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Sample records for included flair sequences

  1. Can a 15-sec FLAIR replace conventional FLAIR sequence in stroke MR protocols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzakoun, J; Maïer, B; Calvet, D; Edjlali, M; Turc, G; Lion, S; Legrand, L; Ben Hassen, W; Naggara, O; Meder, J F; Mas, J L; Oppenheim, C

    2017-06-01

    Triage imaging facilitates the timely recognition of acute stroke with prognostic implications. Improvement in MR acquisition speed is needed given the extreme time constraints before treatment. We compared an ultrafast Echo-Planar FLAIR sequence (EPI-FLAIR) and a conventional FLAIR sequence (cFLAIR) for their diagnostic performances and ability to estimate the age of infarction. Between June and August 2014, 125 consecutive patients (age 69±18 years, 48% men) admitted for a suspicion of acute (≤48-hrs) stroke were explored by both FLAIR sequences at 1.5-Tesla. EPI-FLAIR (15-sec) and cFLAIR (2-min and 15-sec) were compared by two readers, blinded to clinical data. EPI-FLAIR was less prone to kinetic artefacts than cFLAIR (2-3% vs. 23-49% depending on the reader, P0.9). Amongst 8 hemorrhages, one subarachnoid hemorrhage presenting as a sudden deficit was missed on EPI-FLAIR sequence. Amongst 60 infarctions, cFLAIR and EPI-FLAIR were concordant in 50 (83%), while signal changes were visible on cFLAIR only in the remaining 10 (17%) cases. Amongst the 43 patients with known onset time (n=17 within 4.5hrs), FLAIR-DWI mismatch identified<4.5-hrs infarction with the same sensitivity (65%) using cFLAIR and EPI-FLAIR, but the positive predictive value (PPV) was higher for cFLAIR than for EPI-FLAIR (73% vs. 50%, P=0.008). EPI-FLAIR allows a drastic reduction of acquisition time devoted to FLAIR sequence and minimizes motion artifacts. Compared with cFLAIR, it is however associated with increased risk of undiagnosed stroke mimics and lower PPV for identifying<4.5-hrs infarctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Usefulness of low-field FlAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowska, D.; Sasiadek, M.; Zimny, A.

    2004-01-01

    Plain MR study is often insufficient for visualization of all important details of intracranial tumors, hence there are attempts to use supplementary MR techniques. One of them is FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) sequence which previously was available only in high-field MR units, but recently has been introduced also in less expensive low-field units. FLAIR is already widely used in the diagnostics of ischemic and demyelinating lesions, while there are few papers concerning its application in intracranial tumors, none of them regarding low-field MR units.The aim of our study was detailed evaluation of low-field FLAIR in the diagnostics of intracranial tumors. The material consisted of 76 patients with intracranial tumors, who were examined with low-field open MR unit (0.23 Tesla). In all patients, standard T2-weighted and T1-weighted (before and after contrast enhancement) sequences, as well as FLAIR sequence, were performed. The following symptoms were compared in the aforementioned sequences: tumor-edema, edema-brain and tumor-brain borders, visualization of tumour structure, vessels in the tumor area and precise tumor localization. A superiority of FLAIR in assessment of all symptoms has been confirmed, at least in part of the patient group. It concerned particularly the evaluation of brain-edema and edema-brain borders which were better visible with FLAIR than with all other sequences in 29 and 30 patients, respectively. In the assessment of the remaining symptoms (tumor-brain border, tumor structure, visualization of vessels, tumor localization) FLAIR was superior to other sequences in smaller number of patients (13,11,11 and 12, respectively). Totally, in 48 out of 76 patients (63.2%) FLAIR allowed better assessment of at least one of the analyzed symptoms. Low-field MR FLAIR enriches diagnostic information in majority of patients with intracranial tumors, therefore it should be included routinely in the diagnostic algorithm in this group of

  3. Detection of lesions in multiple sclerosis by 2D FLAIR and single-slab 3D FLAIR sequences at 3.0 T: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bink, Andrea; Gaa, Jochen; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E.; Schmitt, Melanie; Mugler, John P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare conventional 2D FLAIR and single-slab 3D FLAIR sequences in the detection of lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis. Eight patients with MS were examined at 3.0 T by using a 2D FLAIR sequence and a single-slab 3D FLAIR sequence. A comparison of lesion detectability was performed for the following regions: periventricular, nonperiventricular/juxtacortical and infratentorial. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) between lesions and brain tissue and CSF were calculated for each sequence. A total of 424 lesions were found using the 2D FLAIR sequence, while with the 3D FLAIR sequence 719 lesions were found. With the 2D FLAIR sequence, 41% fewer lesions were detected than with the 3D FLAIR sequence. Further, 40% fewer supratentorial and 62.5% fewer infratentorial lesions were found with the 2D FLAIR sequence. In images acquired with the 3D FLAIR sequence, the lesions had significantly higher CNRs than in images acquired with the 2D FLAIR sequence. These are the first results using a single-slab 3D FLAIR sequence at 3.0 T for detection of lesions in patients with MS. With the 3D FLAIR sequence significantly higher CNRs were achieved and significantly more lesions in patients with MS were detected. (orig.)

  4. FLAIR-HASTE sequence in differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Jae; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Bae, In Young; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2001-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of using the FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery)-HASTE (half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo) sequence for the differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions. During a 12-month period, 80 patients with 127 focal hepatic lesions [hemangiomas (n=60), hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) (n=27), cysts (n=25), and metastases (n=15) underwent MR imaging using a 1.5-T scanner. Verification of the diagnosis was based on the findings of pathology (n=11), of angiography and clinical investigation (n=17), or of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (n=99). MR sequences included T2-weighted HASTE (TE, 134 ms ; echo space, 4.4 ms), FLAIR-HASTE (TE, 64 ms ; echo space, 4.4 ms ; inversion time, 2000 ms ; number of slices, 5-9 ; acquisition time, 13-20 s), and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted FLASH (TR, 131 ms ; TE, 4 ms). FLAIR-HASTE imaging was of any focal lesions seen on T2-weighted HASTE images was performed in the liver area, and their signal intensity was classified in one of five ways : very high (higher than the spleen), moderately high (similar to the spleen), slightly high (higher than the liver and lower than the spleen), intermediate (similar to the liver), or low (lower than the liver). The signal intensity of the 25 cysts, as determined by FLAIR-HASTE, was low in 21 cases (84%), intermediate in three (12%), and very high in one (4%), which was diagnosed as a complicated cyst in which ultrasound revealed internal septa. At FLAIR-HASTE, all 60 hemangiomas showed either very high (n=50, 83%) or moderately high (n=10, 17%) signal intensity, while that of 42 hepatic malignant tumors was very high in 14 cases (33%), moderately high in 8 (19%), slightly high in 18 (43%), intermediate in one (2.5%), and low in one (2.5%). FLAIR-HASTE showed that the signal intensity of the majority of hepatic cysts was low, while that of most hemangiomas and solid liver tumors was high. For the differential diagnosis of cystic and

  5. FLAIR MR sequence in the diagnosis and follow-up of low-grade astrocytomas

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    Stošić-Opinćal Tatjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the sensitivity of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence in the diagnosis and follow-up of the patients with low-grade astrocytomas compared with T2-weighted (T2W sequence. Methods. Twenty-four patients with biopsy- confirmed low-grade astrocytoma (age range, 15-66 years underwent T1- weighted (T1W, T2W and FLAIR imaging with a superconducting unit 1.0 T. FLAIR images were qualitatively evaluated by comparison with T2W images by the three experienced neuroradiologists. To evaluate the diagnostic value of FLAIR, the neuroradiologists individually assessed the possibilities of the detection of lesions, as well as the possibilities of the differentiation of tumor from the surrounding edema on FLAIR vs. T2W images. Every examiner ranked FLAIR sequence vs. T2W in three degrees: worse, equal and better. Results. The comparison of FLAIR with T2W spin-echo (SE images with regard to the detection of the lesions showed that 82.8% of FLAIR studies were superior, 17.2% were of similar diagnostic value, and none was inferior to the T2W images. The comparison of images with regard to the differentiation of tumor boundaries vs. surrounding edema showed that 92.5% of FLAIR studies were superior, 7.5% were of similar diagnostic value, and none was inferior to the T2W images. Conclusion. Our results were similar to the previous studies' results concerning the advantages of FLAIR sequence in the diagnosis of low grade astrocytomas over T2W sequence. FLAIR was better at showing different tumor components, and at distinguishing CSF from the cystic component, and the postoperative cavity, compared with T2W images. Our conclusion was that FLAIR could be routinely used in the evaluation and follow-up of low-grade astrocytomas.

  6. Diagnostic value of the fast-FLAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husstedt, H.W.; Sickert, M.; Koestler, H.; Haubitz, B.; Becker, H.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify imaging characteristics of fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in brain tumors compared with T1-postcontrast- and T2-sequences. Fast-FLAIR-, T2 fast spin echo (FSE)-, and T1 SE postcontrast images of 74 patients with intracranial neoplasms were analyzed. Four neuroradiologists rated signal intensity and inhomogeneity of the tumor, rendering of cystic parts, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, of the tumor vs edema and of brain vs edema, as well as the presence of motion and of other artifacts. Data analysis was performed for histologically proven astrocytomas, glioblastomas, and meningiomas, for tumors with poor contrast enhancement, and for all patients pooled. Only for tumors with poor contrast enhancement (n = 12) did fast FLAIR provide additional information about the lesion. In these cases, signal intensity, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, and differentiation of the tumor vs edema were best using fast FLAIR. In all cases, rendering of the tumor's inner structure was poor. For all other tumor types, fast FLAIR did not give clinically relevant information, the only exception being a better demarcation of the edema from brain tissue. Artifacts rarely interfered with evaluation of fast-FLAIR images. Thus, fast FLAIR cannot replace T2-weighted series. It provides additional information only in tumors with poor contrast enhancement. It is helpful for defining the exact extent of the edema of any tumor but gives little information about their inner structure. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic value of the fast-FLAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husstedt, H W; Sickert, M; Köstler, H; Haubitz, B; Becker, H

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify imaging characteristics of fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in brain tumors compared with T1-postcontrast- and T2-sequences. Fast-FLAIR-, T2 fast spin echo (FSE)-, and T1 SE postcontrast images of 74 patients with intracranial neoplasms were analyzed. Four neuroradiologists rated signal intensity and inhomogeneity of the tumor, rendering of cystic parts, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, of the tumor vs edema and of brain vs edema, as well as the presence of motion and of other artifacts. Data analysis was performed for histologically proven astrocytomas, glioblastomas, and meningiomas, for tumors with poor contrast enhancement, and for all patients pooled. Only for tumors with poor contrast enhancement (n = 12) did fast FLAIR provide additional information about the lesion. In these cases, signal intensity, demarcation of the tumor vs brain, and differentiation of the tumor vs edema were best using fast FLAIR. In all cases, rendering of the tumor's inner structure was poor. For all other tumor types, fast FLAIR did not give clinically relevant information, the only exception being a better demarcation of the edema from brain tissue. Artifacts rarely interfered with evaluation of fast-FLAIR images. Thus, fast FLAIR cannot replace T2-weighted series. It provides additional information only in tumors with poor contrast enhancement. It is helpful for defining the exact extent of the edema of any tumor but gives little information about their inner structure.

  8. Efficacy of the fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence of MRI as a preoperative diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Takato; Nishio, Shunji; Mihara, Futoshi; Muraishi, Mitsuteru; Hisada, Kei; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Fukui, Masashi

    1998-01-01

    A newly advanced MRI pulse sequence, the FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, in which a long TE spin echo sequence is used with suppression of the CSF with an inversion pulse, displays the CSF space as a no-signal intensity area. There have been only a few reports on the FLAIR pulse sequence of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) as yet. We examined 9 cases of intractable TLE by FLAIR images and analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of the FLAIR pulse sequence for decision making on temporal lobectomy. All patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy, and the diagnoses were confirmed histologically after surgery. Abnormally high T2 signals (HT2S) were more conspicuous with the FLAIR sequence than with any of the conventional sequences. Tilted axial plane, orientated along to the long axis of the hippocampal body, clearly demonstrated hippocampal atrophy (HA). Selection of a FLAIR sequence into the routine MR examination of patients with TLE is recommended. (author)

  9. MR imaging at 0.5 Tesla with FLAIR sequence in the diagnosis of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsa, W.; Leitner, H.; Tscholakoff, D.; Perneczky, G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of MR imaging in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) at 0.5 Tesla using the FLAIR (Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) sequenze. Additionally, the value of MR angiographie (MRA) in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms was assessed. Materials and Methods: 19 patients with suspected acute SAH were included in this study. MR imaging was performed using an axial FLAIR sequence and axial T 1 , T 2 and PD weighted sequences. In 16 patients an additional MRA (3D-TOF) was performed. 10 patients without SAH were examined as a control group. At the end of the study the 29 MR examinations were randomised and the images were read by two experienced radiologists; subsequently a consensus interpretation was made. Results: In 16 patients an acute SAH was verified with the FLAIR sequence, in 13 cases the origin of hemorrhage was found during surgery. In the consensus interpretation of the MR images all cases were diagnosed properly. 12 of the 16 MRA studies were of diagnostic quality, but only 6 cases were interpreted correctly. Conclusion: The FLAIR sequence at 0.5 Tesla proved effective in the diagnosis of acute SAH. MRA at 0.5 Tesla failed in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. (orig.) [de

  10. MRI in neuro-Behcet's syndrome: comparison of conventional spin-echo and FLAIR pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, H.R.; Albrecht, T.; Curati-Alasonatti, W.L.; Williams, E.J.; Haskard, D.O.

    1999-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequence with that of a conventional dual-echo spin-echo (SE) sequence to brain lesions in 20 patients with Behcet's syndrome. They underwent 25 MRI examinations. The images were independently analysed for the number, type and anatomical location of lesions shown. There were 18 abnormal studies (13 initial and 5 follow-up). The FLAIR sequence detected significantly more lesions than the SE TE 80 (P < 0.05) and SE TE 20 (P < 0.01) sequences. It was particularly useful for demonstrating lesions in the juxtacortical white matter, which accounted for over half the lesions detected on the FLAIR images. Of patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms such as headache, seven had normal and five had abnormal studies. All patients presenting with focal neurological signs had abnormal imaging. We found supratentorial and, in particular, juxtacortical lesions to be more frequent than previously described. (orig.)

  11. 3D-Flair sequence at 3T in cochlear otosclerosis

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    Lombardo, Francesco; De Cori, Sara; Aghakhanyan, Gayane; Montanaro, Domenico; De Marchi, Daniele; Frijia, Francesca; Canapicchi, Raffaello [Fondazione CNR Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Neuroradiology Unit, Pisa (Italy); Fortunato, Susanna; Forli, Francesca; Berrettini, Stefano [University of Pisa, ENT Audiology Phoniatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy); Chiappino, Dante [Fondazione CNR Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Department of Radiology, Massa (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    To assess the capability of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) sequences in detecting signal alterations of the endolabyrinthine fluid in patients with otosclerosis. 3D-FLAIR before and after (-/+) gadolinium (Gd) administration was added to the standard MR protocol and acquired in 13 patients with a clinical/audiological diagnosis of severe/profound hearing loss in otosclerosis who were candidates for cochlear implantation and in 11 control subjects using 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment. The MRI signal of the fluid-filled cochlea was assessed both visually and calculating the signal intensity ratio (SIR = signal intensity cochlea/brainstem). We revealed no endocochlear signal abnormalities on T1-weighted -/+ Gd images for either group, while on 3D-FLAIR we found bilateral hyperintensity with enhancement after Gd administration in eight patients and bilateral hyperintensity without enhancement in one patient. No endocochlear signal abnormalities were detected in other patients or the control group. Using 3-T MRI equipment, the 3D-FLAIR -/+ Gd sequence is able to detect the blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) breakdown responsible for alterations of the endolabyrinthine fluid in patients with cochlear otosclerosis. We believe that 3D-FLAIR +/- Gd is an excellent imaging modality to assess the intra-cochlear damage in otosclerosis patients. (orig.)

  12. 3D-Flair sequence at 3T in cochlear otosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Francesco; De Cori, Sara; Aghakhanyan, Gayane; Montanaro, Domenico; De Marchi, Daniele; Frijia, Francesca; Canapicchi, Raffaello; Fortunato, Susanna; Forli, Francesca; Berrettini, Stefano; Chiappino, Dante

    2016-01-01

    To assess the capability of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) sequences in detecting signal alterations of the endolabyrinthine fluid in patients with otosclerosis. 3D-FLAIR before and after (-/+) gadolinium (Gd) administration was added to the standard MR protocol and acquired in 13 patients with a clinical/audiological diagnosis of severe/profound hearing loss in otosclerosis who were candidates for cochlear implantation and in 11 control subjects using 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment. The MRI signal of the fluid-filled cochlea was assessed both visually and calculating the signal intensity ratio (SIR = signal intensity cochlea/brainstem). We revealed no endocochlear signal abnormalities on T1-weighted -/+ Gd images for either group, while on 3D-FLAIR we found bilateral hyperintensity with enhancement after Gd administration in eight patients and bilateral hyperintensity without enhancement in one patient. No endocochlear signal abnormalities were detected in other patients or the control group. Using 3-T MRI equipment, the 3D-FLAIR -/+ Gd sequence is able to detect the blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) breakdown responsible for alterations of the endolabyrinthine fluid in patients with cochlear otosclerosis. We believe that 3D-FLAIR +/- Gd is an excellent imaging modality to assess the intra-cochlear damage in otosclerosis patients. (orig.)

  13. MRI in differentiation between recurrent disk herniation and postoperative scar. Value of FLAIR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiel, Carlos A. h; Bouzas, Carlos A.; Porto, Viviana G.

    2000-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between epidural fibrosis and recurrent or residual disk herniation in symptomatic patients who have been operated is often difficult. The MRI with Spin Echo T1 sequences before and after i.v. gadolinium plays and important role in the differentiation of these two entities. The signal characteristics in T1 and T2 sequences are not reliable to distinguish between herniated disk and scar. In order to evaluate the use of the FLAIR technique in the differentiation between herniated disk and epidural fibrosis we used MRI to study 37 symptomatic patients who had been operated of lumbar disk herniation, with FSE-T2 sequences in axial and sagittal planes, FLAIR in axial sections and SE-T1 in sagittal and axial sections before and after i.v. gadolinium. This sequence was used as gold standard for the final diagnosis. We conclude that the FLAIR technique is a reliable alternative in the differential diagnosis between epidural fibrosis and herniated disk, providing a positive correlation to the SE-T1-weighted images with i.v. gadolinium in 100% of the patients. (author)

  14. Uso da sequência FLAIR-EPI na análise da esclerose mesial temporal EPI-FLAIR sequence in the evaluation of mesial temporal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alberto da Costa Machado Júnior

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar as alterações morfológicas e de intensidade de sinal das regiões hipocampais em pacientes, com epilepsia temporal fármaco-resistente. Para tal, estudamos 8 pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal, utilizando aparelhagem de RM de 1,5T, com sequências Spin Eco - SE, Fast Spin Eco - FSE, Fluid Atenuation Inversion Recovery, com Eco Planar Imaging - FLAIR-EPI. Observamos a superioridade da sequência FLAIR na detecção do aumento da intensidade de sinal da região hipocampal, particularmente com cortes coronais, em relação às sequências SE e FSE, com a vantagem de ser uma técnica de rápida execução. A sequência STIR evidenciou adelgaçamento da cortical do hipocampo, na metade dos casos que apresentavam alteração de sinal.The purpose of this study is to evaluate morpholologycal and signal intensity changes in the hippocampus in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. We studied 8 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis using a 1.5 -T MR and the following sequences Spin Eco- SE, Fast Spin Echo- FSE, Fluid Atenuation Inversion Recovery Echo Planar Imaging - FLAIR-EPI. We noticed a sensitive increase signal intensity on FLAIR- EPI sequences, particularly, in coronal images, than on SE and FSE sequences. The STIR sequence showed a cortical hippocampus atrophy in half of the cases, in whom signal abnormalities were present.

  15. Comparison of 3D cube FLAIR with 2D FLAIR for multiple sclerosis imaging at 3 tesla

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    Patzig, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Fesl, G. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Burke, M. [GE Healthcare, Solingen (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3 D) MRI sequences allow improved spatial resolution with good signal and contrast properties as well as multiplanar reconstruction. We sought to compare Cube, a 3 D FLAIR sequence, to a standard 2 D FLAIR sequence in multiple sclerosis (MS) imaging. Materials and Methods: Examinations were performed in the clinical routine on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. 12 patients with definite MS were included. Lesions with MS-typical properties on the images of Cube FLAIR and 2 D FLAIR sequences were counted and allocated to different brain regions. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Results: With 384 the overall number of lesions found with Cube FLAIR was significantly higher than with 2 D FLAIR (N = 221). The difference was mostly accounted for by supratentorial lesions (N = 372 vs. N = 216) while the infratentorial lesion counts were low in both sequences. SNRs and CNRs were significantly higher in CUBE FLAIR with the exception of the CNR of lesion to gray matter, which was not significantly different. Conclusion: Cube FLAIR showed a higher sensitivity for MS lesions compared to a 2 D FLAIR sequence. 3 D FLAIR might replace 2 D FLAIR sequences in MS imaging in the future. (orig.)

