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Sample records for incomplete colonoscopy prospective

  1. Benefits of Barium Enema in Patients with Incomplete Colonoscopy. Prospective Study of 45 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gispert, S.; Mayolas, N.; Hidalgo, A.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of barium enema in patients with incomplete colonoscopy. There was carried out a prospective 10-month study of 45 patients with incomplete colonoscopy (27 men and 18 women), who were later examined by means of barium enema (33 conventional, 12 double-contrast) in order to check for additional pathology in portions of the colon not visualized by colonoscopy. Barium enema diagnosed six possible additional lesions (13.3%) in portions of the colon not visualized by incomplete colonoscopy (four neoplasia and two non-neoplasia). Regarding the neoplasia two were true positives and two false positives. Both true positives were adenocarcinomas (one synchronous caecum, and another in splenic angle). The two false positives corresponded to fecal matter stuck to the intestinal wall. Regarding the non-neoplasia, multiple stenosis was detected in a patient with Crohn's disease and an enterocolic fistula was found in a patient with sigmoid colon neoplasia. The diagnostic yield of barium enema in the detection of additional pathology in colon portions not visualized by colonoscopy was of 9%. Barium enema following incomplete colonoscopy permits a complete colon evaluation in most cases, and it offers additional diagnostic information. (Author) 21 refs

  2. Benefits of Barium Enema in Patients with Incomplete Colonoscopy. Prospective Study of 45 Cases; Valor del enema de bario en pacientes con colonoscopia incompleta. Estudio prospectivo de 45 casos

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    Gispert, S.; Mayolas, N.; Hidalgo, A. [Hospital General Universitario Vall de Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of barium enema in patients with incomplete colonoscopy. There was carried out a prospective 10-month study of 45 patients with incomplete colonoscopy (27 men and 18 women), who were later examined by means of barium enema (33 conventional, 12 double-contrast) in order to check for additional pathology in portions of the colon not visualized by colonoscopy. Barium enema diagnosed six possible additional lesions (13.3%) in portions of the colon not visualized by incomplete colonoscopy (four neoplasia and two non-neoplasia). Regarding the neoplasia two were true positives and two false positives. Both true positives were adenocarcinomas (one synchronous caecum, and another in splenic angle). The two false positives corresponded to fecal matter stuck to the intestinal wall. Regarding the non-neoplasia, multiple stenosis was detected in a patient with Crohn's disease and an enterocolic fistula was found in a patient with sigmoid colon neoplasia. The diagnostic yield of barium enema in the detection of additional pathology in colon portions not visualized by colonoscopy was of 9%. Barium enema following incomplete colonoscopy permits a complete colon evaluation in most cases, and it offers additional diagnostic information. (Author) 21 refs.

  3. Achieving a complete colonic evaluation in patients with incomplete colonoscopy is worth the effort.

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    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Valente, Michael A; Church, James M

    2014-03-01

    Patients with an incomplete colonoscopy are potentially at risk for missed lesions. The purpose of this work was to identify the percentage of patients completing colonic evaluation after incomplete colonoscopy, the manner in which the evaluation was completed, and the incidence of significant pathology. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The study was conducted in an outpatient colonoscopy clinic in the colorectal surgery department of a tertiary referral center. Patients included those undergoing incomplete colonoscopy from a database of 25,645 colonoscopies performed from 1982 to 2009. Procedures aimed at completing colorectal evaluation were included in the study. Reason for incompletion, secondary study, its success, and findings were measured. A total of 242 patients with incomplete colonoscopies were identified; 166 (69%) were women. The average age of patients was 59 years. Most frequent causes for incomplete colonoscopy were inadequate preparation (34%), pain (30%), and tortuosity (20%). The scope could not pass the splenic flexure in 165 patients (71%). A total of 218 patients (90%) were offered completion studies, and 179 patients (82%) complied. Seventy-three of 82 patients who had a surveillance colonoscopy had a follow-up (89%), compared with 72 (87%) of 83 with symptoms and 40 (74%) of 54 who had a screening. Barium enema (BE) was performed in 74 (41%), repeat colonoscopy in 71 (40%), CT colonography in 17 (9%), and colonoscopy under general anesthesia in 9 patients (5%). Resection with intraoperative/perioperative colonoscopy was required in 8 patients (4%). Repeat colonoscopy found 32 lesions (24 tubular adenomas, 4 tubulovillous adenomas, and 4 sessile serrated polyps) in 17 patients (24%). Radiology demonstrated new abnormalities in 11 (12%) of 91 patients, prompting 7 colonoscopies. In 3 patients, colonoscopy showed an inverted appendix, a tubulovillous adenoma, and a sigmoid stricture. Overall, clinically

  4. Predictors of Incomplete Optical Colonoscopy Using Computed Tomographic Colonography

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    Sachdeva, Reetika; Tsai, Salina D.; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Tieu, Alan A.; Abdelgelil, Ahmed; Besharati, Sepideh; Khashab, Mouen A.; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Kumbhari, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Optical colonoscopy (OC) is the primary modality for investigation of colonic pathology. Although there is data on demographic factors for incomplete OC, paucity of data exists for anatomic variables that are associated with an incomplete OC. These anatomic variables can be visualized using computed tomographic colonography (CTC). We aim to retrospectively identify variables associated with incomplete OC using CTC and develop a scoring method to predict the outcome of OC. Pat...

  5. Predictors of incomplete optical colonoscopy using computed tomographic colonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Reetika; Tsai, Salina D; El Zein, Mohamad H; Tieu, Alan A; Abdelgelil, Ahmed; Besharati, Sepideh; Khashab, Mouen A; Kalloo, Anthony N; Kumbhari, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Optical colonoscopy (OC) is the primary modality for investigation of colonic pathology. Although there is data on demographic factors for incomplete OC, paucity of data exists for anatomic variables that are associated with an incomplete OC. These anatomic variables can be visualized using computed tomographic colonography (CTC). We aim to retrospectively identify variables associated with incomplete OC using CTC and develop a scoring method to predict the outcome of OC. In this case-control study, 70 cases ( with incomplete OC) and 70 controls (with complete OC) were identified. CTC images of cases and controls were independently reviewed by a single CTC radiologist. Demographic and anatomical parameters were recorded. Data was examined using descriptive linear statistics and multivariate logistic regression model. On analysis, female gender (80% vs 58.6% P = 0.007), prior abdominal/pelvic surgeries (51.4% vs 14.3% P diverticulosis (P = 0.867) with incomplete OC. A scoring system to predict the outcome of OC is proposed based on CTC findings. Female gender, prior surgery, and increasing colonic length and tortuosity were associated with incomplete OC, whereas increasing age and history of severe diverticulosis were not. These factors may be used in the future to predict those patients who are at risk of incomplete OC.

  6. Therapeutic impact of colon capsule endoscopy with PillCam™ COLON 2 after incomplete standard colonoscopy: a Spanish multicenter study.

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    Nogales, Óscar; García-Lledó, Javier; Luján, Marisol; Nicolás, David; Juanmartiñena, José Francisco; González-Suárez, Begoña; Sánchez Ceballos, Francisco; Couto, Ignacio; Olmedo, José; Garfia, Cristina; Carretero, Cristina; Fernández Urién, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Sarbelio; Asteinza, Matilde; Olivencia, Pilar; Masedo, Ángeles; Muñoz-Navas, Miguel; Merino, Beatriz; González Asanza, Cecilia

    2017-05-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an alternative approach for the examination of the colon in patients who refuse colonoscopy or after incomplete colonoscopy (IC). We conducted a study to determine the frequency of complete colonoscopy after IC, the diagnostic yield of CCE, the therapeutic impact of lesions found in CCE, the level of colon cleanliness and the safety of the procedure. We performed a prospective, multicenter study involving ten Spanish hospitals. Consecutive outpatients aged ≥ 18 years with previous IC were invited to participate. The latest version of the CCE device, PillCam™ COLON 2 (CCE-2), was administered to all patients according to the protocol. The study population comprised 96 patients. The most frequent cause of IC was the inability to move past a loop using standard maneuvers (75/96 patients, 78%). Complete visualization of the colon was obtained with CCE-2 in 69 patients (71.9%). Of the 27 patients in whom the CCE-2 did not reach the hemorrhoidal plexus, it passed the colonic segment explored with the previous colonoscopy in 20 cases; therefore, it could be inferred that a combined approach (CCE-2 plus colonoscopy) enabled complete visualization of the colonic mucosa in 92.7% of patients. CCE-2 revealed new lesions in 58 patients (60.4%). Polyps were the most frequent finding (41 patients; 42.7% of the total number of patients). In 43 of the 58 patients (44.8% of the total number of patients), the new lesions observed led to modification of therapy, which included a new colonoscopy for polyp resection or surgery in patients with colonic neoplasm. CCE-2 is a suitable diagnostic procedure that can lead to more frequent diagnosis of significant colonic lesions after IC.

  7. Prospective study of anxiety in patients undergoing an outpatient colonoscopy

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    Israel Grilo Bensusan

    Full Text Available Background: Undergoing a colonoscopy can cause anxiety in patients and this is something which has not been closely studied. Objective: To determine the frequency and intensity of anxiety prior to a colonoscopy and the factors which are related to the procedure. Methods: This is a prospective study of patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy in our hospital. Anxiety was assessed using a visual analogue scale of 0 to 100. The severity of anxiety was rated as mild (1-29, moderate (30-79 or severe (80-100. Results: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients completed the study, of whom 154 (47.1% were men with a median age of 54 years (p25-75: 45-65. Three hundred and nine (94.5% patients were found to suffer a certain degree of anxiety. The median value on the visual analogue scale was 31 (p25-75: 10-53. Anxiety levels were mild in 136 patients (44%, moderate in 141 (45.6% and severe in 32 (10.4%. Greater anxiety was associated with female patients (mean 40.38 vs 31.99, p = 0.01 and a poorly tolerated previous colonoscopy (mean 50.67 vs 28.44, p = 0.01 and correlated inversely with age (r = -0.170, p = 0.02. Conclusions: Colonoscopy causes some degree of anxiety in most patients. Being female, younger and having experienced poor tolerance to a previous scan are associated with greater degrees of anxiety. These findings should be taken into account in the implementation of measures to improve the quality and tolerance of colonoscopy.

  8. Prospective Audit of Colonoscopy Practice in a Lebanese University Hospital

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    Rita Slim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Colonoscopy has a great impact on diagnosis and management of the diseases of the colon. In general it's a safe and accurate procedure. No evaluation has been done of any endoscopic practices in a country where the practice of medicine is totally private. Objectives Prospective audit of technical success and complication rates of both therapeutic and diagnostic colonoscopy. Setting One endoscopy unit of a Lebanese university hospital. Patients and design 407 consecutive colonoscopies were evaluated over a 6-month period. Data were recorded for age and sex of the patients, indication of the colonoscopy, presence of comorbidities, patients risk stratification, administrated dose of anesthetic drugs. Data concerning the procedure itself were also monitored. Intervention Completion rate as well as complications reported during or post colonoscopy. All patients were called back by phone 48 hours and 1 month later to identify any related post-procedural complication. Results 407 patients underwent colonoscopy. All patients were sedated with midazolam, propofol and fentanyl. The overall caecal intubation rate was 99.99%. 70 snare polypectomies and 29 cold forceps excision were performed as well as 5 coagulations with Argon Plasma Coagulation. The most important post-procedural complication was chemical colitis in 2 cases. Limitations Patients and endoscopists satisfaction was not evaluated. It's an audit of a single tertiary French affiliated hospital. It does not necessarily reflect what's really happening on a national level. Conclusion This audit enabled us to change some of our practices; i.e. rinsing method of endoscopes. It stimulated the team to keep a high performance level without neglecting the risk of potential complications.

  9. Colonoscopy

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    ... regular activities the next day. Avoid driving, operating machinery, drinking alcohol, and making important decisions for at ... of colonoscopy may include any of the following: Heavy or ongoing bleeding from biopsy or removal of ...

  10. [Does endoscopist fatigue play a role in incomplete colonoscopies and detection of polypoid lesions?].

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    Borda, Fernando; Borda, Ana; Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Fernández-Urién, Ignacio; Vila, Juan José; Zozaya, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the possible effect of endoscopist fatigue on the results of colonoscopies is under discussion. We aimed to analyze possible differences in cecal intubation and the polyp and adenoma detection rate, depending on whether colonoscopies were performed at the beginning or at the end of the daily endoscopy session and to analyze the influence of the queue position on the detection rate. A retrospective study was performed with 1,000 ambulatory and consecutive colonoscopies, divided into 2 groups: «early» and «late» procedures. A total of 95 colonoscopies were excluded due to poor colon cleansing. After confirming that patient characteristics were homogenous in the two groups, we compared the frequency of complete colonoscopies and the polyp and adenoma detection rate. Possible differences between the 2 groups in the polyp detection rate according to the colonoscopy schedule were analyzed. The overall polyp and adenoma detection rates were 44.2 and 30.5%, respectively, with no significant differences among 13 different endoscopists; polyps: p = 0.21; adenomas: p=0.63. No significant differences were found between the «early group» (n= 532) and the «late group» (n = 373) in the rates of complete colonoscopies [97.2 vs 99.4% (p=0.92)], the polyp detection rate [45.9 vs 41.8% (p=0.23)], the adenoma detection rate [30.8 vs 30% (p=0.80)] or the serrated adenoma rate [2.1% vs 1.6% (p=0.62)]. The lesion detection rate did not vary in relation to the «queue position»: polyps [p = 0.60, and adenomas: p = 0.83. In our series, endoscopist fatigue at the end of the day had no influence on the complete colonoscopy rate or on the polyp and adenoma detection rate. There were no differences in the number of polypoid lesions detected according to the timing of the colonoscopy schedule. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Prospective comparison of double contrast barium enema plus flexible sigmoidoscopy v colonoscopy in rectal bleeding: barium enema v colonoscopy in rectal bleeding.

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    Irvine, E J; O'Connor, J; Frost, R A; Shorvon, P; Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Hunt, R H

    1988-01-01

    Rectal bleeding often heralds serious colonic disease. The literature suggests that colonoscopy is superior to barium enema plus sigmoidoscopy, although no good comparative studies exist. Seventy one patients with overt rectal bleeding had prospectively flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema and colonoscopy completed independently. Against the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopy were 0.69 and 0.78 respectively for a spectrum of colonic lesions, while fo...

  12. Virtual colonoscopy vs conventional colonoscopy in patients at high risk of colorectal cancer--a prospective trial of 150 patients.

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    White, T J; Avery, G R; Kennan, N; Syed, A M; Hartley, J E; Monson, J R T

    2009-02-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC)/CT colonography has advantages over the well-documented limitations of colonoscopy/barium enema. This prospective blinded investigative comparison trial aimed to evaluate the ability of VC to assess the large bowel, compared to conventional colonoscopy (CC), in patients at high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied 150 patients (73 males, mean age 60.9 years) at high risk of CRC. Following bowel preparation, VC was undertaken using colonic insufflation and 2D-spiral CT acquisition. Two radiologists reported the images and a consensual agreement reached. Direct comparison was made with CC (performed later the same day). Interobserver agreement was calculated using the Kappa method. Postal questionnaires sought patient preference. Virtual colonoscopy visualized the caecum in all cases. Five (3.33%) VCs were classified as inadequate owing to poor distension/faecal residue. CC completion rate was 86%. Ultimately, 44 patients had normal findings, 44 had diverticular disease, 11 had inflammatory bowel disease, 18 had cancers, and 33 patients had 42 polyps. VC identified 19 cancers--a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.2% respectively. For detecting polyps > 10 mm, VC had a sensitivity and specificity (per patient) of 91% and 99.2% respectively. VC identified four polyps proximal to stenosing carcinomas and extracolonic malignancies in nine patients (6%). No procedural complications occurred with either investigation. A Kappa score achieved for interobserver agreement was 0.777. Virtual colonoscopy is an effective and safe method for evaluating the bowel and was the investigation of choice amongst patients surveyed. VC provided information additional to CC on both proximal and extracolonic pathology. VC may become the diagnostic procedure of choice for symptomatic patients at high risk of CRC, with CC being reserved for therapeutic intervention, or where a tissue diagnosis is required.

  13. Comparison of a 4-Day versus 2-Day Low Fiber Diet Regimen in Barium Tagging CT Colonography in Incomplete Colonoscopy Patients

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    Kaan Meric

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to compare the amount of residual feces, residual fluid, the tagging quality, and patient compliance using 4-day versus 2-day low fiber diet regimen in barium tagging CT colonography in incomplete colonoscopy patients. Methods. A total of 101 patients who underwent CT colonography were assigned to 2-day diet group (n=56 and 4-day diet group (n=45. Fecal tagging was achieved with barium sulphate while bisacodyl and sennoside B were used for bowel preparation. Residual solid stool was divided into two groups measuring 0.05. The prevalence of moderate discomfort was significantly higher in 4-day group (P<0.001. Conclusion. Our study shows that 2-day limited bowel preparation regimen for fecal tag CT colonography is a safe and reasonable technique to evaluate the entire colon, particularly in incomplete conventional colonoscopy patients.

  14. Can Water Exchange Improve Patient Tolerance in Unsedated Colonoscopy A Prospective Comparative Study

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    Richard Azevedo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Unsedated colonoscopy can be painful, poorly tolerated by patients, and associated with unsatisfactory technical performance. Previous studies report an advantage of water exchange over conventional air insufflation in reducing pain during unsedated colonoscopy. Our goal was to analyze the impact of water exchange colonoscopy on the level of maximum pain reported by patients submitted to unsedated colonoscopy, compared to conventional air insufflation. Methods: We performed a single-center, patient-blinded, prospective randomized comparative study, where patients were either allocated to the water group, in which the method of colonoscopy used was water exchange, or the standard air group, in which the examination was accomplished with air insufflation. Results: A total of 141 patients were randomized, 70 to the water and 71 to the air group. The maximum level of pain reported by patients during unsedated colonoscopy, measured by a numeric scale of pain (0-10, was significantly lower in the water group (3.39 ± 2.32, compared to the air group (4.94 ± 2.10, p p = 0.009. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding indications for the procedure, quality of bowel preparation, cecal intubation time, withdrawal time, number of position changes, adenoma detection rate, and postprocedural complications. Only the number of abdominal compressions was significantly different, showing that water exchange decreases the number of compressions needed during colonoscopy. Conclusions: Water exchange was a safe and equally effective alternative to conventional unsedated colonoscopy, associated with less intraprocedural pain without impairing key performance measures.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Insufflation in Colonoscopy Is Safe: A Prospective Trial of 347 Patients

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    M. Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Available evidence suggests that the use of CO2 insufflation in endoscopy is more comfortable for the patient. The safety of CO2 use in colonoscopy remains contentious, particularly in sedated patients. The objective of the present prospective trial was to assess the safety of CO2 colonoscopies. Methods. 109 patients from our previous randomized CO2 colonoscopy study and an additional 238 subsequent consecutive unselected patients who had a routine colonoscopy performed in a private practice were enrolled from April 2008 through September 2008. All but 2 patients were sedated. All patients were routinely monitored with transcutaneous CO2 measurement. Volumes of CO2 administered were correlated with capnographic measurements from transcutaneous monitoring. Results. Of the 347 patients examined, 57% were women; mean (SD age of participants was of 60.2 years (12.8. Mean propofol dosage was 136 mg (64 mg. Mean CO2 values were 34.7 mm Hg (5.3 at baseline, 38.9 mm Hg (5.5 upon reaching the ileum, and 36.9 mm Hg (5.0 at examination's end. Mean maximum increase of CO2 was 4.5 mm Hg (3.6. No correlation was observed between volume of CO2 administered and increase in level of CO2 (correlation coefficient: 0.01; P value: 0.84. No complications were observed. Conclusions. The present prospective study, which was based on one of the largest sedated patient sample reported to date in this setting, provides compelling evidence that CO2 insufflation in colonoscopy is safe and unassociated with relevant increases in transcutaneously measured levels of CO2.

  16. [Prospective evaluation of the safety and tolerance of colonoscopy in children].

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    Gana A, Juan Cristóbal; Glenz A, Constanza; Marchant A, Pamela; Vaca Z, Carina; García R, Ximena; Larraín B, Francisco; Harris D, Paul

    2006-05-01

    Colonoscopy is a well established diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in pediatrics. To evaluate colon preparation alternatives for colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, type of sedation, clinical indications and findings. Prospective study of 123 children referred for colonoscopy. Demographic data, type of colon preparation, sedation, type of endoscope and endoscopic results were obtained. The following day, a phone interview was carried out inquiring about duration, quality and adverse effects of the sedation and procedure. Seventy one boys (58%) and 52 girls (42%) with a mean age of 6.7+/-4.4 years, were recruited. The main indication was lower gastrointestinal bleeding (71%). The different colon preparations produced elimination of clear liquid stools in 50%, non transparent liquid in 23%, semi liquid in 22% and solid in 6% of the patients. Most common side effects were abdominal distension (20%) and nausea (16.8%). The most commonly used drugs were midazolam (76%) and demerol (43%). The average duration of the procedure was 18.3 minutes (range: 4-50). The most common findings were rectal polyps (18.7%) and hemorrhagic colitis (14.6%). In 77% of cases, the sedation was considered very good or good. Colon visualization was described as very good (51%) or good (36%). Seventy three percent of children had complete amnesia. The most common adverse effect was vomiting (7.5%). Lower endoscopies are feasible procedures to carry out in children, in an ambulatory basis, with intravenous sedation and minimum adverse effects.

  17. Manual versus target-controlled infusion of balanced propofol during diagnostic colonoscopy: A prospective randomized controlled trial

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    Vučićević Vera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There is an increasing interest in balanced propofol sedation (BPS for colonoscopy in outpatient settings. Propofol is a potent anesthetic agent for this purpose and has a narrow therapeutic range, which increases a risk of cardiovascular and respiratory complications in case of improper administration. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare patients’ safety and comfort of endoscopists in two methods of BPS targeting deep sedation - propofol target-controlled infusion (TCI and manual intravenous titration technique (MT - during colonoscopy. Methods. This prospective randomized controlled trial included 90 patients (class I or II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists deeply sedated with propofol, coadministered with small doses of midazolam and fentanyl. Propofol was given by MT technique (45 patients or by TCI (45 patients. The following adverse effects were recorded: hypotension, hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, hypoxemia, bradypnea, apnea, hiccupping, and coughing, as well as endoscopist’s comfort during colonoscopy by means of a questionnaire. Results. The MT group compared to the TCI group had a lower mean arterial pressure in the 10th minute after the beginning (p = 0.017, and at the end of colonoscopy (p = 0.006, higher oxygen saturation in the fifth minute (p = 0.033, and in the 15th minute (p = 0.008 after the beginning of colonoscopy, and lower heart rate at the beginning of the procedure (p = 0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in adverse events. Endoscopist’s comfort during colonoscopy was high 95.6% in the TCI group vs. 88.9% in the MT group (p = 0.069. Conclusion. MT is clinically as stable as TCI of propofol for deep sedation during colonoscopy, and endoscopists experienced the same comfort during colonoscopy in both groups. Thus, both combinations are suitable for deep sedation during diagnostic colonoscopy.

  18. Risks and benefits of colonoscopy in patients aged 80 and older: A prospective study

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    Edson Jurado da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aims to compare colonoscopy results in patients aged 50-79 and those aged 80 and older. Patients and Methods: a total of 533 diagnostic colonoscopies performed from August 2011 to January 2012 were evaluated in a prospective study analyzing age, ASA classification, co- morbidities, endoscopic findings, time to reach the cecum, number of complete examina- tions, difficulties and complications. Chi-square test was used to compare categorical data whereas Student's t test to compare means. A p value 0.05, ASA > 2 difficult examination: 41 (20% versus 6 (60% p 0.05. Complete colonoscopy in 450 (94% versus 45 (83%, p 0.05 Time to reach the cecum was 39 ± 10 minutes for difficult procedures and 13 ± 9 for the easy ones. Conclusion: age 80 and older is associated with more adverse events during colonoscopy. Resumo: Objetivo: avaliar riscos em colonoscopia após 80 anos de idade. Pacientes e métodos: entre agosto de 2011 e janeiro de 2012 realizamos colonoscopias em 533 pacientes. Grupo A: idade entre 50 e 79 e Grupo B > de 80 anos. Parâmetros analisados: ASA, comorbidades, achados endoscópicos, tempo de chegada ao ceco, número de exames com- pletos, dificuldade e complicações. Usamos teste Qui-quadrado para comparar proporção e teste t de Student para média e desvio padrão. p 0,05 > ASA 2 difícil 41 (20% e 6 (60% p 0.05. Exame completo 450 (94% e 45 (83% p 0,05. Tempo em minutos 39 ± 10 para os difíceis e 13 ± 9 para os fáceis. Conclusão: a idade de 80 anos constitui um risco para a realização de colonoscopia. Keywords: Colonoscopy, Risks, Complications, Older age, Elderly, Palavras-chave: Colonoscopia, Riscos, Complicações, Idade avançada, Terceira idade

  19. A prospective study of abdominal computerized tomography and colonoscopy in the diagnosis of colonic disease in an elderly population.

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    Lipscomb, G; Loughrey, G; Thakker, M; Rees, W; Nicholson, D

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the accuracy of abdominal computed tomography (CT) and colonoscopy in diagnosing colonic pathology in an elderly population. Patients over the age of 70 for whom an outpatient diagnostic colonoscopy had been requested, were invited to attend for a CT scan of the abdomen following oral colonic preparation. CT was carried out within 1 month of the colonoscopy and all images were evaluated by a single consultant radiologist with no prior knowledge of the colonoscopy result. Of 72 patients who fulfilled entry criteria and attended for colonoscopy, 55 (29 female) had abdominal CT of the abdomen (mean age 76.6 years, range 70-92). Colonoscopy was successful in 67% of cases and the following colonoscopic diagnoses were made: diverticular disease (26), normal (14), colonic carcinoma (6), polyps (9) colitis (2) and angiodysplasia (1). There was agreement between colonoscopic and CT diagnoses in 38 patients (69%) including all those with carcinoma of the colon. There was disagreement in 12 patients with diverticular disease, CT missed three polyps in three patients and angiodysplasia in one patient. CT provided additional important information in 9 patients: gastric leiomyosarcoma (1), aortic aneurysm (1), absence of metastases (3), liver metastases (2), cirrhosis and portal hypertension (1) and a large pleural effusion (1). One patient thought to have a carcinoma of the colon by both techniques was subsequently found to have a diverticular mass at laparotomy. Two patients undergoing colonoscopy had colonic perforations and one of these died. CT may provide an alternative to colonoscopy in diagnosis of colonic disease in the elderly population.

  20. The Offer of Advanced Imaging Techniques Leads to Higher Acceptance Rates for Screening Colonoscopy - a Prospective Study.

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    Albrecht, Heinz; Gallitz, Julia; Hable, Robert; Vieth, Michael; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Neurath, Markus Friedrich; Riemann, Jurgen Ferdinand; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy plays a fundamental role in early diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer and requires public and professional acceptance to ensure the ongoing success of screening programs. The aim of the study was to prospectively assess whether patient acceptance rates to undergo screening colonoscopy could be improved by the offer of advanced imaging techniques. Overall, 372 randomly selected patients were prospectively included. A standardized questionnaire was developed that inquired of the patients their knowledge regarding advanced imaging techniques. Second, several media campaigns and information events were organized reporting about advanced imaging techniques, followed by repeated evaluation. After one year the evaluation ended. At baseline, 64% of the patients declared that they had no knowledge about new endoscopic methods. After twelve months the overall grade of information increased significantly from 14% at baseline to 34%. The percentage of patients who decided to undergo colonoscopy because of the offer of new imaging methods also increased significantly from 12% at baseline to 42% after 12 months. Patients were highly interested in the offer of advanced imaging techniques. Knowledge about these techniques could relatively easy be provided using local media campaigns. The offer of advanced imaging techniques leads to higher acceptance rates for screening colonoscopies.

  1. Prospective Study of the Quality of Colonoscopies Performed by Primary Care Physicians: The Alberta Primary Care Endoscopy (APC-Endo Study.

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    Michael R Kolber

    Full Text Available The quality of colonoscopies performed by primary care physicians (PCPs is unknown.To determine whether PCP colonoscopists achieve colonoscopy quality benchmarks, and patient satisfaction with having their colonoscopy performed by a primary care physician.Prospective multi-center, multi-physician observational study. Colonoscopic quality data collection occurred via completion of case report forms and pathological confirmation of lesions. Patient satisfaction was captured by a telephone survey.Thirteen rural and suburban hospitals in Alberta, Canada.Proportion of successful cecal intubations, average number of adenomas detected per colonoscopy, proportion of patients with at least one adenoma, and serious adverse event rates; patient satisfaction with their wait time and procedure, as well as willingness to have a repeat colonoscopy performed by their primary care endoscopist.In the two-month study period, 10 study physicians performed 577 colonoscopies. The overall adjusted proportion of successful cecal intubations was 96.5% (95% CI 94.6-97.8, and all physicians achieved the adjusted cecal intubation target of ≥90%. The average number of ademonas detected per colonoscopy was 0.62 (95% CI 0.5-0.74. 46.4% (95% CI 38.5-54.3 of males and 30.2% (95% CI 22.3-38.2 of females ≥50 years of age having their first colonoscopy, had at least one adenoma. Four serious adverse events occurred (three post polypectomy bleeds and one perforation and 99.3% of patients were willing to have a repeat colonoscopy performed by their primary care colonoscopist.Two-month study length and non-universal participation by Alberta primary care endoscopists.Primary care physician colonoscopists can achieve quality benchmarks in colonoscopy. Training additional primary care physicians in endoscopy may improve patient access and decrease endoscopic wait times, especially in rural settings.

  2. Patient Satisfaction With Propofol for Outpatient Colonoscopy: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Anantha; Frangopoulos, Christoforos; Shaffer, Lynn E T

    2017-10-01

    Previous literature has shown that propofol has ideal anesthetic properties for patients undergoing colonoscopy, a common procedure at outpatient surgery centers. However, there is a paucity of information regarding patient satisfaction with propofol. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with propofol compared with nonpropofol (fentanyl/midazolam) anesthesia for outpatient colonoscopies. Safety and complications were secondary end points. This study was a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group controlled clinical trial (NCT 02937506). This study was conducted at a single ambulatory surgery center at an urban teaching community health system. Patients were scheduled for outpatient colonoscopy. Those with high-risk cardiac or pulmonary disease were excluded. Anesthesia personnel administered either fentanyl/midazolam (n = 300) or propofol (n = 300) for sedation during outpatient colonoscopy. A single, highly experienced endoscopist performed all colonoscopies. The primary outcomes measured were patient satisfaction (5-point Likert scale) and procedure complications. Data were collected on the day of endoscopy by the nursing staff of the postanesthesia care unit. A subinvestigator blinded to the randomization called patients 24 to 72 hours after discharge to obtain data on postprocedure problems and status of resumption of normal activities. Analysis was intention-to-treat. Fewer patients who received propofol remembered being awake during the procedure (2% vs 17% for fentanyl, p < 0.0001) and were more likely to rate the amount of anesthesia received as being "just right" (98.7% vs 91.3% for fentanyl, p = 0.0002) and state that they were "very satisfied" with their anesthesia (86.3% vs 74% for fentanyl, p = 0.0005). Twenty-six percent of fentanyl procedures were rated "difficult" compared with 4.3% for propofol (p < 0.0001), and complications were fewer in the propofol group (2.7% vs 11.7%, p < 0.0001). The endoscopist could not be completely

  3. Water exchange enhanced cecal intubation in potentially difficult colonoscopy. Unsedated patients with prior abdominal or pelvic surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Zhang, Linhui; Liu, Xiaodong; Leung, Felix W; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiangping; Xue, Ling; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Pan, Yanglin; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-05-01

    Colonoscopy is widely used for management of colorectal diseases. A history of abdominal or pelvic surgery is a well-recognized factor associated with difficult colonoscopy. Although water exchange colonoscopy (WEC) was effective in small groups of male U.S. veterans with such a history, its application in other cultural settings is uncertain. To investigate the application of WEC in such patients. Prospective, randomized, controlled, patient-blinded study. Tertiary-care referral center in China. Outpatients with prior abdominal or pelvic surgery undergoing unsedated diagnostic, screening, or surveillance colonoscopy. Patients were randomized to examination by either WEC or conventional air colonoscopy (AC). Cecal intubation rate. A total of 110 patients were randomized to the WEC (n = 55) or AC (n = 55) group. WEC significantly increased the cecal intubation rate (92.7% vs 76.4%; P = .033). The maximum pain scores (± standard deviation) were 2.1 ± 1.8 (WEC) and 4.6 ± 1.7 (AC), respectively (P WEC would be willing to have a repeat unsedated colonoscopy (90.9% vs 72.7%, P = .013). Single center; unblinded but experienced endoscopists. This randomized, controlled trial confirms that the water exchange method significantly enhanced cecal intubation in potentially difficult colonoscopy in unsedated patients with prior abdominal or pelvic surgery. The lower pain scores and higher proportion accepting repeat of the unsedated option suggest that WEC is promising. It may enhances compliance with colonoscopy in specific populations. ( NCT01485133.). Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing adenoma detection rate in colonoscopy using water exchange, water immersion, and air insufflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Hu, Chi-Tan; Koo, Malcolm; Leung, Felix W

    2017-07-01

    Adenoma detection rate (ADR), defined as the proportion of patients with at least one adenoma of any size, is a quality indicator. We tested the hypothesis that water exchange (WE) improves ADR but water immersion (WI) has no adverse effect on ADR compared with air insufflation (AI). A prospective study was conducted at the Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital in southern Taiwan and the Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital in eastern Taiwan on patients randomly assigned to WE, WI, or AI with stratification by the 3 study colonoscopists. The primary outcome was ADR. From July 2013 to December 2015, 651 patients were recruited and randomized into 3 groups with a 1:1:1 ratio (217 patients per group). Overall, ADR met quality standards: WE 49.8% (95% CI, 43.2%-56.4%), AI 37.8% (95% CI, 31.6%-44.4%), and WI 40.6% (95% CI, 34.2%-47.2%). Compared with AI, WE significantly increased ADR (P = .016). There was no difference between WI and WE. ADRs of WI and AI were comparable. Compared with AI, WE confirmed a longer insertion time, higher cleanliness score, but similar adenoma per positive colonoscopy (APPC) and withdrawal time with polypectomy. Subgroup analysis found WE significantly increased ADR in propofol-sedated patients. Multivariate generalized linear mixed model analysis revealed that age ≥50 years, WE (vs AI), colonoscopy indication, no previous history of colonoscopy, and withdrawal time >8 minutes were significant predictors of increased ADR. Confirmation of prior reports showing WE, but not WI, increased ADR further strengthened the validity of our observations. WE significantly increased ADR in propofol-sedated patients. The outcome differences justify assessment of the role of WE in colorectal cancer prevention. Similar APPC and withdrawal times suggest that adequate inspection was performed on colonoscope withdrawal in each of the study arms. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01894191.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. All rights reserved.

  5. A prospective study of bowel preparation for colonoscopy with polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution versus sodium phosphate in Lynch syndrome: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt-van Pinxteren, M.W.J. van; Kouwen, M.C.A. van; Oijen, M.G. van; van Achterberg, T.; Nagengast, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Lynch gene carriers undergo regular surveillance colonoscopies. Polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG) is routinely prescribed for bowel cleansing, but often poorly tolerated by patients. Sodium phosphate (NaP) may be an alternative. Prospective and random comparison of bowel preparation

  6. Incomplete functional recovery after delirium in elderly people: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freter Susan H

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium often has a poor outcome, but why some people have incomplete recovery is not well understood. Our objective was to identify factors associated with short-term (by discharge and long-term (by 6 month incomplete recovery of function following delirium. Methods In a prospective cohort study of elderly patients with delirium seen by geriatric medicine services, function was assessed at baseline, at hospital discharge and at six months. Results Of 77 patients, vital and functional status at 6 months was known for 71, of whom 21 (30% had died. Incomplete functional recovery, defined as ≥10 point decline in the Barthel Index, compared to pre-morbid status, was present in 27 (54% of the 50 survivors. Factors associated with death or loss of function at hospital discharge were frailty, absence of agitation (hypoactive delirium, a cardiac cause and poor recognition of delirium by the treating service. Frailty, causes other than medications, and poor recognition of delirium by the treating service were associated with death or poor functional recovery at 6 months. Conclusion Pre-existing frailty, cardiac cause of delirium, and poor early recognition by treating physicians are associated with worse outcomes. Many physicians view the adverse outcomes of delirium as intractable. While in some measure this might be true, more skilled care is a potential remedy within their grasp.

  7. Evaluation of the implementation of Galician Health Service indications and priority levels for colonoscopy in symptomatic patients: prospective, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Villaamil, Pablo; Salve-Bouzo, María; Cubiella, Joaquín; Valentín-Gómez, Fátima; Sánchez-Hernández, Eloy; Gómez-Fernández, Isabel; Fernández-Seara, Javier

    2013-01-01

    the Galician Health Service established indications and priority levels (I = fast track, II = preferential, III = normal) for colonoscopy, according to the risk of colorectal cancer and significant colonic lesions detection with access from primary health care. Our aim is to show the results of the implementation. we included colonoscopies requested in symptomatic patients from June to October 2012 in a prospective observational cross sectional study. We collected health care level (primary, secondary), priority, appropriateness to the established criteria, wait times (from colonoscopy application and initial consultation) and diagnostic yield for colorectal cancer and/or significant colonic lesion. We compared health care levels in priorities I and II. 425 colonoscopies were included (I = 221, II = 141, III = 63). The appropriateness rate to the protocol was 67.5 %. Priority levels were significantly associated to wait times (days) from application (I = 8.7 ± 8.9, II = 50 + or - 20.3, III = 80.2 + or - 32.2; p Galician Health Service priority levels are significantly associated with colorectal cancer and significant colonic lesion detection. Referrals to colonoscopy from primary health care reduce waiting times and increase diagnostic yield.

  8. A Novel Hands-Free Abdominal Compression Device for Colonoscopy Significantly Decreases Cecal Intubation Time: A Prospective Single-Blinded Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Allison R; Ryou, Marvin; Chan, Walter W

    2017-06-01

    Colonoscopy outcome is limited by endoscope looping, which leads to patient discomfort, prolonged procedure, and increased sedation requirement. Traditional manual abdominal pressure is imprecise and manually intensive. A hands-free abdominal compression device (ACD) may improve colonoscopy outcome. We aimed to assess the effect of a novel ACD on colonoscopy outcomes compared to manual pressure. This was a prospective single-blinded study of patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy. The ACD (N-Doe Pillow™) was applied on 50 consecutive patients. Endoscopists were blinded to device usage. Control cases using manual pressure were randomly selected in a 2:1 manner. Primary outcome was cecal intubation time. Secondary outcomes included sedation requirement and complications. Subgroup analyses evaluated ACD effect on endoscopists with different experiences and patients at higher risk of difficult colonoscopy. Fisher's exact and Student's t-tests were performed for univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis was performed using generalized linear regression. Fifty patients undergoing colonoscopy with ACD assistance were compared to 100 matched controls. Mean cecal intubation time was significantly reduced in the ACD group compared to controls (6.38 minutes versus 11.8 minutes, P ACD use was independently associated with reduction in cecal intubation time (β-coeff: -4.11, P = .007). Subgroup analyses revealed a trend toward increased improvement in cecal intubation time among junior endoscopists and obese patients. A novel, hands-free ACD significantly decreased cecal intubation time in this prospective, single-blinded, match-controlled study. A trend toward more improvement was seen among junior faculty, suggesting an application for trainees and/or endoscopists with smaller case volumes.

  9. Diagnostic Performance of Computed Tomography Colonography and Colonoscopy: A Prospective and Validated Analysis of 231 Paired Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnesen, R.B.; Benzon, E. von; Adamsen, S.; Svendsen, L.B.; Raaschou, H.O.; Hart Hansen, O.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Detection of colorectal tumors with computed tomography colonography (CTC) is an alternative to conventional colonoscopy (CC), and clarification of the diagnostic performance is essential for cost-effective use of both technologies. Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of CTC compared with CC. Material and Methods: 231 consecutive CTCs were performed prior to same-day scheduled CC. The radiologist and endoscopists were blinded to each other's findings. Patients underwent a polyethylene glycol bowel preparation, and were scanned in prone and supine positions using a single-detector helical CT scanner and commercially available software for image analysis. Findings were validated (matched) in an unblinded comparison with video-recordings of the CCs and re-CCs in cases of doubt. Results: For patients with polyps 5 mm and 10 mm, the sensitivity was 69% (95% CI 58-80%) and 81% (68-94%), and the specificity was 91% (84-98%) and 98% (93-100%), respectively. For detection of polyps 5 mm and 10 mm, the sensitivity was 66% (57-75%) and 77% (65-89%). A flat, elevated low-grade carcinoma was missed by CTC. One cancer relapse was missed by CC, and a cecal cancer was missed by an incomplete CC and follow-up double-contrast barium enema. Conclusion: CC was superior to CTC and should remain first choice for the diagnosis of colorectal polyps. However, for diagnosis of lesions 10 mm, CTC and CC should be considered as complementary methods

  10. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghi, A. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Polo Didattico Pontino, Latina (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  11. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  12. A novel colonoscopy reporting system enabling quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Sascha C.; van Vliet, Joost; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien

    2014-01-01

    The quality of colonoscopy can only be measured if colonoscopy reports include all key quality indicators. In daily practice, reporting is often incomplete and not standardized. This study describes a novel, structured colonoscopy reporting system, which aims to generate standardized and complete

  13. CT colonography versus colonoscopy in the follow-up of patients after diverticulitis - A prospective, comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjern, F.; Jonas, E.; Holmstroem, B.; Josephson, T.; Mellgren, A.; Johansson, C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a viable alternative to colonoscopy or double contrast barium enema in the follow-up of patients after diverticulitis. Material and methods: Fifty patients underwent CTC followed immediately by colonoscopy. Results were blinded to the examiners. Findings of diverticular disease and patient acceptance were evaluated. Results: Bowel preparation and distension were good in the majority of CTC and colonoscopy examinations. Diverticular disease was found in 96% of patients at CTC and in 90% at colonoscopy. The rate of agreement between CTC and colonoscopy for diverticular findings in the sigmoid colon was good (κ = 0.64). No complications were seen. Patients found colonoscopy more uncomfortable (p < 0.03), more painful (p < 0.001), and more difficult (p < 0.01) than CTC. Of the patients favouring one examination, 74% preferred CTC. Conclusion: CTC appears to have a better diagnostic potential for imaging of diverticular disease-specific findings, when compared with colonoscopy. Also, CTC was less uncomfortable and was preferred by a majority of patients. CTC seems to be a reasonable alternative in follow-up of patients with symptomatic diverticular disease

  14. CT colonography versus colonoscopy in the follow-up of patients after diverticulitis - A prospective, comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjern, F. [Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institut, Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: fredrik.hjern@ds.se; Jonas, E. [Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institut, Stockholm (Sweden); Holmstroem, B. [Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institut, Stockholm (Sweden); Josephson, T. [Division of Radiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Mellgren, A. [Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institut, Stockholm (Sweden); Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Johansson, C. [Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institut, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To assess whether computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a viable alternative to colonoscopy or double contrast barium enema in the follow-up of patients after diverticulitis. Material and methods: Fifty patients underwent CTC followed immediately by colonoscopy. Results were blinded to the examiners. Findings of diverticular disease and patient acceptance were evaluated. Results: Bowel preparation and distension were good in the majority of CTC and colonoscopy examinations. Diverticular disease was found in 96% of patients at CTC and in 90% at colonoscopy. The rate of agreement between CTC and colonoscopy for diverticular findings in the sigmoid colon was good ({kappa} = 0.64). No complications were seen. Patients found colonoscopy more uncomfortable (p < 0.03), more painful (p < 0.001), and more difficult (p < 0.01) than CTC. Of the patients favouring one examination, 74% preferred CTC. Conclusion: CTC appears to have a better diagnostic potential for imaging of diverticular disease-specific findings, when compared with colonoscopy. Also, CTC was less uncomfortable and was preferred by a majority of patients. CTC seems to be a reasonable alternative in follow-up of patients with symptomatic diverticular disease.

  15. Prospective comparison of air-contrast barium enema and colonoscopy in patients with fecal occult blood: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Don C; Koch, Johannes; Yee, Judy; McQuaid, Kenneth R; Halvorsen, Robert A

    2004-12-01

    The utility of air-contrast barium enema and colonoscopy for evaluation of the colon has been debated. Air-contrast barium enema is less expensive and invasive than colonoscopy, but it also is less sensitive and specific. Further, although air-contrast barium enema may be less painful than colonoscopy, it often is poorly tolerated by patients. Thus, this study compared the sensitivity and the specificity of air-contrast barium enema and colonoscopy for detection of colonic lesions in patients with fecal occult blood. Over a 30-month period, patients with fecal occult blood were recruited. Patients underwent standard air-contrast barium enema, followed by colonoscopy 7 to 14 days later. Colonoscopists were blinded to the results of air-contrast barium enema until the colonoscopy was completed, after which the results were disclosed. If the findings were discrepant, colonoscopy was repeated. A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Nine air-contrast barium enemas were reported to be inadequate, and the cecum was not intubated at colonoscopy in two patients. In the remaining patients, 5 cancers were identified (1 each cecum, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum) by both studies. Sixty-six polypoid lesions were identified in 30 patients. Diverticula were identified in 42 patients by air-contrast barium enema and in 18 patients by colonoscopy. Air-contrast barium enema detected 3 of 36 polypoid lesions 5 mm or less in diameter, 5 of 15 adenomas 6 to 9 mm in size, and 4 of 15 adenomas 10 mm or greater in diameter (sensitivity 8%, 33%, and 27%, respectively). After excluding patients with diverticula, air-contrast barium enema detected 3 of 7 adenomas 10 mm or greater in size. Overall, 12 polypoid lesions or filling defects were identified by air-contrast barium enema that could not be verified by colonoscopy. The specificity of air-contrast barium enema for lesions 1.0 cm or greater in size was 100%; for those 6 mm or greater, it was 97%. Air

  16. SAFETY OF MANNITOL USE IN BOWEL PREPARATION: a prospective assessment of intestinal methane (CH4) levels during colonoscopy after mannitol and sodium phosphate (NaP) bowel cleansing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Gustavo Andrade de; Martins, Fernanda Prata Borges; Macedo, Erika Pereira de; Gonçalves, Manoel Ernesto Peçanha; Ferrari, Angelo Paulo

    2016-01-01

    - Adequate bowel preparation is critical for the quality of colonoscopy. Despite reported occurrence of colonic explosion due to methane and hydrogen production by bacterial fermentation during colonoscopy, gas exchange during the procedure is believed to be effective in lowering existing methane concentration, allowing for safe utilization of mannitol for bowel preparation. Thus, mannitol is widely used for bowel cleansing prior to colonoscopy, considering its low cost and effectiveness for bowel preparation. - The aim of this study was to assess the safety of mannitol for bowel preparation, when compared to sodium phosphate (NaP). - We conducted a prospective observational study in which 250 patients undergoing colonoscopy at Universidade Federal de São Paulo and Hospital Albert Einstein (São Paulo, Brazil) were approached for inclusion in the study. Patients received either mannitol (n=50) or NaP (n=200) for bowel preparation, based on physician indication. Study was conducted from August 2009 to December 2009. The main outcome of interest was presence of detectable levels of methane (CH4) during colonoscopy and reduction in such levels after gas exchange during the procedure. Methane concentrations were measured in three intestinal segments during scope introduction and withdrawal. Safety was assessed as the absence of high levels of methane, defined as 5%. Measurements were made using a multi-gas monitor (X-am 7000, Dräger Safety AG & Co. KGaA, Lübeck, Germany) connected to a plastic catheter introduced into the working channel of the colonoscope. Additional outcomes of interest included levels of O2. Methane and O2 levels are reported as ppm. Mean, difference and standard deviation of levels of gas measured in both moments were calculated and compared in both groups. Proportions of patients with detectable or high levels of methane in both groups were compared. Continuous variables were analyzed using t test and categorical variables using qui

  17. STUDY ON VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aithagani Rama Chandraiah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Current options available in the investigations of colorectal carcinoma include screening using digital rectal examination, sigmoidoscopy, barium enema and fiberoptic colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy. The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate patient acceptance of virtual colonoscopy compared with that of conventional colonoscopy when performed in patients with or suspected of having colorectal disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study had been conducted on patients attending Department of Radiology for a period of 1 year. Patients with primary or secondary complaints of pain abdomen, lump in abdomen, bleeding per rectum, loose motions/constipation, altered bowel habits, loss of appetite and weight and anaemia, so total number of cases were 51. RESULTS In our study, the patients were in age groups of 21-70 years. Both sexes were represented in our study. Male preponderance was noted in 51 patients. Cases of adenoma were more commonly found 37 (72.78%. The sensitivity of the CT colonography for the polyps more than 10 mm is 100%, polyps 6-9 mm is 90%, less than 6 mm is 80%. Our study consists of 51 patients; among them, 30 patients showed acceptance for CT colonography, 10 patients for optical colonoscopy. Our study consists of 51 patients, the polyps (more than 10 mm detected in 2D viewing were 24, 2D and 3D viewing of 24, the polyps (less than 10 mm detected in 2D viewing were 15, 2D and 3D viewing were 17. 3D viewing resulted in increased sensitivity for identification of patients with larger polyps more than 1 cm, (70-85% sensitivity and patients with smaller polyps less than 1 cm (increased sensitivity 75-88%. CONCLUSIONS Multislice CT (64 colonography is a good alternative to other colorectal screening tests because it has high sensitivity for polyps 10 mm or more in diameter is relatively safe, clinical effective, minimally invasive, cost effective and filter for therapeutic optical colonoscopy.

  18. The Polyp Manager: a new tool for optimal polyp documentation during colonoscopy. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Meeberg, Maartje M; Ouwendijk, Rob J Th; Ter Borg, Pieter C J; van den Hazel, Sven J; van de Meeberg, Paul C

    2016-05-01

    Conventional reporting of polyps is often incomplete. We tested the Polyp Manager (PM), a new software application permitting the endoscopist to document polyps in real time during colonoscopy. We studied completeness of polyp descriptions, user-friendliness and the potential time benefit. In two Dutch hospitals colonoscopies were performed with PM (as a touchscreen endoscopist-operated device or nurse-operated desktop application). Completeness of polyp descriptions was compared to a historical group with conventional reporting (CRH). Prospectively, we compared user-friendliness (VAS-scores) and time benefit of the endoscopist-operated PM to conventional reporting (CR) in one hospital. Duration of colonoscopy and time needed to report polyps and provide a pathology request were measured. Provided that using PM does not prolong colonoscopy, the sum of the latter two was considered as a potential time-benefit if the PM were fully integrated into a digital reporting system. A total of 144 regular colonoscopies were included in the study. Both groups were comparable with regard to patient characteristics, duration of colonoscopy and number of polyps. Using the PM did reduce incomplete documentation of the following items in CRH-reports: location (96 % vs 82 %, P = 0.01), size (95 % vs 89 %, P = 0.03), aspect (71 % vs 36 %, P report was 01:27 ± 01:43 minutes (median + interquartile range) in the entire group (PM as CR), reflecting potential time benefit per colonoscopy. The PM is a user-friendly tool that seems to improve completeness of polyp reporting. Once integrated with digital reporting systems, it is probably time saving as well.

  19. Migraine with aura is associated with an incomplete circle of willis: results of a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Cucchiara

    Full Text Available To compare the prevalence of an incomplete circle of Willis in patients with migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and control subjects, and correlate circle of Willis variations with alterations in cerebral perfusion.Migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and control subjects were prospectively enrolled in a 1∶1∶1 ratio. Magnetic resonance angiography was performed to examine circle of Willis anatomy and arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging to measure cerebral blood flow. A standardized template rating system was used to categorize circle of Willis variants. The primary pre-specified outcome measure was the frequency of an incomplete circle of Willis. The association between circle of Willis variations and cerebral blood flow was also analyzed.170 subjects were enrolled (56 migraine with aura, 61 migraine without aura, 53 controls. An incomplete circle of Willis was significantly more common in the migraine with aura compared to control group (73% vs. 51%, p = 0.02, with a similar trend for the migraine without aura group (67% vs. 51%, p = 0.08. Using a quantitative score of the burden of circle of Willis variants, migraine with aura subjects had a higher burden of variants than controls (p = 0.02. Compared to those with a complete circle, subjects with an incomplete circle had greater asymmetry in hemispheric cerebral blood flow (p = 0.05. Specific posterior cerebral artery variants were associated with greater asymmetries of blood flow in the posterior cerebral artery territory.An incomplete circle of Willis is more common in migraine with aura subjects than controls, and is associated with alterations in cerebral blood flow.

  20. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  1. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  2. A novel colonoscopy reporting system enabling quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Sascha C; van Vliet, Joost; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien

    2014-03-01

    The quality of colonoscopy can only be measured if colonoscopy reports include all key quality indicators. In daily practice, reporting is often incomplete and not standardized. This study describes a novel, structured colonoscopy reporting system, which aims to generate standardized and complete reports and to facilitate the automatic analysis of colonoscopy quality indicators. A new colonoscopy reporting system (EndoALPHA) was developed. The system reports all colonoscopy quality indicators, as well as pathological findings, in a systematic manner using structured terminology. All essential items carry specific codes, which enables statistical analysis and the automatic generation of reports of all quality indicators. The EndoALPHA reporting system was tested with regard to completeness of reporting and evaluation of quality indicators both for individual endoscopists and the endoscopy unit. In 2012, all 810 colonoscopies performed at one colonoscopy center were documented using EndoALPHA. Overall, 94 % of performed colonoscopies were reported completely using the encoded terminology. Individual unadjusted cecal intubation rates were above 90 % for all endoscopists (mean 96.7 %), and the adenoma detection rate was above 20 % for all endoscopists (35.4 % for the unit). The novel EndoALPHA reporting system enables automatic quality assessment on two levels: the completeness of reporting can be evaluated, and if this is adequate, the quality of the colonoscopies can also be assessed. Integrated with feedback, benchmarking and training, the reporting system may facilitate quality improvement for colonoscopy services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Colonoscopy-induced acute diverticulitis: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgun, Emre; Isik, Ozgen; Sapci, Ipek; Aytac, Erman; Abbas, Maher A; Ozuner, Gokhan; Church, James; Steele, Scott R

    2018-01-17

    Colonoscopy in patients with diverticulosis can be technically challenging and limited data exist relating to the risk of post-colonoscopy diverticulitis. Our aim was to evaluate the incidence, management, and outcomes of acute diverticulitis following colonoscopy. Study design is retrospective cohort study. Data were gathered by conducting an automated search of the electronic patient database using current procedural terminology and ICD-9 codes. Patients who underwent a colonoscopy from 2003 to 2012 were reviewed to find patients who developed acute diverticulitis within 30 days after colonoscopy. Patient demographics and colonoscopy-related outcomes were documented, which include interval between colonoscopy and diverticulitis, colonoscopy indication, simultaneous colonoscopic interventions, and follow-up after colonoscopy. From 236,377 colonoscopies performed during the study period, 68 patients (mean age 56 years) developed post-colonoscopy diverticulitis (0.029%; 2.9 per 10,000 colonoscopies). Incomplete colonoscopies were more frequent among patients with a history of previous diverticulitis [n = 10 (29%) vs. n = 3 (9%), p = 0.03]. Mean time to develop diverticulitis after colonoscopy was 12 ± 8 days, and 30 (44%) patients required hospitalization. 34 (50%) patients had a history of diverticulitis prior to colonoscopy. Among those patients, 14 underwent colonoscopy with an indication of surveillance for previous disease. When colonoscopy was performed within 6 weeks of a diverticulitis attack, surgical intervention was required more often when compared with colonoscopies performed after 6 weeks of an acute attack [n = 6 (100%) vs. n = 10 (36%), p = 0.006]. 6 (9%) out of 68 patients received emergency surgical treatment. 15 (24%) out of 62 patients who had non-surgical treatment initially underwent an elective sigmoidectomy at a later date. Recurrent diverticulitis developed in 16 (23%) patients after post-colonoscopy

  4. SEDATION IN COLONOSCOPY BY USING THREE DIFFERENT PROPOFOL INFUSION METHODS AND ANALYSIS OF PLASMA CONCENTRATION LEVELS: A PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Paulo Henrique Boaventura de; Otoch, José Pinhata; Khan, Mohamad Ali; Sakai, Paulo; Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    The propofolemia becomes directly linked to the clinical effects of this anesthetic and is the focus for studies comparing propofol clinical use, in different administration methods routinely used in endoscopy units where sedation is widely administered to patients. To evaluate the effects of three different regimens of intravenous propofol infusion in colonoscopies. A total of 50 patients that underwent colonoscopies were consecutively assigned to three groups: 1) intermittent bolus infusion; 2) continuous manually controlled infusion; 3) continuous automatic infusion. Patients were monitored with Bispectral IndexTM (BIS) and propofol serum levels were collected at three different timepoints. The development of an original dilution of propofol and an inventive capnography catheter were necessary. Regarding clinical outcomes, statistical differences in agitation (higher in group 1, p=0.001) and initial blood pressure (p=0.008) were found. As for propofol serum levels, findings were similar in consumption per minute (p=0.748) and over time (p=0.830). In terms of cost analysis, group 1 cost was R$7.00 (approximately US$2,25); group2, R$17.50 (approximately US$5,64); and group 3, R$112.70 (approximately US$36,35, pendoscopia. Avaliar os efeitos de três diferentes regimes de infusão de propofol intravenoso em colonoscopias. Ao todo 50 pacientes que foram submetidos à colonoscopia foram consecutivamente divididos em três grupos: 1) infusão em bolus intermitente; 2) perfusão contínua controlada manualmente; 3) infusão automática contínua. Os pacientes foram monitorados com Bispectral IndexTM (BIS) e os níveis séricos de propofol foram coletados em três momentos diferentes. Foi necessário a preparação de uma diluição específica de propofol e o desenvolvimento de um cateter de capnografia original manufaturado para a realização do estudo. Em relação aos desfechos clínicos, houve diferença estatística na agitação (maior no grupo 1, p=0,001) e

  5. Immediate CT pneumocolon for failed colonoscopy; comparison with routine pneumocolon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, I; Dover, S; Vallance, R

    2001-02-01

    To assess the role and reliability of 2D CT pneumocolon in the diagnosis of colonic malignancy, and compare feasibility of referral sources. A prospective study of 50 patients with suspected large bowel malignancy. Patients underwent bowel cleansing, rectal air insufflation and contrast enhanced CT with 5 mm collimation, 3 mm reconstruction and a pitch of 1.4. Subsequent correlation was with pathology (16), colonoscopy (13), barium enema (5), ERCP (1) and clinical follow-up alone (8). Diagnostic images were obtained in 43/50 patients (86% feasibility). Follow-up was obtained in 35/43 patients (one patient died of an unrelated cause, and seven patients were deemed unfit for further investigation). Seventeen colonic carcinomas were diagnosed (three false-positives: one ischaemic colitis, one diverticular stricture and one faecal mass), one diverticular stricture, one fistula, one pancreatic carcinoma and one ovarian malignancy. The remaining 14 were negative. Overall sensitivity was 100% (for lesions >1.5 cm) with a specificity of 94% for structural abnormalities, but only 82% for the correct identification of malignancy. Computed tomography (CT) pneumocolon is a reliable alternative to barium enema where colonoscopy is incomplete, with the advantage of extraluminal screening, and examination of the proximal bowel. In the frail elderly or young unfit patient, it is a valuable additional diagnostic tool. Copyright 2001 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  6. HIV-1 infection, but not syphilis or HBV infection, is a strong risk factor for anorectal condyloma in Asian population: a prospective colonoscopy screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Katsunori; Tanaka, Shohei; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Tomonori; Hamada, Yohei; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Teruya, Katsuji; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Igari, Toru; Akiyama, Junichi; Mizokami, Masashi; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Uemura, Naomi; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the association between anorectal precancerous lesions, including condyloma, and sexually transmitted infections (STI) in Asian population. This prospective study enrolled 2677 patients who underwent high-resolution colonoscopy for anorectal cancer screening. Anorectal lesions were diagnosed based on endoscopic findings and confirmed by biopsy. The association of HIV-1 infection, syphilis, and HBV infection with anorectal lesion was estimated by multivariate logistic regression. In HIV-1-infected patients (n=244), anal canal HPV-DNA was screened and genotyped. Although no malignancy was identified, anorectal condyloma was diagnosed in 32 (1.2%) male patients. 41% of anorectal condyloma cases had no specific lower GI symptoms. Multivariate analysis identified HIV-1 infection, but not syphilis or HBV infection, as an independent significant factor for condyloma (OR: 176.5, 95%CI 22.52-1383, pHIV-1 infected patients, positive type 16/18 HPV-DNA (OR: 4.766, 95%CI 1.838-12.36, p=0.001), lower CD4 cell count (per 100/μl decrement, OR: 1.056, 95%CI 1.056-1.587, p=0.013), and current smoking (OR: 3.828, 95%CI 1.486-9.857, p=0.005) were independently associated with anorectal condyloma. HIV-1 infection, but not syphilis or HBV infection, was identified as a strong risk for anorectal condyloma. Anal HPV 16/18 was highly prevalent in patients with HIV-1 infection, especially in those with condyloma. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis of a cecal tumour with virtual colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, J.; Paszkowski, J.; Drews, M.; Karmelita-Katulska, K.; Stajgis, M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors presented a 75-year-old female patient at high risk, suspected of a cecal cancer (CC) due to discomfort in the inguinal fossa, microcytic anemia (although she was postmenopausal), liquid stools and a positive faecal occult blood test. A standard examination of the large intestine was undertaken. Conventional colonoscopy was not completed and the results of barium enema were questionable. Therefore, virtual colonoscopy (VC) was performed, which helped to localize an accurate operation site. As a result, the patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Postoperative histopathological assessment confirmed an advanced cecal cancer. Traditionally, double-contrast barium enema is used to evaluate the colon in patients after incomplete colonoscopy. However, the accuracy of this test is lower in comparison to endoscopy or VC. An incomplete colonoscopy examination may occur in up to 10% of patients. Tortuous course of the colon, diverticulosis, strictures, obstructing mass and fixation of colonic loops due to adhesions after surgery are the most common causes of incomplete examinations. To sum up, VC can be an alternative method of evaluation of the large bowel in patients after an incomplete colonoscopy examination, as follows from the presented case and the available literature. (authors)

  8. Effect of Previous Gastrectomy on the Performance of Postoperative Colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Choi, Jeongmin; Kim, Tae Han; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Im, Jong Pil; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Sang Gyun; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Kim, Joo Sung; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a prior gastrectomy on the difficulty of subsequent colonoscopy, and to identify the surgical factors related to difficult colonoscopies. Materials and Methods Patients with a prior gastrectomy who had undergone a colonoscopy between 2011 and 2014 (n=482) were matched (1:6) to patients with no history of gastrectomy (n=2,892). Cecal insertion time, intubation failure, and bowel clearance score were compared between the gastrectomy and control groups, as was a newly generated comprehensive parameter for a difficult/incomplete colonoscopy (cecal intubation failure, cecal insertion time >12.9 minutes, or very poor bowel preparation scale). Surgical factors including surgical approach, extent of gastrectomy, extent of lymph node dissection, and reconstruction type, were analyzed to identify risk factors for colonoscopy performance. Results A history of gastrectomy was associated with prolonged cecal insertion time (8.7±6.4 vs. 9.7±6.5 minutes; P=0.002), an increased intubation failure rate (0.1% vs. 1.9%; P<0.001), and a poor bowel preparation rate (24.7 vs. 29.0; P=0.047). Age and total gastrectomy (vs. partial gastrectomy) were found to be independent risk factors for increased insertion time, which slowly increased throughout the postoperative duration (0.35 min/yr). Total gastrectomy was the only independent risk factor for the comprehensive parameter of difficult/incomplete colonoscopy. Conclusions History of gastrectomy is related to difficult/incomplete colonoscopy performance, especially in cases of total gastrectomy. In any case, it may be that a pre-operative colonoscopy is desirable in selected patients scheduled for gastrectomy; however, it should be performed by an expert endoscopist each time. PMID:27752394

  9. Left-colon water exchange preserves the benefits of whole colon water exchange at reduced cecal intubation time conferring significant advantage in diagnostic colonoscopy - a prospective, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangping; Luo, Hui; Xiang, Yi; Leung, Felix W; Wang, Limei; Zhang, Linhui; Liu, Zhiguo; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Pan, Yanglin; Guo, Xuegang

    2015-07-01

    Whole-colon water exchange (WWE) reduces insertion pain, increases cecal intubation success and adenoma detection rate, but requires longer insertion time, compared to air insufflation (AI) colonoscopy. We hypothesized that water exchange limited to the left colon (LWE) can speed up insertion with equivalent results. This prospective, randomized controlled study (NCT01735266) allocated patients (18-80 years) to WWE, LWE or AI group (1:1:1). The primary outcome was cecal intubation time. Three hundred subjects were randomized to the WWE (n = 100), LWE (n = 100) or AI group (n = 100). Ninety-four to ninety-five per cent of patients underwent diagnostic colonoscopy. Baseline characteristics were balanced. The median insertion time was shorter in LWE group (4.8 min (95%CI: 3.2-6.2)) than those in WWE (7.5 min (95%CI: 6.0-10.3)) and AI (6.4 min (95%CI: 4.2-9.8)) (both p rates in unsedated patients of the two water exchange methods (WWE 99%, LWE 99%) were significantly higher than that (89.8%) in AI group (p = 0.01). The final success rates were comparable among the three groups after sedation was given. Maximum pain scores and number of patients needing abdominal compression between WWE and LWE groups were comparable, both lower than those in AI group (p higher in WWE group. By preserving the benefits of WWE and reducing insertion time, LWE is appropriate for diagnostic colonoscopy, especially in settings with tight scheduling of patients. The higher PDR in the right colon in WWE group deserves to be further investigated.

