY. V1:15 188, 1973. 17. Ramos ,M.U., J.J.Knapik

  16. Re-evaluation of individual diameter : height allometric models to improve biomass estimation of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo, Alicia; Cornulier, Thomas; Illian, Janine B; Iida, Yoshiko; Kassim, Abdul Rahman; Burslem, David F R P

    2016-12-01

    Accurate estimation of tree biomass is necessary to provide realistic values of the carbon stored in the terrestrial biosphere. A recognized source of errors in tree aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation is introduced when individual tree height values (H) are not directly measured but estimated from diameter at breast height (DBH) using allometric equations. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of 12 alternative DBH : H equations and compare their effects on AGB estimation for three tropical forests that occur in contrasting climatic and altitudinal zones. We found that fitting a three-parameter Weibull function using data collected locally generated the lowest errors and bias in H estimation, and that equations fitted to these data were more accurate than equations with parameters derived from the literature. For computing AGB, the introduced error values differed notably among DBH : H allometric equations, and in most cases showed a clear bias that resulted in either over- or under-estimation of AGB. Fitting the three-parameter Weibull function minimized errors in AGB estimates in our study and we recommend its widespread adoption for carbon stock estimation. We conclude that many previous studies are likely to present biased estimates of AGB due to the method of H estimation. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. Nuclear thermal rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket can be enhanced through the use of unconventional nozzles as part of the propulsion system. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program being conducted at the NASA Lewis is outlined and the advantages of a plug nozzle are described. A facility description, experimental designs and schematics are given. Results of pretest performance analyses show that high nozzle performance can be attained despite substantial nozzle length reduction through the use of plug nozzles as compared to a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pretest measurement uncertainty analyses indicate that specific impulse values are expected to be within + or - 1.17 pct.

  18. Shipboard Medical Backpack: Preproduction Model Test and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    AD-A20 026 NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO CA F/S 6/12 SHIPBOARD MEDICAL BACKPACK : PREPRODUCTION MODEL TEST AND EVALUA--ETC(U) JUN 82 R W...KATAOKA, F R BORKAT UNCLASSIFIED NOSC/TR-737 NL’E EEEEEEEEEEE -EllI///EEEEEE EEEEEEEEEEEghE 00 I-- -4 0 w Technical Report 737 SHIPBOARD MEDICAL BACKPACK ...evaluation of preproduction shipboard medical backpack units by the medical depart- ments of 29 ships during a two-month period from June to August 1981. The

  19. Zero Length Intrastation Fiber Optics Links Test and Evaluation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    WOirCS (Continue on, ev- icb. it r .~53r’Od Idern~f b’ lock r-urmher) Fiber Optics Digital Transmissic-, Analoo Transmission 20. AtiSTRACT (Cowfou. am...typified Defcnse Communications Systems (DCS) transmission node between DCS digital multir!exers and radios. The intent being to evaluate fiber optics...1920 under the technical dircction of the US Army Comunication Electronics Engi’-Vring In*’allation h\\keN)J (USACJEIA). Supplei.,ental testing ’.ws

  20. CLINICAL APPLICATION AND EVALUATION OF SALIVAFERNING TEST IN SJOGREN'S SYNDROME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the saliva ferning test (SFT) as diagnostic test for xerostomia in patients with Sjogren 's Syndrome (SS). Methods In this study, dried samples of freshly produced saliva from 78 patients with established SS according to European Community criteria and 80 healthy controls were examined by light microscopy. The crystallization was classified into 4 types according to the ferning phenomenon: uniformity, branching, spreading and integrity (type Ⅰ normal and type Ⅱ ,III ,Ⅳ abnormal ). Then , the 78 patients underwent labial salivary gland biopsy. According to Tarpley' s classifica tion, minor salivary gland biopsy (≥2+) was considered to be positive. Results 1. The sensitivity of SFT was high (70/ 78 = 89.74% ). And the specificity was also high (67/80 = 83.75% ). 2. Abnormal SFT was observed in 70/78(89.74%) samples from patients group and in 13/80 ( 16.25% ) samples from healthy controls. The differences of SFT in patients group versus controls were statistically significant (P0.05) as diagnostic tests in SS. Conclusion SFT was simple , sensitive and specific as diagnostic test in SS suspect patients just as mini labial gland biopsy.

  1. Toxics testing performance evaluation for GB and GD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, H.J.; Schneider, J.F.; Brubaker, K.L.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1997-10-01

    Residues resulting from demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah, are currently listed as hazardous wastes by the State of Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The US Army Test and Evaluation Command believes that certain categories of waste generated at DPG are not hazardous. To demonstrate this, analytical methods capable of quantitatively measuring the concentrations of chemical agents, including GB and GD, in the different waste media must be available. Argonne National Laboratory has developed methods to analyze metal substrate, spent hypochlorite decontamination fluid, and soil matrices for GB and GD. These methods involve the use of sorbent cartridge preconcentration and thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography using flame photometric detection to achieve the desired sensitivity and specificity. This report describes the methods and presents results for these three common waste matrices. The test results indicate that these methods can be used to quantitatively determine concentrations of GB and GD in the low parts-per-billion range in all sample media tested.

  2. A survey and evaluation of lantern tests of color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, B L; Vingrys, A J

    1982-04-01

    This paper reports a survey of the lantern tests that have been or are used to evaluate the color vision of people who wish to enter occupations that require the ability to recognize colored signal lights reliably. The origin of each lantern is traced and the principal features of each are described. The available data concerning failure rate of normals, the failure rate of people with defective color vision, and the extent to which scores on lantern tests correlate with field trials are summarized. Despite the fact that lantern tests have been used since the turn of the century and that some lanterns have been in use for more than 30 years and some for much longer periods, the available validation data are incomplete and sometimes conflicting. However, the data do indicate that some lanterns may fail a significant proportion of normals and that there is considerable variation between lanterns in the proportion of color vision defectives that will fail. It is noted that most lanterns will pass some protanomals despite their reduced sensitivity to red light and correspondingly short visual range for red signals. The view of Cameron is supported that a more rational approach would be to made a clinical diagnosis of the type of color vision defect, to reject protanopes, deuteranopes, and protanomals and to use a lantern test only to determine which deuteranomals should be accepted.

  3. Farm animals's cognition and the tests used on its evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Priscila Bueno Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognition is a set of activities and processes whereby an animal acquires information and develops knowledge. The most common cognitive processes are: memory, categorization , attention, reasoning and language.  This present research was aimed to study the cognitive ability of livestock based on results of cognitive tests described in the literature, as well to expose the various types of tests applied to make such an assessment, in the periods from 1969 until nowadays. Through this bibliographic study, It was discussed issues related to cognition , sentience and animal consciousness, through preference tests, learning, recognition and memorization applied to domestic animals. In general they show a cognitive ability to evaluate the environment for themselves, based on their preferences and motivations. Cognitive tests have shown the high ability of some species to memorize their handlers's faces, and recognize who is aversively dealing with. Furthermore, it was possible to prove that some producing species are sentient and their choices able to imply physical sensations that can affect your mental state. Thus, it is important to point out measures to help improve the well-being of the animals.

  4. A Combined IRT and SEM Approach for Individual-Level Assessment in Test-Retest Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2015-01-01

    The standard two-wave multiple-indicator model (2WMIM) commonly used to analyze test-retest data provides information at both the group and item level. Furthermore, when applied to binary and graded item responses, it is related to well-known item response theory (IRT) models. In this article the IRT-2WMIM relations are used to obtain additional…

  5. School and Individual Factors That Contribute to the Achievement Gap in College Admissions Tests in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Mejias, Paulina

    2012-01-01

    In Chile, reports and research papers have shown that there is an achievement gap in college admissions tests mostly associated to students' gender, socioeconomic status and type of school attended. This gap represents a barrier for low-income and female students to access higher education, as well as for graduates of public schools. Prior…

  6. Prioritizing individual genetic variants after kernel machine testing using variable selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qianchuan; Cai, Tianxi; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Ni; Harmon, Quaker E; Almli, Lynn M; Binder, Elisabeth B; Engel, Stephanie M; Ressler, Kerry J; Conneely, Karen N; Lin, Xihong; Wu, Michael C

    2016-12-01

    Kernel machine learning methods, such as the SNP-set kernel association test (SKAT), have been widely used to test associations between traits and genetic polymorphisms. In contrast to traditional single-SNP analysis methods, these methods are designed to examine the joint effect of a set of related SNPs (such as a group of SNPs within a gene or a pathway) and are able to identify sets of SNPs that are associated with the trait of interest. However, as with many multi-SNP testing approaches, kernel machine testing can draw conclusion only at the SNP-set level, and does not directly inform on which one(s) of the identified SNP set is actually driving the associations. A recently proposed procedure, KerNel Iterative Feature Extraction (KNIFE), provides a general framework for incorporating variable selection into kernel machine methods. In this article, we focus on quantitative traits and relatively common SNPs, and adapt the KNIFE procedure to genetic association studies and propose an approach to identify driver SNPs after the application of SKAT to gene set analysis. Our approach accommodates several kernels that are widely used in SNP analysis, such as the linear kernel and the Identity by State (IBS) kernel. The proposed approach provides practically useful utilities to prioritize SNPs, and fills the gap between SNP set analysis and biological functional studies. Both simulation studies and real data application are used to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  7. Individual differences in text comprehension as a function of test anxiety and prior knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, A E

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between reading comprehension and comprehension monitoring with undergraduates (223 women, 69 men). Further, the effect of test anxiety and of prior knowledge on reading comprehension and on comprehension monitoring was examined in groups of students of equal

  8. Individual differences in text comprehension as a function of test anxiety and prior knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, A E

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between reading comprehension and comprehension monitoring with undergraduates (223 women, 69 men). Further, the effect of test anxiety and of prior knowledge on reading comprehension and on comprehension monitoring was examined in groups of students of equal

  9. Detection of filaria-specific IgG4 antibodies using Brugia Rapid test in individuals from an area highly endemic for Brugia timori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supali, T; Rahmah, N; Djuardi, Y; Sartono, E; Rückert, Paul; Fischer, P

    2004-05-01

    The filarial parasite Brugia timori is of great public health importance in some islands of Eastern Indonesia. To establish a simple serological test for the identification and post-treatment monitoring of areas endemic for B. timori, a rapid immunochromatographic dipstick test (Brugia Rapid, BR) was evaluated on microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic individuals. This test is based on the detection of anti-filarial IgG4 antibodies that react with a recombinant Brugia malayi antigen (BmR1). In our study area on Alor island the prevalence of microfilaraemia was 26%. With the BR test, 100% of 196 sera from microfilaraemic persons and 76% of 563 sera from amicrofilaraemic persons, either symptomatic or asymptomatic, reacted positive. All 50 control sera from areas non-endemic for lymphatic filariasis gave negative BR test results. This study showed that the BR test can be also used to detect antibodies against B. timori. Due to the high prevalence of IgG4 antibodies as detected by the BR test (81%), no significant correlation with the prevalence of microfilaraemia could be detected within the endemic village. The BR test also shows great promise to be employed as a monitoring tool for B. timori in the framework of the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF).

  10. The ABC's of Suicide Risk Assessment: Applying a Tripartite Approach to Individual Evaluations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M Harris

    Full Text Available There is considerable need for accurate suicide risk assessment for clinical, screening, and research purposes. This study applied the tripartite affect-behavior-cognition theory, the suicidal barometer model, classical test theory, and item response theory (IRT, to develop a brief self-report measure of suicide risk that is theoretically-grounded, reliable and valid. An initial survey (n = 359 employed an iterative process to an item pool, resulting in the six-item Suicidal Affect-Behavior-Cognition Scale (SABCS. Three additional studies tested the SABCS and a highly endorsed comparison measure. Studies included two online surveys (Ns = 1007, and 713, and one prospective clinical survey (n = 72; Time 2, n = 54. Factor analyses demonstrated SABCS construct validity through unidimensionality. Internal reliability was high (α = .86-.93, split-half = .90-.94. The scale was predictive of future suicidal behaviors and suicidality (r = .68, .73, respectively, showed convergent validity, and the SABCS-4 demonstrated clinically relevant sensitivity to change. IRT analyses revealed the SABCS captured more information than the comparison measure, and better defined participants at low, moderate, and high risk. The SABCS is the first suicide risk measure to demonstrate no differential item functioning by sex, age, or ethnicity. In all comparisons, the SABCS showed incremental improvements over a highly endorsed scale through stronger predictive ability, reliability, and other properties. The SABCS is in the public domain, with this publication, and is suitable for clinical evaluations, public screening, and research.

  11. Road-Side Drug Testing: An Evaluation of the Alere DDS®2 Mobile Test System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrig, Timothy P; Moore, Christine M; Stephens, Kimberly; Cooper, Kelsey; Coulter, Cynthia; Baird, Tyson; Garnier, Margaux; Miller, Samuel; Tuyay, James; Osawa, Kei; Chou, Joshua; Nuss, Carson; Collier, Jeff; Wittman, Karen Cudlin

    2017-09-06

    The number of drivers using drugs has increased over the last few years, and is likely to continue its upward trend. Testing drivers for alcohol use is routine and standardized, but the same is not true for the identification of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). The Drug Evaluation and Classification Program (DECP) was developed to train police officers to recognize the signs and symptoms of recent drug use and remains an invaluable program; however there are insufficient numbers of these highly trained drug recognition experts (DRE's) who are available to attend every potential drug involved traffic incident. While blood and urine samples are used to test for drugs in a driver, both have disadvantages particularly as it pertains to the length of time required after a traffic stop to sample collection. Therefore, the development of oral fluid testing devices which can be operated at the roadside and have the potential to assist officers in the identification of drug use is a major advancement in DUID cases. This project evaluated the performance of one instrumental oral fluid roadside testing device (Alere DDS®2) compared to DRE opinion, oral fluid laboratory based analysis and routine blood testing. The results showed that there was a good correlation with DRE observations and the device performance was >80% in all drug categories compared to laboratory-based analytical testing; both in oral fluid and blood, with few exceptions. The instrument can be considered a useful tool to assist law enforcement in identifying a drugged driver. Because the device does not test for all potentially impairing drugs, the opinion of the police officer regarding the condition of a driver should still be considered the most important aspect for arrest and further action. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. A simulation test approach to the evaluation and comparison of unconstrained nonlinear optimization algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillstrom, K. E.

    1976-02-01

    A simulation test technique was developed to evaluate and compare unconstrained nonlinear optimization computer algorithms. Descriptions of the test technique, test problems, computer algorithms tested, and test results are provided. (auth)

  13. Introducing a Third Timed Up & Go Test Trial Improves Performances of Hospitalized and Community-Dwelling Older Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Mette L; Jønsson, Line R; Kristensen, Morten T

    Originally, the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test was described as including a practice trial before a timed trial, but recent studies in individuals with hip fracture have reported that performance improved with a third trial and that high intertester reliability was achieved when the fastest of 3 timed trials was used. Thus, the fastest of 3 TUG trials is recommended when testing individuals with hip fracture. To our knowledge, no study has examined the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability on the TUG test (defined as no further improvement on subsequent trials) when performed by older individuals without hip fracture. The aim of the study, therefore, was to examine whether a third TUG trial is faster than either of 2 TUG trials conducted according to standardized TUG instructions and whether the fastest of 3 trials is the most appropriate measure to apply in hospitalized and community-dwelling older individuals. Eighty-two participants (50 from a geriatric hospital unit and 32 from an outpatient geriatric center; 52 women, 30 men) with a mean (SD) age of 83.6 (7.9) years were included in this cross-sectional study. All participants (except one from the hospital unit) performed 3 TUG trials, as fast as safely possible on the same day, and separated by up to 1-minute pauses. A rollator (4-wheeled rolling walker) was used as a standardized walking aid in the geriatric hospital unit, whereas participants used their normal walking aid (if any) in the outpatient geriatric center. The fastest trial was trial 3 for 47 (57%), trial 2 for 25 (31%), and trial 1 for 10 (12%). Repeated-measures analyses of variance with Bonferroni corrections showed that TUG times improved from trial 1 to trial 3 (P timed trials was significantly (P < .001) faster than the other 2 trials. We suggest that the fastest of the 3 TUG trials is recorded instead of the second trial in both hospitalized and community-dwelling older individuals.