  16. Clinical usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in intracranial lesions focusing on emergent cases

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    Kuramochi, Masashi; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Wada, Mitsuyoshi

    1997-06-01

    Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) Pulse Sequences with inversion times of 1700 ms and echo times of 110 ms were used to demonstrate the brain of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and brain trauma. The long inversion times and long echo times nulls the signal from cerebrospinal fluid and produces heavy T{sub 2} weighting images. We compared FLAIR Pulse Sequences with T{sub 2} weighted image Pulse Sequences for signal intensities of CVD and trauma. FLAIR Pulse Sequences is useful to detect at the periphery of the cerebral hemispheres, but infratentorial small infarctions often cannot be detected for its iso-intensity and slight intensity changes. In all patient of traumatic-subarachnoid hemorrhage (t-SAH) can be definitely detected high signal intensity of the cerebral hemispheres. (author)

  17. Diagnosis of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage at 1.5 Tesla using proton-density weighted FSE and FLAIR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmann, M.; Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H.; Medele, R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla in patients suffering from acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using proton-density weighted (PDW) fast spin echo (FSE) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. Methods: 19 patients suffering from acute SAH as diagnosed by CT were studied 6 h to 3 days after hemorrhage. 10 patients without SAH were studied as a control group. The presence of subarachnoid blood as well as possible artifacts was recorded. Results: In all 19 patients subarachnoid hemorrhage was detected on both FLAIR and PDW images (100%). On the FLAIR images, the cerebral ventricles were partially obscured by flow artifacts in 7 of 19 patients, the basal cisterns in 6 of 19 patients. In 4 of these 13 regions blood was diagnosed on both PDW and CT images, while in the other 9 regions both PDW and CT were unremarkable. Conclusion: The sensitivity of MRI at 1.5 Tesla in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is comparable to CT. The combination of FLAIR and PDW FSE sequences helps to avoid false-positive results caused by flow artifacts. (orig.) [de

  18. Detection of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage 3 months after initial bleeding: evaluation of T2* and FLAIR MR sequences at 3 T in comparison with initial non-enhanced CT as a gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulé, Sébastien; Soize, Sébastien; Benaissa, Azzedine; Portefaix, Christophe; Pierot, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the ability of T2* and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR sequences to detect hemosiderin deposition 3 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in comparison with early non-enhanced CT (NECT) as a gold standard. From September 2008 through May 2013, patients with aneurysmal SAH were included if a NECT less than 24 h after the onset of symptoms showed a SAH, and MRI, including T2* and FLAIR sequences, was performed 3 months later. All aneurysms were treated endovascularly. NECT and MR sequences were blindly analyzed for the presence of SAH (NECT) or hemosiderin deposition (MRI). When positive, details of the spatial distribution of SAH or hemosiderin deposits were noted. Sensitivities were calculated for each patient. Sensitivities, specificities, and positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated for each location. Forty-nine patients (mean age 52.9 years) were included. Bleeding-related patterns were identified in 43 patients (87.8%) on T2* and 10 patients (20.4%) on FLAIR. T2* was highly predictive of the location of the initial hemorrhage, especially in the Sylvian cisterns (PPVs 95% and 100%) and the anterior interhemispheric fissure (PPV 90%). The T2* sequence can detect and localize a previous SAH a few months after aneurysmal bleeding. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. FLAIR images of brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Fuminori; Kinoshita, Masao; Kishibayashi, Jun; Kamada, Kazuhiko; Sunohara, Nobuhiko.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in diagnosing brain diseases. The subjects were 20 patients with multiple cerebral infarction, multiple sclerosis, temporal epilepsy, or brain trauma, and 20 other healthy adults. FLAIR images, with a long repetitive time of 6000 msec and a long inversion time of 1400-1600 msec, showed low signal intensity in the cerebrospinal fluid in the lateral ventricles and the cerebral sulci, and high signal intensity in brain tissues. Signal intensity on FLAIR images correlated well with T2 relaxation times under 100 msec. For multiple sclerosis and cerebral infarction, cystic lesions, which were shown on T2-weighted images with long relaxation times over 100 msec, appeared as low-signal areas; and the lesions surrounding the cystic lesions appeared as high-signal areas. For temporal lobe epilepsy, the hippocampus was visualized as a high-signal area. Hippocampal lesions were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. In a patient with cerebral trauma, FLAIR images revealed the lobulated structure with the residual cortex shown as a high signal area. The lesions surrounding the cystic change were imaged as high signal areas. These structural changes were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted sequences. FLAIR images were useful in detecting white matter lesions surrounding the lateral ventricles and cortical and subcortical lesions near the brain surface, which were unclear on conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. (N.K.)

  20. FLAIR images of subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Mikami, Takeshi; Saito, Koji; Okuyama, Tohru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira; Shibata, Kazunori [Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We studied MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences in 37 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by aneurysmal rupture. FLAIR sequence suppressed the CSF signal and produced very heavy T{sub 2} weighted images. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be demonstrated as high signal intensity on FLAIR sequences in all patients clear visualization of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be obtained by MR FLAIR sequences in not only Fisher`s group 3 or 4, but also Fisher`s group 2. Moreover it was suited for the detection of intraaxial hematoma, Sylvian hematoma, subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the posterior fossa and interhemispheric fissure. Especially, it was useful for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Therefore, if patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage present slight headache or atypical symptoms, sometimes it may be more suitable to perform MRI FLAIR pulse sequences first. Aneurysms were found in 21 cases (56.8%). When the aneurysmal size is more than 7 mm, the rate of detection becomes 100%. Aneurysms present various MR appearances because of flow characteristics. Aneurysms were demonstrated as low signal intensity except in 3 cases. In one out of 3 cases, aneurysms were revealed as high signal intensity and in the other two cases, it was revealed as mixed signal intensity. According to the previous studies, rapid flow was demonstrated as low signal intensity by vascular flow void, and delayed flow was demonstrated as high or mixed signal intensity by flow related enhancement and even echo rephasing. MR clearly delineates the size, the lumen, the flow, and the extraaxial location of aneurysms. (K.H.)

  1. Contrast-enhanced FLAIR in the early diagnosis of infectious meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splendiani, Alesssandra; Puglielli, Edoardo; Amicis, Rosanna De; Masciocchi, Carlo; Gallucci, Massimo; Necozione, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the accuracy of MRI in the early diagnosis of infectious meningitis with emphasis on the value of gadolinium-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Twenty-seven patients with clinical suspicion of infectious meningitis were included. MRI was performed within 3 h of clinical evaluation. For all patients, T1-weighted spin-echo, dual-echo T2-weighted fast-spin-echo and FLAIR sequences were performed, followed by gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo and FLAIR sequences. Final diagnosis was based on the clinical findings and the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, obtained by lumbar puncture after the MRI. Infectious meningitis was confirmed in 12 patients. In all of these patients of the plain studies, FLAIR was positive in only four patients. MRI gadolinium-enhanced FLAIR showed abnormal meningeal enhancement in all 12 patients, while gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo was positive only in six cases. There were no false-positive or false-negative results. It is concluded that MRI could have an important role in the early screening for infectious meningitis, provided a gadolinium-enhanced FLAIR sequence is used. (orig.)

  2. Contrast-enhanced FLAIR in the early diagnosis of infectious meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splendiani, Alesssandra; Puglielli, Edoardo; Amicis, Rosanna De; Masciocchi, Carlo; Gallucci, Massimo [University of L' Aquila, Department of Radiology, L' Aquila (Italy); Necozione, Stefano [University of L' Aquila, Department of Statistic, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the accuracy of MRI in the early diagnosis of infectious meningitis with emphasis on the value of gadolinium-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Twenty-seven patients with clinical suspicion of infectious meningitis were included. MRI was performed within 3 h of clinical evaluation. For all patients, T1-weighted spin-echo, dual-echo T2-weighted fast-spin-echo and FLAIR sequences were performed, followed by gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo and FLAIR sequences. Final diagnosis was based on the clinical findings and the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, obtained by lumbar puncture after the MRI. Infectious meningitis was confirmed in 12 patients. In all of these patients of the plain studies, FLAIR was positive in only four patients. MRI gadolinium-enhanced FLAIR showed abnormal meningeal enhancement in all 12 patients, while gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo was positive only in six cases. There were no false-positive or false-negative results. It is concluded that MRI could have an important role in the early screening for infectious meningitis, provided a gadolinium-enhanced FLAIR sequence is used. (orig.)

  3. Arterial hyperintensity on BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) in hyperacute territorial infarction: comparison with conventional FLAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwag, Eujean; Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Ji Eun; Chae, In Hye [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the utility of BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging compared to conventional FLAIR for the detection of arterial hyperintensity (AH) in hyperacute territorial infarction. We retrospectively analysed MR images of patients with hyperacute (<6 h) territorial infarction over a 9-month study period. Special attention was paid to the presence or absence of AH in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and the number of AHs in the sylvian fissure. We also evaluated the presence of three kinds of artefacts on BLADE FLAIR and conventional FLAIR images. AH was seen in 41 (91 %) patients with conventional FLAIR and 45 (100 %) patients with BLADE FLAIR images. More instances of AH were detected in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and within the sylvian fissure using BLADE FLAIR. Motion artefacts, pulsation artefacts from the sigmoid sinus and incomplete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling that reduced image quality were observed more frequently on conventional FLAIR images than on BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE FLAIR sequences are more sensitive than conventional FLAIR for the detection of AH in hyperacute territorial infarctions and provide better image quality by reducing artefacts. They may be used in place of conventional FLAIR for patients with hyperacute stroke. (orig.)

  4. Signal alteration of the cochlear perilymph on 3 different sequences after intratympanic Gd-DTPA administration at 3 tesla. Comparison of 3D-FLAIR, 3D-T1-weighted imaging, and 3D-CISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Masahiro; Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi; Nihashi, Takashi; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) imaging after intratympanic gadolinium injection is useful for pathophysiologic and morphologic analysis of the inner ear. However, statistical analysis of differences in inner ear signal intensity among 3D-FLAIR and other sequences has not been reported. We evaluated the signal intensity of cochlear fluid on each of 3D-FLAIR, 3D-T 1 -weighted imaging (T 1 WI), and 3D-constructive interference in the steady state (CISS) to clarify the differences in contrast effect among these 3 sequences using intratympanic gadolinium injection. Twenty-one patients underwent 3D-FLAIR, 3D-T 1 WI, and 3D-CISS imaging at 3 tesla 24 hours after intratympanic injection of gadolinium. We determined regions of interest of the cochleae (C) and medulla oblongata (M) on each image, evaluated the signal intensity ratio between C and M (CM ratio), and determined the ratio of cochlear signal intensity of the injected side to that of the non-injected side (contrast value). The CM ratio of the injected side (3.00±1.31, range, 0.53 to 4.88, on 3D-FLAIR; 0.83±0.30, range, 0.36 to 1.58 on 3D-T 1 WI) was significantly higher than that of the non-injected side (0.52±0.14, range, 0.30 to 0.76 on 3D-FLAIR; 0.49±0.11, range, 0.30 to 0.71 on 3D-T 1 WI) on 3D-FLAIR and 3D-T 1 WI (P 1 WI (1.73±0.60 range, 0.98 to 3.09) (P<0.001). The 3D-FLAIR sequence is the most sensitive for observing alteration in inner ear fluid signal after intratympanic gadolinium injection. Our results warrant use of 3D-FLAIR as a sensitive imaging technique to clarify the pathological and morphological mechanisms of disorders of the inner ear. (author)

  5. Detection of optic nerve atrophy following a single episode of unilateral optic neuritis by MRI using a fat-saturated short-echo fast FLAIR sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, S.J.; Brex, P.A.; Silver, N.C.; Barker, G.J.; Miller, D.H.; Brierley, C.M.H.; Compston, D.A.S.; Scolding, N.J.; Moseley, I.F.; Plant, G.T.

    2001-01-01

    We describe an MRI technique for quantifying optic nerve atrophy resulting from a single episode of unilateral optic neuritis. We imaged 17 patients, with a median time since onset of optic neuritis of 21 months (range 3-81 months), using a coronal-oblique fat-saturated short-echo fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (sTE fFLAIR) sequence. The mean cross-sectional area of the intraorbital portion of the optic nerves was calculated by a blinded observer from five consecutive 3 mm slices from the orbital apex forwards using a semiautomated contouring technique and compared with data from 16 controls. The mean optic nerve area was 11.2mm 2 in the affected eye of the patients, 12.9mm 2 in the contralateral eye (P = 0.006 compared to the affected eye) and 12.8mm 2 in controls (P = 0.03 compared to the affected eyes). There was a significant negative correlation between disease duration and the size of the affected optic nerve (r = -0.59, P = 0.012). The measurement coefficient of variation was 4.8 %. The sTE fFLAIR sequence enables measurement of optic nerve area with sufficient reproducibility to show optic nerve atrophy following a single episode of unilateral optic neuritis. The correlation of increasing optic nerve atrophy with disease duration would be consistent with ongoing axonal loss in a persistently demyelinated lesion, or Wallerian degeneration following axonal damage during the acute inflammatory phase. (orig.)

  6. Clinical utility of MR FLAIR imaging for head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro [Kinki Univ., Osaka-Sayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    To study the utility of fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images in the evaluation of traumatic head injury, 56 patients with traumatic head injuries were examined with long TR/TE spin-echo (SE) sequences and FLAIR sequences. In 40 of them, long TR/short TE images were added to those sequences. Careful readings of MR images were done by two well-trained neuroradiologists. The chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of our results. The relative sensitivities of FLAIR images were significantly better than those of long TR/TE, long TR/short TE images for the detection of diffuse axonal injury (p<0.01), cortical contusion (p<0.01), and subdural hematoma (p<0.01 for long TR/TE, p<0.05 for long TR/short TE). The number of cases of epidural hematoma and brainstem injury was too small for statistical significance to be determined. In 9 patients with corpus callosum injuries. FLAIR images demonstrated the lesions as abnormally high signal intensity in the septum pellucidum and fornix. Only sagittal FLAIR images could definitely discriminate the traumatic lesions of the fornix from the surrounding CSF. In addition, FLAIR images could easily discriminate DAI of the corpus callosum from CSF of the cavum velli interpositi. MR FLAIR images were found to be useful for detecting traumatic head injuries. (author)

  7. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, E

    2015-01-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR. (paper)

  8. Estimation of gadolinium-induced T1-shortening with measurement of simple signal intensity ratio between the cochlea and brain parenchyma on 3D-FLAIR. Correlation with T1 measurement by TI scout sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Ishihara, Shunichi; Iwano, Shingo; Kawai, Hisashi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to T 1 -shortening of labyrinthine fluid on 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) has been reported in many inner ear disorders. Although semi-quantitative assessment by simple signal intensity ratio between cochlear fluid and brain tissue has been tried, its feasibility using a multi-channel phased-array head coil with an inherently inhomogenous sensitivity distribution has not been fully evaluated. We evaluated the feasibility of measuring simple signal intensity ratio by correlating rapid T 1 measurements using an inversion time (TI) scout sequence. We evaluated 10 patients with Meniere's disease and 4 patients with sudden deafness. Nine of the patients with Meniere's disease received a unilateral intratympanic injection of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA); the tenth patient received bilateral injections. The 4 patients with sudden deafness received a double-dose intravenous injection. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained 24 hours after intratympanic injections and 4 hours after intravenous injections at 3 tesla using a 32-channel head coil. We measured the ratio (CM ratio) between the signal intensity of the perilymph in the cochlea (C) and that of the medulla oblongata (M) and correlated it with the null-point inversion time (TI null ) obtained with the TI scout sequence. The TI scout consisted of 85 images obtained with TI values between 132.5 and 3087.5 ms at increments of 37.5 ms. The correlation coefficient between TI null and the natural logarithm of the CM ratio was -0.88 (P<0.01). There was significant negative linear correlation. Measurement of the simple signal intensity ratio between the cochlea and the medulla can be used for semi-quantitative analysis of 3D-FLAIR. The results of this study may facilitate clinical research of inner-ear disease using 3D-FLAIR. (author)

  9. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR at 7 Tesla correlates with Amyloid beta in Hippocampus and Brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Schreiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD. While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh compound-B positron-emission-tomography (PiB-PET, Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR- intensity. Methods: 14 healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T. Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho, followed by Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right:rho=0.86; left:rho=0.84, Brainstem (rho=0.85 and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho=0.82. Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR-intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  10. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) at 7 Tesla correlates with amyloid beta in hippocampus and brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Simon J.; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton F.; Wyss, Michael; Steininger, Stefanie C.; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Meier, Irene B.; Kälin, Andrea M.; Leh, Sandra E.; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD). While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh Compund-B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET), Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR intensity. Methods: Fourteen healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T). Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho), followed by Holm–Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right: rho = 0.86; left: rho = 0.84), Brainstem (rho = 0.85) and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho = 0.82). Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  11. Comparative Analysis of Signal Intensity and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient at Varying b-values in the Brain : Diffusion Weighted-Echo Planar Image (T2 and FLAIR) Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Kap; Im, Jung Yeol

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been demonstrated to be a practical method for the diagnosis of various brain diseases such as acute infarction, brain tumor, and white matter disease. In this study, we used two techniques to examine the average signal intensity (SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the brains of patients who ranged in age from 10 to 60 years. Our results indicated that the average SI was the highest in amygdala (as derived from DWI), whereas that in the cerebrospinal fluid was the lowest. The average ADC was the highest in the cerebrospinal fluid, whereas the lowest measurement was derived from the pons. The average SI and ADC were higher in T 2 -DW-EPI than in FLAIR-DW-EPI. The higher the b-value, the smaller the average difference in both imaging techniques; the lower the b-value, the greater the average difference. Also, comparative analysis of the brains of patients who had experienced cerebral infarction showed no distinct lesion in the general MR image over time. However, there was a high SI in apparent weighted images. Analysis of other brain diseases (e.g., bleeding, acute, subacute, chronic infarction) indicated SI variance in accordance with characteristics of the two techniques. The higher the SI, the lower the ADC. Taken together, the value of SI and ADC in accordance with frequently occurring areas and various brain disease varies based on the b-value and imaging technique. Because they provide additional useful information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with various brain diseases through signal recognition, the proper imaging technique and b-value are important for the detection and interpretation of subacute stroke and other brain diseases.

  12. Contrast-enhanced flair imaging in the evaluation of infectious leptomeningeal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Hemant; Sitoh, Y.-Y.; Anand, Pooja; Chua, Violet; Hui, Francis

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to compare contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images with contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for infectious leptomeningitis. Materials and methods: We studied twenty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of infectious meningitis with unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced T1 weighted and contrast-enhanced FLAIR MR sequences. Twelve patients had cytologic and biochemical diagnosis of meningitis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination obtained 48 h before or after the MR study. Sequences were considered positive if abnormal signal was seen in the subarachnoid space (cistern or sulci) or along pial surface. Results: Twenty-seven examinations in 24 patients were performed. Of the 12 patients (thirteen studies) in whom cytology was positive, unenhanced FLAIR images were positive in six cases (sensitivity 46%), contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were positive in 11 (sensitivity 85%), and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were positive in 11 patients (sensitivity 85%). Of the 12 patients (14 studies) in whom cerebrospinal fluid study was negative, unenhanced FLAIR images were negative in 13, contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were negative in 11, and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were negative in eight. Thus, the specificity of unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images was 93, 79 and 57%, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that post-contrast FLAIR images have similar sensitivity but a higher specificity compared to contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for detection of leptomeningeal enhancement. It can be a useful adjunct to post-contrast T1 weighted images in evaluation of infectious leptomeningitis

  13. Contrast-enhanced flair imaging in the evaluation of infectious leptomeningeal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore) and Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)]. E-mail: parurad@hotmail.com; Sitoh, Y.-Y. [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore); Anand, Pooja [Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Chua, Violet [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore); Hui, Francis [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433 (Singapore)

    2006-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to compare contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images with contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for infectious leptomeningitis. Materials and methods: We studied twenty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of infectious meningitis with unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced T1 weighted and contrast-enhanced FLAIR MR sequences. Twelve patients had cytologic and biochemical diagnosis of meningitis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination obtained 48 h before or after the MR study. Sequences were considered positive if abnormal signal was seen in the subarachnoid space (cistern or sulci) or along pial surface. Results: Twenty-seven examinations in 24 patients were performed. Of the 12 patients (thirteen studies) in whom cytology was positive, unenhanced FLAIR images were positive in six cases (sensitivity 46%), contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were positive in 11 (sensitivity 85%), and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were positive in 11 patients (sensitivity 85%). Of the 12 patients (14 studies) in whom cerebrospinal fluid study was negative, unenhanced FLAIR images were negative in 13, contrast-enhanced FLAIR images were negative in 11, and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MR images were negative in eight. Thus, the specificity of unenhanced FLAIR, contrast-enhanced FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images was 93, 79 and 57%, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that post-contrast FLAIR images have similar sensitivity but a higher specificity compared to contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for detection of leptomeningeal enhancement. It can be a useful adjunct to post-contrast T1 weighted images in evaluation of infectious leptomeningitis.