  10. A Randomized Prospective Study of Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy with Low-Dose Sodium Phosphate Tablets versus Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erina Kumagai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal bowel preparation is essential for the safety and outcome of colonoscopy. A solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG is often used as a bowel cleansing agent, but some patients are intolerant of PEG, and this may lead to discontinuation of colonoscopy. Sodium phosphates (NaP tablets are designed to improve patient acceptance and compliance. The objective of this study was to compare bowel preparation efficiency and patient acceptance of a 30 NaP tablet preparation (L-NaP and a 2 L PEG preparation. Patients were randomized into either the L-NaP or PEG group. The primary endpoint was the efficiency of colon cleansing as assessed by a validated four-point scale according to the Aronchick scale by endoscopists and was verified by blinded investigators. The secondary endpoints were patients’ tolerability and acceptance. Colon-cleansing efficiency was not significantly different between the two preparations. However, patients’ overall judgment was significantly in favor of L-NaP, reflecting better acceptance of L-NaP than PEG. Additionally, more patients favored L-NaP over PEG in a hypothetical future occasion requiring colonoscopy.

  11. Competence measurement during colonoscopy training: the use of self-assessment of performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Arjun D; Haringsma, Jelle; Schoon, Erik J; de Man, Rob A; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated a new assessment technique for colonoscopy training. We prospectively evaluated colonoscopy skills during training using the Rotterdam Assessment Form for colonoscopy. The questionnaire covers cecal intubation, procedural time, and subjective grading of performance. Individual learning curves are compared with a group reference. Nineteen trainees self-assessed 2,887 colonoscopies. The cecal intubation rate improved from 65% at baseline to 78% and 85% after 100 and 200 colonoscopies, respectively. In our training program the 90% threshold was reached after 280 colonoscopies on average. Cecal intubation time improved from 13:10 minutes at baseline to 9:30 and 8:30 after 100 and 200 colonoscopies, respectively. This novel self-assessment form allows individual learning curves to be compared with a group reference, provides data on the development of dexterity skills and individual training targets, and stimulates trainees to identify steps for self-improvement.

  12. A prospective randomized trial on the use of Coca-Cola Zero(®) vs water for polyethylene glycol bowel preparation before colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow-En, I; Seow-Choen, F

    2016-07-01

    The study aimed to determine whether Coca-Cola (Coke) Zero is a safe and effective solvent for polyethylene glycol (PEG). Between December 2013 and April 2014, 209 healthy adults (115 men, 95 women) scheduled for elective colonoscopy were randomized to use either Coke Zero (n = 100) or drinking water (n = 109) with PEG as bowel preparation. Each patient received two sachets of PEG to dissolve in 2 l of solvent, to be completed 6 h before colonoscopy. Serum electrolytes were measured before and after preparation. Bowel cleanliness and colonoscopy findings were recorded. Palatability of solution, adverse effects, time taken to complete and willingness to repeat the preparation were documented via questionnaire. Mean palatability scores in the Coke Zero group were significantly better compared with the control group (2.31 ± 0.61 vs 2.51 ± 0.63, P = 0.019), with a higher proportion willing to use the same preparation again (55% vs 43%). The mean time taken to complete the PEG + Coke Zero solution was significantly faster (74 ± 29 min vs 86 ± 31 min, P = 0.0035). The quality of bowel cleansing was also significantly better in the Coke Zero group (P = 0.0297). There was no difference in the frequency of adverse events (P = 0.759) or the polyp detection rate (32% vs 31.2%). Consumption of either preparation did not significantly affect electrolyte levels or hydration status. Coke Zero is a useful alternative solvent for PEG. It is well tolerated, more palatable, leads to quicker consumption of the bowel preparation and results in better quality cleansing. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Capsule colonoscopy increases uptake of colorectal cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groth Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening colonoscopy effectiveness is hampered by limited adherence by the general population. The present prospective study was performed to evaluate whether adding capsule colonoscopy to the endoscopic screening options increases uptake. Methods Invitation letters were sent to 2150 persons above the age of 55 insured with a German medical insurance company in the area of Rinteln, Lower Saxony with a baseline spontaneous annual screening colonoscopy uptake of 1 %. Both capsule or conventional colonoscopy were offered. Interested persons were given information about the two screening options by four local gastroenterologists and examinations were then performed according to screenees’ final choice. Results 154 persons sought further information, and 34 and 90 underwent conventional and capsule colonoscopy, respectively. Colonoscopy uptake was thus increased by the invitation process by 60 % (1.6 % vs. 1 %; p = 0.075, while the option of capsule endoscopy led to a fourfold increase of screening uptake (4.2 % vs. 1 %, p  Conclusions The present study suggests that offering the option of capsule colonoscopy increases uptake of endoscopic colorectal cancer screening. However, capsule endoscopy sensitivity for adenoma detection needs to be improved.

  14. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Post-Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer: A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine; Pedersen, Lars; Vyberg, Mogens; Koeppe, Erika; Crockett, Seth D; Hamilton, Stanley R; Sørensen, Henrik T; Baron, John A

    2016-11-01

    Colonoscopy provides incomplete protection from colorectal cancer (CRC), but determinants of post-colonoscopy CRC are not well understood. We compared clinical features and molecular characteristics of CRCs diagnosed at different time intervals after a previous colonoscopy. We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study of incident CRC cases in Denmark (2007-2011), categorized as post-colonoscopy or detected during diagnostic colonoscopy (in patients with no prior colonoscopy). We compared prevalence of proximal location and DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) in CRC tumors, relative to time since previous colonoscopy, using logistic regression and cubic splines to assess temporal variation. Of 10,365 incident CRCs, 725 occurred after colonoscopy examinations (7.0%). These were more often located in the proximal colon (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90-2.89) and were more likely to have dMMR (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.00-1.59), but were less likely to be metastatic at presentation (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.48-0.89) compared with CRCs diagnosed in patients with no prior colonoscopy. The highest proportions of proximal and/or dMMR tumors were observed in CRCs diagnosed 3-6 years after colonoscopy, but these features were still more frequent among cancers diagnosed up to 10 years after colonoscopy. The relative excess of dMMR tumors was most pronounced in distal cancers. In an analysis of 85 cases detected after colonoscopy, we found BRAF mutations in 23% of tumors and that 7% of cases had features of Lynch syndrome. Colonoscopy exams were incomplete in a higher proportion of cases diagnosed within <1 year (in 38%) than in those diagnosed within 1-10 years after colonoscopy (16%). In a study of incident CRC cases in Denmark, we observed that tumors found in patients who have undergone colonoscopy are more often proximal and have dMMR compared to CRCs detected in patients without previous colonoscopies. The excess of right-sided tumors and

  15. Splenic injury after colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C.R.; Adamsen, S.; Gocht-Jensen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Splenic injury is a rare and serious complication of colonoscopy. The most likely mechanism is tension on the splenocolic ligament and adhesions. Eight cases were identified among claims for compensation submitted to the Danish Patient Insurance Association during the period 1992-2006, seven...

  16. Gossypiboma treated by colonoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, C.; Methratta, S.; Ybasco, A.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Univ. Hospital, Newark (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Gossypibomas are an unusual postoperative complication and are reluctantly reported in the literature. In the past, the patient would require a laparotomy. More recently, they have been treated laparoscopically and percutaneously by interventional radiology. This is the first case report of a gossypiboma treated with colonoscopy. This may represent an addition treatment option for this complication. (orig.)

  17. Indications for colonoscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the procedure and the diagnostic yield, and to evaluate the suitability of colonoscopy for each indication. The seven major indications were rectal bleeding, iron deficiency anaemia, cancer follow-up, polyp follow-up, abdominal pain, abnormal bowel habit and 'other'. Four hundred and forty-eight procedures were included ...

  18. Is determination between complete and incomplete traumatic spinal cord injury clinically relevant? Validation of the ASIA sacral sparing criteria in a prospective cohort of 432 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Middendorp, J J; Hosman, A J F; Pouw, M H; Van de Meent, H

    2009-11-01

    Prospective multicenter longitudinal cohort study. To validate the prognostic value of the acute phase sacral sparing measurements with regard to chronic phase-independent ambulation in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). European Multicenter Study of Human Spinal Cord Injury (EM-SCI). In 432 patients, acute phase (0-15 days) American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA)/International Spinal Cord Society neurological standard scale (AIS) grades, ASIA sacral sparing measurements, which are S4-5 light touch (LT), S4-5 pin prick (PP), anal sensation and voluntary anal contraction; and chronic phase (6 or 12 months) indoor mobility Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) measurements were analyzed. Calculations of positive and negative predictive values (PPV/NPV) as well as univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed in all four sacral sparing criteria. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) ratios of all regression equations was calculated. To achieve independent ambulation 1-year post injury, a normal S4-5 PP score showed the best PPV (96.5%, Pscore (91.7%, Pscores (AUC: 0.906, Pindependent ambulation than with the use of currently used distinction between complete and incomplete SCI (AUC: 0.823, Pscore measurements do not contribute significantly to the prognosis of independent ambulation. The combination of the acute phase voluntary anal contraction and the S4-5 LT and PP scores, predicts significantly better chronic phase-independent ambulation outcomes than the currently used distinction between complete and incomplete SCI. This study was granted by 'Acute Zorgregio Oost' and the 'Internationale Stiftung für Forschung in Paraplegie (IFP)'.

  19. Comparable Efficacy of a 1-L PEG and Ascorbic Acid Solution Administered with Bisacodyl versus a 2-L PEG and Ascorbic Acid Solution for Colonoscopy Preparation: A Prospective, Randomized and Investigator-Blinded Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Su Hwan; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background Two liters of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution administered with ascorbic acid (Asc) can provide efficacy similar to that of a 4-L PEG solution for colonoscopy preparation. In addition, oral bisacodyl (Bis) has been shown to reduce the volume of PEG needed for a bowel preparation with comparable efficacy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a 2-L PEG solution mixed with Asc versus the combination of Bis, Asc and a 1-L PEG solution. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, multi-centre, single-blind, non-inferiority trial. Participants who were scheduled for colonoscopy were included and randomized to receive either 2-L PEG and Asc (2L PEG/Asc group) or 1-L PEG, Asc and 20 mg Bis (1L PEG/Asc + Bis group). The quality of bowel preparation was assessed using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale. Data regarding tolerance, compliance and adverse events were also gathered. Results A total of 187 participants were analyzed; 96 were allocated to the 2L PEG/Asc group and 91 to the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group. Bowel preparation was adequate in 87.5% (84/96) of patients in the 2L PEG/Asc group and 94.5% of the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group (86/91, p = 0.10). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to compliance, tolerability or safety. The patients allocated to the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group expressed more willingness to repeat the procedure than patients in the 2L PEG/Asc group (p = 0.01). Conclusions Bowel preparation with Bis and a 1-L PEG/Asc solution is as effective, well-tolerated, and safe as a 2-L PEG/Asc solution. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 01745835; Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS) KCT0000708 PMID:27588943

  20. Comparable Efficacy of a 1-L PEG and Ascorbic Acid Solution Administered with Bisacodyl versus a 2-L PEG and Ascorbic Acid Solution for Colonoscopy Preparation: A Prospective, Randomized and Investigator-Blinded Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Kwon

    Full Text Available Two liters of polyethylene glycol (PEG solution administered with ascorbic acid (Asc can provide efficacy similar to that of a 4-L PEG solution for colonoscopy preparation. In addition, oral bisacodyl (Bis has been shown to reduce the volume of PEG needed for a bowel preparation with comparable efficacy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a 2-L PEG solution mixed with Asc versus the combination of Bis, Asc and a 1-L PEG solution.This was a prospective, randomized, multi-centre, single-blind, non-inferiority trial. Participants who were scheduled for colonoscopy were included and randomized to receive either 2-L PEG and Asc (2L PEG/Asc group or 1-L PEG, Asc and 20 mg Bis (1L PEG/Asc + Bis group. The quality of bowel preparation was assessed using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale. Data regarding tolerance, compliance and adverse events were also gathered.A total of 187 participants were analyzed; 96 were allocated to the 2L PEG/Asc group and 91 to the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group. Bowel preparation was adequate in 87.5% (84/96 of patients in the 2L PEG/Asc group and 94.5% of the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group (86/91, p = 0.10. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to compliance, tolerability or safety. The patients allocated to the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group expressed more willingness to repeat the procedure than patients in the 2L PEG/Asc group (p = 0.01.Bowel preparation with Bis and a 1-L PEG/Asc solution is as effective, well-tolerated, and safe as a 2-L PEG/Asc solution.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 01745835; Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS KCT0000708.

  1. The Polyp Manager: a new tool for optimal polyp documentation during colonoscopy. A pilot study.

    OpenAIRE

    van de Meeberg, Maartje M.; Ouwendijk, Rob J. Th.; ter Borg, Pieter C. J.; van den Hazel, Sven J.; van de Meeberg, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Conventional reporting of polyps is often incomplete. We tested the Polyp Manager (PM), a new software application permitting the endoscopist to document polyps in real time during colonoscopy. We studied completeness of polyp descriptions, user-friendliness and the potential time benefit. Patients and methods: In two Dutch hospitals colonoscopies were performed with PM (as a touchscreen endoscopist-operated device or nurse-operated desktop application). Completenes...

  2. Constipation, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation, but not diarrhea is associated with diabetes and its related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihana-Sugiyama, Noriko; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Izawa, Eiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Kakei, Masafumi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-03-21

    To determine the bowel symptoms associated with diabetes and diabetes-related factors after excluding gastrointestinal (GI) organic diseases. Participants were 4738 (603 diabetic and 4135 non-diabetic) patients who underwent colonoscopy and completed a questionnaire. On the day of pre-colonoscopy, 9 symptoms (borborygmus, abdominal distension, increased flatus, constipation, diarrhea, loose stools, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation) were prospectively evaluated on a 7-point Likert scale. The test-retest reliability of the bowel symptom scores from the baseline and second questionnaires was analyzed using kappa statistics. Associations between bowel symptom scores and diabetes or diabetes-related factors were analyzed by a rank-ordered logistic model adjusted for related confounders, and odds ratios (ORs) were estimated. In multivariate analysis, constipation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.57, CI: 1.33-1.85, P associated with diabetes, and fecal urgency (AOR = 1.16, CI: 0.99-1.37, P = 0.07) and incomplete evacuation (AOR = 1.16, CI: 1.00-1.36, P = 0.06) were marginally associated with diabetes. These symptoms remained associated even after excluding organic GI diseases on colonoscopy. Test-retest reliability of symptom score with a mean duration of 3.2 mo was good (mean kappa, 0.69). Associations of symptoms with diabetes-related factors were found; constipation with HbA1c ≥ 8.0% (AOR = 2.11, CI: 1.19-3.73), body mass index (BMI) associated with constipation, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation, and poor glycemic control, duration, leanness, and nephropathy affect the risk of these symptoms.

  3. A novel summary report of colonoscopy: timeline visualization providing meaningful colonoscopy video information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minwoo; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kong, Hyoun Joong; Hong, Kyoung Sup; Kim, Sungwan

    2018-03-08

    The colonoscopy adenoma detection rate depends largely on physician experience and skill, and overlooked colorectal adenomas could develop into cancer. This study assessed a system that detects polyps and summarizes meaningful information from colonoscopy videos. One hundred thirteen consecutive patients had colonoscopy videos prospectively recorded at the Seoul National University Hospital. Informative video frames were extracted using a MATLAB support vector machine (SVM) model and classified as bleeding, polypectomy, tool, residue, thin wrinkle, folded wrinkle, or common. Thin wrinkle, folded wrinkle, and common frames were reanalyzed using SVM for polyp detection. The SVM model was applied hierarchically for effective classification and optimization of the SVM. The mean classification accuracy according to type was over 93%; sensitivity was over 87%. The mean sensitivity for polyp detection was 82.1%, and the positive predicted value (PPV) was 39.3%. Polyps detected using the system were larger (6.3 ± 6.4 vs. 4.9 ± 2.5 mm; P = 0.003) with a more pedunculated morphology (Yamada type III, 10.2 vs. 0%; P Informative frames and suspected polyps were presented on a timeline. This summary was evaluated using the system usability scale questionnaire; 89.3% of participants expressed positive opinions. We developed and verified a system to extract meaningful information from colonoscopy videos. Although further improvement and validation of the system is needed, the proposed system is useful for physicians and patients.

  4. The Effectiveness of Short Message Service to Assure the Preparation-to-Colonoscopy Interval before Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Oh; Lee, Nae-Young; Kim, Hyoungjun; Seo, Eun Hee; Heo, Nae-Yun; Park, Seung Ha; Moon, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims. The preparation-to-colonoscopy (PC) interval is one of several important factors for the bowel preparation. Short message service (SMS) reminder from a cellular phone has been suggested to improve compliance in various medical situations. We evaluated the effectiveness of SMS reminders to assure the PC interval for colonoscopy. Methodology. This prospective randomized study was investigator blinded. In the No-SMS group, patients took the first 2 L polyethylene glycol (PEG) between 6 and 8 PM on the day before colonoscopy and the second 2 L PEG approximately 6 hours before the colonoscopy without SMS. In the SMS group, patients took first 2 L PEG in the same manner as the No-SMS group and the second 2 L PEG after receiving an SMS 6 hours before the colonoscopy. Results. The SMS group had a lower score than the No-SMS group, according to the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (P 2.109; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–3.99, P = 0.022) and intervention using SMS ((OR) 2.329; 95% (CI), 1.34–4.02, P = 0.002) were the independent significant factors for satisfactory bowel preparation. Conclusions. An SMS reminder to assure PC interval improved the bowel preparation quality for colonoscopy with bowel preparation. PMID:25792978

  5. High Definition Colonoscopy Combined with i-SCAN Imaging Technology Is Superior in the Detection of Adenomas and Advanced Lesions Compared to High Definition Colonoscopy Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Erik A; Pfau, Patrick R; Mitra, Arnab; Reichelderfer, Mark; Gopal, Deepak V; Hall, Benjamin S; Benson, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Background. Improved detection of adenomatous polyps using i-SCAN has mixed results in small studies. Utility of i-SCAN as a primary surveillance modality for colorectal cancer screening during colonoscopy is uncertain. Aim. Comparing high definition white light endoscopy (HDWLE) to i-SCAN in their ability to detect adenomas during colonoscopy. Methods. Prospective cohort study of 1936 average risk patients who had a screening colonoscopy at an ambulatory procedure center. Patients underwent colonoscopy with high definition white light endoscopy withdrawal versus i-SCAN withdrawal during endoscopic screening exam. Primary outcome measurement was adenoma detection rate for i-SCAN versus high definition white light endoscopy. Secondary measurements included polyp size, pathology, and morphology. Results. 1007 patients underwent colonoscopy with i-SCAN and 929 with HDWLE. 618 adenomas were detected in the i-SCAN group compared to 402 in the HDWLE group (p definition white light endoscopy.

  6. Comparison of carbon dioxide and air insufflation during consecutive EGD and colonoscopy in moderate-sedation patients: a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Chung, Jun-Won; Park, Dong Kyun; Kwon, Kwang An; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jung Ho

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopy is performed with air insufflation and is usually associated with abdominal pain. It is well recognized that carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is absorbed more quickly into the body than air; however, to date, few studies have investigated the use of CO 2 insufflation during consecutive EGD and colonoscopy (CEC). Thus, this study evaluated the efficacy of CO 2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in CEC. From March 2014 to April 2016, a total of 215 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to receive CO 2 insufflation (CO 2 group, n = 108) or air insufflation (air group, n = 107). Abdominal pain after CEC was recorded on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The amount of sedatives administered, use of analgesics, polyp detection rate (PDR), adenoma detection rate (ADR), abdominal circumference, and adverse events were also analyzed. Baseline patient characteristics were not significantly different between the groups. Abdominal pain on the VAS in the CO 2 group and air group 1 hour after CEC was, respectively, 13.8 and 20.1 (P = .010), 3 hours after CEC was 8.3 and 12.5 (P = .056), 6 hours after CEC was 3.5 and 5.3 (P = .246), and 1 day after CEC was 1.8 and 3.4 (P = .192). The dose of sedative administered, analgesic usage, PDR, ADR, and adverse events were not statistically different between the groups. However, the increase in abdominal circumference was significantly higher in the air group than in the CO 2 group. CO 2 insufflation was superior to air insufflation with regard to the pain score on the VAS in the hour after CEC. (Clinical trial registration number: KCT0001491.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CT colonography and colonoscopy: Assessment of patient preference in a 5-week follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, Rogier E.; Birnie, Erwin; Florie, Jasper; Schutter, Michiel P.; Bartelsman, Joep F.; Snel, Pleun; Laméris, Johan S.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Stoker, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate short- and midterm patient preference of computed tomographic (CT) colonography relative to colonoscopy in patients at increased risk for colorectal cancer and to elucidate determinants of preference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients at increased risk

  8. Correlating Quantitative Fecal Immunochemical Test Results with Neoplastic Findings on Colonoscopy in a Population-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Program: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Shahidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC recommends a fecal immunochemical test- (FIT- positive predictive value (PPV for all adenomas of ≥50%. We sought to assess FIT performance among average-risk participants of the British Columbia Colon Screening Program (BCCSP. Methods. From Nov-2013 to Dec-2014 consecutive participants of the BCCSP were assessed. Data was obtained from a prospectively collected database. A single quantitative FIT (NS-Plus, Alfresa Pharma Corporation, Japan with a cut-off of ≥10 μg/g (≥50 ng/mL was used. Results. 20,322 FIT-positive participants underwent CSPY. At a FIT cut-off of ≥10 μg/g (≥50 ng/mL the PPV for all adenomas was 52.0%. Increasing the FIT cut-off to ≥20 μg/g (≥100 ng/mL would increase the PPV for colorectal cancer (CRC by 1.5% and for high-risk adenomas (HRAs by 6.5% at a cost of missing 13.6% of CRCs and 32.4% of HRAs. Conclusions. As the NS-Plus FIT cut-off rises, the PPV for CRC and HRAs increases but at the cost of missed lesions. A cut-off of ≥10 μg/g (≥50 ng/mL produces a PPV for all adenomas exceeding national recommendations. Health authorities need to take into consideration endoscopic resources when selecting a FIT positivity threshold.

  9. Multi-detector CT-colonography in inflammatory bowel disease: Prospective analysis of CT-findings to high-resolution video colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Kjel; Vogt, Christoph; Blondin, Dirk; Beck, Andreas; Heinen, Wolfram; Aurich, Volker; Haeussinger, Dieter; Moedder, Ulrich; Cohnen, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Prospective analysis of multi-detector CT-colonography (MDCTC) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to high-resolution video-endoscopy (HRVC). Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients (mean age 49.6 years) with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis underwent MDCTC (Somatom Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen; 1 mm collimation, Pitch 8, 100 mAs, 120 kVp). HRVC was performed within 2 h after MDCTC. MDCTC was analyzed by two blinded readers. MDCTC-findings including bowel wall alterations and extraintestinal changes were compared to results of HRVC. Results: Over-all-sensitivity was 100% for endoluminal lesions with correct diagnosis of two cancers. Acute and chronic IBD were correctly identified by MDCTC in 63.6%, and 100%, respectively, with a specificity of 75%, and 100%. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of MDCTC for diagnosis of acute and chronic disease were best for chronic disease. Sensitivity was worst for acute ulcerative colitis and specificity was worst for acute Crohn's disease. Haustral loss was seen only in ulcerative colitis. Pseudopolyps and fistulae were findings exclusive to Crohn's disease. Particularly extraintestinal findings as increased vascularization and local lymphadenopathy correlated well with endoscopic definition of acute disease. Because of the possibly more vulnerable colonic wall in acute inflammatory bowel disease, the air inflation for MDCTC should be performed most carefully to avoid any risk of colonic perforation. Conclusion: MDCTC may help to distinguish between patients with acute and chronic IBD. Especially extraintestinal complications, tumorous as well as pseudo-tumorous lesions can be detected with high sensitivity and specificity

  10. Surprising finding on colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griglione, Nicole; Naik, Jahnavi; Christie, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    A 48-year-old man went to his primary care physician for his annual physical. He told his physician that for the past few years, he had intermittent, painless rectal bleeding consisting of small amounts of blood on the toilet paper after defecation. He also mentioned that he often spontaneously awoke, very early in the morning. His past medical history was unremarkable. The patient was born in Cuba but had lived in the United States for more than 30 years. He was divorced, lived alone, and had no children. He had traveled to Latin America-including Mexico, Brazil, and Cuba-off and on over the past 10 years. His last trip was approximately 2 years ago. His physical exam was unremarkable. Rectal examination revealed no masses or external hemorrhoids; stool was brown and Hemoccult negative. Labs were remarkable for eosinophilia ranging from 10% to 24% over the past several years (the white blood cell count ranged from 5200 to 5900/mcL). A subsequent colonoscopy revealed many white, thin, motile organisms dispersed throughout the colon. The organisms were most densely populated in the cecum. Of note, the patient also had nonbleeding internal hemorrhoids. An aspiration of the organisms was obtained and sent to the microbiology lab for further evaluation. What is your diagnosis? How would you manage this condition?

  11. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. Post-Procedure. This new educational video for GI patients, produced by the ...

  12. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. ... Center GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Video and Audio Podcasts Digestive ...

  13. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Clinical Research and Education, underscores the lifesaving importance of colorectal screening by colonoscopy. The video instills confidence in patients about the effectiveness, safety and importance of colonoscopy. Featuring the experience of a female ...

  14. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reflect the current state-of-the-art scientific work and are based on the principles of evidence- ... Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. ...

  15. Virtual colonoscopy in paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Lopez, Elba Martin; Capunay, Carlos; Vallejos, Javier; Carrascosa, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of perspective-filet view for polypoid lesions in paediatric patients in comparison with conventional virtual colonoscopy (VC) analysis and optical colonoscopy. Methods: Sixty-one patients (mean age 5 years old) with a previous episode of rectal bleeding were studied using a 16 slices CT scanner. All patients underwent a colonic preparation. Two acquisitions were done in supine and prone positions with slices of 2 mm thickness; increment 1 mm, 30-50 mA; 90-120 kV. In a workstation an experienced radiologist reviewed images twice. The first read was done using the conventional virtual colonoscopy technique with the evaluation of two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) and endoscopical images. Later, in a second session, perspective-filet view was used. It shows a 360 deg. unrolled visualization of the inner colon. The presence, size and location of the lesions were determined. A record of the reading time was made. Results: At per patient evaluation the conventional virtual colonoscopy analysis obtained a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 98%. The perspective-filet view obtained a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 99%. In the evaluation on a per lesion basis the conventional analysis had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%. Perspective-filet view, had a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 90%. The average total reading time using conventional colonoscopy technique was 18 ± 3 min, versus 4 ± 1 min using the perspective-filet view. Conclusion: Virtual colon dissection with perspective-filet view is more time-efficient than conventional virtual colonoscopy evaluation with correct correlation in results.

  16. Colonoscopy quality: metrics and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Audrey H; Jacobson, Brian C

    2013-09-01

    Colonoscopy is an excellent area for quality improvement because it is high volume, has significant associated risk and expense, and there is evidence that variability in its performance affects outcomes. The best end point for validation of quality metrics in colonoscopy is colorectal cancer incidence and mortality, but a more readily accessible metric is the adenoma detection rate. Fourteen quality metrics were proposed in 2006, and these are described in this article. Implementation of quality improvement initiatives involves rapid assessments and changes on an iterative basis, and can be done at the individual, group, or facility level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determinants of polyp Size in patients undergoing screening colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisonneuve Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-existing polyps, especially large polyps, are known to be the major source for colorectal cancer, but there is limited available information about factors that are associated with polyp size and polyp growth. We aim to determine factors associated with polyp size in different age groups. Methods Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States between 2002 and 2007 using a computer-generated endoscopic report form. Data were transmitted to and stored in a central data repository, where all asymptomatic white (n = 78352 and black (n = 4289 patients who had a polyp finding on screening colonoscopy were identified. Univariate and multivariate analysis of age, gender, performance site, race, polyp location, number of polyps, and family history as risk factors associated with the size of the largest polyp detected at colonoscopy. Results In both genders, size of the largest polyp increased progressively with age in all age groups (P P Conclusions In both genders there is a significant increase in polyp size detected during screening colonoscopy with increasing age. Important additional risk factors associated with increasing polyp size are gender, race, polyp location, and number of polyps, with polyp multiplicity being the strongest risk factor. Previous family history of bowel cancer was not a risk factor.

  18. Patient attitudes toward undergoing colonoscopy without sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, D S; Saifuddin, T; Johnson, J C; King, P D; Marshall, J B

    1999-07-01

    The vast majority of patients undergoing colonoscopy in the United States are given sedation. There are a number of potential advantages to performing colonoscopy without sedation. We sought to determine the attitude of patients toward unsedated colonoscopy in our three practice settings (a university medical center, a cancer center, and a Veterans Affairs medical center), and to see if there were factors that predicted willingness to try it. Four-hundred thirty-four adult patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy completed questionnaires before and after their procedures providing demographic information and assessing willingness to undergo colonoscopy without sedation. Patients were routinely given meperidine and midazolam for their procedures unless they specifically requested that they be unsedated (10 patients). Only 16.9% of our patients were willing to undergo colonoscopy on their preprocedure questionnaire. Willingness increased modestly on the postprocedure questionnaire to 22.6% (p = 0.01). Logistic regression analysis disclosed that male gender, having a college degree, low anxiety based on preprocedure anxiety scales, and lower doses of sedative drugs used during colonoscopy were the best predictors of willingness to undergo colonoscopy without sedation in the future. Only about a fifth of patients undergoing colonoscopy in our three practice settings expressed a willingness to try colonoscopy unsedated. Male gender, higher levels of education, and low anxiety scores on simple scales of preprocedure anxiety may help to predict willingness. Efforts to substantially increase the frequency of patients willing to undergo colonoscopy without sedation will likely require increased patient counseling and education.

  19. Patient experience of CT colonography and colonoscopy after fecal occult blood test in a national screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumb, Andrew A.; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve; Ghanouni, Alex; Von Wagner, Christian; Rees, Colin J.; Hewitson, Paul; Nickerson, Claire; Wright, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    To investigate patient experience of CT colonography (CTC) and colonoscopy in a national screening programme. Retrospective analysis of patient experience postal questionnaires. We included screenees from a fecal occult blood test (FOBt) based screening programme, where CTC was performed when colonoscopy was incomplete or deemed unsuitable. We analyzed questionnaire responses concerning communication of test risks, test-related discomfort and post-test pain, as well as complications. CTC and colonoscopy responses were compared using multilevel logistic regression. Of 67,114 subjects identified, 52,805 (79 %) responded. Understanding of test risks was lower for CTC (1712/1970 = 86.9 %) than colonoscopy (48783/50975 = 95.7 %, p < 0.0001). Overall, a slightly greater proportion of screenees found CTC unexpectedly uncomfortable (506/1970 = 25.7 %) than colonoscopy (10,705/50,975 = 21.0 %, p < 0.0001). CTC was tolerated well as a completion procedure for failed colonoscopy (unexpected discomfort; CTC = 26.3 %: colonoscopy = 57.0 %, p < 0.001). Post-procedural pain was equally common (CTC: 288/1970,14.6 %, colonoscopy: 7544/50,975,14.8 %; p = 0.55). Adverse event rates were similar in both groups (CTC: 20/2947 = 1.2 %; colonoscopy: 683/64,312 = 1.1 %), but generally less serious with CTC. Even though CTC was reserved for individuals either unsuitable for or unable to complete colonoscopy, we found only small differences in test-related discomfort. CTC was well tolerated as a completion procedure and was extremely safe. CTC can be delivered across a national screening programme with high patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  20. Patient experience of CT colonography and colonoscopy after fecal occult blood test in a national screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumb, Andrew A.; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, Division of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ghanouni, Alex; Von Wagner, Christian [University College London, Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, London (United Kingdom); Rees, Colin J. [Durham University School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham (United Kingdom); Hewitson, Paul [University of Oxford, Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, Oxford (United Kingdom); Nickerson, Claire; Wright, Suzanne [Fulwood House, NHS Cancer Screening Programmes, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate patient experience of CT colonography (CTC) and colonoscopy in a national screening programme. Retrospective analysis of patient experience postal questionnaires. We included screenees from a fecal occult blood test (FOBt) based screening programme, where CTC was performed when colonoscopy was incomplete or deemed unsuitable. We analyzed questionnaire responses concerning communication of test risks, test-related discomfort and post-test pain, as well as complications. CTC and colonoscopy responses were compared using multilevel logistic regression. Of 67,114 subjects identified, 52,805 (79 %) responded. Understanding of test risks was lower for CTC (1712/1970 = 86.9 %) than colonoscopy (48783/50975 = 95.7 %, p < 0.0001). Overall, a slightly greater proportion of screenees found CTC unexpectedly uncomfortable (506/1970 = 25.7 %) than colonoscopy (10,705/50,975 = 21.0 %, p < 0.0001). CTC was tolerated well as a completion procedure for failed colonoscopy (unexpected discomfort; CTC = 26.3 %: colonoscopy = 57.0 %, p < 0.001). Post-procedural pain was equally common (CTC: 288/1970,14.6 %, colonoscopy: 7544/50,975,14.8 %; p = 0.55). Adverse event rates were similar in both groups (CTC: 20/2947 = 1.2 %; colonoscopy: 683/64,312 = 1.1 %), but generally less serious with CTC. Even though CTC was reserved for individuals either unsuitable for or unable to complete colonoscopy, we found only small differences in test-related discomfort. CTC was well tolerated as a completion procedure and was extremely safe. CTC can be delivered across a national screening programme with high patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  1. Massaal rectaal bloedverlies na colonoscopie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M T Milou; Kats-Ugurlu, Gursah; van Suylen, Robert Jan; De Schryver, Anneke M P

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A colonoscopy performed one and a half months prior had revealed diverticulosis in the sigmoid colon; a small polyp located 10 cm from the anal margin had been removed at that time. The presenting patient was haemodynamically

  2. Is determination between complete and incomplete traumatic spinal cord injury clinically relevant? Validation of the ASIA sacral sparing criteria in a prospective cohort of 432 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Hosman, A.J.F.; Pouw, M.H.; Meent, H. van de

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multicenter longitudinal cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To validate the prognostic value of the acute phase sacral sparing measurements with regard to chronic phase-independent ambulation in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: European Multicenter Study of

  3. Role of colonoscopy in differentiating intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rajesh Prabhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interface between tuberculosis (TB and Crohn's disease (CD is relevant as TB complicates both the diagnosis and management of CD. Aim: This study aimed to identify the distinctive characteristics of ileocaecal and colonic TB (C-TB and colonic CD (C-CD at colonoscopy and to correlate the colonoscopy findings with histology. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included consecutive patients presenting with classical symptoms of TB or CD. The colonoscopic findings were compared with histology, which was taken as gold standard. Appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results: Fifty-eight individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Nine and 16 patients with C-TB and C-CD, respectively, had histological confirmation of respective diagnosis. In 33 specimens, the histological diagnosis was inconclusive. The sensitivity of colonoscopy for diagnosing C-TB was high at 88.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51.8–99.7. It was 50% (95% CI: 24.7–75.4 for CD. The reverse was true for CD whose specificity was high at 71.4% (95% CI: 55.3–84.3 and low for TB at 46.9% (95% CI: 32.5–61.7. All the patients diagnosed as confirmed CD or TB responded well to respective treatment. Six of the thirty patients with failed response to anti-TB treatment required surgery or change in treatment after 2 months. Conclusion: Colonoscopic findings of isolated ileal involvement, aphthous ulcer, cobble stoning, long-segment strictures, skip lesions and perianal involvement favored a diagnosis of CD. Correlation of colonoscopy with histology is poor for both CD and TB. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopy were better and superior for the diagnosis of CD, than in the diagnosis of TB.

  4. Analysis of incomplete excisions of basal-cell carcinomas after breadloaf microscopy compared with 3D-microscopy: a prospective randomized and blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Alexandra; Adam, Patrick; Schnabl, Saskia; Häfner, Hans-Martin; Breuninger, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Basal-cell carcinomas may show irregular, asymmetric subclinical growth. This study analyzed the efficacy of 'breadloaf' microscopy (serial sectioning) and three-dimensional (3D) microscopy in detecting positive tumor margins. Two hundred eighty-three (283) tumors (51.2%) were put into the breadloaf microscopy group; 270 tumors (48.8%) into the 3D microscopy group. The position of any detected tumor outgrowths was identified in clock face fashion. The time required for cutting and embedding the specimens and the examination of the microscopic slides was measured. Patient/tumor characteristics and surgical margins did not differ significantly. Tumor outgrowths at the excision margin were found in 62 of 283 cases (21.9%) in the breadloaf microscopy group and in 115 of 270 cases (42.6%) in the 3D microscopy group, constituting a highly significant difference (p < 0.001). This difference held true with incomplete excision of fibrosing (infiltrative/sclerosing/morpheaform) tumors [32.9% in the breadloaf microscopy group and 57.5% in the 3D microscopy group (p = 0.003)] and also with solid (nodular) tumors [16.1 and 34.2%, respectively (p < 0.001)]. The mean overall examination time required showed no important difference. In summary, for detection of tumor outgrowths, 3D microscopy has almost twice the sensitivity of breadloaf microscopy, particularly in the situation of aggressive/infiltrative carcinomas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Virtual colonoscopy compared with conventional colonoscopy for stricturing postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Livia; Fiori, Roberto; Tosti, Claudio; Marinetti, Alessandro; Catarinacci, Mario; De Nigris, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni; Pallone, Francesco

    2003-11-01

    The place of virtual colonoscopy (VC) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) requiring endoscopic follow-up after surgery is unknown. The authors compared findings from VC versus conventional colonoscopy (CC) for assessing the postoperative recurrence of CD. Sixteen patients with ileocolonic anastomosis for CD were prospectively enrolled from January 2001 to January 2002. Recurrence was assessed by CC according to Rutgeerts et al. VC was performed with a computed tomography scanner, with images examined by three radiologists who were unaware of the endoscopic findings. CC showed perianastomotic recurrence in 15 of 16 patients. Perianastomotic narrowing or stenosis was detected by VC in 11 of these 15 patients. There were 11 true positive, 1 true negative, 0 false-positive, and 4 false-negative findings (73% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, 20% negative predictive value, 75% accuracy). Among the eight patients showing a rigid stenosis of the anastomosis not allowing passage of the colonoscope, VC detected narrowing or stenosis in seven patients. The current findings suggest that although the widespread use of VC in CD is currently not indicated because of possible false-negative findings, this technique may represent an alternative to CC in noncompliant postsurgical patients with a rigid stenosis not allowing passage of the endoscope.

  6. The Diagnostic Yield of Colonoscopy Stratified by Indications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najami, I; Rancinger, C P; Larsen, Morten Kobaek

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Danish centers reserve longer time for screening colonoscopies and allocate the most experienced endoscopists to these cases. The objective of this study is to determine the diagnostic yield in colonoscopies for different indications to improve planning of colonoscopy activity...

  7. The role of colonoscopy in managing diverticular disease of the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursi, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is frequently found on routine colonoscopy, and the incidence of diverticular disease and its complications appears to be increasing. The role of colonoscopy in managing this disease is still controversial. Colonoscopy plays a key role in managing diverticular bleeding. Several techniques have been effectively used in this field, but band ligation seems to be the best in preventing rebleeding. Colonoscopy is also effective in posing a correct differential diagnosis with other forms of chronic colitis involving colon harbouring diverticula (in particular with Crohn's disease or Segmental Colitis Associated with Diverticulosis). The role of colonoscopy to confirm diagnosis of uncomplicated diverticulitis is still under debate, since the risk of advanced colonic neoplasia in patients admitted for acute uncomplicated diverticulitis is not increased as compared to the average-risk population. On the contrary, colonoscopy is mandatory if patients complain of persistent symptoms or after resolution of an episode of complicated diverticulitis. Finally, a recent endoscopic classification, called Diverticular Inflammation and Complications Assessment (DICA), has been developed and validated. This classification seems to be a promising tool for predicting the outcome of the colon harboring diverticula, but further, prospective studies have to confirm its predictive role on the outcome of the disease.

  8. A Smartphone App for Improvement of Colonoscopy Preparation (ColoprAPP): Development and Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin; Schmid, Roland; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-09-20

    Optimal bowel preparation is one of the major cornerstones for quality of colonoscopy. But poor bowel preparation still occurs in 10% to 25% of all patients. To optimize patient guidance, we developed a new smartphone app (ColoprAPP) for Android smartphones which guides and accompanies the patient starting 4 days before colonoscopy throughout the whole colonoscopy preparation procedure. The objective of this study was to assess the function of a newly developed smartphone app for supporting colonoscopy preparation. We carried out a prospective feasibility study including 25 patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy at our hospital. As a control, we retrieved the data of 25 patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy matching in age, sex, and indication for colonoscopy from our colonoscopy database. Patients were asked to download the smartphone app, ColoprAPP, in addition to being given the regular colonoscopy preparation leaflet. All colonoscopies were performed in the morning after using a split-dose preparation containing a polyethlene glycol-based purgative. The study was designed to test feasibility of the prototype, evaluate grade of bowel cleanliness (Boston bowel preparation scale [BBPS]), and assess patient satisfaction with the app. The smartphone app use was feasible in all patients. BBPS count as a marker for grade of bowel preparation was significantly higher in the smartphone app-supported group (mean 8.1 [SD 0.3] vs 7.1 [SD 0.4], P=.02). Left (mean 2.8 [SD 0.1] vs 2.4 [SD 0.11], P=.02) and transverse colon (mean 2.8 [SD 0.07] vs 2.4 [SD 0.11], Papp-supported group than in controls. Patient satisfaction with a smartphone app-supported colonoscopy preparation was high with an average numeric rating scale score for usefulness of 8.2 (visual analog scale 1-10). A novel developed smartphone app for reinforced education of bowel cleansing was feasible and led to high BBPS scores and patient satisfaction. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02512328; https

  9. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. Post-Procedure. This new educational video for GI patients, produced by the ACG Institute for Clinical Research and Education, ...

  10. Production in Incomplete Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crès, Hervé; Tvede, Mich

    Abstract In the present paper we study voting-based corporate control in a general equilibrium model with incomplete financial markets. Since voting takes place in a multi-dimensional setting, super-majority rules are needed to ensure existence of equilibrium. In a linear-quadratic setup we show ...

  11. Production in incomplete markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crès, Hervé; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper we study voting-based corporate control in a general equilibrium model with incomplete financial markets. Since voting takes place in a multi-dimensional setting, super-majority rules are needed to ensure existence of equilibrium. In a linear-quadratic setup we show...

  12. Virtual colonoscopy with electron beam CT: correlation with barium enema, colonoscopy and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hye Suk; Kim, Min Jung; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik

    1998-01-01

    To perform virtual colonoscopy using electron beam tomography(EBT) in patients in whom a colonic mass was present, and to compare the results with those obtained using barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. Materials and Methods : Ten patients in whom colonic masses were diagnosed by either barium enema or colonoscopy were involved in this study. There were nine cases of adenocarcinoma and one of tubulovillous adenoma. Using EBT preoperative abdominopelvic CT scans were performed. Axial scans were then three-dimensionally reconstructed to produce virtual colonoscopic images and were compared with barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. Virtual colonoscopic images of the masses were classified as either 1)polyploid, 2)sessile,3)fungating, or 4)annular constrictive. We also determined whether ulcers were present within the lesions and whether there was obstruction. Results : After virtual colonoscopy, two lesions were classified as polyploid, one as sessile, five as fungating and two as annular constrictive. Virtual colonoscopic images showed good correlation with the findings of barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. Three of six ulcerative lesions were observed on colonoscopy; in seven adenocarcinomas with partial or total luminal obstruction, virtual colonoscopy visualized the colon beyond the obstructed sites. In one case, barium contrast failed to pass through the obstructed portion and in six cases, the colonoscope similarly failed. Conclusion : Virtual colonoscopies correlated well with barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. They provide three dimensional images of colonic masses and are helpful for the evaluation of obstructive lesions

  13. Early Colonoscopy Improves the Outcome of Patients With Symptomatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Alarcón-Fernández, Onofre; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Romero-García, Rafael; Carrillo-Palau, Marta; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Jiménez, Alejandro; Quintero, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Long waiting times from early symptoms to diagnosis and treatment may influence the staging and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. We analyzed the effect of colonoscopy timing on the outcome of these patients. This study aimed to compare the outcome (tumoral staging and long-term survival) of patients with suspected colorectal cancer according to diagnostic colonoscopy timing. This study is an analysis of a prospectively maintained database. The study was conducted at the Open Access Endoscopy Service of the tertiary public healthcare center Hospital Universitario de Canarias, in the Spanish island of Tenerife. Consecutive patients diagnosed of colorectal cancer between February 2008 and October 2010, fulfilling 1 or more National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence criteria, were assigned to early colonoscopy (improves outcome in patients with symptomatic colorectal cancer. See Video Abstract at http://journals.lww.com/dcrjournal/Pages/videogallery.aspx.

  14. Colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be eager to eat a large meal after fasting, but it is a good idea to start ... that can cause inflammation and narrowing along the gastrointestinal tract. Ulcerative colitis: A disease that causes inflammation ( ...

  15. Colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better chance of curing the disease. Screening for Colon and Rectal Cancer Your doctor will recommend screening for colon and rectal cancer —also called colorectal cancer—starting at age 50 ...

  16. [Potentialities of virtual colonoscopy multispiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of colon pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutova, E Iu

    2012-01-01

    The trial enrolled 626 patients aged 2 to 82 years (mean age 47 +/- 3,2 years), including 548 patients with tumors (adenomatous polyps and carcinoma) of the colon and 78 with its inflammatory diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease). Among them there were 330 men and 296 women. All the patients gave their consent for virtual colonoscopy (VC). They all also underwent endoscopic colonoscopy. The minimum size of a detected polyp on VC multispiral computed tomography (MSCT) scans was 4 mm in diameter. The study showed that VC MSCT had a high sensitivity in detecting various colon diseases, particularly 93% sensitivity in identifying space-occupying lesions, comfortability for the patient compared to endoscopic colonoscopy and irrigoscopy, and a rather high capacity and a low radiation load (compared to irrigoscopy). The quality of examination during VC MSCT depends on how the patient has been prepared (the most complete colon cleansing before the examination). A complete set of postprocedure processes of images should be used to improve the quality of examination. The exclusive prerogative of VC MSCT is to study the thickness of the wall and its lesion extent and to evaluate pericolitic changes, the lymphatic apparatus and mesentery, and in parallel with abdominal parenchymatous organs. This procedure is especially indicated for incomplete or contraindicative endoscopic colonoscopy, examination of the parietal segments of the colon in children to detect developmental malformations.

  17. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Earn your CME from the convenience of your home or office by accessing ACG's web-based educational ... ACG Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What ...

  18. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect your practice; every voice counts. National Affairs Materials Contact Your Representatives ACG This Week, National Affairs ... a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. Post-Procedure. This new educational video for GI patients, produced by the ...

  19. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of its members to clinical gastroenterology and to the life of the College. Research Grants Grant Announcements Junior ... ACG Institute for Clinical Research and Education, underscores the lifesaving importance of colorectal screening by colonoscopy. The video instills ...

  20. Improved Balanced Incomplete Factorization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bru, R.; Marín, J.; Mas, J.; Tůma, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 5 (2010), s. 2431-2452 ISSN 0895-4798 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100300802 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100300902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Source of funding: I - inštitucionálna podpora na rozvoj VO Keywords : preconditioned iterative methods * sparse matrices * incomplete decompositions * approximate inverses * Sherman-Morrison formula * nonsymmetric matrices Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2010

  1. Colonoscopy in Hong Kong Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Yuk Him; Lee, Kim Hung; Chan, Kin Wai; Sihoe, Jennifer Dart Yin; Cheung, Sing Tak; Mou, Jennifer Wai Cheung

    2010-03-07

    To investigate the safety and diagnostic yield of colonoscopy in Chinese children in whom the procedure is not often done. We conducted a retrospective review of all colonoscopies in consecutive children who underwent their first diagnostic colonoscopy from Jan 2003 to 2008. Seventy-nine children (48 boys, 31 girls; mean age 9.2 +/- 4.2 years) were identified and reviewed with a total of 82 colonoscopies performed. Successful caecal and ileal intubation rates were 97.6% and 75.6% respectively. Forty patients (50.6%) had a positive diagnosis made in colonoscopy and that included colonic polyps (23), Crohn's disease (12), ulcerative colitis (1), and miscellaneous causes (4). 80% of polyps were in the rectosigmoid colon. All but one were juvenile hamartomatous polyps. The exception was an adenomatous polyp. The mean ages for children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps were 11.3 and 4.3 years respectively. There was no procedure-related complication. Colonoscopy is a safe procedure in our Chinese children. The increasing diagnosis of IBD in recent decades may reflect a rising incidence of the disease in our children.

  2. Informationally incomplete quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yong Siah; Řeháček, Jaroslav; Hradil, Zdenĕk

    2013-11-01

    In quantum-state tomography on sources with quantum degrees of freedom of large Hilbert spaces, inference of quantum states of light for instance, a complete characterization of the quantum states for these sources is often not feasible owing to limited resources. As such, the concepts of informationally incomplete state estimation becomes important. These concepts are ideal for applications to quantum channel/ process tomography, which typically requires a much larger number of measurement settings for a full characterization of a quantum channel. Some key aspects of both quantumstate and quantum-process tomography are arranged together in the form of a tutorial review article that is catered to students and researchers who are new to the field of quantum tomography, with focus on maximum-likelihood related techniques as instructive examples to illustrate these ideas.

  3. Live image processing does not increase adenoma detection rate during colonoscopy: a randomized comparison between FICE and conventional imaging (Berlin Colonoscopy Project 5, BECOP-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminalai, Alireza; Rösch, Thomas; Aschenbeck, Jens; Mayr, Michael; Drossel, Rolf; Schröder, Andreas; Scheel, Matthias; Treytnar, Doris; Gauger, Ulrich; Stange, Gabriela; Simon, Frank; Adler, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Fujinon intelligent chromoendoscopy (FICE) is a post-processing imaging technique for increasing contrast of mucosa and mucosal lesions that might lead to improvement in colonic adenoma detection during colonoscopy. Previous studies on similar contrast-enhancing techniques as well as on dye staining have yielded variable and conflicting results. This large randomized trial was undertaken to determine whether FICE technology enhances adenoma detection rate (ADR). In a prospective study performed in a multicenter private practice and hospital setting, involving 8 examiners with substantial lifetime experience (>10,000 colonoscopies each), 1,318 patients (men 46.7%, women 53.3%; mean age 59.05 years) were randomly assigned to colonoscopy with either FICE or white light imaging on instrument withdrawal. Of the colonoscopies, 68% were screening and 32% were diagnostic examinations. The primary outcome measure was the ADR (i.e., number of adenomas/total number of patients). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of general ADR (0.28 in both groups), the total number of adenomas (184 vs. 183), or detection of subgroups of adenomas. The rate of identification of hyperplastic polyps was also the same in both groups (127 vs. 121; P=0.67). The results were the same for both the screening and the diagnostic colonoscopy subgroups. Withdrawal time was the same in both groups (8.4 vs. 8.3 min, P=0.55). This large randomized trial could not show any objective advantage of the FICE technique over conventional high-resolution endoscopy in terms of improved ADR.

  4. Safety and efficacy of at-home robotic locomotion therapy in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: a prospective, pre-post intervention, proof-of-concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Rupp

    Full Text Available The compact Motorized orthosis for home rehabilitation of Gait (MoreGait was developed for continuation of locomotion training at home. MoreGait generates afferent stimuli of walking with the user in a semi-supine position and provides feedback about deviations from the reference walking pattern.Prospective, pre-post intervention, proof-of-concept study to test the feasibility of an unsupervised home-based application of five MoreGait prototypes in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI.Twenty-five (5 tetraplegia, 20 paraplegia participants with chronic (mean time since injury: 5.8 ± 5.4 (standard deviation, SD years sensorimotor iSCI (7 ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS C, 18 AIS D; Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI II: Interquartile range 9 to 16 completed the training (45 minutes / day, at least 4 days / week, 8 weeks. Baseline status was documented 4 and 2 weeks before and at training onset. Training effects were assessed after 4 and 8 weeks of therapy.After therapy, 9 of 25 study participants improved with respect to the dependency on walking aids assessed by the WISCI II. For all individuals, the short-distance walking velocity measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test showed significant improvements compared to baseline (100% for both self-selected (Mean 139.4% ± 35.5% (SD and maximum (Mean 143.1% ± 40.6% (SD speed conditions as well as the endurance estimated with the six-minute walk test (Mean 166.6% ± 72.1% (SD. One device-related adverse event (pressure sore on the big toe occurred in over 800 training sessions.Home-based robotic locomotion training with MoreGait is feasible and safe. The magnitude of functional improvements achieved by MoreGait in individuals with iSCI is well within the range of complex locomotion robots used in hospitals. Thus, unsupervised MoreGait training potentially represents an option to prolong effective training aiming at recovery of locomotor function beyond in-patient rehabilitation

  5. Colonoscopia: morbidade negligenciada Colonoscopy: neglected morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bellotti Formiga

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar fatores de risco que determinam morbidade ao exame de colonoscopia. MÉTODOS: No período de março a junho de 2009 foram analisados prospectivamente 170 pacientes submetidos a exame colonoscópico. Fatores de risco como idade, sexo, indicação, exame ambulatorial/internado, efeitos adversos e qualidade do preparo intestinal, procedimento endoscópico, diagnóstico e intercorrência peri-procedimento foram relacionados. RESULTADOS: A média de idade da amostra foi 60,16 ± 14,69 anos, com predominância do sexo feminino. A indicação mais prevalente do exame foi seguimento pós-operatório. Três exames foram inconclusivos por mau preparo. Do restante, 36,53% foram normais e a maioria dos alterados apresentou pólipos, adenomatosos predominantemente. Quanto as comorbidades, 48,82% dos pacientes possuíam alguma comorbidade, sendo Hipertensão Arterial Sistêmica a mais prevalente. Apenas 22,94% dos pacientes apresentaram algum efeito adverso ao preparo. O preparo foi limpo em 65,88% dos exames, mostrando significância quando comparado a morbidade. Outro fator de significância estatística foi a realização de procedimentos (44,7% dos exames, sendo a maioria polipectomias. A morbidade chegou a 16,47%, sendo a desidratação a mais prevalente. Não houve mortalidade. CONCLUSÃO: A qualidade do preparo intestinal e a realização de procedimento endoscópico são fatores diretamente relacionados a morbidade do exame de colonoscopia.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to analyze risks factors of morbidity on colonoscopy. METHOD: From March to June of 2009, 170 patients were examined and analyzed prospectively. Risks factors as age, sex, indication of exam, ambulatory or hospital exam, adverse events and quality of intestinal preparation, endoscopic procedure, diagnoses and incident before, during or after procedure were analyzed. RESULTS: The average age was 60,16±14,69 years old, with majority of female. The prevalent

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Will An Additional Observer Enhance Adenoma Detection During Colonoscopy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Mullen

    2012-07-01

    , increased rate of adenoma detection was seen for the adenomas of size 0.5 to 1.00 cm in the fellow and attending group (7.2% as compared to attending alone group (4.0%. There was no difference in the number of colonoscopies aborted due to poor bowel preparations There was no statistically significant difference in the number of colonoscopies aborted due to poor bowel prep, 91(5.9% Vs 32(4.5%. Conclusions: Our retrospective study has shown no improvement in the rate of adenoma detection when fellows performed colonoscopy with a supervising attending in comparison to procedures performed by attending alone. In fact, Adenoma Detection Rate (ADR and caecal intubation rates are increasingly seen as important quality measure. We propose that ADR needs to be used as a tool to assess trainee competency and should be a marker to evaluate proper training. These could be evaluated in randomized prospective trials in future.

  7. Providing Hospitalized Patients With an Educational Booklet Increases the Quality of Colonoscopy Bowel Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, William F; Pasricha, Trisha; Hubbard, Francie J; Higginbotham, Tina; Givens, Tonya; Slaughter, James C; Obstein, Keith L

    2016-06-01

    Inadequate bowel preparation is a problem frequently encountered by gastroenterologists who perform colonoscopies on hospitalized patients. A method is needed to increase the quality of bowel preparation in inpatients. An educational booklet has been shown to increase the overall quality of bowel preparation for outpatients. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the effects of an educational booklet on the quality of bowel preparation in a group of hospitalized patients. We performed a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial of all inpatients at a tertiary care medical center scheduled for inpatient colonoscopy from October 2013 through March 2014. They were randomly assigned to groups that were (n = 45) or were not (controls, n = 40) given the booklet before bowel preparation the evening before their colonoscopy. All patients received a standard bowel preparation (clear liquid diet the day before the procedure, followed by split-dose GoLYTELY). At the colonoscopy, the Boston Bowel preparation scale (BBPS) was used to assess bowel preparation. The primary outcome measure was adequate bowel preparation (a total BBPS score ≥6 with all segment scores ≥2). Secondary outcomes assessed included total BBPS score, BBPS segment score, and a total BBPS score of 0. There were no differences between the groups in age, race, sex, body mass index, history of colonoscopy, history of polyps, or time of colonoscopy. Twenty-eight patients who received the booklet (62%) and 14 who did not (35%) had an adequate bowel preparation (P = .012). The number needed to treat to attain adequate bowel preparation was 4. After adjusting for age and history of prior colonoscopies, the odds of achieving an adequate bowel preparation and a higher total BBPS score after receipt of the booklet were 3.14 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-7.83) and 2.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.05-4.88), respectively. Three patients in the booklet group and 9 in the no-booklet group had a BBPS score

  8. Impact of patient education on quality of bowel preparation in outpatient colonoscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Chintan; Depasquale, Joseph R; Digiacomo, W Scott; Malinowski, Judith E; Engelhardt, Kristen; Shaikh, Sohail N; Kothari, Shivangi T; Kottam, Raghu; Shakov, Rada; Maksoud, Charbel; Baddoura, Walid J; Spira, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    High-quality bowel preparation is essential for successful outpatient colonoscopy. Currently, the rate of adequate bowel preparation for outpatient colonoscopy in the USA is low. Patients often fail to adhere to recommended preparation instructions. Limited literature exists on evaluating educational intervention as a means of improving the quality of bowel preparation prior to outpatient colonoscopy. Our objective was to determine the effect of an educational intervention on the quality of outpatient colonoscopy preparation. The secondary objective was to determine whether the quality of bowel preparation improves overall colonoscopy outcomes as measured by rate of polyp detection and caecal intubation time. A single-blinded, prospective, randomised, controlled trial was conducted in two inner-city gastroenterology clinics in the USA. One hundred and sixty-four subjects were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of two groups. The control group subjects received verbal and written instructions for colonoscopy. The intervention group subjects received the same instructions and were then asked to answer a questionnaire. The subjects' responses were reviewed and an additional explanation of the preparation process provided. An attending gastroenterologist determined the quality of each bowel preparation at the time of colonoscopy using the Universal Preparation Assessment Scale. The educational intervention had no impact on the overall quality of bowel preparation (P=0.12). However, the type of food (liquid vs solid) consumed during the 24 hours prior to the procedure (P=0.04) and the time since the last solid meal (P=0.03) did have an impact on preparation quality. Other significant factors included elapsed time to first bowel movement from the initiation of bowel preparation (P=0.05) and age younger than 55 (P=0.02). Adequate bowel preparation was associated with shorter total procedure (P=0.001) and caecal intubation (P=0.01) times. Our study failed to demonstrate

  9. Research on micro robot for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guozheng, Yan; Kundong, Wang; Jian, Shi

    2005-01-01

    For diagnosing the colon's pathologies micro-invasively or non-invasively actively, an autonomous prototype of the earthworm-like robot for colonoscopy was designed according with the principle of the bionics and manufactured using precision process technology. In-Vitro experiments in pig colon were made. This micro robot for colonoscopy was drove directly by elecmagnetic linear driver. The mobile cells were joined with two degree-of-freedom joints and the whole body was flexible. The direction of movement and the angle of imaging can be controlled by the shape memory alloy (SMA). In experiments, locomotion efficient was analyzed carefully. In-vitro experiments in pig colon demonstrated that the micro robot can navigate though the colon by itself reliably and freely, which was useful to the application of robot for colonoscopy in the clinic.

  10. An Automated Inpatient Split-dose Bowel Preparation System Improves Colonoscopy Quality and Reduces Repeat Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, Rena; Johnston, Elyse R; Gluskin, Adam B; Gregory, Dyanna L; Cyrus, Rachel; Werth, Lindsay; Ciolino, Jody D; Grande, David P; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2017-07-19

    Inpatient colonoscopy preparations are often inadequate, compromising patient safety and procedure quality, while resulting in greater hospital costs. The aims of this study were to: (1) design and implement an electronic inpatient split-dose bowel preparation order set; (2) assess the intervention's impact upon preparation adequacy, repeated colonoscopies, hospital days, and costs. We conducted a single center prospective pragmatic quasiexperimental study of hospitalized adults undergoing colonoscopy. The experimental intervention was designed using DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) methodology. Prospective data collected over 12 months were compared with data from a historical preintervention cohort. The primary outcome was bowel preparation quality and secondary outcomes included number of repeated procedures, hospital days, and costs. On the basis of a Delphi method and DMAIC process, we created an electronic inpatient bowel preparation order set inclusive of a split-dose bowel preparation algorithm, automated orders for rescue medications, and nursing bowel preparation checks. The analysis data set included 969 patients, 445 (46%) in the postintervention group. The adequacy of bowel preparation significantly increased following intervention (86% vs. 43%; P2.0% vs. 4.6%; P=0.03). Mean hospital days from bowel preparation initiation to discharge decreased from 8.0 to 6.9 days (P=0.02). The intervention resulted in an estimated 1-year cost-savings of $46,076 based on a reduction in excess hospital days associated with repeated and delayed procedures. Our interdisciplinary initiative targeting inpatient colonoscopy preparations significantly improved quality and reduced repeat procedures, and hospital days. Other institutions should consider utilizing this framework to improve inpatient colonoscopy value.