  14. Lessons learned in pilot testing specialty consultations to benefit individuals with lower limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine; Latlief, Gail; Gavin-Dreschnack, Deborah; Harris, Melanie; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Telerehabilitation technologies enable the delivery of rehabilitation services from providers to people with disabilities as well as specialty care consultations. This article discusses the barriers experienced when planning and pilot testing a telerehabilitation multi-site specialty consultation for specialists in their medical centers, and the lessons learned. The barriers included integration and participation, coordination across organizational units, and privacy and information security. Lessons learned included the need for collaboration across multiple departments, telerehabilitation equipment back-ups, and anonymous and private communication protocols. Despite delays resulting from coordination at multiple levels of a national organization, we developed a program plan and successfully implemented a pilot test of the southeast region program. Specialty consultation using telerehabilitation delivery methods requires identifying provider preferences for technological features. Lessons learned could inform development of outpatient telerehabilitation for patients with amputations and studies of patients and providers involved in telerehabilitation.

  15. Lessons Learned in Pilot Testing Specialty Consultations to Benefit Individuals with Lower Limb Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elnitsky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Telerehabilitation technologies enable the delivery of rehabilitation services from providers to people with disabilities as well as specialty care consultations. This article discusses the barriers experienced when planning and pilot testing a telerehabilitation multi-site specialty consultation for specialists in their medical centers, and the lessons learned. The barriers included integration and participation, coordination across organizational units, and privacy and information security. Lessons learned included the need for collaboration across multiple departments, telerehabilitation equipment back-ups, and anonymous and private communication protocols. Despite delays resulting from coordination at multiple levels of a national organization, we developed a program plan and successfully implemented a pilot test of the southeast region program.  Specialty consultation using telerehabilitation delivery methods requires identifying provider preferences for technological features. Lessons learned could inform development of outpatient telerehabilitation for patients with amputations and studies of patients and providers involved in telerehabilitation.

  16. A 48-plex autosomal SNP GenPlex™ assay for human individualization and relationship testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2012-01-01

    SNPs are being increasingly used by forensic laboratories. Different platforms have been developed for SNP typing. We describe the GenPlex™ HID system protocol, a new SNP-typing platform developed by Applied Biosystems where 48 of the 52 SNPforID SNPs and amelogenin are included. The GenPlex™ HID...... system protocol has been successfully tested by a number of forensic laboratories using both ordinary and forensic samples....

  17. Wave Dragon. Test to evaluate hydraulic response. Report phase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, H.C.; Friis-Madsen, E.

    1999-02-01

    Danish Maritime Institute has in the spring 1998 built a model in scale 1:50 of the wave energy converter Wave Dragon. The scale model is based on calculations performed by the inventor Erik Friis-Madsen from the consultant Loewenmark F.R.I. The scale model is tested in the wave tank at Aalborg University, the Hydraulic and Coastal Engineering Laboratory. This report deals with the results from this test (phase A of the test program). The objective of the test series was to get a judgement of the viability of Wave Dragon in extreme sea conditions in the Danish part of the North Sea at a water depth of 30 meters. The test series had to document: The viability of the Wave Dragon in extreme sea conditions up to 100-year waves; the hydraulic response in 7 different sea conditions where forces and movements have been registered. The main findings are: Wave Dragon has the expected behavior, i.e. the converter is able to survive a 100-year storm; An adjustment of the pitch of the converter could improve the energy efficiency; The forces in the mooring system and the junction between wave reflectors and the platform are acceptable. The forces and the movements are registered at 7 different sea conditions. Video recording has been taken during the test. Five of the sea conditions correspond to 'normal' waves in which power will be produced. Two sea conditions correspond to extreme wave situations. The duration of the registration in each sea conditions was approximately 1/2 an hour, i.e. 3.5 hours in scale 1:1. The conclusion is: The planned test series to evaluate the energy performance can start up (phase B of the test program); The energy efficiency is expected to be improved by a slight modification in the geometry of the Wave Dragon. The modifications can include the geometry of the front and the stabilising wing at the rear end of the platform. Further on changes are possible in the stiffness of the junction between the wave reflectors and the platform and

  18. Quality performance of laboratory testing in pharmacies: a collaborative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninotto, Martina; Miolo, Giorgia; Guiotto, Adriano; Marton, Silvia; Plebani, Mario

    2016-11-01

    The quality performance and the comparability between results of pharmacies point-of-care-testing (POCT) and institutional laboratories have been evaluated. Eight pharmacies participated in the project: a capillary specimen collected by the pharmacist and, simultaneously, a lithium-heparin sample drawn by a physician of laboratory medicine for the pharmacy customers (n=106) were analyzed in the pharmacy and in the laboratory, respectively. Glucose, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, were measured using: Reflotron, n=5; Samsung, n=1; Cardiocheck PA, n=1; Cholestech LDX, n=1 and Cobas 8000. The POCT analytical performance only (phase 2) were evaluated testing, in pharmacies and in the laboratory, the lithium heparin samples from a female drawn fasting daily in a week, and a control sample containing high concentrations of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. For all parameters, except triglycerides, the slopes showed a satisfactory correlation. For triglycerides, a median value higher in POCT in comparison to the laboratory (1.627 mmol/L vs. 0.950 mmol/L) has been observed. The agreement in the subjects classification, demonstrates that for glucose, 70% of the subjects show concentrations below the POCT recommended level (5.8-6.1 mmol/L), while 56% are according to the laboratory limit (pharmacies and specific criticisms in the pre- and post-analytical phases.

  19. Lanthanum nitrate genotoxicity evaluation: Ames test, mouse micronucleus assay, and chromosome aberration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Haibo; Cui, Wenming; Zhang, Qiannan; Li, Yongning; Yu, Zhou; Jia, Xudong

    2016-11-01

    The increasing use of rare-earth elements (REE) and their compounds has led to their accumulation in the environment and has raised concern about their safety. The toxic effects of REE such as lanthanum are largely unknown; genotoxicity studies have been limited and results are controversial. We evaluated the genotoxicity of lanthanum nitrate (La(NO3)3) in several in vitro and in vivo tests, including bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay, and chromosome aberration assay. La(NO3)3 was not mutagenic in the Ames test. La(NO3)3 did not increase the frequencies of bone marrow micronuclei or chromosome aberration in the mouse after repeated treatments at oral doses up to 735 (females) and 855mg/kg (males). The compound did not increase the frequency of chromosome aberrations in CHO cells in vitro. These results indicate that lanthanum is not a genotoxic hazard.

  20. Methods to measure peripheral and central sensitization using quantitative sensory testing: A focus on individuals with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, Angela R; Heineman, Amy; Storey, Shannon; Rubia, Gil; Lyon, Debra E; Greenspan, Joel; Dorsey, Susan G

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative sensory testing can be used to assess peripheral and central sensitization; important factors that contribute to the individual's experience of pain and disability. Many studies use quantitative sensory testing in patients with low back pain to detect alterations in pain sensitivity, however, because investigators employ different protocols, interpretation of findings across studies can become problematic. The purpose of this article is to propose a standardized method of testing peripheral and central pain sensitization in patients with low back pain. Video clips are provided to demonstrate correct procedures for measuring the response to experimental pain using mechanical, thermal and pressure modalities. As nurse researchers and clinicians increase utilization of quantitative sensory testing to examine pain phenotypes, it is anticipated that more personalized methods for monitoring the trajectory of low back pain and response to treatment will improve outcomes for this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinimetric properties of the Tinetti Mobility Test, Four Square Step Test, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and spatiotemporal gait measures in individuals with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, Anne D; Fritz, Nora E; Kostyk, Sandra K; Young, Gregory S; Kegelmeyer, Deb A

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with Huntington's disease (HD) experience balance and gait problems that lead to falls. Clinicians currently have very little information about the reliability and validity of outcome measures to determine the efficacy of interventions that aim to reduce balance and gait impairments in HD. This study examined the reliability and concurrent validity of spatiotemporal gait measures, the Tinetti Mobility Test (TMT), Four Square Step Test (FSST), and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale in individuals with HD. Participants with HD [n = 20; mean age ± SD=50.9 ± 13.7; 7 male] were tested on spatiotemporal gait measures and the TMT, FSST, and ABC Scale before and after a six week period to determine test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) values. Linear relationships between gait and clinical measures were estimated using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Spatiotemporal gait measures, the TMT total and the FSST showed good to excellent test-retest reliability (ICC > 0.75). MDC values were 0.30 m/s and 0.17 m/s for velocity in forward and backward walking respectively, four points for the TMT, and 3s for the FSST. The TMT and FSST were highly correlated with most spatiotemporal measures. The ABC Scale demonstrated lower reliability and less concurrent validity than other measures. The high test-retest reliability over a six week period and concurrent validity between the TMT, FSST, and spatiotemporal gait measures suggest that the TMT and FSST may be useful outcome measures for future intervention studies in ambulatory individuals with HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cortisol and ghrelin concentrations following a cold pressor stress test in overweight individuals with and without Night Eating

    OpenAIRE

    Geliebter, Allan; Carnell, Susan; Gluck, Marci E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore appetite-related hormones following stress in overweight individuals, and their interaction with Night Eating (NE) status. Method We measured plasma cortisol and ghrelin concentrations, and recorded ratings of stress and hunger in response to a physiological laboratory stressor (Cold Pressor Test, CPT) in overweight women with (n=11; NE) and without (n=17; non-NE) night eating. Results Following the CPT, cortisol (p < .001) and ghrelin (p < .05) levels increased, as did s...

  3. An empirical likelihood ratio test robust to individual heterogeneity for differential expression analysis of RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maoqi; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-21

    The individual sample heterogeneity is one of the biggest obstacles in biomarker identification for complex diseases such as cancers. Current statistical models to identify differentially expressed genes between disease and control groups often overlook the substantial human sample heterogeneity. Meanwhile, traditional nonparametric tests lose detailed data information and sacrifice the analysis power, although they are distribution free and robust to heterogeneity. Here, we propose an empirical likelihood ratio test with a mean-variance relationship constraint (ELTSeq) for the differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). As a distribution-free nonparametric model, ELTSeq handles individual heterogeneity by estimating an empirical probability for each observation without making any assumption about read-count distribution. It also incorporates a constraint for the read-count overdispersion, which is widely observed in RNA-seq data. ELTSeq demonstrates a significant improvement over existing methods such as edgeR, DESeq, t-tests, Wilcoxon tests and the classic empirical likelihood-ratio test when handling heterogeneous groups. It will significantly advance the transcriptomics studies of cancers and other complex disease.

  4. Individual Differences in Behavioural Despair Predict Brain GSK-3beta Expression in Mice: The Power of a Modified Swim Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Strekalova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While deficient brain plasticity is a well-established pathophysiologic feature of depression, little is known about disorder-associated enhanced cognitive processing. Here, we studied a novel mouse paradigm that potentially models augmented learning of adverse memories during development of a depressive-like state. We used a modification of the classic two-day protocol of a mouse Porsolt test with an additional session occurring on Day 5 following the initial exposure. Unexpectedly, floating behaviour and brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3beta mRNA levels, a factor of synaptic plasticity as well as a marker of distress and depression, were increased during the additional swimming session that was prevented by imipramine. Observed increases of GSK-3beta mRNA in prefrontal cortex during delayed testing session correlated with individual parameters of behavioural despair that was not found in the classic Porsolt test. Repeated swim exposure was accompanied by a lower pGSK-3beta/GSK-3beta ratio. A replacement of the second or the final swim sessions with exposure to the context of testing resulted in increased GSK-3beta mRNA level similar to the effects of swimming, while exclusion of the second testing prevented these changes. Together, our findings implicate the activation of brain GSK-3beta expression in enhanced contextual conditioning of adverse memories, which is associated with an individual susceptibility to a depressive syndrome.

  5. Individual Differences in Behavioural Despair Predict Brain GSK-3beta Expression in Mice: The Power of a Modified Swim Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Nataliia; Shevtsova, Elena; Bakhmet, Anastassia; Steinbusch, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    While deficient brain plasticity is a well-established pathophysiologic feature of depression, little is known about disorder-associated enhanced cognitive processing. Here, we studied a novel mouse paradigm that potentially models augmented learning of adverse memories during development of a depressive-like state. We used a modification of the classic two-day protocol of a mouse Porsolt test with an additional session occurring on Day 5 following the initial exposure. Unexpectedly, floating behaviour and brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3beta) mRNA levels, a factor of synaptic plasticity as well as a marker of distress and depression, were increased during the additional swimming session that was prevented by imipramine. Observed increases of GSK-3beta mRNA in prefrontal cortex during delayed testing session correlated with individual parameters of behavioural despair that was not found in the classic Porsolt test. Repeated swim exposure was accompanied by a lower pGSK-3beta/GSK-3beta ratio. A replacement of the second or the final swim sessions with exposure to the context of testing resulted in increased GSK-3beta mRNA level similar to the effects of swimming, while exclusion of the second testing prevented these changes. Together, our findings implicate the activation of brain GSK-3beta expression in enhanced contextual conditioning of adverse memories, which is associated with an individual susceptibility to a depressive syndrome. PMID:27478647

  6. Reliability and validity of the inertial sensor-based Timed "Up and Go" test in individuals affected by stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüest, Seline; Massé, Fabien; Aminian, Kamiar; Gonzenbach, Roman; de Bruin, Eling D

    2016-01-01

    The instrumented Timed "Up and Go" test (iTUG) has the potential for playing an important role in providing clinically useful information regarding an individual's balance and mobility that cannot be derived from the original single-outcome Timed "Up and Go" test protocol. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the iTUG using body-fixed inertial sensors in people affected by stroke. For test-retest reliability analysis, 14 individuals with stroke and 25 nondisabled elderly patients were assessed. For validity analysis, an age-matched comparison of 12 patients with stroke and 12 nondisabled controls was performed. Out of the 14 computed iTUG metrics, the majority showed excellent test-retest reliability expressed by high intraclass correlation coefficients (range 0.431-0.994) together with low standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference values. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated good agreement between two repeated measurements. Significant differences between patients with stroke and nondisabled controls were found in 9 of 14 iTUG parameters analyzed. Consequently, these results warrant the future application of the inertial sensor-based iTUG test for the assessment of physical deficits poststroke in longitudinal study designs.