  14. Fast FLAIR MR imaging finidngs of cerebral infarction : comparison with T2-weighted spin echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Keun Young; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of FLAIR(Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) MR imaging in cerebral infarction by comparing its results with those of T2-weighted spin-echo imaging. We retrospectively evaluated fast FLAIR images and conventional spin echo images of 82 patients (47 men and 20 women ; median age 60.9 years) with cerebral infarction. MR imaging used a 1.5T MR unit with conventional T2(TR 3900, TE 90) and fast FLAIR sequence (TR 8000, TE 105, TI 2400). We analysed the size of the main lesion and number of lesions, and discrimination between old and new lesions and between small infarction and perivascular space. When T2-weighted and FLAIR imaging were compared, the latter showed that the main lesion was larger in 38 cases (46%), similar in 38 (46%), and smaller in six (7%). The number of lesions was greater in 23 cases(28%), similar in 52 (63%), and fewer in seven (9%). FLAIR images discriminated between old and new lesions in 31 cases ; perivascular space and small infarotion were differentiated in eight cases, and CSF inflowing artifact was observed in 66 (80%). In the diagnosis of cerebral infaretion, fast FLAIR provides images that are equal or superior to T2-weighted images. The fast FLAIR sequence may therefore be used as a part of routine MR brain study in the diagnosis of cerebral infarction

  15. MRI of acute cerebral infarction: a comparison of FLAIR and T2-weighted fast spin-echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, K.; Ogawa, T.; Inugami, A.; Fujita, H.; Hatazawa, J.; Shimosegawa, E.; Okudera, T.; Uemura, K.; Seto, H.

    1997-01-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequences have been reported to provide high sensitivity to a wide range of central nervous system diseases. To our knowledge, however, FLAIR sequences have not been used to study patients with acute cerebral infarcts. We evaluated the usefulness of FLAIR sequences in this context. FLAIR sequences were acquired on a 0.5 T superconducting unit within 8 h of the onset in 19 patients (aged 26-80 years) with a total of 23 ischaemic lesions. The images were reviewed retrospectively by three neuroradiologists, and the FLAIR images were compared with T2-weighted fast spin-echo images. All but one of the ischaemic lesions involving grey matter was clearly demonstrated on FLAIR images as increased signal intensity in cortical or central grey matter. FLAIR images were particularly useful for detecting the hyperacute cortical infarcts within 3 h of onset, which were not readily detected on the spin-echo images. In 9 of 11 patients with complete proximal occlusion, the distal portion of the cerebral artery was visible as an area of high signal intensity on FLAIR images. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. FLAIR images of mild head trauma with transient amnesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakamoto, Hirooki; Miyazaki, Hiromichi; Inaba, Makoto; Ishiyama, Naomi [Hiratsuka City Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kawase, Takeshi

    1998-11-01

    A newly advanced MRI pulse sequence, the FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, in which a long TE spin echo sequence is used with suppression of the CSF with an inversion pulse, displays the CSF space as a no signal intensity area. We examined 45 cases of mild head trauma with posttraumatic amnesia by FLAIR images and could detect some findings which could not be detected by CT scan and conventional MR images. These findings could be detected in many patients with long posttraumatic amnesia (over 2 hours), but they could not be detected in patients with short posttraumatic amnesia (within 30 mins). These findings existed surrounding lateral ventricles and we classified them into 3 types: type 1 is anterior horn of lateral ventricle, type 2 is the base of frontal lobe, and type 3 is cerebral deep white matter. Some of them were examined again by FLAIR images a month later, and these findings had disappeared. We suspect that these lesions were brain edema or mild contusion without hemorrhage. (author)

  17. FLAIR images of mild head trauma with transient amnesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamoto, Hirooki; Miyazaki, Hiromichi; Inaba, Makoto; Ishiyama, Naomi; Kawase, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    A newly advanced MRI pulse sequence, the FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, in which a long TE spin echo sequence is used with suppression of the CSF with an inversion pulse, displays the CSF space as a no signal intensity area. We examined 45 cases of mild head trauma with posttraumatic amnesia by FLAIR images and could detect some findings which could not be detected by CT scan and conventional MR images. These findings could be detected in many patients with long posttraumatic amnesia (over 2 hours), but they could not be detected in patients with short posttraumatic amnesia (within 30 mins). These findings existed surrounding lateral ventricles and we classified them into 3 types: type 1 is anterior horn of lateral ventricle, type 2 is the base of frontal lobe, and type 3 is cerebral deep white matter. Some of them were examined again by FLAIR images a month later, and these findings had disappeared. We suspect that these lesions were brain edema or mild contusion without hemorrhage. (author)

  18. Pre- and postcontrast FLAIR MR imaging in the diagnosis of intracranial meningeal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Hachiya, Junichi

    2000-01-01

    Few reports address the use of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images of the brain in the diagnosis of extraaxial lesions. Our purpose was to assess the value of FLAIR images, including postcontrast ones, in the diagnosis of intracranial meningeal diseases. We reviewed precontrast (n=24) and postcontrast (n=20) FLAIR images obtained from 25 patients with infectious meningitis (n=13), carcinomatous meningitis or dissemination of primary brain tumor (n=7), dural metastasis (n=3), and others (n=2) in comparison with fast spin-echo T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted images. In lesion detectability, precontrast FLAIR images were significantly superior to fast spin-echo T2-weighted images but inferior to postcontrast T1-weighted images. There was no significant difference between postcontrast T1-weighted and FLAIR images. Precontrast FLAIR images can substitute for conventional fast spin-echo T2-weighted images. Postcontrast FLAIR images have diagnostic potential equivalent to conventional postcontrast T1-weighted images. (author)

  19. Comparison of MR sequences in early cerebral infarction at 0.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Cekirge, H.S.; Besim, A.

    2000-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic values of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and gradient spin-echo (GRASE) with those of conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast SE T2-weighted sequences in the evaluation of acute cerebrovascular lesions at 0.5 T. Material and Methods: Twenty-two consecutive patients with the clinical diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular accident were examined by MR imaging within the first 48 h of ictus. MR examination included 5-mm axial conventional SE and turbo SE (TSE) T2-weighted, dual-echo GRASE and FLAIR sequences. The patients also had pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted axial images. Two examiners evaluated the images and scored the conspicuity of the acute lesions. Results: Regardless of location, FLAIR provided the best lesion conspicuity in the detection of acute infarcts, followed by the GRASE sequence. In the posterior fossa, TSE and SE demonstrated the lesions better than GRASE and FLAIR techniques. In the detection of hemorrhagic elements within the ischemic region, TSE demonstrated statistically significant superiority over other sequences. Conclusion: In the detection of acute ischemic lesions in locations other than the posterior fossa, FLAIR provided the best lesion conspicuity among four T2-weighted sequences, including SE, TSE, GRASE and FLAIR. However, for the posterior fossa examination, preference of SE or TSE T2-weighted sequences is suggested

  20. Comparison of MR sequences in early cerebral infarction at 0.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Cekirge, H.S.; Besim, A. [Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Radiology Dept.

    2000-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic values of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and gradient spin-echo (GRASE) with those of conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast SE T2-weighted sequences in the evaluation of acute cerebrovascular lesions at 0.5 T. Material and Methods: Twenty-two consecutive patients with the clinical diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular accident were examined by MR imaging within the first 48 h of ictus. MR examination included 5-mm axial conventional SE and turbo SE (TSE) T2-weighted, dual-echo GRASE and FLAIR sequences. The patients also had pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted axial images. Two examiners evaluated the images and scored the conspicuity of the acute lesions. Results: Regardless of location, FLAIR provided the best lesion conspicuity in the detection of acute infarcts, followed by the GRASE sequence. In the posterior fossa, TSE and SE demonstrated the lesions better than GRASE and FLAIR techniques. In the detection of hemorrhagic elements within the ischemic region, TSE demonstrated statistically significant superiority over other sequences. Conclusion: In the detection of acute ischemic lesions in locations other than the posterior fossa, FLAIR provided the best lesion conspicuity among four T2-weighted sequences, including SE, TSE, GRASE and FLAIR. However, for the posterior fossa examination, preference of SE or TSE T2-weighted sequences is suggested.

  1. Comparison of post-contrast 3D-T1-MPRAGE, 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR MR images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities at 3-T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandham, Balaji; Kalyanpur, Tejas; Gupta, Prashant; Cherian, Mathew

    2017-06-01

    This study was to assess the usefulness of newer three-dimensional (3D)-T 1 sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and 3D-T 2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities. 78 patients who presented with high suspicion of meningeal abnormalities were evaluated using post-contrast 3D-T 2 -FLAIR, 3D-T 1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) and 3D-T 1 -SPACE sequences. The images were evaluated independently by two radiologists for cortical gyral, sulcal space, basal cisterns and dural enhancement. The diagnoses were confirmed by further investigations including histopathology. Post-contrast 3D-T 1 -SPACE and 3D-T 2 -FLAIR images yielded significantly more information than MPRAGE images (p evaluation of meningeal abnormalities and when used in combination have the maximum sensitivity for leptomeningeal abnormalities. The negative-predictive value is nearly 100%, where no leptomeningeal abnormality was detected on these sequences. Advances in knowledge: Post-contrast 3D-T 1 -SPACE and 3D-T 2 -FLAIR images are more useful than 3D-T 1 -MPRAGE images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities.

  2. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  3. A comparison of lesion detection and conspicuity on T2-weighted images (T2 FFE), FLAIR and diffusion-weighted images in patients with traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Eun Yong; Lee, Myeong sub; Kim, Myung Soon; Hong, In Soo; Kim, Young Ju; Whang, Gum

    2001-01-01

    To compare the lesion detectability and conspicuity in traumatic brain injury on T-2 FFE, FLAIR and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) sequences. Thirty-three patients who underwent MR brain imaging after traumatic brain injury were reviewed. T-2 FFE, FLAIR and diffusion-weighted MR sequences were obtained and were compared in terms of the detectability and conspicuity of intra- and extra-axial lesions which showed abnormal signal intensities. Among 33 patients, a total of 108 lesions were found, T-2 FFE sequences detected 88(81%) of these, FLAIR sequences 91%(84%), and diffusion-weighted sequences 57(52%). In the case of petechial hemorrhagic lesions, 16 were detected by T-2 FFE imaging but only one by FLAIR and one by DWI. Sixteen extra-axial lesions (73%) were detected by T-2 FFE, 21 (95%) by FLAIR, and 11(50%) by DWI. Lesion conspicuity on FLAIR images was judged superior to that on T-2 FFE and diffusion-weighted images in 42 lesions (75%). Eleven extra-axial Lesions (92%) were more conspicuous on FLAIR than on T-2 FFE and DWI. For detecting traumatic brain lesions and determining their conspicuity, FLAIR imaging was more useful than T-2 FFE and diffusion weighting , while T-2 FFE imaging was more sensitive for the detecion of petechial hemorrhage. Although diffusion-weighted imaging was generally inferior to both FLAIR and T-2 FFE in terms of lesion detection and conspicuity, for some lesions it was superior. The results suggest that images obtained at each pulse sequence can be used as complementary imaging sequences, and that in traumatic brain injury, the acquisition of FLAIR, T-2 FFE and diffusion-weighted images is useful

  4. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  6. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  9. Fast FLAIR MR images of intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Hye Young; Cho, Young A; Kim, Wha Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging according to various stages, and to compare FLAIR imaging with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. We retrospectively evaluated fast FLAIR images along with spin-echo T1- and T2 weighted MR images of 32 lesions in 25 patients (12 males and 14 females, aged 3 - 84 yrs) with intracranial hemorrhagic lesions. For imaging, 1.5 T unit was used, and the nature of the lesions was found to be as follows : intracranial hemorrhage (n=15); tumor (n=9); infarction (n=4); arteriovenous malformation (n=3); and arachnoid cyst with hemorrhage (n=1). On the basis of spin-echo MR imaging, lesions were classified as acute, early subacute, late subacute, early chronic, or late chronic stage. The signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage were analysed in accordance with each staging, as seen on MR FLAIR imaging, and compared to the staging seen on spin-echo T1- and T-2 weighted MR imaging. The signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on FLAIR imaging, was not characteristic; it was similar to that of T2WI during the acute and subacute stages, and similiar to that of T1WI during the chronic stage. When used together with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, however, FLAIR imaging may be useful for the classification of chronic intracranial hemorrhage as either early or late stage. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  10. Comparison of T2 and FLAIR imaging for target delineation in high grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FLAIR and T2 weighted MRIs are used based on institutional preference to delineate high grade gliomas and surrounding edema for radiation treatment planning. Although these sequences have inherent physical differences there is limited data on the clinical and dosimetric impact of using either or both sequences. Methods 40 patients with high grade gliomas consecutively treated between 2002 and 2008 of which 32 had pretreatment MRIs with T1, T2 and FLAIR available for review were selected for this study. These MRIs were fused with the treatment planning CT. Normal structures, clinical tumor volume (CTV and planning tumor volume (PTV were then defined on the T2 and FLAIR sequences. A Venn diagram analysis was performed for each pair of tumor volumes as well as a fractional component analysis to assess the contribution of each sequence to the union volume. For each patient the tumor volumes were compared in terms of total volume in cubic centimeters as well as anatomic location using a discordance index. The overlap of the tumor volumes with critical structures was calculated as a measure of predicted toxicity. For patients with MRI documented failures, the tumor volumes obtained using the different sequences were compared with the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV. Results The FLAIR CTVs and PTVs were significantly larger than the T2 CTVs and PTVs (p Conclusions Although both T2 and FLAIR MRI sequences are used to define high grade glial neoplasm and surrounding edema, our results show that the volumes generated using these techniques are different and not interchangeable. These differences have bearing on the use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and highly conformal treatment as well as on future clinical trials where the bias of using one technique over the other may influence the study outcome.

  11. Role of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) and proton density magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and evaluation of lesion extent of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Jitender; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Singh, Atampreet; Rathore, Chathurbhuj; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Bahuleyan, Biji

    2010-01-01

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often associated with epilepsy. Identification of FCD can be difficult due to subtle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Though fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence detects the majority of these lesions, smaller lesions may go unnoticed while larger lesions may be poorly delineated. Purpose: To determine the ability of a specialized epilepsy protocol in visualizing and delineating the extent of FCD. Material and Methods: We compared the imaging findings in nine patients with cortical malformation who underwent routine epilepsy MR imaging as well as a specialized epilepsy protocol. All imaging was done on a 1.5T MR unit. The specialized epilepsy protocol included 3D FLAIR in the sagittal plane as well as proton density (PD) and high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images in the transverse plane. Results: In all nine patients, the specialized protocol identified lesion anatomy better. In three patients in whom routine MRI was normal, the specialized epilepsy protocol including 3D FLAIR helped in identifying the lesions. One of these patients underwent surgery, and histo-pathology revealed a cortical dysplasia. In one patient, lesion characterization was improved, while in the remaining patients the extent of the FCD was more clearly demonstrated in the 3D FLAIR and PD images. Statistical analysis of images for cortical thickness, cortical signal intensity, adjacent white matter abnormalities, and gray-white matter junction showed significant statistical difference in the ability of 3D FLAIR to assess these aspects over conventional images. PD images were also found superior to the routine epilepsy protocol in assessment of cortical signal, adjacent white matter, and gray-white matter junction. Conclusion: Specialized MRI sequences and techniques should be performed whenever there is a high suspicion of cortical dysplasia, especially when they remain occult on conventional MR protocols. These techniques

  12. Maturation of the limbic system revealed by MR FLAIR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jacques F.; Vergesslich, Klara [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Cortical signal intensity (SI) of the limbic system in adults is known to be higher than in neocortical structures, but time-related changes in SI during childhood have not been described. To detect maturation-related SI changes within the limbic system using a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR sequence. Twenty children (10 boys, 10 girls; age 3.5-18 years, mean 11.2 years) with no neurological abnormality and normal MR imaging examination were retrospectively selected. On two coronal FLAIR slices, ten regions of interest (ROI) with a constant area of 10 mm{sup 2} were manually placed in the archeocortex (hippocampus), periarcheocortex (parahippocampal gyrus, subcallosal area, cingulate gyrus) and in the neocortex at the level of the superior frontal gyrus on both sides. Significant SI gradients were observed with a higher intensity in the archeocortex, intermediate intensity in the periarcheocortex and low intensity in the neocortex. Significant higher SI values in hippocampal and parahippocampal structures were detected in children up to 10 years of age. These differences mainly reflected differences in cortical structure and myelination state. Archeocortical structures especially showed significant age-related intensity progression suggesting ongoing organization and/or myelination until early adolescence. (orig.)

  13. Maturation of the limbic system revealed by MR FLAIR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Jacques F.; Vergesslich, Klara

    2007-01-01

    Cortical signal intensity (SI) of the limbic system in adults is known to be higher than in neocortical structures, but time-related changes in SI during childhood have not been described. To detect maturation-related SI changes within the limbic system using a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR sequence. Twenty children (10 boys, 10 girls; age 3.5-18 years, mean 11.2 years) with no neurological abnormality and normal MR imaging examination were retrospectively selected. On two coronal FLAIR slices, ten regions of interest (ROI) with a constant area of 10 mm 2 were manually placed in the archeocortex (hippocampus), periarcheocortex (parahippocampal gyrus, subcallosal area, cingulate gyrus) and in the neocortex at the level of the superior frontal gyrus on both sides. Significant SI gradients were observed with a higher intensity in the archeocortex, intermediate intensity in the periarcheocortex and low intensity in the neocortex. Significant higher SI values in hippocampal and parahippocampal structures were detected in children up to 10 years of age. These differences mainly reflected differences in cortical structure and myelination state. Archeocortical structures especially showed significant age-related intensity progression suggesting ongoing organization and/or myelination until early adolescence. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of T2 and FLAIR imaging for target delineation in high grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stall, Bronwyn; Zach, Leor; Ning, Holly; Ondos, John; Arora, Barbara; Shankavaram, Uma; Miller, Robert W; Citrin, Deborah; Camphausen, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    FLAIR and T2 weighted MRIs are used based on institutional preference to delineate high grade gliomas and surrounding edema for radiation treatment planning. Although these sequences have inherent physical differences there is limited data on the clinical and dosimetric impact of using either or both sequences. 40 patients with high grade gliomas consecutively treated between 2002 and 2008 of which 32 had pretreatment MRIs with T1, T2 and FLAIR available for review were selected for this study. These MRIs were fused with the treatment planning CT. Normal structures, clinical tumor volume (CTV) and planning tumor volume (PTV) were then defined on the T2 and FLAIR sequences. A Venn diagram analysis was performed for each pair of tumor volumes as well as a fractional component analysis to assess the contribution of each sequence to the union volume. For each patient the tumor volumes were compared in terms of total volume in cubic centimeters as well as anatomic location using a discordance index. The overlap of the tumor volumes with critical structures was calculated as a measure of predicted toxicity. For patients with MRI documented failures, the tumor volumes obtained using the different sequences were compared with the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV). The FLAIR CTVs and PTVs were significantly larger than the T2 CTVs and PTVs (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0001 respectively). Based on the discordance index, the abnormality identified using the different sequences also differed in location. Fractional component analysis showed that the intersection of the tumor volumes as defined on both T2 and FLAIR defined the majority of the union volume contributing 63.6% to the CTV union and 82.1% to the PTV union. T2 alone uniquely identified 12.9% and 5.2% of the CTV and PTV unions respectively while FLAIR alone uniquely identified 25.7% and 12% of the CTV and PTV unions respectively. There was no difference in predicted toxicity to normal structures using T2 or FLAIR. At the

  15. MR textural analysis on T2 FLAIR images for the prediction of true oligodendroglioma by the 2016 WHO genetic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Wenting; Ren, Yan; Wang, Yin; Gao, Xinyi; Xu, Xiao; Yao, Zhenwei

    2017-11-15

    The genetic status of 1p/19q is important for differentiating oligodendroglioma, isocitrate-dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant, and 1p/19q-codeleted from diffuse astrocytoma, IDH-mutant according to the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. To assess the value of magnetic resonance textural analysis (MRTA) on T 2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images for making a genetically integrated diagnosis of true oligodendroglioma by WHO guidelines. Retrospective case control. In all, there were 54 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of diffuse glioma (grade II). All were tested for IDH and 1p/19q. 3.0T, including T 2 FLAIR sequence, axial T 1 -weighted, and T 2 -weighted sequence. MRTA on a representative tumor region of interest (ROI) was made on preoperative T 2 FLAIR images around the area that had the largest diameter of solid tumor using Omni Kinetics software. Differences between IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted and IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-intact gliomas were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney rank sum test. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were created to assess MRTA diagnostic performance. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated with a cutoff value according to the Youden Index. Comparisons demonstrated significant differences in kurtosis (P = 0.007), energy (0.008), entropy (0.008), mean deviation (MD) (features comprising entropy (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.718, sensitivity = 97.1%) and energy (0.719, 94.1%) had the highest sensitivity but lower specificity (both 45%). Second-order features such as HGLRE (AUC = 0.750, sensitivity = 73.5%, specificity = 80.0%) and sum average (0.751, 70.6%, 80.0%) had relatively higher specificity, and all had AUC >0.7. MD had the highest diagnostic performance, with AUC = 0.878, sensitivity = 94.1%, specificity = 75.0%, PPV = 86.5%, and NPV = 88.2%. MRTA on T 2 FLAIR images may be

  16. Comparative Analysis of Signal Intensity and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient at Varying b-values in the Brain : Diffusion Weighted-Echo Planar Image (T{sub 2} and FLAIR) Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Kap [Dept. of Radiology, Cheomdan Medical Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jung Yeol [Dept. of Digital Management Information Graduate School of Nambu Univesity, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been demonstrated to be a practical method for the diagnosis of various brain diseases such as acute infarction, brain tumor, and white matter disease. In this study, we used two techniques to examine the average signal intensity (SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the brains of patients who ranged in age from 10 to 60 years. Our results indicated that the average SI was the highest in amygdala (as derived from DWI), whereas that in the cerebrospinal fluid was the lowest. The average ADC was the highest in the cerebrospinal fluid, whereas the lowest measurement was derived from the pons. The average SI and ADC were higher in T{sub 2}-DW-EPI than in FLAIR-DW-EPI. The higher the b-value, the smaller the average difference in both imaging techniques; the lower the b-value, the greater the average difference. Also, comparative analysis of the brains of patients who had experienced cerebral infarction showed no distinct lesion in the general MR image over time. However, there was a high SI in apparent weighted images. Analysis of other brain diseases (e.g., bleeding, acute, subacute, chronic infarction) indicated SI variance in accordance with characteristics of the two techniques. The higher the SI, the lower the ADC. Taken together, the value of SI and ADC in accordance with frequently occurring areas and various brain disease varies based on the b-value and imaging technique. Because they provide additional useful information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with various brain diseases through signal recognition, the proper imaging technique and b-value are important for the detection and interpretation of subacute stroke and other brain diseases.