  11. Repeat Colonoscopy within 6 Months after Initial Outpatient Colonoscopy in Ontario: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Paszat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goal of this study is to examine utilization of early repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months after an index procedure. Methods. We identified persons having repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months following outpatient colonoscopy without prior colonoscopy ≤ 5 years or prior diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC. We modeled repeat colonoscopy using a generalized estimating equation with an exchangeable correlation structure to account for clustering of patients by endoscopist. Results. The population included 334,663 persons, 7,892 (2.36% of whom had an early repeat colonoscopy within 6 months. Overall, endoscopist prior year colonoscopy volume was inversely related to repeat ≤ 6 months. Repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months varied by the clinical setting of the index colonoscopy (adjusted OR = 1.41 (95% CI 1.29–1.55 at nonhospital facilities compared to teaching or community hospitals. Among those who had polypectomy or biopsy, the adjusted OR for early repeat ≤ 6 months was elevated among those whose index colonoscopy was at a nonhospital facility (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.30–1.60, compared to those at a teaching hospital or community hospital. Conclusions. Repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months after an index procedure is associated with the clinical setting of the index colonoscopy.

  12. Effect of Physician-Delivered Patient Education on the Quality of Bowel Preparation for Screening Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Yu Shieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inadequate bowel preparation is common in outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy because of unawareness and poor adherence to instruction. Methods. Herein, 105 consecutive outpatients referred for screening colonoscopy were enrolled in this prospective, colonoscopist-blinded study. The patients were assigned to an intensive-education group, with 10 minutes of physician-delivered education, or to standard care. At the time of colonoscopy, the quality of bowel preparation was assessed using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS. The primary outcome was a BBPS score ≥5. The secondary outcomes were the mean BBPS score, insertion time, adenoma detection rate, and number of adenomas detected. Results. We analyzed 39 patients who received intensive education and 60 controls. The percentage of adequate bowel preparations with a BBPS score ≥5 was higher in the intensive-education group than in the control group (97.4% versus 80.0%; P=0.01. The adjusted odds ratio for having a BBPS score ≥5 in the intensive-education group was 10.2 (95% confidence interval = 1.23–84.3; P=0.03. Other secondary outcomes were similar in the 2 groups. Conclusions. Physician-delivered education consisting of a brief counseling session in addition to written instructions improves the quality of bowel preparation in outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy.

  13. Incomplete fusion reactions in Ho

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O beam energy of 100 MeV. Detailed Monte Carlo simulation of recoil range distributions of products were performed with the help of PACE2 code, in order to extract the contributions of incomplete fusion in the individual channels. The results clearly show the incomplete fusion contributions in the tantalum and thulium ...

  14. [Massive rectal blood loss after colonoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.T.; Kats-Ugurlu, G.; van Suylen, R.J.; De Schryver, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A colonoscopy performed one and a half months prior had revealed diverticulosis in the sigmoid colon; a small polyp located 10 cm from the anal margin had been removed at that time. The presenting patient was haemodynamically

  15. Outpatient provider concentration and commercial colonoscopy prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozen, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the magnitude of various contributors to outpatient commercial colonoscopy prices, including market- and provider-level factors, especially market share. We used adjudicated fee-for-service facility claims from a large commercial insurer for colonoscopies occurring in hospital outpatient department or ambulatory surgery center from October 2005 to December 2012. Claims were matched to provider- and market-level data. Linear fixed effects regressions of negotiated colonoscopy price were run on provider, system, and market characteristics. Markets were defined as counties. There were 178,433 claims from 169 providers (104 systems). The mean system market share was 76% (SD = 0.34) and the mean real (deflated) price was US$1363 (SD = 374), ranging from US$169 to US$2748. For every percentage point increase in a system or individual facility's bed share, relative price increased by 2 to 4 percentage points; this result was stable across a number of specifications. Market population and price were also consistently positively related, though this relation was small in magnitude. No other factor explained price as strongly as market share. Price variation for colonoscopy was driven primarily by market share, of particular concern as the number of mergers increases in wake of the recession and the Affordable Care Act. Whether variation is justified by better quality care requires further research to determine whether quality is subsumed in prices. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a female patient, we follow her through the day of her exam. The video reviews all clinical information regarding colonoscopy and urges viewers to follow all instructions from their health care providers. It runs for 6 minutes 40 ...

  17. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... experts, ACG welcomes media inquiries. Enter Media Room News Current Press Releases ACG Annual Meeting Press Releases ... seconds. http://s3.gi.org/videocentral/ColonoscopyVideo.mp4 News Current Press Releases ACG Annual Meeting Press Releases ...

  18. Endoscopic simulator curriculum improves colonoscopy performance in novice surgical interns as demonstrated in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana A; Rattner, David W; Gee, Denise W

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether independent virtual endoscopic training accelerates the acquisition of endoscopic skill by novice surgical interns. Nine novice surgical interns participated in a prospective study comparing colonoscopy performance in a swine model before and after an independent simulator curriculum. An independent observer evaluated each intern for the ability to reach the cecum within 20 min and technical ability as determined by Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills--Colonoscopy (GAGES-C) score and performance compared. In addition, at the conclusion of training, a post test of two basic simulated colonoscopy modules was completed and metrics evaluated. As a control, three attending physicians who routinely perform colonoscopy also completed colonoscopy in the swine model. Prior to endoscopic training, one (11 %) intern successfully intubated the cecum in 19.56 min. Following training, six (67 %) interns reached the cecum with mean time of 9.2 min (p curriculum intern times demonstrated the experts to be significantly faster (p curriculum demonstrated significantly improved GI Mentor™ performance in the efficiency (79 vs. 67.1 %, p = 0.05) and time to cecum (3.37 vs. 5.59 min, p = 0.01) metrics. No other significant difference was demonstrated in GAGES-C categories or other simulator parameter. Simulator training on the GI Mentor™ alone significantly improved endoscopic skills in novice surgical interns as demonstrated in a swine model. This study also identified parameters on the GI Mentor™ that could indicate 'clinical readiness'. This study supports the role for endoscopic simulator training in surgical resident education as an adjunct to clinical experience.

  19. Technical performance of colonoscopy: the key role of sedation/analgesia and other quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Franco; Meucci, Gianmichele; Sgroi, Giusy; Minoli, Giorgio

    2008-05-01

    It is essential to identify the factors in clinical practice that influence the technical performance of colonoscopy as a basis for quality improvement programs. To assess the factors linked to two key indicators of colonoscopy performance, i.e., cecal intubation and polyp diagnosis. Consecutives colonoscopies performed over a 2-wk period in 278 unselected practice sites throughout Italy were prospectively evaluated. A multivariate model was developed to identify determinants of the performance indicators of colonoscopy. In total, 12,835 patients (mean age 60.5 yr, standard deviation [SD] 15.1, 53% men) were studied. Sedation and/or analgesia was administered in 55.3% of procedures: 28.8% of patients received intravenous (IV) benzodiazepines, 15.4% received benzodiazepines in combination with narcotics, 3.1% received propofol, and 7.5% received other sedation regimens. Overall, cecal intubation was achieved in 80.7% of procedures, and the polyp detection rate was 27.3%. Multivariate analysis showed that the strongest predictors of cecal intubation were the quality of bowel preparation (inadequate vs excellent: odds ratio [OR] 0.013, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.009-0.018; fair vs excellent: OR 0.246, 95% CI 0.209-0.290; and good vs excellent: OR 0.586, 95% CI 0.514-0.667) and the use of sedation (IV benzodiazepines vs no sedation: OR 1.460, 95% CI 1.282-1.663; IV benzodiazepines and narcotics vs no sedation: OR 2.128, 95% CI 1.776-2.565; and propofol vs no sedation: OR 2.355, 95% CI 1.590-3.488). The colonoscopy setting (workload and organizational complexity of the center) and the endoscopist colonoscopy volume were other factors independently correlated with completion of the procedure. Detection of polyps partially depended on the quality of bowel cleansing (inadequate vs excellent: OR 0.511, 95% CI 0.404-0.647) and use of sedation (OR 1.172, 95% CI 1.074-1.286). In usual clinical practice, the use of sedation/analgesia, the colon-cleansing quality, the

  20. Incomplete q-Chebyshev Polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Ercan, Elif; Firengiz, Mirac Cetin; Tuglu, Naim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we get the generating functions of q-Chebyshev polynomials using operator. Also considering explicit formulas of q-Chebyshev polynomials, we give new generalizations of q-Chebyshev polynomials called incomplete q-Chebyshev polynomials of the first and second kind. We obtain recurrence relations and several properties of these polynomials. We show that there are connections between incomplete q-Chebyshev polynomials and the some well-known polynomials. Keywords: q-Chebyshev poly...

  1. Propofol versus remifentanil for monitored anaesthesia care during colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerman, A T; Foubert, L A; Herregods, L L; Struys, M M R F; De Wolf, D J; De Looze, D A; De Vos, M M; Mortier, E P

    2003-06-01

    We conducted an open, prospective, randomized study to compare the efficacy, safety and recovery characteristics of remifentanil or propofol during monitored anaesthesia care in patients undergoing colonoscopy. Forty patients were randomly assigned to receive either propofol (1 mg kg(-1) followed by 10 mg kg (-1) h(-1), n = 20) or remifentanil (0.5 microg kg(-1) followed by 0.2 microg kg(-1) min(-1), n = 20). The infusion rate was subsequently adapted to clinical needs. In the propofol group, arterial pressure and heart rate decreased significantly from the baseline. These variables remained unchanged in the remifentanil group, but hypoventilation occurred in 55% of patients. Early recovery was delayed in the propofol group (P < 0.002). Recovery of cognitive and psychomotor functions was faster in the remifentanil group. Fifteen minutes after anaesthesia, the Digit Symbol Substitution Test score was 28.6 +/- 12.8 versus 36.2 +/- 9.4 and the Trieger Dot Test score was 25.6 +/- 8.1 versus 18.7 +/- 4.1 in the propofol and remifentanil groups, respectively (both P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction, using a visual analogue scale, was higher in the propofol group (96 +/- 7 versus 77 +/- 21, P < 0.001). Remifentanil proved efficient in reducing pain during colonoscopy. Emergence times were shorter and the recovery of cognitive function was faster with remifentanil compared with propofol. Remifentanil provided a smoother haemodynamic profile than propofol; however, the frequent occurrence of remifentanil-induced hypoventilation requires the cautious administration of this agent.

  2. Simulation-based training for colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nerup, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    in colonoscopy before practicing on patients. Twenty-five physicians (10 consultants with endoscopic experience and 15 fellows with very little endoscopic experience) were tested on 2 different simulator models: a virtual-reality simulator and a physical model. Tests were repeated twice on each simulator model...... on both the models (P virtual-reality and the physical model, respectively. The established pass/fail standards failed one of the consultants (virtual-reality simulator) and allowed one fellow to pass (physical model). The 2 tested...... simulations-based modalities provided reliable and valid assessments of competence in colonoscopy and credible pass/fail standards were established for both the tests. We propose to use these standards in simulation-based training programs before proceeding to supervised training on patients....

  3. Usefulness of colonoscopy in ischemic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Maya, M; Ponferrada-Díaz, A; González-Asanza, C; Nogales-Rincón, O; Senent-Sánchez, C; Pérez-de-Ayala, V; Jiménez-Aleixandre, P; Cos-Arregui, E; Menchén-Fernández-Pacheco, P

    2010-07-01

    the ischemic colitis is intestinal the most frequent cause of ischemia. With this work we determine the demographic and clinical characteristics, and the usefulness of the colonoscopy in the patients with ischemic colitis diagnosed in our centre in relation to a change of therapeutic attitude. retrospective study in which were selected 112 patients diagnosed with ischemic colitis by colonoscopy and biopsy, in a period of five years. It was analyzed: age, sex, reason for examination, factors of cardiovascular risk, endoscopic degree of ischemia, change in the therapeutic attitude, treatment and outcome. the average age was of 73.64 + or - 12.10 years with an equal incidence in women (50.9%) and the men (49.1%). The associated factors were the HTA (61.1%), tobacco (37.2%) and antecedents of cardiovascular episode (52.2%). The most frequent reason for colonoscopy was rectorrhagia (53.6%) followed of the abdominal pain (30.4%), being urgent the 65.3%. Colonoscopy allowed a change in the therapeutic attitude in the 50 increasing in the urgent one to the 65.75%. Global mortality was of 27.67%. The serious ischemic colitis (25%) was more frequent in men (64.3%) in urgent indication (85.71%) and attends with high mortality (53.57%). Surgical treatment in the 57.14% was made with a good evolution in the 50%, whereas the patients with mild or moderate ischemic colitis had a better prognosis (favourable evolution in 80.95%) with smaller requirement of the surgical treatment (4.76%), p change of attitude according to the result of the same one. The evidence of a serious colitis supposed an increase of the necessity of surgery and worse prognosis.

  4. Torsion of Wandering Gallbladder following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R. Warfe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Torsion of the gallbladder is an uncommon condition that may present as an acute abdomen. Its preoperative diagnosis can often be challenging due to its variable presentation, with specific sonographic signs seen infrequently. We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of torsion of a wandering gallbladder following a colonoscopy in a 69-year-old female who presented with acute abdominal pain after procedure. This was discovered intraoperatively, and after a subsequent cholecystectomy, she had an uncomplicated recovery.

  5. Colonoscopy: Evaluating indications and diagnostic yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shamali, Mohammed A.; Hasan, F.; Siddiqe, I.; Al-Nakeeb, B.; Kalaoui, M.; Khajah, A.

    2001-01-01

    Colonoscopic procedure is an accepted modality for the evaluation ofcolonic disease. Open-access versus restricted-access colonoscopy has beenargued over in the recent literature. The aim of this retrospective analysisis to identify the yield of the major indications for the procedure, and thepattern of colon pathology in our community. We retrospectively analyzed ourexperience in 3000 colonoscopies over a five-year period. The patientscomprised 1145 females (38%) and 1855 males (62%) and their ages ranged from9 months to 95 years (mean 39.2). There were 2283 patients (76%) who wereaged less than 55 years. Complete examination to the cecum was possible in2850 cases (95%). Pathological findings were identified in 640 patients(21%). The diagnostic yield of patients referred for lower abdominal pain andsurveillance was low, at 7% and 17%, respectively. The yield was high forthose with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (47%), non-bloody diarrhea (35%),iron deficiency anemia (30%), mass lesions identified by radiology (53%) andpolyps identified by radiology (70%). Inflammatory bowel disease wasdiagnosed in 220 patients, carcinoma in 64 patients and colonic polyps in 139patients. Colonic diseases are not uncommon in our part of the world.Colonoscopy is a rewarding procedure in those patients referred with lowergastrointestinal bleeding, mass lesions, polyps and diarrhea. The procedureis less rewarding in patients with lower abdominal pain and in thoseundergoing surveillance colonoscopy. Patient selection on the basis of thepresenting complaint may help to utilize the limited resource available togastroenterologists. About 63% of the procedures were done for indicationsfound to have a low yield. Inflammatory bowel disease is seen with increasingfrequency in our population. (author)

  6. [DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC COLONOSCOPY IN PEDIATRICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Milagros; Frisancho, Oscar; Cervera, Zenon; Contardo, Carlos; Ruiz, Edwin; Gómez, Aldo; Vidal, Patricia; Castillo, Raúl; Delgado, Alex; Soriano, César

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding in childhood is an uncommon problem, althought when it happens it maybe an emergency. Upper bleeding predominates, and when we consider lower bleeding, the principal cause are polyps. Recent evidence points out that polyps are responsible for bleeding in 77% of cases.We decided to study the clinical course, histologic characteristics and treatment in children with lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This investigation was held at Edgardo Rebagliati National Hospital during 1990 to 1996. Inclusion criteria were: younger than 14 years, gastrointestinal bleeding, and colonoscopy exam.100 colonoscopies were done in 74 children. Polyps were the cause for gastrointestinal bleeding in 71.6% of cases. In 14 children more than one colonoscopy was done. More than one polyp in 16 children were found. Ulcerative colitis was diagnosed in two cases, and intestinal tuberculosis in other two cases. Average age was 8.8 years, and 100% presented rectorragia and anemia.Polyps were located principally in rectum and sigmoid. Polipectomy was done in 94.34% of the cases, and it was technically succesful. We had only one complication (snare wire was trapped) but with no morbidity.Histological examination demonstrated that juvenile polyp was the most frequent type (56.66%), followed by tubular adenoma (11.32%), and Peutz-Jegher polyp in 3.77%. Treatment was polipectomy in all cases. Eleven procedures were done in the surgical room, and 19 in the endoscopy unit, with no complications in any of the cases.CONCLUSION: In children the main cause for lower gastrointestinal bleeding are polyps. All cases present with rectorragia or anemia, and juvenile polyps are the most frequent type. Colonoscopy is a safe method for diagnosis and treatment, which can be done in the endoscopy unit with mild sedation and with an anesthesist or pediatrician as assistants.

  7. Characteristics and Diagnostic Yield of Pediatric Colonoscopy in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Ting Wu; Chih-An Chen; Yao-Jong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Colonoscopy of the lower gastrointestinal tract has diagnostic and therapeutic value. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the indications, complications, and diagnostic yield of diagnostic colonoscopy among Taiwanese children. Methods: The application of colonoscopy performed on children aged < 18 years between 1998 and 2010 in a referral tertiary center in Southern Taiwan was reviewed. Data on age, gender, indications, complications, and colonoscopic and final diagnoses were col...

  8. Preliminary development of the Active Colonoscopy Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available JungHun Choi1, Kale Ravindra1, Randolph Robert1, David Drozek21Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA; 2College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USAAbstract: Formal colonoscopy training requires a significant amount of time and effort. In particular, it requires actual patients for a realistic learning experience. The quality of colonoscopy training varies, and includes didactic courses and procedures proctored by skilled surgeons. A colonoscopy training model is occasionally used as part of the training method, but the effects are minute due to both the simple and tedious training procedures. To enhance the educational effect of the colonoscopy training model, the Active Colonoscopy Training Model (ACTM has been developed. ACTM is an interactive colonoscopy training device which can create the environment of a real colonoscopy procedure as closely as possible. It comprises a configurable rubber colon, a human torso, sensors, a display, and the control part. The ACTM provides audio and visual interaction to the trainee by monitoring important factors, such as forces caused by the distal tip and the shaft of the colonoscope and the pressure to open up the lumen and the localization of the distal tip. On the computer screen, the trainee can easily monitor the status of the colonoscopy, which includes the localization of the distal tip, maximum forces, pressure inside the colon, and surgery time. The forces between the rubber colon and the constraints inside the ACTM are measured and the real time display shows the results to the trainee. The pressure sensors will check the pressure at different parts of the colon. The real-time localized distal tip gives the colonoscopy trainee easier and more confident operation without introducing an additional device in the colonoscope. With the current need for colonoscopists and physicians, the ACTM can play an essential role resolving the problems of the current

  9. Prevalence of colorectal polyps in pediatric colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Kalpesh; Alsarraj, Abeer; Fong, Emily; Holub, Jennifer L; Gilger, Mark A; El Serag, Hashem B

    2012-04-01

    The available data regarding the prevalence, types, and clinical determinants of colonic polyps in children is limited. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of colorectal polyps in a large cohort of children. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the presence, number, and location of colorectal polyps reported in all children (0-20 years) who underwent colonoscopy at 14 pediatric facilities between January 2000 and December 2007 recorded in Pediatric Endoscopy Database System Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI). We compared procedures with and without polyps with respect to procedure indication, age, sex, and race. We also reviewed a sample of histopathologic reports from one participating center. We analyzed 13,115 colonoscopy procedures performed in 11,637 patients. Colorectal polyps were reported in 810 procedures (6.1%; 95% CI: 5.7-6.5%) performed in 705 patients, and in 12% of patients with lower GI bleeding. Children with colorectal polyps were significantly younger (8.9 years vs. 11.9 years; p children without polyps. In a sample of 122 patients with polyps from a single center, the histological types were solitary juvenile in 91 (70.5%), multiple juvenile in 20 (15.5%), adenoma in 14 (10.9%) and hyperplastic polyps in four patients (3.1%). Colorectal polyps are detected in 6.1% overall and in 12.0% among those with lower gastrointestinal bleeding during pediatric colonoscopy. Approximately 26% are multiple juvenile or adenoma.

  10. Splenic rupture after screening colonoscopy: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuCoin, Christopher; Acholonu, Emeka; Ukleja, Andrew; Cellini, Florencia; Court, Ismael; Dabage, Nemer; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2010-02-01

    Splenic rupture is a rare complication after colonoscopy, and to date there are only 46 reported cases in the English-language literature. Presented is a case report of splenic rupture after screening colonoscopy that resulted in laparotomy and splenectomy within 24 hours of the original procedure. The article covers the hypothesized mechanisms of injury, various precautions to take during colonoscopy, suggested diagnostic algorithm, determining factors in treatment, and vaccine regimen. The article concludes by stating that as the number of colonoscopies increase, so will the prevalence of associated complications, and that physicians are encouraged to understand this paradigm shift.

  11. Gender differences when using sedative music during colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Ida; Karlsson, Frida; Lundberg, Ann; Frisman, Gunilla Hollman

    2013-01-01

    Colonoscopy is a procedure often experienced as uncomfortable and worrying. Music has been reported to reduce discomfort during colonoscopy; however, no study in a Swedish setting has been found. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to analyze the effects of sedative music on patients' experience of anxiety, pain, relaxation, and well-being during colonoscopy. Prior to colonoscopy, adult patients (n = 120), aged 18-80 years, were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n = 60) who listened to sedative instrumental music with 60-80 beats per minute during the colonoscopy or a control group. After the colonoscopy, both groups completed a questionnaire on anxiety, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and an anxiety Visual Analogue Scale. Pain, relaxation, and well-being were also measured with Visual Analogue Scales. Women in the intervention group had a lower level of anxiety during the colonoscopy than those in the control group (p = .007) and well-being was significantly higher in the intervention group, especially among men, than in the controls (p = .006 and p = .025, respectively). Men in the intervention group were more relaxed during the colonoscopy than those in the control group (p = .065). Listening to sedative music decreased anxiety among women and increased well-being among men during colonoscopy.

  12. Stochastic incompleteness of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppes, P.; Zanotti, M.

    1976-01-01

    This article brings out in as conceptually clear terms as possible what seems to be a major incompleteness in the probability theory of particles offered by classical quantum mechanics. The exact nature of this incompleteness is illustrated by consideration of some simple quantum-mechanical examples. In addition, these examples are contrasted with the fundamental assumptions of Brownian motion in classical physics on the one hand, and with a controversey of a deecade ago in mathematical physchology. The central claim is that clasical quantum mechanics is radically incomplete in its probabilistic account of the motion of particles. In the last part of the article the time-dependent joint distribution of position and momentum of the linear harmonic oscillator is derived, and it is shown how the apparently physically paradoxical statistical independence of position and momentum has a natural explanation. The explanation is given within the framework of the non-quantum-mechanical stochastic theory constructed for such oscillators. (Auth.)

  13. Shorter waiting times from education to colonoscopy can improve the quality of bowel preparation: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Kim, Tae Oh; Seo, Joo Wan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Heo, Nae Yun; Park, Jongha; Park, Seung Ha; Yang, Sung Yeon; Moon, Young Soo

    2018-01-01

    Adequate bowel preparation is essential for an effective and safe colonoscopy. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of bowel preparation according to waiting times from education to colonoscopy. A prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized study was performed from December 2016 to March 2017. Patients were divided into two groups: within 2 weeks (group A, n=64) or more than 2 weeks (group B, n=66) from education about bowel preparation to colonoscopy. The primary outcome was the quality of bowel preparation as assessed by the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS). The secondary outcome was the polyp and adenoma detection rate. A total of 130 patients were enrolled. The total BBPS score was significantly higher in group A (within 2 weeks from education to colonoscopy) than in group B (more than 2 weeks). Total BBPS scores were 8.25}0.97 in group A and 7.75}1.32 in group B (P=.017). The rate of good preparation (BBPS≥8) was higher in group A than in group B (78.1% vs. 59.1%, P=.020). The rates of polyp and adenoma detection were both slightly higher in group A (polyps, 42.2% vs. 38.5%, P=.667; adenoma, 31.2% vs. 22.7%, P=.275). A numerical trend was observed for the slightly superior polyp and adenoma detection rate in group A, but it was not statistically significant. This study demonstrated that shorter waiting times from education to colonoscopy can improve the quality of bowel preparation. Ensuring sufficient staff and equipment for endoscopy is one approach to reducing waiting times to colonoscopy. If waiting times can not be reduced, more contact through telephone, e-mail, and text messaging could be used to remind patients about information regarding bowel preparation.

  14. Incomplete fusion reactions in Ho

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is confirmed by the predictions of breakup fusion model of the incomplete fusion. Keywords. Heavy ion ... Several models are used to explain these ICF namely, sum rule model [8], breakup fusion model [9], promptly emitted .... The solid lines are eye guides to the experimental points. Figure 1. Excitation functions of ...

  15. Incomplete contract and divisional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, T.; Wang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we want to analyze the internal divisional structure within an organi- zation in the framework of incomplete contract theory. We use the framework of Aghion and Tirole (1997) and define the managerial control structure as \\sequence of search". A key feature of this paper which

  16. Listening to music decreases need for sedative medication during colonoscopy: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, R; Raj, Mehroof; Paul, Antony; Harish, K; Kumar, Sunil K; Sandesh, K; Asharaf, Syed; Thomas, Varghese

    2006-01-01

    Music played during endoscopic procedures may alleviate anxiety and improve patient acceptance of the procedure. A prospective randomized, controlled trial was undertaken to determine whether music decreases the requirement for midazolam during colonoscopy and makes the procedure more comfortable and acceptable. Patients undergoing elective colonoscopy between October 2003 and February 2004 were randomized to either not listen to music (Group 1; n=40) or listen to music of their choice (Group 2; n=38) during the procedure. All patients received intravenous midazolam on demand in aliquots of 2 mg each. The dose of midazolam, duration of procedure, recovery time, pain and discomfort scores and willingness to undergo a repeat procedure using the same sedation protocol were compared. Patients in Group 2 received significantly less midazolam than those in Group 1 (p=0.007). The pain score was similar in the two groups, whereas discomfort score was lower in Group 2 (p=0.001). Patients in the two groups were equally likely to be willing for a repeat procedure. Listening to music during colonoscopy helps reduce the dose of sedative medications and decreases discomfort experienced during the procedure.

  17. Towards continuous improvement of endoscopy standards: Validation of a colonoscopy assessment form.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Aim: Assessment of procedural colonoscopy skills is an important and topical. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a competency-based colonoscopy assessment form that would be easy to use, suitable for the assessment of junior and senior endoscopists and potentially be a useful instrument to detect differences in performance standards following different training interventions. Method: A standardised assessment form was developed incorporating a checklist with dichotomous yes\\/no responses and a global assessment section incorporating several different elements. This form was used prospectively to evaluate colonoscopy cases during the period of the study in several university teaching hospitals. Results were analysed using ANOVA with Bonferroni corrections for post-hoc analysis. Results: 81 procedures were assessed, performed by eight consultant and 19 trainee endoscopists. There were no serious errors. When divided into three groups based on previous experience (novice, intermediate and expert) the assessment form demonstrated statistically significant differences between all three groups (p<0.05). When separate elements were taken into account, the global assessment section was a better discriminator of skill level than the checklist. Conclusion: This form is a valid, easy to use assessment method. We intend to use it to assess the value of simulator training in trainee endoscopists. It also has the potential to be a useful training tool when feedback is given to the trainee.

  18. Prevalence of colon polyps detected by colonoscopy screening in asymptomatic black and white patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David; Holub, Jennifer; Moravec, Matthew; Eisen, Glenn; Peters, Dawn; Morris, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Context Compared to whites, Black men and women have a higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer and may develop cancer at a younger age. Colorectal cancer screening might be less effective in Blacks, if there are racial differences in the age-adjusted prevalence and location of cancer precursor lesions. Objectives To determine and compare the prevalence rates and location of polyp(s) >9mm in asymptomatic Blacks and whites who receive colonoscopy screening. Design, Setting, and Patients Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 practice sites in the United States using a computerized endoscopic report generator from 2004–2005. Data were transmitted to a central data repository, where all asymptomatic whites (n = 80,061) and Blacks (n = 5464) who received screening colonoscopy were identified. Main outcome measures Prevalence and location of polyp(s) >9mm, adjusted for age, gender, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis. Results Both Black men and women had a higher prevalence of polyp(s) >9mm (7.7 versus 6.2%; p 9mm (OR 1.133; 95% CI 0.93,1.38). However, in a sub-analysis of patients over age 60 years, proximal polyps >9mm were more likely in Black men (p = 0.026) and women (p9mm, and Black over age 60 years are more likely to proximal polyps >9mm. PMID:18812532

  19. Colonoscopy training for nurse endoscopists : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; Corporaal, Sietske; Giezen-Beintema, Wiesje M.; de Vries, Sietske E.; van Dullemen, Hendrik M.

    Background: Screening by using colonoscopy is recommended in many countries to reduce the risk of death from colorectal cancer. Given the limited supply of medical endoscopists, nurse endoscopists may represent an economic alternative. Objective: To develop a colonoscopy training program for nurse

  20. Motivating Factors Associated With Receipt of Asymptomatic Colonoscopy Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey H Basch

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: A primary care physician′s recommendation may be the most prevalent motivating factor in patients′ decisions to receive a colonoscopy, but a subgroup seeks CRC screening on their own. Analysis of the motivations of individuals who have sought colonoscopy screening may offer useful insights into motivating those who have not.

  1. Automatic and unbiased assessment of competence in colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Søndergaard, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Colonoscopy is a difficult procedure to master. Increasing demands for colonoscopy, due to screening and surveillance programs, have highlighted the need for competent performers. Valid methods for assessing technical skills are pivotal for training and assessment. This study...

  2. Colonoscopy in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria | Ismaila | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colonoscopy is an accurate method of diagnosing colonic disease but is technically demanding and operator dependent. Colonoscopy is not a common procedure in Nigeria. After the restructuring of the endoscopic unit of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria, a preliminary survey was carried out with the aim of ...

  3. Effect Supermint oil (Peppermint oil on children's pain during Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain during colonoscopy, especially in children, including the challenges faced by the medical team. The aim of study was investigation the analgesic effect Supermint oil (peppermint oil on pain in children during colonoscopy. Methods and Materials: In this clinical trial study, 101 children (7-14 years old candidate colonoscopy were randomly divided into two groups, respectively. About half an hour before the colonoscopy case group (n=51 was administrated oral drops Supermint oil (peppermint oil. Patients were filled a pediatric pain questionnaire. In control group (n=50 filled a questionnaire without any administration. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 and (T-test and Paired sample t-test, Corraletion,Man withney. Results: Mean value of pain, duration of colonoscopy in control group was 5/60+1/85 and in case group was 4/20+1/70 and this diference was significant (P

  4. [Colonoscopy with carbon dioxide insufflation: luxury or neccesity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz, Maite

    2013-01-01

    Colonoscopy is an essential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for many gastrointestinal diseases and is also a key element in the prevention and early diagnosis of colon cancer. Despite numerous technical advances, colonoscopy continues to be uncomfortable for patients, both during and after the procedure. To a large extent, the discomfort of colonoscopy depends on the need to distend the colon, which usually produces abdominal pain. Although ambient air is usually employed to expand and inflate the colon, in the last few years devices that allow carbon dioxide (CO(2)) insufflation in colonoscopy have been developed. This gas is a highly attractive option for pain-free colonoscopy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving the Quality of Color Colonoscopy Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahyot Rozenn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colonoscopy is currently one of the best methods to detect colorectal cancer. Nowadays, one of the widely used colonoscopes has a monochrome chipset recording successively at 60 Hz and components merged into one color video stream. Misalignments of the channels occur each time the camera moves, and this artefact impedes both online visual inspection by doctors and offline computer analysis of the image data. We propose to restore this artefact by first equalizing the color channels and then performing a robust camera motion estimation and compensation.

  6. Polyp prevalence at colonoscopy among Nigerians: A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... result of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, 14 (20.9%) for colorectal cancer (CRC) and 13 (19.4%) for routine screening. Thirty-nine (58.2%) patients had the polyps at the rectosigmoid region of the colon, 17 (25.4%) had the polyps located proximal to .... (rectum and sigmoid colon) and proximal colon (from.

  7. The Incomplete Superficial Palmar Arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Azandeh, Saeed; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Nejad, Daryoush Bijan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Superficial palmar arch (SPA) is dominant vascular structure in palm of hand. In present study we described a case of Ulnar / Radiopalmar pattern of incomplete SPA in an Iranian cadaver. When the SPA is complete, the superficial palmer branches of the radial artery contribute to the ulnar artery. In incomplete type of SPA, there was no anastomosis between the ulnar and radial arteries (UA, RA). Case Report: In the present case, the brachial artery divided into RA and UA at the cubital fossa. There was no anastomosis between radial and ulnar arteries (RA, UA) in the palm of the hand. UA gave three palmar digital arteries; proper palmar digital artery and two common palmar digital arteries. RA gave proper palmar digital artery and arteria princeps pollicis. Conclusion: Knowledge of anatomical variation of SPA is important for the hand surgical interventions and this is a very rare variation which can be easily tested clinically by Allen's test PMID:27298904

  8. Transition Complexity of Incomplete DFAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the transition complexity of regular languages based on the incomplete deterministic finite automata. A number of results on Boolean operations have been obtained. It is shown that the transition complexity results for union and complementation are very different from the state complexity results for the same operations. However, for intersection, the transition complexity result is similar to that of state complexity.

  9. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  10. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  11. Characteristics and Diagnostic Yield of Pediatric Colonoscopy in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Ting; Chen, Chih-An; Yang, Yao-Jong

    2015-10-01

    Colonoscopy of the lower gastrointestinal tract has diagnostic and therapeutic value. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the indications, complications, and diagnostic yield of diagnostic colonoscopy among Taiwanese children. The application of colonoscopy performed on children aged chronic abdominal pain (20.6%), iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 11.8%), and chronic diarrhea (11.4%). There were 144 patients (75%) with a conclusive diagnosis in their first colonoscopy, including nonspecific colitis (23.4%), polyp (20.4%), and inflammatory bowel disease (8.3%). The diagnostic yields of colonoscopy according to the major indications were 77.3% in LGIB, 68.1% in chronic abdominal pain, 66.7% in IDA, and 79.2% in chronic diarrhea. Among the patients with LGIB, juvenile polyp (26.4%) was the most common etiology. There were no major procedure-related complications. LGIB is the most common indication for pediatric colonoscopy. Pediatric colonoscopy is most effective in diagnosing pediatric LGIB and chronic diarrhea. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Location of colorectal cancer: colonoscopy versus surgery. Yield of colonoscopy in predicting actual location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum-Guzman, Juan Pablo; Wanderley de Melo, Silvio

    2017-07-01

     Recent studies suggest that differences in biological characteristics and risk factors across cancer site within the colon and rectum may translate to differences in survival. It can be challenging at times to determine the precise anatomical location of a lesion with a luminal view during colonoscopy. The aim of this study is to determine if there is a significant difference between the location of colorectal cancers described by gastroenterologists in colonoscopies and the actual anatomical location noted on operative and pathology reports after colon surgery.  A single-center retrospective analysis of colonoscopies of patient with reported colonic masses from January 2005 to April 2014 (n = 380) was carried. Assessed data included demography, operative and pathology reports. Findings were compared: between the location of colorectal cancers described by gastroenterologists in colonoscopies and the actual anatomical location noted on operative reports or pathology samples.  We identified 380 colonic masses, 158 were confirmed adenocarcinomas. Of these 123 underwent surgical resection, 27 had to be excluded since no specific location was reported on their operative or pathology report. An absolute difference between endoscopic and surgical location was found in 32 cases (33 %). Of these, 22 (23 %) differed by 1 colonic segment, 8 (8 %) differed by 2 colonic segments and 2 (2 %) differed by 3 colonic segments.  There is a significant difference between the location of colorectal cancers reported by gastroenterologists during endoscopy and the actual anatomical location noted on operative or pathology reports after colon surgery. Endoscopic tattooing should be used when faced with any luminal lesions of interest.

  13. Reconstruction tomography from incomplete projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, B.E.

    1975-01-01

    In some instances, reconstruction radionuclide tomography must be carried out from projections that do not include projection values for all portions of the object to be reconstructed. This may occur, for example, when the field of view of the detector is limited, or when an opaque foreign body is present within the object. The effects of such incomplete projections upon reconstructions of computer-simulated phantoms were studied, using iterative and convolution methods. Several methods for reducing the resulting artifacts and inaccuracies are discussed

  14. A randomized controlled trial of an educational video to improve quality of bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Min Su; Kim, HyungKil; Kim, Shin Il; Shin, Chun Ho; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Won Seop; Moon, Soyoung

    2016-06-17

    High-quality bowel preparation is necessary for colonoscopy. A few studies have been conducted to investigate improvement in bowel preparation quality through patient education. However, the effect of patient education on bowel preparation has not been well studied. A randomized and prospective study was conducted. All patients received regular instruction for bowel preparation during a pre-colonoscopy visit. Those scheduled for colonoscopy were randomly assigned to view an educational video instruction (video group) on the day before the colonoscopy, or to a non-video (control) group. Qualities of bowel preparation using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Quality scale (Ottawa score) were compared between the video and non-video groups. In addition, factors associated with poor bowel preparation were investigated. A total of 502 patients were randomized, 250 to the video group and 252 to the non-video group. The video group exhibited better bowel preparation (mean Ottawa total score: 3.03 ± 1.9) than the non-video group (4.21 ± 1.9; P preparation for colonoscopy (total Ottawa score 2.79, P = 0.021), and non-use of visual aids (OR = 3.09, P preparation. In the comparison of the colonoscopic outcomes between groups, the polyp detection rate was not significantly different between video group and non-video group (48/250, 19.2 % vs. 48/252, 19.0 %; P = 0.963), but insertion time was significantly short in video group (5.5 ± 3.2 min) than non-video group (6.1 ± 3.7 min; P = 0.043). The addition of an educational video could improve the quality of bowel preparation in comparison with standard preparation method. Clinical Research Information Service KCT0001836 . The date of registration: March, 08(th), 2016, Retrospectively registered.

  15. Appointment waiting times and education level influence the quality of bowel preparation in adult patients undergoing colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wah-Kheong; Saravanan, Arjunan; Manikam, Jeeta; Goh, Khean-Lee; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2011-07-28

    Risk factors for poor bowel preparation are recognized to be independent of the type of bowel preparation method used. Patient and administrative factors influencing bowel preparation are known to vary in different healthcare systems. A prospective, cross-sectional study of patients undergoing colonoscopy in an Asian tertiary centre was conducted to identify risk factors associated with poor bowel preparation, and to evaluate the impact of poor bowel preparation on technical performance and patient comfort. Data on 501 patients (mean age 60.1 ± 14.0 years old, 51.2% males, 60.9% with secondary education or higher) was available for analysis. Poor bowel preparation was present in 151 patients (30.1%). Lower education level (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.54 - 3.60), colonoscopy appointment waiting time beyond 16 weeks (OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.04 - 3.37) and non-adherence to bowel preparation instructions (OR = 4.76, 95% CI = 3.00 - 7.55) were identified as independent risk factors for poor bowel preparation. Poor bowel preparation was associated with a lower cecal intubation rate (78.1% versus 98.3%, p patient discomfort during colonoscopy (patient with moderate to severe abdominal discomfort 31.8% versus 3.2%, p Education levels and appointment waiting times, in addition to non-adherence to bowel preparation instructions, increase the risk of poor bowel preparation in adult patients undergoing colonoscopy. The latter has a significant impact on colonoscopy performance and patient comfort.

  16. Comparison of split-dosing vs non-split (morning) dosing regimen for assessment of quality of bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hardik; Desai, Devendra; Samant, Hrishikesh; Davavala, Sandeep; Joshi, Anand; Gupta, Tarun; Abraham, Philip

    2014-12-16

    To compare (using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale) the efficacy of split-dose vs morning administration of polyethylene glycol solution for colon cleansing in patients undergoing colonoscopy, and to assess the optimal preparation-to-colonoscopy interval. Single-centre, prospective, randomized, investigator-blind stud in an academic tertiary-care centre. Two hundred patients requiring elective colonoscopy were assigned to receive one of the two preparation regimens (split vs morning) prior to colonoscopy. Main outcome measurements were bowel preparation quality and patient tolerability. Split-dose regimen resulted in better bowel preparation compared to morning regimen [Ottawa score mean 5.52 (SD 1.23) vs 6.02 (1.34); P = 0.017]. On subgroup analysis, for afternoon procedures, both the preparations were equally effective (P = 0.756). There was no difference in tolerability and compliance between the two regimens. Overall, previous evening - same morning split-dosing regimen results in better bowel cleansing for colonoscopy compared to morning preparation. For afternoon procedures, both schedules are equally effective; morning preparation may be more convenient to the patient.

  17. Comparison of split-dosing vs non-split (morning) dosing regimen for assessment of quality of bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hardik; Desai, Devendra; Samant, Hrishikesh; Davavala, Sandeep; Joshi, Anand; Gupta, Tarun; Abraham, Philip

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare (using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale) the efficacy of split-dose vs morning administration of polyethylene glycol solution for colon cleansing in patients undergoing colonoscopy, and to assess the optimal preparation-to-colonoscopy interval. METHODS: Single-centre, prospective, randomized, investigator-blind stud in an academic tertiary-care centre. Two hundred patients requiring elective colonoscopy were assigned to receive one of the two preparation regimens (split vs morning) prior to colonoscopy. Main outcome measurements were bowel preparation quality and patient tolerability. RESULTS: Split-dose regimen resulted in better bowel preparation compared to morning regimen [Ottawa score mean 5.52 (SD 1.23) vs 6.02 (1.34); P = 0.017]. On subgroup analysis, for afternoon procedures, both the preparations were equally effective (P = 0.756). There was no difference in tolerability and compliance between the two regimens. CONCLUSION: Overall, previous evening - same morning split-dosing regimen results in better bowel cleansing for colonoscopy compared to morning preparation. For afternoon procedures, both schedules are equally effective; morning preparation may be more convenient to the patient. PMID:25512770

  18. Mechanical analysis of insertion problems and pain during colonoscopy: why highly skill-dependent colonoscopy routines are necessary in the first place... and how they may be avoided

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeve, Arjo J.; Fockens, Paul; Breedveld, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Colonoscopy requires highly skill-dependent manoeuvres that demand a significant amount of training, and can cause considerable discomfort to patients, which increases the use of sedatives. Understanding the underlying fundamental mechanics behind insertion difficulties and pain during colonoscopy

  19. Demystifying incomplete neutralisation during final devoicing | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , particularly as far as the reliability of the data and the proper explanation of incompleteness are concerned. This paper approaches final devoicing and incompleteness from the perspective of the functions they perform in the phonological ...

  20. Semantic Borders and Incomplete Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Filho, Waldomiro J; Dazzani, Maria Virgínia

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we explore a fundamental issue of Cultural Psychology, that is our "capacity to make meaning", by investigating a thesis from contemporary philosophical semantics, namely, that there is a decisive relationship between language and rationality. Many philosophers think that for a person to be described as a rational agent he must understand the semantic content and meaning of the words he uses to express his intentional mental states, e.g., his beliefs and thoughts. Our argument seeks to investigate the thesis developed by Tyler Burge, according to which our mastery or understanding of the semantic content of the terms which form our beliefs and thoughts is an "incomplete understanding". To do this, we discuss, on the one hand, the general lines of anti-individualism or semantic externalism and, on the other, criticisms of the Burgean notion of incomplete understanding - one radical and the other moderate. We defend our understanding that the content of our beliefs must be described in the light of the limits and natural contingencies of our cognitive capacities and the normative nature of our rationality. At heart, anti-individualism leads us to think about the fact that we are social creatures, living in contingent situations, with important, but limited, cognitive capacities, and that we receive the main, and most important, portion of our knowledge simply from what others tell us. Finally, we conclude that this discussion may contribute to the current debate about the notion of borders.

  1. Causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding on colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.U.; Gul, R.; Khursheed, L.; Hadayat, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bleeding from anus is usually referred as rectal bleeding but actually rectal bleeding is defined as bleeding from lower colon or rectum, which means bleeding from a place distal to ligament of Treitz. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of different causes of rectal bleeding in patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five patients with evidence of rectal bleed, without gender discrimination were selected by non-probability convenient sampling from the out-patient department and general medical wards. Patients with suspected upper GI source of bleeding; acute infectious bloody diarrhoea and any coagulopathy were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to fibre optic colonoscopy after preparation of the gut and findings were recorded. Where necessary, biopsy samples were also taken. Diagnosis was based on colonoscopic findings. Results: A total of 175 patients (92 males and 83 females) with mean age 35.81±9.18 years were part of the study. Colonoscopy showed abnormal findings in 150 (85.7%) patients. The commonest diagnosis was haemorrhoids, which was found in 39 (22.3%) patients. It was followed by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 30 (17.1%) patients, solitary rectal ulcer in 13 (7.4%) patients and polyps in 25 (14.3%) patients. Other less frequent findings were non-specific inflammation and fungating growths in rectum. Conclusion: Haemorrhoids was the leading cause of bleeding per rectum in this study, followed by evidence of IBD while infrequent findings of polyps and diverticuli indicate that these are uncommon in this region. (author)

  2. Risk Factors for Hemorrhoids on Screening Colonoscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne F Peery

    Full Text Available Constipation, a low fiber diet, sedentary lifestyle and gravidity are commonly assumed to increase the risk of hemorrhoids. However, evidence regarding these factors is limited. We examined the association between commonly cited risk factors and the prevalence of hemorrhoids.We performed a cross sectional study of participants who underwent a colonoscopy in a colorectal adenoma prevention trial and who had a detailed assessment of bowel habits, diet and activity. The presence of hemorrhoids was extracted from the subjects' colonoscopy reports. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals while adjusting for age and sex.The study included 2,813 participants. Of these, 1,074 had hemorrhoids recorded. Constipation was associated with an increased prevalence of hemorrhoids (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.11, 1.86. Of the fiber subtypes, high grain fiber intake was associated with a reduced risk (OR for quartile 4 versus quartile 1 = 0.78, 95% CI 0.62, 0.98. We found no association when comparing gravid and nulligravida women (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.62-1.40. Sedentary behavior was associated with a reduced risk (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65-0.98, but not physical activity (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.66-1.03. Neither being overweight nor obese was associated with the presence of hemorrhoids (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.72-1.09 and OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70-1.06.Constipation is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhoids. Gravidity and physical activity do not appear to be associated. High grain fiber intake and sedentary behavior are associated with a decreased risk of hemorrhoids.

  3. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fusion reactions. The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de- excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly ...

  4. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de-excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly smaller than critical ...

  5. The Evolution of Conventions under Incomplete Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitta-Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Jensen, Mogens; Sloth, Birgitte

    to incomplete information of the prototype strategic conflict known as Chicken. The second is an incomplete information bilateral monopoly, which is also an extension to incomplete information of Nash's demand game, or a simple version of the so-called sealed bid double auction. For both games selection...

  6. Assessment of colonoscopy by use of magnetic endoscopic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    performance. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop and explore the validity of an automated, unbiased assessment tool. DESIGN: We tested 10 experienced endoscopists and 11 trainees in colonoscopy on a physical simulator (Kagaku Colonoscope Training Model). Participants were tested with an easy...... and a difficult case. SETTING: Center for Clinical Education, Capital Region of Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: By using magnetic endoscopic imaging, we developed a colonoscopy progression score (CoPS). A pass/fail score was established by using the contrast-group method. RESULTS: We found significant...... in the group. The CoPS does not consider polyp detection rate, tissue damage, or patient discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a score of progression in colonoscopy, based on magnetic endoscopic imaging. With the same tool, a map of progression in colonoscopy can be provided. The CoPS and map of progression...

  7. Combining different methods improves assessment of competence in colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Preisler, Louise

    2017-01-01

    's hands and colonoscopy progression score, respectively. Equal weight (=25%) to all four methods resulted in a reliability of 0.91 and optimal weighting of the methods (55%, 10%, 25% and 10%, respectively) resulted in a maximum reliability of 0.95. CONCLUSION: Combining subjective expert ratings......OBJECTIVES: To develop a reliable method of assessing competence in colonoscopy based on multiple sources. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Physicians with varying degrees of experience in colonoscopy performed two colonoscopies each in a standardized simulated environment. Their performances were assessed...... score calculations were used to explore different combinations of the measures. RESULTS: Twenty physicians were included in the study. The reliability (Cronbach's alpha) were 0.92, 0.57, 0.87 and 0.55 for the subjective score assessed under direct observation, time to cecum, distance between operator...

  8. Colonoscopy Practice in Lagos, Nigeria: A Report of an Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Onyekwere

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colonoscopy effectiveness depends on the quality of the examination. Community-based report of quality of colonoscopy practice in a developing country will help in determining standard and also serve as a stimulus for improvement in service. Aim. To review the quality of colonoscopy practice and document pattern of colonic disease including polyp detection rate in Lagos, Nigeria. Method. A protocol that captured the patients’ demographics, indication, and some quality indices of colonoscopy was developed and sent to all the identified colonoscopy units in Lagos to complete for all procedures performed between January 2011 and June 2012. All data were collated and analyzed. The quality indices studied were compared with guideline standard. Results. Twelve colonoscopy centers were identified but only nine centers responded. The gastroenterologist/endoscopists were physicians (3 and surgeons (5. Six hundred and seven colonoscopy procedures were performed during this period (M : F = 333 : 179 while the sex was not disclosed in 95 subjects. The examination indications were lower GI bleeding (24.2%, altered bowel habits (9.2%, lower abdominal pain (9.1%, screening for CRC (4.3% and unspecified (46.8%. Conscious sedation was generally used while bowel preparation (good in 81.4% was done with low residue diet and stimulant laxatives. Caecal intubation rate was 81.2%. Common endoscopic findings were haemorrhoids (43.2%, polyps/masses (13.4%, diverticulosis (11.1%, and no abnormality (23.4%. Polyp was detected in 6.8% of cases. Conclusion. Colonoscopy utilization is low, and the quality of practice is suboptimal; although limited resources could partly explain this, however it is not clear if the low rate of polyp detection is due to missed lesions or low population incidence.

  9. Audit of colonoscopy practice in Lagos University Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedapo Osinowo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent procurement of new endoscopies and accessories led to the reactivation of diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy services at our center. A preliminary audit is deemed necessary after a 2-year period of open access colonoscopy. Objective: To assess the pattern of indications, diagnostic yield, and selected key performance indicators in the practice of colonoscopy at our tertiary hospital. Patients and Methods: The endoscopy reports of all patients that underwent colonoscopy from January 2012 to April 2014 were reviewed. The demographic data, indications, and endoscopic findings were recorded. Information on cecal intubation, colonoscopy withdrawal time, polyp detection, adverse events, and bowel preparation quality were also extracted and analyzed. Results: Colonoscopy was performed in 149 patients. They were 81 males and 68 females, aged between 18 and 101 years with a mean of 46.9 ± 22.7 years. 126 (84.5% patients had a colonoscopy for symptomatic conditions while 5 (4% were for screening. Bowel preparation was assessed to be excellent in 81 (54.4%, adequate in 42 (28.2%, and inadequate in 26 (17.4% patients, respectively. The cecal intubation rate (CIR was 80.2%, polyp detection rate 7.4%, average colonoscopy withdrawal time was 6 min 53 s, overall diagnostic yield 55.9% and there were no adverse events. Tumors were seen in 19 patients (10.1%; 13 were located in the rectum, three in the sigmoid and three in the descending colon. Conclusion: The audit revealed that our CIR could be improved by a more effective bowel preparation, increased expertise, and procedure volume of endoscopists. Tumors of the colorectum were detected in 10.1% of patients.

  10. Sedation levels during propofol administration for outpatient colonoscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsay, Michael A. E.; Newman, Kate B.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Richardson, Charles T.; Rogers, Lindsay; Brown, Bertrand J.; Hein, H. A. Tillmann; De Vol, Edward B.; Daoud, Yahya A.

    2014-01-01

    The levels of sedation required for patients to comfortably undergo colonoscopy with propofol were examined. One hundred patients undergoing colonoscopy with propofol were enrolled. In addition to standard-of-care monitoring, sedation level was monitored with the Patient State Index (PSI) obtained from a brain function monitor, transcutaneous carbon dioxide (tcpCO2) was monitored with the TCM TOSCA monitor, and end-tidal carbon dioxide was monitored via nasal cannula. The Ramsay Sedation Scor...

  11. Fully convolutional neural networks for polyp segmentation in colonoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Brandao, P.; Mazomenos, E.; Ciuti, G.; Bianchi, F.; Menciassi, A.; Dario, P.; Koulaouzidis, A.; Arezzo, A.; Stoyanov, D.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common and deadliest forms of cancer, accounting for nearly 10% of all forms of cancer in the world. Even though colonoscopy is considered the most effective method for screening and diagnosis, the success of the procedure is highly dependent on the operator skills and level of hand-eye coordination. In this work, we propose to adapt fully convolution neural networks (FCN), to identify and segment polyps in colonoscopy images. We converted three esta...

  12. Impact of Bowel Preparation Quality on Adenoma Identification During Colonoscopy and Optimal Timing of Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Seok; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Lee, Eaum Seok; Kim, Seok Hyun; Sung, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Seok; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Chung, Woo Suk

    2015-10-01

    All present guidelines regarding surveillance intervals after index colonoscopy are based on optimal bowel preparation. However, the appropriate timing of repeat colonoscopy after suboptimal bowel preparation is not clear. To determine the appropriate timing of repeat colonoscopy following index colonoscopy with suboptimal bowel preparation. The medical records of patients who underwent colonoscopy over 5 years were retrospectively analyzed. Index colonoscopy was defined as the first colonoscopy in patients who underwent the procedure at least twice during the study period. Bowel preparation quality was classified as optimal, fair, or poor. The overall adenoma detection rate was 39.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38.0-40.1%), but the detection rate depended significantly on bowel preparation quality (p preparation (p 2.19-6.16) preparation relative to optimal preparation; however, no difference was observed at surveillance intervals >2 years. Bowel preparation quality significantly affects AMR. Colonoscopy should be repeated within 2 years in patients with suboptimal bowel preparation at index colonoscopy.

  13. Image Retrieval Method for Multiscale Objects from Optical Colonoscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Nosato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical colonoscopy is the most common approach to diagnosing bowel diseases through direct colon and rectum inspections. Periodic optical colonoscopy examinations are particularly important for detecting cancers at early stages while still treatable. However, diagnostic accuracy is highly dependent on both the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor. Moreover, it is extremely difficult, even for specialist doctors, to detect the early stages of cancer when obscured by inflammations of the colonic mucosa due to intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis. Thus, to assist the UC diagnosis, it is necessary to develop a new technology that can retrieve similar cases of diagnostic target image from cases in the past that stored the diagnosed images with various symptoms of colonic mucosa. In order to assist diagnoses with optical colonoscopy, this paper proposes a retrieval method for colonoscopy images that can cope with multiscale objects. The proposed method can retrieve similar colonoscopy images despite varying visible sizes of the target objects. Through three experiments conducted with real clinical colonoscopy images, we demonstrate that the method is able to retrieve objects of any visible size and any location at a high level of accuracy.

  14. Application of the BSG guidelines to a colonoscopy waiting list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, D; Tawfiq, S; Harries, B; Sheridan, W

    2009-06-01

    Abstract Objective Currently priority for colonoscopy is given to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Surveillance colonoscopies place a significant demand on the service. These are held on a separate waiting list in our institution, which is currently several years behind. The purpose of this study was to apply the BSG guidelines to this waiting list in our institution in order to ascertain whether patients are appropriately listed. Method This was a retrospective review. The patients on the waiting list whose procedures were due in 2004 and 2005 formed the study group. Information on demographics, previous colonoscopies, and indication was taken from the case notes. Results were analysed using Microsoft Excel. Results A total of 172 patients were overdue their colonoscopies. If the BSG guidelines were strictly adhered to, 49% of these patients were inappropriately listed. If applied less rigidly, 42% of patients should not have been on the list. The reasons for removal from the list were as follows: Thirty-nine patients were older than the upper age limit, 23 had had clear colonoscopies after adenomatous polyp follow up, four were listed for diverticular disease follow up, four for metaplastic polyps, one for constipation and one for per rectum (PR) bleed follow up. Conclusion With strict application of the BSG guidelines to a surveillance colonoscopy waiting list, 49% of the patients on the list do not need the procedure. It is recommended that consultant led education and control of the waiting list be used to reduce unnecessary investigations.

  15. [Preparation for colonoscopy using Golytely--a sure method? Comparative histological and clinical study between lavage and saline laxatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, J; Schubert, G E; Thiel, A; Wolters, U

    1990-07-15

    Looking at clinical side-effects, effectiveness and tolerability, we compared the salinic solution "Golytely" vs. a conventional preparatory procedure (Cascara-Salax) in a prospective study including 28 patients with macroscopic normal mucosa. Mucosal changes in colonic step biopsies were investigated according to prefixed criteria. There was no significant difference concerning weight, blood pressure, pulse rate, body temperature or essential laboratory findings. Whereas preparation using Cascara-Salax was less molesting stated by the patients, there was no difference in the way colonoscopy itself was tolerated in both groups. The performing doctor's evaluation of the colonic cleaning effect and examination conditions showed "Golytely" significantly ahead of Cascara-Salax. Histologically, colonic mucous layers depicted changes in the control groups in 63% vs. 40% in the "Golytely" group. "Golytely" seems to provide a safe and effective method of preparation for colonoscopy.

  16. 19 CFR 4.75 - Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incomplete manifest; incomplete export... Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond. (a) Pro forma manifest. Except as provided for in § 4.75(c), if a master desiring to clear his vessel for a foreign port does not have available for...

  17. Quality of colonoscopy and spectrum of lower gastrointestinal disease as determined by colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, K.U.; Qureshi, M.O.; Salih, M.

    2015-01-01

    To document the quality of colonoscopy practice and the pattern of colonic disease including polyp detection rate at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from May 2013 to June 2014. Methodology: This retrospective study recorded demographics of patients, indications and quality indices of 505 colonoscopies performed during the study period. Preparation was done with low residue diet and polyethylene glycol. Conscious sedation was generally used. Quality indices studied were compared with guideline standard. Results:Out of 505 colonoscopy patients, 305 were males and 200 were females. The indications for colonoscopic examination were lower gastrointestinal bleeding (26.5%, n=134), screening for colorectal cancer (14.1%, n=71), chronic diarrhea (12.9%, n=65), abdominal pain (10.9%, n=55), anemia (9.1%, n=46), constipation (7.3%, n=37), hematochezia and diarrhea (6.3%, n=32), altered bowel habits (5.1%, n=26), weight loss (3.6%, n=18), colonic thickening on CT scan (3.0%, n=15) and others (1.2%, n=6). Bowel preparation was adequate (in 92%, n=465) cases. Cecal intubation rate was 88.71% (n=448). Endoscopic diagnoses were hemorrhoids (36.2%, n=183), normal (22%, n=111), polyps (11.3%, n=57), ulcerative colitis (8.7%, n=44), cancer (4%, n=20), diverticulosis (3.4%, n=17), infective colitis (2.6%, n=13), intestinal TB (2.6%, n=13), non-specific colitis (2.2%, n=11), proctitis (1.8%, n=9) and others (5.3%, n=27). Conclusion: There is room for improvement in quality of colonoscopy, cecal intubation rate is slightly below the recommended standard and polyp detection rate is quite low however, it is not clear if the low rate of polyp detection is due to missed lesions or low population incidence. Time to reach caecum and withdrawal time should clearly be documented in the notes which can help to evaluate quality of the procedure in a better way

  18. Routine Colonoscopy after Acute Uncomplicated Diverticulitis - Challenging a Putative Indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Armando; Ramalho, Rosa; Lopes, Susana; Macedo, Guilherme

    2017-01-01

    Most international guidelines recommend performing a routine colonoscopy after the conservative management of acute diverticulitis, mainly to rule out a colorectal malignancy; however, data to support these recommendations are scarce and conflicting. This study is aimed at determining the rate of advanced colonic neoplasia (ACN) found by colonoscopy, and hence the need for routine colonoscopy after CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis. We retrospectively analyzed all patients hospitalized for acute diverticulitis between July 2008 and June 2013. Patients who underwent colonoscopy more than 1 year after the acute episode were excluded. Advanced adenoma (AA) was defined as an adenoma with: (i) ≥10 mm, (ii) ≥25% villous features, or (iii) high-grade dysplasia. ACN included cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and AA. Of the 364 selected patients, 252 (69%) underwent colonoscopy (51% women, median age 55 ± 11 years). Adenomatous polyps were evident in 14.7% patients; 5.1% had AA and 3.2% had CRC. Patients with complicated diverticulitis had a higher number of ACN compared to those with uncomplicated diverticulitis (20.9 vs. 5.7%, p = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, age ≥50 years (OR 8.12, 95% CI 2.463-45.112; p = 0.017) and abscess on CT (OR 3.15, 95% CI 1.586-11.586; p = 0.036) were identified as significant risk factors for ACN. Patients with diverticulitis complicated with abscess have a higher risk of ACN on follow-up colonoscopy. The prevalence of ACN in patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis is quite similar to the average-risk population, and therefore an episode of CT-diagnosed uncomplicated diverticulitis, per se, does not seem to be a recommendation for colonoscopy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The use of low-volume polyethylene glycol containing ascorbic acid versus 2 L of polyethylene glycol plus bisacodyl as bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Na, Sun-Kyung; Song, Hye-Kyung; Moon, Chang Mo; Kim, Seong-Eun; Shim, Ki-Nam; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Moon, Il Hwan

    2015-08-01

    Low-volume polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparations have been developed to improve compliance for colonoscopy. Our study aimed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of low-volume PEG containing ascorbic acid for colonoscopy against 2 L of PEG plus bisacodyl. We prospectively enrolled consecutive inpatients who had not undergone polypectomy at the index colonoscopy and were subsequently referred for polypectomy at our hospital. A total of 62 patients were randomized to receive either low-volume PEG containing ascorbic acid (n = 31) or 2 L of PEG plus bisacodyl (n = 31) as a split-dose regimen in inpatients. The efficacy of preparation was determined using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Score (OBPS) and a 4-point scale. Adverse events, tolerability, and willingness were evaluated using a questionnaire. Based on the OBPS and 4-point scale, we determined that the efficacy of low-volume PEG containing ascorbic acid was comparable to that of the 2 L of PEG plus bisacodyl (p = 0.071 for OBPS, p = 0.056 for the 4-point scale). Adverse events were comparable between the two groups (p = 1.000). A greater proportion of patients in the low-volume PEG containing ascorbic acid (90.6%) and the 2L of PEG plus bisacodyl (96.9%) were willing to repeat the same preparation for subsequent colonoscopy. Low-volume PEG containing ascorbic acid had comparable efficacy and tolerability to 2 L of PEG plus bisacodyl, when given as a split dose, for colonoscopy in inpatients. Split-dose low-volume PEG containing ascorbic acid is a good alternative for bowel preparation for colonoscopy in inpatients.

  20. Item calibration in incomplete testing designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman D. Verhelst

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the justifiability of item parameter estimation in incomplete testing designs in item response theory. Marginal maximum likelihood (MML as well as conditional maximum likelihood (CML procedures are considered in three commonly used incomplete designs: random incomplete, multistage testing and targeted testing designs. Mislevy and Sheenan (1989 have shown that in incomplete designs the justifiability of MML can be deduced from Rubin's (1976 general theory on inference in the presence of missing data. Their results are recapitulated and extended for more situations. In this study it is shown that for CML estimation the justification must be established in an alternative way, by considering the neglected part of the complete likelihood. The problems with incomplete designs are not generally recognized in practical situations. This is due to the stochastic nature of the incomplete designs which is not taken into account in standard computer algorithms. For that reason, incorrect uses of standard MML- and CML-algorithms are discussed.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Surveillance after Index Colonoscopy: Guidance from the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Leddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences between American (United States [US] and European guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance may create confusion for the practicing clinician. Under- or overutilization of surveillance colonoscopy can impact patient care.