  7. Evaluation of registered visually disabled individuals in a district of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sambuddha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the sociodemographic characteristics, degree and cause of visual disability among certified visually disabled individuals in a rural district of West Bengal, India and to identify possible lacunae, if any, in the existing certification system. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study by secondary data analysis of medical records of 155 visually disabled individuals and their 310 eyes. Demographical features, diagnosis, percentage of visual disability and work activity status of each individual were analyzed. Results: One hundred and thirty one (84.52% individuals had 100% disability. The number of males was significantly higher than that of females. Fifty eight (37.42% individuals were below 21 years of age. Phthisis bulbi was the most common cause followed by microphthalmos. Further, 81.29% patients had the same lesion bilaterally. Conclusion: Patients with higher grades of disability have attended certification boards. A large number of disabled individuals comprised children and young adults. Male gender bias demands concern.

  8. EVA Metro Sedan electric-propulsion system: test and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimers, E.

    1979-09-01

    The procedure and results of the performance evaluation of the EVA Metro Sedan (car No. 1) variable speed dc chopper motor drive and its three speed automatic transmission are presented. The propulsion system for a battery powered vehicle manufactured by Electric Vehicle Associates, Valley View, Ohio, was removed from the vehicle, mounted on the programmable electric dynamometer test facility and evaluated with the aid of a hp 3052A Data Acquisition System. Performance data for the automatic transmission, the solid state dc motor speed controller, and the dc motor in the continuous and pulsating dc power mode, as derived on the dynamometer test facility, as well as the entire propulsion system are given. This concept and the system's components were evaluated in terms of commercial applicability, maintainability, and energy utility to establish a design base for the further development of this system or similar propulsion drives. The propulsion system of the EVA Metro Sedan is powered by sixteen 6-volt traction batteries, Type EV 106 (Exide Battery Mfg. Co.). A thyristor controlled cable form Pulsomatic Mark 10 controller, actuated by a foot throttle, controls the voltage applied to a dc series field motor, rated at 10 hp at 3800 rpm (Baldor Electric Co.). Gear speed reduction to the wheel is accomplished by the original equipment three speed automatic transmission with torque converter (Renault 12 Sedan). The brake consists of a power-assisted, hydraulic braking system with front wheel disk and rear drum. An ability to recuperate electric energy with subsequent storage in the battery power supply is not provided.

  9. Evaluation of five serological tests for the diagnosis of porcine brucellosis in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praud, Anne; Gimenez, Olivier; Zanella, Gina; Pozzi, Nathalie; Antras, Valérie; Meyer, Laurence; Garin-Bastuji, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Porcine brucellosis due to Brucella suis biovar 1 raises important issues for pig breeders in French Polynesia. In this region, the disease is enzootic, spreads silently and engenders economic losses in infected farms as well as sporadic human cases. While serological tests are essential in surveillance and control programmes of animal diseases, to date none of the available tests have been shown to be reliable enough to be used as a gold standard in routine individual diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. Few studies about the estimation of the sensitivity and the specificity of porcine brucellosis screening tests have been published, none of them dealing with French Polynesia. The studied population included 1,595 pigs from French Polynesia. Five tests were evaluated: Rose Bengal test, fluorescence polarisation assay, indirect ELISA, and two competitive ELISAs (C-ELISA). The sensitivity and the specificity of each test were estimated. C-ELISA2 was the most sensitive test (Se C-ELISA2=0.954 [0.889; 0.992] 95% credibility interval (CrI)) while both C-ELISA and Rose Bengal test (RBT) were the most specific ones (Sp C-ELISA1=0.856 [0.806; 0.915] 95% CrI; Sp C-ELISA2=0.849 [0.817; 0.879] 95% CrI; Sp RBT=0.853 [0.812; 0.898] 95% CrI).

  10. Individual differences in the elevated plus-maze and the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estanislau, Celio; Ramos, Anna Carolina; Ferraresi, Paula Daniele; Costa, Naiara Fernanda; de Carvalho, Heloisa Maria Cotta Pires; Batistela, Silmara

    2011-01-01

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus composed of enclosed and open (elevated) arms and time spent in the open arms by a rat can be increased/decreased by anxiolytic/anxiogenic agents. In the forced swim test, floating behavior is used as an index of behavioral despair and can be decreased by antidepressant agents. As the comorbidity between anxiety and depression is a remarkable issue in human behavioral disorders, a possible relationship between the behaviors seen in the cited tests is of great relevance. In the present study, fifty-four male rats (Rattus norvegicus) were submitted to a plus-maze session and to a 2-day forced swim protocol. According to their time in the open arms, they were divided into three groups: Low Open, Medium Open and High Open. Some plus-maze measures were found to be coherent with time in the open arms and are suggested to also be reliable anxiety indexes. In the forced swim test, the Low Open group showed decreases in floating duration from forced swim Session 1 to Session 2, an alteration opposite to that observed in the other groups (particularly, the Medium Open group). The Low Open group also showed increases in floating latency, again in sharp contrast with the alteration found in the other groups. Accordingly, positive and negative correlation were found between time in the open arms and floating duration and latency, respectively. Results are compared to previous studies and mediation of the effect by reactivity to aversive stimulation or alterations induced by open arm exposure is discussed.

  11. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  12. Recommendations for presymptomatic genetic testing and management of individuals at risk for hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obici, Laura; Kuks, Jan B.; Buades, Juan; Adams, David; Suhr, Ole B.; Coelho, Teresa; Kyriakides, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review These recommendations highlight recent experience in genetic counselling for the severe autosomal-dominant, late-onset transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) disease, and present a structured approach towards identification and monitoring of asymptomatic carriers of the mutated gene. Recent findings The effectiveness of current treatment options is still limited in patients with TTR-FAP beyond stage I. Diagnosis in the early stages of TTR-FAP is essential to prevent or delay the progression of disease. Existing legal and cultural issues differ among countries within Europe. Experts of the European Network for TTR-FAP (ATTReuNET) concluded that genetic counselling for diagnosed individuals and at-risk family members is mostly beneficial and should be carried out with care by trained professionals. Systematic and regular monitoring of an asymptomatic carrier is necessary to detect early signs of TTR-FAP and maximize the effectiveness of treatment. This includes five areas of assessment: history/clinical examination, sensorimotor function, autonomic dysfunction, cardiac function, and renal function. At least two related symptoms and positive biopsy findings are required to confirm diagnosis of TTR-FAP. Summary Early detection of TTR-FAP is essential to improve the prognosis of TTR-FAP. ATTReuNET recommends genetic counselling and routine monitoring for asymptomatic carriers of TTR-FAP. PMID:26734953

  13. The Evaluation of Prick Test Results in Malatya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kahraman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Skin prick test used for determination of allergic diseases is an easy, cheap, safe, fast, and frequently utilized test. There are factors such as genetic tendency, climate, humidity, vegetation, and altitude affecting the development of allergy. Our goal is to determine the allergic susceptibility of allergic patient in Malatya province. Material and Method: The 403 patients who referred to our chest clinic in Malatya between January 2008 and June 2010 with complaint of respiratory allergic diseases including asthma and allergic rhinitis were retrospectively investigated. Skin prick test results were evaluated according to age and gender. Results: Of the 403 patients incorporated to the study, 177 (43.9% were male, 226 (56.1% were female. Most common reaction was against to grasses, in 78 patients (19.4%. The other common reactions were found against to grains, in 70 patients (17.4%; to D. Farinea in 51 patients (12.7%; to D Pteronyssinus in 44 patients (10.9%; to grass mix in 41 patients (10.2%. Although reactions were higher in men than in women, only against to D. Pteronyssinus was statistical significant (p=0.032. Reactions were observed most commonly in 10-19 age group and secondly in 20-29 age group. Discussion: Atopic patients in Malatya province should be careful especially against to grasses, grains, and house dust mites.

  14. Evaluation of Obesity-Associated Dermatoses in Obese and Overweight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Döner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Although the effects of obesity on the skin are known, there are no adequate studies on this subject. To evaluate obesity-related dermatoses in obese and overweight people and to compare the obtained results with those of individuals with body mass index (BMI lower than 25 kg/m2.Material and methods: A total of 500 (mean age: 43.6±12.8; 318 female, 182 male volunteer patients aged 18 years and older, who were treated in inpatient clinics except dermatology, and their relatives were included in the study. The subjects were grouped according to BMI: less than 25 kg/m2 (controls, n = 120, 25-29.9 kg/m2 (overweights, n=130, and greater than 30 kg/m2 (obeses, n=250. The participants were examined dermatologically and all known skin diseases associated with obesity were noted. Results: The total number of dermatoses was statistically higher in obeses and overweights than in controls, as well as in obeses than in overweights. The five most frequently seen dermatoses in all groups were: varicose vein, tinea pedis, striae distensae, acrochordon and onychomycosis, respectively. There were statistically significant differences: between obeses and controls with regard to varicose vein, tinea pedis, striae distensae, acrochordon, onychomycosis, acanthosis nigricans and intertrigo; between overweights and controls with respect to varicose vein, tinea pedis, striae distensae, acrochordon and onychomycosis; between obeses and overweights with regard to striae distensae, acanthosis nigricans and onychomycosis. A positive correlation was detected between BMI and degree of plantar hyperkeratosis in all participants; between BMI and hirsutism score, severity of androgenetic alopecia (AGA and cellulite in women. Conclusion: While acanthosis nigricans and AGA in females were associated with obesity, the other dermatoses were related with not only with obesity but also with increasing weight gain.

  15. Evaluation of methods to test chemicals suitability for umbilical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, S. J.; Lindeman, O. E.; Cenegy, L. M.

    2006-03-15

    . Once the chemicals passed all tests they were further evaluated in a full size operational umbilical unit. The test protocols developed are fully discussed in this paper. (Author) (tk)

  16. Evaluation of the theory of mind in autism spectrum disorders with the Strange Stories test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Lima Velloso

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the theory of mind in autism spectrum disorders (ASD and control individuals by applying the Strange Stories test that was translated and adapted to the Portuguese language. Method Twenty-eight children with ASD and 56 controls who were all male and aged between 6 and 12 years participated in the study. Results There were significant differences between the median scores of the groups for each of the 12 stories of the test and for the sum total of all the median scores. The median scores for all stories were significantly greater in the control group than those in the experimental group (children with ASD. In addition, the protocol had excellent internal consistency. Conclusion The theory of mind skills assessed with the Strange Stories test indicated alterations in children with ASD compared with children in the control group.

  17. Visualizing the origins of selfish de novo mutations in individual seminiferous tubules of human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Geoffrey J; McGowan, Simon J; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Verrill, Clare; Goriely, Anne; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2016-03-01

    De novo point mutations arise predominantly in the male germline and increase in frequency with age, but it has not previously been possible to locate specific, identifiable mutations directly within the seminiferous tubules of human testes. Using microdissection of tubules exhibiting altered expression of the spermatogonial markers MAGEA4, FGFR3, and phospho-AKT, whole genome amplification, and DNA sequencing, we establish an in situ strategy for discovery and analysis of pathogenic de novo mutations. In 14 testes from men aged 39-90 y, we identified 11 distinct gain-of-function mutations in five genes (fibroblast growth factor receptors FGFR2 and FGFR3, tyrosine phosphatase PTPN11, and RAS oncogene homologs HRAS and KRAS) from 16 of 22 tubules analyzed; all mutations have known associations with severe diseases, ranging from congenital or perinatal lethal disorders to somatically acquired cancers. These results support proposed selfish selection of spermatogonial mutations affecting growth factor receptor-RAS signaling, highlight its prevalence in older men, and enable direct visualization of the microscopic anatomy of elongated mutant clones.

  18. Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) Lubrication Interval Test and Evaluation (LITE). Post-Test Grease Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Martinez, James E.; Devivar, Rodrigo V.

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) is a mechanism of the International Space Station (ISS) that orients the solar power generating arrays toward the sun as the ISS orbits our planet. The orientation with the sun must be maintained to fully charge the ISS batteries and maintain all the other ISS electrical systems operating properly. In 2007, just a few months after full deployment, the starboard SARJ developed anomalies that warranted a full investigation including ISS Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The EVA uncovered unexpected debris that was due to degradation of a nitride layer on the SARJ bearing race. ISS personnel identified the failure root-cause and applied an aerospace grease to lubricate the area associated with the anomaly. The corrective action allowed the starboard SARJ to continue operating within the specified engineering parameters. The SARJ LITE (Lubrication Interval Test and Evaluation) program was initiated by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing to simulate the operation of the ISS SARJ for an extended time. The hardware was designed to test and evaluate the exact material components used aboard the ISS SARJ, but in a controlled area where engineers could continuously monitor the performance. After running the SARJ LITE test for an equivalent of 36+ years of continuous use, the test was opened to evaluate the metallography and lubrication. We have sampled the SARJ LITE rollers and plate to fully assess the grease used for lubrication. Chemical and thermal analysis of these samples has generated information that has allowed us to assess the location, migration, and current condition of the grease. The collective information will be key toward understanding and circumventing any performance deviations involving the ISS SARJ in the years to come.

  19. The swimming test is effective for evaluating spasticity after contusive spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Youngjae; Ogata, Toru; Nagao, Motoshi; Kitamura, Taku; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ichihara, Yoshinori; Doi, Toru; Sawada, Yasuhiro; Akai, Masami; Nishimura, Ryohei; Fujita, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity is a frequent chronic complication in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the severity of spasticity varies in patients with SCI. Therefore, an evaluation method is needed to determine the severity of spasticity. We used a contusive SCI model that is suitable for clinical translation. In this study, we examined the feasibility of the swimming test and an EMG for evaluating spasticity in a contusive SCI rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats received an injury at the 8th thoracic vertebra. Swimming tests were performed 3 to 6 weeks after SCI induction. We placed the SCI rats into spasticity-strong or spasticity-weak groups based on the frequency of spastic behavior during the swimming test. Subsequently, we recorded the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) and examined the immunoreactivity of serotonin (5-HT) and its receptor (5-HT2A) in the spinal tissues of the SCI rats. The spasticity-strong group had significantly decreased rate-dependent depression of the H-reflex compared to the spasticity-weak group. The area of 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the spasticity-strong group. Thus, both electrophysiological and histological evaluations indicate that the spasticity-strong group presented with a more severe upper motor neuron syndrome. We also observed the groups in their cages for 20 hours. Our results suggest that the swimming test provides an accurate evaluation of spasticity in this contusive SCI model. We believe that the swimming test is an effective method for evaluating spastic behaviors and developing treatments targeting spasticity after SCI. PMID:28182676

  20. Validation of a computer-adaptive test to evaluate generic health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zardaín Pilar C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL is a relevant variable in the evaluation of health outcomes. Questionnaires based on Classical Test Theory typically require a large number of items to evaluate HRQoL. Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT can be used to reduce tests length while maintaining and, in some cases, improving accuracy. This study aimed at validating a CAT based on Item Response Theory (IRT for evaluation of generic HRQoL: the CAT-Health instrument. Methods Cross-sectional study of subjects aged over 18 attending Primary Care Centres for any reason. CAT-Health was administered along with the SF-12 Health Survey. Age, gender and a checklist of chronic conditions were also collected. CAT-Health was evaluated considering: 1 feasibility: completion time and test length; 2 content range coverage, Item Exposure Rate (IER and test precision; and 3 construct validity: differences in the CAT-Health scores according to clinical variables and correlations between both questionnaires. Results 396 subjects answered CAT-Health and SF-12, 67.2% females, mean age (SD 48.6 (17.7 years. 36.9% did not report any chronic condition. Median completion time for CAT-Health was 81 seconds (IQ range = 59-118 and it increased with age (p Conclusions Although domain-specific CATs exist for various areas of HRQoL, CAT-Health is one of the first IRT-based CATs designed to evaluate generic HRQoL and it has proven feasible, valid and efficient, when administered to a broad sample of individuals attending primary care settings.