  17. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  18. Flair: A powerful but user friendly graphical interface for FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachoudis, V.

    2009-01-01

    FLAIR is an advanced user graphical interface for FLUKA, to enable the user to start and control FLUKA jobs completely from a GUI environment without the need for command-line interactions. It is written entirely with python and Tkinter allowing easier portability across various operating systems and great programming flexibility with focus to be used as an Application Programming Interface (API) for FLUKA. FLAIR is an integrated development environment (IDE) for FLUKA, it does not only provide means for the post processing of the output but a big emphasis has been set on the creation and checking of error free input files. It contains a fully featured editor for editing the input files in a human readable way with syntax highlighting, without hiding the inner functionality of FLUKA from the users. It provides also means for building the executable, debugging the geometry, running the code, monitoring the status of one or many runs, inspection of the output files, post processing of the binary files (data merging) and interface to plotting utilities like gnuplot and PovRay for high quality plots or photo-realistic images. The program includes also a database of selected properties of all known nuclides and their known isotopic composition as well a reference database of ∼ 300 predefined materials together with their Sterheimer parameters. (authors)

  19. Ultra-low energy storage ring at FLAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsch, Carsten P.; Papash, A. I.; Gorda, O.; Harasimowicz, J.; Karamyshev, O.; Karamysheva, G.; Newton, D.; Panniello, M.; Putignano, M.; Siggel-King, M. R. F.; Smirnov, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR) at the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) will provide cooled beams of antiprotons in the energy range between 300 keV down to 20 keV and possibly less. The USR has been completely redesigned over the past three years. The ring structure is based on a “split achromat” lattice that allows in-ring experiments with internal gas jet target. Beam parameters might be adjusted in a wide range: from very short pulses in the nanosecond regime to a Coasting beam. In addition, a combined fast and slow extraction scheme was developed that allows for providing external experiments with cooled beams of different time structure. Detailed investigations of the USR, including studies into the ring’s long term beam dynamics, life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with an internal target were carried out. New tools and beam handling techniques for diagnostics of ultra-low energy ions at beam intensities less than 10 6 were developed by the QUASAR Group. In this paper, progress on the USR project will be presented with an emphasis on the expected beam parameters available to the experiments at FLAIR.

  20. New multispectral MRI data fusion technique for white matter lesion segmentation: method and comparison with thresholding in FLAIR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del C Valdes Hernandez, Maria; Ferguson, Karen J.; Chappell, Francesca M.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Brain tissue segmentation by conventional threshold-based techniques may have limited accuracy and repeatability in older subjects. We present a new multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) image analysis approach for segmenting normal and abnormal brain tissue, including white matter lesions (WMLs). We modulated two 1.5T MR sequences in the red/green colour space and calculated the tissue volumes using minimum variance quantisation. We tested it on 14 subjects, mean age 73.3 ± 10 years, representing the full range of WMLs and atrophy. We compared the results of WML segmentation with those using FLAIR-derived thresholds, examined the effect of sampling location, WML amount and field inhomogeneities, and tested observer reliability and accuracy. FLAIR-derived thresholds were significantly affected by the location used to derive the threshold (P = 0.0004) and by WML volume (P = 0.0003), and had higher intra-rater variability than the multispectral technique (mean difference ± SD: 759 ± 733 versus 69 ± 326 voxels respectively). The multispectral technique misclassified 16 times fewer WMLs. Initial testing suggests that the multispectral technique is highly reproducible and accurate with the potential to be applied to routinely collected clinical MRI data. (orig.)

  1. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, magnetization transfer spin echo, and fat-saturation T1-weighted sequences in infectious meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azad, Rajiv; Tayal, Mohit; Azad, Sheenam; Sharma, Garima; Srivastava, Rajendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    To compare the contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR), the CE T1-weighted (CE-T1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and magnetization transfer (MT) for early detection and characterization of infectious meningitis. Fifty patients and 10 control subjects were evaluated with the CE-FLAIR and the CE-T1W sequences with FS and MT. Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence and grading of abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. Quantitative assessment included computation of net meningeal enhancement, using single pixel signal intensity software. A newly devised FLAIR based scoring system, based on certain imaging features including ventricular dilatation, ependymal enhancement, infarcts and subdural effusions was used to indicate the etiology. Data were analysed using the Student's t test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, the intraclass correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test with Bonferroni correction as the post hoc test. The CE-FLAIR sequence demonstrated a better sensitivity (100%), diagnostic accuracy (95%), and a stronger correlation with the cerebrospinal fluid, total leukocyte count (r = 0.75), protein (r = 0.77), adenosine deaminase (r = 0.81) and blood glucose (r = -0.6) values compared to the CE-T1W sequences. Qualitative grades and quantitative meningeal enhancement on the CE-FLAIR sequence were also significantly greater than those on the other sequences. The FLAIR based scoring system yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 91.6% and a sensitivity of 96%. A strong inverse Pearson's correlation (r = -0.95) was found between the assigned score and patient's Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of admission. The CE-FLAIR sequence is better suited for evaluating infectious meningitis and could be included as a part of the routine MR imaging protocol

  2. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, magnetization transfer spin echo, and fat-saturation T1-weighted sequences in infectious meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Rajiv; Tayal, Mohit; Azad, Sheenam; Sharma, Garima; Srivastava, Rajendra Kumar [SGRR Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Patel Nagar, Dehradun (India)

    2017-11-15

    To compare the contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR), the CE T1-weighted (CE-T1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and magnetization transfer (MT) for early detection and characterization of infectious meningitis. Fifty patients and 10 control subjects were evaluated with the CE-FLAIR and the CE-T1W sequences with FS and MT. Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence and grading of abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. Quantitative assessment included computation of net meningeal enhancement, using single pixel signal intensity software. A newly devised FLAIR based scoring system, based on certain imaging features including ventricular dilatation, ependymal enhancement, infarcts and subdural effusions was used to indicate the etiology. Data were analysed using the Student's t test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, the intraclass correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test with Bonferroni correction as the post hoc test. The CE-FLAIR sequence demonstrated a better sensitivity (100%), diagnostic accuracy (95%), and a stronger correlation with the cerebrospinal fluid, total leukocyte count (r = 0.75), protein (r = 0.77), adenosine deaminase (r = 0.81) and blood glucose (r = -0.6) values compared to the CE-T1W sequences. Qualitative grades and quantitative meningeal enhancement on the CE-FLAIR sequence were also significantly greater than those on the other sequences. The FLAIR based scoring system yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 91.6% and a sensitivity of 96%. A strong inverse Pearson's correlation (r = -0.95) was found between the assigned score and patient's Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of admission. The CE-FLAIR sequence is better suited for evaluating infectious meningitis and could be included as a part of the routine MR imaging protocol.

  3. Flair MR imaging in the Detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage : comparison with CT and T1-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Youn; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Oh, Tae Kyung; Kim, Ho Kyun [College of Medicine, Jnje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To compare the findings of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging in the detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), with those of precontrast CT and T1-weighted MR imaging. In 13 patients (14 cases) with SAH, FLAIR MR images were retrospectively analyzed and compared with CT (10 patients, 11 cases) and T1-weighted MR images (9 cases). SAH was confirmed on the basis of high density along the subarachnoid space, as seen on precontrast CT, or lumbar puncture. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0T unit. FLAIR MR and CT images were obtained during the acute stage(less than 3 days after ictus) in 10 and 9 cases, respectively, during the subacute stage (4-14 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively, and during the chronic stage (more than 15 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively. CT was performed before FLAIR MR imaging, and the interval between CT and FLAIR ranged from 24 hours (6 cases) to 2-3 (2 cases) or 4-7 days (3 cases). In each study, the conspicuity of visualization of SAH was graded as excellent, good, fair, or negative at five locations (sylvian fissure, cortical sulci, anterior basal cistern, posterior basal cistern, and perimesencephalic cistern). In all cases, subarachnoid hemorrhages were demonstrated as high signal intensity areas on FLAIR images. The detection rates for SAH on CT and T1-weighted MR images were 100% (11/11) and 89% (8/9), respectively. FLAIR was superior to T1-weighted imaging in the detection of SAH at all sites except the anterior basal cistern (p less than 0.05) and superior to CT in the detection of SAH at the cortical sulci (p less than 0.05). On FLAIR MR images, subarachnoid hemorrhages at all stages are demonstrated as high signal intensity areas; the FLAIR MR sequence is thus considered useful in the detection of SAH. In particular FLAIR is more sensitive than CT for the detection of SAH in the cortical sulci. (author)

  4. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  5. FLAIR imaging in the follow-up of low-grade gliomas: time to dispense with the dual-echo?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bynevelt, M.; Britton, J.; Seymour, H.; MacSweeney, E.; Sandhu, K. [Atkinson Morley' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Thomas, N. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Atkinson Morley' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) imaging has established its utility in neuroimaging. We propose this imaging sequence as a replacement for proton density (PD) and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences in the follow-up of low-grade glioma. 26 MRI examinations of 18 patients with such tumours were reviewed by three neuroradiologists and a neurosurgeon. FLAIR was found to be superior for appreciation of the lesion (91 % of studies) and for demonstration of its margin (92 %). FLAIR was also better at showing different tumour components, particularly in regions difficult to demonstrate in some planes, such as the vertex in axial imaging. The sequence also defines the postoperative cavity, shows the least amount of susceptibility effect associated with surgical clips, and demonstrates local spread (to white matter tracts, subependymal and capsular) more distinctly. We conclude that FLAIR can replace PD and T2-weighted spin-echo imaging in radiological follow-up of low-grade glioma. (orig.)

  6. Usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) image in mesial temporal sclerosis : comparison with turbo spin-echo T2-weighted image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Chang, Seung Kuk; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    To determine the usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) imaging for the in detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), compared with that of turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging. Two neuroradiologists independently analyzed randomly mixed MR images of 20 lesions of 17 patients in whom MTS had been diagnosed, and ten normal controls. All subjects underwent both who performed both FLAIR and turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, in a blind fashion. In order to determine hippocampal morphology, oblique coronal images perpendicular to the long axis of the hippocampus were obtained. The detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, the radiologists' preferred imaging sequence, and intersubject consistency of detection were evaluated. Signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala was considered high if substantially higher than signal intensity in the cortex of adjacent temporo-parietal lobe. In all normal controls, FLAIR and spin-echo T2-weighted images showed normal signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala. In MTS, the mean detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, as seen on FLAIR images was 93%, compared with 43% on spin-echo T2-weighted images. In all cases in which signal intensity on FLAIR images was normal, signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images was also normal. The radiologists preferred the contrast properties of FLAIR to those of spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS using MRI, FLAIR images are more useful for the detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala than are spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS, FLAIR imaging is therefore a suitable alternative to spin-echo T2-weighted imaging.

  7. Usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) image in mesial temporal sclerosis : comparison with turbo spin-echo T2-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Chang, Seung Kuk; Eun, Choong Ki

    1999-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) imaging for the in detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), compared with that of turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging. Two neuroradiologists independently analyzed randomly mixed MR images of 20 lesions of 17 patients in whom MTS had been diagnosed, and ten normal controls. All subjects underwent both who performed both FLAIR and turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, in a blind fashion. In order to determine hippocampal morphology, oblique coronal images perpendicular to the long axis of the hippocampus were obtained. The detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, the radiologists' preferred imaging sequence, and intersubject consistency of detection were evaluated. Signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala was considered high if substantially higher than signal intensity in the cortex of adjacent temporo-parietal lobe. In all normal controls, FLAIR and spin-echo T2-weighted images showed normal signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala. In MTS, the mean detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, as seen on FLAIR images was 93%, compared with 43% on spin-echo T2-weighted images. In all cases in which signal intensity on FLAIR images was normal, signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images was also normal. The radiologists preferred the contrast properties of FLAIR to those of spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS using MRI, FLAIR images are more useful for the detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala than are spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS, FLAIR imaging is therefore a suitable alternative to spin-echo T2-weighted imaging

  8. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, Walter L.; Oatridge, Angela; Herlihy, Amy H.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Puri, Basant K.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T 1 weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  9. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Inje University, Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Kyo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J. [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, So Hyun [Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyoung Ro [Philips HealthCare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Jung Kyo; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J.; Cho, So Hyun; Lee, Gyoung Ro

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  11. FLAIR imaging for differential diagnosis of new cerebral microbleeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akira

    2009-01-01

    It may be difficult to determine the time of appearance of cerebral microbleeds (MBs) in T2*-weighted MR imaging (MRI), because most MBs take more than several years to become absorbed. The presence of MBs is closely related to intracerebral hemorrhage, and it is important to detect new MBs in order to prevent intracerebral hemorrhage. We evaluated 108 patients on maintenance hemodialysis with MRI at least twice from May 2003 to May 2008. Seventy-two new MBs were detected and 59 MBs disappeared. Initial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging revealed 3 MBs with surrounding hyperintensity (SH), but follow-up FLAIR imaging demonstrated disappearance of the SH in all cases. Five of the 72 new MBs had SH, but follow-up FLAIR imaging demonstrated disappearance of the SH in all cases. In one case, SH with the enlarged MB disappeared in follow-up FLAIR images. In conclusion, we considered SH of new MBs to be vasogenic edema accompanying new intracerebral hemorrhage. It was useful to compare T2*-weighted MRI with FLAIR imaging to determine the differential diagnosis of new MBs. (author)

  12. Usefulness of combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR images in optic neurits : Comparison with fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye Yeon; Son, Seok Hyun; Eun, Choong Ki; Han, Sang Suk

    2001-01-01

    To compare the usefulness of combined fat- and fluid-suppressed selective partial inversion recovery-fluid attenuated inversion recovery(SPIR-FLAIR) images in the detection of high signal intensity of the optic nerve in optic neuritis with that of fat-suppressed selective partial inversion recovery(SPIR) or short inversion time inversion recovery(STIR) images. Two radiologists independently analyzed randomly mixed MR images of 16 lesions in 14 patients (M:F=7:7; mean age, 40 years) in whom optic neuritis had been clinically diagnosed. All subjects underwent both SPIR-FLAIR and fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR imaging, in a blind fashion. In order to evaluate the optic nerve, coronal images perpendicular to its long axis were obtained. The detection rate of high signal intensity of the optic nerve, the radiologists preferred imaging sequences, and intersubject consistency of detection were evaluated. 'High signal intensity' was defined as the subjective visual evaluation of increased signal intensity compared with that of the contralateral optic nerve or that of white matter. The mean detection rate of high signal intensity of the optic nerve was 90% for combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR images, and 59% for fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images. In all cases in which the signal intensity observed on SPIR-FLAIR images was normal, that on fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images was also normal. The radiologists preferred the contrast properties of SPIR-FLAIR to those of fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images. In the diagnosis of optic neuritis using MRI, combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR images were more useful for the detection of high signal intensity of the optic nerve than fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images. For the evaluation of optic neuritis, combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR imaging is superior to fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR imaging

  13. Utility of coronal contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed FLAIR in the evaluation of optic neuropathy and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegel, Kevin H; Tyan, Andrew E; Iyer, Veena R; Rykken, Jeffrey B; McKinney, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating chronic sequelae of optic neuritis, such as optic neuropathy with or without optic nerve atrophy, can be challenging on whole brain MRI. This study evaluated the utility of dedicated coronal contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed FLAIR (CE-FS-FLAIR) MR imaging to detect optic neuropathy and optic nerve atrophy. Over 4.5 years, a 3 mm coronal CE-FS-FLAIR sequence at 1.5T was added to the routine brain MRIs of 124 consecutive patients, 102 of whom had suspected or known demyelinating disease. Retrospective record reviews confirmed that 28 of these 102 had documented onset of optic neuritis >4 weeks prior to the brain MRI. These 28 were compared to the other 22 ("controls") of the 124 patients who lacked a history of demyelinating disease or visual symptoms. Using coronal CE-FS-FLAIR, two neuroradiologists separately graded each optic nerve (n = 50 patients, 100 total nerves) as either negative, equivocal, or positive for optic neuropathy or atrophy. The scoring was later repeated. The mean time from acute optic neuritis onset to MRI was 4.1 ± 4.6 years (range 34 days-17.4 years). Per individual nerve grading, the range of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of coronal CE-FS-FLAIR in detecting optic neuropathy was 71.4-77.1%, 93.8-95.4%, and 85.5-89.0%, respectively, with strong interobserver (k = 0.667 - 0.678, p optic atrophy, interobserver agreement was moderate (k = 0.437 - 0.484, p optic neuropathy years after the onset of acute optic neuritis, but is less useful in detecting optic nerve atrophy.