  2. Is colonoscopy necessary in children suspected of having colonic polyps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Lee, Jong Seung; Choe, Yon Ho

    2010-09-01

    The clinical spectrum, histology, and endoscopic features of colonic polyps in the pediatric age group were studied to evaluate the role of colonoscopy in children suspected of having colonic polyps. Seventy-six patients with colorectal polyps were studied. Investigations included barium enema (n=6), sigmoidoscopy (n=17), and colonoscopy (n=53) at the initial visit. Colonoscopy was also performed in 23 patients who received barium enema or sigmoidoscopy. Data related to age, gender, family history, signs, symptoms, size, location, polyp types, and associated diseases were collected and analyzed. Among the 76 patients, juvenile polyps were detected in 58 (76.3%), potentially premalignant polyposis in 17 (22.4%), familial adenomatous polyposis in 11 (14.5%), Peutz-Jegher syndrome in 4 (5.3%), and juvenile polyposis syndrome in 2 (2.6%). Twenty-two patients (28.9%) had polyps in the upper colon. All patients with potentially malignant polyps had polyps in both the upper colon and rectosigmoid colon. Although most of the children with colorectal polyps had juvenile polyps, a significant number of cases showed multiple premalignant and proximally located polyps. This finding emphasizes the need for a colonoscopy in such patients. Thus, the risk of malignant change, particularly in children with multiple polyps, makes surveillance colonoscopy necessary.

  3. Laparoscopic Splenectomy for Traumatic Splenic Injury after Screening Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Abunnaja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy is a widespread diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The most common complications include bleeding and perforation. Splenic rupture following colonoscopy is rarely encountered and is most likely secondary to traction on the splenocolic ligament. Exploratory laparotomy and splenectomy is the most commonly employed therapeutic intervention for this injury reported in the literature. We present the case of a patient with this potentially fatal complication who was treated successfully at our institution. To our knowledge it is the first report in the literature of laparoscopic splenectomy as a successful minimally invasive treatment of splenic rupture following colonoscopy. The patient was a 62-year-old female who underwent screening colonoscopy with polypectomies at the cecum, descending colon and rectum. Immediately following the procedure she developed abdominal pain and had a syncopal episode. Clinical, laboratory and imaging findings were suggestive of hemoperitoneum and a ruptured spleen. A diagnostic laparoscopy was emergently performed and revealed a grade IV splenic laceration and hemoperitoneum. Laparoscopic splenectomy was completed safely and effectively. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful. We conclude that splenic rupture after colonoscopy is a rare but dangerous complication. A high index of suspicion is required to recognize it early. Awareness of this potential complication can lead to optimal patient outcome. Laparoscopic splenectomy may be a feasible treatment option.

  4. A comparative study of standard vs. high definition colonoscopy for adenoma and hyperplastic polyp detection with optimized withdrawal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, J E; Stavrindis, M; Thomas-Gibson, S; Guenther, T; Tekkis, P P; Saunders, B P

    2008-09-15

    Colonoscopy has a known miss rate for polyps and adenomas. High definition (HD) colonoscopes may allow detection of subtle mucosal change, potentially aiding detection of adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. To compare detection rates between HD and standard definition (SD) colonoscopy. Prospective, cohort study with optimized withdrawal technique (withdrawal time >6 min, antispasmodic, position changes, re-examining flexures and folds). One hundred and thirty patients attending for routine colonoscopy were examined with either SD (n = 72) or HD (n = 58) colonoscopes. Groups were well matched. Sixty per cent of patients had at least one adenoma detected with SD vs. 71% with HD, P = 0.20, relative risk (benefit) 1.32 (95% CI 0.85-2.04). Eighty-eight adenomas (mean +/- standard deviation 1.2 +/- 1.4) were detected using SD vs. 93 (1.6 +/- 1.5) with HD, P = 0.12; however more nonflat, diminutive (9 mm) hyperplastic polyps was 7% (0.09 +/- 0.36). High definition did not lead to a significant increase in adenoma or hyperplastic polyp detection, but may help where comprehensive lesion detection is paramount. High detection rates appear possible with either SD or HD, when using an optimized withdrawal technique.

  5. Debt renegotiation with incomplete contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Melo Jorge Neto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A debt contract usually does not include a provision about renegotiation. The right to seize the borrower’s asset and the rules of this process are usually stipulated in the contract. Such a promise not to renegotiate is not credible since renegotiation can mitigate the dead-weight loss of liquidating insolvent borrowers. Once the initial contract may not consider the renegotiation procedure and renegotiation may occur, this paper investigates why a complete contract is not offered. It shows that the lender does not need to stipulate the renegotiation procedure on the initial contract because he is indifferent about committing or not to the terms of a contract. This indicates that a complete contract gives the lender the same expected return as an incomplete contract, in which the renegotiation process is determined after the occurrence of default.Um contrato de débito geralmente não inclui uma cláusula sobre renegociação. O direito de liquidar os ativos do tomador e as regras do processo são habitualmente estipuladas no contrato. Tal promessa de não renegociar não é crível, já que a renegociação pode mitigar a perda bruta de se liquidar tomadores insolventes. Uma vez que o contrato inicial pode não considerar os procedimentos de renegociação, e esta pode, de fato, vir a ocorrer, este artigo investiga a razão de um contrato completo não ser ofertado. Mostra-se que o emprestador não precisa estipular os procedimentos de renegociação no contrato inicial porque ele é indiferente entre se comprometer ou não aos termos do contrato. Isto indica que um contrato completo dá ao emprestador o mesmo retorno esperado de um contrato incompleto, no qual os procedimentos de renegociação são determinados após a declaração de default.

  6. Procedural Skills Education – Colonoscopy as a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitreyi Raman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, surgical and procedural apprenticeship has been an assumed activity of students, without a formal educational context. With increasing barriers to patient and operating room access such as shorter work week hours for residents, and operating room and endoscopy time at a premium, alternate strategies to maximizing procedural skill development are being considered. Recently, the traditional surgical apprenticeship model has been challenged, with greater emphasis on the need for surgical and procedural skills training to be more transparent and for alternatives to patient-based training to be considered. Colonoscopy performance is a complex psychomotor skill requiring practioners to integrate multiple sensory inputs, and involves higher cortical centres for optimal performance. Colonoscopy skills involve mastery in the cognitive, technical and process domains. In the present review, we propose a model for teaching colonoscopy to the novice trainee based on educational theory.

  7. Incomplete linear tibial fractures in two horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.J.; Allhands, R.V.; Baker, G.J.; Boero, M.J.; Foreman, J.H.; Hyyppa, T.; Huhn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Incomplete linear tibial fractures were identified in two horses with the aid of scintigraphy. Both horses were treated successfully by strict stall confinement, and both returned to normal athletic activity. Scintigraphy can be used to facilitate the generally difficult diagnosis of incomplete tibial fractures

  8. Suction v. conventional curettage in incomplete abortion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evacuation of the uterus for incomplete abortion is one of the most common operations performed world-wide. At Harare Central Hospital,. Zimbabwe, over 4 000 patients undergo evacuation for an incomplete abortion each year.' This accounts for. 50% of the emergency gynaecological workload. Most patients satisfy the ...

  9. 40 CFR 152.105 - Incomplete applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Incomplete applications. 152.105 Section 152.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Agency Review of Applications § 152.105 Incomplete...

  10. Is early colonoscopy after CT-diagnosed diverticulitis still necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhardja, Thomas Surya; Norhadi, Shana; Seah, Edward Zhenyu; Rodgers-Wilson, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    WHO GLOBOCAN 2012 data showed that Australia and New Zealand have the highest incidence rates of colorectal cancer in the world (Ferlay et al. 1). Current guidelines recommend that patients admitted for an episode of acute diverticulitis require an early follow-up colonoscopy to rule out colorectal malignancy as reported by Fozard et al. (Colorectal Dis 13:1-11, 2011). Recent studies however have indicated that this may not be warranted (Brar et al. Dis Colon rectum 56:1259-1264, 2013). This study aimed to review the current practice by looking at our institution's rate of colorectal malignancy diagnosed after an episode of acute diverticulitis. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who presented with acute diverticulitis at our institution between 2011 and 2013. Included in the study were patients who received follow-up colonic evaluation in the next 12 months after admission. Patients who had a colonoscopy in the last year prior to emergency presentation were excluded. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of histologically confirmed colorectal carcinoma diagnosed on follow-up colonoscopy. Secondary outcome measures were incidence of low-grade or advanced adenoma on follow-up colonic evaluation. A total of 523 cases of acute diverticulitis were diagnosed on CT scan. Out of 351 patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis, 196 had follow-up colonoscopy, with one case of colorectal malignancy recorded. Low-grade and advanced adenomas were found on 10.7 and 2.0% of colonoscopies performed respectively in this subgroup. Seventy-four out of 172 patients with complicated diverticulitis had follow-up evaluation, with four cases of colorectal malignancy discovered. Low-grade and advanced adenomas were found on 6.75 and 5.41% of colonoscopies performed respectively in this subgroup. Routine interval colonoscopy following an episode of conservatively managed uncomplicated diverticulitis may not be necessary. Interval colonoscopy is still indicated in

  11. UK key performance indicators and quality assurance standards for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Colin J; Thomas Gibson, Siwan; Rutter, Matt D; Baragwanath, Phil; Pullan, Rupert; Feeney, Mark; Haslam, Neil

    2016-12-01

    Colonoscopy should be delivered by endoscopists performing high quality procedures. The British Society of Gastroenterology, the UK Joint Advisory Group on GI Endoscopy, and the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland have developed quality assurance measures and key performance indicators for the delivery of colonoscopy within the UK. This document sets minimal standards for delivery of procedures along with aspirational targets that all endoscopists should aim for. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Expert opinions and scientific evidence for colonoscopy key performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Colin J; Bevan, Roisin; Zimmermann-Fraedrich, Katharina; Rutter, Matthew D; Rex, Douglas; Dekker, Evelien; Ponchon, Thierry; Bretthauer, Michael; Regula, Jaroslaw; Saunders, Brian; Hassan, Cesare; Bourke, Michael J; Rösch, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Colonoscopy is a widely performed procedure with procedural volumes increasing annually throughout the world. Many procedures are now performed as part of colorectal cancer screening programmes. Colonoscopy should be of high quality and measures of this quality should be evidence based. New UK key performance indicators and quality assurance standards have been developed by a working group with consensus agreement on each standard reached. This paper reviews the scientific basis for each of the quality measures published in the UK standards. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. A Case of Taenia asiatica Infection Diagnosed by Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heung Up; Chung, Young-Bae

    2017-02-01

    A case of Taenia asiatica infection detected by small bowel series and colonoscopy is described. The patient was a 42-year-old Korean man accompanied by discharge of movable proglottids via anus. He used to eat raw pig liver but seldom ate beef. Small bowel series radiologic examinations showed flat tape-like filling defects on the ileum. By colonoscopy, a moving flat tapeworm was observed from the terminal ileum to the ascending colon. The tapeworm was identified as T. asiatica by mitochondrial DNA sequencing. The patient was prescribed with a single oral dose (16 mg/kg) of praziquantel.

  14. Incomplete information and fractal phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiuping A.

    2004-01-01

    The incomplete statistics for complex systems is characterized by a so called incompleteness parameter ω which equals unity when information is completely accessible to our treatment. This paper is devoted to the discussion of the incompleteness of accessible information and of the physical signification of ω on the basis of fractal phase space. ω is shown to be proportional to the fractal dimension of the phase space and can be linked to the phase volume expansion and information growth during the scale refining process

  15. [Colonoscopy quality control as a requirement of colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Enrique; Alarcón-Fernández, Onofre; Jover, Rodrigo

    2013-11-01

    The strategies used in population-based colorectal screening strategies culminate in colonoscopy and consequently the success of these programs largely depends on the quality of this diagnostic test. The main factors to consider when evaluating quality are scientific-technical quality, safety, patient satisfaction, and accessibility. Quality indicators allow variability among hospitals, endoscopy units and endoscopists to be determined and can identify those not achieving recommended standards. In Spain, the working group for colonoscopy quality of the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology and the Spanish Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy have recently drawn up a Clinical Practice Guideline that contains the available evidence on the quality of screening colonoscopy, as well as the basic requirements that must be met by endoscopy units and endoscopists carrying out this procedure. The implementation of training programs and screening colonoscopy quality controls are strongly recommended to guarantee the success of population-based colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving Endoscopic Adherence to Quality Metrics in Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jonathan J; Decker, Christopher H; Connolly, Sean E

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate documentation of quality metrics in the endoscopy reports provides evidence that a thorough and complete examination was performed. The aim of our study was to assess compliance with 3 current quality metrics for colonoscopy defined by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. We retrospectively examined colonoscopy reports from 6 gastroenterologists at Ochsner Medical Center for appropriate documentation of the quality of the bowel preparation and photodocumentation of the appendiceal orifice and the ileocecal valve. A performance review and educational session then took place with each physician. Subsequent colonoscopy reports were evaluated to monitor for improvement. Bowel preparation documentation was high before and after the educational sessions (97.5% and 97.2%). Preeducation, the mean photodocumentation rate of the appendiceal orifice was 55% (range, 23%-84%). For the ileocecal valve, the documentation rate was 32.5% (range, 3%-73%). Posteducation, the mean appendiceal orifice labeling increased to an average of 91%, with a median change of 28.5% (P=0.0313). Documentation of the ileocecal valve improved to an average of 73%, a median change of 37.5% (P=0.0625). Although reassessment of subsequent reports will be necessary to evaluate the permanence of this intervention, our evidence suggests that educational sessions can improve the quality and accuracy of documentation of quality metrics during colonoscopies.

  17. Acceptance of Colonoscopy Requires more than Test Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Condon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancer screening, including colonoscopy, lags behind other forms of cancer screening for participation rates. The intrinsic nature of the endoscopic procedure may be an important barrier that limits patients from finding this test acceptable and affects willingness to undergo screening. With colon cancer screening programs emerging in Canada, test characteristics and their impact on acceptance warrant consideration.

  18. Methods for certification in colonoscopy - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2018-01-01

    studies were based on small sample sizes. The studies were categorized after outcome measures into five groups: Clinical process related outcome metrics (n = 2), direct observational colonoscopy assessment (n = 8), simulator based metrics (n = 11), automatic computerized metrics (n = 2), and self...

  19. Computed Tomographic Virtual Colonoscopy to Screen for Colorectal Neoplasia in asymptomatic adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Choi, J Richard; Hwang, Inku and others

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the performance characteristics of computed tomographic (CT) virtual colonospy for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in an average-risk screening population. A total of 1233 symptomatic adults (mean age, 57.8 years) underwent same-day virtual and optical colonoscopy. Radiologists used the three-dimensional endoluminal display for the initial detection of polyps on CT virtual colonoscopy. For the initial examination of each colonic segment, the colonoscopists were unaware of the findings on virtual colonoscopy, which were revealed to them before any subsequent reexamination. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual colonoscopy and the sensitivity of optical colonoscopy were calculated with the use of the findings of the final, unblinded optical colonoscopy as the reference standard. The sensitivity of virtual colonoscopy for adenomatous polyps was 93.8 percent for polyps at least 10 mm in diameter, 93.9 percent for polyps at least 8 mm in diameter, and 88.7 percent for polyps at least 6 mm in diameter. The sensitivity of optical colonoscopy for adenomatous polyps was 87.5 percent, 91.5 percent, and 92.3 percent for the three sizes of polyps, respectively. The specificity of virtual colonoscopy for adenomatous polyps was 96.0 percent for polyps at least 10 mm in diameter, 92.2 percent for polyps at least 8 mm in diameter, and 79.6 percent for polyps at least 6 mm in diameter.Two polyps were malignant; both were detected on virtual colonoscopy, and one of them was missed on optical colonoscopy before the results on virtual colonoscopy were revealed. CT virtual colonoscopy with the use of a three-dimensional approach is an accurate screening method for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic average-risk adults and compares favorably with optical colonoscopy in terms of the detection of clinically relevant lesions

  20. Incomplete albinism in Discoglossus pictus (Otth, 1837

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Spadola

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors present an incomplete albinism case in a Discoglossus pictus subject found in Sicily. This is the first note for Italian territory, the second for the species and the third for Discoglossus genus.

  1. Quantum Bertrand duopoly of incomplete information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Gan; Chen Xi; Sun Min; Du Jiangfeng

    2005-01-01

    We study Bertrand's duopoly of incomplete information. It is found that the effect of quantum entanglement on the outcome of the game is dramatically changed by the uncertainty of information. In contrast with the case of complete information where the outcome increases with entanglement, when information is incomplete the outcome is maximized at some finite entanglement. As a consequence, information and entanglement are both crucial factors that determine the properties of a quantum oligopoly

  2. Can we ease the financial burden of colonoscopy? Using real-time endoscopic assessment of polyp histology to predict surveillance intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, S; Parker, F; Lontos, S; Vaughan, R; Efthymiou, M

    2015-12-01

    Polyps identified at colonoscopy are predominantly diminutive (1%) of high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma; however, the cost of histological assessment is substantial. The aim of this study was to determine whether prediction of colonoscopy surveillance intervals based on real-time endoscopic assessment of polyp histology is accurate and cost effective. A prospective cohort study was conducted across a tertiary care and private community hospital. Ninety-four patients underwent colonoscopy and polypectomy of diminutive (≤5 mm) polyps from October 2012 to July 2013, yielding a total of 159 polyps. Polyps were examined and classified according to the Sano-Emura classification system. The endoscopic assessment (optical diagnosis) of polyp histology was used to predict appropriate colonoscopy surveillance intervals. The main outcome measure was the accuracy of optical diagnosis of diminutive colonic polyps against the gold standard of histological assessment. Optical diagnosis was correct in 105/108 (97.2%) adenomas. This yielded a sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values (with 95%CI) of 97.2% (92.1-99.4%), 78.4% (64.7-88.7%), 90.5% (83.7-95.2%) and 93% (80.9-98.5%) respectively. Ninety-two (98%) patients were correctly triaged to their repeat surveillance colonoscopy. Based on these findings, a cut and discard approach would have resulted in a saving of $319.77 per patient. Endoscopists within a tertiary care setting can accurately predict diminutive polyp histology and confer an appropriate surveillance interval with an associated financial benefit to the healthcare system. However, limitations to its application in the community setting exist, which may improve with further training and high-definition colonoscopes. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. A prospective descriptive study of the management of miscarriages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the current management of incomplete miscarriage at Harare and Parirenyatwa Hospitals and to determine the proportion of patients with incomplete miscarriage managed with Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA), sharp curettage or medical evacuation. Design: A prospective descriptive study.

  4. Quality is the key for emerging issues of population-based colonoscopy screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young Yoon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy is currently regarded as the gold standard and preferred method of screening for colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the benefit of colonoscopy screening may be blunted by low participation rates in population-based screening programs. Harmful effects of population-based colonoscopy screening may include complications induced by colonoscopy itself and by sedation, psychosocial distress, potential over-diagnosis, and socioeconomic burden. In addition, harmful effects of colonoscopy may increase with age and comorbidities. As the risk of adverse events in population-based colonoscopy screening may offset the benefit, the adverse events should be managed and monitored. To adopt population-based colonoscopy screening, consensus on the risks and benefits should be developed, focusing on potential harm, patient preference, socioeconomic considerations, and quality improvement of colonoscopy, as well as efficacy for CRC prevention. As suboptimal colonoscopy quality is a major pitfall of population-based screening, adequate training and regulation of screening colonoscopists should be the first step in minimizing variations in quality. Gastroenterologists should promote quality improvement, auditing, and training for colonoscopy in a population-based screening program.

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Colonoscopy Depends on Adequate Bowel Preparation Rates - A Modeling Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Kingsley

    Full Text Available Inadequate bowel preparation during screening colonoscopy necessitates repeating colonoscopy. Studies suggest inadequate bowel preparation rates of 20-60%. This increases the cost of colonoscopy for our society.The aim of this study is to determine the impact of inadequate bowel preparation rate on the cost effectiveness of colonoscopy compared to other screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC.A microsimulation model of CRC screening strategies for the general population at average risk for CRC. The strategies include fecal immunochemistry test (FIT every year, colonoscopy every ten years, sigmoidoscopy every five years, or stool DNA test every 3 years. The screening could be performed at private practice offices, outpatient hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers.At the current assumed inadequate bowel preparation rate of 25%, the cost of colonoscopy as a screening strategy is above society's willingness to pay (<$50,000/QALY. Threshold analysis demonstrated that an inadequate bowel preparation rate of 13% or less is necessary before colonoscopy is considered more cost effective than FIT. At inadequate bowel preparation rates of 25%, colonoscopy is still more cost effective compared to sigmoidoscopy and stool DNA test. Sensitivity analysis of all inputs adjusted by ±10% showed incremental cost effectiveness ratio values were influenced most by the specificity, adherence, and sensitivity of FIT and colonoscopy.Screening colonoscopy is not a cost effective strategy when compared with fecal immunochemical test, as long as the inadequate bowel preparation rate is greater than 13%.

  6. A Study of Incomplete Abortion Following Medical Method of Abortion (MMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawde, Anuya A; Ambadkar, Arun; Chauhan, Anahita R

    2016-08-01

    Medical method of abortion (MMA) is a safe, efficient, and affordable method of abortion. However, incomplete abortion is a known side effect. To study incomplete abortion due to medication abortion and compare to spontaneous incomplete abortion and to study referral practices and prescriptions in cases of incomplete abortion following MMA. Prospective observational study of 100 women with first trimester incomplete abortion, divided into two groups (spontaneous or following MMA), was administered a questionnaire which included information regarding onset of bleeding, treatment received, use of medications for abortion, its prescription, and administration. Comparison of two groups was done using Fisher exact test (SPSS 21.0 software). Thirty percent of incomplete abortions were seen following MMA; possible reasons being self-administration or prescription by unregistered practitioners, lack of examination, incorrect dosage and drugs, and lack of follow-up. Complications such as collapse, blood requirement, and fever were significantly higher in these patients compared to spontaneous abortion group. The side effects of incomplete abortions following MMA can be avoided by the following standard guidelines. Self medication, over- the-counter use, and prescription by unregistered doctors should be discouraged and reported, and need of follow-up should be emphasized.

  7. Zero-sum games with incomplete definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprzeuzkouski, Alain

    1976-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author proposes three methods of resolution of incompletely defined games. According to the first one, combined strategies are introduced in an incompletely defined matrix game. According to the second and new one, a new strategy type (C-strategies) is defined for which the payoff function is always defined but not necessarily unequivocal. This leads to assume the existence of a referee who will decide the payoff assigned to players when they use these C-strategies which generate several possibilities. According to the last one, players are informed of the referee's choice. The three methods are compared, and the author shows that they are equivalent to the conventional method of resolution of matrix games in the case of a completely defined game. In another part, the author applied results obtained for incompletely defined matrix games to the case of multi-stage games with target

  8. Incomplete Sparse Approximate Inverses for Parallel Preconditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzt, Hartwig; University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN; Huckle, Thomas K.; Bräckle, Jürgen; Dongarra, Jack

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new preconditioning method that can be seen as a generalization of block-Jacobi methods, or as a simplification of the sparse approximate inverse (SAI) preconditioners. The “Incomplete Sparse Approximate Inverses” (ISAI) is in particular efficient in the solution of sparse triangular linear systems of equations. Those arise, for example, in the context of incomplete factorization preconditioning. ISAI preconditioners can be generated via an algorithm providing fine-grained parallelism, which makes them attractive for hardware with a high concurrency level. Finally, in a study covering a large number of matrices, we identify the ISAI preconditioner as an attractive alternative to exact triangular solves in the context of incomplete factorization preconditioning.

  9. Intravenous contrast enhanced computed tomography colonoscopy in children with suspected colonic polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anmol; Saxena, Akshay K; Kalra, Naveen; Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Thapa, Babu R; Rao, Katragadda L N; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of intravenous contrast enhanced computed tomographic colonoscopy (IVCTC) in the diagnosis of clinically suspected colorectal polyps in children, using conventional colonoscopy (CC) as the gold standard. This was a prospective study conducted between July 2008 and June 2010. 30 pediatric patients with history of rectal bleeding and clinically suspected to have colorectal polyps were enrolled. All of the patients underwent IVCTC followed by CC. 30 IVCTC and 31 CC were performed in 30 patients. The findings of IVCTC were compared with those of CC. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain diagnostic performance values of IVCTC on per polyp (sensitivity and positive predictive value) and per patient (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value) basis. By IVCTC, 63 polyps were detected in 28 patients of which 53 polyps were eligible for inclusion in the statistical analysis. 60 polyps were detected by CC in 28 patients of which 50 polyps were eligible for inclusion in the statistical analysis. The per polyp sensitivity and positive predictive values were 94% and 88.6% respectively. The per patient sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values were 96.4, 50, 96.4, and 50% respectively. Twenty polyps, in 10 patients, were visualized only after intravenous contrast administration of which 5 polyps, in 5 patients, were likely to have been missed in the absence of the intravenous contrast injection as these polyps were submerged in fluid. Four patients would have had a false negative CTC examination if the intravenous contrast had not been injected; while in another patient, the number of polyps would have been underestimated. CTC is capable of serving as a safe and efficient non-invasive tool for evaluating children with clinically suspected colorectal polyps. Administration of intravenous contrast improves the sensitivity of

  10. Intravenous contrast enhanced computed tomography colonoscopy in children with suspected colonic polyps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Anmol; Saxena, Akshay K.; Kalra, Naveen; Sodhi, Kushaljit S.; Thapa, Babu R.; Rao, Katragadda L.N.; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of intravenous contrast enhanced computed tomographic colonoscopy (IVCTC) in the diagnosis of clinically suspected colorectal polyps in children, using conventional colonoscopy (CC) as the gold standard. Methods: This was a prospective study conducted between July 2008 and June 2010. 30 pediatric patients with history of rectal bleeding and clinically suspected to have colorectal polyps were enrolled. All of the patients underwent IVCTC followed by CC. 30 IVCTC and 31 CC were performed in 30 patients. The findings of IVCTC were compared with those of CC. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain diagnostic performance values of IVCTC on per polyp (sensitivity and positive predictive value) and per patient (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value) basis. Results: By IVCTC, 63 polyps were detected in 28 patients of which 53 polyps were eligible for inclusion in the statistical analysis. 60 polyps were detected by CC in 28 patients of which 50 polyps were eligible for inclusion in the statistical analysis. The per polyp sensitivity and positive predictive values were 94% and 88.6% respectively. The per patient sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values were 96.4, 50, 96.4, and 50% respectively. Twenty polyps, in 10 patients, were visualized only after intravenous contrast administration of which 5 polyps, in 5 patients, were likely to have been missed in the absence of the intravenous contrast injection as these polyps were submerged in fluid. Four patients would have had a false negative CTC examination if the intravenous contrast had not been injected; while in another patient, the number of polyps would have been underestimated. Conclusion: CTC is capable of serving as a safe and efficient non-invasive tool for evaluating children with clinically suspected colorectal polyps. Administration of

  11. Micro robot prototype for colonoscopy and in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Yan, G

    2007-01-01

    For actively diagnosing the colon's pathologies micro-invasively or non-invasively, an autonomous prototype of the earthworm-like robot for colonoscopy was designed according to the principle of bionics, and manufactured using precision process technology. In vitro experiments in pig colon were carried out. The micro robot was driven directly by an electromagnetic linear driver. The mobile cells were joined with joints of two degrees of freedom, and the whole body was flexible. The direction of movement and the angle of imaging can be controlled by the shape memory alloy (SMA). In experiments, locomotion efficient and locomotion ability was analysed carefully. Locomotion force and velocity were tested. In vitro experiments in pig colon demonstrated that the micro robot can navigate though the colon by itself reliably and freely, which will be useful for the application of the robot to colonoscopy in the clinic.

  12. Pericoronal radiolucency associated with incomplete crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo

    2013-01-01

    The author experienced 8 cases of pericoronal radiolucency involving an incomplete tooth crown that had not developed to form the cemento-enamel junction, and the underdeveloped crown sometimes appeared to be floating within the radiolucency radiographically. The first impression was that these cystic lesions had odontogenic keratocysts, but half of them turned out to be dentigerous cysts histopathologically. There has been no report concerning odontogenic cysts involving an incompletely developed crown. The purpose of this paper is to report that dentigerous cysts may develop before the completion of the cemento-enamel junction of a developing crown.

  13. Pericoronal radiolucency associated with incomplete crown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The author experienced 8 cases of pericoronal radiolucency involving an incomplete tooth crown that had not developed to form the cemento-enamel junction, and the underdeveloped crown sometimes appeared to be floating within the radiolucency radiographically. The first impression was that these cystic lesions had odontogenic keratocysts, but half of them turned out to be dentigerous cysts histopathologically. There has been no report concerning odontogenic cysts involving an incompletely developed crown. The purpose of this paper is to report that dentigerous cysts may develop before the completion of the cemento-enamel junction of a developing crown.

  14. Contractual Incompleteness, Unemployment, and Labour Market Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmann, Steffen; Falk, Armin; Grunewald, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This article provides evidence that involuntary unemployment, and the segmentation of labour markets into firms offering "good" and "bad" jobs, may both arise as a consequence of contractual incompleteness.We provide a simple model that illustrates how unemployment and market segmentation may...... jointly emerge as part of a market equilibrium in environments where work effort is not third-party verifiable. Using experimental labour markets that differ only in the verifiability of effort, we demonstrate empirically that contractual incompleteness can cause unemployment and segmentation. Our data...

  15. Trends in quality of screening colonoscopy in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Elisabeth; Gessl, Irina; Sallinger, Daniela; Jeschek, Philip; Britto-Arias, Martha; Heinze, Georg; Fasching, Elisabeth; Weiss, Werner; Gschwantler, Michael; Trauner, Michael; Ferlitsch, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Background and study aim: Screening colonoscopy only effectively prevents colorectal cancer if performed with high quality. The aim of this study was to analyze the detection rates of premalignant colorectal lesions in screening colonoscopies performed within a nationwide quality control program for screening colonoscopy in Austria. Methods: Data from electronic records of the screening program from its implementation in 2007 until December 2014 were analyzed in order to calculate detection rates for adenomas, advanced adenomas, polyps, and proximal lesions, and rates of cecal intubation, sedation, complications, and adequate bowel preparation. Results were evaluated to identify trends and changes in quality parameters over the 8-year study period. Results: During the study period, 301 endoscopists provided data from 159 246 screening colonoscopies. Mean age of screened individuals was 61.1 years, and 49.1 % were women. Significant increases over time were found for age- and sex-adjusted adenoma detection rates (ADRs), which increased from a mean of 22.2 % (SD 10.7 %) in 2007/2008 to 24.2 % (SD 11.6 %) in 2013/2014. On average, each endoscopist increased their individual ADR by + 1.5 percentage points per 2-year period (95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.9 - 2.2 percentage points; P  Austria between 2007 and 2014. Although, overall ADR increased significantly during the study period, there was a decrease in the rate of advanced adenoma detection. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Prevention, early detection, and overdiagnosis of colorectal cancer within 10 years of screening colonoscopy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Hermann; Altenhofen, Lutz; Stock, Christian; Hoffmeister, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Screening colonoscopy was introduced in Germany in October 2002. We aimed to quantify its effects on prevention, early detection, and overdiagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the 10 years since its introduction. We analyzed data from more than 4.4 million screening colonoscopies (conducted on individuals 55-79 years old from 2003 through 2012) available through the national screening colonoscopy registry. CRCs prevented, detected earlier than they would have been without screening, and overdiagnosed (cancers detected at screening colonoscopy that would not have become clinically manifest during the patient's lifetime) were estimated by Markov models. Model parameters included sex-specific and age-specific findings at screening colonoscopy; mortality; rates of transition from nonadvanced to advanced adenoma, advanced adenoma to preclinical cancer, or preclinical cancer to clinically manifest cancer; and protection from screening colonoscopy. Overall, approximately 180,000 CRCs (1/28 screening colonoscopies) were estimated to have been prevented, and more than 40,000 CRCs (1/121 screening colonoscopies) were detected earlier than they would have been without screening, compared with approximately 4500 overdiagnoses (1/1089 screening colonoscopies). Almost all CRCs prevented or detected earlier than they would have been without screening resulted from screening colonoscopies performed on individuals up to 75 years old (97% and 89%, respectively), whereas 28% of overdiagnoses occurred from screening colonoscopies of individuals older than 75 years old. On the basis of a 10-year analysis of data from a national registry in Germany, screening colonoscopies have large potential for prevention and early detection of CRC, with low risk of overdiagnosis. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of colonoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric lower gastrointestinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jae Hong

    2010-01-01

    The safety and effectiveness of colonoscopy in the investigation of lower gastrointestinal tract pathology in children has been established for more than 2 decades in Korea. Skill and experience have since advanced to the point that both diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy are now routinely performed by most pediatric gastroenterologists. Pediatric colonoscopy differs significantly from its adult parallels in nearly every aspect including patient and parent management and preparation, sele...

  18. Outcomes of Early Versus Delayed Colonoscopy in Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Using a Hospital Administrative Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Neha; Patel, Parita; Sengupta, Neil

    2017-09-28

    Limited data exist on whether early colonoscopy for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) alters 30-day mortality, performance of endoscopic intervention, or need for blood transfusion. Our primary objective was to determine whether early colonoscopy in LGIB is associated with decreased 30-day mortality using a large hospital administrative database. Patients hospitalized between January 2008 and September 2015 were identified using a validated, machine learning algorithm for identifying patients with LGIB. "Early" colonoscopy occurred by day 2 of admission and "late" colonoscopy between days 3 and 5. A propensity score for early colonoscopy was constructed using plausible confounders. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to determine factors associated with 30-day mortality, endoscopic intervention, and transfusion need. The propensity score was included as a confounding factor for mortality analysis in the multivariable model. In total, 1204 patients underwent colonoscopy for LGIB. Of these, 295 patients (25%) underwent early colonoscopy, and these patients had a lower Charlson Comorbidity Index (P=0.001) and shorter length of stay (3 vs. 5 d, P=0.0001). Early colonoscopy was not associated with decreased 30-day mortality [odds ratio (OR), 0.73; confidence interval (CI), 0.27-1.69], but was associated with increased endoscopic intervention (OR, 2.62; CI, 1.37-4.95) and decreased need for transfusion (OR, 0.65; CI, 0.49-0.87). On multivariable analysis adjusting for timing of colonoscopy, age, and propensity score for early colonoscopy, early colonoscopy was not associated with a decrease in 30-day mortality (OR, 1.37; CI, 0.50-3.79). Early colonoscopy does not affect 30-day mortality but may allow for earlier endoscopic intervention and decreased transfusion need.

  19. Quality in Colonoscopy: Beyond the Adenoma Detection Rate Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Taveira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colonoscopy quality is a hot topic in gastroenterological communities, with several actual guidelines focusing on this aspect. Although the adenoma detection rate (ADR is the single most important indicator, several other metrics are described and need reporting. Electronic medical reports are essential for the audit of quality indicators; nevertheless, they have proved not to be faultless. Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse and audit quality indicators (apart from ADR using only our internal electronic endoscopy records as a starting point for improvement. Methods: An analysis of electronically recorded information of 8,851 total colonoscopies from a single tertiary centre from 2010 to 2015 was performed. Results: The mean patient age was 63.4 ± 8.5 years; 45.5% of them were female, and in 14.6% sedation was used. Photographic documentation was done in 98.4% with 10.7 photographs on average, and 37.4% reports had p p p = 0.002 and “adequate” bowel preparation (p = 0.004. Conclusions: There is much more to report than the ADR to ensure quality in colonoscopy practice. Better registry systematization and integrated software should be goals to achieve in the short term.

  20. Reiki as a pain management adjunct in screening colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Alda L; Sullivan, Mary E; Winter, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of Reiki decreases the amount of meperidine administered to patients undergoing screening colonoscopy. The literature review reveals limited studies to show whether Reiki has been able to decrease the amount of opioid the patient receives during screening colonoscopy. A chart review of 300 patients was conducted to obtain baseline average doses of meperidine patients received as the control. Following the chart review, 30 patients were recruited to the Reiki study. Twenty-five of the study arm patients received Reiki in conjunction with meperidine. Five randomly chosen study arm patients received placebo Reiki in conjunction with meperidine in an attempt to blind the clinicians to the treatment received by the patients. Results showed that there were no significant differences in meperidine administration between the patients in the chart review group (control) and the Reiki group. The study revealed that 16% who received Reiki, together with intravenous administration of conscious sedation, received less than 50 mg of meperidine. All the patients in the chart review group received more than 50 mg of meperidine. Results from this pilot study suggest that there may be a decrease in meperidine needed during screening colonoscopy when patients receive Reiki treatments before the procedure. A larger study powered to detect smaller medication differences is the next step in more accurately determining the effect of Reiki on pain management.

  1. [Bowel preparation for colonoscopy. Any significant progress on the horizon?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Sánchez, Liseth; Pellisé, María

    2015-04-01

    Colonoscopy is the method of choice for colorectal cancer screening. To be effective, screening colonoscopy must have high quality standards. The key element is the quality of the preparation. However, up to 20% of patients are inadequately prepared and, at present, anterograde washing is the least tolerated part of the procedure. In the choice of preparation, safety is a prerequisite and efficacy is a priority. Tolerance is a secondary but nevertheless influential factor in the quality of preparation and has consequently been the primary focus of many recent studies. In the last few years, a rapidly increasing number of studies have evaluated new drugs, dosages and adjuvant therapies to improve efficacy and tolerability. These studies have collaterally shown that inadequate preparation and lack of adherence to the prescribed regimen can be partially predicted, making it essential to identify this patient subgroup and invest the necessary effort in their instruction. New individualized and flexible approaches are expected for the different clinical scenarios. The search for the ideal colonoscopy preparation, which would be tolerable, safe and above all effective, remains open. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  2. AFRICAN-AMERICANS’ AND LATINOS’ PERCEPTIONS OF USING HYPNOSIS TO ALLEVIATE DISTRESS BEFORE A COLONOSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sarah J.; Schnur, Julie B.; Montgomery, Guy H.; Jandorf, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) screenings can effectively detect and prevent cancer, a large portion of African-Americans and Latinos do not undergo regular colonoscopy screening. Research suggests that anticipatory distress can significantly hinder minorities’ adherence to colonoscopy recommendations. There is significant promise that hypnosis may effectively reduce such distress. The current study examined African-Americans’ and Latinos’ (n = 213) perceptions of using hypnosis prior to a colonoscopy. Overall, 69.9% of the sample expressed favourable perceptions of using pre-colonoscopy hypnosis, although there was notable variability. The results from this study can guide clinical decision making and inform future research efforts. PMID:26566440

  3. Editorial: On the Quality of Quality Metrics: Rethinking What Defines a Good Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominitz, Jason A; Spiegel, Brennan

    2016-05-01

    The colonoscopy quality assurance movement has focused on a variety of process metrics, including the adenoma detection rate (ADR). However, the ADR only ascertains whether or not at least one adenoma is identified. Supplemental measures that quantify all neoplasia have been proposed. In this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, Aniwan and colleagues performed tandem screening colonoscopies to determine the adenoma miss rate among high-ADR endoscopists. This permitted validation of supplemental colonoscopy quality metrics. This study highlights potential limitations of ADR and the need for further refinement of colonoscopy quality metrics, although logistic challenges abound.

  4. Prune belly syndrome associated with incomplete VACTERL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghritlaharey R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A Prune Belly syndrome with VATER/VACTERL association is an extremely rare. They are either stillborn or die within few days of life, only few such cases have been reported in literature. We are presenting here a male neonate of Prune Belly syndrome associated with incomplete VACTERL with brief review of literature.

  5. Higher Education's Grade for Data: "Incomplete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebel, Sara

    2008-01-01

    The latest national report card on higher education, as in the past, handed out a lot of "incompletes." Like the student who keeps forgetting to turn in that lab report, the grades can't be computed without all the data. There's a lot policy makers don't know about their states' higher-education performance, and the gaps in information limit the…

  6. 32 CFR 651.44 - Incomplete information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Impact Statement § 651.44 Incomplete information... adverse impacts on the human environment. (4) An evaluation of such impacts based upon theoretical...

  7. Scalable tensor factorizations for incomplete data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acar, Evrim; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; KOlda, Tamara G.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of incomplete data—i.e., data with missing or unknown values—in multi-way arrays is ubiquitous in biomedical signal processing, network traffic analysis, bibliometrics, social network analysis, chemometrics, computer vision, communication networks, etc. We consider the problem of how ...

  8. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Heavy-ion reactions; incomplete fusion; isomeric cross-section ratio; 12C, 16O beams; 93Nb; 89Y targets; angular momentum. ... R Tripathi1 A Goswami1. Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain 456 010, India ...

  9. Kurt Gödel, completeness, incompleteness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 1 (2007), 012005_1-012005_4 E-ISSN 1742-6596. [Brno Kurt Gödel Days. Brno, 25.04.2007-28.04.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100300503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Kurt Gödel * completeness * incompleteness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  10. Another look at the second incompleteness theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study proofs of some general forms of the Second Incompleteness Theorem. These forms conform to the Feferman format, where the proof predicate is xed and the representation of the axiom set varies. We extend the Feferman framework in one important point: we allow the interpretation

  11. Another look at the second incompleteness theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study proofs of some general forms of the Second Incompleteness Theorem. These forms conform to the Feferman format, where the proof predicate is fixed and the representation of the axiom set varies. We extend the Feferman framework in one important point: we allow the

  12. Computerized tests to evaluate recovery of cognitive function after deep sedation with propofol and remifentanil for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrat, Xavier; Ubre, Marta; Risco, Raquel; Gambús, Pedro L; Pedroso, Angela; Iglesias, Aina; Fernandez-Esparrach, Gloria; Ginés, Àngels; Balust, Jaume; Martínez-Palli, Graciela

    2018-03-27

    The use of sedation for diagnostic procedures including gastrointestinal endoscopy is rapidly growing. Recovery of cognitive function after sedation is important because it would be important for most patients to resume safe, normal life soon after the procedure. Computerized tests have shown being accurate descriptors of cognitive function. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the time course of cognitive function recovery after sedation with propofol and remifentanil. A prospective observational double blind clinical study conducted in 34 young healthy adults undergoing elective outpatient colonoscopy under sedation with the combination of propofol and remifentanil using a target controlled infusion system. Cognitive function was measured using a validated battery of computerized cognitive tests (Cogstate™, Melbourne, Australia) at different predefined times: prior to starting sedation (Tbaseline), and then 10 min (T10), 40 min (T40) and 120 min (T120) after the end of colonoscopy. Tests included the assessment of psychomotor function, attention, visual memory and working memory. All colonoscopies were completed (median time: 26 min) without significant adverse events. Patients received a median total dose of propofol and remifentanil of 149 mg and 98 µg, respectively. Psychomotor function and attention declined at T10 but were back to baseline values at T40 for all patients. The magnitude of psychomotor task reduction was large (d = 0.81) however 100% of patients were recovered at T40. Memory related tasks were not affected 10 min after ending sedation. Cognitive impairment in attention and psychomotor function after propofol and remifentanil sedation was significant and large and could be easily detected by computerized cognitive tests. Even though, patients were fully recovered 40 min after ending the procedure. From a cognitive recovery point of view, larger studies should be undertaken to propose adequate criteria for discharge

  13. Colonoscopy in the diagnosis of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Borba de Souza e Benevides

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding originated from a source distal to the Treitz ligament and the colonoscopy is well established as the diagnostic procedure of choice. Objective: To evaluate the results of colonoscopies performed to diagnose the cause of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a general hospital at Mato Grosso do Sul. Material and methods: Colonoscopy procedures performed in the Endoscopy service of the Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul in those patients admitted due to an acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding from January 2014 to December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The studied variables were age, gender, diagnosis and localization of the lesion. Results: The mean age was 66 years, and there was a little predominance of the male gender. Diverticular disease was the main cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in this study, followed by cancer, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease, polyps, and angiodysplasia. Conclusion: The colonoscopy showed to be an effective diagnostic method in the case of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding and a good therapeutic tool in the case of diverticular disease and angiodysplasia. Resumo: Hemorragia digestiva baixa é definida como sangramento originado de uma fonte distal ao ligamento de Treitz e a colonoscopia esta bem estabelecida como o seu procedimento diagnóstico de escolha. Objetivo: Avaliar os resultados das colonoscopias realizadas para elucidação diagnóstica dos casos de Hemorragia digestiva baixa aguda em um Hospital Geral de Mato Grosso do Sul. Materiais e métodos: Foram analisadas, de forma retrospectiva, as colonoscopias realizadas nos pacientes internados devido à hemorragia digestiva baixa aguda, no período de janeiro de 2014 a dezembro de 2015, no serviço de endoscopia digestiva do Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul. As variáveis estudadas foram a idade, sexo, diagnóstico e localização da lesão. Resultados: A média de

  14. Reinvitation to screening colonoscopy: a randomized-controlled trial of reminding letter and invitation to educational meeting on attendance in nonresponders to initial invitation to screening colonoscopy (REINVITE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisera, Malgorzata; Kaminski, Michal F; Kraszewska, Ewa; Rupinski, Maciej; Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-05-01

    The response rate to initial invitation to population-based primary screening colonoscopy within the NordICC trial (NCT 00883792) in Poland is around 50%. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a reinvitation letter and invitation to an educational intervention on participation in screening colonoscopy in nonresponders to initial invitation. Within the NordICC trial framework, individuals living in the region of Warsaw, who were drawn from Population Registries and assigned randomly to the screening group, received an invitation letter and a reminder with a prespecified screening colonoscopy appointment date. One thousand individuals, aged 55 to 64 years, who did not respond to both the invitation and the reminding letter were assigned randomly in a 1:1 ratio to the reinvitation group (REI) and the educational meeting group (MEET). The REI group was sent a reinvitation letter and reminder 6 and 3 weeks before the new colonoscopy appointment date, respectively. The MEET group was sent an invitation 6 weeks before an educational meeting date. Outcome measures were participation in screening colonoscopy within 6 months and response rate within 3 months from the date of reinvitation or invitation to an educational meeting. The response rate and the participation rate in colonoscopy were statistically significantly higher in the REI group compared with the MEET group (16.5 vs. 4.3%; Pletter results in a higher response rate and participation rate to screening colonoscopy than invitation to tailored educational meeting in nonresponders to previous invitations. (NCT01183156).

  15. Comparison of manual vacuum aspiration and misoprostol in the management of incomplete abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabkika Bray Madoue

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incomplete abortions can be managed expectantly, surgically and medically (using misoprostol. Expectant management is safe in places where women have access to information, appropriate care and follow-up; however, in isolated and poor areas women who come for help need an intervention. Objective: To compare the efficiency of manual vacuum aspiration (MVA and misoprostol in the treatment of incomplete abortion. Patients and method: This was a prospective study over five months from March to August 2015. All patients admitted with a diagnosis of incomplete abortion were recruited into the study. Results: 308 patients with incomplete abortion were randomized into two treatment groups - MVA (done under local anaesthesia and misoprostol (400 micrograms by the vaginal route. MVA was successfully performed for all patients. Two patients presented with anaemia. In the misoprostol group, 23 patients had vaginal bleeding, and 10 persistence of incomplete abortion. Conclusion: MVA is more effective than misoprostol with less complications in the treatment of incomplete abortion when it is done by a trained person.

  16. Reasons for Participation and Nonparticipation in Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Trial of Colonoscopy and CT Colonography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wijkerslooth, Thomas R.; de Haan, Margriet C.; Stoop, Esther M.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Thomeer, Maarten; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Fockens, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Stoker, Jaap; Dekker, Evelien

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We compared reported reasons for participation and nonparticipation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening between colonoscopy and computed tomographic (CT) colonography in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: We randomly invited 8,844 people for screening by colonoscopy or CT

  17. Time of day variation in polyp detection rate for colonoscopies performed on a 3-hour shift schedule.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Munson, Gregory W

    2011-03-01

    Recent research suggests that the colonoscopy polyp detection rate (PDR) varies by time of day, possibly because of endoscopist fatigue. Mayo Clinic Rochester (MCR) schedules colonoscopies on 3-hour shifts, which should minimize fatigue.

  18. Comparisons of Rigid Proctoscopy, Flexible Colonoscopy, and Digital Rectal Examination for Determining the Localization of Rectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akira; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Okada, Kazutake; Saito, Gota

    2018-02-01

    Rigid proctoscopy is considered essential for rectal tumor localization, although the current gold standard for detection of colorectal cancers is colonoscopy. The European Society for Medical Oncology Guidelines indicate that rigid and flexible endoscopies afford essentially identical results, although little evidence is yet available to support this. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of colonoscopy in identifying the location of rectal cancer and to compare the results with those of rigid proctoscopy and digital rectal examination. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospective database. The study was conducted at a single tertiary colorectal surgery referral center. A total of 173 patients scheduled for curative surgery for histologically verified rectal adenocarcinoma between December 2009 and February 2015 were entered into the study, after having given informed consent. The main study measure was the mean difference and limits of agreement in assessment of the height of the distal edge of rectal cancer from the anal verge, using the Bland and Altman method. The mean difference between rigid proctoscopy and flexible colonoscopy was -0.2 cm (95% CI, -2.0 to 1.6 cm). The mean difference between rigid proctoscopy and digital rectal examination was 0.3 cm (95% CI, 1.9 to 2.4 cm). Intermethod variability larger than the 95% CI between rigid and flexible endoscopes was correlated to the tumor height (OR, 4.27 (95% CI, 1.84-3.10); p = 0.021). This study was conducted in a single center. The limits of agreement (-2.0 and 1.6 cm) in identifying the height of rectal cancers from the anal verge are sufficiently small to support the view that flexible colonoscopy provides similar tumor locations to those measured by rigid proctoscopy, although the discrepancy occasionally exceeded 2 cm for tumors >5 cm above the anal verge. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A405.

  19. Advanced incomplete factorization algorithms for Stiltijes matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Il`in, V.P. [Siberian Division RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The modern numerical methods for solving the linear algebraic systems Au = f with high order sparse matrices A, which arise in grid approximations of multidimensional boundary value problems, are based mainly on accelerated iterative processes with easily invertible preconditioning matrices presented in the form of approximate (incomplete) factorization of the original matrix A. We consider some recent algorithmic approaches, theoretical foundations, experimental data and open questions for incomplete factorization of Stiltijes matrices which are {open_quotes}the best{close_quotes} ones in the sense that they have the most advanced results. Special attention is given to solving the elliptic differential equations with strongly variable coefficients, singular perturbated diffusion-convection and parabolic equations.

  20. Past incompleteness of a bouncing multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu, E-mail: jun.zhang@tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    According to classical GR, Anti-de Sitter (AdS) bubbles in the multiverse terminate in big crunch singularities. It has been conjectured, however, that the fundamental theory may resolve these singularities and replace them by nonsingular bounces. This may have important implications for the beginning of the multiverse. Geodesics in cosmological spacetimes are known to be past-incomplete, as long as the average expansion rate along the geodesic is positive, but it is not clear that the latter condition is satisfied if the geodesic repeatedly passes through crunching AdS bubbles. We investigate this issue in a simple multiverse model, where the spacetime consists of a patchwork of FRW regions. The conclusion is that the spacetime is still past-incomplete, even in the presence of AdS bounces.

  1. Clustering Incomplete Spectral Data with Robust Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äyrämö, S.; Pölönen, I.; Eskelinen, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    Missing value imputation is a common approach for preprocessing incomplete data sets. In case of data clustering, imputation methods may cause unexpected bias because they may change the underlying structure of the data. In order to avoid prior imputation of missing values the computational operations must be projected on the available data values. In this paper, we apply a robust nan-K-spatmed algorithm to the clustering problem on hyperspectral image data. Robust statistics, such as multivariate medians, are more insensitive to outliers than classical statistics relying on the Gaussian assumptions. They are, however, computationally more intractable due to the lack of closed-form solutions. We will compare robust clustering methods on the bands incomplete data cubes to standard K-means with full data cubes.

  2. Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis with Incomplete Double Ureter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaro Hayashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP is a type of chronic renal inflammation that usually occurs in immunocompromised middle-aged women with chronic urinary tract infection or ureteral obstruction induced by the formation of ureteral stones. XGP with an incomplete double ureter is extremely rare. Case Presentation. A 76-year-old woman was referred to our department to undergo further examination for a left renal tumor that was detected by ultrasonography. Dynamic contrast computed tomography (CT revealed an enhanced tumor in the upper renal parenchyma. Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed based on a preoperative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Histological sections showed the aggregation of foam cells; thus, XGP was diagnosed. Conclusion. We herein report a rare case of XGP in the upper pole of the kidney, which might have been associated with an incomplete double ureter.

  3. Lossy Channel Games under Incomplete Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayna Dimitrova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate lossy channel games under incomplete information, where two players operate on a finite set of unbounded FIFO channels and one player, representing a system component under consideration operates under incomplete information, while the other player, representing the component's environment is allowed to lose messages from the channels. We argue that these games are a suitable model for synthesis of communication protocols where processes communicate over unreliable channels. We show that in the case of finite message alphabets, games with safety and reachability winning conditions are decidable and finite-state observation-based strategies for the component can be effectively computed. Undecidability for (weak parity objectives follows from the undecidability of (weak parity perfect information games where only one player can lose messages.

  4. Unpartitioned versus incompletely partitioned cochleae: radiologic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennaroglu, Levent; Saatci, Isil

    2004-07-01

    In the process of evaluating our patients, we realized that the term "Mondini deformity" was being used to describe two different types of incomplete partition of the cochlea. THE First one consisted of an unpartitioned, completely empty cochlea where the interscalar septum and entire modiolus were absent, giving the cochlea a cystic appearance; a grossly dilated vestibule accompanied this lesion. The second pathology fitted the classic description of Mondini deformity, consisting of a normal basal turn and cystic apex (where the middle and apical turns form a cystic cavity), dilated vestibule, and enlarged vestibular aqueduct. This study was planned to investigate the differences between the two types of incomplete partition for inner ear malformations based on radiologic features. We conducted a retrospective review of temporal bone computed tomography (CT) findings. The subjects were 18 patients with profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who had high-resolution CT with contiguous 1-mm thick images obtained through the petrous bone in axial sections. The CT results were reviewed as incomplete partition type I (IP-I) and type II (IP-II). Incomplete partition type I (unpartitioned cochlea, cystic cochleovestibular malformation) is defined as a malformation in which the cochlea lacks the entire modiolus and interscalar septa, resulting in a cystic appearance and there is an accompanying grossly dilated vestibule. In incomplete partition type II (incompletely partitioned cochlea, the Mondini deformity), there is a cochlea comprised of a normal basal turn and cystic apex accompanied by a minimally dilated vestibule and enlarged vestibular aqueduct (VA). Measurements involving the cochlea, vestibule, vestibular aqueduct, and internal auditory canal (IAC) were done to determine the characteristic features of these pathologies. : Thirteen ears had IP-I and 18 ears had IP-II anomaly. The size of the cochleae in both anomalies showed no significant difference from

  5. Diagnostic accuracy and tolerability of contrast enhanced CT colonoscopy in symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozsunar, Yelda; Coskun, Guelten; Delibas, Naciye; Uz, Burcin; Yuekselen, Vahit

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We compared the accuracy and tolerability of intravenous contrast enhanced spiral computed tomography colonography (CTC) and optical colonoscopy (OC) for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic patients for colorectal neoplasia. Methods: A prospective study was performed in 48 patients with symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer. Spiral CTC was performed in supine and prone positions after colonic cleansing. The axial, 2D MPR and virtual endoluminal views were analyzed. Results of spiral CTC were compared with OC which was done within 15 days. The psychometric tolerance test was asked to be performed for both CTC and colonoscopy after the procedure. Results: Ten lesions in 9 of 48 patients were found in CTC and confirmed with OC. Two masses and eight polyps, consisted of 1 tubulovillous, 1 tubular, 2 villous adenoma, 4 adenomatous polyp, 4 adenocarcinoma, were identified. Lesion prevalence was 21%. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values were found 100%, 87%, 89%, 67% and 100%, respectively. Psychometric tolerance test showed that CTC significantly more comfortable comparing with OC (p = 0.00). CTC was the preferred method in 37% while OC was preferred in 6% of patients. In both techniques, the most unpleasant part was bowel cleansing. Conclusion: Contrast enhanced CTC is a highly accurate method in detecting colorectal lesions. Since the technique was found to be more comfortable and less time consuming compare to OE, it may be preferable in management of symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer.

  6. Derivatives of the Incomplete Beta Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Boik

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The incomplete beta function is defined as where Beta(p, q is the beta function. Dutka (1981 gave a history of the development and numerical evaluation of this function. In this article, an algorithm for computing first and second derivatives of Ix,p,q with respect to p and q is described. The algorithm is useful, for example, when fitting parameters to a censored beta, truncated beta, or a truncated beta-binomial model.

  7. Corruption in PPPs, Incentives and Contract Incompleteness

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Iossa; David Martimort

    2014-01-01

    In a public procurement setting, we discuss the desirability of completing contracts with state-contingent clauses providing for monetary compensations to the contractor when revenue shocks occur. Realized shocks are private information of the contractor and this creates agency costs of delegated service provision. Verifying the contractor’s messages on the shocks entails contracting costs that make incomplete contracts attractive, despite their higher agency costs. A public official (supervi...

  8. Therapy for Severe Gestoses in Incomplete Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Pavlova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve pregnancy outcomes in severe gestosis. Subjects and methods: Sixty-five women with incomplete pregnancy in presence of severe gestosis were examined and the status of 65 neonatal babies was evaluated in the early neonatal period. The women were allocated into 3 groups: 1 19 pregnant women were urgently operated on for severe admission condition (preeclampsia; 2 22 pregnant women received standard therapy for gestosis; 3 24 had standard therapy for gestosis in combination with 6% solution of the hydroxyethyl starch Stabisol®. Results. During gestosis therapy, pregnancy prolongation was 4.5±1.2 bed/days in Group 2 and averaged 7.6±1.6 bed/days in Group 3. The rate of neonatal referral to an intensive care unit was 63.1, 50.0, and 37.5% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Referral to a neonatal pathology unit at the second stage of nursing was required in 100, 77.2, and 62.5% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Conclusion. The use of 6% solution of the hydroxyethyl starch Stabisol® in complex therapy for gestosis in incomplete pregnancy prolongs pregnancy, accelerates rehabilitation in puerperas, prevents respiratory distress syndrome in full measure, and improves the neonatal adaptation period and perinatal outcomes as a whole. Key words: severe gestosis, incomplete pregnancy, 6% solution of Stabisol®.

  9. Examining the Impact of Latino Nativity, Migration, and Acculturation Factors on Colonoscopy Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas-Muñiz, Rosario; Jandorf, Lina; Philip, Errol; Cohen, Noah; Villagra, Cristina; Sriphanlop, Pathu; Schofield, Elizabeth; DuHamel, Katherine

    2016-10-01

    Latinos are a diverse population comprised of multiple countries of origin with varying cultural profiles. This study examines differences in colonoscopy completion across place of birth and migration-related factors in a sample of predominantly Dominican and Puerto Rican Latinos living in New York City after receiving a recommendation for colonoscopy screening and navigation services. The sample included 702 Latinos recruited for two cancer screening projects targeting Latinos eligible for colonoscopy who seek healthcare in New York City. Participants completed a survey that included sociodemographic, health-related questions, psychosocial assessments and cancer screening practices, in Spanish or English. Migration, acculturation, and language factors were found to predict colonoscopy completion. The results indicated that Latinos born in the Dominican Republic and Central America were more likely to complete a screening colonoscopy than their counterparts born in the US. Further, those who emigrated at an older age, who have resided in the US for less than 20 years, preferred Spanish and those with lower US acculturation levels were also more likely to complete a screening colonoscopy. The findings suggest that Latinos who are less acculturated to the US are more likely to complete a screening colonoscopy after receiving a physician recommendation for colonoscopy screening. The results provide important information that can inform clinical practice and public health interventions. Continued attention to cultural and migration influences are important areas for cancer screening intervention development.

  10. No increased risk of perforation during colonoscopy in patients undergoing Nurse Administered Propofol Sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Hadikhadem, Talie; Andersen, Lærke Toftegård

    2013-01-01

    colonoscopies performed with either NAPS or conventional sedation regimes. Material and methods. Data were retrospectively retracted from medical journals from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011. All journals were examined and cross-referenced to reveal any perforations. We analyzed all colonoscopies in regard...

  11. Long-term risk of colorectal cancer after negative colonoscopy in a Danish gFOBT screening cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Andreas; Andersen, Ole; Fischer, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) is implemented in several countries. Approximately half of all screen positive persons have negative colonoscopy, but consensus is lacking on how these persons should be followed up. Health authorities in Denmark and The Nether...... to improve colonoscopy quality have been successful in ensuring low CRC risk after negative colonoscopy also in FOBT positive persons....

  12. Patient anxiety before invasive diagnostic examinations: coronarography, arteriography, and colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryz, J.; Izdebski, P.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to answer such questions as: 1) Do patients show higher levels of anxiety (cognitive and/or physiological rates) before invasive examinations? 2) Does the type of invasive diagnostic examinations influence the patients' anxiety level? 3) Does the level of the patients' knowledge about coronarography, arteriography, or colonoscopy cause differences in their anxiety levels? The study was conducted at the Military Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz in the Departments of Gastroenteriology, Radiology, and Cardiology and in the Clinic of General Surgery, Chest and Vessels, and lasted seven months, from August 2002 to February 2003. 93 patients (29 women and 64 men) qualifying for different invasive examinations participated in the study. The participants were divided in three groups. The first consisted of patients awaiting coronarography, the second arteriography of the lower limbs, and the third colonoscopy. The participants were chosen on the basis of medical criteria. A structured interview was used to assess their levels of knowledge about the invasive examination they were to undergo. Anxiety was assessed with the Inventory of State and Trait Anxiety and by blood pressure measurement. On the basis of the obtained data we conclude that patients awaiting invasive examinations have higher physiological anxiety rates and that the type of invasive examination significantly influences patient anxiety levels. The type of examination did not differentiate patients according to their cognitive rates of anxiety: the level was average. The levels of patient knowledge about coronarography, colonoscopy, and arteriography did not cause any differences in physiological and cognitive rates of anxiety. The authors conclude that the cognitive aspects of anxiety do not influence the way patients experience physiological anxiety before invasive examinations. (author)

  13. Midazolam versus diazepam for combined esophogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, D E; Leventhal, R; Kumar, S; Berman, D; Kajani, M; Yoo, Y K; Carra, J; Tarter, R; Van Thiel, D H

    1989-08-01

    This study compares the effects of two different benzodiazepines used for conscious sedation during combined upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy. Subjects were assessed for their degree of analgesia and amnesia for the procedure, prior experience with endoscopy, and willingness to undergo another similar procedure should such be necessary. The patients were randomized single blind to receive either midazolam or diazepam for their preprocedure sedation. The amount of preprocedure sedation utilized was determined by titration of the dose to achieve slurring of speech. Prior to receiving either agent, the subjects were shown a standard card containing pictures of 10 common objects, were asked to name and remember them, and were told they would be "quizzed" (at 30 min and 24 hr) after being sedated for their recollection as to the objects pictured on the card. Each subject filled out a questionnaire addressing their perceived discomfort during the endoscopic procedure and their memory of the procedure 24 hr after the procedure. Sixty-three percent of the midazolam-sedated subjects reported total amnesia for their colonoscopy vs 20% of diazepam-sedated patients (P less than 0.001). Fifty-three percent of midazolam-sedated patients reported total amnesia of their upper gastrointestinal endoscopy vs only 23% of diazepam-sedated subjects (P less than 0.05). The midazolam-sedated subjects reported experiencing less pain with both upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (P less than 0.05) and colonoscopy (P less than 0.001) than did the diazepam-sedated group. Most importantly, the midazolam group was more willing to undergo another similar endoscopic procedure should they be asked to do so by their physician (P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Essays on incomplete contracts in regulatory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Eduardo Humberto

    This dissertation consists of three essays. The first essay, The Hold-Up Problem in Public Infrastructure Franchising, characterizes the equilibria of the investment decisions in public infrastructure franchising under incomplete contracting and ex-post renegotiation. The parties (government and a firm) are unable to credibly commit to the contracted investment plan, so that a second step investment is renegotiated by the parties at the revision stage. As expected, the possibility of renegotiation affects initial non-verifiable investments. The main conclusion of this essay is that not only underinvestment but also overinvestment in infrastructure may arise in equilibrium, compared to the complete contracting case. The second essay, Alternative Institutional Arrangements in Network Utilities: An Incomplete Contracting Approach, presents a theoretical assessment of the efficiency implications of privatizing natural monopolies which are vertically related to potential competitive firms. Based on the incomplete contracts and asymmetric information paradigm. I develop a model that analyzes the relative advantages of different institutional arrangements---alternative ownership and market structures in the industry--- in terms of their allocative and productive efficiencies. The main policy conclusion of this essay is that both ownership and the existence of conglomerates in network industries matter. Among other conclusions, this essay provides an economic rationale for a mixed economy in which the network is public and vertical separation of the industry when the natural monopoly is under private ownership. The last essay, Opportunistic Behavior and Legal Disputes in the Chilean Electricity Sector, analyzes post-contractual disputes in this newly privatized industry. It discusses the presumption that opportunistic behavior and disputes arise due to inadequate market design, ambiguous regulation, and institutional weaknesses. This chapter also assesses the presumption

  15. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papanikolaou IS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ioannis S Papanikolaou,1 Pantelis S Karatzas,2 Lazaros T Varytimiadis,2 Athanasios Tsigaridas,2 Michail Galanopoulos,2 Nikos Viazis,2 Dimitrios G Karamanolis21Hepato-gastroenterology Unit, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Attikon University General Hospital, University of Athens, 2Gastroenterology Department, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists.Keywords: endoscopy, colonoscopy, teaching techniques, simulator, endoscopists, colon, polyps

  16. Narrative message targets within the decision-making process to undergo screening colonoscopy among Latinos: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennelly, Marie Oliva; Sly, Jamilia R; Villagra, Cristina; Jandorf, Lina

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a preventable yet leading cause of cancer mortality among Latinos in the USA. Cultural targeting and narrative messaging are two strategies to increase the low screening colonoscopy rates among Latinos. This study identifies key messages for educational interventions aiming to increase screening colonoscopy used among Latinos and proposes a model to understand the relationship between factors involved in colonoscopy decision-making. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 Latino participants primarily of Puerto Rican descent on the topics of CRC knowledge, barriers and facilitators to colonoscopy use, and the use of narrative in colorectal health messaging. Knowledge about colorectal anatomy and the anesthesia component of colonoscopy procedure is low. Fear of procedure-related pain and fear of treatment-related burden following a cancer diagnosis are significant barriers to colonoscopy. Fear of disease-related suffering and death following a cancer diagnosis and fear of regret are strong facilitators and can be augmented by cancer narratives. Storytelling is commonly used in Latino culture and is an acceptable method to educate the Latino community about CRC screening via colonoscopy. Machismo is a unique barrier to colonoscopy for Latino men via homophobia and reluctance to seek healthcare. A preliminary model to understand factors in colonoscopy decision-making among Latinos is presented. Counseling practices and educational interventions that use culturally targeted narrative health messaging to mediate fears and increase colonoscopy knowledge may increase screening colonoscopy use among Latinos.