  1. The swimming test is effective for evaluating spasticity after contusive spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Youngjae; Ogata, Toru; Nagao, Motoshi; Kitamura, Taku; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ichihara, Yoshinori; Doi, Toru; Sawada, Yasuhiro; Akai, Masami; Nishimura, Ryohei; Fujita, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity is a frequent chronic complication in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the severity of spasticity varies in patients with SCI. Therefore, an evaluation method is needed to determine the severity of spasticity. We used a contusive SCI model that is suitable for clinical translation. In this study, we examined the feasibility of the swimming test and an EMG for evaluating spasticity in a contusive SCI rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats received an injury at the 8th thoracic vertebra. Swimming tests were performed 3 to 6 weeks after SCI induction. We placed the SCI rats into spasticity-strong or spasticity-weak groups based on the frequency of spastic behavior during the swimming test. Subsequently, we recorded the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) and examined the immunoreactivity of serotonin (5-HT) and its receptor (5-HT2A) in the spinal tissues of the SCI rats. The spasticity-strong group had significantly decreased rate-dependent depression of the H-reflex compared to the spasticity-weak group. The area of 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the spasticity-strong group. Thus, both electrophysiological and histological evaluations indicate that the spasticity-strong group presented with a more severe upper motor neuron syndrome. We also observed the groups in their cages for 20 hours. Our results suggest that the swimming test provides an accurate evaluation of spasticity in this contusive SCI model. We believe that the swimming test is an effective method for evaluating spastic behaviors and developing treatments targeting spasticity after SCI.

  2. LLNL heart valve condition classification project anechoic testing results at the TRANSDEC evaluation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V

    1999-10-31

    This report first briefly outlines the procedures and support/activation fixture developed at LLNL to perform the heart valve tests in an anechoic-like tank at the US Navy Transducer Evaluation Facility (TransDec) located in San Diego, CA. Next they discuss the basic experiments performed and the corresponding experimental plan employed to gather meaningful data systematically. The signal processing required to extract the desired information is briefly developed along with some of the data. Finally, they show the results of the individual runs for each valve, point out any of the meaningful features and summaries.

  3. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Grahm C; Edke, Mangesh; Griffin, Timothy M

    2012-08-15

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle data and a high-speed infrared video file. During the first night of wheel running, mice reached consistent running speeds within the first 40 force events, indicating a rapid habituation to wheel running, given that mice generated >2,000 force-event files/night. Average running speeds and peak normal and tangential forces were consistent throughout the first four nights of running, indicating that one night of running is sufficient to characterize the locomotor biomechanics of healthy mice. Twelve weeks of wheel running significantly increased spontaneous wheel-running speeds (16 vs. 37 m/min), lowered duty factors (ratio of foot-ground contact time to stride time; 0.71 vs. 0.58), and raised hindlimb peak normal forces (93 vs. 115% body wt) compared with inexperienced mice. Peak normal hindlimb-force magnitudes were the primary force component, which were nearly tenfold greater than peak tangential forces. Peak normal hindlimb forces exceed the vertical forces generated during overground running (50-60% body wt), suggesting that wheel running shifts weight support toward the hindlimbs. This force-instrumented running-wheel system provides a comprehensive, noninvasive screening method for monitoring gait biomechanics in mice during spontaneous locomotion.

  4. The association between disease and profitability in individual finishing boars at a test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Birk; Baadsgaard, Niels Peter; Houe, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Endemic diseases in finisher herds are considered to be costly for the pig producer. We investigated the effect of diseases on the profit margin using data from a Danish boar test station (n = 5777) collected from July 2002 to December 2004. Boars reaching a target slaughter weight of at least 80......: profit margin. The results showed that treatment in the finishing period had a negative effect on the profit margin. According to the least square means estimates, boars that were treated parenterally had a reduction in the profit margin of 2.24 €. This corresponded to a reduction in the profit margin...... of 17%. Boars treated orally had a reduction of 0.88 €, which corresponded to a reduction in the profit margin of 7%. Pathological findings, breed and weight at 4 weeks were also significantly associated with the profit margin. The effect of pathological findings was influenced by breed and caused...

  5. Evaluating Individual Training Adaptation With Smartphone-Derived Heart Rate Variability in a Collegiate Female Soccer Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Andrew A; Esco, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring individual responses throughout training may provide insight to coaches regarding how athletes are coping to the current program. It is unclear if the evolution of heart rate variability (HRV) throughout training in team-sport athletes can be useful in providing early indications of individual adaptation. This study evaluated relationships between changes in resting cardiac autonomic markers derived from a novel smartphone device within the first 3 weeks of a 5-week conditioning program and the eventual change in intermittent running performance at week 5 among 12 collegiate female soccer players. Change variables from weeks 1 to 3 of the weekly mean and weekly coefficient of variation for resting heart rate ([INCREMENT]RHRmean and [INCREMENT]RHRcv, respectively) and log-transformed root mean square of successive R-R intervals multiplied by 20 ([INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDmean and [INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDcv, respectively) were compared with changes in Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 performance ([INCREMENT]Yo-Yo). A very large and significant correlation was found between [INCREMENT]Yo-Yo and [INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDcv (r = -0.74; p = <0.01) and a large nonsignificant correlation was found with [INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDmean (r = 0.50; p = 0.096). This study suggests that a decrease in Ln rMSSDcv within the first 3 weeks of training is a favorable response, indicative of positive adaptation. Collecting daily HRV data with a smartphone application using ultrashort HRV measures seems useful for athlete monitoring.

  6. Age determination in roe deer - a new approach to tooth wear evaluated on known age individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Toke Thomas

    2006-01-01

    integrated in a scoring system. Permanent cheek teeth emerge in May-July in the year after birth, which enables precise age determination of individuals with deciduous premolars. For individuals with permanent cheek teeth, the method provides the correct age for all individuals younger than 13 months...... and > 80% of all individuals between 13 and 24 months old. For older individuals the accuracy decreases, but decent accuracy is achieved to the age of 48 months. Males have higher wear rates than females corroborating recent documentation of sex-specific life history tactics in ungulates. The data...... originate from two separated Danish roe deer populations exposed to contrasting habitats, but no difference in wear rate is found between populations. Thus, previous concern about the validity of age determination methods based on tooth wear may have been overstated. The findings demonstrate that objective...

  7. Anthropometric and Intellectual Evaluation of Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Ging Shu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a rare, multifaceted genetic disorder resulting from the absence of normally active paternally expressed genes from the 15q11-q13 chromosome region. Due to a lack of anthropometric and intellectual data in Taiwan, we attempted these evaluations. Twenty patients (14 males/6 females aged 7–23 years with molecularly confirmed PWS were enrolled with parental consent. Their mean height standard deviation score (SDS was −1.26 ± 1.89 (from −4.3 to +2.16; mean weight SDS was +1.77 ± 2.00 (from −0.44 to +5.89; mean body mass index SDS was +3.84 ± 10.54 (from −0.08 to +10.48; and mean body fat tissue SDS was 39.4 ± 10.54% (14.7-57.8% by an InBody 3.0 analyzer. All were hypogonadal. Nine of them had once been given growth hormone therapy, and were taller and slimmer than the rest. Their in telligence tests showed full intelligence quotient = 52.0 ± 7.6; verbal intelligence quotient = 55.9 ± 8.77; performance intelligence quotient = 53.2 ± 9.0. Chronic health status revealed that diabetes was prevalent among the older population. Their IQ was in the range of those with moderate retardation.

  8. Simultaneous One-Sided Tests with Application to Education Evaluation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Dalal, Siddhartha R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    There is widespread interest in using various statistical inference tools as a part of the evaluations for individual teachers and schools. Evaluation systems typically involve classifying hundreds or even thousands of teachers or schools according to their estimated performance. Many current evaluations are largely based on individual estimates…

  9. Evaluation of Surface Cracks Using Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution characteristics of surface cracks with various widths are discussed based on finite element (FEM) results. The crack depth was 0.20 mm, the width range was from 0.02 to 1.00 mm. The results showed that crack width and lift-off (the distance between surface and sensor) will influence signals. Discussed in this paper is the influence of various lift-off parameters on the peak to peak values of the normal component in magnetic flux leakage testing. The effects can be applied to evaluate surface breaking cracks of different widths and depths.An idea is presented to smooth narrow, sharp crack tips using alternating current (AC) field magnetization.

  10. Evaluation of genotoxicity through micronuclei test in workers of car and battery repair garages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Martino-Roth

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the micronuclei test (MNT was applied in exfoliated cells of buccal mucosa, in order to evaluate the genotoxic risk associated with occupational exposure of mechanics, storage battery renovation workers, and car painters. For each individual, 3000 exfoliated buccal cells were analyzed. There was a significantly higher frequency of micronucleated cells (MNC in the exposed workers than in controls. Smoking and drinking habits, age, and working time did not represent significant factors in terms of increasing the production of micronuclei (MN, when the control and the exposed groups were compared. These results allowed to conclude that the studied individuals belong to a risk group and should periodically undergo biological monitoring and proper care.

  11. Evaluating the implementation of nurse-initiated HIV rapid testing in three Veterans Health Administration substance use disorder clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, E E; Hagedorn, H J; Butler, J N; Felmet, K; Hoang, T; Wilson, P; Klima, G; Sudzina, E; Anaya, H D

    2012-11-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) are at higher risk of HIV infection, yet recent studies show rates of HIV testing are low among this population. We implemented and evaluated a nurse-initiated HIV oral rapid testing (NRT) strategy at three Veterans Health Administration SUD clinics. Implementation of NRT includes streamlined nurse training and a computerized clinical reminder. The evaluation employed qualitative interviews with staff and a quantitative evaluation of HIV testing rates. Barriers to testing included lack of laboratory support and SUD nursing resistance to performing medical procedures. Facilitators included the ease of NRT integration into workflow, engaged management and an existing culture of disease prevention. Six-months post intervention, rapid testing rates at SUD clinics in sites 1, 2, and 3 were 5.0%, 1.1% and 24.0%, respectively. Findings indicate that NRT can be successfully incorporated into some types of SUD subclinics with minimal perceived impact on workflow and time.

  12. Evaluation of total grip strength and individual finger forces on opposing (A-type) handles among Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Seo, Min-Tae; Kang, Hyun-Sung

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of grip span on finger forces and defined the best grip span for maximising total grip strength based on the finger forces and subjective discomfort in a static exertion. Five grip spans (45, 50, 55, 60 and 65 mm) of the opposing (A-type) handle shape were tested in this study to measure total grip strength and individual finger force among Korean population. A total of 30 males who participated in this study were asked to exert a maximum grip force with two repetitions, and to report the subjective discomfort experienced between exertions using the Borg's CR-10 scale. The highest grip strength was obtained at 45 mm and 50 mm grip spans. Results also showed that forces of all fingers, except for the middle finger force, significantly differed over the grip spans. The lowest subjective discomfort was observed in the 50 mm grip span. The results might be used as development guidelines for ergonomic opposing (A-type) hand tools for Korean population.

  13. Individual differences in laughter perception reveal roles for mentalizing and sensorimotor systems in the evaluation of emotional authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, C; Walsh, E; Jessop, R; Agnew, Z K; Sauter, D A; Warren, J E; Scott, S K

    2015-01-01

    Humans express laughter differently depending on the context: polite titters of agreement are very different from explosions of mirth. Using functional MRI, we explored the neural responses during passive listening to authentic amusement laughter and controlled, voluntary laughter. We found greater activity in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC) to the deliberate, Emitted Laughs, suggesting an obligatory attempt to determine others' mental states when laughter is perceived as less genuine. In contrast, passive perception of authentic Evoked Laughs was associated with greater activity in bilateral superior temporal gyri. An individual differences analysis found that greater accuracy on a post hoc test of authenticity judgments of laughter predicted the magnitude of passive listening responses to laughter in amPFC, as well as several regions in sensorimotor cortex (in line with simulation accounts of emotion perception). These medial prefrontal and sensorimotor sites showed enhanced positive connectivity with cortical and subcortical regions during listening to involuntary laughter, indicating a complex set of interacting systems supporting the automatic emotional evaluation of heard vocalizations.

  14. A new ethical landscape of prenatal testing: individualizing choice to serve autonomy and promote public health: a radical proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munthe, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A new landscape of prenatal testing (PNT) is presently developing, including new techniques for risk-reducing, non-invasive sampling of foetal DNA and drastically enhanced possibilities of what may be rapidly and precisely analysed, surrounded by a growing commercial genetic testing industry and a general trend of individualization in healthcare policies. This article applies a set of established ethical notions from past debates on PNT for analysing PNT screening-programmes in this new situation. While some basic challenges of PNT stay untouched, the new development supports a radical individualization of how PNT screening is organized. This reformation is, at the same time, difficult to reconcile with responsible spending of resources in a publicly funded healthcare context. Thus, while the ethical imperative of individualization holds and applies to PNT, the new landscape of PNT provides reasons to start rolling back the type of mass-screening programmes currently established in many countries. Instead, more limited offers are suggested, based on considerations of severity of conditions and optimized to simultaneously serve reproductive autonomy and public health within an acceptable frame of priorities. The new landscape of PNT furthermore underscores the ethical importance of supporting and including people with disabilities. For the very same reason, no ban on what may be analysed using PNT in the new landscape should be applied, although private offers must, of course, conform to strict requirements of respecting reproductive autonomy and what that means in terms of counselling.

  15. Impact on parents of receiving individualized feedback of psychological testing conducted with children as part of a research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kelly; Fernandez, Conrad V; Chambers, Christine T; Bandstra, Nancy F; Parker, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    While many researchers accept the principle that participants have a right to receive information learned from their participation in research, there are few studies examining the impact of receiving results on participants. This study was developed to examine the impact on parents of the receipt of individual results of research-based psychological testing of their children. A summary of the child's individual results of standardized measures of language and development was sent by mail with the questionnaire designed to assess the impact of receiving results. Response rate from the mailed questionnaire was 55.6% (n=74/133). Most parents reported the results as helpful and positive. The majority would receive results again. Overall, the sharing of individualized feedback from psychological testing conducted as part of a research study was well accepted by parents. This practice appears ethically permissible with appropriate support options for addressing participant concerns upon receiving the results as well options for clinical follow-up for the child.

  16. Evaluating the Individualism and Collectivism Scale for use in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Hai

    2007-08-01

    A Chinese translation of the 27-item Individualism and Collectivism Scale was administered in southern mainland China to 626 Chinese university students (210 men and 416 women) with a mean age of 19.9 yr. (SD = 1.5). From analysis of the responses to these items, the prior four factors, Horizontal Individualism, Vertical Individualism, Horizontal Collectivism, and Vertical Collectivism, did not clearly emerge in the Chinese sample. Further research on the viability of the scale and conceptualization of the horizontal and vertical distinction in the Chinese context is recommended.