  14. Should abdominal sequences be included in prostate cancer MR staging studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEvoy, S.H.; Lavelle, L.P.; Purcell, Y.M.; Quinlan, D.M.; Skehan, S.J.; Collins, C.D.; McMahon, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ESUR guideline that abdominal MR sequences are reserved for high-risk prostate cancer is tested. • Routine abdominal sequences are of low yield in prostate cancer MR staging. • Routine abdominal staging sequences frequently result in incidental findings. • Abdominal staging sequences should be reserved for high-risk prostate cancer cases. - Abstract: Objectives: Prostate cancer staging MR examinations commonly include abdominal sequences to assess for non-regional (common iliac or para-aortic) nodal metastasis. In our experience the diagnostic yield of this is limited, but incidental findings are frequent, often necessitating further investigations. The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic utility of abdominal sequences in routine prostate cancer MR staging studies. Methods: Findings on abdominal sequences of consecutive MRI prostate studies performed for staging newly diagnosed prostate cancer between September 2011 and September 2013 were reviewed with respect to adenopathy and additional incidental findings. Results were correlated with Gleason grade and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in each case. Results: 355 MRI prostate examinations were reviewed. 4 (1.1%) showed enlarged non-regional lymph nodes. Incidental findings were found in 82(23.1%) cases, neccessitating further investigation in 45 (12.7%) cases. Enlarged non-regional nodes were associated with higher PSA level and Gleason grade (p = 0.007, p = 0.005 respectively). With a combined threshold of PSA > 20 ng/mL and/or Gleason grade ≥8 the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 100, 60, 3 and 100% respectively for predicting the presence of non-regional adenopathy. Conclusions: Routine abdominal sequences are of very low yield in routine prostate cancer MR staging, frequently resulting in incidental findings requiring further work-up and should be reserved for high-risk cases. Our experience supports the use of an abdominal staging sequence in high

  15. Ivy signs on FLAIR images before and after STA-MCA anastomosis in patients with Moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ideguchi, Reiko; Enokizono, Mikako; Uetani, Masataka (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Nagasaki Univ. Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan)), e-mail: qqtt37gd9@forest.ocn.ne.jp; Morikawa, Minoru (Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)); Ogawa, Yoji (Dept. of Radiology, Hanwa Daini Senboku Hospital, Osaka (Japan)); Nagata, Izumi (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan))

    2011-04-15

    Background: Leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging is one of the features of Moyamoya disease. However, the correlation between ivy sign and cerebral perfusion status has not been fully evaluated. Purpose: To characterize ivy sign on FLAIR images in Moyamoya disease and compare this finding with hemodynamic alterations on perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT) obtained before and after bypass surgery. Material and Methods: Sixteen patients with angiographically confirmed Moyamoya disease who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis were included in the study. The presence of ivy sign on FLAIR images was classified as 'negative', 'minimal' and 'positive'. We evaluated the relationship between ivy sign and findings of SPECT, including cerebral vascular reserve (CVR) before and after surgery. Results: Minimal or positive ivy sign was seen in 13 (81%) of 16 patients, and 21 (66%) of 32 hemispheres. CVR in the areas with positive or minimal ivy sign was lower than that in the areas with negative ivy sign. After STA-MCA anastomosis, ivy sign disappeared or decreased in all 21 hemispheres demonstrating ivy sign. SPECT demonstrated apparent hemodynamic improvement in areas demonstrating disappearance or decrease of ivy sign. Conclusion: Ivy sign on FLAIR image is seen in areas with decreased cerebral perfusion. The sign is useful for non-invasive assessment of cerebral hemodynamic status before and after surgery

  16. Evaluation of prospective motion correction of high-resolution 3D-T2-FLAIR acquisitions in epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Sjoerd B; Micallef, Caroline; Barkhof, Frederik; Hill, Andrea; Winston, Gavin P; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S

    2018-03-02

    T2-FLAIR is the single most sensitive MRI contrast to detect lesions underlying focal epilepsies but 3D sequences used to obtain isotropic high-resolution images are susceptible to motion artefacts. Prospective motion correction (PMC) - demonstrated to improve 3D-T1 image quality in a pediatric population - was applied to high-resolution 3D-T2-FLAIR scans in adult epilepsy patients to evaluate its clinical benefit. Coronal 3D-T2-FLAIR scans were acquired with a 1mm isotropic resolution on a 3T MRI scanner. Two expert neuroradiologists reviewed 40 scans without PMC and 40 with navigator-based PMC. Visual assessment addressed six criteria of image quality (resolution, SNR, WM-GM contrast, intensity homogeneity, lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence) on a seven-point Likert scale (from non-diagnostic to outstanding). SNR was also objectively quantified within the white matter. PMC scans had near-identical scores on the criteria of image quality to non-PMC scans, with the notable exception that intensity homogeneity was generally worse. Using PMC, the percentage of scans with bad image quality was substantially lower than without PMC (3.25% vs. 12.5%) on the other five criteria. Quantitative SNR estimates revealed that PMC and non-PMC had no significant difference in SNR (P=0.07). Application of prospective motion correction to 3D-T2-FLAIR sequences decreased the percentage of low-quality scans, reducing the number of scans that need to be repeated to obtain clinically useful data. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA copy number, including telomeres and mitochondria, assayed using next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Stuart

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA copy number variations occur within populations and aberrations can cause disease. We sought to develop an improved lab-automatable, cost-efficient, accurate platform to profile DNA copy number. Results We developed a sequencing-based assay of nuclear, mitochondrial, and telomeric DNA copy number that draws on the unbiased nature of next-generation sequencing and incorporates techniques developed for RNA expression profiling. To demonstrate this platform, we assayed UMC-11 cells using 5 million 33 nt reads and found tremendous copy number variation, including regions of single and homogeneous deletions and amplifications to 29 copies; 5 times more mitochondria and 4 times less telomeric sequence than a pool of non-diseased, blood-derived DNA; and that UMC-11 was derived from a male individual. Conclusion The described assay outputs absolute copy number, outputs an error estimate (p-value, and is more accurate than array-based platforms at high copy number. The platform enables profiling of mitochondrial levels and telomeric length. The assay is lab-automatable and has a genomic resolution and cost that are tunable based on the number of sequence reads.

  18. Perbedaan Intensitas Penyengatan Meningeal Hasil MRI antara Sekuens T2 FLAIR Post Contrast dan T1WI Post Contrast Gadolinium-DTPA dalam Mendeteksi Penyangatan Meningeal pada Kasus Meningitis Tuberkulosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Hendarin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis meningitis TB terutama pada kasus possible dan probable sulit ditegakkan. Pemeriksaan MRI kepala dengan kontras Gadolinium-DTPA adalah modalitas radiologi yang paling sensitif untuk membantu mendiagnosis penyakit ini. Penyangatan meningeal di daerah basal merupakan gambaran MRI yang paling banyak ditemukan pada meningitis TB. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui perbedaan peningkatan intensitas sinyal meningen sekuens T2-FLAIR dengan T1WI pada pasien meningitis tuberkulosis menggunakan pemeriksaan MRI kepala dengan kontras Gadolinium-DTPA di RSUP Dr. Hasan Sadikin Bandung pada bulan Januari 2015–Juni 2016. Subjek penelitian sebanyak 21 orang dengan meningitis TB dilakukan pemeriksaan MRI kepala dengan kontras Gadolinium-DTPA. Analisis statistik komparatif dilakukan untuk menguji perbedaan peningkatan intensitas sinyal meningen sekuens T2-FLAIR post contrast dengan T1WI post contrast. Hasil penelitian menujukkan rerata peningkatan intensitas sinyal meningen sekuen T2-FLAIR (∆T2-FLAIR sebesar 360,59±182,19 aμ sedangkan T1WI (∆T1WI sebesar 126,47±72,57 aμ. Hasil uji statistik menggunakan uji T pada derajat kepercayaan 95% menunjukkan perbedaan yang bermakna ∆T2-FLAIR dengan ∆T1WI pada nilai p=0,000. Sebagai simpulan didapatkan peningkatan intensitas sinyal meningen sekuens T2-FLAIR post contrast lebih besar daripada T1WI post contrast pada kasus meningitis TB.  [MKB. 2017;49(3:172–78] Kata kunci: Meningitis tuberkulosis, MRI sekuens T1WI dan T2-FLAIR, penyangatan meningeal Difference between Gadolinium-DTPA Enhanced T2 FLAIR Sequence and T1WI Sequence MRI in Detecting Meningeal Enhancement in Tuberculous Meningitis The diagnosis of TB meningitis, especially in possible and probable cases, is difficult. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the head with Gadolinium-DTPA is the most sensitive imaging modality that supports diagnosis of this disease. The most common presentation of TB meningitis in MRI is basal meningeal enhancement

  19. Clinical-Radiological Parameters Improve the Prediction of the Thrombolysis Time Window by Both MRI Signal Intensities and DWI-FLAIR Mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madai, Vince Istvan; Wood, Carla N; Galinovic, Ivana; Grittner, Ulrike; Piper, Sophie K; Revankar, Gajanan S; Martin, Steve Z; Zaro-Weber, Olivier; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Ebinger, Martin; Fiebach, Jochen B; Sobesky, Jan

    2016-01-01

    With regard to acute stroke, patients with unknown time from stroke onset are not eligible for thrombolysis. Quantitative diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI relative signal intensity (rSI) biomarkers have been introduced to predict eligibility for thrombolysis, but have shown heterogeneous results in the past. In the present work, we investigated whether the inclusion of easily obtainable clinical-radiological parameters would improve the prediction of the thrombolysis time window by rSIs and compared their performance to the visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch. In a retrospective study, patients from 2 centers with proven stroke with onset value/mean value of the unaffected hemisphere). Additionally, the visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch was evaluated. Prediction of the thrombolysis time window was evaluated by the area-under-the-curve (AUC) derived from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Factors such as the association of age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, MRI field strength, lesion size, vessel occlusion and Wahlund-Score with rSI were investigated and the models were adjusted and stratified accordingly. In 82 patients, the unadjusted rSI measures DWI-mean and -SD showed the highest AUCs (AUC 0.86-0.87). Adjustment for clinical-radiological covariates significantly improved the performance of FLAIR-mean (0.91) and DWI-SD (0.91). The best prediction results based on the AUC were found for the final stratified and adjusted models of DWI-SD (0.94) and FLAIR-mean (0.96) and a multivariable DWI-FLAIR model (0.95). The adjusted visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch did not perform in a significantly worse manner (0.89). ADC-rSIs showed fair performance in all models. Quantitative DWI and FLAIR MRI biomarkers as well as the visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch provide excellent prediction of eligibility for thrombolysis in acute stroke, when easily obtainable clinical-radiological parameters are included in the prediction

  20. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  2. Detection of brain metastasis. Comparison of Turbo-FLAIR imaging, T2-weighted imaging and double-dose gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Naoto; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Sasaki, Yasuhito; Aoki, Shigeki; Wada, Akihiko

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare Turbo-FLAIR imaging, T 2 -weighted imaging, and double-dose gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in the detection of brain metastasis. Using the three sequences, 20 consecutive patients with brain metastases were prospectively studied with a 1.5-Tesla system. Three independent, blinded readers assessed the images for the presence, size, number, and location of metastatic lesions. In the detection of large lesions (>0.5 cm), Turbo-FLAIR imaging (38/48, 79%) was not significantly different from gadolinium-enhanced imaging (42/48, 88%) (p=0.273). T 2 -weighted imaging (31/48, 65%), however, was inferior to gadolinium-enhanced imaging (p<0.05). There was no difference between Turbo-FLAIR imaging and gadolinium-enhanced imaging in the accuracy of detecting solitary brain metastasis (4/4, 100%). In conclusion, Turbo-FLAIR imaging is a useful, noninvasive screening modality for brain metastasis. Its use may lead to cost savings in the diagnosis of brain metastases and may impact positively the cost-effectiveness of treatment. (author)

  3. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Molecular diagnostics for congenital hearing loss including 15 deafness genes using a next generation sequencing platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Keulenaer Sarah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hearing loss (HL can originate from mutations in one of many genes involved in the complex process of hearing. Identification of the genetic defects in patients is currently labor intensive and expensive. While screening with Sanger sequencing for GJB2 mutations is common, this is not the case for the other known deafness genes (> 60. Next generation sequencing technology (NGS has the potential to be much more cost efficient. Published methods mainly use hybridization based target enrichment procedures that are time saving and efficient, but lead to loss in sensitivity. In this study we used a semi-automated PCR amplification and NGS in order to combine high sensitivity, speed and cost efficiency. Results In this proof of concept study, we screened 15 autosomal recessive deafness genes in 5 patients with congenital genetic deafness. 646 specific primer pairs for all exons and most of the UTR of the 15 selected genes were designed using primerXL. Using patient specific identifiers, all amplicons were pooled and analyzed using the Roche 454 NGS technology. Three of these patients are members of families in which a region of interest has previously been characterized by linkage studies. In these, we were able to identify two new mutations in CDH23 and OTOF. For another patient, the etiology of deafness was unclear, and no causal mutation was found. In a fifth patient, included as a positive control, we could confirm a known mutation in TMC1. Conclusions We have developed an assay that holds great promise as a tool for screening patients with familial autosomal recessive nonsyndromal hearing loss (ARNSHL. For the first time, an efficient, reliable and cost effective genetic test, based on PCR enrichment, for newborns with undiagnosed deafness is available.

  5. Utility of coronal contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed FLAIR in the evaluation of optic neuropathy and atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Boegel

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Evaluating chronic sequelae of optic neuritis, such as optic neuropathy with or without optic nerve atrophy, can be challenging on whole brain MRI. This study evaluated the utility of dedicated coronal contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed FLAIR (CE-FS-FLAIR MR imaging to detect optic neuropathy and optic nerve atrophy. Materials and methods: Over 4.5 years, a 3 mm coronal CE-FS-FLAIR sequence at 1.5T was added to the routine brain MRIs of 124 consecutive patients, 102 of whom had suspected or known demyelinating disease. Retrospective record reviews confirmed that 28 of these 102 had documented onset of optic neuritis >4 weeks prior to the brain MRI. These 28 were compared to the other 22 (“controls” of the 124 patients who lacked a history of demyelinating disease or visual symptoms. Using coronal CE-FS-FLAIR, two neuroradiologists separately graded each optic nerve (n = 50 patients, 100 total nerves as either negative, equivocal, or positive for optic neuropathy or atrophy. The scoring was later repeated. Results: The mean time from acute optic neuritis onset to MRI was 4.1 ± 4.6 years (range 34 days-17.4 years. Per individual nerve grading, the range of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of coronal CE-FS-FLAIR in detecting optic neuropathy was 71.4–77.1%, 93.8–95.4%, and 85.5–89.0%, respectively, with strong interobserver (k = 0.667 − 0.678, p < 0.0001, and intraobserver (k = 0.706 − 0.763, p < 0.0001 agreement. For optic atrophy, interobserver agreement was moderate (k = 0.437 − 0.484, p < 0.0001, while intraobserver agreement was moderate-strong (k = 0.491 − 0.596, p < 0.0001. Conclusion: Coronal CE-FS-FLAIR is quite specific in detecting optic neuropathy years after the onset of acute optic neuritis, but is less useful in detecting optic nerve atrophy. Keywords: Optic

  6. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities predict early ischemic recurrence in TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Woong; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Tae Jung; Oh, Kyungmi; Han, Moon-Ku; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2018-02-27

    To evaluate the relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) vascular hyperintensity (FVH) and early ischemic lesion recurrence (follow-up diffusion-weighted imaging [FU-DWI] [+]) in patients with lesion-negative TIA. We recruited consecutive patients with lesion-negative TIA within 24 hours of symptom onset, who underwent follow-up MRI during the acute period. FVH was defined as a focal or serpentine high signal intensity on FLAIR images. Other potential confounders were adjusted to evaluate the relationship between FVH and FU-DWI (+). Furthermore, to compare clinical outcomes between the FU-DWI (+) and FU-DWI (-) groups, we assessed 1-year recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA. Among 392 patients with lesion-negative TIA, 82 patients had FU-DWI (+) on the follow-up MRI. In the multivariate analysis, FVH remained an independent predictor of FU-DWI (+) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.45-9.29, p TIA. As FU-DWI (+) frequently occurs during the acute period and has a subsequent worse outcome after discharge, additional radiologic or clinical markers for it are necessary. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage: Comparison of combined FLAIR/SWI versus CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Rajeev Kumar, E-mail: rajeev.verma@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Kottke, Raimund, E-mail: raimund.kottke@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Andereggen, Lukas, E-mail: lukas.andereggen@insel.ch [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Weisstanner, Christian, E-mail: christian.weisstanner@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Zubler, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.zubler@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Gralla, Jan, E-mail: jan.gralla@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Kiefer, Claus, E-mail: claus.kiefer@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Slotboom, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.slotboom@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); and others

    2013-09-15

    Objectives: Aim of this study was to compare the utility of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) with the established diagnostic techniques CT and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) in their detecting capacity of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and further to compare the combined SWI/FLAIR MRI data with CT to evaluate whether MRI is more accurate than CT. Methods: Twenty-five patients with acute SAH underwent CT and MRI within 6 days after symptom onset. Underlying pathology for SAH was head trauma (n = 9), ruptured aneurysm (n = 6), ruptured arteriovenous malformation (n = 2), and spontaneous bleeding (n = 8). SWI, FLAIR, and CT data were analyzed. The anatomical distribution of SAH was subdivided into 8 subarachnoid regions with three peripheral cisterns (frontal-parietal, temporal-occipital, sylvian), two central cisterns and spaces (interhemispheric, intraventricular), and the perimesencephalic, posterior fossa, superior cerebellar cisterns. Results: SAH was detected in a total of 146 subarachnoid regions. CT identified 110 (75.3%), FLAIR 127 (87%), and SWI 129 (88.4%) involved regions. Combined FLAIR and SWI identified all 146 detectable regions (100%). FLAIR was sensitive for frontal-parietal, temporal-occipital and Sylvian cistern SAH, while SWI was particularly sensitive for interhemispheric and intraventricular hemorrhage. Conclusions: By combining SWI and FLAIR, MRI yields a distinctly higher detection rate for SAH than CT alone, particularly due to their complementary detection characteristics in different anatomical regions. Detection strength of SWI is high in central areas, whereas FLAIR shows a better detection rate in peripheral areas.

  8. Improved differentiation between MS and vascular brain lesions using FLAIR* at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilsdonk, Iris D.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Lopez-Soriano, Alexandra; Jong, Marcus C. de; Graaf, Wolter L. de; Conijn, Mandy M.A.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1118, HZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Polman, Chris H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Luijten, Peter R. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Geurts, Jeroen J.G. [VU University, Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Geerlings, Mirjam I. [University Medical Center, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate whether a new magnetic resonance image (MRI) technique called T2*-weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR*) can differentiate between multiple sclerosis (MS) and vascular brain lesions, at 7 Tesla (T). We examined 16 MS patients and 16 age-matched patients with (risk factors for) vascular disease. 3D-FLAIR and T2*-weighted images were combined into FLAIR* images. Lesion type and intensity, perivascular orientation and presence of a hypointense rim were analysed. In total, 433 cerebral lesions were detected in MS patients versus 86 lesions in vascular patients. Lesions in MS patients were significantly more often orientated in a perivascular manner: 74 % vs. 47 % (P < 0.001). Ten MS lesions (2.3 %) were surrounded by a hypointense rim on FLAIR*, and 24 MS lesions (5.5 %) were hypointense on T2*. No lesions in vascular patients showed any rim or hypointensity. Specificity of differentiating MS from vascular lesions on 7-T FLAIR* increased when the presence of a central vessel was taken into account (from 63 % to 88 %), most obviously for deep white matter lesions (from 69 % to 94 %). High sensitivity remained (81 %). 7-T FLAIR* improves differentiation between MS and vascular lesions based on lesion location, perivascular orientation and presence of hypointense (rims around) lesions. circle A new MRI technique T2*-weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR*) was investigated. circle FLAIR* at 7-T MRI combines FLAIR and T2* images into a single image. circle FLAIR* at 7 T does not require enhancement with contrast agents. (orig.)

  9. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Z; Faeghi, F; Haghighatkhah, H R; Abdolmohammadi, J

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don't have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR) by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  10. An HMM posterior decoder for sequence feature prediction that includes homology information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.

    2005-01-01

    Motivation: When predicting sequence features like transmembrane topology, signal peptides, coil-coil structures, protein secondary structure or genes, extra support can be gained from homologs. Results: We present here a general hidden Markov model (HMM) decoding algorithm that combines probabil......Motivation: When predicting sequence features like transmembrane topology, signal peptides, coil-coil structures, protein secondary structure or genes, extra support can be gained from homologs. Results: We present here a general hidden Markov model (HMM) decoding algorithm that combines......://phobius.cgb.ki.se/poly.html . An implementation of the algorithm is available on request from the authors....

  11. Voxel based morphometry of FLAIR MRI in children with intractable focal epilepsy: Implications for surgical intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riney, Catherine J.; Chong, William K.; Clark, Chris A.; Cross, J. Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in particular fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), has transformed the delineation of structural brain pathology associated with focal epilepsy. However, to date there is no literature on voxel based morphometry (VBM) of FLAIR in children with epilepsy. The aim of this study was to explore the role of visual and VBM assessment of FLAIR in pre-operative investigation of children with intractable focal epilepsy. Methods: Children with intractable epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and children with intractable cryptogenic focal epilepsy (CFE) were investigated. FLAIR and T1-weighted MRI were acquired on a 1.5T MRI scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). VBM was performed using SPM5 (Wellcome Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London). Results: Eight children with FCD (M = 5, age 7.9–17.3 years) and 14 children with CFE (M = 8, 7.8–16.8 years) were enrolled. VBM of FLAIR detected 7/8 (88%) of FCD whilst VBM of T1-weighted MRI detected only 3/8 (38%) FCD. VBM of FLAIR detected abnormality in 4/14 children with CFE, in 2/14 (14%) the abnormality was concordant with other data on the epileptogenic zone and with visible abnormality on repeat visual inspection of MR data. VBM of T1-weighed MRI detected abnormality in 2/14 children with CFE, none of which correlated with visible abnormality. Discussion: This study highlights the important role that FLAIR imaging has in the pre-operative assessment of children with intractable epilepsy. VBM of FLAIR may provide important information allowing selection of children with intractable CFE who are likely to benefit from further neuroradiological or neurophysiological evaluation.

  12. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis.