  17. Occult blood test and colonoscopy in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusen Toledo, Yunia; Chao Gonzalez, Lissette; Barroso Marquez, Lisset

    2009-01-01

    A descriptive-prospective study was conducted on 212 outpatients from the Gastroenterology Service at CIMEQ's Hospital from January 2006- May 2007. These patients received an immune-chemical test of hidden blood in fecal stools and an endoscopic colon study, with the objective of determining the value of the hidden blood and colonoscopy for the detection of colorrectal cancer. Age average was 60, 6 ± 14,0 years, with predominance of the female sex. The main clinical condition for this study was to observe the change of intestinal habits in a 28, 3 % of patients, The test performed on hidden blood was positive in 76 patients (36,0%) and 34 (16,0%) had positive colorrectal cancer diagnosis, of which a 50% was localized at the proximal colon; 91,12% of the neoplasias were of the adenocarcinoma-type, where moderately differentiated ones predominated. A sensitiveness of a 76, 47 % and of a 71,91 % specificity were obtained when evaluating the efficacy of hidden blood in the diagnosis of neoplasias

  18. Use of automated irrigation pumps improves quality of bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sujan; Sabbagh, Rana; Antaki, Fadi

    2016-03-25

    To evaluate the effectiveness of automated irrigation pumps (AIPs) in improving the quality of the bowel preparation and the yield of colonoscopy. A retrospective observational study was conducted at a single medical center. Outpatient colonoscopies performed during a 4-mo time period when AIPs were not in use, were compared to colonoscopies performed during control period. The main outcomes measured were quality of bowel preparation, procedures aborted due to poor preparation, recommendations to repeat at short interval due to sub-optimal bowel preparation and adenoma detection rates. One thousand and thirty-seven colonoscopies were included. A higher proportion of cases did not achieve a satisfactory bowel preparation when AIPs were not used (24.4% vs 10.3%, P preparation was not significantly different, however a repeat procedure at a short interval was recommended in a higher proportion of cases when AIPs were not used (21.3% vs 6.9%, P preparation was 2.91 (95%CI: 2.04-4.15) times more likely when AIPs were used. Detection of polyps and adenomas was not significantly different. AIP use during colonoscopy results in a higher proportion of colonic preparation rated as satisfactory, although polyp detection rate is not significantly affected. Recommendations for repeat colonoscopy at shorter interval significantly decrease with the use of AIPs. This study supports the use of the irrigation pumps in endoscopy units to improve the quality of colonoscopy.

  19. Colonoscopy after Hinchey I and II left-sided diverticulitis: utility or futility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Avery S; Bingham, Jason R; Janssen, Karmon M; Johnson, Eric K; Maykel, Justin A; Ocampo, Omar; Gonzalez, John P; Steele, Scott R

    2016-11-01

    Modern 64- to 128-slice computed tomography (CT) scanners have questioned the need for routine colonoscopy after hospital admission for presumed uncomplicated diverticulitis. This is a retrospective review of all patients (>18 years) who underwent planned colonoscopy after admission for Hinchey I or II acute diverticulitis (January 2009 to January 2014). The findings on the final radiologist report were then correlated with the colonoscopy results. In total, 110 patients (mean age, 55.2 ± 16; 46.4% female) underwent a subsequent colonoscopy (median, 60 days) after admission for diverticulitis. Overall, 102 patients (92.7%) had CT findings consistent with definitive diverticulitis, 6 patients had a diagnosis suggestive of diverticulitis on CT scan, and 2 patients had masses on their admission CT scans. Within the group with definitive diverticulitis, follow-up colonoscopy identified diverticulosis in 99 (97.0%), whereas the other 3 had normal findings. Of the patients with CT scans suggestive of diverticulitis, follow-up colonoscopy showed 3 with diverticulosis, 2 with malignancies, and 1 with nonspecific inflammation. The reliability of CT scans for diverticulitis compared with colonoscopy was found to have a kappa = .829 (P diverticulitis in the absence of other concerning or indeterminate findings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Effect of Robotic-Assisted Gait Training in Patients With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Ji Yong; Park, Han Kyul; Kim, Na Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) compared to conventional overground training. Methods Sixty patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial by comparing RAGT to conventional overground training. The RAGT group received RAGT three sessions per week at duration of 40 minutes with regular physiotherapy in 4 weeks. The conventional group underwent regular physiotherapy twice a day, 5 times...

  1. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for incomplete automobile... AUTOMOBILES § 529.4 Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, §§ 529.5 and 529.6, each incomplete automobile manufacturer is considered, with...

  2. A new version of an old modal incompleteness theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosmaer, J.

    2010-01-01

    Thomason [5] showed that a certain modal logic L⊂ S4 is incomplete with respect to Kripke semantics. Later Gerson [3] showed that L is also incomplete with respect to neighborhood semantics. In this paper we show that L is in fact incomplete with respect to any class of complete Boolean algebras

  3. Goedel incompleteness theorems and the limits of their applicability. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, Lev D

    2011-01-01

    This is a survey of results related to the Goedel incompleteness theorems and the limits of their applicability. The first part of the paper discusses Goedel's own formulations along with modern strengthenings of the first incompleteness theorem. Various forms and proofs of this theorem are compared. Incompleteness results related to algorithmic problems and mathematically natural examples of unprovable statements are discussed. Bibliography: 68 titles.

  4. Leadership training to improve adenoma detection rate in screening colonoscopy: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michal F; Anderson, John; Valori, Roland; Kraszewska, Ewa; Rupinski, Maciej; Pachlewski, Jacek; Wronska, Ewa; Bretthauer, Michael; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal adenoma detection rate (ADR) at colonoscopy is associated with increased risk of interval colorectal cancer. It is uncertain how ADR might be improved. We compared the effect of leadership training versus feedback only on colonoscopy quality in a countrywide randomised trial. 40 colonoscopy screening centres with suboptimal performance in the Polish screening programme (centre leader ADR ≤ 25% during preintervention phase January to December 2011) were randomised to either a Train-Colonoscopy-Leaders (TCLs) programme (assessment, hands-on training, post-training feedback) or feedback only (individual quality measures). Colonoscopies performed June to December 2012 (early postintervention) and January to December 2013 (late postintervention) were used to calculate changes in quality measures. Primary outcome was change in leaders' ADR. Mixed effect models using ORs and 95% CIs were computed. The study included 24,582 colonoscopies performed by 38 leaders and 56,617 colonoscopies performed by 138 endoscopists at the participating centres. The absolute difference between the TCL and feedback groups in mean ADR improvement of leaders was 7.1% and 4.2% in early and late postintervention phases, respectively. The TCL group had larger improvement in ADR in early (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.01; p<0.001) and late (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.66; p=0.004) postintervention phases. In the late postintervention phase, the absolute difference between the TCL and feedback groups in mean ADR improvement of entire centres was 3.9% (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.50; p=0.017). Teaching centre leaders in colonoscopy training improved important quality measures in screening colonoscopy. NCT01667198. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Guidelines versus real life practice: the case of colonoscopy in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, M; Dassie, F; Russo, L; Mazzocut, S; Ferrata, M; De Carlo, E; Mioni, R; Fallo, F; Vettor, R; Martini, C; Maffei, P

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate guideline application and colonoscopy findings in real-life practice in acromegaly. We conducted a retrospective observational non-interventional and cross-sectional analysis on 146 patients with acromegaly (ACRO) referred to our clinic. We evaluated colonoscopy data, focusing on the correlation between colonoscopy findings and hormonal/metabolic values. The total number of colonoscopies performed in ACRO patients increased from 6 in the period 1990-1994 to 57 in the period 2010-2014. Colonoscopy procedures were performed according to guidelines in 25% of ACRO patients at diagnosis, 51% at follow-up and 11% globally (both at diagnosis and follow-up). Among the 146 ACRO patients, 68% were subjected to at least one colonoscopy and in 32% of the cases a polyp was detected during the procedure. The presence of polyps was significantly associated with mean levels of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), fasting glucose and insulin levels (p < 0.05). Polyps were detected in 48% of untreated patients and in 26% of patients under treatment for acromegaly (p = 0.04). The general risk of polyps and adenomatous polyps in ACRO patients was higher compared to the control population of Veneto Region, Italy (odds ratio 1.33 and 1.16, respectively). No cancerous polyps were detected in our analysis. In real-life practice, adherence to ACRO colonoscopy clinical guidelines was lower than expected. Among patients who underwent colonoscopy, the prevalence of colon polyps was higher for ACRO patients, suggesting the need for new strategies to ensure adherence to colonoscopy guidelines.

  6. Effect of oxygen on tachycardia and arterial oxygen saturation during colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, C; Christensen, M; Schulze, S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of supplementary oxygen on heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation during colonoscopy. DESIGN: Controlled study. SETTING: Two university hospitals, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 40 patients having colonoscopy. INTERVENTIONS: 20 patients were given supplementary oxygen...... colonoscopy. RESULTS: There were no differences in the incidence of tachycardia or mean heart rate during endoscopy between the two groups, and no patient developed symptomatic cardiac arrhythmias or hypotensive episodes. 10 patients in the room air compared with none in the oxygen treatment group (p = 0...

  7. Building Chaotic Model From Incomplete Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek, Michael; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a number of novel techniques for building a predictive chaotic model from incomplete time series. A predictive chaotic model is built by reconstructing the time-delayed phase space from observed time series and the prediction is made by a global model or adaptive local models based on the dynamical neighbors found in the reconstructed phase space. In general, the building of any data-driven models depends on the completeness and quality of the data itself. However, the completeness of the data availability can not always be guaranteed since the measurement or data transmission is intermittently not working properly due to some reasons. We propose two main solutions dealing with incomplete time series: using imputing and non-imputing methods. For imputing methods, we utilized the interpolation methods (weighted sum of linear interpolations, Bayesian principle component analysis and cubic spline interpolation) and predictive models (neural network, kernel machine, chaotic model) for estimating the missing values. After imputing the missing values, the phase space reconstruction and chaotic model prediction are executed as a standard procedure. For non-imputing methods, we reconstructed the time-delayed phase space from observed time series with missing values. This reconstruction results in non-continuous trajectories. However, the local model prediction can still be made from the other dynamical neighbors reconstructed from non-missing values. We implemented and tested these methods to construct a chaotic model for predicting storm surges at Hoek van Holland as the entrance of Rotterdam Port. The hourly surge time series is available for duration of 1990-1996. For measuring the performance of the proposed methods, a synthetic time series with missing values generated by a particular random variable to the original (complete) time series is utilized. There exist two main performance measures used in this work: (1) error measures between the actual

  8. Colonoscopy quality assessment Valoración de la calidad en la práctica de la colonoscopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Morán Sánchez

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: colonoscopy has become accepted as the most effective method for colon exploration. Some application problems have been detected in the setting of normal clinical care due to its wide range of uses in recent years, and therefore there is a need to measure colonoscopy quality. For that purpose valid quality indicators are necessary to be defined. The application process of some quality indicators is presented in this study. The proposed indicators in this study are: quality of bowel preparation, cecal intubation rate, withdrawal time, adenoma detection rate, and adenoma removal rate. Material and method: this is a prospective 12-month study where colonoscopies performed in the VI health area of Murcia Region were evaluated. From February 2006 to February 2007 a total of 609 subjects were eligible for colonoscopy after a positive fecal blood test in the setting of a colorectal cancer screening program. A sample of thirty patients (n: 30 was considered representative to assess the reliability of quality indicators and for a preliminary analysis of results. Results: indicators results are: quality of bowel preparation (87%, kappa 0.74 (95% CI: 0.48-0.99; cecal intubation rate (90% 0.74 (95% CI: 0.49-0.99; adenoma detection and removal rate (96%, kappa: 0.78 (95% CI: 0.53-0.99; withdrawal time: 13.36 min (95% CI: 10.48-16.11. Kappa: 0.78 (95% CI: 0.49-0.99. Conclusions: quality indicators definition and application in colonoscopy performance is possible. More studies are necessary to define the role of these indicators in the setting of clinical practice.Objetivo: la colonoscopia constituye la técnica exploratoria del colon más importante en la actualidad. Su uso, cada vez más frecuente conlleva la aparición de problemas en su aplicación. Es necesario medir la calidad en la realización de esta técnica, para ello es preciso definir indicadores válidos que permitan la realización de ciclos de evaluación de la calidad. En este estudio se

  9. Elliptic flow and incomplete equilibration at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, R S; Borghini, N; Ollitrault, Jean Yves

    2005-01-01

    We argue that RHIC data, in particular those on the anisotropic flow coefficients v_2 and v_4, suggest that the matter produced in the early stages of nucleus-nucleus collisions is incompletely thermalized. We interpret the parameter (1/S)(dN/dy), where S is the transverse area of the collision zone and dN/dy the multiplicity density, as an indicator of the number of collisions per particle at the time when elliptic flow is established, and hence as a measure of the degree of equilibration. This number serves as a control parameter which can be varied experimentally by changing the system size, the centrality or the beam energy. We provide predictions for Cu-Cu collisions at RHIC as well as for Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC.

  10. Low-Rank Representation for Incomplete Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-rank matrix recovery (LRMR has been becoming an increasingly popular technique for analyzing data with missing entries, gross corruptions, and outliers. As a significant component of LRMR, the model of low-rank representation (LRR seeks the lowest-rank representation among all samples and it is robust for recovering subspace structures. This paper attempts to solve the problem of LRR with partially observed entries. Firstly, we construct a nonconvex minimization by taking the low rankness, robustness, and incompletion into consideration. Then we employ the technique of augmented Lagrange multipliers to solve the proposed program. Finally, experimental results on synthetic and real-world datasets validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Light particle revelation on incomplete fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillibert, A.

    1984-01-01

    Incomplete fusion reactions have been studied through light particles emission in the reaction 116 Sn + 16 O at 125 MeV (ALICE facility in Orsay). We measured energy angular distributions and correlations between any two of these particles (α particles, protons, neutrons), while γ multiplicity measurements provide us fuller informations. From collected data, the following pictures can be drawn: - the only fast particles observed are α particles, while protons and neutrons seem to come only from statistical evaporation; - outgoing channels where two α particles are emitted cannot be solely explained by the sequential emission of 8 Be → 2α: about half of the cross section proceeds from statistical evaporation of one α particle. Accordingly, 2αxn channels do not necessarily agree with high value of angular momentum in the entrance channel. From the study of experimental results in the yrast plane, we can assign a large width to the angular momentum distribution [fr

  12. Effective hamiltonian calculations using incomplete model spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, S.; Mukherjee, D.

    1987-01-01

    It appears that the danger of encountering ''intruder states'' is substantially reduced if an effective hamiltonian formalism is developed for incomplete model spaces (IMS). In a Fock-space approach, the proof a ''connected diagram theorem'' is fairly straightforward with exponential-type of ansatze for the wave-operator W, provided the normalization chosen for W is separable. Operationally, one just needs a suitable categorization of the Fock-space operators into ''diagonal'' and ''non-diagonal'' parts that is generalization of the corresponding procedure for the complete model space. The formalism is applied to prototypical 2-electron systems. The calculations have been performed on the Cyber 205 super-computer. The authors paid special attention to an efficient vectorization for the construction and solution of the resulting coupled non-linear equations

  13. Using motion capture to assess colonoscopy experience level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Preisler, Louise; Hillingsø, Jens Georg

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study technical skills of colonoscopists using a Microsoft Kinect™ for motion analysis to develop a tool to guide colonoscopy education. RESULTS: Ten experienced endoscopists (gastroenterologists, n = 2; colorectal surgeons, n = 8) and 11 novices participated in the study. A Microsoft...... Kinect™ recorded the movements of the participants during the insertion of the colonoscope. We used a modified script from Microsoft to record skeletal data. Data were saved and later transferred to MatLab for analysis and the calculation of statistics. The test was performed on a physical model...... gurney, number of times the right hand was used to control the small wheel of the colonoscope, angulation of elbows, position of hands in relation to body posture, angulation of body posture in relation to the anus, mean distance between the hands and percentage of time the hands were approximated...

  14. Optimal procedural sequence for same-day bidirectional endoscopy with moderate sedation: A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo-Wei; Cheng, Chi-Liang; Liu, Nai-Jen; Tang, Jui-Hsiang; Kuo, Yen-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Tsui, Yi-Ning; Lee, Bai-Ping; Hung, Hsiang-Ling

    2018-03-01

    Same-day bidirectional endoscopy (BDE) is a commonly performed procedure, but the optimal sequence for the procedure with moderate conscious sedation is not well established. This study investigated the optimal sequence for same-day BDE under moderate conscious sedation and carbon dioxide insufflation in terms of sedation doses, patient discomfort, and colonoscopy performance. A prospective randomized controlled study of 120 patients who were scheduled for BDE examination was performed. Colonoscopy followed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) examination was performed in 60 patients (colonoscopy-EGD group), and EGD followed by colonoscopy examination was performed in another 60 patients (EGD-colonoscopy group). Endoscopists and patients completed a questionnaire to assess objective and subjective discomfort. Baseline demographics, procedure indications, bowel preparation quality, cecal intubation rate/time, colonoscopy withdrawal time, endoscopic interventions, BDE procedure time, colon polyp/adenoma detection rates, patient discomfort, and adverse events were similar between the two study groups. The total doses of fentanyl and midazolam were significantly higher for the colonoscopy-EGD group than for the EGD-colonoscopy group (83.4 ± 17.7 vs 68.7 ± 18.6 μg and 6.3 ± 1.4 vs 5.2 ± 1.3 mg, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The recovery time to discharge was significantly longer for the colonoscopy-EGD group than for the EGD-colonoscopy group (43.5 ± 16.2 vs 34.5 ± 8.9 min, P = 0.0003). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy followed by colonoscopy is the optimal sequence for same-day BDE under moderate conscious sedation and carbon dioxide insufflation. Following this order allows for a reduction of sedation doses and for shorter recovery times. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an International Observational Study (EPAGE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froehlich, F; Harris, JK; Wietlisbach, V

    2006-01-01

    in endoscopy centers internationally. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient. RESULTS: 6004 patients were...

  16. Back-to-back colon capsule endoscopy and optical colonoscopy in colorectal cancer screening individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, Morten; Kroijer, Rasmus; Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine

    2018-01-01

    mm polyps in colon capsule endoscopy (97%; 95% CI: 94-100) was superior to colonoscopy (89%; 95% CI: 84-94). A complete capsule endoscopy examination (N=134) could detect patients with intermediate or greater risk (according to the European guidelines) with an accuracy, sensitivity, specificity......AIM: To determine the polyp detection rate and per-patient sensitivity for polyps >9 mm of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) compared with colonoscopy as well as the diagnostic accuracy of CCE. METHOD: Individuals who had positive immunochemical faecal occult blood test during screening had...... investigator blinded colon capsule endoscopy and colonoscopy. Participants underwent repeat endoscopy if significant lesions detected by colon capsule endoscopy were considered to have been missed by colonoscopy. RESULTS: There were 253 participants. The polyp detection rate was significantly higher in colon...

  17. Colonoscopy conversion after flexible sigmoidoscopy screening: results from the UK bowel scope screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Keith; Yew, Andrew; Ishaq, Sauid; Jewes, Sarah; Shetty, Sharan S; Brookes, Matthew; Veitch, Andrew; McKaig, Brian; Murugananthan, Aravinth

    2017-12-05

    In the UK Bowel Scope screening programme (BSSP), patients progress to colonoscopy based on high-risk features on flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS). To assess practice of colonoscopy conversion and predictors of additional adenoma detection on colonoscopy. The Bowel Cancer Screening database was interrogated and collated with endoscopic and histological findings from patients undergoing colonoscopy following FS between August 2013 and August 2016. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of new adenomas. Wolverhampton bowel cancer screening centre, covering Wolverhampton, Dudley, Cannock and Walsall, with a combined catchment population of 1 million. This is the first UK site to fully roll-out BSSP. FS was performed on 11,711 patients, with an adenoma detection rate (ADR) of 8.5%, and conversion to colonoscopy in 421 (3.6%). The additional ADR at colonoscopy was 35.2%, with one additional malignant diagnosis (0.26%). The adenoma miss rate was 3.6%. On multivariate analysis, a polyp ≥10mm was the only high-risk indication associated with additional ADR at colonoscopy (odds ratio [OR] 3.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.51-3.65, p<0.001), in addition to male gender (OR 2.36, 95% CI:1.46-3.83, p<0.001). Predictors of detection of a new adenoma ≥10mm included: villous adenoma (p=0.002), polyp≥10mm (p=0.007) and male gender (p=0.039). Presence of any conversion criteria was associated with the detection of any proximal adenoma (p<0.001) and adenoma ≥10mm (p=0.031). Male gender, ≥10mm polyps and villous-preponderant histology at FS were predictors of <10mm and ≥10mm adenomas at colonoscopy. Further data are required to assess the role for gender-based stratification of conversion criteria. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical outcomes of surveillance colonoscopy for patients with sessile serrated adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jae Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs are known to be precursors of colorectal cancer (CRC. The proper interval of follow-up colonoscopy for SSAs is still being debated. We sought to determine the proper interval of colonoscopy surveillance in patients diagnosed with SSAs in South Korea. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients diagnosed with SSAs who received 1 or more follow-up colonoscopies. The information reviewed included patient baseline characteristics, SSA characteristics, and colonoscopy information. Results: From January 2007 to December 2011, 152 SSAs and 8 synchronous adenocarcinomas were identified in 138 patients. The mean age of the patients was 62.2 years and 60.1% patients were men. SSAs were located in the right colon (i.e., from the cecum to the hepatic flexure in 68.4% patients. At the first follow-up, 27 SSAs were identified in 138 patients (right colon, 66.7%. At the second follow-up, 6 SSAs were identified in 65 patients (right colon, 66.7%. At the 3rd and 4th follow-up, 21 and 11 patients underwent colonoscopy, respectively, and no SSAs were detected. The total mean follow-up duration was 33.9 months. The mean size of SSAs was 8.1±5.0 mm. SSAs were most commonly found in the right colon (126/185, 68.1%. During annual follow-up colonoscopy surveillance, no cancer was detected. Conclusions: Annual colonoscopy surveillance is not necessary for identifying new CRCs in all patients diagnosed with SSAs. In addition, the right colon should be examined more carefully because SSAs occur more frequently in the right colon during initial and follow-up colonoscopies.

  19. Commonly used preparations for colonoscopy: Efficacy, tolerability and safety – A Canadian Association of Gastroenterology position paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkun, Alan; Chiba, Naoki; Enns, Robert; Marcon, Margaret; Natsheh, Susan; Pham, Co; Sadowski, Dan; Vanner, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The increased demand for colonoscopy, coupled with the introduction of new bowel cleansing preparations and recent caution advisories in Canada, has prompted a review of bowel preparations by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. METHODS: The present review was conducted by the Clinical Affairs group of committees including the endoscopy, hepatobiliary/transplant, liaison, pediatrics, practice affairs and regional representation committees, along with the assistance of Canadian experts in the field. An effort was made to systematically assess randomized prospective trials evaluating commonly used bowel cleansing preparations in Canada. RESULTS: Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-; sodium phosphate (NaP)-; magnesium citrate (Mg-citrate)-; and sodium picosulphate, citric acid and magnesium oxide (PSMC)-containing preparations were reviewed. Regimens of PEG 2 L with bisacodyl (10 mg to 20 mg) or Mg-citrate (296 mL) are as effective as standard PEG 4 L regimens, but are better tolerated. NaP preparations appear more effective and better tolerated than standard PEG solutions. PSMC has good efficacy and tolerability but head-to-head trials with NaP solutions remain few, and conclusions equivocal. Adequate hydration during preparation and up to the time of colonoscopy is critical in minimizing side effects and improving bowel cleansing in patients receiving NaP and PSMC preparations. All preparations may cause adverse events, including rare, serious outcomes. NaP should not be used in patients with cardiac or renal dysfunction (PEG solution is preferable in these patients), bowel obstruction or ascites, and caution should be exercised when used in patients with pre-existing electrolyte disturbances, those taking medications that may affect electrolyte levels and elderly or debilitated patients. Health Canada’s recommended NaP dosing for most patients is two 45 mL doses 24 h apart. However, both safety and efficacy data on this dosing schedule are lacking

  20. Development of an Algorithm to Classify Colonoscopy Indication from Coded Health Care Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kenneth F; Johnson, Eric A; Chubak, Jessica; Kamineni, Aruna; Doubeni, Chyke A; Buist, Diana S M; Williams, Andrew E; Weinmann, Sheila; Doria-Rose, V Paul; Rutter, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health data are potentially valuable resources for evaluating colonoscopy screening utilization and effectiveness. The ability to distinguish screening colonoscopies from exams performed for other purposes is critical for research that examines factors related to screening uptake and adherence, and the impact of screening on patient outcomes, but distinguishing between these indications in secondary health data proves challenging. The objective of this study is to develop a new and more accurate algorithm for identification of screening colonoscopies using electronic health data. Data from a case-control study of colorectal cancer with adjudicated colonoscopy indication was used to develop logistic regression-based algorithms. The proposed algorithms predict the probability that a colonoscopy was indicated for screening, with variables selected for inclusion in the models using the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). The algorithms had excellent classification accuracy in internal validation. The primary, restricted model had AUC= 0.94, sensitivity=0.91, and specificity=0.82. The secondary, extended model had AUC=0.96, sensitivity=0.88, and specificity=0.90. The LASSO approach enabled estimation of parsimonious algorithms that identified screening colonoscopies with high accuracy in our study population. External validation is needed to replicate these results and to explore the performance of these algorithms in other settings.

  1. Colonoscopy can miss diverticula of the left colon identified by barium enema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryota; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2013-04-21

    To identify the diagnostic value of colonoscopy for diverticulosis as determined by barium enema. A total of 65 patients with hematochezia who underwent colonoscopy and barium enema were analyzed, and the diagnostic value of colonoscopy for diverticula was assessed. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve was compared in relation to age (barium enema. Colonoscopy had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 90%. No significant differences were found in the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC-AUC) for age group or sex. The ROC-AUC of the left colon was significantly lower than that of the right colon (0.81 vs 0.96, P = 0.02). Colonoscopy identified 486 colonic diverticula, while barium enema identified 1186. The detection ratio for the entire colon was therefore 0.41 (486/1186). The detection ratio in the left colon (0.32, 189/588) was significantly lower than that of the right colon (0.50, 297/598) (P barium enema, only half the number of colonic diverticula can be detected by colonoscopy in the entire colon and even less in the left colon.

  2. Colonoscopy procedure simulation: virtual reality training based on a real time computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tingxi; Medveczky, David; Wu, Jackie; Wu, Jianhuang

    2018-01-25

    Colonoscopy plays an important role in the clinical screening and management of colorectal cancer. The traditional 'see one, do one, teach one' training style for such invasive procedure is resource intensive and ineffective. Given that colonoscopy is difficult, and time-consuming to master, the use of virtual reality simulators to train gastroenterologists in colonoscopy operations offers a promising alternative. In this paper, a realistic and real-time interactive simulator for training colonoscopy procedure is presented, which can even include polypectomy simulation. Our approach models the colonoscopy as thick flexible elastic rods with different resolutions which are dynamically adaptive to the curvature of the colon. More material characteristics of this deformable material are integrated into our discrete model to realistically simulate the behavior of the colonoscope. We present a simulator for training colonoscopy procedure. In addition, we propose a set of key aspects of our simulator that give fast, high fidelity feedback to trainees. We also conducted an initial validation of this colonoscopic simulator to determine its clinical utility and efficacy.

  3. Physician Perceptions on Colonoscopy Quality: Results of a National Survey of Gastroenterologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad F. Gellad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Quality indicators for colonoscopy have been developed, but the uptake of these metrics into practice is uncertain. Our aims were to assess physician perceptions regarding colonoscopy quality measurement and to quantify the perceived impact of quality measurement on clinical practice. Methods. We conducted in-person interviews with 15 gastroenterologists about their perceptions regarding colonoscopy quality. Results from these interviews informed the development of a 34-question web-based survey that was emailed to 1,500 randomlyselected members of the American College of Gastroenterology. Results. 160 invitations were undeliverable, and 167 out of 1340 invited physicians (12.5% participated in the survey. Respondents and nonrespondents did not differ in age, sex, practice setting, or years since training. 38.8% of respondents receive feedback on their colonoscopy quality. The majority of respondents agreed with the use of completion rate (90% and adenoma detection rate (83% as quality indicators but there was less enthusiasm for withdrawal time (61%. 24% of respondents reported usually or always removing diminutive polyps solely to increase their adenoma detection rate, and 20% reported prolonging their procedure time to meet withdrawal time standards. Conclusions. A minority of respondents receives feedback on the quality of their colonoscopy. Interventions to increase continuous quality improvement in colonoscopy screening are needed.

  4. Physician perceptions on colonoscopy quality: results of a national survey of gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellad, Ziad F; Voils, Corrine I; Lin, Li; Provenzale, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Background. Quality indicators for colonoscopy have been developed, but the uptake of these metrics into practice is uncertain. Our aims were to assess physician perceptions regarding colonoscopy quality measurement and to quantify the perceived impact of quality measurement on clinical practice. Methods. We conducted in-person interviews with 15 gastroenterologists about their perceptions regarding colonoscopy quality. Results from these interviews informed the development of a 34-question web-based survey that was emailed to 1,500 randomlyselected members of the American College of Gastroenterology. Results. 160 invitations were undeliverable, and 167 out of 1340 invited physicians (12.5%) participated in the survey. Respondents and nonrespondents did not differ in age, sex, practice setting, or years since training. 38.8% of respondents receive feedback on their colonoscopy quality. The majority of respondents agreed with the use of completion rate (90%) and adenoma detection rate (83%) as quality indicators but there was less enthusiasm for withdrawal time (61%). 24% of respondents reported usually or always removing diminutive polyps solely to increase their adenoma detection rate, and 20% reported prolonging their procedure time to meet withdrawal time standards. Conclusions. A minority of respondents receives feedback on the quality of their colonoscopy. Interventions to increase continuous quality improvement in colonoscopy screening are needed.

  5. Role of colonoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric lower gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong

    2010-09-01

    The safety and effectiveness of colonoscopy in the investigation of lower gastrointestinal tract pathology in children has been established for more than 2 decades in Korea. Skill and experience have since advanced to the point that both diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy are now routinely performed by most pediatric gastroenterologists. Pediatric colonoscopy differs significantly from its adult parallels in nearly every aspect including patient and parent management and preparation, selection criteria for sedation and general anesthetic, bowel preparation, expected diagnoses, instrument selection, imperative for terminal ileal intubation, and requirement for biopsies from macroscopically normal mucosa. Investigation of inflammatory bowel disease, whether for diagnosis or follow-up evaluation, and suspected colonic polyps are the most common indication for pediatric colonoscopy. The child who presents with signs and symptoms of lower gastrointestinal disorder should undergo colonoscopy with biopsy to make the diagnosis, as well as to help determine the appropriate therapy. This review introduces practical information on pediatric colonoscopy, the author's experiences, and the role of colonoscopic examination in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric lower gastrointestinal disorders.

  6. Impact of feedback and monitoring on colonoscopy withdrawal times and polyp detection rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Amalie Bach; Hendel, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown colonoscopy withdrawal time (WT) to be a reliable surrogate indicator for polyp detection rate (PDR) and adenoma detection rate (ADR) in colonoscopy. Our aim was to assess the impact of feedback and monitoring of WT on PDR in routine colonoscopies with long-term follow-up. Materials and methods A total of 307 colonoscopies were performed in three separate clinical scenarios. First, PDR and WT were recorded without the staff being aware of the specific objective of the study. Before the second scenario, the staff was given interventional information and feedback on WTs and PDRs from the first scenario and was encouraged to aim for a minimum WT of 8 min. Retention of knowledge gained was reassessed in the third scenario 1 year later. Results The PDR in the first two scenarios differed significantly (p0.05). The increase in PDR between the first and second scenarios was retained in the third follow-up scenario 1 year later where the WT of both polyp-positive and polyp-negative colonoscopies was found to be longer. Conclusions PDR almost doubled from the first to the second scenario of a real-life colonoscopy setting, indicating that awareness of WT is crucial. The knowledge gained from this intervention in routine practice was even retained after a year. PMID:28761691

  7. Levodopa therapy in incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Oliver; Zörner, Björn; Dietz, Volker

    2008-11-01

    We studied the influence of levodopa (L-Dopa) on training effects in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI). A low-dose of L-Dopa per day is known to enhance the effects of physical training after stroke. This is tested here in subjects suffering a SCI. Twelve subacute, incomplete SCI (iSCI) subjects (ASIA C and D) were randomized in a trial with a double-blind, crossover design to receive 6 weeks of L-Dopa (200 mg), followed by 6 weeks of placebo, or vice versa. Outcome measures were ASIA Motor-Score (AMS) reflecting motor recovery; walking ability, assessed by the Walking Index of Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI); and Activities of Daily Living (ADL), as monitored by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). Both placebo and L-Dopa, in combination with physiotherapy, produced a significant motor recovery after SCI. The combination of L-Dopa and physiotherapy had no greater effect on the outcome than placebo and physiotherapy. The possible reasons for the different effect of L-Dopa in stroke and iSCI subjects are discussed.

  8. Incomplete copolymer degradation of in situ chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdillon, Pierre; Boissenot, Tanguy; Goldwirt, Lauriane; Nicolas, Julien; Apra, Caroline; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2018-02-17

    In situ carmustine wafers containing 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) are commonly used for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma to overcome the brain-blood barrier. In theory, this chemotherapy diffuses into the adjacent parenchyma and the excipient degrades in maximum 8 weeks but no clinical data confirms this evolution, because patients are rarely operated again. A 75-year-old patient was operated twice for recurrent glioblastoma, and a carmustine wafer was implanted during the second surgery. Eleven months later, a third surgery was performed, revealing unexpected incomplete degradation of the wafer. 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was performed to compare this wafer to pure BCNU and to an unused copolymer wafer. In the used wafer, peaks corresponding to hydrophobic units of the excipient were no longer noticeable, whereas peaks of the hydrophilic units and traces of BCNU were still present. These surprising results could be related to the formation of a hydrophobic membrane around the wafer, thus interfering with the expected diffusion and degradation processes. The clinical benefit of carmustine wafers in addition to the standard radio-chemotherapy remains limited, and in vivo behavior of this treatment is not completely elucidated yet. We found that the wafer may remain after several months. Alternative strategies to deal with the blood-brain barrier, such as drug-loaded liposomes or ultrasound-opening, must be explored to offer larger drug diffusion or allow repetitive delivery.

  9. An evaluation of the Integrated Pulmonary Index (IPI) for the detection of respiratory events in sedated patients undergoing colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenstadt, Haim; Ben-Menachem, Erez; Herman, Amir; Dach, Rina

    2012-06-01

    The Integrated Pulmonary Index (IPI™) is a new decision making tool calculated from measured end tidal carbon dioxide (etCO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) and pulse rate (PR) using a fuzzy logic model. The aim of this study was to compare prospectively IPI to respiratory adverse events in patients undergoing moderate sedation for colonoscopy. Following ethics committee approval and personal informed consent 51 adult patients undergoing elective colonoscopy were enrolled. Patients received routine care by the endoscopy staff that were blinded to IPI, etCO(2), and RR; whilst a trained senior anesthesiologist observer, not involved in the procedure, collected this data. 'Requires attention' respiratory adverse events (at least 1 min of SpO(2) ≤ 92 % and/or RR ≤ 8 and or 20 % decrease in etCO(2)) and 'requires intervention' respiratory adverse events (at least 1 min of SpO(2) ≤ 85 % and/or RR = 0) were documented by the observer. There were no differences in etCO(2), RR, SpO(2) and PR between 5778 IPI readings ranging from 1 to 10. Low (1-3), medium (4-6) and high (7-10) IPI groups did not differ in RR, SpO(2) and PR, but etCO(2) was higher in the high IPI group (p = 0.0185). Among requires attention events (n = 113) the IPI was high (7-10) in 53.1 %, intermediate (4-6) in 32.7 %, or low (1-3) in 14.2 %. The presented data demonstrate limited agreement between respiratory physiological parameters and the IPI. Further IPI evaluation and validation is indicated mainly for events requiring immediate intervention and in different patient populations including obese patients.

  10. Diagnostic value of CT-colonography as compared to colonoscopy in an asymptomatic screening population: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, Margriet C. de; Gelder, Rogier E. van; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap; Graser, Anno

    2011-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses on CT-colonography included both average and high risk individuals, which may overestimate the diagnostic value in screening. A meta-analysis was performed to obtain the value of CT-colonography for screening. A search was performed using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane. Article selection and critical appraisal was done by two reviewers. Inclusion criteria: prospective, randomized trials or cohort studies comparing CT-colonography with colonoscopy (≥50 participants), ≥95% average risk participants ≥50 years. Study characteristics and 2 x 2 contingency Tables were recorded. Sensitivity and specificity estimates were calculated per patient and per polyp (≥6 mm, ≥10 mm), using univariate and bivariate analyses. Five of 1,021 studies identified were included, including 4,086 participants ( 2 -values showed substantial heterogeneity, especially for 6-9 mm polyps and adenomas: 68.1% vs. 78.6% (sensitivity per patient). Estimated sensitivities for patients with polyps or adenomas ≥ 6 mm were 75.9% and 82.9%, corresponding specificities 94.6% and 91.4%. Estimated sensitivities for patients with polyps or adenomas ≥ 10 mm were 83.3% and 87.9%, corresponding specificities 98.7% and 97.6%. Estimated sensitivities per polyp for advanced adenomas ≥ 6 mm and ≥ 10 mm were 83.9% and 83.8%. Compared to colonoscopy, CT-colonography has a high sensitivity for adenomas ≥ 10 mm. For (advanced) adenomas ≥ 6 mm sensitivity is somewhat lower. (orig.)

  11. An electronic colonoscopy record system enables detailed quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 64 cases were deemed to be incomplete because of obstructing lesions (n=26), extensive diverticulosis (n=4), technical difficulty (n=31) and patient discomfort (n=3). There were two complications recorded: perforation (n=1) and bleeding (n=1). Conclusions. The HEMR system enabled the audit of experiences with ...

  12. Visuo-Spatial Ability in Colonoscopy Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Buzink, Sonja N.; Verwey, Willem B.; Jakimowicz, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using "Visualization" tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To remedy this situation, the current study…

  13. Visuo-spatial ability in colonoscopy simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Verwey, W.B.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using Visualization tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To

  14. Development and Testing of an Automated 4-Day Text Messaging Guidance as an Aid for Improving Colonoscopy Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin Michael; Klare, Peter; Neu, Bruno; Schmid, Roland M; von Delius, Stefan

    2016-06-21

    In gastroenterology a sufficient colon cleansing improves adenoma detection rate and prevents the need for preterm repeat colonoscopies due to invalid preparation. It has been shown that patient education is of major importance for improvement of colon cleansing. Objective of this study was to assess the function of an automated text messaging (short message service, SMS)-supported colonoscopy preparation starting 4 days before colonoscopy appointment. After preevaluation to assess mobile phone usage in the patient population for relevance of this approach, a Web-based, automated SMS text messaging system was developed, following which a single-center feasibility study at a tertiary care center was performed. Patients scheduled for outpatient colonoscopy were invited to participate. Patients enrolled in the study group received automated information about dietary recommendations and bowel cleansing during colonoscopy preparation. Data of outpatient colonoscopies with regular preparation procedure were used for pair matching and served as control. Primary end point was feasibility of SMS text messaging support in colonoscopy preparation assessed as stable and satisfactory function of the system. Secondary end points were quality of bowel preparation according to the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) and patient satisfaction with SMS text messaging-provided information assessed by a questionnaire. Web-based SMS text messaging-supported colonoscopy preparation was successful and feasible in 19 of 20 patients. Mean (standard error of the mean, SEM) total BBPS score was slightly higher in the SMS group than in the control group (7.3, SEM 0.3 vs 6.4, SEM 0.2) and for each colonic region (left, transverse, and right colon). Patient satisfaction regarding SMS text messaging-based information was high. Using SMS for colonoscopy preparation with 4 days' guidance including dietary recommendation is a new approach to improve colonoscopy preparation. Quality of colonoscopy

  15. Some properties of a family of incomplete hypergeometric functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, Srivastava et al. introduced and studied some fundamental properties and characteristics of a family of potentially useful incomplete hypergeometric functions. Our principal objective in this paper is to investigate several further properties of these incomplete hypergeometric functions and some general classes of incomplete hypergeometric polynomials associated with them. Various (known or new) special cases and consequences of the results presented in this paper are also considered.

  16. The Surprise Examination Paradox and the Second Incompleteness Theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Kritchman, Shira; Raz, Ran

    2010-01-01

    We give a new proof for Godel's second incompleteness theorem, based on Kolmogorov complexity, Chaitin's incompleteness theorem, and an argument that resembles the surprise examination paradox. We then go the other way around and suggest that the second incompleteness theorem gives a possible resolution of the surprise examination paradox. Roughly speaking, we argue that the flaw in the derivation of the paradox is that it contains a hidden assumption that one can prove the consistency of the...

  17. Goedel incompleteness theorems and the limits of their applicability. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, Lev D [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-25

    This is a survey of results related to the Goedel incompleteness theorems and the limits of their applicability. The first part of the paper discusses Goedel's own formulations along with modern strengthenings of the first incompleteness theorem. Various forms and proofs of this theorem are compared. Incompleteness results related to algorithmic problems and mathematically natural examples of unprovable statements are discussed. Bibliography: 68 titles.

  18. Gibbs' theorem for open systems with incomplete statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagci, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    Gibbs' theorem, which is originally intended for canonical ensembles with complete statistics has been generalized to open systems with incomplete statistics. As a result of this generalization, it is shown that the stationary equilibrium distribution of inverse power law form associated with the incomplete statistics has maximum entropy even for open systems with energy or matter influx. The renormalized entropy definition given in this paper can also serve as a measure of self-organization in open systems described by incomplete statistics.

  19. Elimination of waste: creation of a successful Lean colonoscopy program at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Aneel; Andrew, Nathan; Kaur, Shubjeet; Orquiola, Alan; Alavi, Karim; Steele, Scott R; Maykel, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Lean processes involve streamlining methods and maximizing efficiency. Well established in the manufacturing industry, they are increasingly being applied to health care. The objective of this study was to determine feasibility and effectiveness of applying Lean principles to an academic medical center colonoscopy unit. Lean process improvement involved training endoscopy personnel, observing patients, mapping the value stream, analyzing patient flow, designing and implementing new processes, and finally re-observing the process. Our primary endpoint was total colonoscopy time (minutes from check-in to discharge) with secondary endpoints of individual segment times and unit colonoscopy capacity. A total of 217 patients were included (November 2013-May 2014), with 107 pre-Lean and 110 post-Lean intervention. Pre-Lean total colonoscopy time was 134 min. After implementation of the Lean process, mean colonoscopy time decreased by 10 % to 121 min (p = 0.01). The three steps of the process affected by the Lean intervention (time to achieve adequate sedation, time to recovery, and time to discharge) decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 min (p 4.0 to 3.4 min (p = 0.09), and 41.2 to 35.4 min (p = 0.05), respectively. Overall, unit capacity of colonoscopies increased from 39.6 per day to 43.6. Post-Lean patient satisfaction surveys demonstrated an average score of 4.5/5.0 (n = 73) regarding waiting time, 4.9/5.0 (n = 60) regarding how favorably this experienced compared to prior colonoscopy experiences, and 4.9/5.0 (n = 74) regarding professionalism of staff. One hundred percentage of respondents (n = 69) stated they would recommend our institution to a friend for colonoscopy. With no additional utilization of resources, a single Lean process improvement cycle increased productivity and capacity of our colonoscopy unit. We expect this to result in increased patient access and revenue while maintaining patient satisfaction. We believe these results are widely

  20. Preformulation studies on Freund's incomplete adjuvant emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R O; Mahaguna, V

    1998-02-01

    Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant (FIA), which is used in vaccine therapy, is a water-in-oil emulsion delivery system consisting of an aqueous internal phase containing an antigenic protein dispersed in an external phase containing a mixture of mannide monooleate and light mineral oil. Preformulation studies are reported in this investigation for FIA emulsion. The preformulation studies included the determination of the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the formulations investigated, the surface activity of mannide monooleate at the interface between the oil phase and the aqueous phase containing ovalbumin as the model antigenic protein, and the effect of ovalbumin on the surface activity at the interface. The influence of the concentration of mannide monooleate and/or ovalbumin on the interfacial tension between light mineral oil and either purified water or 0.9% w/v normal saline solution was measured by the DuNouy Ring Method at 25 degrees C. The CMC was determined experimentally from the relationship between the concentration of the surface active agent in each formulation and the interfacial tension. The number of moles of the surface active agent per unit area at the interface (surface excess concentration) was calculated from the Gibbs' Adsorption equation. The results indicated that mannide monooleate was an effective surface active agent since the formulation containing only mannide monooleate provided the lowest magnitude of CMC. The presence of the surface active agent, mannide monooleate and/or ovalbumin, in the formulations studied reduced the interfacial tension between the two phases. The surface activity was influenced by the presence of an electrolyte (sodium chloride), a protein (ovalbumin), or mannide monooleate in the formulation. The presence of antigenic proteins in the aqueous phase of a waterin-oil emulsion influenced the effectiveness of a surface active agent in the formulation.

  1. Using motion capture to assess colonoscopy experience level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Morten Bo; Preisler, Louise; Hillingsoe, Jens Georg; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Konge, Lars

    2014-05-16

    To study technical skills of colonoscopists using a Microsoft Kinect™ for motion analysis to develop a tool to guide colonoscopy education. Ten experienced endoscopists (gastroenterologists, n = 2; colorectal surgeons, n = 8) and 11 novices participated in the study. A Microsoft Kinect™ recorded the movements of the participants during the insertion of the colonoscope. We used a modified script from Microsoft to record skeletal data. Data were saved and later transferred to MatLab for analysis and the calculation of statistics. The test was performed on a physical model, specifically the "Kagaku Colonoscope Training Model" (Kyoto Kagaku Co. Ltd, Kyoto, Japan). After the introduction to the scope and colonoscopy model, the test was performed. Seven metrics were analyzed to find discriminative motion patterns between the novice and experienced endoscopists: hand distance from gurney, number of times the right hand was used to control the small wheel of the colonoscope, angulation of elbows, position of hands in relation to body posture, angulation of body posture in relation to the anus, mean distance between the hands and percentage of time the hands were approximated to each other. Four of the seven metrics showed discriminatory ability: mean distance between hands [45 cm for experienced endoscopists (SD 2) vs 37 cm for novice endoscopists (SD 6)], percentage of time in which the two hands were within 25 cm of each other [5% for experienced endoscopists (SD 4) vs 12% for novice endoscopists (SD 9)], the level of the right hand below the sighting line (z-axis) (25 cm for experienced endoscopists vs 36 cm for novice endoscopists, P < 0.05) and the level of the left hand below the z-axis (6 cm for experienced endoscopists vs 15 cm for novice endoscopists, P < 0.05). By plotting the distributions of the percentages for each group, we determined the best discriminatory value between the groups. A pass score was set at the intersection of the distributions, and the

  2. Applicable observation of butorphanol in painless colonoscopy examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To summarize the clinical effect of butorphanol compound propofol in painless colonoscopy examination and its feasibility.Methods:100 colonoscopy examination patients (56 males and 44 females aged from 19 to 60 years old registered between August, 2016 and September, 2016 in the endoscopy center of our hospital were randomly selected. ASA classification is I or II level. Their body weight ranged from 55 kg to 75kg. They were randomly divided into two groups and each group included 50 cases. All patients went through conventional ambrosia and liquid fasting for 8 hours before the anesthesia and they drank magnesium sulfate liquid of 2500ml to clean their gastrointestinal tracts.After patients entered the operating room, their veins of upper limb were opened so as to monitor their HR, MAP and SPO2. After that, butorphanol of 20μg/kg was injected to patients of the experimental group while normal saline of the same amount of was injected to patients of the contrast group. After 60 seconds, propofol of 1~2 mg/kg was injected to both groups by the way of intravenous injection. The enteroscopy examination was started after patients had no eyelash reflection. Besides, actual application dose of propofol was adjusted according to clinical indications of patients and the adjusting frequency each time was controlled between 30 milligrams and 50 milligrams until the completion of the examination. SPSS 22.0 statistical software was used to analyze and handle research data of this group. Results:Anesthesia effect: The difference of inter-group comparison showed no statistical significance (P>0.05. The intra-group comparison and the inter-group comparison show that the difference in terms of changes of HR, MAP and SpO2 of patients in two groups before and after the anesthesia had no statistical significance (P>0.05.The awakening time, VAS score, postoperative vomiting times and the occurrence rate of respiratory depression of the observation group

  3. The use of high definition colonoscopy versus standard definition: does it affect polyp detection rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John; Thaventhiran, Anthony; Mackenzie, Hugh; Stubbs, Benjamin

    2017-11-03

    Polyp detection rate (PDR) during lower gastrointestinal endoscopy (LGIE) is of clinical importance. Detecting adenomatous polyps early in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence can halt disease progression, enabling treatment at a favourable stage. High definition colonoscopy (HDC) has been used in our hospital alongside standard definition equipment since 2011. We aim to determine what affect the use of HDC has on PDR. Post-hoc analysis of a prospectively maintained database on all patients undergoing LGIE was performed (01/01/2012-31/12/2015), n = 15,448. Analysis tested the primary outcome of HD's effect on PDR across LGIE and secondary outcome stratified this by endoscopist group (Physician (PE), Surgeon (SE) and Nurse Endoscopist (NE)). Of 15,448 patients, 1353 underwent HDC. Unmatched analysis showed PDR increased by 5.3% in this group (p < 0.001). Matched analysis considered 2288 patients from the total cohort (1144 HDC) and showed an increase of 1% in PDR with HDC (p = 0.578). Further unmatched analysis stratified by endoscopist groups showed a PDR increase of 1.8% (p = 0.375), 5.4% (p = 0.008) and 4.6% (p = 0.021) by PE, SE and NE respectively. Matched analysis demonstrated an increase of 1% (p = 0.734) and 1.5% (p = 0.701) amongst PE and NE, with a decrease of 0.6% (p = 0.883) by SE. The introduction of HDC increased PDR across all LGIE in our hospital, though this was not clinically significant. This marginal benefit was present across all endoscopist groups with no group benefiting over another in matched analysis.

  4. Education for Ward Nurses Influences the Quality of Inpatient's Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2015-08-01

    Although adequate bowel preparation is a prerequisite for colonoscopy, preparation among inpatients is often suboptimal. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of ward nurse education on the quality of bowel preparation of inpatients.A prospective, double-blinded, non-randomized, controlled study was performed. Expert endoscopists provided enhanced education to nurses who belonged to an "educated ward" followed by training that was repeated every week for 1 month. The primary outcome was the quality of the bowel preparation, which was based on the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (OBPS). Patient compliance and their subjective feelings and the factors affecting inadequate bowel preparation were also analyzed.One hundred three inpatients in the educated ward and 102 patients in the control ward were enrolled. Baseline data were comparable between the 2 wards. The mean values of the total OBPS scores were 4.42 ± 2.23 and 6.15 ± 2.38 in the educated and control wards, respectively (P preparation (OBPS ≥ 6) in the educated ward was significantly lower than that in the control ward (31.1% vs 58.8%, P preparation and diet instructions in the educated ward was superior to that in the control ward (P2.365, P = 0.025), constipation (OR 6.517, P 2.044, P = 0.042) were independently associated with inadequate bowel preparation among inpatients.Ward nurse education effectively improved the quality of bowel preparation, and relevant colonoscopic outcomes among inpatients. Additional efforts are needed to control constipation and to encourage additional water ingestion in inpatients for better bowel preparation.

  5. Factors Associated With Missed and Cancelled Colonoscopy Appointments at Veterans Health Administration Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Melissa R; Gravely, Amy; Gellad, Ziad F; Nugent, Sean; Burgess, James F; Shaukat, Aasma; Nelson, David B

    2016-02-01

    Cancelled and missed colonoscopy appointments waste resources, increase colonoscopy delays, and can adversely affect patient outcomes. We examined individual and organizational factors associated with missed and cancelled colonoscopy appointments in Veteran Health Administration facilities. From 69 facilities meeting inclusion criteria, we identified 27,994 patients with colonoscopy appointments scheduled for follow-up, on the basis of positive fecal occult blood test results, between August 16, 2009 and September 30, 2011. We identified factors associated with colonoscopy appointment status (completed, cancelled, or missed) by using hierarchical multinomial regression. Individual factors examined included age, race, sex, marital status, residence, drive time to nearest specialty care facility, limited life expectancy, comorbidities, colonoscopy in the past decade, referring facility type, referral month, and appointment lead time. Organizational factors included facility region, complexity, appointment reminders, scheduling, and prep education practices. Missed appointments were associated with limited life expectancy (odds ratio [OR], 2.74; P = .0004), no personal history of polyps (OR, 2.74; P < .0001), high facility complexity (OR, 2.69; P = .007), dual diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and substance abuse (OR, 1.82; P < .0001), and opt-out scheduling (OR, 1.57; P = .02). Cancelled appointments were associated with age (OR, 1.61; P = .0005 for 85 years or older and OR, 1.44; P < .0001 for 65-84 years old), no history of polyps (OR, 1.51; P < .0001), and opt-out scheduling (OR, 1.26; P = .04). Additional predictors of both outcomes included race, marital status, and lead time. Several factors within Veterans Health Administration clinic control can be targeted to reduce missed and cancelled colonoscopy appointments. Specifically, developing systems to minimize referrals for patients with limited life expectancy could reduce missed appointments, and use of opt

  6. Fear as a Barrier to Asymptomatic Colonoscopy Screening in an Urban Minority Population with Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Basch, Charles E; Zybert, Patricia; Wolf, Randi L

    2016-08-01

    This study identified barriers to colonoscopy in a high-risk population and examined associations between barriers and both intention to comply with physician recommendation to receive colonoscopy and documented receipt of colonoscopy. Participants, enrollees in a randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of educational interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening, were all 50+ years old and out of compliance with recommended screening guidelines. Direct financial cost of the procedure was not a barrier. The most commonly cited barriers were being afraid of the colonoscopy procedure (43.1 %), embarrassment (42.3 %), having to take a powerful laxative (36.2 %), fear of cancer (31.2 %), and fear of sedation (30.3 %). There were dose-response relationships between barriers and both intention to comply with physician recommendation of colonoscopy: 0, 1, 2, 3 barriers, 88.9, 79.0, 69.2 and 60.0 % intending to comply, respectively (linear trend χ(2) = 27.9, p = .000) and documented receipt of a colonoscopy: 0, 1, 2, 3 barriers, 21.7, 21.6, 8.5, 12.0 %, respectively (linear trend χ(2) = 8.4, p = .004). Only 6.9 % of the 102 expressing both fear of procedure and concern about taking a powerful laxative had a colonoscopy. These findings highlight the need to address patients' fear and suggest the importance of offering alternative colorectal cancer screening tests. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02392143.

  7. The impact of anesthesia providers on major morbidity following screening colonoscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, David A; Guercio, Jason R; Hanna, John W; Abreu, Maria T; Ma, Qianli; Uribe, Claudia; Birnbach, David J; Sinclair, David R; Candiotti, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Few studies evaluate the impact of anesthesia providers during procedures, such as colonoscopy, on low-risk patients. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of anesthesia providers on several outcome variables, including major morbidity, following screening colonoscopies. Methods A propensity-matched cohort study of 14,006 patients who enrolled with a national insurer offering health maintenance organization (HMO), preferred provider organization (PPO), and Medicare Advantage plans for a screening colonoscopy between July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2007 were studied. Records were evaluated for completion of the colonoscopy, new cancer diagnosis (colon, anal, rectal) within 6 months of the colonoscopy, new primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI), new primary diagnosis of stroke, hospital admission within 7 days of the colonoscopy, and adherence to guidelines for use of anesthesia providers. Results The presence of an anesthesia provider did not affect major morbidity or the percent of completed exams. Overall morbidity within 7 days was very low. When an anesthesia provider was present, a nonsignificant trend toward greater cancer detection within 6 months of the procedure was observed. Adherence to national guidelines regarding the use of anesthesia providers for low-risk patients was poor. Conclusion A difference in outcome associated with the presence or absence of an anesthesia provider during screening colonoscopy in terms of MI, stroke, or hospital admission within 7 days of the procedure was not observed. Adherence to published guidelines for the use of anesthesia providers is low. The incidence of completed exams was unaffected by the presence of an anesthesia provider. However, a nonstatistically significant trend toward increased cancer detection requires further study. PMID:26060404

  8. Usefulness of oil lubrication during colonoscopy: A comparative study with the conventional technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, J L; Carmona-Sánchez, R; Rosas-Vitorino, C

    2016-01-01

    The different forms of lubrication are among the most simple, accessible, and economic techniques that have been implemented for improving the diagnostic performance of colonoscopy. To determine whether the use of oil improved the number of complete colonoscopies, facilitated the procedure, reduced pain, or improved the study's diagnostic performance, compared with the conventional lubrication technique. One hundred and seventy-five patients referred for colonoscopy were alternately allocated to receive treatment with the standard lubrication method with chlorhexidine gel (group 1) or lubrication with corn oil administered through the working channel (group II). The number of complete colonoscopies, the length of time needed to reach the cecum, the degree of difficulty estimated by the endoscopist and the assistant, the level of pain at the end of the study estimated by the patient, and the endoscopic findings were all determined. Eighty-eight patients made up group I and 87 made up group II. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in relation to general characteristics, the number of complete colonoscopies (93 vs. 97%, respectively), the time needed to reach the cecum (8:00 vs. 8:41min, respectively), the level of pain at the end of the study, or the detection of polyps. The degree of difficulty was slightly lower in group II, but with no statistical significance. Lubrication with oil during colonoscopy did not improve the number of complete colonoscopies, did not facilitate the study, nor did it reduce pain or increase the diagnostic performance of the study, when compared with the conventional technique. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Variation in use of surveillance colonoscopy among colorectal cancer survivors in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salz Talya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical practice guidelines recommend colonoscopies at regular intervals for colorectal cancer (CRC survivors. Using data from a large, multi-regional, population-based cohort, we describe the rate of surveillance colonoscopy and its association with geographic, sociodemographic, clinical, and health services characteristics. Methods We studied CRC survivors enrolled in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS study. Eligible survivors were diagnosed between 2003 and 2005, had curative surgery for CRC, and were alive without recurrences 14 months after surgery with curative intent. Data came from patient interviews and medical record abstraction. We used a multivariate logit model to identify predictors of colonoscopy use. Results Despite guidelines recommending surveillance, only 49% of the 1423 eligible survivors received a colonoscopy within 14 months after surgery. We observed large regional differences (38% to 57% across regions. Survivors who received screening colonoscopy were more likely to: have colon cancer than rectal cancer (OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.05-1.90; have visited a primary care physician (OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.14-1.82; and received adjuvant chemotherapy (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.27-2.41. Compared to survivors with no comorbidities, survivors with moderate or severe comorbidities were less likely to receive surveillance colonoscopy (OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.98 and OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.29-0.66, respectively. Conclusions Despite guidelines, more than half of CRC survivors did not receive surveillance colonoscopy within 14 months of surgery, with substantial variation by site of care. The association of primary care visits and adjuvant chemotherapy use suggests that access to care following surgery affects cancer surveillance.

  10. Expected long-term impact of the German screening colonoscopy programme on colorectal cancer prevention: analyses based on 4,407,971 screening colonoscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Hermann; Altenhofen, Lutz; Stock, Christian; Hoffmeister, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopy based screening programmes for colorectal cancer (CRC) are being implemented in an increasing number of countries. In Germany, screening colonoscopy at age 55 or older has been offered since the end of 2002. We aimed to estimate the long-term impact of this offer on CRC prevention. We estimated numbers of prevented CRC cases by expected age and year of their (prevented) occurrence over four decades (2005-2045) by four state Markov models (non-advanced adenoma, advanced adenoma, preclinical CRC, clinically manifest CRC). Estimates are based on screening colonoscopies reported to the German screening colonoscopy registry in 2003-2012 (N=4,407,971), transition rates between the four states and general population mortality rates. Numbers of prevented clinically manifest CRC cases are projected to increase from prevented cases is expected to be higher among men than among women and to strongly vary by age. The vast majority of prevented cases would have occurred at age 75 or older. Despite modest participation rates, the German screening colonoscopy programme will lead to substantial reductions in the CRC burden. The reductions will be fully disclosed in the long run only and predominantly affect numbers of incident cases above 75years of age. Screening offers would need to start at younger ages in order to achieve more effective CRC prevention at younger ages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Karatzas, Pantelis S; Varytimiadis, Lazaros T; Tsigaridas, Athanasios; Galanopoulos, Michail; Viazis, Nikos; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists.

  12. The Incomplete Social Psychology of Aging: A Psychologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Thomas O.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that the social psychology of aging, as currently practiced within social gerontology, is incomplete. Examines this incompleteness (its origins, range, and effects), and presents outlines of a more complete social psychology of aging. Suggests a life span developmental social psychology would have beneficial effects. (Author)

  13. Incomplete fusion reactions in 16 O+ 165 Ho

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed Monte Carlo simulation of recoil range distributions of products were performed with the help of PACE2 code, in order to extract the contributions of incomplete fusion in the individual channels. The results clearly show the incomplete fusion contributions in the tantalum and thulium products. This is confirmed by the ...