  17. Evaluation of a steady-state test of foam stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Stefan; Lösch, Dörte; Carey, Enda; Weaire, Denis; Hloucha, Matthias; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2011-02-01

    We have evaluated a steady-state test of foam stability, based on the steady-state height of a foam produced by a constant velocity of gas flow. This test is mentioned in the book by Bikerman [Foams, Springer, Berlin, 1973] and an elementary theory was developed for it by Verbist et al. [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 8 (1996) p. 3715]. For the study, we used an aqueous solution of the cationic surfactant dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide, C12TAB, at a concentration of two times the critical micelle concentration (2 cmc). During foam generation, bubbles collapse at the top of the column which, in turn, eventually counterbalances the rate of bubble production at the bottom. The resulting balance can be described mathematically by an appropriate solution of the foam drainage equation under specified boundary conditions. Our experimental findings are in agreement with the theoretical predictions of a diverging foam height at a critical gas velocity and a finite foam height in the limit of zero velocity. We identify a critical liquid fraction below which a foam is unstable as an important parameter for characterizing foam stability. Furthermore, we deduce an effective viscosity of the liquid which flows through the foam. Currently unexplained are two experimental observations, namely sudden changes of the steady-state foam height in experiments that run over several hours and a reduction in foam height once an overflow of the foam from the containing vessel has occurred.

  18. Further evaluation of the CSNI separate effect test activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Auria, F.; Aksan, S.N.; Glaeser, H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed Separate Effect Test (SET) Validation Matrix for the thermalhydraulic system codes has been established by a subgroup of the Task Group on Thermalhydraulic System Behaviour as requested by OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behavior. The construction of such matrix constituted an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data to select for code validation. As a final result, 67 phenomena have been identified and characterized, roughly 200 facilities have been considered and more than 1000 experiments have been selected as useful for the validation of the codes. The objective of the present paper is to provide additional evaluation of the obtained data base and to supply an a-posteriori judgement in relation to (a) the data base adequacy, (b) the phenomenon, and (c) the need for additional experiments. This has been provided independently by each of the authors. The main conclusions are that large amount of data are available for certain popular phenomena e.g. heat transfer, but data are severely lacking in more esoteric areas e.g. for characterizing phenomena such as parallel channel instability and boron mixing and transport.

  19. Online subjective testing for consumer-photo quality evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Michele A.; McKnight, Patrick; Quartuccio, Jacob; Nicholas, David; Jaladi, Ramesh; Corriveau, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We take a look at crowdsourcing for subjective image quality evaluation using real image stimuli with nonsimulated distortions. Our aim is to scale the task of subjectively rating images while ensuring maximal data validity and accuracy. While previous work has begun to explore crowdsourcing for quality assessment, it has either used images that are not representative of popular consumer scenarios or used crowdsourcing to collect data without comparison to experiments in a controlled environment. Here, we address the challenges imposed by the highly variable online environment, using stimuli that are subtle and more complex than has traditionally been used in quality assessment experiments. In a series of experiments, we vary different design parameters and demonstrate how they impact the subjective responses obtained. Of the parameters examined are stimulus display mode, study length, stimulus habituation, and content homogeneity/heterogeneity. Our method was tested on a database that was rated in a laboratory test previously. Once our design parameters were chosen, we rated a database of consumer photographs and are making this data available to the research community.

  20. Ecotoxicological evaluation of 4-aminobiphenyl using a test battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangning; Yu, Hongxia; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Junfeng; Hua, Zichun

    2004-05-01

    Experimental bioassays are currently used in ecotoxicology and environmental toxicology to provide information for risk assessment evaluation of new chemicals and to investigate their effects and mechanisms of action; in addition, ecotoxicological models are used for the detection, control, and monitoring of the presence of pollutants in the environment. As a single bioassay will never provide a full picture of the quality of the environment, a representative, cost-effective, and quantitative test battery should be developed. In this study, the effects of 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) were investigated using a battery of ecotoxicological model systems, including immobilization of Daphnia magna, development of zebrafish embryos, and inhibition of mammalian cell proliferation. The growth inhibition effects of 4-ABP were assessed on mouse connective tissue fibroblast cells (L929 cells) and human hepatocelluar carcinoma cells (HepG2 cells) by using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-trazolium bromide reduction assay. The results reveal that 4-aminobiphenyl is toxic for aquatic organisms and mammalian cells. The system most sensitive to 4-aminobiphenyl is D. magna immobilization, followed by development of zebrafish embryos, and inhibition of cell proliferation. L929 and HepG2 cell growth inhibition bioassays show low sensitivity. These findings indicate that a single model for the possible harmful effect of 4-ABP has its limitations; only a test battery, composed of bioassays on different species, can provide an accurate assessment of the action of 4-ABP in the whole environment.

  1. Development of nondestructive testing/evaluation methodology for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, James L., III; Skelton, Donald R.; Marinis, Ryan T.; Klempner, Adam R.; Hefti, Peter; Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    2008-02-01

    Development of MEMS constitutes one of the most challenging tasks in today's micromechanics. In addition to design, analysis, and fabrication capabilities, this task also requires advanced test methodologies for determination of functional characteristics of MEMS to enable refinement and optimization of their designs as well as for demonstration of their reliability. Until recently, this characterization was hindered by lack of a readily available methodology. However, using recent advances in photonics, electronics, and computer technology, it was possible to develop a NonDestructive Testing (NDT) methodology suitable for evaluation of MEMS. In this paper, an optoelectronic methodology for NDT of MEMS is described and its application is illustrated with representative examples; this description represents work in progress and the results are preliminary. This methodology provides quantitative full-field-of-view measurements in near real-time with high spatial resolution and nanometer accuracy. By quantitatively characterizing performance of MEMS, under different vibration, thermal, and other operating conditions, specific suggestions for their improvements can be made. Then, using the methodology, we can verify the effects of these improvements. In this way, we can develop better understanding of functional characteristics of MEMS, which will ensure that they are operated at optimum performance, are durable, and are reliable.

  2. RAPID TEST METHOD FOR EVALUATION OF ANTIFREEZE ADDITIVE EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gushchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usage of chemical additives while executing concrete works at negative temperatures is considered as a convenient and economical method. Range of the used antifreeze additives is rather wide. A great number of new additives are advertised but their characteristics have not been practically studied. Evaluation of the antifreeze additive efficiency is unfortunately rather long process and it does not provide comprehensive data on concrete structure formation processes. Due to this development of rapid and comprehensive methodology for construction companies is urgently required.Freezing processes of antifreeze additive aqueous solutions and hardening of cement paste with them have been investigated in the paper. The paper proposes a methodology for determination of freezing point for aqueous solutions of chemical additives of various applications. Identity of  freezing point for a chemical additive aqueous solution and cement paste with an equal concentration of the additive in the paste pore fluid has been determined while taking  calcium nitrate and sodium formate additives as an example. The paper demonstrates the possibility to evaluate efficiency of antifreeze additive action on the basis of kinetics in temperature changes of the cement paste with additives by its consecutive freezing and defrosting.  A methodology for operational evaluation in the field of chemical additive application for concreting items at negative temperatures has been offered in the paper.  The methodology does not require  deficient and expensive test-equipment. It can be applied at ordinary construction companies and it is comprehensible for personnel of low-qualification.  The paper shows the possibility to develop an original methodology for designing concrete structure which is based on operating efficiency determinations  for single and integrated antifreeze additives.

  3. An Evaluation of Testing for English Majors Level 8 in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ting-ting

    2015-01-01

    The paper mainly presents the evaluation of a test named Testing for English Majors (TEM8) undertaken in China’s higher education institution concerning the following aspects:test purpose, test specifications, candidates and the specific test tech⁃niques. The evaluation is based on Bachman and Palmer’s framework of test usefulness which included test validity, reliability, practicality and backwash effect. The evaluation indicates that this test is proved to be a successful language test which satisfy test-developers’purpose to measure test-takers’overall language ability.

  4. EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICAL ABILITIES OF TRAINEES OF NORDIC WALKING WITH UKK2-TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Čokorilo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The research included (N=60 females from the territory of Municipality of Novi Sad. The sample of individuals included females of the average age of 58.5 ±6.90, average body mass of 70.9 kg±15.32, and average body height of 164.8 m±7.24. The walking test of 2 kilometres of length offers the possibility to determine the Fitness Index (general ability and evaluate maximal consumption of oxygen VO2max. Since the individuals were older, very demanding tests were not recommendable, so we chose UKK test of 2 kilometre walking. Although it engages great muscle groups, it is not considered a risky activity which can bring to quick body exhaustion. Nordic walking is very convenient for intensifying of the training, and the important thing is that it protects joints. The use of sticks off-loads the whole passive composition for moving, such as ligaments and connective tissues, back and joints (especially knees, for some 15 to 35 tonnes per hour. Because of that, Nordic walking is ideal as a rehabilitation sport for people with orthopaedic disorders. The protocol of the test requires observation of the air temperature in the span of 5 - 25°C, moderate humidity, casual clothes or sweat suit and appropriate clothes and sneakers, and 5 to 10 minutes of warm-up: stretching of the spine muscles, legs muscles, and fast walking of 200 meters. After such preparations, the test starts, and each individual sets own tempo of walking. After 2 kilometres, we measure achieved time and the value of the pulse

  5. Citrullinemia stimulation test in the evaluation of the intestinal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pinto Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Citrullinemia is been reported as a quantitative parameter of the enterocyte mass and function. Aim: The objective of this research is to analyse the value of fasting and stimulated citrullinemias in the intestinal function evaluation. Methods: A case-control study was undertaken, including 11 patients with short bowel syndrome, 13 patients submitted to malabsorptive bariatric surgery and 11 healthy controls. Plasma levels of amino acids were determined, before and after a stimulation test with oral L-glutamine, by ion exchange chromatography. Results: Citrullinemia was inferior in short bowel patients (28,6 ± 11,3 versus 35,5 ± 11 in operated obese versus 32,2 ± 6,6 μmol/L in controls; n.s. and lower than 25,5 μmol/L in 54,5% of them (versus 16,7%; p = 0,041; accuracy = 74%; odds ratio = 3, 95%CI 1,2-7,6. ΔCitrullinemia80 (relative variation of citrullinemia at the 80th minute of test was lower in short bowel patients; its diagnostic accuracy was similar to baseline citrullinemia and also not significant. ΔCitrullinemia80 revealed a high predictive capacity of a short bowel inferior or equal to 50 cm (auR.O.C. = 82,3%; 95%CI 61,7-102,8; p = 0,038. Conclusions: In short bowel syndrome context, citrullinemia stimulation test with oral L-glutamine is feasible and it may improve the predictive capacity of severity. Further investigation is required to determine its clinical relevance and applicability.

  6. [French version of TASTE (test for the ability and evaluation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, A M; Cadot, M; Pereira, A M; Depreeuw, E; Ansseau, M

    2001-01-01

    Ability to study and evaluation is only one example of performance among many others but research and publications concerning this issue for more than 50 years, especially in the context of test anxiety and need of achievement, conferred upon it a prototypical dimension. Investigations about motivation also stimulate many scientists and constitute another foundation of this study (13). The level of performance depends on knowledge and motivation (33). Time devoted to study is essential to succeed; so motivation and procrastination are in competition. The importance of reinforcement (extrinsical motivation) and the desire for learning and knowing (intrinsical motivation) are determinant. Other elements must be emphasized: guarantee of obtaining rewards, self efficacy and causal attribution. These considerations point out the multidimensional and interactive aspects of test anxiety (7, 31). The number of components is not described unanimously but experts agree with emotional, cognitive and behavioral dimensions (25). So, anxiety was approached in its motivational properties, and it was the case until the sixties, in terms of drive corresponding to a need like thirst or hunger (18); then it was conceptualized in a dynamic context broader than that of stress and coping (29, 30). Last, it constitutes the object of theories highlighting cognitive interference (9, 23, 26) or defective skills (8, 32). A lot of questionnaires were built without answering the different aspects and for instance without linking the theoretical and therapeutic components concerning this problem. Committed to the traditional fields of research (test anxiety and need of achievement), to Weiner's work about attribution theory (34) and that of Bandura in self efficacy (4, 5), E. Depreeuw (10) was particularly interested in Heckhausen's model (16, 17), trying to associate experimental conceptions with the clinical reality. On this basis, he elaborated the TASTE (10, 12, 20): test for ability to

  7. Determining Individual Phase Properties in a Multi-phase Q&P Steel using Multi-scale Indentation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Guang; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-15

    A new inverse method was developed to predict the stress-strain behaviors of constituent phases in a multi-phase steel using the load-depth curves measured in nanoindentation tests combined with microhardness measurements. A power law hardening response was assumed for each phase, and an empirical relationship between hardness and yield strength was assumed. Adjustment was made to eliminate the indentation size effect and indenter bluntness effect. With the newly developed inverse method and statistical analysis of the hardness histogram for each phase, the average stress-strain curves of individual phases in a quench and partitioning (Q&P) steel, including austenite, tempered martensite and untempered martensite, were calculated and the results were compared with the phase properties obtained by in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) test. It is demonstrated that multi-scale instrumented indentation tests together with the new inverse method are capable of determining the individual phase flow properties in multi-phase alloys.

  8. A review of principles in design and usability testing of tactile technology for individuals with visual impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Emily L; Renganathan, Ramkesh; Toth, Bryan N; Cohen, Alexa J; Bajcsy, Andrea V; Bateman, Amelia; Jennings, Mathew C; Khattar, Anish; Kuo, Ryan S; Lee, Felix A; Lim, Meilin K; Migasiuk, Laura W; Zhang, Amy; Zhao, Oliver K; Oliveira, Marcio A

    2017-01-01

    To lay the groundwork for devising, improving, and implementing new technologies to meet the needs of individuals with visual impairments, a systematic literature review was conducted to: a) describe hardware platforms used in assistive devices, b) identify their various applications, and c) summarize practices in user testing conducted with these devices. A search in relevant EBSCO databases for articles published between 1980 and 2014 with terminology related to visual impairment, technology, and tactile sensory adaptation yielded 62 articles that met the inclusion criteria for final review. It was found that while earlier hardware development focused on pin matrices, the emphasis then shifted toward force feedback haptics and accessible touch screens. The inclusion of interactive and multimodal features has become increasingly prevalent. The quantity and consistency of research on navigation, education, and computer accessibility suggest that these are pertinent areas of need for the visually impaired community. Methodologies for usability testing ranged from case studies to larger cross-sectional studies. Many studies used blindfolded sighted users to draw conclusions about design principles and usability. Altogether, the findings presented in this review provide insight on effective design strategies and user testing methodologies for future research on assistive technology for individuals with visual impairments.