  13. Full-Length Sequence of Mouse Acupuncture-Induced 1-L (Aig1l Gene Including Its Transcriptional Start Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been investigating the molecular efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA, which is one type of acupuncture therapy. In our previous molecular biological study of acupuncture, we found an EA-induced gene, named acupuncture-induced 1-L (Aig1l, in mouse skeletal muscle. The aims of this study consisted of identification of the full-length cDNA sequence of Aig1l including the transcriptional start site, determination of the tissue distribution of Aig1l and analysis of the effect of EA on Aig1l gene expression. We determined the complete cDNA sequence including the transcriptional start site via cDNA cloning with the cap site hunting method. We then analyzed the tissue distribution of Aig1l by means of northern blot analysis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We used the semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to examine the effect of EA on Aig1l gene expression. Our results showed that the complete cDNA sequence of Aig1l was 6073 bp long, and the putative protein consisted of 962 amino acids. All seven tissues that we analyzed expressed the Aig1l gene. In skeletal muscle, EA induced expression of the Aig1l gene, with high expression observed after 3 hours of EA. Our findings thus suggest that the Aig1l gene may play a key role in the molecular mechanisms of EA efficacy.

  14. R179H mutation in ACTA2 expanding the phenotype to include prune-belly sequence and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, J; Milewicz, D M; Gow, R; de Nanassy, J; Maharajh, G; Miller, E; Oppenheimer, L; Weiler, G; O'Connor, M

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in ACTA2 (smooth muscle cell-specific isoform of α-actin) lead to a predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysms and other vascular diseases. More recently, the ACTA2 R179H mutation has been described in individuals with global smooth muscle dysfunction. We report a patient heterozygous for the mutation in ACTA2 R179H who presented with megacystis at 13 weeks gestational age and, at birth, with prune-belly sequence. He also had deep skin dimples and creases on his palms and soles, a finding not previously described but possibly related to ACTA2. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the R179H mutation in ACTA2 in a child with prune-belly sequence. We think the R179H mutation in ACTA2 should be included in the differential diagnosis of individuals presenting with the sequence without an identified mechanical obstruction. Furthermore, as ACTA2 R179H has been reported in patients with severe vasculomyopathy and premature death, we recommend that molecular testing for this mutation be considered in fetuses presenting with fetal megacystis with a normal karyotype, particularly if the bladder diameter is 15 mm or more, to allow expectant parents to make an informed decision. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. FLAIR lesion segmentation: Application in patients with brain tumors and acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran, E-mail: artzimy@gmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aizenstein, Orna, E-mail: ornaaize@gmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Jonas-Kimchi, Tali, E-mail: talijk@tlvmc.gov.il [Radiology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Myers, Vicki, E-mail: vicki_myers@hotmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hallevi, Hen, E-mail: hen.hallevi@gmail.com [Neurology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben Bashat, Dafna, E-mail: dafnab@tlvmc.gov.il [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Lesion size in fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is an important clinical parameter for patient assessment and follow-up. Although manual delineation of lesion areas considered as ground truth, it is time-consuming, highly user-dependent and difficult to perform in areas of indistinct borders. In this study, an automatic methodology for FLAIR lesion segmentation is proposed, and its application in patients with brain tumors undergoing therapy; and in patients following stroke is demonstrated. Materials and methods: FLAIR lesion segmentation was performed in 57 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets obtained from 44 patients: 28 patients with primary brain tumors; 5 patients with recurrent-progressive glioblastoma (rGB) who were scanned longitudinally during anti-angiogenic therapy (18 MRI scans); and 11 patients following ischemic stroke. Results: FLAIR lesion segmentation was obtained in all patients. When compared to manual delineation, a high visual similarity was observed, with an absolute relative volume difference of 16.80% and 20.96% and a volumetric overlap error of 24.87% and 27.50% obtained for two raters: accepted values for automatic methods. Quantitative measurements of the segmented lesion volumes were in line with qualitative radiological assessment in four patients who received anti-anogiogenic drugs. In stroke patients the proposed methodology enabled identification of the ischemic lesion and differentiation from other FLAIR hyperintense areas, such as pre-existing disease. Conclusion: This study proposed a replicable methodology for FLAIR lesion detection and quantification and for discrimination between lesion of interest and pre-existing disease. Results from this study show the wide clinical applications of this methodology in research and clinical practice.

  16. FLAIR lesion segmentation: Application in patients with brain tumors and acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artzi, Moran; Aizenstein, Orna; Jonas-Kimchi, Tali; Myers, Vicki; Hallevi, Hen; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lesion size in fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is an important clinical parameter for patient assessment and follow-up. Although manual delineation of lesion areas considered as ground truth, it is time-consuming, highly user-dependent and difficult to perform in areas of indistinct borders. In this study, an automatic methodology for FLAIR lesion segmentation is proposed, and its application in patients with brain tumors undergoing therapy; and in patients following stroke is demonstrated. Materials and methods: FLAIR lesion segmentation was performed in 57 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets obtained from 44 patients: 28 patients with primary brain tumors; 5 patients with recurrent-progressive glioblastoma (rGB) who were scanned longitudinally during anti-angiogenic therapy (18 MRI scans); and 11 patients following ischemic stroke. Results: FLAIR lesion segmentation was obtained in all patients. When compared to manual delineation, a high visual similarity was observed, with an absolute relative volume difference of 16.80% and 20.96% and a volumetric overlap error of 24.87% and 27.50% obtained for two raters: accepted values for automatic methods. Quantitative measurements of the segmented lesion volumes were in line with qualitative radiological assessment in four patients who received anti-anogiogenic drugs. In stroke patients the proposed methodology enabled identification of the ischemic lesion and differentiation from other FLAIR hyperintense areas, such as pre-existing disease. Conclusion: This study proposed a replicable methodology for FLAIR lesion detection and quantification and for discrimination between lesion of interest and pre-existing disease. Results from this study show the wide clinical applications of this methodology in research and clinical practice

  17. Patient-specific 3D FLAIR for enhanced visualization of brain white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Refaat E; Pednekar, Amol S; Govindarajan, Koushik A; Sun, Xiaojun; Riascos, Roy F; Ramírez, María G; Hasan, Khader M; Lincoln, John A; Nelson, Flavia; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2017-08-01

    To improve the conspicuity of white matter lesions (WMLs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) using patient-specific optimization of single-slab 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen MS patients were enrolled in a prospective 3.0T MRI study. FLAIR inversion time and echo time were automatically optimized for each patient during the same scan session based on measurements of the relative proton density and relaxation times of the brain tissues. The optimization criterion was to maximize the contrast between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), while suppressing cerebrospinal fluid. This criterion also helps increase the contrast between WMLs and WM. The performance of the patient-specific 3D FLAIR protocol relative to the fixed-parameter protocol was assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Patient-specific optimization achieved a statistically significant 41% increase in the GM-WM contrast ratio (P < 0.05) and 32% increase in the WML-WM contrast ratio (P < 0.01) compared with fixed-parameter FLAIR. The increase in WML-WM contrast ratio correlated strongly with echo time (P < 10 -11 ). Two experienced neuroradiologists indicated substantially higher lesion conspicuity on the patient-specific FLAIR images over conventional FLAIR in 3-4 cases (intrarater correlation coefficient ICC = 0.72). In no case was the image quality of patient-specific FLAIR considered inferior to conventional FLAIR by any of the raters (ICC = 0.32). Changes in proton density and relaxation times render fixed-parameter FLAIR suboptimal in terms of lesion contrast. Patient-specific optimization of 3D FLAIR increases lesion conspicuity without scan time penalty, and has potential to enhance the detection of subtle and small lesions in MS. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:557-564. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Improve Image Quality of Transversal Relaxation Time PROPELLER and FLAIR on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, N.; Alam, D. Y.; Jamaluddin, M.; Samad, B. A.

    2018-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that uses the interaction between the magnetic field and the nuclear spins. MRI can be used to show disparity of pathology by transversal relaxation time (T2) weighted images. Some techniques for producing T2-weighted images are Periodically Rotated Overlapping Parallel Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR). A comparison of T2 PROPELLER and T2 FLAIR parameters in MRI image has been conducted. And improve Image Quality the image by using RadiAnt DICOM Viewer and ENVI software with method of image segmentation and Region of Interest (ROI). Brain images were randomly selected. The result of research showed that Time Repetition (TR) and Time Echo (TE) values in all types of images were not influenced by age. T2 FLAIR images had longer TR value (9000 ms), meanwhile T2 PROPELLER images had longer TE value (100.75 - 102.1 ms). Furthermore, areas with low and medium signal intensity appeared clearer by using T2 PROPELLER images (average coefficients of variation for low and medium signal intensity were 0.0431 and 0.0705, respectively). As for areas with high signal intensity appeared clearer by using T2 FLAIR images (average coefficient of variation was 0.0637).

  19. Endolympathic hydrops in patients with vestibular schwannoma: visualization by non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Ikeda, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Signal intensity of ipsilateral labyrinthine lymph fluid has been reported to increase in most cases with vestibular schwannoma (VS) on 3D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). The purpose of this study was twofold, (1) to evaluate if endolymphatic space can be recognized in the patients with VS on non-contrast-enhanced 3D-FLAIR images and (2) to know if the vertigo in the patients with VS correlates to vestibular endolymphatic hydrops. From the introduction of 32-channel head coil at 3 T in May 2008 to June 2010, 15 cases with unilateral VS were identified in the radiology report database. The two cases without a significant signal increase on 3D FLAIR were excluded. Resting 13 cases were retrospectively analyzed in regard to the recognition of endolymphatic hydrops in the cochlea and vestibule and to the correlation between the patients' symptoms and endolymphatic hydrops. In all cases, vestibular endolymphatic space can be recognized on non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR. Cochlear endolymphatic space can be identified only in one case with significant hydrops. Vestibular hydrops was identified in four cases. Among these four cases, three had vertigo, and one had no vertigo. In those nine cases without hydrops, two had vertigo, and seven did not have vertigo. No significant correlation between vertigo and vestibular hydrops was found. Vestibular endolymphatic space can be recognized on non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR. In some patients with VS, vestibular hydrops is seen; however, endolymphatic hydrops in the vestibule might not be the only responsible cause of vertigo in the patients with VS. (orig.)

  20. Endolympathic hydrops in patients with vestibular schwannoma: visualization by non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Signal intensity of ipsilateral labyrinthine lymph fluid has been reported to increase in most cases with vestibular schwannoma (VS) on 3D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). The purpose of this study was twofold, (1) to evaluate if endolymphatic space can be recognized in the patients with VS on non-contrast-enhanced 3D-FLAIR images and (2) to know if the vertigo in the patients with VS correlates to vestibular endolymphatic hydrops. From the introduction of 32-channel head coil at 3 T in May 2008 to June 2010, 15 cases with unilateral VS were identified in the radiology report database. The two cases without a significant signal increase on 3D FLAIR were excluded. Resting 13 cases were retrospectively analyzed in regard to the recognition of endolymphatic hydrops in the cochlea and vestibule and to the correlation between the patients' symptoms and endolymphatic hydrops. In all cases, vestibular endolymphatic space can be recognized on non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR. Cochlear endolymphatic space can be identified only in one case with significant hydrops. Vestibular hydrops was identified in four cases. Among these four cases, three had vertigo, and one had no vertigo. In those nine cases without hydrops, two had vertigo, and seven did not have vertigo. No significant correlation between vertigo and vestibular hydrops was found. Vestibular endolymphatic space can be recognized on non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR. In some patients with VS, vestibular hydrops is seen; however, endolymphatic hydrops in the vestibule might not be the only responsible cause of vertigo in the patients with VS. (orig.)

  1. MRI based thrombolysis for FLAIR-negative stroke patients within 4.5-6h after symptom onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Er; Zhou, Jia; Li, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Yu-Wu; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Yue-Hua

    2017-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of DWI-FLAIR mismatch in identifying patients who might benefit from thrombolytic therapy within 4.5-6h, we analyzed the data of 105 ischemic stroke patients with known time of symptom onset who underwent MRI within 6h of stroke and thrombolysis between December 2006 and December 2013. They were divided into three groups: symptom onset within 4.5h (n=66); 4.5-6h and FLAIR images negative (n=9); and 4.5-6h and FLAIR images positive (n=30). Outcome of thrombolysis was assessed for each group by recanalization rate, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores. The results showed that mismatch between positive DWI and negative FLAIR images identified patients within 4.5h of symptom onset with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 40.9%, 76.9%, and 75% and 43.5%. Recanalization rate, NIHSS score and mRS score were all better in both the 0-4.5h and 4.5-6h FLAIR-negative groups than in the 4.5-6h FLAIR-positive group (psymptom onset, patients with negative FLAIR images may benefit from thrombolysis therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A case of Marchiafava-Bignami disease: MRI findings on spin-echo and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Araki, Yutaka; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2000-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) was diagnosed in a 56-year-old man. Spin-echo (SE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the acute phase showed normal signal areas in the central layer of the corpus callosum (CC), although the intensity of these areas revealed abnormal hyperintensity on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). On follow-up SE MRI at the late phase, the central layer of the CC showed fluid-like intensity. On FLAIR MRI, the lesions of the CC turned into hypointense cores surrounded by hyperintense rims indicating central necrosis and peripheral demyelination. Degenerative changes of the CC in MBD were clearly demonstrated by FLAIR MRI

  3. Rationality, Intuition and Flair in Entrepreneur’s Configuration - an Epistemological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltan Raluca; Vancea Romulus

    2011-01-01

    The present paper proposes an overview of the evolution of the concept of entrepreneur in an epistemological approach. After a brief history of the concept, there are some basic economic and managerial guidelines in entrepreneur’s configuration; these guidelines are found in the work of experts in management, respectively, leading economists. Rationality, flair and intuition of the entrepreneur are then analyzed in terms of existing trends in the economy, acknowledging the entrepreneurship an...

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Pseudoflebitic pattern in the sequence T2 FLAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantilla Martin, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an infrequent illness, although more than one hundred possible causes have been described. These causes can be divided In two categories: local ones and systemic ones. Magnetic resonance is the most sensitive non invasive method to diagnose CVT. This article presents cases of dural sinus thrombosis, reported in the Clinic Reina Sofia between June of 2003 and June of 2004. Fifteen cases were found. The principle symptoms were: headache, convulsions, and focal neurological deficit. The more frequently affected venous sinus were the transverse and the superior sagittal ones

  5. Anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) as an indicator of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison of double inversion recovery, FLAIR and T2W MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Emiko; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mori, Nobuyuki [Tenri Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tenri, Nara (Japan); Matsumoto, Riki; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kyoto (Japan); Mikuni, Nobuhiro [Sapporo Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kunieda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Susumu [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto (Japan); Paul, Dominik [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the diagnostic capability of anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) for determining seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by comparing different MR sequences. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Three 3D sequences (double inversion recovery (DIR), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)) and two 2D sequences (FLAIR and T2WI) were acquired at 3 T. Signal changes in the anterior temporal white matter of 21 normal volunteers were evaluated. ATLAS laterality was evaluated in 21 TLE patients. Agreement of independent evaluations by two neuroradiologists was assessed using {kappa} statistics. Differences in concordance between ATLAS laterality and clinically defined seizure focus laterality were analysed using McNemar's test with multiple comparisons. Pre-amygdala high signals (PAHS) were detected in all volunteers only on 3D-DIR. Inter-evaluator agreement was moderate to almost perfect for each sequence. Correct diagnosis of seizure laterality was significantly more frequent on 3D-DIR than on any other sequences (P {<=} 0.031 for each evaluator). The most sensitive sequence for detecting ATLAS laterality was 3D-DIR. ATLAS laterality on 3D-DIR can be a good indicator for determining seizure focus localization in TLE. (orig.)

  6. Anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) as an indicator of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison of double inversion recovery, FLAIR and T2W MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Emiko; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori; Mori, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Riki; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Susumu; Paul, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic capability of anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) for determining seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by comparing different MR sequences. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Three 3D sequences (double inversion recovery (DIR), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)) and two 2D sequences (FLAIR and T2WI) were acquired at 3 T. Signal changes in the anterior temporal white matter of 21 normal volunteers were evaluated. ATLAS laterality was evaluated in 21 TLE patients. Agreement of independent evaluations by two neuroradiologists was assessed using κ statistics. Differences in concordance between ATLAS laterality and clinically defined seizure focus laterality were analysed using McNemar's test with multiple comparisons. Pre-amygdala high signals (PAHS) were detected in all volunteers only on 3D-DIR. Inter-evaluator agreement was moderate to almost perfect for each sequence. Correct diagnosis of seizure laterality was significantly more frequent on 3D-DIR than on any other sequences (P ≤ 0.031 for each evaluator). The most sensitive sequence for detecting ATLAS laterality was 3D-DIR. ATLAS laterality on 3D-DIR can be a good indicator for determining seizure focus localization in TLE. (orig.)

  7. Lateralization of temporal lobe epilepsy using a novel uncertainty analysis of MR diffusion in hippocampus, cingulum, and fornix, and hippocampal volume and FLAIR intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Schwalb, Jason M; Elisevich, Kost V; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Hamidian, Hajar; Akhondi-Asl, Ali-Reza; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2014-07-15

    To analyze the utility of a quantitative uncertainty analysis approach for evaluation and comparison of various MRI findings for the lateralization of epileptogenicity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), including novel diffusion-based analyses. We estimated the hemispheric variation uncertainty (HVU) of hippocampal T1 volumetry and FLAIR (Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) intensity. Using diffusion tensor images of 23 nonepileptic subjects, we estimated the HVU levels of mean diffusivity (MD) in the hippocampus, and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the posteroinferior cingulum and crus of fornix. Imaging from a retrospective cohort of 20 TLE patients who had undergone surgical resection with Engel class I outcomes was analyzed to determine whether asymmetry of preoperative volumetrics, FLAIR intensities, and MD values in hippocampi, as well as FA values in posteroinferior cingula and fornix crura correctly predicted laterality of seizure onset. Ten of the cohort had pathologically proven mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Seven of these patients had undergone extraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) for lateralization or to rule out extra-temporal foci. HVU was estimated to be 3.1×10(-5) for hippocampal MD, 0.027 for FA in posteroinferior cingulum, 0.018 for FA in crus of fornix, 0.069 for hippocampal normalized volume, and 0.099 for hippocampal normalized FLAIR intensity. Using HVU analysis, a higher hippocampal MD value, lower FA within the posteroinferior cingulum and crus of fornix, shrinkage in hippocampal volume, and higher hippocampal FLAIR intensity were observed beyond uncertainty on the side ipsilateral to seizure onset for 10, 10, 9, 9, and 10 out of 10 pathology-proven MTS patients, respectively. Considering all 20 TLE patients, these numbers were 18, 15, 14, 13, and 16, respectively. However, consolidating the lateralization results of HVU analysis on these quantities by majority voting has detected the epileptogenic side for 19 out of 20 cases

  8. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Boles

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn, inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing.

  9. Comparison between FLAIR images and T2-weighted fast spin-echo images of cerebral territory and lacunar infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeng, Mi Hye; Choi, Hye-Young; Lim, Soo Mee; Lee, Jung Sik

    2003-01-01

    To assess the significance of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of intracranial infarctions and to find out differential points between central lacunar infarctions and perivascular spaces. We consecutively selected 25 cases of territorial infarction in 20 patients, 37 cases of central infarction in 40 patients, and 30 patients with perivascular space. Signal intensity and lesion conspicuity were analyzed and compared between FLAIR and FSE T2-weighted images, and differences in signal intensity between central infarction and perivascular spaces were determined. Lesion conspicuity for FLAIR was better than for T2-weighted images in 12 and 15, worse in 4 and 24, and similar in 9 and 16 of territorial and central infarctions, respectively. In nine cases of territorial and one case of central infarction, there was associated hemorrhage. At FLAIR imaging, perivascular spaces showed a fine round low signal without a peripheral high signal rim in 17 patients but no demonstrable signals in 15. Differential diagnosis of perivascular spaces and central infarction was thus not difficult. FLAIR MRI was useful in the diagnosis of infarctions and in differentiating between central small lacular infarctions and perivascular spaces

  10. FLAIR* to visualize veins in white matter lesions: A new tool for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campion, T.; Turner, B.P.; Schmierer, K.; Smith, R.J.P.; Altmann, D.R.; Brito, G.C.; Evanson, J.; George, I.C.; Sati, P.; Reich, D.S.; Miquel, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    To explore the potential of a post-processing technique combining FLAIR and T_2* (FLAIR*) to distinguish between lesions caused by multiple sclerosis (MS) from cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in a clinical setting. FLAIR and T_2* head datasets acquired at 3T of 25 people with relapsing MS (pwRMS) and ten with pwSVD were used. After post-processing, FLAIR* maps were used to determine the proportion of white matter lesions (WML) showing the 'vein in lesion' sign (VIL), a characteristic histopathological feature of MS plaques. Sensitivity and specificity of MS diagnosis were examined on the basis of >45% VIL"+ and >60% VIL"+ WML, and compared with current dissemination in space (DIS) MRI criteria. All pwRMS had >45% VIL"+ WML (range 58-100%) whilst in pwSVD the proportion of VIL"+ WML was significantly lower (0-64%; mean 32±20%). Sensitivity based on >45% VIL"+ was 100% and specificity 80% whilst with >60% VIL"+ as the criterion, sensitivity was 96% and specificity 90%. DIS criteria had 96% sensitivity and 40% specificity. FLAIR* enables VIL"+ WML detection in a clinical setting, facilitating differentiation of MS from SVD based on brain MRI. (orig.)