  14. Hydatidiform moles among patients with incomplete abortion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SHS

    However, there is no previous study that has determined the prevalence and associ- ated risk factors of HM among patients with incomplete abortion evacuated at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) and Sekou. Toure Regional Hospital (STRH). Methods: A total of 180 patients with incomplete abortion were enrolled between ...

  15. A case of incomplete and refractory Kawasaki disease: Diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnosis of incomplete Kawasaki disease (KD) – i.e. cases that do not full all the diagnostic criteria – requires a high index of suspicion. We report a case of incomplete KD that was refractory to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and subsequently responded to treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone.

  16. Incomplete fusion reactions in 16 O· 165 Ho

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed Monte Carlo simulation of recoil range distributions of products were performed with the help of PACE2 code, in order to extract the contributions of incomplete fusion in the individual channels. The results clearly show the incomplete fusion contributions in the tantalum and thulium products. This is confirmed by the ...

  17. Appointment-keeping behaviors and procedure day are associated with colonoscopy attendance in a patient navigator population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayor, Jennifer; Maniar, Swapnil; Chan, Walter W

    2017-04-01

    Patient navigator programs (PNP) have been shown to improve colonoscopy completion with demonstrated cost-effectiveness. Despite additional resources available to these patients, many still do not attend their colonoscopies. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with colonoscopy attendance amongst patients in whom logistical barriers to attendance have been minimized through enrollment in a PNP. Retrospective case-control study of patients enrolled in a PNP for colonoscopy performed at a tertiary endoscopy center from 2009 to 2014. Cases were defined as patients who did not attend their first scheduled colonoscopy after PNP enrollment. Age- and gender-matched controls completed their first scheduled colonoscopy after PNP enrollment. 514 subjects (257 cases, mean age 57.1years, 36.6% males) were included. Patients who attended their colonoscopy were less likely to be Spanish-speaking (64.6% vs 78.2%, p=0.0003) and uninsured (0.4% vs 3.9%, p=0.006). Attendance rates were significantly lower for screening colonoscopies compared to an indication of surveillance or diagnostic (45.5% vs 65.3%, pattended colonoscopies scheduled on Monday (39.2% vs 52.1%, p=0.04) and in December (10.7% vs 52.3%, pattendance. Appointment-keeping behaviors, in addition to insurance-status, language-barriers and medical comorbidities, influence colonoscopy attendance in a PNP population. Patients scheduled for colonoscopies on Mondays or in December may require more resources to ensure attendance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perceived Threat and Internet Use Predict Intentions to Get Bowel Cancer Screening (Colonoscopy): Longitudinal Questionnaire Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniela; Grapendorf, Johannes; Greving, Hannah; Sassenberg, Kai

    2018-02-07

    Many people use the Internet for health-related information search, which is known to help regulate their emotional state. However, not much is known yet about how Web-based information search together with negative emotional states (ie, threat of cancer diagnosis) relate to preventive medical treatment decisions (ie, colonoscopy intentions). The aim of this study was to investigate how frequency of health-related Internet use together with perceived threat of a possible (bowel) cancer diagnosis influences intentions to get a colonoscopy. Previous research has shown that people who experience threat preferentially process positive information in an attempt to downregulate the aversive emotional state. The Internet can facilitate this regulatory strategy through allowing self-directed, unrestricted, and thus biased information search. In the context of threat regarding a possible bowel cancer diagnosis, feelings of threat can still be effectively reduced through cancer screening (ie, colonoscopy). We, therefore, predict that in that particular context, feelings of threat should be related to stronger colonoscopy intentions, and that this relationship should be enhanced for people who use the Internet often. A longitudinal questionnaire study was conducted among healthy participants who were approaching or just entering the bowel cancer risk group (aged 45-55 years). Perceived threat of a possible (bowel) cancer diagnosis, frequency of health-related Internet use, and intentions to have a colonoscopy were assessed at 2 time points (6-month time lag between the 2 measurement points T1 and T2). Multiple regression analyses were conducted to test whether threat and Internet use at T1 together predicted colonoscopy intentions at T2. In line with our predictions, we found that the threat of a possible (bowel) cancer diagnosis interacted with the frequency of Internet use (both T1) to predict colonoscopy intentions (T2; B=.23, standard error [SE]=0.09, P=.01). For people

  19. Barriers and facilitators associated with colonoscopy completion in individuals with multiple chronic conditions: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shahnaz Sultan,1–4 Melissa R Partin,1,2 Phalgoon Shah,5 Jennifer LeLaurin,4 Ivette Magaly Freytes,4 Chandylen L Nightingale,6 Susan F Fesperman,4 Barbara A Curbow,7 Rebecca J Beyth3,4,8 1Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, 2Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, 4Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, 5Department of Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, 6Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem NC, 7Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 8Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USA Background: A recommendation to undergo a colonoscopy, an invasive procedure that requires commitment and motivation, planning (scheduling and finding a driver and preparation (diet restriction and laxative consumption, may be uniquely challenging for individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs. This qualitative study aimed to describe the barriers and facilitators to colonoscopy experienced by such patients.Materials and methods: Semistructured focus groups were conducted with male Veterans who were scheduled for outpatient colonoscopy and either failed to complete the procedure or completed the examination. Focus group recordings were transcribed and analyzed by an inductive grounded approach using constant comparative analysis.Results: Forty-four individuals aged 51–83 years participated in this study (23 adherent and 21 nonadherent. Participants had an average of 7.4 chronic conditions (range 2–14. The five most common chronic conditions were hypertension (75%, hyperlipidemia (75

  20. Colonoscopy and computerised tomography scan are not sufficient to localise right sided colonic lesions accurately.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Solon, Jacqueline Gemma

    2009-11-23

    : Aim: accurate pre-operative localisation of colonic lesions is critical especially in laparoscopic colectomy where tactile localisation is absent particularly in screen-detected tumours. The study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of colonoscopy and double-contrast computerised tomography (CT) to localise lesions treated by right hemicolectomy. Method: a retrospective chart review was performed of patients treated by right hemicolectomy under the colorectal service between July 2003 and October 2006. Pre-operative tumour location determined by CT scan and colonoscopy were compared with the intra-operative and histopathologic findings. Results: of 101 patients, 73 (73%) were for adenoma or cancer, with a final diagnosis of adenocarcinoma in 59 (59%). Pre-operative localisation was inaccurate in 29% of lesions using both CT and colonoscopy. In the transverse colon colonoscopy alone was only 37.5% accurate, increasing to 62.5% when information from the CT scan was added. Conclusion: pre-operative localisation of right-sided colon cancers using colonoscopy and CT scanning is unreliable in at least 29% of cases. Inaccurate localisation of transverse colon tumours risks inadequate lymphadenectomy with an adverse cancer outcome. Pre-operative abdominal CT scan improves accuracy but endoscopic tattoo localisation should be employed routinely especially in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection.

  1. Risk perception among Brazilian individuals with high risk for colorectal cancer and colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Erika M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk perception is considered a motivating factor for adopting preventive behaviors. This study aimed to verify the demographic characteristics and cancer family history that are predictors of risk perception and to verify if risk perception is a predictor of colonoscopy adherence. Methods Individuals with a family colorectal cancer history as indicated by a proband with cancer were interviewed by telephone. They responded to a questionnaire covering demographic characteristics, colonoscopy history and four questions on risk perception. Tests of multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to identify associations between dependent and independent variables. Results The 117 participants belonged to 62 families and had a mean age of 45.2 years. The majority of these individuals were female (74.4% and from families who met the Amsterdam Criteria (54.7%. The average risk perception was 47.6%, with a median of 50%. The average population perception of individual risk was 55.4%, with a median of 50%. Variables associated with a higher risk perception were age, gender, religion, school level, income, and death of a family member. The variable predicting colonoscopy was receiving medical information regarding risk (odds ratio OR 8.40. Conclusions We found that family cancer history characteristics (number of relatives with cancer, risk classification are associated with adequate risk perception. Risk perception does not predict colonoscopy in this sample. The only variable that predicted colonoscopy was receiving medical information recommending screening.

  2. Comorbid Illness, Bowel Preparation, and Logistical Constraints Are Key Reasons for Outpatient Colonoscopy Nonattendance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colonoscopy nonattendance is a challenge for outpatient clinics globally. Absenteeism results in a potential delay in disease diagnosis and loss of hospital resources. This study aims to determine reasons for colonoscopy nonattendance from a Canadian perspective. Design. Demographic data, reasons for nonattendance, and patient suggestions for improving compliance were elicited from 49 out of 144 eligible study participants via telephone questionnaire. The 49 nonattenders were compared to age and sex matched controls for several potential contributing factors. Results. Nonattendance rates were significantly higher in winter months; the OR of nonattendance was 5.2 (95% CI, 1.6 to 17.0, p<0.001 in winter versus other months. Being married was positively associated with attendance. There was no significant association between nonattendance and any of the other variables examined. The top 3 reasons for nonattendance were being too unwell to attend the procedure, being unable to complete bowel preparation, or experiencing logistical challenges. Conclusions. Colonoscopy attendance rates appear to vary significantly by season and it may be beneficial to book more colonoscopies in the summer or overbook in the winter. Targets for intervention include more tailored teaching sessions, reminders, taxi chits, and developing a hospital specific colonoscopy video regarding procedure and bowel preparation requirements.

  3. Optimism and barriers to colonoscopy in low-income Latinos at average risk for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efuni, Elizaveta; DuHamel, Katherine N; Winkel, Gary; Starr, Tatiana; Jandorf, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening continues to be underused, particularly by Latinos. CRC and colonoscopy fear, worry, and fatalism have been identified as screening barriers in Latinos. The study purpose was to examine the relationship of optimism, fatalism, worry, and fear in the context of Latinos referred for CRC screening. Our sample included 251 Latinos between the ages of 50 and 83 years who had no personal or immediate family history of CRC, no personal history of gastrointestinal disorder, no colonoscopy in the past 5 years, and received a referral for a colonoscopy. Face-to-face interviews were performed, and data were analyzed using regression models. Greater optimism (β = -1.72, p optimism (β = -0.09, p < 0.05), higher fatalism (β = 0.28, p < 0.01), and female gender (β = 0.9, p < 0.05) were associated with greater worry. Interventions that address fatalism and promote optimistic beliefs may reduce worry among Latinos referred for colonoscopy. Interventions that alleviate colonoscopy fear because of family history of cancer particularly among Latino women may help improve distress about CRC screening. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Developing a tool to preserve eye contact with patients undergoing colonoscopy for pain monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Y

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Yaron Niv, Yossi TalDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, IsraelAbstract: Colonoscopy has become the leading procedure for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer. Patients’ experience of colonic endoscopic procedures is scarcely reported, even though it is considered a major factor in colorectal cancer screening participation. Pain due to air inflation or stretching the colon with an endoscope is not rare during examination and may be the main obstacle to cooperation and participation in a screening program. We propose a four-stage study for developing a tool dedicated to pain monitoring during colonoscopy, as follows: (1 comparison of patient, nurse, and endoscopist questionnaire responses about patient pain and technical details of the procedure using the PAINAD tool during colonoscopy; (2 observation of the correlation between patients’ facial expressions and other parameters (using the short PAINAD; (3 development of a device for continuous monitoring of the patient’s facial expression during the procedure; (4 assessment of the usability of such a tool and its contribution to the outcomes of colonoscopy procedures. Early intervention by the staff performing the procedure, in reaction to alerts encoded by this tool, may prevent adverse events during the procedure.Keywords: pain scoring, colonoscopy, pain monitoring, facial expression

  5. Quality Assessment of Colonoscopy Reporting: Results from a Statewide Cancer Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to assess quality of colonoscopy reports and determine if physicians in practice were already documenting recommended quality indicators, prior to the publication of a standardized Colonoscopy Reporting and Data System (CO-RADS in 2007. We examined 110 colonoscopy reports from 2005-2006 through Maryland Colorectal Cancer Screening Program. We evaluated 25 key data elements recommended by CO-RADS, including procedure indications, risk/comorbidity assessments, procedure technical descriptions, colonoscopy findings, specimen retrieval/pathology. Among 110 reports, 73% documented the bowel preparation quality and 82% documented specific cecal landmarks. For the 177 individual polyps identified, information on size and morphology was documented for 87% and 53%, respectively. Colonoscopy reporting varied considerately in the pre-CO-RADS period. The absence of key data elements may impact the ability to make recommendations for recall intervals. This paper provides baseline data to assess if CO-RADS has an impact on reporting and how best to improve the quality of reporting.

  6. Use of the Endocuff during routine colonoscopy examination improves adenoma detection: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Matthew; Karnes, William; Jamal, M Mazen; Lee, John G; Lee, Robert; Samarasena, Jason; Bechtold, Matthew L; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-11-21

    To perform meta-analysis of the use of Endocuff during average risk screening colonoscopy. Scopus, Cochrane databases, MEDLINE/PubMed, and CINAHL were searched in April 2016. Abstracts from Digestive Disease Week, United European Gastroenterology, and the American College of Gastroenterology meeting were also searched from 2004-2015. Studies comparing EC-assisted colonoscopy (EAC) to standard colonoscopy, for any indication, were included in the analysis. The analysis was conducted by using the Mantel-Haenszel or DerSimonian and Laird models with the odds ratio (OR) to assess adenoma detection, cecal intubation rate, and complications performed. Nine studies ( n = 5624 patients) were included in the analysis. Compared to standard colonoscopy, procedures performed with EC had higher frequencies for adenoma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.23-1.80; P = 0.03), and sessile serrated adenomas detection (OR = 2.34 95%CI: 1.63-3.36; P detection without any difference in cecal intubation rates compared to standard colonoscopy.

  7. The Effect of Music on Pain, Anxiety and Vital Signs of Children during Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the effect of music on pain, anxiety and vital signs in children undergoing colonoscopy.   Method and Materials: This randomized study was carried out on 101 children (7 to 14 years old requiring colonoscopy. Children were randomly allocated to a control or case group. The case group was played relaxing music (by Clayderman during the procedure. Spiegelberger and pain questionaires were administered immediately after the colonoscopy. Pulse rate, blood pressure and percent blood oxygen saturation were recorded for each subject. The control group was treated in an identical manner, but was not played music during the procedure. Data were analyzed using SPSS software.   Results: Satisfaction, anxiety, pain, and blood pressure were significantly different between the groups                (P0.05.   Conclusion: Music can reduce anxiety and pain during colonoscopy.   Key words: Anxiety, Music,Vital signs, Colonoscopy

  8. PillCam© Colon Capsule for the study of colonic pathology in clinical practice: Study of agreement with colonoscopy Capsula colónica PillCam© para el estudio de la patología del colon en la práctica clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Herrerías-Gutiérrez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: several studies have pointed out the effectiveness of the PillCam© colon capsule endoscopy (CCE compared with the colonoscopy in the study of the colonic pathology. Aims and methods: the objective of our study was to assess the agreement in the diagnosis of CCE with conventional colonoscopy as well as its sensitivity and specificity, and to describe the findings of the CCE in our clinical practice. Consecutive patients with abdominal symptoms were included in the study. The CCE was performed as previously reported (with PEG and sodium phosphate as laxative agents. The nature and location of the findings, colonic transit time, complications, cleanliness degree and consistency with diagnostic colonoscopy, when performed, were analyzed. Results: a total of 144 subjects (67 women and 77 men; (52.17±16.71 years with the following indications were included: screening of Colorectal cancer (88 patients, control after polipectomy (24, incomplete colonoscopy (7, rectal bleeding (10, anemia (8, diarrhea (7. The CCE exploration was complete in 134/144 cases (93%, with no case of retention. The preparation was good-very good in 88/134 (65,6%, fair in 26/134 (19,4% and poor in 20/134 (15% of the cases. The average colonic transit was of 140.76 min (9-603. Any adverse effect was notified. In 44 cases a colonoscopy was carried out after CCE (results were hidden from another endoscopist. Compared to colonoscopy, the rate of agreement was 75,6%, the sensitivity was 84% and the specificity 62,5%, PPV was 77,7% and NPV was 71,4 %. The colonic findings in 134 CCE were: in 34 cases CCE it did not show lesions, diverticulosis in 63 explorations, polyps in 43, angiodysplasias in 15, Crohn's Disease in 9 and ulcerative colitis in other 8 cases. Conclusions: the CCE is an effective and reliable technique for the detection of lesions in colon, and because of its high agree-ment with the colonoscopy, it could be useful in clinical practice. Further studies

  9. The CIMP Phenotype in BRAF Mutant Serrated Polyps from a Prospective Colonoscopy Patient Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie C. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancers arising via the serrated pathway are often associated with BRAF V600E mutation, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, and microsatellite instability. Previous studies have shown a strong association between BRAF V600E mutation and serrated polyps. This study aims to evaluate CIMP status of all the serrated polyp subtypes and its association with functionally important genes such as MLH1, p16, and IGFBP7. CIMP status and methylation were evaluated using the real-time based MethyLight assay in 154 serrated polyps and 63 conventional adenomas. Results showed that CIMP-high serrated polyps were strongly associated with BRAF mutation and proximal colon. CIMP-high was uncommon in conventional adenomas (1.59%, occurred in 8.25% of hyperplastic polyps (HPs, and became common in sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs (51.43%. MLH1 methylation was mainly observed in the proximal colon and was significantly associated with BRAF mutation and CIMP-high. The number of samples methylated for p16 and IGFBP7 was the highest in SSAs. The methylation panel we used to detect CIMP is highly specific for CIMP-high cancers. With this panel, we demonstrate that CIMP-high is much more common in SSAs than HPs. This suggests that CIMP-high correlates with increased risk of malignant transformation which was also observed in methylation of functionally important genes.

  10. The corner of the gastroenterologist: What colonoscopy can do, what to ask to radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennato, Raffaele [Department of Gastroenterology, ' Antonio Cardarelli Hospital' , Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: lelloben@katamail.com; Balzano, Antonio [Department of Gastroenterology, ' Antonio Cardarelli Hospital' , Naples (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Colonoscopy is the diagnostic technique of choice for most colonic diseases and allows to explore the entire colonic mucosal surface and to visualize the mucosa of terminal ileum. When it is done with appropriate indications, significantly more clinically relevant diagnoses are made. Moreover, colonoscopy keeps an operative role in the treatment of some acute and chronic colonic diseases and it is the most effective colorectal cancer screening modality. The endoscopic exploration of colon is not infallible and presents rare complications. Programs of endoscopic training and practice, monitoring of quality indicators and continuous technological development are improving endoscopic diagnostic and therapeutic role. Appropriate indications for colonoscopy, its limits and complications and questions for the radiologist are discussed.

  11. Verres needle desufflation as an effective treatment option for colonic perforation after colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Evie; Al-Taher, Mahdi; Peeters, Koen; Bouvy, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence of colonoscopic perforation and the efficacy of minimal invasive management by Verres needle desufflation. All colonoscopies performed between January 2007 and January 2012, at the Maastricht University Medical Centre, were reviewed. During the study period, 18,449 colonoscopies were performed. Fourteen colonoscopic perforations were diagnosed. Seven patients underwent immediate surgery, whereas the remaining 7 patients were initially managed conservatively: 5 of these patients also underwent Verres needle desufflation. One of the patients who received Verres needle desufflation underwent secondary surgery because of failure of nonsurgical treatment. Conservative management of colonoscopic perforation, including treatment with Verres needle desufflation, was associated with lower complication rates and shorter hospital stays compared with immediate surgical intervention. Verres needle desufflation in combination with nil per os and antibiotic treatment is a safe option for managing colon perforation after colonoscopy in selected patients lacking clinical signs of peritonitis or sepsis.

  12. The corner of the gastroenterologist: What colonoscopy can do, what to ask to radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennato, Raffaele; Balzano, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the diagnostic technique of choice for most colonic diseases and allows to explore the entire colonic mucosal surface and to visualize the mucosa of terminal ileum. When it is done with appropriate indications, significantly more clinically relevant diagnoses are made. Moreover, colonoscopy keeps an operative role in the treatment of some acute and chronic colonic diseases and it is the most effective colorectal cancer screening modality. The endoscopic exploration of colon is not infallible and presents rare complications. Programs of endoscopic training and practice, monitoring of quality indicators and continuous technological development are improving endoscopic diagnostic and therapeutic role. Appropriate indications for colonoscopy, its limits and complications and questions for the radiologist are discussed

  13. Enhanced education for bowel preparation before colonoscopy: A state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Zhang, Ming Ming; Li, Yue Yue; Li, Li Xiang; Li, Yan Qing

    2017-02-01

    Colonoscopy remains the mainstay in diagnosing and monitoring colorectal cancer and other colorectal lesions. The diagnostic efficiency of colonoscopy greatly depends on the quality of bowel preparation, which is closely associated with the patient's compliance with the preparation instructions. In addition, the procedural requirements of bowel preparation are often complex and difficult for patients to comprehend and memorize, especially those with lower health literacy and motivation. Therefore, in recent years, many educational methods have been developed, such as educational booklets, cartoon visual aids, educational videos, short message service, telephone, social media and smart phone applications. These educational methods have significantly improved compliance with the instructions for bowel preparation and ultimately promoted the visualization of the colon in patients undergoing colonoscopy. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Mucinous adenocarcinoma ovary: diagnostic dilemma and the usefulness of colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, S.; Khan, M.Q.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the fourth most common malignant disease of women. Types of ovarian carcinoma, including serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and transitional carcinoma, differ from each other with respect to morphology, genetic alterations and in their clinical course.Ovary is a common site for tumour metastases with 5-30% of ovarian cancers metastatic in nature. Differentiating primary from metastatic mucinous ovarian adenocarcinoma is often challenging. We assessed the usefulness of colonoscopy to sort out this dilemma. Methods: In this case-series with retrospective data collection at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan, demographics, indication for referral, tumour size, laterality, and the immuno-histochemical stains were recorded. Results: A total of 17 patients were referred to gastroenterology department between March 2009 and March 2012. Mean age of the patients was 36.7 years (range, 16-58 years) and the indication for referral was mucinous pathology. All of these patients had surgery outside hospital; histopathology was submitted at our pathology laboratory for review. Out of 17 patients, 16 had progressive abdominal distension as the primary symptom whereas one patient had a history of bleeding per rectum; 67% (12/17) of the tumours were more than 10cm and 94% (16/ 17) were unilateral. We were able to find the colorectal primary in 17.4% (3/17) of the patients, whereas upper GI endoscopies were unrevealing all patients. CK-7 was positive in two of three and CK-20 was positive in all the three patients with colorectal primary. Conclusion: We were able to identify gastrointestinal primary in significant number of patients without gastrointestinal symptoms that showed immuno-histochemical stain pattern of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma and had a tumour size of greater than 10cm and were unilateral. (author)

  15. Absence seizure associated with coloprep consumption in colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abin Chandrakumar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coloprep is a bowel preparatory solution given before endoscopic procedures to get a unobscured internal vision. It has among its constituents’ sodium sulphate, potassium sulphate and magnesium sulphate which produce an osmotic effect in the bowel. However, the use of such agents in hyponatremic and patients predisposed to seizures can have adverse ramifications. The current case outlines manifestation of absence seizure in a 52-year-old male patient who was administered Coloprep for colonoscopy. There was absence of other predisposing factors and the symptoms were ameliorated using timely identification and rectification of the underlying derangements. Resumo: Coloprep é uma solução preparatória intestinal administrada antes de procedimentos endoscópicos, com o objetivo de se ter uma visão interna não obscurecida. Entre os constituintes de Coloprep, observa-se sulfato de sódio, sulfato de potássio e sulfato de magnésio, que provocam efeito osmótico no intestino. Mas o uso de tais agentes em pacientes hiponatrêmicos e com predisposição para convulsões pode ter ramificações adversas. O caso em tela delineia uma manifestação de convulsão de ausência em paciente do gênero masculino com 52 anos e que recebeu Coloprep para colonoscopia. Não havia outros fatores predisponentes e os sintomas melhoraram graças à oportuna identificação e correção dos transtornos subjacentes. Keywords: Adverse reaction, Seizure, Purgative, Hyponatremia, Sodium phosphate, Palavras-chave: Reação adversa, Convulsão, Purgante, Hiponatremia, Fosfato de sódio

  16. A Review of Current Issues Underlying Colon Cleansing before Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence C Hookey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review examines four current issues related to the efficacy, patient tolerance and safety of the following bowel cleansing agents: oral sodium phosphate (NaP, polyethylene glycol (PEG and magnesium citrate (Pico-Salax, Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc, Canada, an agent recently made available in Canada. MedLine and PubMed databases were systematically searched to identify studies related to the efficacy of altered PEG solutions combined with adjunct treatments; the efficacy, tolerability and safety of Pico-Salax; the association between nephrocalcinosis, and chronic renal failure and oral NaP use; and the role of diet. Although lower volume PEG solutions combined with adjuvant agents were generally associated with better patient tolerance, their efficacy was varied and interpretation of this end point is complicated by study design issues. There are very few reported studies of Pico-Salax, and as a result, there are insufficient data to draw conclusions about the efficacy of this agent. The available data suggest that Pico-Salax may be better tolerated by patients, than oral NaP and PEG solutions. There is a paucity of hemodynamic monitoring data pre- and postadministration, but the available data suggests that this small-volume osmotic agent could cause subclinical contraction of the intravascular space. Recent case reports suggest an association between nephrocalcinosis and oral NaP ingestion, but to date, these reports have been confined to a single centre. Preliminary studies suggest that this is not a widespread problem, but more studies are needed. There are only a few studies examining diet and patient tolerability, but they do suggest that diet may be liberalized with some cleansing regimens to enhance tolerability without decreasing efficacy. The present review highlights current controversies and advances in colon cleansing before colonoscopy, and also identifies areas for further study.

  17. Use of high-flow nasal cannula in obese patients receiving colonoscopy under intravenous propofol sedation: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chan Lee

    Full Text Available Intravenous sedation during colonoscopy has become the standard practice in the United States given its higher patient satisfaction and procedural quality. This practice is not free of side effects as a significant proportion of patients undergoing this procedure tend to have respiratory depression and desaturation events. Obesity, as it relates to higher levels of body mass index (BMI has a positive correlation with the incidence of hypoxemia. During colonoscopy High flow nasal cannula (HFNC may potentially improve oxygen performance in patients receiving colonoscopy under intravenous sedation. Here we present 3 cases of patients undergoing adjunctive oxygen therapy with HFNC during colonoscopy with intravenous sedation. We found patients to have lower number of desaturation events and were satisfied with their experience. Keywords: High BMI (body mass index, HFNC (high-flow nasal cannula, Colonoscopy, Intravenous sedation, Obesity

  18. The topology of integrable systems with incomplete fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshkin, K R

    2014-01-01

    Liouville's theorem holds for Hamiltonian systems with complete Hamiltonian fields which possess a complete involutive system of first integrals; such systems are called Liouville-integrable. In this paper integrable systems with incomplete Hamiltonian fields are investigated. It is shown that Liouville's theorem remains valid in the case of a single incomplete field, while if the number of incomplete fields is greater, a certain analogue of the theorem holds. An integrable system on the algebra sl(3) is taken as an example. Bibliography: 11 titles

  19. Evaluating screening colonoscopy quality in an uninsured urban population following patient navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Naylor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Patient navigation (PN increases screening colonoscopy completion in minority and uninsured populations. However, colonoscopy quality is under-reported in the setting of PN and quality indicators have often failed to meet benchmark standards. This study investigated screening colonoscopy quality indicators after year-one of a PN initiative targeting the medically uninsured. This was a retrospective analysis of 296 outpatient screening colonoscopies. Patients were 45 to 75 years of age with no history of bowel cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or colorectal surgery. The screening colonoscopy quality indicators: adenoma detection rate (ADR, cecal intubation rate (CIR, and bowel preparation quality were compared in 89 uninsured Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC patients who received PN and 207 University Hospital patients who received usual care. The FQHC PN and University Hospital cohorts were similar in female sex (69% vs. 70%; p = 0.861 and African American race (61% vs. 61%; p = 0.920. The FQHC PN cohort was younger (57 years vs. 60 years; p < 0.001. There was no difference in ADR (33% vs. 32%; p = 0.971 or CIR (96% vs. 95%; p = 0.900 comparing the FQHC PN and University Hospital cohorts. The FQHC PN patients had a greater likelihood of an optimal bowel preparation on multivariate logistic regression (odds ratio 4.17; 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 16.20. Uninsured FQHC patients who received PN were observed to have intra-procedure quality indicators that exceeded bench-mark standards for high-quality screening colonoscopy and were equivalent to those observed in an insured University Hospital patient population.

  20. Aromatherapy for reducing colonoscopy related procedural anxiety and physiological parameters: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pei-Hsin; Peng, Yen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ou, Ming-Chiu

    2010-01-01

    Colonoscopy is generally tolerated, some patients regarding the procedure as unpleasant and painful and generally performed with the patient sedated and receiving analgesics. The effect of sedation and analgesia for colonoscopy is limited. Aromatherapy is also applied to gastrointestinal endoscopy to reduce procedural anxiety. There is lack of information about aromatherapy specific for colonoscopy. In this study, we aimed to performed a randomized controlled study to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on relieve anxiety, stress and physiological parameters of colonoscopy. A randomized controlled trail was carried out and collected in 2009 and 2010. The participants were randomized in two groups. Aromatherapy was then carried out by inhalation of Sunflower oil (control group) and Neroli oil (Experimental group). The anxiety index was evaluated by State Trait Anxiety Inventory-state (STAI-S) score before aromatherapy and after colonoscopy as well as the pain index for post-procedural by visual analogue scale (VAS). Physiological indicators, such as blood pressure (systolic and diastolic blood pressure), heart rate and respiratory rate were evaluated before and after aromatherapy. Participates in this study were 27 subjects, 13 in control group and 14 in Neroli group with average age 52.26 +/- 17.79 years. There was no significance of procedural anxiety by STAI-S score and procedural pain by VAS. The physiological parameters showed a significant lower pre- and post-procedural systolic blood pressure in Neroli group than control group. Aromatic care for colonoscopy, although with no significant effect on procedural anxiety, is an inexpensive, effective and safe pre-procedural technique that could decrease systolic blood pressure.

  1. Transmural Colonic Infarction after Routine Colonoscopy in a Young Patient without Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Zizzo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy is one of the most widely used procedures in medical practice for the diagnosis and treatment of many benign and malignant diseases of the colorectal tract. Colonscopy has become the reference procedure for screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer. The overall rate of adverse events is estimated to be about 2.8 per 1,000 procedures, while complications requiring hospitalization are about 1.9 per 1,000 colonoscopies. Mortality from all causes and colonoscopy-specific mortality are estimated to be 0.07 and 0.007%, respectively. An exceptional fearsome postcolonoscopy complication is colon ischemia (CI; only few cases have been reported worldwide. We present the case of a 43-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain; fever and rectal bleeding appeared 12 h after a voluntary ‘screening’ colonoscopy. She had no risk factors for CI. Her laboratory tests showed alterations in inflammatory markers and a computed tomography scan showed a circumferential thickening in the left colon and free fluid in the abdomen. After 12 h of observation and conservative therapy, the clinical state of the patient worsened with the rising of signs of peritonitis. Laparoscopy showed that colon infarction extended from the distal third of the transverse colon to the proximal rectum. Laparotomy, resection of the pathological colon and terminal colostomy were performed. The specimen examined confirmed an extended ischemic colitis and transmural infarction on the antimesocolic side, in the absence of a vasculitis. The patient underwent recanalization after 8 months. CI after colonoscopy is a rare and alarming complication that must be known and taken into account in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic cases after colonoscopy, particularly in patients with known risk factors. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical data, imaging and especially endoscopy. Treatment is almost always conservative but, in

  2. Patient-Reported Attributions for Missed Colonoscopy Appointments in Two Large Healthcare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Viraj; Modi, Varsha; Kalavar, Anisha; Espadas, Donna; Hanser, Loretta; Gould, Milena; El-Serag, Hashem B; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-07-01

    Missed colonoscopy appointments (no-shows) can lead to wasted resources and delays in colorectal cancer diagnosis, an area of special concern in public health systems that often provide care for vulnerable patients. Our objective was to identify reasons for missed colonoscopy appointments in patients seeking care at two large public health systems in Houston, TX. We conducted a telephone survey of patients who missed their colonoscopy appointments at two tertiary care health systems. Using a structured survey instrument, we collected information on patient-specific and health services barriers. Patient-specific barriers included perceived procedural-related factors (e.g., difficulty in preparation), cognitive-emotional factors (e.g., fear or concern about modesty), and changes in health status (e.g., improvement or worsening of health). Health services barriers included logistical factors (e.g., travel-related difficulties) and appointment scheduling problems (inconvenient date or time). We examined differences in attributions for missed appointments between the two study sites. Of 160 unique patients (102 Site A and 58 Site B) who missed their appointment during the study period, 153 (95.6 %) attributed their no-show to at least one of the listed barriers. Most respondents (125; 78.1 %) cited travel-related issues or scheduling problems as reasons for their missed appointment. Not having a ride or a travel companion was the most commonly reported travel-related issue. We also found significant differences for barriers between the two sites. Most missed colonoscopy appointments resulted from potentially preventable travel- and scheduling-related issues. Because barriers to keeping colonoscopy appointments are different across health systems, each health system might need to develop unique interventions to reduce missed colonoscopy appointments.

  3. Quantum Mechanics is Incomplete but it is Consistent with Locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, H. S.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum mechanics is seen to be incomplete not because it cannot explain the correlations that characterize entanglement without invoking either non-locality or realism, both of which, despite special relativity or no-go theorems, are at least conceivable. Quantum mechanics is incomplete, in a perhaps broader than hidden variable sense, because it fails to address within its theoretical structure the question of how even a single particle, by being in a given quantum state, causes the frequency distribution of measurement values specified by the state. This incompleteness of quantum mechanics as it is currently conceived is both fundamental and indefeasible. Failure to address the question of how the states of entangled particles are given effect to yield the correlations they specify is simply a particular albeit attention arresting instance of this incompleteness. But if that is so then quantum mechanics cannot be held to be inconsistent with locality.

  4. Genetic etiology and clinical consequences of complete and incomplete achromatopsia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Slingerland, N.W.; Roosing, S.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Moll-Ramirez, N.G. van; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klaver, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic causes of complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM) and assess the association between disease-causing mutations, phenotype at diagnosis, and visual prognosis. DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Probands with complete ACHM (n

  5. Genetic etiology and clinical consequences of complete and incomplete achromatopsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Slingerland, Niki W. R.; Roosing, Susanne; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic causes of complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM) and assess the association between disease-causing mutations, phenotype at diagnosis, and visual prognosis. DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Probands with complete ACHM (n

  6. Predictors of guideline concordance for surveillance colonoscopy recommendations in patients at a safety-net health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ben; Freeland, Zachary; Gopal, Purva; Agrawal, Deepak; Mayorga, Christian A; Mithani, Rozina; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Halm, Ethan A; Singal, Amit G

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate surveillance intervals for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is one of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services 2014 physician quality reporting system measures. Appropriateness of surveillance intervals will continue to be monitored closely, particularly as reimbursements become tied to quality measures. Quantify and identify predictors for guideline-concordant surveillance recommendations after adenoma polypectomy. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients who had colonoscopy with polypectomy at a safety-net health system between June 2011 and December 2013. Surveillance recommendations shorter and longer than guideline recommendations were defined as potential overuse and underuse. We used multivariate logistic regression to identify correlates of guideline-concordant surveillance recommendations, overuse, and underuse. Among 1,822 patients with polypectomy, 1,329 had ≥1 adenoma. Surveillance interval recommendations were guideline-concordant in 1,410 (77.4%) patients, potential overuse in 263 (14.4%), potential underuse in 85 (4.7%), and missing in 64 (3.5%) patients. Predictors of guideline-concordant recommendations in multivariate analyses included age >65 years (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02-1.80), incomplete resection (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.41-9.09), and good/excellent prep quality (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.72-2.86). Underuse recommendations were more likely in patients with ≥3 adenomas; overuse recommendations were more likely in patients with high-grade dysplasia or fair prep quality and less likely in those with piecemeal resection, ≥3 adenomas, age >65, or Hispanic ethnicity. Surveillance recommendations are not concordant with guidelines in one of four cases. Interventions to improve prep quality and guideline concordance of surveillance recommendations can improve cost-effectiveness of CRC screening.

  7. Incomplete Financial Markets and Jumps in Asset Prices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crès, Hervé; Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar; Tvede, Mich

    A dynamic pure-exchange general equilibrium model with uncertainty is studied. Fundamentals are supposed to depend continuously on states of nature. It is shown that: 1. if financial markets are complete, then asset prices vary continuously with states of nature, and; 2. if financial markets...... are incomplete, jumps in asset prices may be unavoidable. Consequently incomplete financial markets may increase volatility in asset prices significantly....

  8. Gibbs' theorem for open systems with incomplete statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Bagci, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    Gibbs' theorem, which is originally intended for canonical ensembles with complete statistics has been generalized to open systems with incomplete statistics. As a result of this generalization, it is shown that the stationary equilibrium distribution of inverse power law form associated with the incomplete statistics has maximum entropy even for open systems with energy or matter influx. The renormalized entropy definition given in this paper can also serve as a measure of self-organization ...

  9. Incomplete Stevens–Johnson syndrome secondary to atypical pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Ramasamy, Anantharaman; Patel, Chiraush; Conlon, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Steven-Johnson syndrome is a common condition characterised by erythematous target lesions on the skin and involvement of the oral mucosa, genitals and conjunctivae. It has been documented as one of the extra-pulmonary manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Recently, there has been several documentation of an incomplete presentation of this syndrome – without the typical rash but with mucosal, conjunctival and genital involvement. Our case illustrates that the incomplete Steven-Jo...

  10. Estimation of Elasticity Price of Electricity with Incomplete Information

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier Labandeira; José M. Labeaga; Xiral López-Otero

    2010-01-01

    The sharp increase in energy prices and the growing concern for environmental issues, among other things, are behind the renewed interest in energy demand estimation. However, there is very little academic literature that takes account of the usual situation of energy suppliers: high quality but incomplete data. In this paper, we propose a useful and rather simple instrument for estimating electricity demand with incomplete or/and imperfect data available to suppliers. In particular, using re...

  11. Theorems of Tarski's Undefinability and Godel's Second Incompleteness - Computationally

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We present a version of Godel's Second Incompleteness Theorem for recursively enumerable consistent extensions of a fixed axiomatizable theory, by incorporating some bi-theoretic version of the derivability conditions (first discussed by M. Detlefsen 2001). We also argue that Tarski's theorem on the Undefinability of Truth is Godel's First Incompleteness Theorem relativized to definable oracles; here a unification of these two theorems is given.

  12. A new incomplete pattern classification method based on evidential reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhun-Ga; Pan, Quan; Mercier, Gregoire; Dezert, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The classification of incomplete patterns is a very challenging task because the object (incomplete pattern) with different possible estimations of missing values may yield distinct classification results. The uncertainty (ambiguity) of classification is mainly caused by the lack of information of the missing data. A new prototype-based credal classification (PCC) method is proposed to deal with incomplete patterns thanks to the belief function framework used classically in evidential reasoning approach. The class prototypes obtained by training samples are respectively used to estimate the missing values. Typically, in a c -class problem, one has to deal with c prototypes, which yield c estimations of the missing values. The different edited patterns based on each possible estimation are then classified by a standard classifier and we can get at most c distinct classification results for an incomplete pattern. Because all these distinct classification results are potentially admissible, we propose to combine them all together to obtain the final classification of the incomplete pattern. A new credal combination method is introduced for solving the classification problem, and it is able to characterize the inherent uncertainty due to the possible conflicting results delivered by different estimations of the missing values. The incomplete patterns that are very difficult to classify in a specific class will be reasonably and automatically committed to some proper meta-classes by PCC method in order to reduce errors. The effectiveness of PCC method has been tested through four experiments with artificial and real data sets.

  13. Effect of Functional Status on the Quality of Bowel Preparation in Elderly Patients Undergoing Screening and Surveillance Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akash; Lin, Lisa; Bernheim, Oren; Bagiella, Emilia; Jandorf, Lina; Itzkowitz, Steven H; Shah, Brijen J

    2016-07-15

    Optimal bowel preparation is essential for successful screening or for surveillance colonoscopy (SC). Inadequate bowel preparation is associated with older age, the male gender, and the presence of certain comorbidities. However, the association between patients' functional status and bowel preparation quality has not been studied. We prospectively examined the relationship between functional status, namely, the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and ambulate, and the quality of bowel preparation in elderly patients undergoing SC. Before undergoing SC, 88 elderly patients were surveyed regarding their functional status, specifically regarding their ability to perform ADLs and ambulate a quarter of a mile. Gastroenterologists then determined the quality of the bowel preparation, which was classified as either adequate or inadequate. Then, the frequency of inadequate bowel preparation in patients who did or did not experience difficulty performing ADLs and ambulating was calculated. Difficulty ambulating (unadjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.83; p2.93; p=0.001), and history of diabetes (OR, 2.88; p=0.007) were significant univariate predictors of inadequate bowel preparation. After adjusting for the above variables, only difficulty ambulating (adjusted OR, 5.78; p=0.004) was an independent predictor of inadequate bowel preparation. Difficulty with ambulation is a strong predictor of inadequate bowel preparation in elderly patients undergoing SC.

  14. Value of Fecal Calprotectin as a Biomarker for Juvenile Polyps in Children Investigated With Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Ingunn; Nemeth, Artur; Lörinc, Ester; Toth, Ervin; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation of colonic juvenile polyps with abdominal discomfort and occult rectal bleedings make them difficult to recognize. The aim of this study was to report the clinical features of colonic juvenile polyps in children referred to colonoscopy and evaluate fecal calprotectin (FCP) as a screening biomarker for their diagnosis. The study included a total of 266 children (range 3.1-19.0 years, median age 15.8 years) investigated with ileocolonoscopy; of whom, 239 (89%) were investigated for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FCPs were analyzed as a marker of colonic inflammation, and levels polyps were detected in 12 (4.5%) children; the remaining 67 (25.2%) had Crohn disease, 57 (21.4%) ulcerative colitis, 5 (1.9%) unclassified IBD, 4 (1.5%) allergic colitis, bleeding source was localized in 6 (2.3%), and 115 (43.2%) had unspecific or normal findings. FCP was available in 203 (76.3%) children before colonoscopy; levels of FCP were higher in children with juvenile polyps (range 28-2287 mg/kg, median 844 mg/kg) compared with those with normal colonoscopies (range children after polypectomy, of whom all had their FCP levels significantly reduced (range 0-281 mg/kg, median 49 mg/kg, P Colonic juvenile polyps are frequently found in pediatric patients presenting with hematochezia and elevated FCP levels. Colonic juvenile polyps are difficult to differentiate from pediatric IBD without a colonoscopy.

  15. Patient acceptance of MR colonography with improved fecal tagging versus conventional colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Løgager, V; Chabanova, E

    2010-01-01

    Conventional colonoscopy (CC) is the gold standard for colonic examinations. However, patient acceptance is not high. Patient acceptance is influenced by several factors, notably anticipation and experience. This has led to the assumption that patient acceptance would be higher in non...

  16. New endoscopes and add-on devices to improve colonoscopy performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Tziatzios, Georgios; Dimitriadis, George D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2017-06-07

    Colonoscopy is the gold standard for colorectal cancer prevention; however, it is still an imperfect modality. Precancerous lesions can be lost during screening examinations, thus increasing the risk of interval cancer. A variety of factors either patient-, or endoscopist dependent or even the procedure itself may contribute to loss of lesions. Sophisticated modalities including advanced technology endoscopes and add-on devices have been developed in an effort to eliminate colonoscopy's drawbacks and maximize its ability to detect potentially culprit polyps. Novel colonoscopes aim to widen the field of view. They incorporate more than one cameras enabling simultaneous image transmission. In that way the field of view can expand up to 330°. On the other hand a plethora of add-on devices attachable on the standard colonoscope promise to detect lesions in the proximal aspect of colonic folds either by offering a retrograde view of the lumen or by straightening the haustral folds during withdrawal. In this minireview we discuss how these recent advances affect colonoscopy performance by improving its quality indicators (cecal intubation rate, adenoma detection rate) and other metrics (polyp detection rate, adenomas per colonoscopy, polyp/adenoma miss rate) associated with examination's outcomes.

  17. Colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalykke, Claus; Jensen, Michael Dam; Fallingborg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been highly debated as risk estimates from different studies vary greatly. The present national Danish guideline on colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients...

  18. The effect of auricular acupuncture on pain during colonoscopy with midazolam and pethidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, R.; Srilestari, A.; Abdurrohim, K.; Abdullah, M.

    2017-08-01

    Colonoscopy is the standard procedure for colorectal cancer screening. One of its common complications is abdominal pain. Analgesia has not provided favorable outcomes so various complementary practices have been developed, including auricular acupuncture. In this study, a randomized controlled trial of 56 patients who underwent colonoscopy was conducted to determine the effect of acupuncture on the pain experienced during colonoscopy. Subjects were divided into two groups: The first received acupuncture combined with midazolam and pethidine, while the second were administered placebo puncture in addition to midazolam and pethidine. The median Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) score was lower in the auricular acupuncture group than in the placebo puncture group(0.7 [0-4.83] vs. 1.9 [0-6.20] p = 0.010), while there were no significant differences to median Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores (29 [0-100] vs. 44.5 [0-100] p = 0.147), heart rate changes (-2.58 [14.31] vs.-2.43 [12.28]; p = 0.970), or the mean time to the cecum (16 [8-51] vs. 22 [5-63] p = 0.206). Auricular acupuncture combined with midazolam and pethidine was found to be effective at reducing pain during colonoscopy.

  19. Association between bowel habits and quality of bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Won; Koo, Ja Seol; Kang, Seonghee; Kim, Seung Young; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Yim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Sang Woo

    2017-07-01

    The effectiveness of colonoscopy is highly dependent on the quality of bowel preparation. Although many studies have previously evaluated the role of cleansing methods and dosing regimens, few have examined the association between bowel habits and subsequent bowel preparation. Here, we aimed to evaluate the impact of bowel habits on the quality of bowel preparation.A total of 404 patients who underwent a total colonoscopy and completed a personal bowel habit questionnaire at Korea University Hospital between December 2012 and December 2013 were enrolled. The usual stool form of patients was classified into 7 categories according to the Bristol Stool Scale (BSS). The quality of bowel preparation was determined during colonoscopy according to the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (OBPS). Segment scores of ≥3 or total OBPS scores of >7 were defined as poor bowel preparation.Poor bowel preparation was reported in 9.4% of observed colonoscopies. The odds ratio (OR) of poor bowel preparation being associated with infrequent bowel movements (preparation, but the association was statistically insignificant (OR: 2.38; 95% CI, 0.90-6.33, P = .082). After adjusting for age, sex, drinking, presence of diabetes mellitus, and bowel preparation regimen, infrequent bowel movement (preparation. When subdividing by colonic segment, it was significantly associated with poor bowel preparation in all segments.Infrequent bowel movement (preparation.

  20. Colonoscopy results are not enhanced by use of magnet endoguide in specialist practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Christensen, Anders; Knudsen, Elisabeth; Hendel, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    screening. UPD has been proposed as a tool for optimization of results and reduction of patient discomfort. In this study, we aimed to qualify the debate by examining the success rate and patient discomfort in an unselected colonoscopy population referred to specialist clinics with experienced investigators...

  1. Colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalykke, Claus; Jensen, Michael Dam; Fallingborg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    colitis; and patients with ulcerative colitis as well as Crohn´s disease with a concomitant diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis. A colonoscopy surveillance program is recommended in these subgroups with intervals ranging from every 3-6 months to every 5 years, using chromoendoscopy with targeted...

  2. Development of a colonoscopy add-on device for improvement of the intubation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litten JD

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan D Litten1, JungHun Choi2, David Drozek31Department of Mechanical Engineering; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Program; 3College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Specialty Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USAAbstract: A colonoscopy add-on device has been developed to reduce intubation time without modification of the current colonoscope and peripheral devices. One of the main purposes of the system is to minimize trauma caused by the distal tip of the colonoscope. The detachable sensory fixture at the end of the distal tip measures the distance between the distal tip and the colon wall in three directions, and the actuation system attached at the base of the colonoscope controls the distal tip by rotating two dial knobs. The device controls the distal tip to minimize contact between the distal tip and the colon wall, and the distal tip ideally points out the next possible lumen. A compatibility test of the infrared sensory system was carried out, and the design of the actuation system was accomplished. The system is integrated and controlled by a microprocessor. The device was tested in a silicon colon and porcine intestine. The results showed that a colonoscopist successfully reached the cecum with the aid of the colonoscopy add-on device without significant contact between the colon wall and the distal tip. The colonoscopy aid device was very helpful for the novice colonoscopist.Keywords: colonoscope, infrared sensors, intubation, trauma, colonoscopy training model

  3. A content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images based on image recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Eiichi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images that can find images similar to ones being diagnosed. Optical colonoscopy is a method of direct observation for colons and rectums to diagnose bowel diseases. It is the most common procedure for screening, surveillance and treatment. However, diagnostic accuracy for intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), is highly dependent on the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor, because there is considerable variety in the appearances of colonic mucosa within inflammations with UC. In order to solve this issue, this paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method based on image recognition techniques. The proposed retrieval method can find similar images from a database of images diagnosed as UC, and can potentially furnish the medical records associated with the retrieved images to assist the UC diagnosis. Within the proposed method, color histogram features and higher order local auto-correlation (HLAC) features are adopted to represent the color information and geometrical information of optical colonoscopy images, respectively. Moreover, considering various characteristics of UC colonoscopy images, such as vascular patterns and the roughness of the colonic mucosa, we also propose an image enhancement method to highlight the appearances of colonic mucosa in UC. In an experiment using 161 UC images from 32 patients, we demonstrate that our method improves the accuracy of retrieving similar UC images.

  4. Split-dose menthol-enhanced PEG vs PEG-ascorbic acid for colonoscopy preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharara, Ala I; Harb, Ali H; Sarkis, Fayez S; Chalhoub, Jean M; Badreddine, Rami; Mourad, Fadi H; Othman, Mahmoud; Masri, Omar

    2015-02-14

    To compare the efficacy and palatability of 4 L polyethylene glycol electrolyte (PEG) plus sugar-free menthol candy (PEG + M) vs reduced-volume 2 L ascorbic acid-supplemented PEG (AscPEG). In a randomized controlled trial setting, ambulatory patients scheduled for elective colonoscopy were prospectively enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either PEG + M or AscPEG, both split-dosed with minimal dietary restriction. Palatability was assessed on a linear scale of 1 to 5 (1 = disgusting; 5 = tasty). Quality of preparation was scored by assignment-blinded endoscopists using the modified Aronchick and Ottawa scales. The main outcomes were the palatability and efficacy of the preparation. Secondary outcomes included patient willingness to retake the same preparation again in the future and completion of the prescribed preparation. Overall, 200 patients were enrolled (100 patients per arm). PEG + M was more palatable than AscPEG (76% vs 62%, P = 0.03). Completing the preparation was not different between study groups (91% PEG + M vs 86% AscPEG, P = 0.38) but more patients were willing to retake PEG + M (54% vs 40% respectively, P = 0.047). There was no significant difference between PEG + M vs AscPEG in adequate cleansing on both the modified Aronchick (82% vs 77%, P = 0.31) and the Ottawa scale (85% vs 74%, P = 0.054). However, PEG + M was superior in the left colon on the Ottawa subsegmental score (score 0-2: 94% for PEG + M vs 81% for AscPEG, P = 0.005) and received significantly more excellent ratings than AscPEG on the modified Aronchick scale (61% vs 43%, P = 0.009). Both preparations performed less well in afternoon vs morning examinations (inadequate: 29% vs 15.2%, P = 0.02). 4 L PEG plus menthol has better palatability and acceptability than 2 L ascorbic acid- PEG and is associated with a higher rate of excellent preparations; Clinicaltrial.gov identifier: NCT01788709.

  5. Patient Characteristics Associated With Quality of Colonoscopy Preparation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kunjal; Tofani, Christina; Sokach, Carly; Patel, Devin; Kastenberg, David; Daskalakis, Constantine

    2018-03-01

    Some features of patients are associated with inadequate bowel preparation, which reduces the effectiveness of colonoscopy examination. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between patients' sociodemographic characteristics, health conditions, and medications with inadequate bowel preparation. We searched the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Review databases for randomized controlled trials cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control, and cross-sectional studies published through March 2016. We collected information on study design, study population, and bowel preparation. For each factor, we obtained the odds ratio (OR) for inadequate bowel preparation. We conducted the meta-analyses using the random-effects approach and investigated any identified heterogeneity and publication bias via graphical methods, stratification, and meta-regression. We performed a meta-analysis of 67 studies, comprising 75,818 patients. The estimated pooled OR for inadequate bowel preparation was small for sociodemographic characteristics: 1.14 for age, and 1.23 for male sex (excluding studies in Asia, which had substantial heterogeneity and publication bias), and 1.49 for low education. The effect of high body mass index differed significantly in studies with mostly female patients (OR, 1.05) vs those with mostly male patients (OR, 1.30) (P = .013 for the difference). ORs for constipation and cirrhosis were heterogeneous; adjusted ORs were larger than unadjusted ORs (1.97 vs 1.29 for constipation and 3.41 vs 1.36 for cirrhosis). Diabetes (OR, 1.79), hypertension (OR, 1.25), stroke or dementia (OR, 2.09), and opioid use (OR, 1.70) were associated with inadequate bowel preparation. History of abdominal surgery (OR, 0.99) did not associate with inadequate bowel preparation. Use of tricyclic antidepressants had a larger effect on risk of inadequate bowel preparation in studies of mostly female patients (OR, 2.62) than studies of mostly male patients (OR

  6. The impact of anesthesia providers on major morbidity following screening colonoscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubarsky DA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available David A Lubarsky,1 Jason R Guercio,2 John W Hanna,3,4 Maria T Abreu,5 Qianli Ma,3 Claudia Uribe,3 David J Birnbach,1,6 David R Sinclair,1 Keith A Candiotti1 1Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Humana, Comprehensive Health Insights, Miami, FL, USA; 4University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 5Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 6Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background and aims: Few studies evaluate the impact of anesthesia providers during procedures, such as colonoscopy, on low-risk patients. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of anesthesia providers on several outcome variables, including major morbidity, following screening colonoscopies. Methods: A propensity-matched cohort study of 14,006 patients who enrolled with a national insurer offering health maintenance organization (HMO, preferred provider organization (PPO, and Medicare Advantage plans for a screening colonoscopy between July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2007 were studied. Records were evaluated for completion of the colonoscopy, new cancer diagnosis (colon, anal, rectal within 6 months of the colonoscopy, new primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI, new primary diagnosis of stroke, hospital admission within 7 days of the colonoscopy, and adherence to guidelines for use of anesthesia providers. Results: The presence of an anesthesia provider did not affect major morbidity or the percent of completed exams. Overall morbidity within 7 days was very low. When an anesthesia provider was present, a nonsignificant trend toward greater cancer detection within 6 months of the procedure was observed. Adherence to national

  7. Reluctance to screening colonoscopy in Arab Americans: a community based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Nizar; Harb, Walid

    2013-08-01

    To explore compliance of Arab-Americans to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and identify the barriers for non-compliance. An observational community based study. Arab-American Friday prayer attendees' ≥50 years in three mosques in Dearborn, MI volunteered. Demographics, health insurance status, screening history, availability of a primary care physician (PCP) and the ability to communicate in Arabic were inquired. The responses were compared using a student t test between respondents who have had CRC screening with colonoscopy and those who have not had any screening tests. A p value of 0.05 or lower was considered statistically significant. Total number surveyed was 130. Average age is 64 years. Males were 76 % (99) and females 24 % (31). More than 50 % were Lebanese and 28 % were from Yemen. Majority had health insurance (89 %), and 86 % had a primary care physician of which 79 % of them spoke Arabic. Half of the participants had colonoscopy mostly for screening purposes. Fifty-eight (45 %) participants did not have CRC screening. Majority of the females (72.4 %) had colonoscopy compared to 46.8 % of the males (p value = 0.016). The mean length of stay in the U.S was 39.16 years in the colonoscopy group compared to 30.77 years in the non-screening group (p value = 0.006). Participants without a PCP did not have CRC screening (77.8 %) (p value = 0.005). Participants with a non-Arabic speaking PCP had more colonoscopy rates (77.3 %) compared to those with an Arabic speaking PCP (50 %) (p value = 0.027). More Lebanese had colonoscopy (71.9 %) compared to 25.7 % of the surveyed Yemenis (p value = 0.00). Discomfort, unawareness about CRC screening, and nonrecommendation by PCP were reported barriers. Arab-Americans have lower screening colonoscopy rates. Unfamiliarity of the importance of screening is a principal issue. Having a non-arabic speaking PCP is beneficial. Better education to this population about the benefits and ease of

  8. Association Between Socioeconomic Status and Participation in Colonoscopy Screening Program in First Degree Relatives of Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhdari, Arezoo; Yavari, Parvin; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 15% to 25% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases have positive family history for disease. Colonoscopy screening test is the best way for prevention and early diagnosis. Studies have found that first degree relatives (FDRs) with low socioeconomic status are less likely to participate in colonoscopy screening program. The aim of this study is to determine the association between socioeconomic status and participation in colonoscopy screening program in FDRs. This descriptive cross-sectional, study has been conducted on 200 FDRs who were consulted for undergoing colonoscopy screening program between 2007 and 2013 in research institute for gastroenterology and liver disease of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. They were interviewed via phone by a valid questionnaire about socioeconomic status. For data analysis, chi-square, exact fisher and multiple logistic regression were executed by SPSS 19. The results indicated 58.5% participants underwent colonoscopy screening test at least once to the time of the interview. There was not an association between participation in colonoscopy screening program and socioeconomic status to the time of the interview in binomial analysis. But statistical significance between intention to participate and educational and income level were found. We found, in logistic regression analysis, that high educational level (Diploma and University degree in this survey) was a predictor to participate in colonoscopy screening program in FDRs. According to this survey low socioeconomic status is an important factor to hinder participation of FDRs in colonoscopy screening program. Therefore, planned interventions for elevation knowledge and attitude in FDRs with low educational level are necessary. Also, reducing colonoscopy test costs should be a major priority for policy makers.

  9. Association of Reference Payment for Colonoscopy With Consumer Choices, Insurer Spending, and Procedural Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Brown, Timothy T; Whaley, Christopher; Finlayson, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Regulatory limits on consumer cost sharing permit wide variation in the prices charged for screening and diagnostic tests such as colonoscopy. Employers are experimenting with reference payment initiatives that offer full insurance coverage at low-priced facilities but require substantial cost sharing if patients select high-priced alternatives. To ascertain the effect of reference payment on facility choice, insurer spending, consumer cost sharing, and procedural complications for colonoscopy. The California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS) implemented reference payment in January 2012. We obtained data on 21 644 CalPERS enrollees who underwent colonoscopy in the 3 years prior to implementation and on 13 551 patients in the 2 years after implementation. Control group data were obtained on 258 616 Anthem Blue Cross enrollees who underwent colonoscopy and who were not subject to reference payment initiatives during this 5-year period. Consumer choice of facility, price paid per procedure, total insurer spending, consumer cost sharing, and procedural complications. Choices, prices, and complications were compared for CalPERS and Anthem patients before and after implementation of reference payments, using difference-in-difference multivariable regressions to adjust for patient demographic characteristics and comorbidities, procedure indications, and geographic location. Utilization of low-priced facilities for CalPERS members increased from 68.6% in 2009 to 90.5% in 2013. After adjusting for patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and other factors, the implementation of reference payment increased use of low-priced facilities by 17.6 percentage points (95% CI, 11.8 to 23.4; P spending for the procedure. Implementation of reference payment for colonoscopy was associated with reduced spending and no change in complications.

  10. Impact of bowel preparation type on the quality of colonoscopy: a multicenter community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel; Walayat, Saqib; Ahmed, Zohair; Dhillon, Sonu; Asche, Carl V; Puli, Srinivas; Ren, Jinma

    2016-01-01

    High-quality bowel preparation is crucial for achieving the goals of colonoscopy. However, choosing a bowel preparation in clinical practice can be challenging because of the many formulations. This study aims to assess the impact the type of bowel preparation on the quality of colonoscopy in a community hospital setting. A retrospective, observational study was conducted utilizing a colonoscopy screening/surveillance database in central Illinois during the period of January 1, 2010, to March 31, 2014. Patients without bowel preparation assessment were excluded from this study. Controlling for the confounders, generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted impact [odds ratio (OR)] of bowel preparation type on the quality of preparation (excellent, good, fair, and poor), and on the detection of advanced adenoma. The association between the time of withdrawal after insertion and the quality of preparation was also examined using a linear model. A total of 28,368 colonoscopies; half the patients were male, and the average age was 61±9 years. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used in the majority (70.2%) of bowel preparations, followed by sodium sulfate (21.4%), sodium phosphate (2.5%), magnesium sulfate (0.4%), and others. Compared with PEG, magnesium sulfate had a poorer quality of bowel preparations (OR=0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9; ppreparation was significantly improved by using sodium sulfate (OR=5.7, 95% CI 5.4-6.1; p2.1, 95% CI 1.8-2.5; ppreparation, the better quality of preparation significantly increased the detection rate of advanced adenoma (5.0, 3.6, and 2.9% for excellent, good, and fair, respectively). When possible, sodium sulfate-based preparations should be recommended in the community setting for colonoscopy because of their high quality of bowel preparation.

  11. Predictors of Inadequate Inpatient Colonoscopy Preparation and Its Association with Hospital Length of Stay and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, Rena; Johnston, Elyse R; Gregory, Dyanna L; Ciolino, Jody D; Cooper, Andrew; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2015-11-01

    Adequate bowel preparation is essential to safe and effective inpatient colonoscopy. Predictors of poor inpatient colonoscopy preparation and the economic impacts of inadequate inpatient preparations are not defined. The aims of this study were to (1) determine risk factors for inadequate inpatient bowel preparations, and (2) examine the association between inadequate inpatient bowel preparation and hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients undergoing inpatient colonoscopy preparation over 12 months (1/1/2013-12/31/2013). Of 524 identified patients, 22.3% had an inadequate preparation. A multiple logistic regression model identified the following potential predictors of inadequate bowel preparation: lower income (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.04, 1.22), opiate or tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) use (OR 1.55; 0.98, 2.46), and afternoon colonoscopy (OR 1.66; 1.07, 2.59); as well as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class ≥3 (OR 1.15; 1.05, 1.25) and symptoms of nausea/vomiting (OR 1.14; 1.04, 1.25) when a fair preparation was considered inadequate. Inadequate bowel preparation was associated with significantly increased hospital LOS (model relative mean estimate 1.25; 95% CI 1.03, 1.51) and hospital costs (estimate 1.31; 1.03, 1.67) when compared to adequate preparations. The rate of inadequate inpatient bowel preparations is high and associated with a significant increase in hospital LOS and costs. We identified five potential predictors of inadequate inpatient preparation: lower socioeconomic class, opiate/TCA use, afternoon colonoscopies, ASA class ≥3, and pre-preparation nausea/vomiting; these data should guide future initiatives to improve the quality of inpatient bowel preparations.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Active Splenic Bleeding After Colonoscopy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcillo, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.corcillo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Departement de Medecine Interne (Switzerland); Aellen, Steve, E-mail: steve.aellen@hopitalvs.ch; Zingg, Tobias [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Service de Chirurgie Viscerale (Switzerland); Bize, Pierre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Departement de Radiologie Interventionnelle (Switzerland); Demartines, Nicolas [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Service de Chirurgie Viscerale (Switzerland); Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Departement de Radiologie Interventionnelle (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Colonoscopy is reported to be a safe procedure that is routinely performed for the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal diseases. Splenic rupture is considered to be a rare complication with high mortality and morbidity that requires immediate diagnosis and management. Nonoperative management (NOM), surgical treatment (ST), and, more recently, proximal splenic artery embolization (PSAE) have been proposed as treatment options. The goal of this study was to assess whether PSAE is safe even in high-grade ruptures. Methods: We report two rare cases of post colonoscopy splenic rupture. A systematic review of the literature from 2002 to 2010 (first reported case of PSAE) was performed and the three types of treatment compared. Results: All patients reviewed (77 of 77) presented with intraperitoneal hemorrhage due to isolated splenic trauma. Splenic rupture was high-grade in most patients when grading was possible. Six of 77 patients (7.8 %) were treated with PSAE, including the 2 cases reported herein. Fifty-seven patients (74 %) underwent ST. NOM was attempted first in 25 patients with a high failure rate (11 of 25 [44 %]) and requiring a salvage procedure, such as PSAE or ST. Previous surgery (31 of 59 patients), adhesions (10 of 13), diagnostic colonoscopies (49 of 71), previous biopsies or polypectomies (31 of 57) and female sex (56 of 77) were identified as risk factors. In contrast, splenomegaly (0 of 77 patients), medications that increase the risk of bleeding (13 of 30) and difficult colonoscopies (16 of 51) were not identified as risk factors. PSAE was safe and effective even in elderly patients with comorbidities and those taking medications that increase the risk of bleeding, and the length of the hospital stay was similar to that after ST. Conclusion: We propose a treatment algorithm based on clinical and radiological criteria. Because of the high failure rate after NOM, PSAE should be the treatment of choice to manage grade I through IV splenic

  13. Neighborhood Hypergraph Based Classification Algorithm for Incomplete Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of classification in incomplete information system is a hot issue in intelligent information processing. Hypergraph is a new intelligent method for machine learning. However, it is hard to process the incomplete information system by the traditional hypergraph, which is due to two reasons: (1 the hyperedges are generated randomly in traditional hypergraph model; (2 the existing methods are unsuitable to deal with incomplete information system, for the sake of missing values in incomplete information system. In this paper, we propose a novel classification algorithm for incomplete information system based on hypergraph model and rough set theory. Firstly, we initialize the hypergraph. Second, we classify the training set by neighborhood hypergraph. Third, under the guidance of rough set, we replace the poor hyperedges. After that, we can obtain a good classifier. The proposed approach is tested on 15 data sets from UCI machine learning repository. Furthermore, it is compared with some existing methods, such as C4.5, SVM, NavieBayes, and KNN. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance via Precision, Recall, AUC, and F-measure.