  9. Correlates of previous couples’ HIV counseling and testing uptake among married individuals in three HIV prevalence strata in Rakai, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph K. B. Matovu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies show that uptake of couples’ HIV counseling and testing (couples’ HCT can be affected by individual, relationship, and socioeconomic factors. However, while couples’ HCT uptake can also be affected by background HIV prevalence and awareness of the existence of couples’ HCT services, this is yet to be documented. We explored the correlates of previous couples’ HCT uptake among married individuals in a rural Ugandan district with differing HIV prevalence levels. Design: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 2,135 married individuals resident in the three HIV prevalence strata (low HIV prevalence: 9.7–11.2%; middle HIV prevalence: 11.4–16.4%; and high HIV prevalence: 20.5–43% in Rakai district, southwestern Uganda, between November 2013 and February 2014. Data were collected on sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics, including previous receipt of couples’ HCT. HIV testing data were obtained from the Rakai Community Cohort Study. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis to identify correlates that are independently associated with previous receipt of couples’ HCT. Data analysis was conducted using STATA (statistical software, version 11.2. Results: Of the 2,135 married individuals enrolled, the majority (n=1,783, 83.5% had been married for five or more years while (n=1,460, 66% were in the first-order of marriage. Ever receipt of HCT was almost universal (n=2,020, 95%; of those ever tested, (n=846, 41.9% reported that they had ever received couples’ HCT. There was no significant difference in previous receipt of couples’ HCT between low (n=309, 43.9%, middle (n=295, 41.7%, and high (n=242, 39.7% HIV prevalence settings (p=0.61. Marital order was not significantly associated with previous receipt of couples’ HCT. However, marital duration [five or more years vis-à-vis 1–2 years: adjusted odds ratio (aOR: 1.06; 95% confidence interval (95% CI: 1.04–1.08] and

  10. Individual Differences in Navigation between Sharable Content Objects--An Evaluation Study of a Learning Module Prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Boris; Urbas, Leon

    2003-01-01

    Reports the design and evaluation of a prototype for learning modules compliant to the SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) standard for use with hypermedia systems in Web-based instruction. Discusses a study of undergraduates that considered relations between individual differences in learner characteristics, including intrinsic…

  11. Evaluating the Content of Individualized Education Programs and 504 Plans of Young Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiel, Craig F.; Evans, Steven W.; Langberg, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree with which Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 Plans prepared for middle school students with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) conformed to best practices and included evidence-based services. Specifically, we examined the problem areas identified in the statement of…

  12. Importance of an individual's evaluation of functional status for health-related quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavelova, Miriam; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Krokavcova, Martina; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quantifying the clinical impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most important determinants for optimizing individual patient care. Useful clinical measures for MS can be evaluated from different perspectives. Objective/Hypothesis: This cross-sectional study compared physical di

  13. Evaluating the Content of Individualized Education Programs and 504 Plans of Young Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiel, Craig F.; Evans, Steven W.; Langberg, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree with which Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 Plans prepared for middle school students with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) conformed to best practices and included evidence-based services. Specifically, we examined the problem areas identified in the statement of…

  14. Evaluation of the physical activity scale for individuals with physical disabilities in people with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; Niezen, A.; Smit, C. A. J.; Post, M. W. M.

    Study design: Cross-sectional study. Objectives: To evaluate the physical activity scale for individuals with physical disabilities (PASIPD) in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centers with a specialized SCI unit. Methods: The PASIPD was examined by comparing

  15. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III–V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video su...

  16. IGE Evaluation Phase IV: PRS Descriptive Study Final Report. Report from the Project on Evaluation of Practices in Individualized Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Deborah M.; And Others

    Individually Guided Education (IGE) is a complex instructional system intended to enable the elementary school to provide an environment where students learn at a rate and in a manner appropriate to their learning styles. This desriptive study concerns the implementation of the Pre-Reading Skills Program (PRS) which was created to be compatible…

  17. Relationships between heart rate target determined in different exercise testing in COPD patients to prescribed with individualized exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabre C

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudine Fabre,1 Baptiste Chehere,1 Frédéric Bart,2 Patrick Mucci,1 Benoit Wallaert,3 Jean Marie Grosbois2,4 1University of Lille, EA-7369 – URePSSS, Unité de Recherche Pluridisciplinaire Sport, Santé, Société, Faculté des Sciences du Sport et de l’EP, Ronchin, 2Centre Hospitalier Béthune, Service de Pneumologie et d’Allergologie, Rue Delbecque, Beuvry, 3CHRU Lille – Service de Pneumologie et Immunoallergologie, Centre des Compétences des Maladies Pulmonaires Rares, Hôpital Calmette, CHRU Lille and Hospital Center Regional University De Lille, Lille, 4FormAction Santé, ZA du Bois, Pérenchies, France Background: It has been scientifically proven that pulmonary rehabilitation improves exercise tolerance and facilitates the carrying out of daily physical activities. To optimize the physical and physiological benefits, it is necessary to individualize the training intensity for each patient. The aim of this study is to compare the heart rate (HR responses to three exercise modalities measuring aerobic fitness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, in order to easily prescribe individual target HRs for endurance training.Patients and method: Fifty COPD patients (mean age: 60.1±8.5 years were included in the study. Each patient carried out a cardiopulmonary exercise test, a 6-minute walk test (6MWT and a 6-minute stepper test (6MST. During these tests, HR was recorded continuously. After the cardiopulmonary exercise test, the HR was noted at the ventilatory threshold (VT and at the end of the two exercise field tests (6MWTpeak and 6MSTpeak. The values of the HR during the last 3 minutes of both field tests were averaged (6MWT456 and 6MST456. Finally, the HR at 60% of the HR reserve was calculated with the values of the HR measured during 6MWT and 6MST (HRr60%walk, HRr60%step.Results: The HRs measured during the 6MST were significantly higher than those measured during the 6MWT. The HRr60%step was not significantly

  18. Avoidance temperament and social-evaluative threat in college students' math performance: a mediation model of math and test anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Jeffrey; Lench, Heather C; Kao, Grace; Yeh, Yu-Chen; Kwok, Oi-man

    2014-01-01

    Standardized testing has become a common form of student evaluation with high stakes, and limited research exists on understanding the roles of students' personality traits and social-evaluative threat on their academic performance. This study examined the roles of avoidance temperament (i.e., fear and behavioral inhibition) and evaluative threat (i.e., fear of failure and being viewed as unintelligent) in standardized math test and course grades in college students. Undergraduate students (N=184) from a large public university were assessed on temperamental fear and behavioral inhibition. They were then given 15 minutes to complete a standardized math test. After the test, students provided data on evaluative threat and their math performance (scores on standardized college entrance exam and average grades in college math courses). Results indicate that avoidance temperament was linked to social-evaluative threat and low standardized math test scores. Furthermore, evaluative threat mediated the influence of avoidance temperament on both types of math performance. Results have educational and clinical implications, particularly for students at risk for test anxiety and underperformance. Interventions targeting emotion regulation and stress management skills may help individuals reduce their math and test anxieties.

  19. Habitual pelvic posture and time spent sitting: Measurement test-retest reliability for the LUMOback device and preliminary evidence for slouched posture in individuals with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    It has been difficult to monitor the pelvic position during actual daily life. However, recent developments in wearable device technologies, such as the LUMOback device, provide the possibility to evaluate habitual pelvic posture and time spent sitting during daily life. The current study aimed (1) to investigate test-retest reliability for habitual pelvic posture and time spent sitting with the LUMOback in individuals with prolonged low back pain (low back pain group) and without low back pain (control group), and (2) to preliminarily investigate differences in those measures between groups. Fifteen individuals in each group wore the LUMOback daily for 2 weeks. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated in each group by comparing the mean from the first week with the mean from the second week: (1) for the posture score, which is a proportion of time with neutral posture, and (2) for time spent sitting. The two measures for the first week were compared between the low back pain and control groups. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the posture score were .82 in the low back pain group and .91 in the control group. The intraclass correlation coefficients for time spent sitting were .75 in the low back pain group and .85 in the control group. The posture score in the low back pain group (mean ± SD: 37.5% ± 10.3%) was less than that in the control group (49.6% ± 6.0%; p  .05). The current study found (1) acceptable test-retest reliability for the posture score and time spent sitting evaluated by the LUMOback device, and (2) preliminary evidence of a difference in the posture score, indicating a more slouched lumbopelvic posture in individuals with prolonged low back pain than those without low back pain.

  20. Testing Results and Prospects of Educational Module “Individualization and Personalization of Educational Work with Students of Different Types”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaslavskaya O.Y.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the testing results of educational module “Individualization and Personalization of Educational Work with Students of Different Types” in pedagogical master program, Teacher education (secondary general education teacher training direction. The module based on the professional direction, involving the connection of the objectives, content, forms, tools, and educational results with the main educational results according to Federal State Educational standard, as well as the content of different professional activities of future teachers of secondary education, are contained in the professional standards of the teacher. We characterized the structure and content of module subjects, the kinds of master educational activity organization, assessment tools which were used for the module educational outcomes (competencies, job functions and teacher activity in master students. The article describes the changes and updates that have been made in teaching and guidance documents on the results of the module testing and presents the perspectives of module in master students training.

  1. The Role of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in the Formulation of High - intensity Individualized Rehabilitation Exercise Prescription and Exercise Rehabilitation Effects Evaluation Among Patients With Chronic Heart Failure%心肺运动试验在慢性心力衰竭患者高强度个体化运动康复处方制定和运动康复效果评估中的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振英; 孙兴国; 席家宁; 葛万刚; 李浩; 刘艳玲; 冯静; 姜立清; 高华

    2016-01-01

    / min、ml· min -1·kg -1、% pred)、峰值氧脉搏(ml/次、% pred)、BNP 水平、LVEDD、LVEF、6MWD、QoL 评分比较,差异均无统计学意义(P >0.05);康复组患者治疗后无氧阈(L/ min、ml·min -1·kg -1、% pred)、峰值摄氧量(L/ min、ml· min -1·kg -1、% pred)、峰值氧脉搏( ml/次、% pred)、LVEF、6MWD 较治疗前升高,QoL 评分较治疗前降低( P <0.05)。结论 CPET 可以客观定量评估 CHF 患者病情,精准制定高强度个体化运动康复处方,运动康复12周可显著改善 CHF 患者心肺功能、运动耐力和 QoL,是 CHF 二级预防的重要组成部分,值得大力推广。%Objective To evaluate the holistic cardiopulmonary function by using cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) among patients with chronic heart failure ( CHF) objectively and quantitatively, to formulate high - intensity individualized rehabilitation exercise prescription precisely,to evaluate the effects of exercise rehabilitation on cardiopulmonary function,exercise tolerance and quality of life( QoL)among patients with CHF,to investigate the role of CPET in the formulation of individualized rehabilitation exercise prescription and rehabilitation effects evaluation among patients with CHF. Methods 20 patients who were diagnosed with CHF in Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University from August 2014 to January 2016,were randomly divided into two groups:control group(n = 10)and exercise rehabilitation group(ER group,n = 10). Patients in control group were treated with conventional therapy without exercise and patients in ER group were treated with conventional therapy and exercise rehabilitation according to high - intensity individualized rehabilitation exercise prescription based on CPET results,exercise intensity of cycle ergometer was Δ50% power,30 min/ d,5 d/ week,for 12 weeks. General information,CPET results,plasma brain natriuretic peptide( BNP

  2. Development and evaluation of a hospital-based peer support group for younger individuals with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Melissa; Toth-Cohen, Susan; Mulcahey, M J

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of stroke in younger individuals is rising, producing unique challenges due to loss of productive roles and long-term impact in the survivor's life. This paper reports the results of a hospital-based program based on occupational therapy principles that was designed to provide support and education for 13 younger individuals (<65) with stroke. Participants demonstrated improved socialization, healthy coping, and role attainment as measured by the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ), and a member satisfaction questionnaire. Key factors for successful implementation and considerations for future programs to meet the needs of younger adults with stroke are discussed.

  3. Electrokinetic Evaluation of Individual Exosomes by On-Chip Microcapillary Electrophoresis with Laser Dark-Field Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kei; Kobayashi, Masashi; Hanamura, Nami; Akagi, Takanori; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    Cell-secreted nanovesicles called exosomes are expected as a promising candidate biomarker of various diseases. Toward the future application of exosomes as a disease biomarker for low-invasive diagnostics, challenges remain in the development of sensitive and precise analysis methods for exosomes. In this study, we performed the electrokinetic evaluation of individual exosomes by the combined use of on-chip microcapillary electrophoresis and laser dark-field microscopy. We extracted exosomes from six types of human cell cultured in a serum-free medium by differential ultracentrifugation and their zeta potential (electrophoretic mobility) were evaluated. We demonstrated that the proposed electrophoresis apparatus is particularly suitable for the tracking analysis of the electrophoretic migration of individual exosomes and enables the accurate evaluation of the zeta potential distribution of exosomes, for the first time. From the experimental results, we found that there is a strong correlation between the average zeta potentials of exosomes and their cells of origin.

  4. Standards for the application of bibliometrics in the evaluation of individual researchers working in the natural sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Although bibliometrics has been a separate research field for many years, there is still no uniformity in the way bibliometric analyses are applied to individual researchers. Therefore, this study aims to set up standards for the use of bibliometrics in the evaluation of individual researchers working in the natural sciences. 2005 saw the introduction of the h index, which gives information about a researcher's productivity and the impact of his or her publications in a single number (h is the number of publications with at least h citations); however, it is not possible to cover the multidimensional complexity of research performance and to undertake inter-personal comparisons with this number. This study therefore includes recommendations for a set of indicators to be used for evaluating researchers. Our standards relate to the selection of data on which an evaluation is based, the analysis of the data and the presentation of the results.

  5. Investigating DIF and extensions using an LLTM approach and also an individual differences approach: an international testing context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIYU XIE

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to investigate two ways to generalise differential item functioning (DIF by grouping of items that share a common feature, or an item property as in the Linear Logistic Test Model (LLTM. An item “facet” refers to this type of grouping, and DIF can be expressed in terms of more fundamental parameters that relate to the facet of items. Hence the differential facet functioning (DFF model, a particular version of the LLTM, helps to explain the DIF effects more substantively. Using the mathematics data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA 2003, this study shows that modeling the DFF effect through an interaction of the group-by-facet parameter rather than DIF effect on the individual item level can be handled easily with the NLMIXED procedure of SAS. We found that the results are more interpretable when the bias is interpreted on the facet level rather than the item level. Analogous to the multidimensional DIF model, one natural extension of the DFF model is to make the model multidimensional when DFF facets (i.e., LLTM facets are considered as dimensions. This extension, multidimensional DFF (MDFF, is also investigated. The MDFF model allows individual differences to be modeled on the dimension that exhibits a DFF effect. However, it is always recommended to check the individual DIF estimates and construct a substantive analysis first before conducting DFF and MDFF analysis.

  6. Patch Testing for Evaluation of Hypersensitivity to Implanted Metal Devices: A Perspective From the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Peter C; Crawford, Glen; Nedorost, Susan; Scheinman, Pamela L; Atwater, Amber Reck; Mowad, Christen; Brod, Bruce; Ehrlich, Alison; Watsky, Kalman L; Sasseville, Denis; Silvestri, Dianne; Worobec, Sophie M; Elliott, John F; Honari, Golara; Powell, Douglas L; Taylor, James; DeKoven, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society recognizes the interest in the evaluation and management of metal hypersensitivity reactions. Given the paucity of robust evidence with which to guide our practices, we provide reasonable evidence and expert opinion-based guidelines for clinicians with regard to metal hypersensitivity reaction testing and patient management. Routine preoperative evaluation in individuals with no history of adverse cutaneous reactions to metals or history of previous implant-related adverse events is not necessary. Patients with a clear self-reported history of metal reactions should be evaluated by patch testing before device implant. Patch testing is only 1 element in the assessment of causation in those with postimplantation morbidity. Metal exposure from the implanted device can cause sensitization, but a positive metal test does not prove symptom causality. The decision to replace an implanted device must include an assessment of all clinical factors and a thorough risk-benefit analysis by the treating physician(s) and patient.

  7. Evaluation of Mapping Methodologies at a Legacy Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A. J.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Roback, R. C.; Kelley, R. E.; Drellack, S.; Reed, D.; Miller, E.; Cooper, D. I.; Sandoval, M.; Wang, R.