  11. FLAIR* to visualize veins in white matter lesions: A new tool for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campion, T.; Turner, B.P.; Schmierer, K. [Queen Mary University of London, Blizard Institute (Neuroscience), London (United Kingdom); Barts Health NHS Trust, Emergency Care and Acute Medicine Clinical Academic Group Neuroscience, The Royal London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Smith, R.J.P. [Queen Mary University of London, Blizard Institute (Neuroscience), London (United Kingdom); Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust, Cheltenham (United Kingdom); Altmann, D.R. [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Medical Statistics, London (United Kingdom); Brito, G.C. [Queen Mary University of London, Blizard Institute (Neuroscience), London (United Kingdom); Evanson, J. [Barts Health NHS Trust, Emergency Care and Acute Medicine Clinical Academic Group Neuroscience, The Royal London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); George, I.C. [NIH, Translational Neuroradiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yale School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, New Haven, CT (United States); Sati, P.; Reich, D.S. [NIH, Translational Neuroradiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (United States); Miquel, M.E. [Barts Health NHS Trust, Emergency Care and Acute Medicine Clinical Academic Group Neuroscience, The Royal London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Queen Mary University of London, William Harvey Research Institute (Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit), London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    To explore the potential of a post-processing technique combining FLAIR and T{sub 2}* (FLAIR*) to distinguish between lesions caused by multiple sclerosis (MS) from cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in a clinical setting. FLAIR and T{sub 2}* head datasets acquired at 3T of 25 people with relapsing MS (pwRMS) and ten with pwSVD were used. After post-processing, FLAIR* maps were used to determine the proportion of white matter lesions (WML) showing the 'vein in lesion' sign (VIL), a characteristic histopathological feature of MS plaques. Sensitivity and specificity of MS diagnosis were examined on the basis of >45% VIL{sup +} and >60% VIL{sup +} WML, and compared with current dissemination in space (DIS) MRI criteria. All pwRMS had >45% VIL{sup +} WML (range 58-100%) whilst in pwSVD the proportion of VIL{sup +} WML was significantly lower (0-64%; mean 32±20%). Sensitivity based on >45% VIL{sup +} was 100% and specificity 80% whilst with >60% VIL{sup +} as the criterion, sensitivity was 96% and specificity 90%. DIS criteria had 96% sensitivity and 40% specificity. FLAIR* enables VIL{sup +} WML detection in a clinical setting, facilitating differentiation of MS from SVD based on brain MRI. (orig.)

  12. Multimodal MEMPRAGE, FLAIR, and R2* Segmentation to Resolve Dura and Vessels from Cortical Gray Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Viviani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available While widely in use in automated segmentation approaches for the detection of group differences or of changes associated with continuous predictors in gray matter volume, T1-weighted images are known to represent dura and cortical vessels with signal intensities similar to those of gray matter. By considering multiple signal sources at once, multimodal segmentation approaches may be able to resolve these different tissue classes and address this potential confound. We explored here the simultaneous use of FLAIR and apparent transverse relaxation rates (a signal related to T2* relaxation maps and having similar contrast with T1-weighted images. Relative to T1-weighted images alone, multimodal segmentation had marked positive effects on 1. the separation of gray matter from dura, 2. the exclusion of vessels from the gray matter compartment, and 3. the contrast with extracerebral connective tissue. While obtainable together with the T1-weighted images without increasing scanning times, apparent transverse relaxation rates were less effective than added FLAIR images in providing the above mentioned advantages. FLAIR images also improved the detection of cortical matter in areas prone to susceptibility artifacts in standard MPRAGE T1-weighted images, while the addition of transverse relaxation maps exacerbated the effect of these artifacts on segmentation. Our results confirm that standard MPRAGE segmentation may overestimate gray matter volume by wrongly assigning vessels and dura to this compartment and show that multimodal approaches may greatly improve the specificity of cortical segmentation. Since multimodal segmentation is easily implemented, these benefits are immediately available to studies focusing on translational applications of structural imaging.

  13. Ulcerative colitis flair induced by mesalamine suppositories hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hao; Liu, Xiao-Chang; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Jing

    2014-04-07

    Mesalamine suppositories have been used widely for the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis and considered to be safer than systemic administration for its limited systemic absorption. However, previous studies have shown that mesalamine suppository occasionally causes severe hypersensitivity reactions including fever, rashes, colitis exacerbation and acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Here we present a 25-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis with bloody diarrhea accompanied by abdominal pain and fever which were aggravated after introduction of mesalamine suppositories. In light of symptom exacerbation of ulcerative colitis, increased inflammatory injury of colon mucosa shown by colonoscopy and elevated peripheral eosinophil count after mesalamine suppositories administration, and the Naranjo algorithm score of 10, the possibility of hypersensitivity reaction to mesalamine suppositories should be considered, warning us to be aware of this potential reaction after administration of mesalamine formulations even if it is the suppositories.

  14. The alternatively-included 11a sequence modifies the effects of Mena on actin cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Michele; Mondal, Chandrani; Carmona, Guillaume; McClain, Leslie M; Riquelme, Daisy N; Tadros, Jenny; Ma, Duan; Vasile, Eliza; Condeelis, John S; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2016-10-17

    During tumor progression, alternative splicing gives rise to different Mena protein isoforms. We analyzed how Mena11a, an isoform enriched in epithelia and epithelial-like cells, affects Mena-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and cell behavior. While other Mena isoforms promote actin polymerization and drive membrane protrusion, we find that Mena11a decreases actin polymerization and growth factor-stimulated membrane protrusion at lamellipodia. Ectopic Mena11a expression slows mesenchymal-like cell motility, while isoform-specific depletion of endogenous Mena11a in epithelial-like tumor cells perturbs cell:cell junctions and increases membrane protrusion and overall cell motility. Mena11a can dampen membrane protrusion and reduce actin polymerization in the absence of other Mena isoforms, indicating that it is not simply an inactive Mena isoform. We identify a phosphorylation site within 11a that is required for some Mena11a-specific functions. RNA-seq data analysis from patient cohorts demonstrates that the difference between mRNAs encoding constitutive Mena sequences and those containing the 11a exon correlates with metastasis in colorectal cancer, suggesting that 11a exon exclusion contributes to invasive phenotypes and leads to poor clinical outcomes.

  15. Leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR images in moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan)]. E-mail: hirokazu_fujiwara@ybb.ne.jp; Momoshima, Suketaka [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Sachio [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: There are a few reports on leptomeningeal high signal intensity (LMHI: ivy sign) on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images in moyamoya disease, but the feature of this finding has not been completely understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize LMHI on FLAIR images in moyamoya disease and to assess usefulness of this finding in the diagnosis of moyamoya disease in conventional MR imaging. Material and methods: MR imaging of 28 patients with moyamoya disease was retrospectively reviewed. The grade of LMHI on FLAIR images was classified as 'absent,' 'minimal,' 'moderate' and 'marked.' Fifty-four hemispheres of 28 patients (2 patients had unilateral disease) were assessed for the frequency of visualization and distribution of LMHI. The correlations between LMHI on FLAIR images, moyamoya vessels on T1- and T2-weighted images and MR angiography findings were also analyzed. Results: Moderate and marked LMHI was seen in 31 out of 54 hemispheres (57%). LMHI was seen more prominently in the frontal and parietal lobes than in the temporal and occipital lobes. Although there was a tendency for LMHI on FLAIR images to be prominent in groups with moderate and marked moyamoya vessels on T1- and T2-weighted images, there was no significant correlation. More prominent LMHI was observed in the hemispheres in which cortical branches of the middle cerebral arteries were poorly visualized on MR angiography. Conclusion: Leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) on FLAIR images is predominantly seen in the frontal and parietal lobes. Because this sign can be seen in patients with unremarkable moyamoya vessels, LMHI is a useful sign in conventional MR imaging for the diagnosis of moyamoya disease.

  16. Decreased hyperintense vessels on FLAIR images after endovascular recanalization of symptomatic internal carotid artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenhua; Yin Qin; Yao Lingling; Zhu Shuanggen; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Ke Kaifu; Liu Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hyperintense vessels (HV) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were assumed to be explained by slow antegrade or retrograde leptomeningeal collateral flow related to extracranial or intracranial artery steno-occlusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recanalization after endovascular therapy of symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion on the presence of HV. Methods: Eleven patients with symptomatic ICA occlusion were retrospectively enrolled. Changes in the HV on FLAIR images were examined in affected hemisphere of each patient after successful treatment with endovascular recanalization (angioplasty, n = 3; stent-assisted angioplasty, n = 8). The relationship between postoperative changes in the HV and Thrombolysis In Cerebral Ischemia (TICI) scale (I-III) was assessed. Results: After operation, HV of the 11 affected hemispheres were showed to be decreased (n = 3) or disappeared (n = 8) in treated side. The median interval between pre- and postoperative MRI examinations was 97.0 h (range, from 69. to 48.7 h). Of the 8 patients with disappeared HV, 7 achieved high TICI grade flow (III) and 1 had relatively low TICI grade flow (IIc) in treated side. However, all the 3 patients with decreased HV were found to be relatively low TICI grade flow (IIc). Conclusion: Our data indicate that endovascular recanalization of ICA occlusion was effective for decreasing HV. Postoperative decrease in HV can be considered as a marker for hemodynamic improvement.

  17. Sensitivity of different MRI sequences in the early detection of melanoma brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Michael O.; Schwarz, Daniel; Radbruch, Alexander; Enk, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin; Hassel, Jessica; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2018-01-01

    Background After the emergence of new MRI techniques such as susceptibility- and diffusion-weighted imaging (SWI and DWI) and because of specific imaging characteristics of melanoma brain metastases (MBM), it is unclear which MRI sequences are most beneficial for detection of MBM. This study was performed to investigate the sensitivity of six clinical MRI sequences in the early detection of MBM. Methods Medical records of all melanoma patients referred to our center between November 2005 and December 2016 were reviewed for presence of MBM. Analysis encompassed six MRI sequences at the time of initial diagnosis of first or new MBM, including non-enhanced T1-weighted (T1w), contrast-enhanced T1w (ceT1w), T2-weighted (T2w), T2w-FLAIR, susceptibility-weighted (SWI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI. Each lesion was rated with respect to its conspicuity (score from 0—not detectable to 3—clearly visible). Results Of 1210 patients, 217 with MBM were included in the analysis and up to 5 lesions per patient were evaluated. A total of 720 metastases were assessed and all six sequences were available for 425 MBM. Sensitivity (conspicuity ≥2) was 99.7% for ceT1w, 77.0% for FLAIR, 64.7% for SWI, 61.0% for T2w, 56.7% for T1w, and 48.4% for DWI. Thirty-one (7.3%) of 425 lesions were only detectable by ceT1w but no other sequence. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced T1-weighting is more sensitive than all other sequences for detection of MBM. Disruption of the blood-brain-barrier is consistently an earlier sign in MBM than perifocal edema, signal loss on SWI or diffusion restriction. PMID:29596475

  18. Influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Tohru; Nonoshita, Koji; Miyazaki, Takayuki; Arima, Akira [Funabashi Municipal Medical Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    The influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) pulse sequence was studied. On multislice fast FLAIR images, the water null point was shortened in comparison with that on single slice images owing to the crosstalk received from adjacent slices. That influence became greater with decreases in the slice gap and increases in the number of slices. The timing of crosstalk in each slice varied according to excitation order. The process of recovery of longitudinal magnetization changed according to differences in timing; thus, it was possible that the water null point changed in each slice. In brain images with thinner slice gaps, the signal intensity of CSF is increased by the effect of crosstalk. In order to eliminate changes in the water null point caused by crosstalk on fast FLAIR, the multislice sequence requires a sequence with interleaving based on the premise that slice gaps are set for more than 100% of slice thickness. (author)

  19. Influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Tohru; Nonoshita, Koji; Miyazaki, Takayuki; Arima, Akira

    2000-01-01

    The influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) pulse sequence was studied. On multislice fast FLAIR images, the water null point was shortened in comparison with that on single slice images owing to the crosstalk received from adjacent slices. That influence became greater with decreases in the slice gap and increases in the number of slices. The timing of crosstalk in each slice varied according to excitation order. The process of recovery of longitudinal magnetization changed according to differences in timing; thus, it was possible that the water null point changed in each slice. In brain images with thinner slice gaps, the signal intensity of CSF is increased by the effect of crosstalk. In order to eliminate changes in the water null point caused by crosstalk on fast FLAIR, the multislice sequence requires a sequence with interleaving based on the premise that slice gaps are set for more than 100% of slice thickness. (author)

  20. Learning Foreign Languages with ClipFlair: Using Captioning and Revoicing Activities to Increase Students' Motivation and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, Rocío; Sokoli, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the rationale and outcomes of ClipFlair, a European-funded project aimed at countering the factors that discourage Foreign Language Learning (FLL) by providing a motivating, easily accessible online platform to learn a foreign language through revoicing (e.g. dubbing) and captioning (e.g. subtitling). This…

  1. Edge Contrast of the FLAIR Hyperintense Region Predicts Survival in Patients with High-Grade Gliomas following Treatment with Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, N; Piccioni, D; Karunamuni, R; Chang, Y-H; White, N; Delfanti, R; Seibert, T M; Hattangadi-Gluth, J A; Dale, A; Farid, N; McDonald, C R

    2018-04-05

    Treatment with bevacizumab is standard of care for recurrent high-grade gliomas; however, monitoring response to treatment following bevacizumab remains a challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether quantifying the sharpness of the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintense border using a measure derived from texture analysis-edge contrast-improves the evaluation of response to bevacizumab in patients with high-grade gliomas. MRIs were evaluated in 33 patients with high-grade gliomas before and after the initiation of bevacizumab. Volumes of interest within the FLAIR hyperintense region were segmented. Edge contrast magnitude for each VOI was extracted using gradients of the 3D FLAIR images. Cox proportional hazards models were generated to determine the relationship between edge contrast and progression-free survival/overall survival using age and the extent of surgical resection as covariates. After bevacizumab, lower edge contrast of the FLAIR hyperintense region was associated with poorer progression-free survival ( P = .009) and overall survival ( P = .022) among patients with high-grade gliomas. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that edge contrast cutoff significantly stratified patients for both progression-free survival (log-rank χ 2 = 8.3, P = .003) and overall survival (log-rank χ 2 = 5.5, P = .019). Texture analysis using edge contrast of the FLAIR hyperintense region may be an important predictive indicator in patients with high-grade gliomas following treatment with bevacizumab. Specifically, low FLAIR edge contrast may partially reflect areas of early tumor infiltration. This study adds to a growing body of literature proposing that quantifying features may be important for determining outcomes in patients with high-grade gliomas. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. FLAIR imaging for multiple sclerosis: a comparative MR study at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, Rainald; Reilmann, Ralf; Schwindt, Wolfram; Kugel, Harald; Heindel, Walter; Kraemer, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to identify the optimal TE for FLAIR-imaging at 3.0 T assessing three different echo times qualitatively and quantitatively and (2) to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of high-field 3.0-T FLAIR imaging in comparison to conventional 1.5-T MRI in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Twenty-two patients with clinically definite MS underwent axial FLAIR imaging at 1.5 and 3.0 T. In 15 of these patients further FLAIR images with a TE of 100, 120 and 140 ms were acquired at 3.0 T. Imaging protocols were modified for 3.0 T using the increased SNR to acquire more and thinner slices while maintaining a comparable scan time. FLAIR images of either different TEs or different field strengths were ranked for each patient qualitatively by two observers. Signal intensity measurements were obtained in the gray and white matter, CSF and representative white matter lesions (WML). At 3.0 T, a TE of 100 and 120 ms proved superior in all qualitative categories when compared to 140 ms. In the quantitative assessment CNR of WML was highest for 120 ms (CNR: 19.8), intermediate for 100 ms (17.2) and lowest for 140 ms (15.3) (P<0.003). For lesion conspicuity and overall image quality, 3.0 T was judged superior to 1.5 T, whereas no difference was found for gray-white differentiation and image noise. With regard to artifacts, 3.0 T was inferior to 1.5 T. The CNR for WML was slightly lower at 3.0 T, but the difference was not significant (22.6 vs. 28.0, P=ns). (orig.)

  3. Hyperintense vessels on FLAIR: A useful non-invasive method for assessing intracerebral collaterals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenhua; Xu Gelin; Yue Xuanye; Wang Xiaoliang; Ma Minmin; Zhang Renliang; Wang Handong; Zhou Changsheng; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate relationship between hyperintense vessels (HV) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and artery steno-occlusion related intracerebral collaterals. Materials and methods: A total of 233 patients with 260 atherosclerotic lesions in the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were examined with FLAIR and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). HV were graded as 0, 1, 2 and 3 by its distributions in the MCA territory. Grade 0 indicated no HV; Grade 1 indicated the HV limited in Sylvian fissure; Grade 2 indicated the HV limited in Sylvian fissure and the temporal-occipital junction; Grade 3 indicated the HV extended to frontal-parietal lobes. Collateral blood flows were classified by DSA results. The relationship between HV grades and patterns of collateral flows was analyzed. Results: HV were observed in 76 out of 260 hemispheres. For patients with Grade 1 HV, most of their collateral flows (80.8%) were antegrade; for patients with Grade 2, the retrograde leptomeningeal flows were commonly manifested as anterior cerebral artery to MCA (75%); for patients with Grade 3 HV, most of the retrograde leptomeningeal flows were manifested as posterior cerebral artery to MCA (81.8%). As the grade HV increased, the frequency of retrograde leptomeningeal collateral from ACA to MCA decreased (100% to 75% and to 18.2%), and increased (0% to 25% and to 81.8%) for the retrograde leptomeningeal collateral via PCA to MCA (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The HV could assess non-invasively intracerebral collaterals in patients with steno-occlusive lesions of M1 segment of MCA.

  4. Comparison of different magnetic resonance cholangiography techniques in living liver donors including Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kinner

    Full Text Available Preoperative evaluation of potential living liver donors (PLLDs includes the assessment of the biliary anatomy to avoid postoperative complications. Aim of this study was to compare T2-weighted (T2w and Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted (T1w magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC techniques in the evaluation of PLLDs.30 PLLDs underwent MRC on a 1.5 T Magnetom Avanto (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany using (A 2D T2w HASTE (Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo fat saturated (fs in axial plane, (B 2D T2w HASTE fs thick slices in coronal plane, (C free breathing 3D T2w TSE (turbo spin echo RESTORE (high-resolution navigator corrected plus (D maximum intensity projections (MIPs, (E T2w SPACE (sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions plus (F MIPs and (G T2w TSE BLADE as well as Gd-EOB-DTPA T1w images without (G and with (H inversion recovery. Contrast enhanced CT cholangiography served as reference imaging modality. Two independent reviewers evaluated the biliary tract anatomy on a 5-point scale subjectively and objectively. Data sets were compared using a Mann-Whitney-U-test. Kappa values were also calculated.Source images and maximum intensity projections of 3D T2w TSE sequences (RESTORE and SPACE proved to be best for subjective and objective evaluation directly followed by 2D HASTE sequences. Interobserver variabilities were good to excellent (k = 0.622-0.804.3D T2w sequences are essential for preoperative biliary tract evaluation in potential living liver donors. Furthermore, our results underline the value of different MRCP sequence types for the evaluation of the biliary anatomy in PLLDs including Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1w MRC.

  5. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller's organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Munoz

    Full Text Available The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller's organ, located in the tick's forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor.

  6. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities and 4D MR angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in anterior cerebral artery ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Gawlitza

    Full Text Available To assess FLAIR vascular hyperintensities (FVH and dynamic (4D angiograms derived from perfusion raw data as proposed magnetic resonance (MR imaging markers of leptomeningeal collateral circulation in patients with ischemia in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA.Forty patients from two tertiary care university hospitals were included. Infarct volumes and perfusion deficits were manually measured on DWI images and TTP maps, respectively. FVH and collateral flow on 4D MR angiograms were assessed and graded as previously specified.Forty-one hemispheres were affected. Mean DWI lesion volume was 8.2 (± 13.9; range 0-76.9 ml, mean TTP lesion volume was 24.5 (± 17.2, range 0-76.7 ml. FVH were observed in 26/41 (63.4% hemispheres. Significant correlations were detected between FVH and TTP lesion volume (ρ = 0.4; P<0.01 absolute (ρ = 0.37; P<0.05 and relative mismatch volume (ρ = 0.35; P<0.05. The modified ASITN/SIR score correlated inversely with DWI lesion volume (ρ = -0.58; P<0.01 and positively with relative mismatch (ρ = 0.29; P< 0.05. ANOVA of the ASITN/SIR score revealed significant inter-group differences for DWI (P<0.001 and TTP lesion volumes (P<0.05. No correlation was observed between FVH scores and modified ASITH/SIR scores (ρ = -0.16; P = 0.32.FVH and flow patterns on 4D MR angiograms are markers of perfusion deficits and tissue at risk. As both methods did not show a correlation between each other, they seem to provide complimentary instead of redundant information. Previously shown evidence for the meaning of these specific MR signs in internal carotid and middle cerebral artery stroke seems to be transferrable to ischemic stroke in the ACA territory.