  14. Prediction of incomplete screening mammograms based on age and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Tiffany D; Stiff, Jennifer H; Myers, John A; Milam, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the age-associated rate of incomplete mammograms requiring additional testing based on Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) score. A retrospective, observational study design from a tertiary medical center was used to evaluate which explanatory variables significantly predicted whether a woman had an incomplete mammogram. An incomplete mammogram was defined as a BIRADS score of 0 (requiring further imaging), whereas a benign process was defined as a BIRADS score of 1 or 2. Explanatory variables included traditional clinical factors (age, race, and menopausal state). During the study period, 20,269 subjects were evaluated. The majority of the patients were white (n = 12,955; 64.6%) and had a BIRADS score consistent with a benign finding (n = 17,571; 86.6%). Premenopausal state (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.27-1.50), white race (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.08-1.29), and younger age (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.27-1.50) significantly increased the odds a woman had an incomplete study. In this cross-sectional, single-institution analysis, premenopausal state and white race are associated with an increased rate for incomplete mammograms. Patients should be counseled appropriately before the initiation of screening.

  15. Intravascular ultrasound assessed incomplete stent apposition and stent fracture in stent thrombosis after bare metal versus drug-eluting stent treatment the Nordic Intravascular Ultrasound Study (NIVUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Petteri; Vikman, Saila; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2013-01-01

    This prospective multicenter registry used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with definite stent thrombosis (ST) to compare rates of incomplete stent apposition (ISA), stent fracture and stent expansion in patients treated with drug-eluting (DES) versus bare metal (BMS) stents. ST...

  16. Pricing the Option to Surrender in Incomplete Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Consiglio, Andrea; De Giovanni, Domenico

    that encompasses the most known sources of incompleteness. We show that the surrender option, joined with a wide range of claims embedded in insurance contracts, can be priced through our tool, and deliver hedging portfolios to mitigate the risk arising from their positions. We provide extensive empirical analysis......New international accounting standards require insurers to reflect the value of embedded options and guarantees in their products. Pricing techniques based on the Black & Scholes paradigm are often used, however, the hypotheses underneath this model are rarely met. We propose a framework...... to highlight the effect of incompleteness on the fair value of the option....

  17. Tsallis Entropy, Escort Probability and the Incomplete Information Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sadeghi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-extensive statistical mechanics appears as a powerful way to describe complex systems. Tsallis entropy, the main core of this theory has been remained as an unproven assumption. Many people have tried to derive the Tsallis entropy axiomatically. Here we follow the work of Wang (EPJB, 2002 and use the incomplete information theory to retrieve the Tsallis entropy. We change the incomplete information axioms to consider the escort probability and obtain a correct form of Tsallis entropy in comparison with Wang’s work.

  18. Commonly Used Preparations for Colonoscopy: Efficacy, Tolerability and Safety – A Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Barkun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The increased demand for colonoscopy, coupled with the introduction of new bowel cleansing preparations and recent caution advisories in Canada, has prompted a review of bowel preparations by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology.

  19. Patients and caregivers costs for colonoscopy-based colorectal cancer screening: Experience of low-income individuals undergoing free colonoscopies☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sonja; Subramanian, Sujha; Tangka, Florence K.L.; Cole-Beebe, Maggie; Sun, Amy; Kramer, Cheryl L.; Pacillio, Gina

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have documented barriers to colorectal cancer screenings. However, there is lack of comprehensive information on the time and costs borne by low-income patients and the persons accompanying the patient (caregiver) for colonoscopies in the United States. We surveyed patients in three health clinics in Philadelphia retrospectively who had undergone free colonoscopies in the previous 18-month period. Participants were asked questions about time and out-of-pockets expenses for themselves and their caregivers. Even when colonoscopies were free to the patient through Colorectal Cancer Control Program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the patient and caregivers still incurred costs in relation to preparing for, undergoing, and recovering from a colonoscopy. These costs can be substantial and may account for some of the low colorectal cancer screening rates especially among the low-income populations. Patients’ and caregivers’ costs need to be considered when designing and implementing colorectal cancer control programs. PMID:28153341

  20. Bibliographic review, indication guidelines of colonoscopy and its application in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Perez, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    A review of the available evidence is realized at around the appropriate indications and quality criteria in colonoscopy. This review has served as instrument to programs of early detection, diagnostic and treatment of colonic diseases in endoscopy units and endoscopists that have effected colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) has been a preventable disease based on the effects of manipulable risk factors and screening for early detection of the same. Family history, older age, male sex, the number of size of adenomas, the presence of a villous component, high grade dysplasia and proximal location are associated with a significantly increased of the risk for CRC. Inappropriate/unnecessary indication of the procedure and lack of criteria uniformity, ignoring the international clinical guidelines of colonoscopy indication, has caused a collapse of endoscopy units in the world to the prejudice of the quality. Applicable quality indicators are defined to establish locally based on the available evidence, the minimum requirements that must meet endoscopy units and endoscopists that have participated in CRC screening programs. A preferred strategy or protocol of indication and monitoring is proposed to contemplate the evaluable quality criteria. Quality indicators of colonoscopy have allowed to optimize resources and determine the variability of the compliance between hospitals, endoscopy units or endoscopists and to identify deficiencies to plan improvement strategies. The medical criteria adequately base and individualized has prevailed in the diagnostic strategy decision. A constant evaluation of the performance in endoscopy units should be developed according to criteria of international quality. The protocolization and uniformity of criteria and concepts of the reference system for colonoscopy and post realization report, have been the key to adequate communication between health professionals and the patient. Alternative and complementary studies have been part of

  1. Colonoscopic Diagnostic Findings in Patients Undergoing Colonoscopy In Qom Hazrat-e-Masoome Hospital During 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolandmartabeh M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In recent years there have been noticeable changes in diagnosis and treatment of colon disorders by colonoscopy and direct vision. Along with its international development, this useful equipment is being used in Iran to treat various disorders. It should be mentioned that there are no exact statistics of these disorders to date. This study was done with aim of evaluating the diagnostic findings in patients undergoing colonoscopy in Qom during 2007-2008.Methods: This descriptive-cross sectional study was done on 500 patients having referred to colonoscopy ward of Hazrate-e-Masoome Hospital in Qom. After colonoscopy, patient data were entered into a special questionnaire and then pathologic findings were added to it. The data were taken for statistical analysis.Results: Out of 500 patients undergoing colonoscopy 279 were male (55.8% and 221 female (44.2%. In all groups and both sexes the most common reason for carrying out colonoscopy was abdominal pain (46.6% rectorrhagia (41%. As regards diagnosis, a total of 199 cases (39.8% of all 500 colonoscopies had normal colonoscopy,124 cases (24.8% had hemorrhoid, 64 cases (12.8% had polyp, 55 cases (11% had inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, 30 cases (6% had tumor, 17 cases(3.2% had diverticulosis and 12 cases (2.4% had solitary rectal ulcer. There was a significant relationship between abdominal pain and tumor, polyp and diverticulosis. (p<0.001 There was also a significant relationship between age and the aforementioned disorders. (p<0.001Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the prevalence of cancer and IBD is higher in men diverticulosis is higher in women. The highest prevalence of IBD was in the age group of 21-30 years. With an increase in age, the incidence rate of this disease decreases.

  2. Reasons for Lack of Diagnostic Colonoscopy After Positive Result on Fecal Immunochemical Test in a Safety-Net Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jason; Halm, Ethan A; Tiro, Jasmin A; Merchant, Zahra; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; McCallister, Katharine; Sanders, Joanne M; Ahn, Chul; Bishop, Wendy Pechero; Singal, Amit G

    2017-01-01

    Effective colorectal cancer screening depends on timely diagnostic evaluation in patients with abnormal results on fecal immunochemical tests (FITs). Although prior studies suggest low rates of follow-up colonoscopy, there is little information among patients in safety-net health systems and few data characterizing reasons for low follow-up rates. This study aimed to characterize factors contributing to lack of follow-up colonoscopy in a racially diverse and socioeconomically disadvantaged cohort of patients with abnormal results on FIT ("abnormal FIT" for brevity) receiving care in an integrated safety-net health system. We performed a retrospective electronic medical record review of patients aged 50-64 years with abnormal FIT at a population-based safety-net health system between January 2010 and July 2013. Review of electronic medical records focused on patients without follow-up colonoscopy to characterize patient-, provider-, and system-level reasons for lack of diagnostic evaluation. We used logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of follow-up colonoscopy within 12 months of abnormal FIT. Of 1267 patients with abnormal FIT, 536 (42.3%) failed to undergo follow-up colonoscopy within 1 year. Failure was attributable to patient-level factors in 307 (57%) cases, provider factors in 97 (18%) cases, and system factors in 118 (22%) cases. In multivariate analysis, follow-up colonoscopy was less likely among those aged 61-64 years (odds ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.87) compared with 50-55 year olds. Nearly half (42%) of patients with abnormal FIT failed to undergo follow-up colonoscopy within 1 year. Lack of diagnostic evaluation is related to a combination of patient-, provider-, and system-level factors, highlighting the need for multilevel interventions to improve follow-up colonoscopy completion rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Consumption-Portfolio Optimization with Recursive Utility in Incomplete Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Holger; Seifried, Frank Thomas; Steffensen, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    In an incomplete market, we study the optimal consumption-portfolio decision of an investor with recursive preferences of Epstein–Zin type. Applying a classical dynamic programming approach, we formulate the associated Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equation and provide a suitable verification theorem...

  4. Pareto Improving Price Regulation when the Asset Market is Incomplete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herings, P.J.J.; Polemarchakis, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    When the asset market is incomplete, competitive equilibria are constrained suboptimal, which provides a scope for pareto improving interventions. Price regulation can be such a pareto improving policy, even when the welfare effects of rationing are taken into account. An appealing aspect of price

  5. Incomplete Continuous-time Securities Markets with Stochastic Income Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Larsen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    We derive closed-form solutions for the equilibrium interest rate and market price of risk processes in an incomplete continuous-time market with uncertainty generated by Brownian motions. The economy has a finite number of heterogeneous exponential utility investors, who receive partially unspan...

  6. Entrance channel effect in the incomplete fusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh B.P.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the effect of various entrance channel parameters on incomplete fusion strength and the reaction dynamics in 12C+159Tb system at energies ≈ 4-7MeV/A have been investigated by measuring the excitation functions of individual reaction channels. Experimental excitation functions have been analyzed in the framework of compound nucleus decay using statistical model code PACE4. Analysis of data suggests the production of xn/pxn-channels via complete fusion of 12C with 159Tb, as these are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, while, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of α-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones. This enhancement has been attributed due to incomplete fusion. For better insight into the underlying dynamics, fraction of incomplete fusion to the total fusion has been deduced and compared with 16O+159Tb and other nearby systems as a function of various entrance channel parameters. The fraction of incomplete fusion has been found to be sensitive to the projectile type, energy and entrance-channel mass-asymmetry.

  7. An Incomplete Data Approach to the Analysis of Covariance Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiiveri, H. T.

    1987-01-01

    Covariance structures associated with linear structural equation models are discussed. Algorithms for computing maximum likelihood estimates (namely, the EM algorithm) are reviewed. An example of using likelihood ratio tests based on complete and incomplete data to improve the fit of a model is given. (SLD)

  8. Improvement of wheat in Zambia using incomplete resistance against rusts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milliano, de W.A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The programme of wheat improvement developed in Zambia used local facilities (finance, personnel, infrastructure), low budget, and few personnel. Incomplete resistance against rusts was used to obtain durable resistance.
    The abiotic conditions, socio-economic status of the farmers,

  9. Temperature definition and fundamental thermodynamic relations in incomplete statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Congjie; Chen Jincan; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2006-01-01

    Within the incomplete statistics characterized by the normalization -bar i p i q =1, a precise mathematical calculation related to the partial differential of the partition function with respect to the internal energy is provided. A concomitant definition of the physical temperature and several important fundamental thermodynamic relations are given

  10. Robustness of shape descriptors to incomplete contour representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anarta; Petkov, Nicolai

    2005-11-01

    With inspiration from psychophysical researches of the human visual system, we propose a novel aspect and a method for performance evaluation of contour-based shape recognition algorithms regarding their robustness to incompleteness of contours. We use complete contour representations of objects as a reference (training) set. Incomplete contour representations of the same objects are used as a test set. The performance of an algorithm is reported using the recognition rate as a function of the percentage of contour retained. We call this evaluation procedure the ICR test. We consider three types of contour incompleteness, viz. segment-wise contour deletion, occlusion, and random pixel depletion. As an illustration, the robustness of two shape recognition algorithms to contour incompleteness is evaluated. These algorithms use a shape context and a distance multiset as local shape descriptors. Qualitatively, both algorithms mimic human visual perception in the sense that recognition performance monotonously increases with the degree of completeness and that they perform best in the case of random depletion and worst in the case of occluded contours. The distance multiset method performs better than the shape context method in this test framework.

  11. Incomplete Continuous-Time Securities Markets with Stochastic Income Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Larsen, Kasper

    In an incomplete continuous-time securities market governed by Brownian motions, we derive closed-form solutions for the equilibrium risk-free rate and equity premium processes. The economy has a finite number of heterogeneous exponential utility investors, who receive partially unspanned income ...

  12. Introducing Misoprostol for the Treatment of Incomplete Abortion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Despite legal restriction, induced abortions and resulting complications are common in Nigeria. Misoprostol administration for incomplete abortion was introduced in 3 Nigerian hospitals. The feasibility of the hospitals, patient and provider acceptability were assessed using questionnaire and interview guides administered ...

  13. On the Pricing of Options in Incomplete Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melenberg, B.; Werker, B.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we reconsider the pricing of options in incomplete continuous time markets.We first discuss option pricing with idiosyncratic stochastic volatility.This leads, of course, to an averaged Black-Scholes price formula.Our proof of this result uses a new formalization of idiosyncraticy

  14. Optimizing incomplete sample designs for item response model parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.

    Several models for optimizing incomplete sample designs with respect to information on the item parameters are presented. The following cases are considered: (1) known ability parameters; (2) unknown ability parameters; (3) item sets with multiple ability scales; and (4) response models with

  15. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus - a common developmental anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, Dragan; Wang, Chen; Raininko, Raili [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundberg, Staffan; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Child Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus, an imperfect fetal development, has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations. We studied this condition in a nonepileptic population without obvious developmental anomalies. We analyzed the coronal MR images of 50 women and 50 men who did not have epilepsy. Twenty of them were healthy volunteers and 80 were patients without obvious intracranial developmental anomalies, intracranial masses, hydrocephalus or any condition affecting the temporal lobes. If the entire hippocampus (the head could not be evaluated) were affected, the incomplete inversion was classified as total, otherwise as partial. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus was found in 19/100 subjects (9 women, 10 men). It was unilateral, always on the left side, in 13 subjects (4 women, 9 men): 9 were of the total type, 4 were partial. It was bilateral in six subjects (five women, one man): four subjects had total types bilaterally, two had a combination of total and partial types. The collateral sulcus was vertically oriented in all subjects with a deviating hippocampal shape. We conclude that incomplete inversion of the hippocampus is not an unusual morphologic variety in a nonepileptic population without other obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. (orig.)

  16. An Uncertainty Measure for Incomplete Decision Tables and Its Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianhua; Wang, Wentao; Xu, Qing

    2013-08-01

    Uncertainty measures can supply new viewpoints for analyzing data. They can help us in disclosing the substantive characteristics of data. The uncertainty measurement issue is also a key topic in the rough-set theory. Although there are some measures to evaluate the uncertainty for complete decision systems (also called decision tables), they cannot be trivially transplanted into incomplete decision systems. There are relatively few studies on uncertainty measurement in incomplete decision systems. In this paper, we propose a new form of conditional entropy, which can be used to measure the uncertainty in incomplete decision systems. Some important properties of the conditional entropy are obtained. In particular, two validity theorems guarantee that the proposed conditional entropy can be used as a reasonable uncertainty measure for incomplete decision systems. Experiments on some real-life data sets are conducted to test and verify the validity of the proposed measure. Applications of the proposed uncertainty measure in ranking attributes and feature selection are also studied with experiments.

  17. Hydatidiform moles among patients with incomplete abortion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of hydatidiform mole is not clearly defined, partly because most studies have reported different prevalence rates from different regions. However, there is no previous study that has determined the prevalence and associated risk factors of HM among patients with incomplete abortion evacuated at ...

  18. On Positive Semidefinite Modification Schemes for Incomplete Cholesky Factorization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scott, J.; Tůma, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2014), A609-A633 ISSN 1064-8275 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06684S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : sparse matrices * sparse linear systems * positive-definite symmetric systems * iterative solvers * preconditioning * incomplete Cholesky factorization Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.854, year: 2014

  19. The Importance of Structure in Incomplete Factorization Preconditioners

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scott, J.; Tůma, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2011), s. 385-404 ISSN 0006-3835 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100300902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : sparse symmetric linear systems * incomplete factorizations * preconditioners * level-based approach Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.724, year: 2011

  20. Plural Form in Franchising: An Incomplete Contracting Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.J. Hendrikse (George); T. Jiang (Tao)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractPlural form franchising is modeled from an incomplete contracting perspective. Complete franchising is the unique, efficient governance structure only when the plural form externality is limited and the costs of investment are low for both franchisees. Governance structure choice is

  1. A risk reserve model for hedging in incomplete markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minina, V.; Vellekoop, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the pricing and hedging problem for contingent claims in incomplete markets. We assume that traders wish to maximize the expected final payoff of the hedging portfolio and the claims, and we avoid the use of utility functions. Instead, we model how traders are

  2. Suction v. conventional curettage in incomplete abortion A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This randomised controlled trial of 357 patients who had had an incomplete abortion compared suction curettage with conventional curettage for evacuation ofthe uterus. The 179 patients undergoing suction curettage had a significantly lower intra-operative blood loss (P < 0,0001) and a significantly higher mean ...

  3. Modeling, refining and analyzing Incomplete B\\"uchi Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Menghi, Claudio; Spoletini, Paola; Ghezzi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Software development is an iterative process which includes a set of development steps that transform the initial high level specification of the system into its final, fully specified, implementation. This report discusses the theoretical foundations that allow Incomplete B\\"uchi Automata (IBAs) to be used in the iterative development of a sequential system.

  4. Sudan and South Sudan's bitter and incomplete divorce

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudan and South Sudan's bitter and incomplete divorce. Copnall, James 2017. London, Hurst Publishers, 317 pp. ISBN 978-184804-830-9. Reviewed by Nicodemus Minde*. Having served as the BBC Sudan correspondent from 2009 to 2012, James. Copnall has compiled an insightful account of the bitter-sweet split of the.

  5. Do Price Incentives Work in Incomplete Food Agricultural Marketing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... incentives do not work in incomplete food agricultural marketing systems. Implied is that making food agriculture an effective poverty reduction tool requires both medium – and long-term state-led investments in processing and food market outlet development. This position revives the argument that the role of the state in ...

  6. Management of incomplete abortions at South African public hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Main conclusions. It is suggested that uncomplicated incomplete abortion can be more effectively and safely managed using the manual vacuum aspiration technique with sedation/analgesia as an outpatient procedure. Attention should be directed at the introduction of this management routine at all types of hospital and to ...

  7. Incomplete contour representations and shape descriptors : ICR test studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Anarta; Petkov, Nicolai; Gregorio, MD; DiMaio,; Frucci, M; Musio, C

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by psychophysical studies of the human cognitive abilities we propose a novel aspect and a method for performance evaluation of contour based shape recognition algorithms regarding their robustness to incompleteness of contours. We use complete contour representations of objects as a

  8. The epidemiology of incomplete abortion in South Africa | Rees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions. Incomplete abortions and, in particular, unsafe abortions are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in South Africa. The methods used in this study underestimate the true incidence for reasons that are discussed. A high priority should be given to the prevention of unsafe abortion.

  9. The AI&M procedure for learning from incomplete data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We investigate methods for parameter learning from incomplete data that is not missing at random. Likelihood-based methods then require the optimization of a profile likelihood that takes all possible missingness mechanisms into account. Optimizing this profile likelihood poses two main difficult...

  10. Can we make the second incompleteness theorem coordinate free?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    2008-01-01

    Is it possible to give a coordinate free formulation of the Second Incompleteness Theorem? We pursue one possible approach to this question. We show that (i) cutfree consistency for finitely axiomatized theories can be uniquely characterized modulo EA-provable equivalence, (ii) consistency

  11. Influence of the mass asymmetry on the incomplete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Pachouri, Dipti; Afzal Ansari, M.; Rashid, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, a ratio of the incomplete fusion cross-section to the total cross-section (CF + ICF) has been measured, fraction for the 16 O + 45 Sc, 16 O + 74 Ge, 20 Ne + 59 Co and 20 Ne + 165 Ho systems at ≅ 3-8 MeV/ nucleon

  12. Factors influencing change in clinical practice: A qualitative evaluation of the implementation of the quality improvement in colonoscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, Praveen T; Rees, Colin J; Nixon, Catherine; East, James E; Brown, Sally

    2016-01-01

    The quality improvement in colonoscopy study was a region wide service improvement study to improve adenoma detection rate at colonoscopy by implementing evidence into routine colonoscopy practice. Implementing evidence into clinical practice can be challenging. The purpose of this paper is to perform a qualitative interview study to evaluate factors that influenced implementation within the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff in endoscopy units taking part in the quality improvement in colonoscopy study, after study completion. Units and interviewees were purposefully sampled to ensure a range of experiences was represented. Interviews were conducted with 11 participants. Key themes influencing uptake of the quality improvement in colonoscopy evidence bundle included time, study promotion, training, engagement, positive outcomes and modifications. Areas within themes were increased awareness of quality in colonoscopy (QIC), emphasis on withdrawal time and empowerment of endoscopy nurses to encourage the use of quality measures were positive outcomes of the study. The simple, visible study posters were reported as useful in aiding study promotion. Feedback sessions improved engagement. Challenges included difficulty arranging set-up meetings and engaging certain speciality groups. This evaluation suggests that methods to implement evidence into clinical practice should include identification and empowerment of team members who can positively influence engagement, simple, visible reminders and feedback. Emphasis on timing of meetings and strategies to engage speciality groups should also be given consideration. Qualitative evaluations can provide important insights into why quality improvement initiatives are successful or not, across different sites.

  13. Current state of micro-robots/devices as substitutes for screening colonoscopy: assessment based on technology readiness levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Siles, Silvia C; Coleman, Stuart; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    Previous reports have described several candidates, which have the potential to replace colonoscopy, but to date, there is still no device capable of fully replacing flexible colonoscopy in the management of colonic disorders and for mass adult population screening for asymptomatic colorectal cancer. NASA developed the TRL methodology to describe and define the stages of development before use and marketing of any device. The definitions of the TRLS used in the present review are those formulated by "The US Department of Defense Technology Readiness Assessment Guidance" but adapted to micro-robots for colonoscopy. All the devices included are reported in scientific literature. They were identified by a systematic search in Web of Science, PubMed and IEEE Xplore amongst other sources. Devices that clearly lack the potential for full replacement of flexible colonoscopy were excluded. The technological salient features of all the devices included for assessment are described briefly, with particular focus on device propulsion. The devices are classified according to the TRL criteria based on the reported information. An analysis is next undertaken of the characteristics and salient features of the devices included in the review: wireless/tethered devices, data storage-transmission and navigation, additional functionality, residual technology challenges and clinical and socio-economical needs. Few devices currently possess the required functionality and performance to replace the conventional colonoscopy. The requirements, including functionalities which favour the development of a micro-robot platform to replace colonoscopy, are highlighted.

  14. Carbon dioxide insufflation can significantly reduce toilet use after colonoscopy: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Feng; Hu, Wen-Hao; Chen, Yen-Nien; Lai, Ho-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Kan; Chang, Li-Chun; Tu, Chia-Hong; Chou, Chu-Kuang; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chiu, Han-Mo

    2014-03-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation during colonoscopy can significantly decrease abdominal pain and bloating after the procedure, but its impact on the frequency and duration of toilet use remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of CO2 insufflation on toilet use after screening colonoscopy. From 138 average-risk individuals who underwent screening colonoscopy during March to August 2013, 120 were enrolled and randomized to receive either CO2 or air insufflation at colonoscopy. Both the colonoscopist and participant were blinded to the type of gas used. Abdominal pain and distension were assessed using a visual analog scoring system. The frequency and duration of toilet visits during a 2-hour postcolonoscopy period were recorded using a radiofrequency identification system. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups in terms of age, sex, and procedure time. In the 2 hours after colonoscopy, 50 participants (83 %) in the air group and 18 participants (30 %) in the CO2 group (P toilet at least once. The mean (± SD) duration of each toilet visit was 5.93 ± 4.65 minutes in the air group and 1.53 ± 2.84 minutes in the CO2 group (P toilet use after colonoscopy. Use of this technique may help reduce patient burden and allow more efficient use of space in the endoscopy unit. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Assessing the realism of colonoscopy simulation: the development of an instrument and systematic comparison of 4 simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew; Horswill, Mark S; Plooy, Annaliese M; Watson, Marcus O; Karamatic, Rozemary; Basit, Tabinda A; Wallis, Guy M; Riek, Stephan; Burgess-Limerick, Robin; Hewett, David G

    2012-03-01

    No useful comparative data exist on the relative realism of commercially available devices for simulating colonoscopy. To develop an instrument for quantifying realism and provide the first wide-ranging empiric comparison. Repeated measures, observational study. Nineteen experienced colonoscopists completed cases on 4 colonoscopy simulators (AccuTouch, GI Mentor II, Koken, and Kyoto Kagaku) and evaluated each device. A medical simulation center in a large tertiary hospital. For each device, colonoscopists completed the newly developed Colonoscopy Simulator Realism Questionnaire (CSRQ), which contains 58 items grouped into 10 subscales measuring the realism of different aspects of the simulation. Subscale scores are weighted and combined into an aggregated score, and there is also a single overall realism item. Overall, current colonoscopy simulators were rated as only moderately realistic compared with real human colonoscopy (mean aggregated score, 56.28/100; range, 48.39-60.45, where 0 = "extremely unrealistic" and 100 = "extremely realistic"). On both overall realism measures, the GI Mentor II was rated significantly less realistic than the AccuTouch, Kyoto Kagaku, and Koken (P realism. There is no clear "first choice" simulator among those assessed. Each has unique strengths and weaknesses, reflected in the differing results observed across 9 subscales. These findings may facilitate the targeted selection of simulators for various aspects of colonoscopy training. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Simple colonoscopy reporting system checking the detection rate of colon polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Choi, Youn Jung; Kwon, Hye Jung; Park, Seun Ja; Park, Moo In; Moon, Won; Kim, Sung Eun

    2015-08-21

    To present a simple colonoscopy reporting system that can be checked easily the detection rate of colon polyps. A simple colonoscopy reporting system Kosin Gastroenterology (KG quality reporting system) was developed. The polyp detection rate (PDR), adenoma detection rate (ADR), serrated polyp detection rate (SDR), and advanced adenoma detection rate (AADR) are easily calculated to use this system. In our gastroenterology center, the PDR, ADR, SDR, and AADR test results from each gastroenterologist were updated, every month. Between June 2014, when the program was started, and December 2014, the overall PDR and ADR in our center were 62.5% and 41.4%, respectively. And the overall SDR and AADR were 7.5% and 12.1%, respectively. We envision that KG quality reporting system can be applied to develop a comprehensive system to check colon polyp detection rates in other gastroenterology centers.

  17. Splenic rupture after colonoscopy: Report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccolo Gaetano

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Splenic rupture is a rare complication of colonoscopy. For this reason the diagnosis could be delayed and the outcome dismal. Fifty-four cases of splenic rupture after colonoscopy have been described in the literature. The majority of the cases required emergent or delayed splenectomy, 13 of these cases were treated conservatively. The main feature that stands out from the review of the literature is the "surprise" of this unexpected complication. This factor explains the elevated mortality (2 out of 54 cases, likely due to the delay in diagnosis. The case here described is probably among the most complex published in the literature; in fact the presence of dense intra-abdominal adhesions not only contributed to the complication itself, but also explain the confinement of the hemoperitoneum to the left supra-mesocolic space and the delayed presentation (13 days from the time of the trauma.

  18. Active Choice and Financial Incentives to Increase Rates of Screening Colonoscopy-A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shivan J; Feingold, Jordyn; Vandertuyn, Matthew; Niewood, Tess; Cox, Catherine; Doubeni, Chyke A; Volpp, Kevin G; Asch, David A

    2017-11-01

    Behavioral economic approaches could increase uptake for colorectal cancer screening. We performed a randomized controlled trial of 2245 employees to determine whether an email containing a phone number for scheduling (control), an email with the active choice to opt in or opt out (active choice), or the active choice email plus a $100 incentive (financial incentive) increased colonoscopy completion within 3 months. Higher proportions of participants in the financial incentive group underwent screening (3.7%) than in the control (1.6%) or active choice groups (1.5%) (P = .01 and P < .01). We found no difference in uptake of screening between the active choice and control groups (P = .88). The $100 conditional incentive modestly but significantly increased colonoscopy use. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT02660671. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. BOWEL PREPARATION BEFORE COLONOSCOPY FOR CHILDREN: comparison of efficacy of three different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen DEHGHANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Colonoscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Adequate bowel preparation is mandatory. Several regimens were discussed in the literature. Among the drugs which has recently used, polyethylene glycol is one of the most popular agents. Objectives - The aim of this study was to compare efficacy of three different methods for 1 day preparation before colonoscopy. Methods - This study included children with the range of ages (2-21 who had an indication of colonoscopy. Exclusion criteria were based on the history of previous surgery, parental disagreement, and patients who did not use preparation protocol. Three methods for bowel preparation were studied: 1- Polyethylene glycol only; 2- Polyethylene glycol and bisacodyl suppositories; 3- Polyethylene glycol plus normal saline enema. Boston Bowel Preparation Score was used for evaluation of preparation. SPSS version 16.0 (Chicago, IL, USA were used for data analysis. Results - In this study 83 cases completed the bowel preparation completely. Acceptable bowel preparation was seen in 24 (85.71%, 36 (94.73%, and 14 (82.35% of cases in PEG, PEG + bisacodyl, and PEG + normal saline enema groups respectively. PEG + bisacodyl suppositories was more effective than PEG + normal saline for the preparation of the first segment ( P=0.05. For second and third segment of colon, BPPS score was higher in PEG + bisacodyl suppositories compared to other regimens, but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion - There was no significant difference between 1 day colonoscopy regimens in terms of bowel preparation score. Lowest score was seen in PEG + enema group compared to other group.

  20. BOWEL PREPARATION BEFORE COLONOSCOPY FOR CHILDREN: comparison of efficacy of three different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Haghighat, Mahmood; Imanieh, Mohammad-Hadi; Ghanbari, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Colonoscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Adequate bowel preparation is mandatory. Several regimens were discussed in the literature. Among the drugs which has recently used, polyethylene glycol is one of the most popular agents. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy of three different methods for 1 day preparation before colonoscopy. This study included children with the range of ages (2-21) who had an indication of colonoscopy. Exclusion criteria were based on the history of previous surgery, parental disagreement, and patients who did not use preparation protocol. Three methods for bowel preparation were studied: 1- Polyethylene glycol only; 2- Polyethylene glycol and bisacodyl suppositories; 3- Polyethylene glycol plus normal saline enema. Boston Bowel Preparation Score was used for evaluation of preparation. SPSS version 16.0 (Chicago, IL, USA) were used for data analysis. In this study 83 cases completed the bowel preparation completely. Acceptable bowel preparation was seen in 24 (85.71%), 36 (94.73%), and 14 (82.35%) of cases in PEG, PEG + bisacodyl, and PEG + normal saline enema groups respectively. PEG + bisacodyl suppositories was more effective than PEG + normal saline for the preparation of the first segment ( P=0.05). For second and third segment of colon, BPPS score was higher in PEG + bisacodyl suppositories compared to other regimens, but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between 1 day colonoscopy regimens in terms of bowel preparation score. Lowest score was seen in PEG + enema group compared to other group.

  1. Long-term risk of acute diverticulitis among patients with incidental diverticulosis found during colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahedi, Kamyar; Fuller, Garth; Bolus, Roger; Cohen, Erica; Vu, Michelle; Shah, Rena; Agarwal, Nikhil; Kaneshiro, Marc; Atia, Mary; Sheen, Victoria; Kurzbard, Nicole; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Yen, Linnette; Hodgkins, Paul; Erder, M Haim; Spiegel, Brennan

    2013-12-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is the most common finding during routine colonoscopy, and patients often question the significance of these lesions. Guidelines state that these patients have a 10% to 25% lifetime risk of developing acute diverticulitis. However, this value was determined based on limited data, collected before population-based colonoscopy, so the true number of cases of diverticulosis was not known. We measured the long-term risk of acute diverticulitis among patients with confirmed diverticulosis discovered incidentally on colonoscopy. We performed a retrospective study using administrative and clinical data from the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, collecting data on patients who underwent colonoscopies from January 1996 through January 2011. We identified patients diagnosed with diverticulosis, determined incidence rates per 1000 patient-years, and analyzed a subgroup of patients with rigorously defined events confirmed by imaging or surgery. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to identify factors associated with the development of diverticulitis. We identified 2222 patients with baseline diverticulosis. Over an 11-year follow-up period, 95 patients developed diverticulitis (4.3%; 6 per 1000 patient-years); of these, 23 met the rigorous definition of diverticulitis (1%; 1.5 per 1000 patient-years). The median time-to-event was 7.1 years. Each additional decade of age at time of diagnosis reduced the risk for diverticulitis by 24% (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-0.9). Based on a study of the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, only about 4% of patients with diverticulosis develop acute diverticulitis, contradicting the common belief that diverticulosis has a high rate of progression. We also found that younger patients have a higher risk of diverticulitis, with risk increasing per year of life. These results can help inform patients with diverticulosis about their risk of developing acute

  2. Patient compliance with surveillance colonoscopy: patient factors and the use of a graded recall system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Chahaya; Lendzion, Rebecca; Phan-Thien, Kim-Chi; King, Denis; Perera, Dayashan S

    2018-04-01

    Surveillance colonoscopy allows for the early detection and improved treatment outcomes in colorectal neoplasms but compliance rates and factors require further investigation. This is a retrospective cohort study examining 816 patients recalled for surveillance colonoscopy at an Australian colorectal practice over a 6-month period. Primary outcome was compliance with colonoscopy within 12 months of recall. The secondary outcome of this study was to identify factors affecting compliance including patient factors and the practices' graded recall system. A total of 715 patients (87.6%) were compliant with recall requests for repeat colonoscopy. Significantly higher compliance rates were noted with a personal history of adenomatous polyps (90.9% versus 85.6%, P = 0.025). Those with private insurance or Department of Veterans Affairs were more likely to be compliant than those publicly funded (89.0% versus 93.3% versus 79.0%, P = 0.007). No statistically significant difference in compliance was shown with a personal history of colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, perianal disease, National Health and Medical Research Council risk category, gender, time associated with the practice or the clinician. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of letters sent and compliance with recall, with 61.8% being compliant after a single letter, and a final cumulative compliance after five letters of 87.6% (R = 0.882, P = 0.048). A graded recall system can achieve compliance rates as high as 87.6% compared to a single letter only achieving 61.8% compliance. A history of adenomatous polyps and insurance status were the only factors shown to result in higher recall compliance. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Impact of a simulation training curriculum on technical and nontechnical skills in colonoscopy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Samir C; Garg, Ankit; Scaffidi, Michael A; Yu, Jeffrey J; Plener, Ian S; Yong, Elaine; Cino, Maria; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Walsh, Catharine M

    2015-12-01

    GI endoscopy simulation-based training augments early clinical performance; however, the optimal manner by which to deliver training is unknown. We aimed to validate a simulation-based structured comprehensive curriculum (SCC) designed to teach technical, cognitive, and integrative competencies in colonoscopy. Single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Endoscopic simulation course at an academic hospital. Thirty-three novice endoscopists were allocated to an SCC group or self-regulated learning (SRL) group. The SCC group received a curriculum consisting of 6 hours of didactic lectures and 8 hours of virtual reality simulation-based training with expert feedback. The SRL group was provided a list of desired objectives and was instructed to practice on the simulator for an equivalent time (8 hours). Clinical transfer was assessed during 2 patient colonoscopies using the Joint Advisory Group Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (JAG DOPS) scale. Secondary outcome measures included differences in procedural knowledge, immediate post-training simulation performance, and delayed post-training (4-6 weeks) performance during an integrated scenario test on the JAG DOPS communication and integrated scenario global rating scales. There was no significant difference in baseline or post-training performance on the simulator task. The SCC group performed superiorly during their first and second clinical colonoscopies. Additionally, the SCC group demonstrated significantly better knowledge and colonoscopy-specific performance, communication, and global performance during the integrated scenario. We were unable to measure SRL participants' effort outside of mandatory training. In addition, feedback metrics and number of available simulation cases are limited. These results support integration of endoscopy simulation into a structured curriculum incorporating instructional feedback and complementary didactic knowledge as a means to augment technical, cognitive, and

  4. Patient acceptance of MR colonography with improved fecal tagging versus conventional colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Løgager, V; Chabanova, E

    2010-01-01

    Conventional colonoscopy (CC) is the gold standard for colonic examinations. However, patient acceptance is not high. Patient acceptance is influenced by several factors, notably anticipation and experience. This has led to the assumption that patient acceptance would be higher in non-invasive ex......-invasive examinations such as MR/CT colonography (MRC/CTC) and perhaps even higher without bowel preparation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient acceptance of MRC with fecal tagging versus CC....

  5. The role of autofluorescence colonoscopy in diagnosis and management of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latos, W.; Kawczyk-Krupka, A.; Ledwon, A.; Kosciarz-Grzesiok, A.; Misiak, A.; Sieron-Stoltny, K.; Sieron, A.

    2008-02-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a chronic disease of the rectum. Although SRUS is a benign condition there are studies which suggest that chronic ischaemia which occurs in the SRUS may lead to "transitional mucosa" that is similar to that adjacent to colorectal carcinomas and adenomas and may lead to colorectal dysplasia and carcinoma development. The exclusion of primary or metastatic malignancy is the most important aim in the differential diagnosis of SRUS. In our study we assess the possibilities of autofluorescence colonoscopy (AFC) in diagnosis and management of SRUS. We performed white light colonoscopy first. The tissue samples were taken for pathological examination. When SRUS was histopathologically confirmed AFC was performed by means of Xillix OncoLIFE. During AFC numerical colour value (NCV) of autofluorescence of SRUS lesions was noted. During 1946 colonoscopies eight persons were diagnosed as having solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. We did not observe autofluorescence increase in case of polipoid and flat ulcer lesions (NCV 0,39-0,67; mean 0,525) and little increase of autofluorescence in case of erythema lesion (NCV- 0,94). SRUS is a rare disorder of the rectum but it causes differential diagnosis problems. The most common reason for incorrect diagnosis are inadequate tissue specimens. AFC allows to reveal subtle areas within the lesions of more intense autofluorescence and localizes the potential cancer-transformating dysplasia. In this way the most representative area with highest risk of pre- or cancerous changes, for biopsy specimen is indicated.

  6. Endoscopic appearance of proximal colorectal neoplasms and potential implications for colonoscopy in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondagh, Eveline J A; Bouwens, Mariëlle W E; Riedl, Robert G; Winkens, Bjorn; de Ridder, Rogier; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Soetikno, Roy M; Masclee, Ad A M; Sanduleanu, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    In everyday practice, the use of colonoscopy for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) is less effective in the proximal than the distal colon. A potential explanation for this is that proximal neoplasms have a more subtle endoscopic appearance, making them more likely to be overlooked. To investigate the differences in endoscopic appearance, ie, diminutive size and nonpolypoid shape, of proximal compared with distal colorectal neoplasms. Cross-sectional, single-center study. Endoscopists at the Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands who were previously trained in the detection and classification of nonpolypoid colorectal lesions. Consecutive patients undergoing elective colonoscopy. Endoscopic appearance, ie, diminutive size (colorectal adenomas and serrated polyps (SPs), with a focus on adenomas with advanced histology, ie, high-grade dysplasia or early CRC and SPs with dysplasia or large size. We included 3720 consecutive patients with 2106 adenomas and 941 SPs. We found that in both men and women, proximal adenomas with high-grade dysplasia/early CRC (n = 181) were more likely to be diminutive or nonpolypoid than distal ones (76.3% vs 26.2%; odds ratio [OR] 9.24; 95% CI, 4.45-19.2; P colorectal neoplasms with advanced histology frequently are small or have a nonpolypoid appearance. These findings support careful inspection of the proximal colon, if quality of cancer prevention with the use of colonoscopy is to be optimized. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship between chronic diarrhea with normal colonoscopy findings and terminal ileum lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongling; Wang, Changcheng; Liu, Shuqing; Xu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Ju; Chen, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    The causes and mechanisms of chronic diarrhea are complex. This study aimed to explore the relationship between chronic diarrhea with normal colonoscopy findings and terminal ileum lesions. All cases were collected from January 2009 to June 2010. The 40 patients in the patient group had chronic diarrhea with normal colonoscopy findings. Those who had hyperthyroidism, diabetes, chronic pancreatitis, cirrhosis, atrophic gastritis, short bowel syndrome and connective tissue diseases had been excluded. The control group contained 40 healthy individuals without diarrhea. Endoscopy of the terminal ileum was applied in both groups, with the endoscope inserted into terminal ileum for more than 20 cm. The patients diagnosed of chronic diarrhea with terminal ileum lesions were treated with metronidazole and probiotics for 10-14 days. Before treatment there were significant differences in endoscopy findings of the terminal ileum between the two groups (P diarrhea, and terminal ileum lesions disappeared in 30 cases as determined by endoscopy. In the control group, endoscopy showed scattered hyperplasia of lymphoid follicles in 5 cases, and the follicles were small with the maximal diameter being 3 mm. There was no hyperemia, edema, erosion or ulcers. Chronic diarrhea patients with normal colonoscopy findings may have lesions in the terminal ileum that can be detected by endoscopy; including hyperemia, erosion, ulcers and lymphoid follicle hyperplasia. Therapeutic effect is good with metronidazole and probiotics.

  8. The Influence of Sociocultural Factors on Colonoscopy and FOBT Screening Adherence among Low-income Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C.; Jandorf, Lina; Ellison, Jennie; Villagra, Cristina; DuHamel, Katherine N.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined barriers and facilitators to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among Hispanics, particularly sociocultural factors that may be relevant. This paper examines the influence of sociocultural factors on adherence to fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy. A survey was conducted among a sample of 400 low-income Hispanics in East Harlem, New York. Fatalism and health literacy were both significantly associated with colonoscopy screening adherence in bivariate models, though fatalism became non-significant and health literacy became less significant in multivariable models. With respect to adherence to colonoscopy or FOBT, both fatalism and health literacy were associated in bivariate models, though only fatalism remained significant in multivariable models (p=.03; OR: .94; 95% CI: .881–.992). These findings suggest fatalism and health literacy may play a role in shaping CRC screening adherence among low-income Hispanics. Researchers should continue investigating how sociocultural factors influence screening adherence among Hispanics, using larger and more geographically diverse samples. PMID:21841288

  9. Effect of music on level of anxiety in patients undergoing colonoscopy without sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chia-Hui; Chen, Yi-Yu; Wu, Kuan-Ta; Wang, Shu-Chi; Yang, Jeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Yin; Lin, Chia-I; Kuo, Hsiang-Ju; Dai, Chia-Yen; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan

    2017-03-01

    Listening to music can be a noninvasive method for reducing the anxiety level without any adverse effects. The aim of this study was to explore whether music can reduce anxiety and to compare two different styles of music, informal classical music and light music, to ascertain the more effective style of music in reducing anxiety in patients undergoing colonoscopy without sedation. This study enrolled 138 patients who underwent colonoscopy without sedation during a general health examination from February 2009 to January 2015. The patients were randomly assigned to a group that did not listen to music, a group that listened to music by David Tolley, or a group that listened to music by Kevin Kern. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to evaluate the status of anxiety. A trend test for mild anxiety was performed on the patients in the three groups, and a significant trend was noted (p=0.017 for all patients; p=0.014 for analysis by sex). Multivariate analysis for mild anxiety on the patients in each group was also performed in this study, and music by Kevin Kern was found to have the lowest odds ratio (Odds ratio=0.34, p=0.045). Listening to music, especially music by Kevin Kern, reduced the level of anxiety in patients undergoing colonoscopy examination without sedation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  10. Double-level Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Bin Ayaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Séquard Syndrome is a type of Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury characterized by a relatively greater ipsilateral loss of proprioception and motor function, with contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensations. The residual deficits in balance produced by such injury may render a person liable to fall that may result in vertebral fracture and another injury to the spinal cord. We present here a case who initially had Brown-Séquard Syndrome due to penetrating knife injury to the neck and later on developed Cauda Equina Syndrome (another Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury due to fractured LV1 following a fall. The fracture was fixed through Pedicle Screws and the patient underwent effective rehabilitation to gain maximum achievable independence in functional activities. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 392-398

  11. Incomplete dicephalous conjoined twins: prenatal US and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, Diego; Ruata, Maria I.; Ruiz Lascano, Diogenes; Travella, Claudio; Tinti, Maria E.

    2002-01-01

    The authors report a case of incomplete dicephali conjoined twins, with prenatal diagnostic by ultrasound scan and confirmed with nuclear magnetic resonance. In this case the fetus presented two complete heads and necks, two parallel columns up to the coccyx, one single body, two complete arms and two complete legs. Thorax and abdominal organs were not double, however the heart had more than four cavities. This abnormality appears when the zygote division happens after the day 14 from fertilization and it is unable to cause the fission, resulting in an incomplete division. This kind of conjoined twins have practically no chance of surviving, due to the large number of shared organs. The prenatal diagnosis is important to separate these cases from those with a chance of living with surgical intervention. (author)

  12. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  13. Incomplete Stevens-Johnson syndrome secondary to atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Anantharaman; Patel, Chiraush; Conlon, Christopher

    2011-10-04

    Steven-Johnson syndrome is a common condition characterised by erythematous target lesions on the skin and involvement of the oral mucosa, genitals and conjunctivae. It has been documented as one of the extra-pulmonary manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Recently, there has been several documentation of an incomplete presentation of this syndrome - without the typical rash but with mucosal, conjunctival and genital involvement. Our case illustrates that the incomplete Steven-Johnson syndrome may present with oral mucosal and conjunctival involvement alone without skin or genital involvement. This important clinical diagnosis should not be missed due to its atypical presentation. Treatment of Steven-Johnson syndrome remains supportive along with treating the underlying infection if recognised.

  14. Using incomplete citation data for MEDLINE results ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovic, Jorge R; Bernstam, Elmer V

    2005-01-01

    Information overload is a significant problem for modern medicine. Searching MEDLINE for common topics often retrieves more relevant documents than users can review. Therefore, we must identify documents that are not only relevant, but also important. Our system ranks articles using citation counts and the PageRank algorithm, incorporating data from the Science Citation Index. However, citation data is usually incomplete. Therefore, we explore the relationship between the quantity of citation information available to the system and the quality of the result ranking. Specifically, we test the ability of citation count and PageRank to identify "important articles" as defined by experts from large result sets with decreasing citation information. We found that PageRank performs better than simple citation counts, but both algorithms are surprisingly robust to information loss. We conclude that even an incomplete citation database is likely to be effective for importance ranking.

  15. Impact of bowel preparation type on the quality of colonoscopy: a multicenter community-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-quality bowel preparation is crucial for achieving the goals of colonoscopy. However, choosing a bowel preparation in clinical practice can be challenging because of the many formulations. This study aims to assess the impact the type of bowel preparation on the quality of colonoscopy in a community hospital setting. Methods: A retrospective, observational study was conducted utilizing a colonoscopy screening/surveillance database in central Illinois during the period of January 1, 2010, to March 31, 2014. Patients without bowel preparation assessment were excluded from this study. Controlling for the confounders, generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted impact [odds ratio (OR] of bowel preparation type on the quality of preparation (excellent, good, fair, and poor, and on the detection of advanced adenoma. The association between the time of withdrawal after insertion and the quality of preparation was also examined using a linear model. Results: A total of 28,368 colonoscopies; half the patients were male, and the average age was 61±9 years. Polyethylene glycol (PEG was used in the majority (70.2% of bowel preparations, followed by sodium sulfate (21.4%, sodium phosphate (2.5%, magnesium sulfate (0.4%, and others. Compared with PEG, magnesium sulfate had a poorer quality of bowel preparations (OR=0.6, 95% CI 0.4–0.9; p<0.05, whereas the quality of bowel preparation was significantly improved by using sodium sulfate (OR=5.7, 95% CI 5.4–6.1; p<0.001 and sodium phosphate (OR=2.1, 95% CI 1.8–2.5; p<0.001. For those who had adequate bowel preparation, the better quality of preparation significantly increased the detection rate of advanced adenoma (5.0, 3.6, and 2.9% for excellent, good, and fair, respectively. Conclusion: When possible, sodium sulfate–based preparations should be recommended in the community setting for colonoscopy because of their high quality of bowel preparation.

  16. Hyoscine for polyp detection during colonoscopy: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Imran; Ashraf, Sohail; Siddique, Sameer; Nguyen, Douglas L; Choudhary, Abhishek; Bechtold, Matthew L

    2014-11-16

    To assess the role of hyoscine for polyp detection during colonoscopy. Studies (randomized controlled trials or RCTs) that compared the use of hyoscine vs no hyoscine or placebo for polyp detection during colonoscopy were included in our analysis. A search on multiple databases was performed in September 2013 with search terms being "hyoscine and colonoscopy", "hyoscine and polyp", "hyoscine and adenoma", "antispasmotic and colonoscopy", "antispasmotic and adenoma", and "antispasmotic and polyp". Jadad scoring was used to assess the quality of studies. The efficacy of hyoscine was analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel model for polyp and adenoma detection with odds ratio (OR). The I (2) measure of inconsistency was used to assess heterogeneity (P 50%). Statistical analysis was performed by RevMan 5.1. Funnel plots was used to assess publication bias. The search of the electronic databases identified 283 articles. Of these articles, eight published RCTs performed at various locations in Europe, Asia, and Australia were included in our meta-analysis, seven published as manuscripts and one published as an abstract (n = 2307). All the studies included patients with a hyoscine and a no hyoscine/placebo group and were of adequate quality (Jadad score ≥ 2). Eight RCTs assessed the polyp detection rate (PDR) (n = 2307). The use of hyoscine demonstrated no statistically significant difference as compared to no hyoscine or placebo for PDR (OR = 1.06; 95%CI: 0.89-1.25; P = 0.51). Five RCTs assessed the adenoma detection rate (ADR) (n = 2015). The use of hyoscine demonstrated no statistically significant difference as compared to no hyoscine or placebo for ADR (OR = 1.12; 95%CI: 0.92-1.37; P = 0.25). Furthermore, the timing of hyoscine administration (given at cecal intubation or pre-procedure) demonstrated no differences in PDR compared to no hyoscine or placebo. Publication bias or heterogeneity was not observed for any of the outcomes. Hyoscine use in patients undergoing

  17. Impact of responsive insertion technology (RIT) on reducing discomfort during colonoscopy: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Artur; Szura, Miroslaw; Solecki, Rafal; Matyja, Maciej; Szczepanik, Antoni; Matyja, Andrzej

    2017-05-01

    In many countries, colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening are performed without sedation due to the cost. Changes in the structure of the endoscopes are designed to facilitate the colonoscopic examination, reduce the duration of the procedure, and improve the imaging of the intestinal lumen. The variable stiffness of the endoscope and the recently introduced responsive insertion technology (RIT) are features aimed at easing colonoscope insertion and reducing the discomfort and pain during the examination. The aim of the study is to analyze whether the new RIT system can improve the practice of colonoscopy under no anesthesia with respect to the widely available variable stiffness colonoscopes. This analysis included 647 patients who underwent complete colonoscopy in the screening program. All colonoscopies were performed without sedation. Olympus series 180 and 190 endoscopes equipped with a magnetic positioning system were used. Group I included patients who were examined using endoscopes equipped with responsive insertion technology (RIT), and group II included patients who were examined using conventional variable stiffness colonoscopies. The main objective was to evaluate the cecal intubation time, the number of loops, the requirement to apply manual pressure to different areas of the abdomen and the degree of discomfort and pain expressed on a visual analogue scale (VAS). ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01688557. Group I consisted of 329 patients, and group II included 318 patients. The mean age of the patients was 58.4 years (SD ± 4.21). Both groups were compared in terms of age, sex, and BMI. The mean cecal intubation time was 209 s in group I and 224 s in group II (p < 0.05). Increased loop formation was observed upon endoscope insertion in group II (1.7 vs. 1.35) (p < 0.05) and required more manual pressure to the abdomen (2.2 vs. 1.7) (p = 0.001). In group I, less discomfort and pain, as graded on a VAS (2.3 vs. 2.6), were noted. The

  18. Distributed control systems with incomplete and uncertain information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingpeng

    Scientific and engineering advances in wireless communication, sensors, propulsion, and other areas are rapidly making it possible to develop unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) with sophisticated capabilities. UAVs have come to the forefront as tools for airborne reconnaissance to search for, detect, and destroy enemy targets in relatively complex environments. They potentially reduce risk to human life, are cost effective, and are superior to manned aircraft for certain types of missions. It is desirable for UAVs to have a high level of intelligent autonomy to carry out mission tasks with little external supervision and control. This raises important issues involving tradeoffs between centralized control and the associated potential to optimize mission plans, and decentralized control with great robustness and the potential to adapt to changing conditions. UAV capabilities have been extended several ways through armament (e.g., Hellfire missiles on Predator UAVs), increased endurance and altitude (e.g., Global Hawk), and greater autonomy. Some known barriers to full-scale implementation of UAVs are increased communication and control requirements as well as increased platform and system complexity. One of the key problems is how UAV systems can handle incomplete and uncertain information in dynamic environments. Especially when the system is composed of heterogeneous and distributed UAVs, the overall system complexity is increased under such conditions. Presented through the use of published papers, this dissertation lays the groundwork for the study of methodologies for handling incomplete and uncertain information for distributed control systems. An agent-based simulation framework is built to investigate mathematical approaches (optimization) and emergent intelligence approaches. The first paper provides a mathematical approach for systems of UAVs to handle incomplete and uncertain information. The second paper describes an emergent intelligence approach for UAVs

  19. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For in...

  20. Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Under Incomplete and Costly Information

    OpenAIRE

    Y.H. Farzin; J.D. Kaplan

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the efficient management of nonpoint source pollution (NPS) under a limited pollution control budget and incomplete information. We focus on the tradeoff between data collection and pollution abatement efforts by incorporating information acquisition into a NPS pollution control model. Comparative static results show conditions under which (i) a favorable change in the abatement costs at one source may lead to an increase in the treatment level at all sources, and vice versa, (ii) ...

  1. Estimating bus passenger waiting times from incomplete bus arrivals data

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, F.N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of estimating bus passenger waiting times at bus stops using incomplete bus arrivals data. This is of importance to bus operators and regulators as passenger waiting time is a key performance measure. Average waiting times are usually estimated from bus headways, that is, time gaps between buses. It is both time-consuming and expensive to measure bus arrival times manually so methods using automatic vehicle location systems are attractive; however, these syste...

  2. On precision of optimization in the case of incomplete information

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volf, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2012), s. 170-184 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/10/0956 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : stochastic optimization * censored data * Fisher information * product-limit estimator Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/SI/volf-on precision of optimization in the case of incomplete information.pdf

  3. Monetary Policy with Incomplete Exchange Rate Pass-Through

    OpenAIRE

    Adolfson, Malin

    2001-01-01

    The central bank's optimal reaction to foreign and domestic shocks is analyzed in an inflation targeting model allowing for incomplete exchange rate pass-through. Limited pass-through is incorporated through nominal rigidities in an aggregate supply-aggregate demand model derived from some microfoundations. Three main results are obtained. First, the results suggest that the interest rate response to foreign shocks is smaller when pass-through is low. Second, the inflation-output variability ...

  4. Effect of quality of bowel preparation on quality indicators of adenoma detection rates and colonoscopy completion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Tarun; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Gohel, Tushar; Podugu, Amareshwar; Thota, Prashanthi N; Kiran, Ravi P; Lopez, Rocio; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R

    2016-05-01

    Adequate bowel preparation is important for safe and effective colonoscopy. Quality indicators (QI) for colonoscopy include achieving at least 95% completion rate and an adenoma detection rate (ADR) of at least 25% in average-risk men and 15% in average-risk women aged over 50. Our aim was to investigate the impact of bowel preparation on ADR and colonoscopy completion rates. This retrospective cohort study included patients who underwent colonoscopy between January 2008 and December 2009. The main outcome measurements were ADR and colonoscopy completion rates to the cecum. A total of 2519 patients was included; 1030 (41.0%) had excellent preparation, 1145 (45.5%) good-, 240 (9.5%) fair-, and 104 (4.1%) poor preparation. Colonoscopy completion rates were significantly lower in patients with poor or fair preparation (72.1% and 75.4%, respectively) than in those with good and excellent preparation (99.7% and 99.9%, respectively; P preparation (excellent, good, fair and poor) at 24.2% vs. 26.8% vs. 32.1% vs. 22.1%, respectively; P = 0.06. All the groups had ADR above the QI (25% for men and 15% for women) with evidence of significantly higher ADR in the women with excellent or good preparation and in men with excellent, good or fair preparation. On multivariate analysis, male gender was significantly associated with increased ADR (P preparation did not influence ADR. Patients with fair and poor standards of preparation have significantly lower colonoscopy completion rates than those with excellent and good preparation. However, there was no difference in ADR between the different grades of preparation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  5. A cross-sectional study of the appropriateness of colonoscopy requests in the Spanish region of Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Diana; Cantero, Francesc Xavier; Llagostera, Maria; Piñeiro, Pilar; Nieto, Raquel; Saladich, Rosa; Mascort, Juanjo; Marzo, Mercè; Almeda, Jesús; Segarra, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Colonoscopies are being requested with increasing frequency in the last few years, as they are used both as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in several gastrointestinal diseases. Our purpose is to describe the appropriateness of colonoscopy requests issued both from primary care centres and from hospitals, according to the EPAGE II guidelines (European Panel on the Appropriateness of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy). Methods and analysis Cross-sectional study. Colonoscopy requests issued since January 2011 and received at the endoscopy units of all six reference hospitals serving the primary care centres of the South Metropolitan and Central Catalonia districts will be collected (total=1500 requests). Variables to be collected include gender, date of birth, origin of the request and reference hospital, priority of the procedure, type of clinician requesting the procedure, date and indication of request, abdominal examination performed, anal inspection examination performed, date of last colonoscopy if applicable, diagnosis and date of diagnosis. Using the available information and the EPAGE II website, colonoscopy requests will be assigned as an appropriateness score. The association between the variables collected and the EPAGE II scores will be assessed using a Student's t test and a χ2 test. A multilevel logistic model will be generated on the factors associated with the appropriateness of the requests. Ethics and dissemination Colonoscopy is a costly procedure and not free from complications. In order to increase cost effectiveness, reduce waiting lists and optimise resources, it is necessary to use tools such as the EPAGE II guidelines, which establish criteria to assess the appropriateness of colonoscopies. The purpose of this study is to describe the current situation and to discuss whether current clinical practice is appropriate. The results of the study will be published in the next few years. In consideration of the ethical principles and

  6. Experimental study of virtual colonoscopy of simulated mass lesions in pig colon: comparison of CT and MR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiujun; He Zhiyan; Tao Yonghao; Miao Jingtao; Chen Yuanjiong; Hu Yuansheng; Wang Linchuan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To probe into the technique and diagnostic value of MR virtual colonoscopy (MRVC) compared with CT virtual colonoscopy (CTVC) and colonoscopy. Methods: Two approximately 25-cm-long-sections of fresh pit colon in vitro had 20 mass lesions created ranging from 3 mm to 12 mm in diameter. MR scanning, as well as CT scanning of the water- or air-insufflated colon was performed, and CT data were obtained with collimation of 3 mm at a pitch of 1.0 and reconstruction intervals of 1.5 mm. MRI data were acquired with the same matrix and reformatting slab, and with heavily T 2 -weighted fast spin-echo pulse sequences. Post processed image sets were performed by the same experienced doctor on a workstation using navigator software based on CT or MRI source imaging data. One section was also underwent electron colonoscopy. Results: MRVC and CTVC displayed colon morphology in a manner similar to colonoscopy. The sensitivity of MRVC and CTVC were all 100%, and the accuracy was 71.4% for MRVC and 100% for CTVC. With the combined analysis of the four-in-one multi-view images, they accurately demonstrated the site and size of lesions and distinguished the lesions from the artifacts such as small air bubbles, and the accuracy of MRVC was improved up to 100%. CTVC was better than MRVC (P<0.05), but both were inferior to colonoscopy in depicting mucosal details of the colon and lesions (P < 0.025). Conclusion: Virtual colonoscopy (CTVC or MRVC, the former appears better) provided noninvasive endoscope-like display of the colon, and permitted identification of colonic mass lesions as small as 3 mm in diameter, the diagnostic accuracy could be improved by combining with source images and other reformations

  7. Comparisons of screening colonoscopy performed by a nurse practitioner and gastroenterologists: a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges-Gonzalez, Michele; Mann, Nirmal Singh; Al-Juburi, Amar; Tseng, David; Inadomi, John; Rossaro, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Several barriers to colorectal cancer screening have been identified including limited access to trained endoscopists and highlight insufficient capacity to meet projected demand for colonoscopies. Two European studies have found that nonphysician providers can perform colonoscopies as safely and accurately as physicians. Training nurse practitioners (NP) to perform colonoscopy may be an effective strategy to increase access. The goal of this study was to compare accuracy, safety, and patient satisfaction in screening colonoscopy performed by board certified gastroenterologists (GI-MD) and a gastroenterology trained nurse practitioner (GI-NP). A consecutive sample of average risk participants referred for screening colonoscopy was randomized to have their procedure performed by either a GI-MD (n = 100) or a GI-NP (n = 50). Participants completed a preprocedure and postprocedure questionnaire. Endoscopists completed a postprocedure questionnaire. Cecal intubation rates, duration of procedure, sedative, and analgesic use, and patient reported procedural pain scores were equivalent among the groups. The GI-NP group had a higher adenoma detection rate compared with the combined GI-MD groups (42% and 17%, respectively, p = .0001) and a higher satisfaction score when compared with the combined GI-MD groups (mean 5.9 ± 13.81 and 8.6 ± 16.11, respectively, p = .042; visual analog scale 0-100 mm, "0" = completely satisfied, "100" = completely dissatisfied). There were no immediate complications reported in any group. The properly trained GI-NP in our study performed screening colonoscopy as safely, accurately, and satisfactorily as the GI-MDs. Using well-trained NPs for screening colonoscopy can be an effective strategy to increase access to colorectal screening.