    2013-12-01

    On June 12th, 1985, a nuclear test with an announced yield between 20-150kt was detonated in rhyolitic lava in a vertical emplacement borehole at a depth of 608m below the surface. This test did not collapse to the surface and form a crater, but rather resulted in a subsurface collapse with more subtle surface expressions of deformation, providing an opportunity to evaluate the site using a number of surface mapping methodologies. The site was investigated over a two-year time span by several mapping teams. In order to determine the most time efficient and accurate approach for mapping post-shot surface features at a legacy test site, a number of different techniques were employed. The site was initially divided into four quarters, with teams applying various methodologies, techniques, and instrumentations to each quarter. Early methods included transect lines and site gridding with a Brunton pocket transit, flagging tape, measuring tape, and stakes; surveying using a hand-held personal GPS to locate observed features with an accuracy of × 5-10m; and extensive photo-documentation. More recent methods have incorporated the use of near survey grade GPS devices to allow careful location and mapping of surface features. Initially, gridding was employed along with the high resolution GPS surveys, but this was found to be time consuming and of little observational value. Raw visual observation (VOB) data included GPS coordinates for artifacts or features of interest, field notes, and photographs. A categorization system was used to organize the myriad of items, in order to aid in database searches and for visual presentation of findings. The collected data set was imported into a geographic information system (GIS) as points, lines, or polygons and overlain onto a digital color orthophoto map of the test site. Once these data were mapped, spectral data were collected using a high resolution field spectrometer. In addition to geo-locating the field observations with 10cm

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of training strategies: performance goals and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshay, Wellesley R; Tinkey, Peggy T

    2007-01-01

    The Public Health Service policy, Animal Welfare Act regulations, and the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals all require that institutions provide training for personnel engaged in animal research. Most research facilities have developed training programs to meet these requirements but may not have developed ways of assessing the effectiveness of these programs. Omission of this critical activity often leads to training that is ineffective, inefficient, or unnecessary. Evaluating the effectiveness of biomedical research and animal care training should involve a combination of assessments of performance, competence and knowledge, and appropriate tests for each type of knowledge, used at appropriate time intervals. In this article, the hierarchical relationship between performance, competence, and knowledge is described. The discussion of cognitive and psychomotor knowledge includes the important distinction between declarative and procedural knowledge. Measurement of performance is described and can include a variety of indirect and direct measurement techniques. Each measurement option has its own profile of strengths and weaknesses in terms of measurement validity, reliability, and costs of development and delivery. It is important to understand the tradeoffs associated with each measurement option, and to make appropriate choices of measurement strategy based on these tradeoffs arrayed against considerations of frequency, criticality, difficulty of learning, logistics, and budget. The article concludes with an example of how these measurement strategies can be combined into a cost-effective assessment plan for a biomedical research facility.

  9. Complex document information processing: prototype, test collection, and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, G.; Argamon, S.; Frieder, O.; Grossman, D.; Lewis, D.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of large collections of complex documents is an increasingly important need for numerous applications. Complex documents are documents that typically start out on paper and are then electronically scanned. These documents have rich internal structure and might only be available in image form. Additionally, they may have been produced by a combination of printing technologies (or by handwriting); and include diagrams, graphics, tables and other non-textual elements. The state of the art today for a large document collection is essentially text search of OCR'd documents with no meaningful use of data found in images, signatures, logos, etc. Our prototype automatically generates rich metadata about a complex document and then applies query tools to integrate the metadata with text search. To ensure a thorough evaluation of the effectiveness of our prototype, we are also developing a roughly 42,000,000 page complex document test collection. The collection will include relevance judgments for queries at a variety of levels of detail and depending on a variety of content and structural characteristics of documents, as well as "known item" queries looking for particular documents.

  10. Contamination of nanoparticles by endotoxin: evaluation of different test methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smulders Stijn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanomaterials can be contaminated with endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS during production or handling. In this study, we searched for a convenient in vitro method to evaluate endotoxin contamination in nanoparticle samples. We assessed the reliability of the commonly used limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL assay and an alternative method based on toll-like receptor (TLR 4 reporter cells when applied with particles (TiO2, Ag, CaCO3 and SiO2, or after extraction of the endotoxin as described in the ISO norm 29701. Results Our results indicate that the gel clot LAL assay is easily disturbed in the presence of nanoparticles; and that the endotoxin extraction protocol is not suitable at high particle concentrations. The chromogenic-based LAL endotoxin detection systems (chromogenic LAL assay and Endosafe-PTS, and the TLR4 reporter cells were not significantly perturbed. Conclusion We demonstrated that nanoparticles can interfere with endotoxin detection systems indicating that a convenient test method must be chosen before assessing endotoxin contamination in nanoparticle samples.

  11. A test battery for the ecotoxicological evaluation of pentachlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, G; Jos, A; Hazen, M J; Molero, M L; del Peso, A; Salguero, M; Castillo, P D; Rodríguez-Vicente, M C; Repetto, M

    2001-01-01

    Experimental bioassays are currently used in ecotoxicology and environmental toxicology to provide information for risk assessment evaluation of new chemicals and to investigate their effects and mechanisms of action; in addition, ecotoxicological models are used for the detection, control and monitoring of the presence of pollutants in the environment. As a single bioassay will never provide a full picture of the quality of the environment, a representative, cost-effective and quantitative test battery should be developed. The effects of pentachlorophenol were studied using a battery of ecotoxicological model systems, including immobilization of Daphnia magna, bioluminiscence inhibition in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, growth inhibition of the alga Chlorella vulgaris, and micronuclei induction in the plant Allium cepa. The inhibition of cell proliferation and MTT reduction were investigated in Vero cells. Neutral red uptake, cell growth, MTT reduction, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and activity were studied in the salmonid fish cell line RTG-2, derived from the gonad of rainbow trout. Pentachlorophenol was very toxic for all biota and cells. The system most sensitive to pentachlorophenol, was micronuclei induction in A. cepa, followed by D. magna immobilization, bioluminescence inhibition in V. fischeri bacteria at 60 min and cell proliferation inhibition of RTG-2 cells at 72 h. Inhibition of cell proliferation and MTT reduction on Vero monkey cells showed intermediate sensitivity.

  12. Statistical tools for weld defect evaluation in radiographic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacereddine, N.; Tridi, M. [LTSI, Centre de Recherche en Soudage et Controle, Alger (Algeria); Hamami, L. [Ecole National Polytechnique, Alger (Algeria). Dept. Electronique; Ziou, D. [Sherbrooke Univ., Quebec (Canada). DMI, Faculte des Sciences

    2006-07-01

    A reliable detection of defects in welded joints is one of the most important tasks in non-destructive testing by radiography, since the human factor still has a decisive influence on the evaluation of defects on the film. An incorrect classification may disapprove a piece in good conditions or approve a piece with discontinuities exceeding the limit established by the applicable standards. The progresses in computer science and the artificial intelligence techniques have allowed the welded joint quality interpretation to be carried out by using pattern recognition tools, making the system of the weld inspection more reliable, reproducible and faster. In this work, we develop and implement algorithms based on statistical approaches for segmentation and classification of the weld defects. Because of the complex nature of the considered images and so that the extracted defect area represents the most accurately possible the real defect, and that the detected defect corresponds as well as possible to its real class, the choice of the algorithms must be very judicious. In order to achieve this, a comparative study of the various segmentation and classification methods was performed to demonstrate the advantages of the ones in comparison with the others giving to the most optimal combinations. (orig.)

  13. Individual lending versus group lending: An evaluation with Kenya's microfinance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odongo Kodongo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Group micro-lending has been used successfully in some parts of the world to expand the reach of microcredit programs. However, our study shows that microfinance institutions in Kenya prefer individual lending which is associated with higher default rates compared to group lending. The study also shows that high interest rates increase the odds of client delinquency while loan size is inversely related to delinquency. Given these findings, policymakers need to work for stability in the macro-environment to ensure interest rates charged by microfinance institutions (MFIs remain stable and affordable. Alternatively, MFIs can develop a graduated scale for charging interest rates in which credit is extended to groups at first to hedge the firm against repayment risk; following this, the firm identifies individuals within the groups whose credit risk has improved and issue progressive individual loans to them. Such individual loans would fetch higher returns in form of interest for MFI and boost their outreach, reduce delinquency, and enhance self-sufficiency.

  14. Evaluating Training and Implementation of the Individualized Meaning-Centered Approach to Teaching Braille Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, Julie A.; Wormsley, Diane P.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of training workshops in braille literacy for teachers of students who are visually impaired and have additional disabilities. Participants in the training workshops in the Individualized Meaning-Centered Approach indicated general satisfaction with the training. Most reported using the approach with…

  15. Overview of methods used to evaluate the adequacy of nutrient intakes for individuals and populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman-Vinas, B.; Serra-Majem, L.; Ribas-Barba, L.; Ngo, J.; Garcia-Alvarez, A.; Wijnhoven, T.M.A.; Tabacchi, G.; Branca, F.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the methods of measuring micronutrient intake adequacy for individuals and for populations in order to ascertain best practice. A systematic review was conducted to locate studies on the methodological aspects of measuring nutrient adequacy. The

  16. Overview of methods used to evaluate the adequacy of nutrient intakes for individuals and populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman-Vinas, B.; Serra-Majem, L.; Ribas-Barba, L.; Ngo, J.; Garcia-Alvarez, A.; Wijnhoven, T.M.A.; Tabacchi, G.; Branca, F.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the methods of measuring micronutrient intake adequacy for individuals and for populations in order to ascertain best practice. A systematic review was conducted to locate studies on the methodological aspects of measuring nutrient adequacy. The result

  17. A randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individual auditory cueing device on freezing and gait speed in people with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Deirdre

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological disorder resulting from a degeneration of dopamine producing cells in the substantia nigra. Clinical symptoms typically affect gait pattern and motor performance. Evidence suggests that the use of individual auditory cueing devices may be used effectively for the management of gait and freezing in people with Parkinson's disease. The primary aim of the randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of an individual auditory cueing device on freezing and gait speed in people with Parkinson's disease. Methods A prospective multi-centre randomised cross over design trial will be conducted. Forty-seven subjects will be randomised into either Group A or Group B, each with a control and intervention phase. Baseline measurements will be recorded using the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire as the primary outcome measure and 3 secondary outcome measures, the 10 m Walk Test, Timed "Up & Go" Test and the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale. Assessments are taken 3-times over a 3-week period. A follow-up assessment will be completed after three months. A secondary aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of such a device on the quality of life of people with Parkinson's disease using a qualitative methodology. Conclusion The Apple iPod-Shuffle™ and similar devices provide a cost effective and an innovative platform for integration of individual auditory cueing devices into clinical, social and home environments and are shown to have immediate effect on gait, with improvements in walking speed, stride length and freezing. It is evident that individual auditory cueing devices are of benefit to people with Parkinson's disease and the aim of this randomised controlled trial is to maximise the benefits by allowing the individual to use devices in both a clinical and social setting, with minimal disruption to their daily routine. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered

  18. One window-period donation in two years of individual donor-nucleic acid test screening for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Eduardo Levi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe general data on nucleic acid/serology testing and report the first hepatitis B-nucleic acid testing yield case of an immunized donor in Brazil. Methods: A total of 24,441 donations collected in 2010 and 2011 were submitted to individual nucleic acid testing for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus using the TaqMan® MPX kit (Roche on the Cobas s201 platform, in addition to routine screening for serological markers. Nucleic acid testing-reactive donations were further evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction using Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus tests. Results: Thirty-two donations were reactive by nucleic acid testing, 31 were also serologically reactive and one first-time donor was identified as having hepatitis B in the window period. Follow-up samples showed increasing titers of anti-HBs rising from 19 UI/mL in the index donation to 109 IU/mL seven months later attributable to his vaccination history. Curiously, this donor was never reactive for HbsAg nor for anti-HBc. In the yield donation, he was concomitantly reactive for syphilis (enzyme immunoassay and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption; venereal disease research laboratory non-reactive. Overall, six donors (0.02% were characterized as occult hepatitis B. A total of 35% of the confirmed (recombinant immunoblot assay positive hepatitis C donations were nucleic acid testing non-reactive and no human immunodeficiency virus "elite controller" was identified. Conclusion: The yield rate (1:24,441; 95% confidence interval: 1:9,537 - 1:89,717 contrasts to the North American rate (1:410,540 donations and strongly advocates the adoption of nucleic acid testing for hepatitis B in Brazil despite the increasing rate of anti-HBs reactive subjects due to the successful immunization program.

  19. Evaluating Individual Students' Perceptions of Instructional Quality: An Investigation of their Factor Structure, Measurement Invariance, and Relations to Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Ronny; Nilsen, Trude; Jansen, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Students' perceptions of instructional quality are among the most important criteria for evaluating teaching effectiveness. The present study evaluates different latent variable modeling approaches (confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, and bifactor modeling), which are used to describe these individual perceptions with respect to their factor structure, measurement invariance, and the relations to selected educational outcomes (achievement, self-concept, and motivation in mathematics). On the basis of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 large-scale data sets of Australia, Canada, and the USA (N = 26,746 students), we find support for the distinction between three factors of individual students' perceptions and full measurement invariance across countries for all modeling approaches. In this regard, bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling outperformed alternative approaches with respect to model fit. Our findings reveal significant relations to the educational outcomes. This study synthesizes different modeling approaches of individual students' perceptions of instructional quality and provides insights into the nature of these perceptions from an individual differences perspective. Implications for the measurement and modeling of individually perceived instructional quality are discussed. PMID:26903917

  20. Semantic memory for actions as assessed by the Kissing and Dancing Test: Education and age effects in cognitively healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Roque Baradel

    Full Text Available Action semantics is a relevant part of cognitive-linguistic assessment and the "Kissing and Dancing Test" (KDT has been used extensively for this purpose, evidencing clinical distinctions among brain-damaged patients. To enhance its use, reference values are necessary, especially for populations with heterogeneous educational levels and socioeconomic backgrounds.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of schooling and age on the KDT in cognitively unimpaired individualMETHODS: The KDT was applied to seventy-four healthy subjects. Sociodemographic factors were investigated through correlational and between-group analyses. Reference values according to age and schooling were provided.RESULTSKDT performance correlated significantly with schooling (r=0.757, p<0.01, age (r=-0.496, p<0.01 and socioeconomic status (r=0.418 p<0.01 but these variables were intercorrelated. Correlation with schooling and age remained signifi when controlling for age and socioeconomic status (r=0.530, p<0.01, and for schooling (-0.305,<0.01, respectively. When controlling for schooling, correlation between socioeconomic status and KDT was not significant (p=0.164. Between-group analyses revealed no age effects. Significant differences were found in performance according to educational level. Scores below 39/52 and below 47/52 (percentile 25 for individuals with 8 or less years of schooling and for individuals with 9 or more years of schooling, respectively, seem suggestive of an impairment in Action Semantics Processing and shall be further investigatedCONCLUSION KDT performance was influenced both by age and schooling, indicating the need to consider these demographic features as covariates when analyzing performance on the test and to adjust cut-off scores according to these demographic characteristics in clinical practice.