  8. Experimental validation of incomplete data CT image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hsiao, M.L.; Tam, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray CT inspection of large metal parts is often limited by x-ray penetration problems along many of the ray paths required for a complete CT data set. In addition, because of the complex geometry of many industrial parts, manipulation difficulties often prevent scanning over some range of angles. CT images reconstructed from these incomplete data sets contain a variety of artifacts which limit their usefulness in part quality determination. Over the past several years, the authors' company has developed 2 new methods of incorporating a priori information about the parts under inspection to significantly improve incomplete data CT image quality. This work reviews the methods which were developed and presents experimental results which confirm the effectiveness of the techniques. The new methods for dealing with incomplete CT data sets rely on a priori information from part blueprints (in electronic form), outer boundary information from touch sensors, estimates of part outer boundaries from available x-ray data, and linear x-ray attenuation coefficients of the part. The two methods make use of this information in different fashions. The relative performance of the two methods in detecting various flaw types is compared. Methods for accurately registering a priori information with x-ray data are also described. These results are critical to a new industrial x-ray inspection cell built for inspection of large aircraft engine parts

  9. Acute inflammation at a mandibular solitary horizontal incompletely impacted molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Yamaoka

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Minoru Yamaoka, Yusuke Ono, Masahide Ishizuka, Yoko Hasumi-Nakayama, Ryosuke Doto, Kouichi Yasuda, Takashi Uematsu, Kiyofumi FurusawaOral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Matsumoto Dental University School of Dentistry, Shiojiri, Nagano, JapanAbstract: Acute inflammation is frequently seen in the elderly around incompletely impacted molars located apart from molars or premolars. To identify the factors causing acute inflammation in the solitary molars without second molars or without second and first molars, ages of patients and rates of acute inflammation in 75 horizontal incompletely impacted mandibular molars in contact or not in contact with molars in subjects 41 years old or older were studied using orthopantomographs. Acute inflammation was seen in nine third molars out of 48 third molars in contact with second molars (18.8%, whereas acute inflammation was seen in 11 molars out of 19 solitary molars without second molars or without first and second molars (57.9% (p < 0.01. The mean age of 48 subjects with third molars in contact with the second molar was 50.42 ± 7.62 years, and the mean age of 19 subjects with isolated molars was 65.16 ± 10.41 years (p < 0.0001. These indicate that a solitary horizontal incompletely impacted molar leads more frequently to acute inflammation along with aging due to possible bone resorption resulting from teeth loss.Keywords: mandible, third molar, impaction, elderly, acute inflammation, solitary molar

  10. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate for Intruded Teeth with Incomplete Apex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T S Oliveira, Caroline; M A de Carvalho, Fredson; C O Gonçalves, Leonardo; M N de Souza, Jessyca; F R Garcia, Lucas; A F Marques, André; N de Souza, Samir

    2018-01-01

    The axial displacement of a tooth within the alveolar bone is called traumatic intrusive luxation. The treatment of immature permanent teeth with incomplete root formation is a challenging procedure, as the prognosis is uncertain. The objective of the present article is to report the successful treatment of traumatic intrusive luxation in teeth with incomplete root formation, where mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was used as an apical plug to induce apexification. A 10-year-old boy was referred to our department for emergency treatment of dentoalveolar trauma to the maxillary central incisors. After clinical and radiographic examination, the teeth were surgically repositioned and rigidly fixed. Three months later, a pulp vitality test of both teeth elicited a negative response. Endodontic therapy with an MTA plug was used to induce apexification as root formation was incomplete. The root canals were then filled. Clinical and radiographic examination was then performed again at 2 and 4 months later. The MTA apical plug was effective in inducing apexification and maintaining both teeth.

  11. Magnetic resonance colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy: Patient burden and preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paardt, M.P. van der; Boellaard, T.N.; Zijta, F.M.; Baak, L.C.; Depla, A.C.T.M.; Dekker, E.; Nederveen, A.J.; Bipat, S.; Stoker, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. • When discarding the bowel preparation, the examinations were rated equally burdensome. • The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy for their future examination of the bowel. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate patient burden and preferences for MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy. Methods: Symptomatic patients were consecutively recruited to undergo MR colonography with automated carbon dioxide insufflation and a limited bowel preparation followed within four weeks by colonoscopy with a standard bowel cleansing preparation. Four questionnaires regarding burden (on a five-point scale) and preferences (on a seven-point scale) were addressed after MR colonography and colonoscopy and five weeks after colonoscopy. Results: Ninety-nine patients (47 men, 52 women; mean age 62.3, SD 8.7) were included. None of the patients experienced severe or extreme burden from the MR colonography bowel preparation compared to 31.5% of the patients for the colonoscopy bowel preparation. Colonoscopy was rated more burdensome (25.6% severe or extreme burden) compared to MR colonography (5.2% severe or extreme burden) (P < 0.0001). When discarding the bowel preparations, the examinations were rated equally burdensome (P = 0.35). The majority of patients (61.4%) preferred MR colonography compared to colonoscopy (29.5%) immediately after the examinations and five weeks later (57.0% versus 39.5%). Conclusion: MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy

  12. Magnetic resonance colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy: Patient burden and preferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paardt, M.P. van der, E-mail: m.p.vanderpaardt@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, T.N., E-mail: t.n.boellaard@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zijta, F.M., E-mail: fmzijta@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Medisch Centrum Haaglanden, Den Haag (Netherlands); Baak, L.C., E-mail: l.c.baak@olvg.nl [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Depla, A.C.T.M., E-mail: actm.depla@slz.nl [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Slotervaartziekenhuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dekker, E., E-mail: e.dekker@amc.uva.nl [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nederveen, A.J., E-mail: a.j.nederveen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, S., E-mail: s.bipat@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, J., E-mail: j.stoker@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. • When discarding the bowel preparation, the examinations were rated equally burdensome. • The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy for their future examination of the bowel. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate patient burden and preferences for MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation in comparison to conventional colonoscopy. Methods: Symptomatic patients were consecutively recruited to undergo MR colonography with automated carbon dioxide insufflation and a limited bowel preparation followed within four weeks by colonoscopy with a standard bowel cleansing preparation. Four questionnaires regarding burden (on a five-point scale) and preferences (on a seven-point scale) were addressed after MR colonography and colonoscopy and five weeks after colonoscopy. Results: Ninety-nine patients (47 men, 52 women; mean age 62.3, SD 8.7) were included. None of the patients experienced severe or extreme burden from the MR colonography bowel preparation compared to 31.5% of the patients for the colonoscopy bowel preparation. Colonoscopy was rated more burdensome (25.6% severe or extreme burden) compared to MR colonography (5.2% severe or extreme burden) (P < 0.0001). When discarding the bowel preparations, the examinations were rated equally burdensome (P = 0.35). The majority of patients (61.4%) preferred MR colonography compared to colonoscopy (29.5%) immediately after the examinations and five weeks later (57.0% versus 39.5%). Conclusion: MR colonography with a limited bowel preparation and automated carbon dioxide insufflation demonstrated less burden compared to colonoscopy. The majority of patients preferred MR colonography over colonoscopy.

  13. Pilot Validation Study: Canadian Global Rating Scale for Colonoscopy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Carpentier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The United Kingdom Global Rating Scale (GRS-UK measures unit-level quality metrics processes in digestive endoscopy. We evaluated the psychometric properties of its Canadian version (GRS-C, endorsed by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG. Methods. Prospective data collection at three Canadian endoscopy units assessed GRS-C validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change according to responses provided by physicians, endoscopy nurses, and administrative personnel. These responses were compared to national CAG endoscopic quality guidelines and GRS-UK statements. Results. Most respondents identified the overarching theme each GRS-C item targeted, confirming face validity. Content validity was suggested as 18 out of 23 key CAG endoscopic quality indicators (78%, 95% CI: 56–93% were addressed in the GRS-C; statements not included pertained to educational programs and competency monitoring. Concordance ranged 75–100% comparing GRS-C and GRS-UK ratings. Test-retest reliability Kappa scores ranged 0.60–0.83, while responsiveness to change scores at 6 months after intervention implementations were greater (P<0.001 in two out of three units. Conclusion. The GRS-C exhibits satisfactory metrics, supporting its use in a national quality initiative aimed at improving processes in endoscopy units. Data collection from more units and linking to actual patient outcomes are required to ensure that GRS-C implementation facilitates improved patient care.

  14. MR enterography correlates highly with colonoscopy and histology for both distal ileal and colonic Crohn's disease in 310 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, David J.; Kampalath, Vinay; Harris, Adam; Patel, Ajay; Resnick, Murray B.; Machan, Jason; Beland, Michael; Chen, William T.; Shah, Samir A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: To evaluate the efficacy of MR enterography (MRE) in patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease without the use of anti-peristaltic pharmacologic agents compared to colonoscopy and histology. Methods: A retrospective review of 850 consecutive patients who underwent routine MRE to evaluate known or suspected Crohn's disease was performed. Of these, 310 patients also underwent colonoscopy with biopsy(s) within 90 days. The results of the MRE were compared to the colonoscopy and pathology reports to determine the presence or absence of disease in evaluable bowel segments. Individual imaging parameters (including wall thickening, enhancement, T2 signal, mesenteric vascular prominence and adenopathy) were also separately analyzed to determine their independent predictive value. Results: In 310 patients, the overall sensitivity and specificity of MRE (using endoscopy as a gold standard) were 85% and 80% respectively (kappa = 0.65). The sensitivity of MRE for detection of pathologically severe disease was 87% in the terminal ileum (TI) and 88% in the colon. In the subset of 162 patients who underwent colonoscopy within 30 days of MRE, the overall sensitivity remained 85% but the specificity increased to 85% (kappa = 0.69). Wall thickening and abnormal enhancement were sensitive indicators of Crohn's disease (75% and 78%), while abnormal T2 signal, mesenteric vascular prominence and adenopathy were specific (86%, 91% and 93%). Conclusion: MRE compares favorably to colonoscopy for evaluation of known or suspected Crohn's disease noninvasively and without the exposure to ionizing radiation associated with CT enterography (CTE).

  15. The role of physical examinations and education in prospective medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. L.; Mockbee, J.; Snow, C. K.; Compton, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's prospective medicine program, with the principal elements of physical examinations and an educational program for health awareness is described. Participation in the voluntary physical examination program is increasing. In 1976 13,621 employees were given partial or complete examination in NASA Health Units. From the 941 examinations performed at NASA Headquarters in 1976, 522 principal findings were detected. Equipment and techniques in exercise EKG, tonometry, and colonoscopy were partially responsible for this high rate. The health awareness program includes consultations with physicians, training devices and courses, health bulletins, and special screening programs. Epidemiological studies, now underway, will be used to evaluate the health awareness programs.

  16. Comparison of a split-dose bowel preparation with 2 liters of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid and 1 liter of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid and bisacodyl before colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Hun; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Yoo, In Kyung; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Lee, Hong Sik; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Chang Duck

    2017-08-01

    Recently, a low-volume polyethylene glycol formulation containing ascorbic acid (PEG-Asc) has proven as safe and effective as traditional 4-L PEG solutions for colonoscopy preparation. However, currently available aqueous purgative formulations are poorly tolerated. The aim of this study was to compare a split-dose 2-L PEG-Asc formulation and a 1-L PEG-Asc formulation with bisacodyl (10 mg) to determine the quality of bowel cleansing and patient tolerability. A single-center, randomized, observer-blinded study was performed between May 2015 and September 2015. Two hundred outpatients referred for colonoscopy were prospectively enrolled and assigned to either the split-dose 2-L PEG-Asc group or the 1-L PEG-Asc with bisacodyl 10-mg group. The Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) and Aronchick Bowel Preparation Scale (ABPS) were used to evaluate bowel cleansing. The tolerability of the regimens and satisfaction of patients was determined based on a questionnaire. Two hundred patients received either 2-L PEG-Asc or 1-L PEG-Asc with bisacodyl. Regarding colon cleansing outcome (BBPS and ABPS), the 1-L PEG-Asc with bisacodyl group showed similar but non-inferior results compared with the 2-L PEG-Asc group on both BBPS (6.92 ± 1.63 vs 6.57 ± 1.37; P = .103) and ABPS (96% vs 95%; P = 1.000) scales. Tolerability was similar for both 1-L PEG-Asc with bisacodyl and 2-L PEG-Asc. 1-L PEG-Asc is a suitable alternative to low-volume bowel preparation for colonoscopy. Our study showed that the 1-L PEG-Asc plus bisacodyl preparation has comparable tolerability and results in adequate colon cleansing. Bowel preparation with bisacodyl and 1-L PEG-Asc is a suitable alternative to low-volume bowel preparation for colonoscopy. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT02980562.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Capnography is superior to pulse oximetry for the detection of respiratory depression during colonoscopy La capnografía es superior a la pulsioximetría en la detección de depresión respiratoria durante las colonoscopias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cacho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: pulse oximetry is a widely accepted procedure for ventilatory monitoring during gastrointestinal endoscopy, but this method provides an indirect measurement of the respiratory function. In addition, detection of abnormal ventilatory activity can be delayed, especially if supplemental oxygen is provided. Capnography offers continuous real-time measurement of expiratory carbon dioxide. Objective: we aimed at prospectively examining the advantages of capnography over the standard pulse oximetry monitoring during sedated colonoscopies. Patients and methods:fifty patients undergoing colonoscopy were simultaneously monitored with pulse oximetry and capnography by using two different devices in each patient. Several sedation regimens were administered. Episodes of apnea or hypoventilation detected by capnography were compared with the occurrence of hypoxemia. Results: twenty-nine episodes of disordered respiration occurred in 16 patients (mean duration 54.4 seconds. Only 38% of apnea or hypoventilation episodes were detected by pulse oximetry. A mean delay of 38.6 seconds was observed in the events detected by pulse oximetry (two episodes of disturbed ventilation were simultaneously detected by capnography and pulse oximetry. Conclusions: apnea or hypoventilation commonly occurs during colonoscopy with sedation. Capnography is more reliable than pulse oximetry in early detection of respiratory depression in this setting.

  18. Colonoscopy and Colorectal Cancer Screening in Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Review of a Series of Cases and Recommendations for Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Leonard S.; Becker, Andrew; Paraguya, Maria; Chukwu, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) frequently have comorbidities that might interfere with colonoscopy preparation and examination. In this article, the authors review their experience with colonoscopies performed from 2002 through 2010 on adults with IDD at a state institution to evaluate quality and safety of…

  19. Use of Bristol Stool Form Scale to predict the adequacy of bowel preparation - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, A; Shah, N; Depasquale, J; Baddoura, W; Spira, R; Rector, T

    2016-02-01

    Inadequate bowel preparation continues to be a substantial problem for colonoscopy. The seven-point Bristol Stool Form Scale (BSFS) has been associated with delayed colonic transit in adults. We evaluated the utility of the BSFS to identify patients more likely to present with an inadequate preparation. Two large community-based academic medical centres in New Jersey, USA, studied a prospective cohort of 411 consecutive patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy who were prescribed similar bowel preparations. The BSFS and several other study variables were collected by gastroenterology fellows during an outpatient visit prior to scheduling colonoscopy. All colonoscopy examinations were performed in the morning by a gastroenterologist who graded the adequacy of bowel preparation. Inadequate preparation was defined as one resulting in a repeat colonoscopy at a shorter time interval than would generally be recommended based solely on risk factors or pathological findings. The ability of study variables to discriminate those who did or did not have an adequate preparation was summarized by the c-statistic. The relationship between variables that provided some discrimination and the probability of an adequate preparation was modelled using logistic regression. The mean age of the study sample was 56 ± 8 (SD) years and 63% were women. Bowel preparation was adequate in 337 (82%) of the patients. The BSFS ratings ranged from 1 to 7. The score was <3 in 144 (35%) indicating lower gastrointestinal motility. There was a statistically significant association between the score and the probability of an adequate bowel preparation (odds ratio 1.4; 95% confidence interval 1.2-1.7; P < 0.001) and the c-statistic was 0.64 (0.58-0.70). Use of the BSFS may help identify patients for whom standard bowel preparation most probably will not be adequate. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. On the dynamical incompleteness of the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Zea, Diego Javier; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2017-08-02

    Major scientific challenges that are beyond the capability of individuals need to be addressed by multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional consortia. Examples of these endeavours include the Human Genome Project, and more recently, the Structural Genomics (SG) initiative. The SG initiative pursues the expansion of structural coverage to include at least one structural representative for each protein family to derive the remaining structures using homology modelling. However, biological function is inherently connected with protein dynamics that can be studied by knowing different structures of the same protein. This ensemble of structures provides snapshots of protein conformational diversity under native conditions. Thus, sequence redundancy in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) (i.e. crystallization of the same protein under different conditions) is therefore an essential input contributing to experimentally based studies of protein dynamics and providing insights into protein function. In this work, we show that sequence redundancy, a key concept for exploring protein dynamics, is highly biased and fundamentally incomplete in the PDB. Additionally, our results show that dynamical behaviour of proteins cannot be inferred using homologous proteins. Minor to moderate changes in sequence can produce great differences in dynamical behaviour. Nonetheless, the structural and dynamical incompleteness of the PDB is apparently unrelated concepts in SG. While the first could be reversed by promoting the extension of the structural coverage, we would like to emphasize that further focused efforts will be needed to amend the incompleteness of the PDB in terms of dynamical information content, essential to fully understand protein function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Blink rate, incomplete blinks and computer vision syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portello, Joan K; Rosenfield, Mark; Chu, Christina A

    2013-05-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS), a highly prevalent condition, is frequently associated with dry eye disorders. Furthermore, a reduced blink rate has been observed during computer use. The present study examined whether post task ocular and visual symptoms are associated with either a decreased blink rate or a higher prevalence of incomplete blinks. An additional trial tested whether increasing the blink rate would reduce CVS symptoms. Subjects (N = 21) were required to perform a continuous 15-minute reading task on a desktop computer at a viewing distance of 50 cm. Subjects were videotaped during the task to determine their blink rate and amplitude. Immediately after the task, subjects completed a questionnaire regarding ocular symptoms experienced during the trial. In a second session, the blink rate was increased by means of an audible tone that sounded every 4 seconds, with subjects being instructed to blink on hearing the tone. The mean blink rate during the task without the audible tone was 11.6 blinks per minute (SD, 7.84). The percentage of blinks deemed incomplete for each subject ranged from 0.9 to 56.5%, with a mean of 16.1% (SD, 15.7). A significant positive correlation was observed between the total symptom score and the percentage of incomplete blinks during the task (p = 0.002). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was noted between the blink score and symptoms (p = 0.035). Increasing the mean blink rate to 23.5 blinks per minute by means of the audible tone did not produce a significant change in the symptom score. Whereas CVS symptoms are associated with a reduced blink rate, the completeness of the blink may be equally significant. Because instructing a patient to increase his or her blink rate may be ineffective or impractical, actions to achieve complete corneal coverage during blinking may be more helpful in alleviating symptoms during computer operation.

  2. Rough Set Approach to Incomplete Multiscale Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xibei; Qi, Yong; Yu, Dongjun; Yu, Hualong; Song, Xiaoning; Yang, Jingyu

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale information system is a new knowledge representation system for expressing the knowledge with different levels of granulations. In this paper, by considering the unknown values, which can be seen everywhere in real world applications, the incomplete multiscale information system is firstly investigated. The descriptor technique is employed to construct rough sets at different scales for analyzing the hierarchically structured data. The problem of unravelling decision rules at different scales is also addressed. Finally, the reduct descriptors are formulated to simplify decision rules, which can be derived from different scales. Some numerical examples are employed to substantiate the conceptual arguments. PMID:25276852

  3. Incomplete block factorization preconditioning for indefinite elliptic problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Hua [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The application of the finite difference method to approximate the solution of an indefinite elliptic problem produces a linear system whose coefficient matrix is block tridiagonal and symmetric indefinite. Such a linear system can be solved efficiently by a conjugate residual method, particularly when combined with a good preconditioner. We show that specific incomplete block factorization exists for the indefinite matrix if the mesh size is reasonably small. And this factorization can serve as an efficient preconditioner. Some efforts are made to estimate the eigenvalues of the preconditioned matrix. Numerical results are also given.

  4. Functional electrical stimulation for incomplete spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fazio, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the early use of functional electrical stimulation on an individual with an incomplete spinal cord injury to assist with motor recovery and a return to ambulation. A 32-year-old woman sustained a C7 burst fracture after a fall, requiring anterior cervical fixation from C6 to T1 prior to transfer to acute rehabilitation. She presented as a C8 AIS B spinal cord injury, meaning she had some sensory function spared below the level of injury but not motor function. At di...

  5. Bilateral Complete and Incomplete Fusion of Incisors and its Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Godwin Clovis; Chalakkal, Paul; De Souza, Neil; Gavhane, Sanket

    2017-01-01

    This case report highlights the management of a case of bilateral complete and incomplete fusion of maxillary incisors in a 10-year-old child. A mock-up was done on the diagnostic cast. Pretreatment esthetic evaluation was done using bis-acryl composite temporaries which were transferred intraorally from the diagnostic cast using a putty index. An incisal overlap veneer preparation was done, following which, an IPS e-max veneer was cemented. A digital mock-up was carried out using the Adobe Photoshop and Corel Draw softwares to aid in laboratorial fabrication of the veneer.

  6. Bilateral complete and incomplete fusion of incisors and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin Clovis Da Costa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report highlights the management of a case of bilateral complete and incomplete fusion of maxillary incisors in a 10-year-old child. A mock-up was done on the diagnostic cast. Pretreatment esthetic evaluation was done using bis-acryl composite temporaries which were transferred intraorally from the diagnostic cast using a putty index. An incisal overlap veneer preparation was done, following which, an IPS e-max veneer was cemented. A digital mock-up was carried out using the Adobe Photoshop and Corel Draw softwares to aid in laboratorial fabrication of the veneer.

  7. Incomplete Excluder limb graft deployment: cause and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonaris, Chris; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Kouvelos, George; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    The Excluder stent graft (W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) is one of the most frequently used devices for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and offers the advantage of a simple and reliable deployment mechanism. We report an unexpected complication during deployment of an Excluder limb graft; the "rip cord" deployment system broke during pulling, most probably because of interference with a previously placed common iliac artery stent, thereby resulting in incomplete graft deployment. This report notes that problems may rarely arise when deploying an Excluder limb graft within already stented iliac arteries and provides technical considerations to manage such events successfully. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incomplete urethral duplication with cyst formation in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, M.H.; Barnhart, M.D.; Barthez, P.Y.; Smeak, D.D.

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete urethral duplication with cyst formation was diagnosed in a dog that had soft, fluctuant, subcutaneous swellings in the ventral perineal and penile areas and a history of nocturia and incontinence during recumbency that were unresponsive to treatment with antibiotics. Retrograde urethrocystography, voiding urethrography, double-contrast cystography, radiography after direct administration of contrast medium into cystic structures, and excretory urography were performed to evaluate the urinary tract. Communication between the cysts and the urethra was demonstrated radiographically only after intralesional injection of contrast medium. Nocturia and incontinence resolved after surgical removal of the urethral duplication and cysts. The dog was clinically normal 1 year after surgery

  9. Incomplete McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a genetic, non-inheritable disease that can cause bone pain, bone deformities and fracture. It has a large clinic spectrum from benign monostotic fibrous dysplasia to McCune-Albright syndrome. Rare McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by precocious puberty, cafe au lait spots and fibrous dysplasia. Herein we presented a case who was preferred to hospital with pathological fractures and diagnosed with Incomplet McCune Albright syndrome because of the lack of endocrine hyperfunction and developed early puberty at clinical course.

  10. Finding small OBDDs for incompletely specified truth tables is hard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jesper Torp; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2006-01-01

    We present an efficient reduction mapping undirected graphs G with n = 2^k vertices for integers k to tables of partially specified Boolean functions g: {0,1}^(4k+1) -> {0,1,*} so that for any integer m, G has a vertex colouring using m colours if and only if g has a consistent ordered binary...... decision diagram with at most (2m + 2)n^2 + 4n decision nodes. From this it follows that the problem of finding a minimum-sized consistent OBDD for an incompletely specified truth table is NP-hard and also hard to approximate...

  11. Finding small OBDDs for incompletely specified truth tables is hard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltersen, Peter Bro; Kristensen, Jesper Torp

    2006-01-01

    We present an efficient reduction mapping undirected graphs G with n = 2^k vertices for integers k to tables of partially specified Boolean functions g: {0,1}^(4k+1) -> {0,1,*} so that for any integer m, G has a vertex colouring using m colours if and only if g has a consistent ordered binary dec...... decision diagram with at most (2m + 2)n^2 + 4n decision nodes. From this it follows that the problem of finding a minimum-sized consistent OBDD for an incompletely specified truth table is NP-hard and also hard to approximate....

  12. Parameter learning in MTE networks using incomplete data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, Antonio; Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    a considerable computational burden as well as the inability to handle missing values in the training data. In this paper we describe an EM-based algorithm for learning the maximum likelihood parameters of an MTE network when confronted with incomplete data. In order to overcome the computational difficulties we......Bayesian networks with mixtures of truncated exponentials (MTEs) are gaining popularity as a flexible modelling framework for hybrid domains. MTEs support efficient and exact inference algorithms, but estimating an MTE from data has turned out to be a difficult task. Current methods suffer from...

  13. Same-day colonoscopy preparation with Senna alkaloids and bisacodyl tablets: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenidogan, Erdinc; Okan, Ismail; Kayaoglu, Huseyin Ayhan; Akgul, Gokhan Giray; Sansal, Mufit; Tali, Servet; Ozsoy, Zeki; Sahin, Mustafa

    2014-11-07

    To evaluate the efficacy of same-day bowel preparation with Senna alkaloids combined with bisacodyl tablets in routine colonoscopy procedures. Between March and June 2013, a same-day bowel preparation was implemented in our endoscopy unit. The preparation consisted of a semi-liquid, fiber-free diet one day prior to the procedure, with two bisacodyl tablets after lunch and dinner, and 250 mL of Senna alkaloid with 1.5 L of drinking water at 6 am the day of the procedure. The quality control parameters of colonoscopy were evaluated and implemented according to the guidelines of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. The pre-procedure, during-procedure and post-procedure patient data were collected and analyzed: (1) pre-procedure (age, gender, comorbid diseases, colonoscopy indications, complete lack of compliance with the bowel preparation protocol); (2) during-procedure (sedation dose, duration of colonoscopy, withdrawal time, cecal intubation rate, polyp detection rate, Boston Bowel Preparation Scores and presence of foam and clear liquid); and (3) post-procedure (visual analogue scale score, pain during the procedure, patient satisfaction and premature withdrawal due to the insufficient bowel preparation). A total of 75 patients were included in this study with a mean age of 54.64 ± 13.29 years; 53.3% (40/75) were female and 46.7% (35/75) were male. A complete lack of compliance with the bowel preparation protocol was seen in 6.7% of patients (5/75). The mean total duration of colonoscopy was 16.12 ± 6.51 min, and the mean withdrawal time was 8.89 ± 4.07 min. The cecal intubation rate was 93.8% (61/64) and the polyp detection rate was 40% (30/75). The mean Boston Bowel Preparation Score was 7.38 ± 1.81, with the following distribution: right colon, 2.34 ± 0.89; transverse colon, 2.52 ± 0.67; left colon, 2.52 ± 0.63. The mean visual analogue scale score was 4.59 ± 1.57. Due to insufficient bowel preparation, seven patients (7/75; 9.3%) were

  14. Revaluation on detection of metastatic cancer of the colorectum with barium enema. Comparison with computed tomography and colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Jiro; Mizukami, Yusuke; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    1996-01-01

    The findings with barium enema were analyzed and compared to those with computed tomography and colonoscopy in 15 patients with metastatic cancer of the colorectum, which were from 8 gastric, 2 colonic, 2 ovarian, 1 pancreatic, 1 prostatic carcinomas and 1 unknown origin. Primary cancers of intra-abdominal cavity origin tended to make multiple colorectal metastases (91.7%). With barium enema colonic and rectal involvement was mostly expressed as the tethered type and the diffuse type by Ishikawa's classification, respectively. Computed tomography detected direct tumor invasion to the colorectum in 4 cases. Of the other 11 cases, 8 patients (72.3%) showed abnormally thickened colorectal wall. Colonoscopy detected only 3 (37.5%) out of 8 lesions seen in 4 patients who had undergone colonoscopy before barium enema. Many of the lesions missed were the tethered type involvement. Barium enema is the most sensitive method to detect metastatic cancer of the colorectum. (author)

  15. Design and preliminary evaluation of a self-steering, pneumatically driven colonoscopy robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Hossein; Welch, C Ross; Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Dasgupta, Prithviraj; Terry, Benjamin S

    2017-04-01

    Colonoscopy is a diagnostic procedure to detect pre-cancerous polyps and tumours in the colon, and is performed by inserting a long tube equipped with a camera and biopsy tools. Despite the medical benefits, patients undergoing this procedure often complain about the associated pain and discomfort. This discomfort is mostly due to the rough handling of the tube and the creation of loops during the insertion. The overall goal of this work is to minimise the invasiveness of traditional colonoscopy. In pursuit of this goal, this work presents the development of a semi-autonomous colonoscopic robot with minimally invasive locomotion. The proposed robotic approach allows physicians to concentrate mainly on the diagnosis rather than the mechanics of the procedure. In this paper, an innovative locomotion approach for robotic colonoscopy is addressed. Our locomotion approach takes advantage of longitudinal expansion of a latex tube to propel the robot's tip along the colon. This soft and compliant propulsion mechanism, in contrast to minimally invasive mechanisms used in, for example, inchworm-like robots, has shown promising potential. In the preliminary ex vivo experiments, the robot successfully advanced 1.5 metres inside an excised curvilinear porcine colon with average speed of 28 mm/s, and was capable of traversing bends up to 150 degrees. The robot creates less than 6 N of normal force at its tip when it is pressurised with 90 kPa. This maximum force generates pressure of 44.17 mmHg at the tip, which is significantly lower than safe intraluminal human colonic pressure of 80 mmHg. The robot design inherently prevents loop formation in the colon, which is recognised as the main cause of post procedural pain in patients. Overall, the robot has shown great promise in an ex vivo experimental setup. The design of an autonomous control system and in vivo experiments are left as future work.

  16. Quality assurance as an integrated part of the electronic medical record - a prototype applied for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Geir; Ottestad, Per Marcus; Skafløtten, Stein Roger; Bretthauer, Michael; Moritz, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have not developed much beyond the days of typewritten journals when it comes to facilitating extraction of data for quality assurance (QA) and improvement of health-care performance. Based on 5 years' experience from the Norwegian Gastronet QA programme, we have developed a highly QA-profiled EMR for colonoscopy. We used a three-tier solution (client, server and database) written in the Java programming language using a number of open-source libraries. QA principles from the Norwegian paper-based Gastronet QA programme formed the basis for development of the ColoReg software. ColoReg is developed primarily for colonoscopy reporting in a screening trial, but may be used in routine clinical work. The QA module in ColoReg is well suited for intervention towards suboptimal performance in both settings. We have developed user-friendly software dominated by clickable boxes and curtain menus reducing free text to a minimum. The software gives warnings when illogical registrations are entered and reasons have to be given for divergence from software recommendations for work-up and surveillance. At any time, defined performance quality parameters are readily accessible in tabular form with the named, logged-in endoscopist being compared with all other anonymized endoscopists in the database. The ColoReg software is developed for use in an international, multicentre trial on colonoscopy screening. It is user-friendly and secures continuous QA of the endoscopist's performance. The principles used are applicable to development of EMRs in general.

  17. Colorectal cancer prevention by an optimized colonoscopy protocol in routine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Li, Yi-Jhen; Hurley, Thomas G; Tsai, Meng-Han; Hardin, James W; Hurley, Deborah M; Hebert, James R; de Groen, Piet C

    2015-03-15

    We conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate the colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality prevention achievable in clinical practice with an optimized colonoscopy protocol targeting near-complete polyp clearance. The protocol consisted of: (i) telephonic reinforcement of bowel preparation instructions; (ii) active inspection for polyps throughout insertion and circumferential withdrawal; and (iii) timely updating of the protocol and documentation to incorporate the latest guidelines. Of 17,312 patients provided screening colonoscopies by 59 endoscopists in South Carolina, USA from September 2001 through December 2008, 997 were excluded using accepted exclusion criteria. Data on 16,315 patients were merged with the South Carolina Central Cancer Registry and Vital Records Registry data from January 1996 to December 2009 to identify incident CRC cases and deaths, incident lung cancers and brain cancer deaths (comparison control cancers). The standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) relative to South Carolina and US SEER-18 population rates were calculated. Over 78,375 person-years of observation, 18 patients developed CRC versus 104.11 expected for an SIR of 0.17, or 83% CRC protection, the rates being 68% and 91%, respectively among the adenoma- and adenoma-free subgroups (all p cancer SIR was 0.96 (p = 0.67), and brain cancer SMR was 0.92 (p = 0.35). Over 80% reduction in CRC incidence and mortality is achievable in routine practice by implementing key colonoscopy principles targeting near-complete polyp clearance. © 2014 UICC.

  18. Patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) during colonoscopy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Candelas, Fernando; Guiral, Silvia; Carbó, Rosa; Valero, Ana; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; González, Francisco; Bracho, Maria Alma

    2010-09-08

    No recognized risk factors can be identified in 10-40% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients suggesting that the modes of transmission involved could be underestimated or unidentified. Invasive diagnostic procedures, such as endoscopy, have been considered as a potential HCV transmission route; although the actual extent of transmission in endoscopy procedures remains controversial. Most reported HCV outbreaks related to nosocomial acquisition have been attributed to unsafe injection practices and use of multi-dose vials. Only a few cases of likely patient-to-patient HCV transmission via a contaminated colonoscope have been reported to date. Nosocomial HCV infection may have important medical and legal implications and, therefore, possible transmission routes should be investigated. In this study, a case of nosocomial transmission of HCV from a common source to two patients who underwent colonoscopy in an endoscopy unit is reported. A retrospective epidemiological search after detection of index cases revealed several potentially infective procedures: sample blood collection, use of a peripheral catheter, anesthesia and colonoscopy procedures. The epidemiological investigation showed breaches in colonoscope reprocessing and deficiencies in the recording of valuable tracing data. Direct sequences from the NS5B region were obtained to determine the extent of the outbreak and cloned sequences from the E1-E2 region were used to establish the relationships among intrapatient viral populations. Phylogenetic analyses of individual sequences from viral populations infecting the three patients involved in the outbreak confirmed the patient pointed out by the epidemiological search as the source of the outbreak. Furthermore, the sequential order in which the patients underwent colonoscopy correlates with viral genetic variability estimates. Patient-to-patient transmission of HCV could be demonstrated although the precise route of transmission remained unclear. Viral

  19. Quality audit of colonoscopy reports amongst patients screened or surveilled for colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Daphnée; Barkun, Alan; Martel, Myriam

    2012-07-21

    To complete a quality audit using recently published criteria from the Quality Assurance Task Group of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. Consecutive colonoscopy reports of patients at average/high risk screening, or with a prior colorectal neoplasia (CRN) by endoscopists who perform 11 000 procedures yearly, using a commercial computerized endoscopic report generator. A separate institutional database providing pathological results. Required documentation included patient demographics, history, procedure indications, technical descriptions, colonoscopy findings, interventions, unplanned events, follow-up plans, and pathology results. Reports abstraction employed a standardized glossary with 10% independent data validation. Sample size calculations determined the number of reports needed. Two hundreds and fifty patients (63.2 ± 10.5 years, female: 42.8%, average risk: 38.5%, personal/family history of CRN: 43.3%/20.2%) were scoped in June 2009 by 8 gastroenterologists and 3 surgeons (mean practice: 17.1 ± 8.5 years). Procedural indication and informed consent were always documented. 14% provided a previous colonoscopy date (past polyp removal information in 25%, but insufficient in most to determine surveillance intervals appropriateness). Most procedural indicators were recorded (exam date: 98.4%, medications: 99.2%, difficulty level: 98.8%, prep quality: 99.6%). All reports noted extent of visualization (cecum: 94.4%, with landmarks noted in 78.8% - photodocumentation: 67.2%). No procedural times were recorded. One hundred and eleven had polyps (44.4%) with anatomic location noted in 99.1%, size in 65.8%, morphology in 62.2%; removal was by cold biopsy in 25.2% (cold snare: 18%, snare cautery: 31.5%, unrecorded: 20.7%), 84.7% were retrieved. Adenomas were noted in 24.8% (advanced adenomas: 7.6%, cancer: 0.4%) in this population with varying previous colonic investigations. This audit reveals lacking reported items, justifying additional research to

  20. A new composite measure of colonoscopy: the Performance Indicator of Colonic Intubation (PICI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Roland M; Damery, Sarah; Gavin, Daniel R; Anderson, John T; Donnelly, Mark T; Williams, J Graham; Swarbrick, Edwin T

    2018-01-01

     Cecal intubation rate (CIR) is an established performance indicator of colonoscopy. In some patients, cecal intubation with acceptable tolerance is only achieved with additional sedation. This study proposes a composite Performance Indicator of Colonic Intubation (PICI), which combines CIR, comfort, and sedation. METHODS : Data from 20 085 colonoscopies reported in the 2011 UK national audit were analyzed. PICI was defined as the percentage of procedures achieving cecal intubation with median dose (2 mg) of midazolam or less, and nurse-assessed comfort score of 1 - 3/5. Multivariate logistic regression analysis evaluated possible associations between PICI and patient, unit, colonoscopist, and diagnostic factors. RESULTS : PICI was achieved in 54.1 % of procedures. PICI identified factors affecting performance more frequently than single measures such as CIR and polyp detection, or CIR + comfort alone. Older age, male sex, adequate bowel preparation, and a positive fecal occult blood test as indication were associated with a higher PICI. Unit accreditation, the presence of magnetic imagers in the unit, greater annual volume, fewer years' experience, and higher training/trainer status were associated with higher PICI rates. Procedures in which PICI was achieved were associated with significantly higher polyp detection rates than when PICI was not achieved. CONCLUSIONS : PICI provides a simpler picture of performance of colonoscopic intubation than separate measures of CIR, comfort, and sedation. It is associated with more factors that are amenable to change that might improve performance and with higher likelihood of polyp detection. It is proposed that PICI becomes the key performance indicator for intubation of the colon in colonoscopy quality improvement initiatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Pattern of Inflammation on Surveillance Colonoscopy Does Not Predict Development of Colitis-associated Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegadeesan, Ramprasad; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Gutierrez, Norma G; Venkatesh, Preethi G K; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R; Shen, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Identification of colonoscopic features which increase colitis-associated neoplasia risk in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) may allow patient risk stratification. Our objective was to investigate whether colonoscopic features correlate with the risk of developing colitis-associated neoplasia in patients with UC on surveillance. In this retrospective case-control study, patients with UC who underwent surveillance colonoscopies from 1998 to 2011 were included. Patients with UC with neoplasia were compared with a matched control group of patients with UC without neoplasia in a 1:3 ratio. A total of 111 eligible patients with UC with colon neoplasia were compared with 356 patients with UC without colon neoplasia. On univariate analysis, colitis-associated neoplasia was associated with male gender (odds ratio [OR] = 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.71-3.89, P ≤ 0.001) and smoking history (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.1-2.39, P = 0.045) but not with colonoscopic features, including tubular colon/shortened colon, scarring, segment of severe inflammation, inflammatory polyps, colonic stricture, or macroscopically normal appearance colonoscopy. In multivariate analysis, only male gender (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.77-4.08, P ≤ 0.001) was found to be associated with an increased risk, whereas the use of 5-aminosalicylates was associated with a decreased risk for colitis-associated neoplasia (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31-0.84, P = 0.009). In patients with UC, colonoscopic features especially on standard-definition white-light colonoscopy did not appear to reliably predict the development of colitis-associated neoplasia. This will leave room for image-enhanced endoscopy technology and molecular markers for the early and accurate detection of colitis-associated neoplasia.

  2. Assessment of early learning curves among nurses and physicians using a high-fidelity virtual-reality colonoscopy simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglikova, Irina; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Drewes, Asbjorn M; Funch-Jensen, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that nurses can perform diagnostic endoscopy procedures, which traditionally have been a physician's responsibility. The existing studies concerning quality of sigmoidoscopy performed by nurses are small, used assessment tools with insufficient validation and to date there is very little knowledge of the learning curve patterns for physicians and nurses. The aim of a present study was to assess early learning curves on a virtual-reality colonoscopy simulator of untrained residents as compared with that of nurses with and without endoscopy assistance experience. Thirty subjects were included in the study: 10 female residents (median age 30.5 years) without colonoscopy experience, 10 female nurses (median age 27.5 years) without endoscopy assistance experience and 10 female nurses (median age 42 years) with endoscopy assistance experience. All participants performed 10 repetitions of task 6 from the "Introduction" colonoscopy module of the Accu Touch Endoscopy simulator. Eight experienced colonoscopists performed three repetitions of task 6 in order to provide the reference expert level of performance. All subjects completed the virtual colonoscopy without complications. Significant differences existed between residents and nurses with respect to time to complete the procedure. Residents and nurses showed similar learning curve patterns. There were not significant differences between the groups in terms of volume of insufflated air, percentage of time without discomfort, and percentage of mucosa seen. None of the trainee groups achieved expert proficiency level in terms of time and amount of insufflated air by the tenth repetition. Nurses performed virtual colonoscopy as accurately and safely as residents. Although the residents performed significantly faster, time differences showed a tendency towards decreasing, and appraisement of the numeric time differences seemed of minor practical importance. From a technical point of view this

  3. Cecal intubation time between cap-assisted water exchange and water exchange colonoscopy: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chih-Wei; Koo, Malcolm; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi

    2017-11-01

    The water exchange (WE) method can decrease the discomfort of the patients undergoing colonoscopy. It also provides salvage cleansing and improves adenoma detection, but a longer intubation time is required. Cap-assisted colonoscopy leads to a significant reduction in cecal intubation time compared with traditional colonoscopy with air insufflation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combined cap-assisted colonoscopy and water exchange (CWE) could decrease the cecal intubation time compared with WE. A total of 120 patients undergoing fully sedated colonoscopy at a regional hospital in southern Taiwan were randomized to colonoscopy with either CWE (n=59) or WE (n=61). The primary endpoint was cecal intubation time. The mean cecal intubation time was significantly shorter in CWE (12.0 min) compared with WE (14.8 min) (P=0.004). The volume of infused water during insertion was lower in CWE (840 ml) compared with WE (1044 ml) (P=0.003). The adenoma detection rate was 50.8 and 47.5% for CWE and WE, respectively (P=0.472). The Boston Bowel Preparation Scale scores were comparable in the two groups. Results from the multiple linear regression analysis indicated that WE with a cap, a higher degree of endoscopist's experience, a higher Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score, and a lower volume of water infused during insertion, without abdominal compression, without change of position, and without chronic laxative use, were significantly associated with a shorter cecal intubation time. In comparison with WE, CWE could shorten the cecal intubation time and required lower volume of water infusion during insertion without compromising the cleansing effect of WE.

  4. Colonic diverticular bleeding: urgent colonoscopy without purging and endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and hemoclips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Couto-Worner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular disease is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Most of the times, bleeding stops without any intervention but in 10-20 % of the cases it is necessary to treat the hemorrhage. Several modalities of endoscopic treatment have been described after purging the colon. We present five cases of severe diverticular bleeding treated with injection of epinephrine and hemoclips. All the colonoscopies were performed without purging of the colon in an emergency setting, with correct visualization of the point of bleeding. Patients recovered well avoiding other aggressive procedures such as angiography or surgery.

  5. Difference in F-18 FDG uptake after esophago gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy in healthy sedated subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Ryool; Chang, Woo Jin; Bae, Seung Il; Song, In Wook; Bong, Jin Gu; Jeong, Hye Yeon; Park, So Young; Bae, Jeong Yup; Yoon, Hyun Dae [Raphael Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ji Hyoung [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineFatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    We aimed to evaluate the difference in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in sedated healthy subjects after they underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy procedures. The endoscopy group (n = 29) included healthy subjects who underwent screening via F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after an EGD and/or colonoscopy under sedation on the same day. The control group (n = 35) included healthy subjects who underwent screening via PET/CT only. FDG uptake in the tongue, uvula, epiglottis, vocal cords, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, liver, cecum, colon, anus, and muscle were compared between the two groups. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the tongue, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus did not significantly differ between the endoscopy and control groups. In contrast, mean SUVmax in the whole stomach was 18 % higher in the endoscopy group than in the control group (SUVmax: 2.96 vs. 2.51, P = 0.010). In the lower gastrointestinal track, SUVmax from the cecum to the rectum was not significantly different between the two groups, whereas SUVmax in the anus was 20 % higher in the endoscopy group than in the control group (SUVmax: 4.21 vs. 3.50, P = 0.002). SUVmax in the liver and muscle was not significantly different between the two groups. Mean volume of the stomach and mean cross section of the colon was significantly higher in the endoscopy group than in the control group (stomach: 313.28 cm{sup 3} vs. 209.93 cm{sup 3}, P < 0.001, colon: 8.82 cm{sup 2} vs. 5.98 cm{sup 2}, P = 0.001). EGD and colonoscopy under sedation does not lead to significant differences in SUVmax in most parts of the body. Only gastric FDG uptake in the EGD subjects and anal FDG uptake in the colonoscopy subjects was higher than uptake in those regions in the control subjects.

  6. Routine vs. on-demand analgesia in colonoscopy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Øyvind; de Lange, Thomas; Stallemo, Asbjørn; Wiig, Håvard; Hasund, Audun; Dvergsnes, Katrine; Garborg, Kjetil; Ystrøm, Carl Magnus; Løberg, Magnus; Hoff, Geir; Bretthauer, Michael; Kalager, Mette

    2016-09-01

    Colonoscopy is frequently performed with opioid analgesia, but the impact of drug delivery timing has not been studied in detail. Low-dose opioids administered before the procedure may provide better pain control than on-demand administration when the patient experiences pain. A total of 119 outpatients were randomized to receive 50 μg of fentanyl either before colonoscopy (routine group) or on demand if needed during the colonoscopy (on-demand group). Additional fentanyl or midazolam was allowed in both groups if required. The primary outcome was pain measured on both a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS; 0 = no pain, 100 = worst possible pain) and a four-point Likert scale (no, slight, moderate, or severe pain) immediately after the procedure. A total of 61 patients in the routine group and 58 patients in the on-demand group were included in the study. Mean VAS pain scores were 27.4 mm in the routine group and 30.5 mm in the on-demand group (mean difference - 3.2 mm; 95 % confidence interval - 11.9 to 5.5; P = 0.5). On the Likert scale, moderate or severe pain was experienced by 25.0 % and 31.5 % of patients in the routine and on-demand groups, respectively (p = 0.5). Cecal intubation rate and time to reach the cecum were similar between the groups. More patients in the on-demand group (81.0 %) than in the routine group (62.3 %) were able to leave the clinic without the need for recovery time (P = 0.03). Routine administration of fentanyl did not provide better analgesia during colonoscopy than on-demand fentanyl, and more patients needed time for recovery. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01786434). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Ameboma: A Colon Carcinoma-Like Lesion in a Colonoscopy Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ameboma is a rare complication of amebic colitis presenting as a mass of granulation tissue with peripheral fibrosis and a core of inflammation related to amebic chronic infection. The initial presentations are usually obstruction and low gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common sites are the ascending colon and the cecum. It may mimic colon carcinoma, Crohn's disease, carcinoma of the colon, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, tuberculosis, fungal infection, AIDS-associated lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma in colonoscopy findings. The therapeutic strategy should be combined with antibiotics for invasive dysentery and eradication of luminal cysts.

  8. Quantos exames são necessários para adquirir aptidão em colonoscopia? How many procedures are necessary to achieve competency in colonoscopy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Prata Borges Martins Thuler

    2004-12-01

    o número de exames realizados. Dependendo, porém, de aptidões individuais, talvez mais de 100 exames sejam necessários no treinamento.BACKGROUND: Competency for colonoscopy implies technical and cognitive skills. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has suggested 100 supervised procedures might be necessary. There are no specific recommendations in Brazil. AIM: To evaluate technical progress of trainees during a regular colonoscopy training program. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Two gastrointestinal fellows at Federal University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil, were prospectively evaluated during first year training. The frequency and time of reaching the cecum, total procedure duration, ability to identify lesions and patient discomfort were recorded. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy one colonoscopies were preformed by both fellows (fellow A: 186 and B: 85. Twenty-seven cases were excluded of obstructive lesions or previous surgery, leading 171 and 72 exams, respectively. The mean success rate of reaching the cecum was 82.5% and 56.9%, respectively. For the first 72 exams it was 72.2% and 56.9%. Fellow A reached the cecum in 76% of first 100 colonoscopies, improving to 91.5% after the 101st. Mean time for trainees to complete the procedure was 17.7 and 23.5 minutes to fellows A and B. Trainee A took 19.8 and 14.7 minutes before and after the 100th colonoscopy. DISCUSSION: Success rate and time taken to reach the cecum progressively improved over the number of procedures with statistical significance. However, because of individual differences, 100 colonoscopies may be insufficient to acquisition of technical skills. CONCLUSION: Although analyzing the learning curve of two fellows only, we could notice a statistically significant improve in reaching the cecum with experience over time. However, depending on individual skills more than 100 procedures may be necessary during training.

  9. Global stability of two models with incomplete treatment for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yali; Li Jianquan; Ma Zhien; Liu Luju

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Two tuberculosis models with incomplete treatment. → Intuitive epidemiological interpretations for the basic reproduction numbers. → Global dynamics of the two models. → Strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis. - Abstract: Two tuberculosis (TB) models with incomplete treatment are investigated. It is assumed that the treated individuals may enter either the latent compartment due to the remainder of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or the infectious compartment due to the treatment failure. The first model is a simple one with treatment failure reflecting the current TB treatment fact in most countries with high tuberculosis incidence. The second model refines the simple one by dividing the latent compartment into slow and fast two kinds of progresses. This improvement can be used to describe the case that the latent TB individuals have been infected with some other chronic diseases (such as HIV and diabetes) which may weaken the immunity of infected individuals and shorten the latent period of TB. Both of the two models assume mass action incidence and exponential distributions of transfers between different compartments. The basic reproduction numbers of the two models are derived and their intuitive epidemiological interpretations are given. The global dynamics of two models are all proved by using Liapunov functions. At last, some strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis are discussed.

  10. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  11. Incomplete hippocampal inversion - is there a relation to epilepsy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, Dragan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundberg, Staffan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Uppsala (Sweden); Wang, Chen [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Raininko, Raili [Uppsala University, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations but also in nonepileptic subjects without obvious developmental anomalies. We studied the frequency of IHI in different epilepsy syndromes to evaluate their relationship. Three hundred patients were drawn from the regional epilepsy register. Of these, 99 were excluded because of a disease or condition affecting the temporal lobes or incomplete data. Controls were 150 subjects without epilepsy or obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. The coronal MR images were analysed without knowledge of the clinical data. Among epilepsy patients, 30% had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). Of controls, 18% had IHI (20 left-sided, 8 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, 25% had IHI, which was not a significantly higher frequency than in controls (P=0.34). There was no correlation between EEG and IHI laterality. A total of 44% of Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of cryptogenic generalised epilepsy patients had IHI. The IHI frequency was very high in some epileptic syndromes, but not significantly higher in TLE compared to controls. No causality between TLE and IHI could be found. IHI can be a sign of disturbed cerebral development affecting other parts of the brain, maybe leading to epilepsy. (orig.)

  12. Global stability of two models with incomplete treatment for tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yali, E-mail: yylhgr@126.co [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China) and Department of Applied Mathematics and Physics, Air Force Engineering University, Xi' an 710051 (China); Li Jianquan, E-mail: jianq_li@263.ne [Department of Applied Mathematics and Physics, Air Force Engineering University, Xi' an 710051 (China); Ma Zhien, E-mail: zhma@mail.xjtu.edu.c [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu Luju, E-mail: dahai20401095@yahoo.com.c [Department of Mathematics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: Two tuberculosis models with incomplete treatment. Intuitive epidemiological interpretations for the basic reproduction numbers. Global dynamics of the two models. Strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis. - Abstract: Two tuberculosis (TB) models with incomplete treatment are investigated. It is assumed that the treated individuals may enter either the latent compartment due to the remainder of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or the infectious compartment due to the treatment failure. The first model is a simple one with treatment failure reflecting the current TB treatment fact in most countries with high tuberculosis incidence. The second model refines the simple one by dividing the latent compartment into slow and fast two kinds of progresses. This improvement can be used to describe the case that the latent TB individuals have been infected with some other chronic diseases (such as HIV and diabetes) which may weaken the immunity of infected individuals and shorten the latent period of TB. Both of the two models assume mass action incidence and exponential distributions of transfers between different compartments. The basic reproduction numbers of the two models are derived and their intuitive epidemiological interpretations are given. The global dynamics of two models are all proved by using Liapunov functions. At last, some strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis are discussed.

  13. On Multilabel Classification Methods of Incompletely Labeled Biomedical Text Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kolesov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilabel classification is often hindered by incompletely labeled training datasets; for some items of such dataset (or even for all of them some labels may be omitted. In this case, we cannot know if any item is labeled fully and correctly. When we train a classifier directly on incompletely labeled dataset, it performs ineffectively. To overcome the problem, we added an extra step, training set modification, before training a classifier. In this paper, we try two algorithms for training set modification: weighted k-nearest neighbor (WkNN and soft supervised learning (SoftSL. Both of these approaches are based on similarity measurements between data vectors. We performed the experiments on AgingPortfolio (text dataset and then rechecked on the Yeast (nontext genetic data. We tried SVM and RF classifiers for the original datasets and then for the modified ones. For each dataset, our experiments demonstrated that both classification algorithms performed considerably better when preceded by the training set modification step.

  14. Recognition of control chart patterns with incomplete samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftah Abdelrahman Senoussi, Ahmed; Masood, Ibrahim; Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Fahrul Hassan, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    In quality control, automated recognition of statistical process control (SPC) chart patterns is an effective technique for monitoring unnatural variation (UV) in manufacturing process. In most studies, focus was given on complete patterns by assuming there is no constrain in the SPC samples. Nevertheless, there is in-practice case whereby the SPC samples cannot be captured properly due to measurement sensor error or human error. Thus, this research aims to design a recognition scheme for incomplete samples pattern that will be useful for an industrial application. The design methodology involves three phases: (i) simulation of UV and SPC chart patterns, (ii) design of pattern recognition scheme, and (iii) evaluation of performance recognition. It involves modelling of the simulated SPC samples in bivariate quality control, raw data input representation, and recognizer training and testing. The proposed technique indicates a high recognition accuracy (normal pattern = 99.5%, shift patterns = 97.5%). This research will provide a new perspective in SPC charting scheme when dealing with constraint in terms of incomplete samples, which is greatly useful for an industrial practitioner in finding the solution for corrective action.

  15. An information propagation model considering incomplete reading behavior in microblog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qiang; Huang, Jiajia; Zhao, Xiande

    2015-02-01

    Microblog is one of the most popular communication channels on the Internet, and has already become the third largest source of news and public opinions in China. Although researchers have studied the information propagation in microblog using the epidemic models, previous studies have not considered the incomplete reading behavior among microblog users. Therefore, the model cannot fit the real situations well. In this paper, we proposed an improved model entitled Microblog-Susceptible-Infected-Removed (Mb-SIR) for information propagation by explicitly considering the user's incomplete reading behavior. We also tested the effectiveness of the model using real data from Sina Microblog. We demonstrate that the new proposed model is more accurate in describing the information propagation in microblog. In addition, we also investigate the effects of the critical model parameters, e.g., reading rate, spreading rate, and removed rate through numerical simulations. The simulation results show that, compared with other parameters, reading rate plays the most influential role in the information propagation performance in microblog.

  16. Incomplete hippocampal inversion - is there a relation to epilepsy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajic, Dragan; Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter; Lundberg, Staffan; Wang, Chen; Raininko, Raili

    2009-01-01

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations but also in nonepileptic subjects without obvious developmental anomalies. We studied the frequency of IHI in different epilepsy syndromes to evaluate their relationship. Three hundred patients were drawn from the regional epilepsy register. Of these, 99 were excluded because of a disease or condition affecting the temporal lobes or incomplete data. Controls were 150 subjects without epilepsy or obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. The coronal MR images were analysed without knowledge of the clinical data. Among epilepsy patients, 30% had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). Of controls, 18% had IHI (20 left-sided, 8 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, 25% had IHI, which was not a significantly higher frequency than in controls (P=0.34). There was no correlation between EEG and IHI laterality. A total of 44% of Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of cryptogenic generalised epilepsy patients had IHI. The IHI frequency was very high in some epileptic syndromes, but not significantly higher in TLE compared to controls. No causality between TLE and IHI could be found. IHI can be a sign of disturbed cerebral development affecting other parts of the brain, maybe leading to epilepsy. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic Financial Constraints: Distinguishing Mechanism Design from Exogenously Incomplete Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaivanov, Alexander; Townsend, Robert M

    2014-05-01

    We formulate and solve a range of dynamic models of constrained credit/insurance that allow for moral hazard and limited commitment. We compare them to full insurance and exogenously incomplete financial regimes (autarky, saving only, borrowing and lending in a single asset). We develop computational methods based on mechanism design, linear programming, and maximum likelihood to estimate, compare, and statistically test these alternative dynamic models with financial/information constraints. Our methods can use both cross-sectional and panel data and allow for measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity. We estimate the models using data on Thai households running small businesses from two separate samples. We find that in the rural sample, the exogenously incomplete saving only and borrowing regimes provide the best fit using data on consumption, business assets, investment, and income. Family and other networks help consumption smoothing there, as in a moral hazard constrained regime. In contrast, in urban areas, we find mechanism design financial/information regimes that are decidedly less constrained, with the moral hazard model fitting best combined business and consumption data. We perform numerous robustness checks in both the Thai data and in Monte Carlo simulations and compare our maximum likelihood criterion with results from other metrics and data not used in the estimation. A prototypical counterfactual policy evaluation exercise using the estimation results is also featured.

  18. The median effective concentration (EC50) of propofol with different doses of fentanyl during colonoscopy in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyang; Yu, Fang; Zhu, Huichen; Yang, Yuting; Yang, Liqun; Lian, Jianfeng

    2016-04-21

    Propofol and fentanyl are the most widely administered anesthesia maintaining drugs during colonoscopy. In this study, we determined the median effective concentration (EC50) of propofol required for colonoscopy in elderly patients, and the purpose of this study was to describe the pharmacodynamic interaction between fentanyl and propofol when used in combination for colonoscopy in elderly patients. Ninety elderly patients scheduled for colonoscopy were allocated into three groups in a randomized, double-blinded manner as below, F0.5 group (0.5 μg.kg(-1) fentanyl), F1.0 group (1.0 μg.kg(-1) fentanyl) and saline control group. Anaesthesia was achieved by target-controlled infusion of propofol (Marsh model, with an initial plasma concentration of 2.0 μg.ml(-1)) and fentanyl. Colonoscopy was started 3 min after the injection of fentanyl. The EC50 of propofol for colonoscopy with different doses of fentanyl was measured by using an up-and-down sequential method with an adjacent concentration gradient at 0.5 μg.ml(-1) to inhibit purposeful movements. Anaesthesia associated adverse events and recovery characters were also recorded. The EC50 of propofol for colonoscopy in elderly patients were 2.75 μg.ml(-1) (95% CI, 2.50-3.02 μg.ml(-1)) in F0.5 group, 2.05 μg.ml(-1) (95% CI, 1.98-2.13 μg.ml(-1)) in F1.0 group and 3.08 μg.ml(-1) (95% CI, 2.78-3.42 μg.ml(-1)) in control group respectively (P fentanyl up to 1.0 μg.kg(-1) reduces the propofol EC50 required for elderly patients undergoing colonoscopy, and there was no significant difference in anaesthesia associated adverse events but prolonged awake and discharge time. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR15006368. Date of registration: May 3, 2015.

  19. Colonoscopic Diagnostic Findings in Patients Undergoing Colonoscopy In Qom Hazrat-e-Masoome Hospital During 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Ghadir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: In recent years there have been noticeable changes in diagnosis and treatment of colon disorders by colonoscopy and direct vision. Along with its international development, this useful equipment is being used in Iran to treat various disorders. It should be mentioned that there are no exact statistics of these disorders to date. This study was done with aim of evaluating the diagnostic findings in patients undergoing colonoscopy in Qom during 2007-2008.

     

    Methods: This descriptive-cross sectional study was done on 500 patients having referred to colonoscopy ward of Hazrate-e-Masoome Hospital in Qom. After colonoscopy, patient data were entered into a special questionnaire and then pathologic findings were added to it. The data were taken for statistical analysis.

     

    Results: Out of 500 patients undergoing colonoscopy 279 were male (55.8% and 221 female (44.2%. In all groups and both sexes the most common reason for carrying out colonoscopy was abdominal pain (46.6% rectorrhagia (41%. As regards diagnosis, a total of 199 cases (39.8% of all 500 colonoscopies had normal colonoscopy,124 cases (24.8% had hemorrhoid, 64 cases (12.8% had polyp, 55 cases (11% had inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, 30 cases (6% had tumor, 17 cases(3.2% had diverticulosis and 12 cases (2.4% had solitary rectal ulcer. There was a significant relationship between abdominal pain and tumor, polyp and diverticulosis. (p<0.001 There was also a significant relationship between age and the aforementioned disorders. (p<0.001

     

    Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the prevalence of cancer and IBD is higher in men

  20. Is Travel Time to Colonoscopy Associated With Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries in Iowa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Mary E; Matthews, Kevin A; Gaglioti, Anne; Bay, Camden; McDowell, Bradley D; Ward, Marcia M; Levy, Barcey T

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to decrease the incidence of late-stage colorectal cancer, yet a substantial proportion of Americans do not receive screening. Those in rural areas may face barriers to colonoscopy services based on travel time, and previous studies have demonstrated lower screening among rural residents. Our purpose was to assess factors associated with late-stage CRC, and specifically to determine if longer travel time to colonoscopy was associated with late-stage CRC among an insured population in Iowa. SEER-Medicare data were used to identify individuals ages 65 to 84 years old diagnosed with CRC in Iowa from 2002 to 2009. The distance between the centroid of the ZIP code of residence and the ZIP code of colonoscopy was computed for each individual who had continuous Medicare fee-for-service coverage for a 3- to 4-month period prior to diagnosis, and a professional claim for colonoscopy within that time frame. Demographic characteristics and travel times were compared between those diagnosed with early- versus late-stage CRC. Also, demographic differences between those who had colonoscopy claims identified within 3-4 months prior to diagnosis (81%) were compared to patients with no colonoscopy claims identified (19%). A total of 5,792 subjects met inclusion criteria; 31% were diagnosed with early-stage versus 69% with late-stage CRC. Those divorced or widowed (vs married) were more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage CRC (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.06-1.37). Travel time was not associated with diagnosis of late-stage CRC. Among a Medicare-insured population, there was no relationship between travel time to colonoscopy and disease stage at diagnosis. It is likely that factors other than distance to colonoscopy present more pertinent barriers to screening in this insured population. Additional research should be done to determine reasons for nonadherence to screening among those with access to CRC screening services, given that over