  1. A Process for Reviewing and Evaluating Generated Test Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2016-01-01

    Testing organization needs large numbers of high-quality items due to the proliferation of alternative test administration methods and modern test designs. But the current demand for items far exceeds the supply. Test items, as they are currently written, evoke a process that is both time-consuming and expensive because each item is written,…

  2. Comparison of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential and Caloric Tests Findings in Noise Induced Hearing Loss-Affected and Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farinoosh Fakharnia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Balance disturbance is one of the non-auditory effects of noisy industrial environments that is usually neglected. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise on vestibular system among workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL, based on both vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP and caloric tests.Methods: Thirty male workers with noise-induced hearing loss and thirty male matched controls were examined by VEMP and caloric tests. Study parameters included unilateral weakness, p13 and n23 latencies, and p13-n23 amplitude. Caloric test was performed only for 20 patients.Results: No significant difference was observed in unilateral weakness between the two groups. On the other hand, the difference in mean latencies of p13 in the right ear (p=0.003 and left ear (p=0.01 was significant between the two groups. However, the difference in n23 latency was significant only in the right ear (p=0.03. There was no significant difference between groups in p13-n23 amplitude.Conclusion: It seems that pars inferior of vestibule is the susceptible part in individuals with NIHL. In general, abnormal findings in both VEMP and caloric tests were more common compared to functional symptoms such as vertigo, which may be due to central compensation and the symmetry of the disorder.

  3. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III-V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video surveillance and the inked footprint technique to record usual walking speed and maximum speed patterns both in subjects' homes and during the 10-meter walking test. From these methods, walking speed, stride length, and step rate were calculated. [Results] While both usual and maximum walking speeds of the 10-meter walking test correlated with stride length and step rate, at-home walking speeds only significantly correlated with stride length. [Conclusion] Walking patterns of the 10-meter walking test are quantifiably distinct from those demonstrated in patients' homes, and this difference is mainly characterized by stride length. In order to enhance in-home walking ability, exercises that improve length of stride rather than step rate should be recommended.

  4. Individual differences in brain structure and resting brain function underlie cognitive styles: evidence from the Embedded Figures Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xin; Wang, Kangcheng; Li, Wenfu; Yang, Wenjing; Wei, Dongtao; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive styles can be characterized as individual differences in the way people perceive, think, solve problems, learn, and relate to others. Field dependence/independence (FDI) is an important and widely studied dimension of cognitive styles. Although functional imaging studies have investigated the brain activation of FDI cognitive styles, the combined structural and functional correlates with individual differences in a large sample have never been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of individual differences in FDI cognitive styles by analyzing the correlations between Embedded Figures Test (EFT) score and structural neuroimaging data [regional gray matter volume (rGMV) was assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM)]/functional neuroimaging data [resting-brain functions were measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)] throughout the whole brain. Results showed that the increased rGMV in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was associated with the EFT score, which might be the structural basis of effective local processing. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between ALFF and EFT score was found in the fronto-parietal network, including the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We speculated that the left IPL might be associated with superior feature identification, and mPFC might be related to cognitive inhibition of global processing bias. These results suggested that the underlying neuroanatomical and functional bases were linked to the individual differences in FDI cognitive styles and emphasized the important contribution of superior local processing ability and cognitive inhibition to field-independent style.

  5. Individual differences in brain structure and resting brain function underlie cognitive styles: evidence from the Embedded Figures Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hao

    Full Text Available Cognitive styles can be characterized as individual differences in the way people perceive, think, solve problems, learn, and relate to others. Field dependence/independence (FDI is an important and widely studied dimension of cognitive styles. Although functional imaging studies have investigated the brain activation of FDI cognitive styles, the combined structural and functional correlates with individual differences in a large sample have never been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of individual differences in FDI cognitive styles by analyzing the correlations between Embedded Figures Test (EFT score and structural neuroimaging data [regional gray matter volume (rGMV was assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM]/functional neuroimaging data [resting-brain functions were measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF] throughout the whole brain. Results showed that the increased rGMV in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL was associated with the EFT score, which might be the structural basis of effective local processing. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between ALFF and EFT score was found in the fronto-parietal network, including the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. We speculated that the left IPL might be associated with superior feature identification, and mPFC might be related to cognitive inhibition of global processing bias. These results suggested that the underlying neuroanatomical and functional bases were linked to the individual differences in FDI cognitive styles and emphasized the important contribution of superior local processing ability and cognitive inhibition to field-independent style.

  6. Evaluation tests for photovoltaic concentrator receiver sections and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodworth, J.R.; Whipple, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    Sandia has developed a third-generation set of specifications for performance and reliability testing of photovoltaic concentrator modules. Several new requirements have been defined. The primary purpose of the tests is to screen new concentrator designs and new production runs for susceptibility to known failure mechanisms. Ultraviolet radiation testing of materials precedes receiver section and module performance and environmental tests. The specifications include the purpose, procedure, and requirements for each test. Recommendations for future improvements are presented.

  7. 'Sink or swim': an evaluation of the clinical characteristics of individuals with high bone mass.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gregson, C L

    2011-04-01

    High bone mineral density on routine dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) may indicate an underlying skeletal dysplasia. Two hundred fifty-eight individuals with unexplained high bone mass (HBM), 236 relatives (41% with HBM) and 58 spouses were studied. Cases could not float, had mandible enlargement, extra bone, broad frames, larger shoe sizes and increased body mass index (BMI). HBM cases may harbour an underlying genetic disorder. INTRODUCTION: High bone mineral density is a sporadic incidental finding on routine DXA scanning of apparently asymptomatic individuals. Such individuals may have an underlying skeletal dysplasia, as seen in LRP5 mutations. We aimed to characterize unexplained HBM and determine the potential for an underlying skeletal dysplasia. METHODS: Two hundred fifty-eight individuals with unexplained HBM (defined as L1 Z-score ≥ +3.2 plus total hip Z-score ≥ +1.2, or total hip Z-score ≥ +3.2) were recruited from 15 UK centres, by screening 335,115 DXA scans. Unexplained HBM affected 0.181% of DXA scans. Next 236 relatives were recruited of whom 94 (41%) had HBM (defined as L1 Z-score + total hip Z-score ≥ +3.2). Fifty-eight spouses were also recruited together with the unaffected relatives as controls. Phenotypes of cases and controls, obtained from clinical assessment, were compared using random-effects linear and logistic regression models, clustered by family, adjusted for confounders, including age and sex. RESULTS: Individuals with unexplained HBM had an excess of sinking when swimming (7.11 [3.65, 13.84], p < 0.001; adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval shown), mandible enlargement (4.16 [2.34, 7.39], p < 0.001), extra bone at tendon\\/ligament insertions (2.07 [1.13, 3.78], p = 0.018) and broad frame (3.55 [2.12, 5.95], p < 0.001). HBM cases also had a larger shoe size (mean difference 0.4 [0.1, 0.7] UK sizes, p = 0.009) and increased BMI (mean difference 2.2 [1.3, 3.1] kg\\/m(2

  8. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test : a useful tool for evaluation of physical performance in intermittent sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Iaia, F Marcello; Krustrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The two Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (IR) tests evaluate an individual's ability to repeatedly perform intense exercise. The Yo-Yo IR level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test focuses on the capacity to carry out intermittent exercise leading to a maximal activation of the aerobic system, whereas Yo-Yo IR level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) determines an individual's ability to recover from repeated exercise with a high contribution from the anaerobic system. Evaluations of elite athletes in various sports involving intermittent exercise showed that the higher the level of competition the better an athlete performs in the Yo-Yo IR tests. Performance in the Yo-Yo IR tests for young athletes increases with rising age. The Yo-Yo IR tests have shown to be a more sensitive measure of changes in performance than maximum oxygen uptake. The Yo-Yo IR tests provide a simple and valid way to obtain important information of an individual's capacity to perform repeated intense exercise and to examine changes in performance.

  9. Dosimetric Evaluation of Individualized Adaptive Motion Margins for Abdominal and Thoracic Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Keall, Paul

    the former ignores motion correlation along different axes the latter tends to overestimate the dosimetric consequences of random motion. The purpose of this study was to propose and investigate an individualized adaptive margin approach that accounts for motion correlation while still considering......, the smallest Dmin was 71%. The mean PTV volume was 7.6 cm3 for adaptive margins (4.3 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.0 mm margins) and 8.2 cm3 for standard margins (1.8 mm, 3.4 mm, 2.4 mm margins). Conclusions: A strategy for individualized adaptive margins that accounts for motion correlation was proposed. Compared to standard...... margins, the adaptive margins result in slightly smaller PTvs. and give fewer outliers with low minimum CTV dose....

  10. 40 CFR 230.61 - Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical, biological, and physical... FILL MATERIAL Evaluation and Testing § 230.61 Chemical, biological, and physical evaluation and testing... appropriate physical and chemical environmental characteristics. (d) Physical tests and evaluation. The...

  11. The evaluation of the individual impact factor of researchers and research centers using the RC algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Villafáfila, Amelia; Ramos-Brieva, Jesus A

    2015-01-01

    The RC algorithm quantitatively evaluates the personal impact factor of the scientific production of isolated researchers. The authors propose an adaptation of RC to evaluate the personal impact factor of research centers, hospitals and other research groups. Thus, these could be classified according to the accredited impact of the results of their scientific work between researchers of the same scientific area. This could be useful for channelling budgets and grants for research.

  12. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  13. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  14. Smart merger of developmental and operational test and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzelle, Charles Delano, Jr.

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has implemented Acquisition Reform to take advantage of commercial products, to compress the acquisition cycle, and to reduce the overall life-cycle cost of major weapon systems. This initiative, following requirements of the National Performance Review to perform faster, cheaper, and better, is expected to produce significant savings required to fund a new generation of weapons for the United States military. The DoD has a clear requirement to verify through a rigorous test and evaluation (T&E) that these advanced weapons are suitable and effective for use in combat. T&E is an inherently expensive and time-consuming activity performed to ensure that the system under test can meet contractual specifications and the operational user requirements. With a detailed and rich theoretical base, T&E has come to consider alternatives. Making a change from the safe and traditional paradigm of sequential developmental and operational T&E to a combined T&E strategy is one option. The central research question for this dissertation is "Does combining developmental and operational T&E permit faster acquisition cycle times without unnecessarily increasing risks of deploying ineffective systems?" In this interrupted time-series multiple case study, the impact of the independent variable of acquisition reform is assessed regarding the applicability and utility of a combined T&E strategy for the dependent variable of the Brilliant Eyes, Follow-on Early Warning System, and Space-based Infra-red System programs. In this analysis, the Brilliant Eyes and Follow-on Early Warning System preceded application of the independent variable while the Space-based Infra-red System followed Acquisition Reform. The conclusion of this dissertation is that the combined T&E strategy, where developmental and operational T&E events and resources are merged to the greatest extent possible consistent with mission requirements, provides significant advantages in cost and

  15. Overall test evaluation based on trajectory tracking data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhengming; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Morellim, E.A., Klein, V., Accuracy of aerodynamic model parameters estimated from flight test data, N19980048414/XAB, 1997.[2]Range Safety Group, Common risk criteria for national test ranges: Inert Debris, AD-A324 955/4/HDM,1997.[3] Williams, C.E., Comparison of circular error probable estimators for small samples, AD-A324 337/5/HDM, 1997.[4]Zhang, J.H., Spectrum analysis with its application in simulation, Journal of NUDT(in Chinese), 1998,(3): 1.[5] Andrese, J.A., Methodology for the analysis of obscurant attenuation effects on seeker target acquisition performance using modeling and simulation, AD-A353 726/XAB, 1998.[6]Wu, L.R., A Monte Carlo simulation of guidance accuracy evaluation, AD-A313 304/8/HDM, 1996.[7] Wang, Z.M., Yi, D.Y., Calibration and Evaluation on Trajectory Tracking Data(in Chinese), Changsha: NUDT Press, 1999, 367—374.[8] Wang, Z. M., Duan, X.J., Frequency domain method on separation of signal and noise, Science in China, Ser. E, 2000, 43(1): 9.[9]Wang, Z. M., Zhu, J. B., Reduced model on parameters of trajectory tracking data with its application,Science in China, Ser. E, 1999, 42(2): 190.[10]Zhang, J. H., Jia, P. R., Accuracy Analysis and Appraisal on Long-range Rocket(in Chinese), Changsha: NUDT Press, 1995, 27—64, 397—413.[11]James, O. B., Statistical Decision Theory and Bayesian Analysis, New York: Springer-Verlag, 1985, 215—230, 491—510.

  16. Retrospective evaluation of the consequence of alleged patch test sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2006-01-01

    consequences in cases of possible patch test sensitization. Among 7619 consecutively tested eczema patients in a 14-year period 26 (0.3%) were identified in the database as having had a late patch test reaction, which may be an indication of patch test sensitization. 9 of these cases were not suitable....... For the remaining 11 patients we could not rule out that they were patch test sensitized, and they were investigated further. 1 was diseased and 10 were interviewed regarding the possible consequences of the alleged patch test sensitization. 9 had not experienced any dermatitis problems, and 1 could not exclude...

  17. Application of micronucleus test and comet assay to evaluate BTEX biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Matsumoto, Silvia Tamie; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    The BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) mixture is an environmental pollutant that has a high potential to contaminate water resources, especially groundwater. The bioremediation process by microorganisms has often been used as a tool for removing BTEX from contaminated sites. The application of biological assays is useful in evaluating the efficiency of bioremediation processes, besides identifying the toxicity of the original contaminants. It also allows identifying the effects of possible metabolites formed during the biodegradation process on test organisms. In this study, we evaluated the genotoxic and mutagenic potential of five different BTEX concentrations in rat hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells, using comet and micronucleus assays, before and after biodegradation. A mutagenic effect was observed for the highest concentration tested and for its respective non-biodegraded concentration. Genotoxicity was significant for all non-biodegraded concentrations and not significant for the biodegraded ones. According to our results, we can state that BTEX is mutagenic at concentrations close to its water solubility, and genotoxic even at lower concentrations, differing from some described results reported for the mixture components, when tested individually. Our results suggest a synergistic effect for the mixture and that the biodegradation process is a safe and efficient methodology to be applied at BTEX-contaminated sites.

  18. Testing the Participatory Education Evaluation Concept in a National Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilainen, Ville

    2012-01-01

    The article focuses on the realisation of participatory evaluation (PE) in national educational evaluation activity. The realisation of PE is examined by adapting the Daigneault and Jacob model (2009; originally Cousins & Whitmore, 1998) to five national-level educational evaluations carried out in Finland. According to the chosen frame of…

  19. Development and Operation of an Automatic Rotor Trim Control System for use During the UH-60 Individual Blade Control Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale wind tunnel test to evaluate the effects of Individual Blade Control (IBC) on the performance, vibration, noise and loads of a UH-60A rotor was recently completed in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel [1]. A key component of this wind tunnel test was an automatic rotor trim control system that allowed the rotor trim state to be set more precisely, quickly and repeatably than was possible with the rotor operator setting the trim condition manually. The trim control system was also able to maintain the desired trim condition through changes in IBC actuation both in open- and closed-loop IBC modes, and through long-period transients in wind tunnel flow. This ability of the trim control system to automatically set and maintain a steady rotor trim enabled the effects of different IBC inputs to be compared at common trim conditions and to perform these tests quickly without requiring the rotor operator to re-trim the rotor. The trim control system described in this paper was developed specifically for use during the IBC wind tunnel test

  20. Diagnostic test evaluation for Trichinella infections in pigs: a renewed interaction between diagnostic test data and their statistical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopfer, D.D.V.; Maassen, C.B.M.; Achterberg, R.P.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.; Teunis, P.; Buist, W.G.; Molina, V.; Guarnera, E.; Gonzales, M.; Krivokapich, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Peralta, J.L.; Trabattoni, H.; Larrieu, E.; Engel, B.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of serological tests applied to monitor Trichinella free herds, Bayesian methodology was used to estimate the diagnostic test parameters: sensitivity, specificity and prevalence in the absence of a Gold Standard test. In the absence of Dutch serum samples for positive pigs