  7. Comprehensive processing of high-throughput small RNA sequencing data including quality checking, normalization, and differential expression analysis using the UEA sRNA Workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Matthew; Mohorianu, Irina; Stocks, Matthew; Applegate, Christopher; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has revealed compelling details about the small RNA (sRNA) population in eukaryotes. These 20 to 25 nt noncoding RNAs can influence gene expression by acting as guides for the sequence-specific regulatory mechanism known as RNA silencing. The increase in sequencing depth and number of samples per project enables a better understanding of the role sRNAs play by facilitating the study of expression patterns. However, the intricacy of the biological hypotheses coupled with a lack of appropriate tools often leads to inadequate mining of the available data and thus, an incomplete description of the biological mechanisms involved. To enable a comprehensive study of differential expression in sRNA data sets, we present a new interactive pipeline that guides researchers through the various stages of data preprocessing and analysis. This includes various tools, some of which we specifically developed for sRNA analysis, for quality checking and normalization of sRNA samples as well as tools for the detection of differentially expressed sRNAs and identification of the resulting expression patterns. The pipeline is available within the UEA sRNA Workbench, a user-friendly software package for the processing of sRNA data sets. We demonstrate the use of the pipeline on a H. sapiens data set; additional examples on a B. terrestris data set and on an A. thaliana data set are described in the Supplemental Information A comparison with existing approaches is also included, which exemplifies some of the issues that need to be addressed for sRNA analysis and how the new pipeline may be used to do this. © 2017 Beckers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Sequence-specific 1H-NMR assignments for the aromatic region of several biologically active, monomeric insulins including native human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M; Lee, R W; Kaarsholm, N C; Thøgersen, H; Brange, J; Dunn, M F

    1990-06-12

    The aromatic region of the 1H-FT-NMR spectrum of the biologically fully-potent, monomeric human insulin mutant, B9 Ser----Asp, B27 Thr----Glu has been investigated in D2O. At 1 to 5 mM concentrations, this mutant insulin is monomeric above pH 7.5. Coupling and amino acid classification of all aromatic signals is established via a combination of homonuclear one- and two-dimensional methods, including COSY, multiple quantum filters, selective spin decoupling and pH titrations. By comparisons with other insulin mutants and with chemically modified native insulins, all resonances in the aromatic region are given sequence-specific assignments without any reliance on the various crystal structures reported for insulin. These comparisons also give the sequence-specific assignments of most of the aromatic resonances of the mutant insulins B16 Tyr----Glu, B27 Thr----Glu and B25 Phe----Asp and the chemically modified species des-(B23-B30) insulin and monoiodo-Tyr A14 insulin. Chemical dispersion of the assigned resonances, ring current perturbations and comparisons at high pH have made possible the assignment of the aromatic resonances of human insulin, and these studies indicate that the major structural features of the human insulin monomer (including those critical to biological function) are also present in the monomeric mutant.

  9. MRI sequences in head and neck radiology. State of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Henninger, Benjamin; Kremser, Christian; Jaschke, Werner [Medical Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiology

    2017-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of head and neck pathologies. However, the diagnostic power of MRI is strongly related to the appropriate selection and interpretation of imaging protocols and sequences. The aim of this article is to review state-of-the-art sequences for the clinical routine in head and neck MRI and to describe the evidence for which medical question these sequences and techniques are useful. Literature review of state-of-the-art sequences in head and neck MRI. Basic sequences (T1w, T2w, T1wC+) and fat suppression techniques (TIRM/STIR, Dixon, Spectral Fat sat) are important tools in the diagnostic workup of inflammation, congenital lesions and tumors including staging. Additional sequences (SSFP (CISS, FIESTA), SPACE, VISTA, 3D-FLAIR) are used for pathologies of the cranial nerves, labyrinth and evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in Meniere's disease. Vessel and perfusion sequences (3D-TOF, TWIST/TRICKS angiography, DCE) are used in vascular contact syndromes, vascular malformations and analysis of microvascular parameters of tissue perfusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging (EPI-DWI, non-EPI-DWI, RESOLVE) is helpful in cholesteatoma imaging, estimation of malignancy, and evaluation of treatment response and posttreatment recurrence in head and neck cancer. Understanding of MRI sequences and close collaboration with referring physicians improves the diagnostic confidence of MRI in the daily routine and drives further research in this fascinating image modality.

  10. MRI sequences in head and neck radiology. State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Henninger, Benjamin; Kremser, Christian; Jaschke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of head and neck pathologies. However, the diagnostic power of MRI is strongly related to the appropriate selection and interpretation of imaging protocols and sequences. The aim of this article is to review state-of-the-art sequences for the clinical routine in head and neck MRI and to describe the evidence for which medical question these sequences and techniques are useful. Literature review of state-of-the-art sequences in head and neck MRI. Basic sequences (T1w, T2w, T1wC+) and fat suppression techniques (TIRM/STIR, Dixon, Spectral Fat sat) are important tools in the diagnostic workup of inflammation, congenital lesions and tumors including staging. Additional sequences (SSFP (CISS, FIESTA), SPACE, VISTA, 3D-FLAIR) are used for pathologies of the cranial nerves, labyrinth and evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in Meniere's disease. Vessel and perfusion sequences (3D-TOF, TWIST/TRICKS angiography, DCE) are used in vascular contact syndromes, vascular malformations and analysis of microvascular parameters of tissue perfusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging (EPI-DWI, non-EPI-DWI, RESOLVE) is helpful in cholesteatoma imaging, estimation of malignancy, and evaluation of treatment response and posttreatment recurrence in head and neck cancer. Understanding of MRI sequences and close collaboration with referring physicians improves the diagnostic confidence of MRI in the daily routine and drives further research in this fascinating image modality.

  11. Morphology and SSU rDNA sequence analysis of two hypotrichous ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Hypotrichia) including the new species Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Borong; Wang, Chundi; Huang, Jie; Shi, Yuhong; Chen, Xiangrui

    2016-10-01

    The morphology and phylogeny of two hypotrichous ciliates, Metaurostylopsis parastruederkypkeae n. sp. and Neourostylopsis flavicana (Wang et al., 2011) Chen et al., 2013 were investigated based on morphology, infraciliature and the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) sequence. The new species, M. parastruederkypkeae n. sp. was identified according to its characteristics: body shape ellipsoidal, size about (165-200) × (45-60) μm in vivo, cell color reddish; two types of cortical granules including wheat grain-like and yellow-greenish larger ones along the marginal cirri rows and dorsal kineties and dot-like and reddish smaller ones, grouped around marginal cirri on ventral side and arranged in short lines on dorsal side; 26-41 adoral membranelles; three frontal and one parabuccal, five to seven frontoterminal, one buccal, and three to six transverse cirri; seven to thirteen midventral pairs; five to nine unpaired ventral cirri, five to seven left and three to five right marginal rows; and three complete dorsal kineties. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA sequences showed that both Metaurostylopsis and Neourostylopsis are monophyletic. As the internal relationship between and within both genera are not clear, further studies on the species in these two genera are necessary. The key characteristics of all known twelve Metaurostylopsis-Apourostylopsis-Neourostylopsis species complex were updated.

  12. MRI in seven cases of tacrolimus (FK-506) encephalopathy: utility of FLAIR and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube (Japan); Dept. of Radiology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Terae, S.; Chu, B.C.; Kaneko, K.; Kamada, H.; Miyasaka, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    We assessed the utility of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) images in investigation of tacrolimus (FK-506) encephalopathy, and to see whether we could predict its cause from clinical and imaging data. In seven patients with presumed FK-506 toxicity the areas involved on MRI were similar to those in cyclosporin A (CsA) toxicity. The abnormal signal was most evident on FLAIR in all cases. In three of four patients who underwent DWI, no diffusion abnormalities were detected; in the remaining patient, increased diffusion was seen in the deep white matter bilaterally on the apparent diffusion coefficient map, consistent with the findings on T2-weighted spin-echo and FLAIR images. Five of the six patients for whom we had clinical data showed sudden changes in electrolyte or fluid equilibrium due to diarrhoea, a polyuria or oliguria one day before or on the day of onset of the central nervous system disturbances. We speculate that FK-506 encephalopathy is triggered by the disturbance of the electrolyte and/or fluid equilibrium, given a certain serum level of FK-506. (orig.)

  13. MRI in seven cases of tacrolimus (FK-506) encephalopathy: utility of FLAIR and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Terae, S.; Chu, B.C.; Kaneko, K.; Kamada, H.; Miyasaka, K.

    2001-01-01

    We assessed the utility of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) images in investigation of tacrolimus (FK-506) encephalopathy, and to see whether we could predict its cause from clinical and imaging data. In seven patients with presumed FK-506 toxicity the areas involved on MRI were similar to those in cyclosporin A (CsA) toxicity. The abnormal signal was most evident on FLAIR in all cases. In three of four patients who underwent DWI, no diffusion abnormalities were detected; in the remaining patient, increased diffusion was seen in the deep white matter bilaterally on the apparent diffusion coefficient map, consistent with the findings on T2-weighted spin-echo and FLAIR images. Five of the six patients for whom we had clinical data showed sudden changes in electrolyte or fluid equilibrium due to diarrhoea, a polyuria or oliguria one day before or on the day of onset of the central nervous system disturbances. We speculate that FK-506 encephalopathy is triggered by the disturbance of the electrolyte and/or fluid equilibrium, given a certain serum level of FK-506. (orig.)

  14. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T 2 -weighted (T 2 W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T 2 W imaging was performed, EPI-T 2 W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T 2 W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T 2 W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T 2 W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  15. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging was performed, EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T{sub 2}W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  16. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active...... related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein...... sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally...

  17. Prevalence and sequence variations of the genes encoding the five antigens included in the novel 5CVMB vaccine covering group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Hedberg, Sara Thulin; Mölling, Paula; Unemo, Magnus; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Olcén, Per

    2009-03-04

    During the recent years, projects are in progress for designing broad-range non-capsular-based meningococcal vaccines, covering also serogroup B isolates. We have examined three genes encoding antigens (NadA, GNA1030 and GNA2091) included in a novel vaccine, i.e. the 5 Component Vaccine against Meningococcus B (5CVMB), in terms of gene prevalence and sequence variations. These data were combined with the results from a similar study, examining the two additional antigens included in the 5CVMB (fHbp and GNA2132). nadA and fHbp v. 1 were present in 38% (n=36), respectively 71% (n=67) of the isolates, whereas gna2132, gna1030 and gna2091 were present in all the Neisseria meningitidis isolates tested (n=95). The level of amino acid conservation was relatively high in GNA1030 (93%), GNA2091 (92%), and within the main variants of NadA and fHbp. GNA2132 (54% of the amino acids conserved) appeared to be the most diversified antigen. Consequently, the theoretical coverage of the 5CVMB antigens and the feasibility to use these in a broad-range meningococcal vaccine is appealing.

  18. High-throughput sequencing reveals microbial communities in drinking water treatment sludge from six geographically distributed plants, including potentially toxic cyanobacteria and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hangzhou; Pei, Haiyan; Jin, Yan; Ma, Chunxia; Wang, Yuting; Sun, Jiongming; Li, Hongmin

    2018-04-10

    The microbial community structures of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) generated for raw water (RW) from different locations and with different source types - including river water, lake water and reservoir water -were investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Because the unit operations in the six DWTPs were similar, community composition in fresh sludge may be determined by microbial community in the corresponding RW. Although Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes were the dominant phyla among the six DWTS samples, no single phylum exhibited similar abundance across all the samples, owing to differences in total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, Al, Fe, and chloride in RW. Three genera of potentially toxic cyanobacteria (Planktothrix, Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis), and four potential pathogens (Escherichia coli, Bacteroides ovatus, Prevotella copri and Rickettsia) were found in sludge samples. Because proliferation of potentially toxic cyanobacteria and Rickettsia in RW was mainly affected by nutrients, while growth of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides ovatus and Prevotella copri in RW may be influenced by Fe, control of nutrients and Fe in RW is essential to decrease toxic cyanobacteria and pathogens in DWTS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Suriana; Steen, Jennifer A; Bongers, Mareike; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2013-06-24

    Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous 'arms' target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal insertion provides stable

  20. Study of the fast inversion recovery pulse sequence. With reference to fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery and fast short TI inversion recovery pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Maki, Toshio; Suzuki, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    The fast inversion recovery (fast IR) pulse sequence was evaluated. We compared the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) pulse sequence in which inversion time (TI) was established as equal to the water null point for the purpose of the water-suppressed T 2 -weighted image, with the fast short TI inversion recovery (fast STIR) pulse sequence in which TI was established as equal to the fat null point for purpose of fat suppression. In the fast FLAIR pulse sequence, the water null point was increased by making TR longer. In the FLAIR pulse sequence, the longitudinal magnetization contrast is determined by TI. If TI is increased, T 2 -weighted contrast improves in the same way as increasing TR for the SE pulse sequence. Therefore, images should be taken with long TR and long TI, which are longer than TR and longer than the water null point. On the other hand, the fat null point is not affected by TR in the fast STIR pulse sequence. However, effective TE was affected by variation of the null point. This increased in proportion to the increase in effective TE. Our evaluation indicated that the fast STIR pulse sequence can control the extensive signals from fat in a short time. (author)

  1. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  2. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Carrete, Henrique; Higa, Elisa Mieko Suemitsu; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Castro Neto, Eduardo Ferreira de; Canzian, Mauro; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2011-02-01

    We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO) levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10) were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) -MTS group (p<0.001), suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05) demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  3. L'uso del doppiaggio e del sottotitolaggio nell'insegnamento della L2: Il caso della piattaforma ClipFlair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lupe Romero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – The purpose of this paper is to present the Clipflair project, a web platform for foreign language learning (FLL through revoicing and captioning of clips. Using audiovisual material in the language classroom is a common resource for teachers since it introduces variety, provides exposure to nonverbal cultural elements and, most importantly, presents linguistic and cultural aspects of communication in their context. However, teachers using this resource face the difficulty of finding active tasks that will engage learners and discourage passive viewing. ClipFlair proposes working with AV material productively while also motivating learners by getting them to revoice or caption a clip. Revoicing is a term used to refer to (rerecording voice onto a clip, as in dubbing, free commentary, audio description and karaoke singing. The term captioning refers to adding written text to a clip, such as standard subtitles, annotations and intertitles. Clips can be short video or audio files, including documentaries, film scenes, news pieces, animations and songs. ClipFlair develops materials that enable foreign language learners to practice all four standard CEFR skills: writing, speaking, listening and reading. Within the project’s scope, more than 350 ready-made activities, which involve captioning and/or revoicing of clips, has been created. These activities has been created for more than 16 languages including English, Spanish and Italian, but focus is placed on less widely taught languages, namely Estonian, Greek, Romanian and Polish, as well as minority languages, i.e. Basque, Catalan and Irish. Non-European languages, namely Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Russian and Ukrainian are also included. The platform has three different areas: The Gallery offers the materials and the activities; the Studio area, offers a captioning and revoicing tools, in order to create or practice and learn languages by using the activities; the Social Network area

  4. Whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens EK007-RG4, a promising biocontrol agent against a broad range of bacteria, including the fire blight bacterium Erwinia amylovora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibi, Roghayeh; Tarighi, Saeed; Behravan, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain EK007-RG4, which was isolated from the phylloplane of a pear tree. P. fluorescens EK007-RG4 displays strong antagonism against Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent for fire blight disease, in addition to several...

  5. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  6. Catalogue of generic plant states leading to core melt in PWRs: includes appendix 1: detailed description of sequences leading to core melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The Task Group on thermal-hydraulic system behaviour was given a mandate from PWG 2 on Coolant System-Behaviour with the approval of CSNI to deal with the topic of Accident Management. A writing group was set up to identify generic plant states leading to core melt for pressurized water reactors (PWR) and find 'possible approaches to accident management measures' (AM-Measures) for dealing with them. From a matrix of 15 initiating events and 12 system failures (i.e. from 180 possibilities), 32 event sequences have been identified as leading to core melt. Each sequence has been divided into characteristic plant state intervals according to safety function challenges. For each of the 141 defined characteristic plant state intervals, the members of the Writing Group made proposals for AM-Measures

  7. MRI of the brain stem using fluid attenuated inversion recivery pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coene, B.; Hajnal, J.V.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences with inversion times of 2000-2500 ms and echo times of 130-200 ms were used to image the brain stem of a normal adult and five patients. These sequences produce high signal from many white matter tracts and display high lesion contrast. The corticospinal and parietopontine tracts, lateral and medial lemnisci, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, medial longitudinal fasciculi, thalamo-olivary tracts the cuneate and gracile fasiculi gave high signal and were directly visualised. The oculomotor and trigeminal nerves were demonstrated within the brain stem. Lesions not seen with conventional T2-weighted spin echo sequences were seen with high contrast in patients with infarction, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, chunt obstruction and metastatic tumour. The anatomical detail and high lesion contrast given by the FLAIR pulse sequence appear likely to be of value in diagnosis of disease in the brain stem. (orig.)

  8. A prospective comparison study of fast T1 weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery and T1 weighted turbo spin echo sequence at 3 T in degenerative disease of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, K; Bydder, G M

    2014-09-01

    This study compared T1 fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1 turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences for evaluation of cervical spine degenerative disease at 3 T. 72 patients (44 males and 28 females; mean age of 39 years; age range, 27-75 years) with suspected cervical spine degenerative disease were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the spine were obtained using T1 FLAIR and T1 TSE sequences. Two experienced neuroradiologists compared the sequences qualitatively and quantitatively. On qualitative evaluation, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling and contrast at cord-CSF, disc-CSF and disc-cord interfaces were significantly higher on fast T1 FLAIR images than on T1 TSE images (p degenerative disease, owing to higher cord-CSF, disc-cord and disc-CSF contrast. However, intrinsic cord contrast is low on T1 FLAIR images. T1 FLAIR is more promising and sensitive than T1 TSE for evaluation of degenerative spondyloarthropathy and may provide a foundation for development of MR protocols for early detection of degenerative and neoplastic diseases.

  9. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between perinatal vital parameter and neonatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadowaki, Sachiko; Iwata, Osuke; Tamura, Masanori [Nagano Children' s Hospital, Toyoshina (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-01-01

    A follow-up study was performed to assess the correlation among the incidence of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, clinical evidence of perinatal insults that may cause white matter damage, and the outcome of the infants. We evaluated periventricular white matter lesions of 329 neonates whose MRI were obtained before two months corrected age. The detective rate of periventricular abnormalities on FLAIR imaging was significantly higher than that of T1-T2 weighted imaging. The most typical lesion detected on FLAIR imaging was periventricular low intensities (PVLI), frequently observed in the neonates with a history of preterm labour, very low birth weight, birth asphyxia and severe respiratory failure. Although we could not characterize the risk factors of PVLI, the incidence of PVLI had a strong correlation with the scores of motor and developmental tests at 12 and 36-months corrected age. In conclusion, FLAIR imaging, detecting the border zone damage of white matter, would be a strong tool to pick out neonates at high risk of neurological disturbances from those without clinical evidence of neurological insults in the neonatal period. (author)

  10. Experimental acute intracerebral hemorrhage: Value of MR sequences for a safe diagnosis at 1.5 and 0.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueker, W.; Thron, A.; Thiex, R.; Rohde, I.; Rohde, V.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the detectability of intracerebral hematomas with MR imaging at 1.5 T and 0.5 T with fluid attenuated inversion recovery turbo spin-echo (FLAIR) and gradient-echo sequences. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven intracerebral hematomas were created in 25 piglets by injection of venous blood into the brain through a burr hole. All were imaged with T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences (fast field echo, FFE), T2-weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery turbo spin-echo sequences (FLAIR), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) and T1-weighted spin-echo sequences. Follow-up was performed on the 2nd, 4th and 10th postoperative days. Ten animals were additionally investigated with similar sequences at 0.5 T. Histologic correlation was obtained in all cases. Results: T2* FFE sequences detected all acute intracerebral hematomas and demonstrated the size correctly at 1.5 T and 0.5 T. The conspicuity was better at 1.5 T. FLAIR sequences were unreliable in the hyperacute phase at 1.5 T. However, subarachnoid and intraventricular extension was best appreciated with FLAIR images. T2 TSE images were incapable of detecting para ventricular and subarachnoid hemorrhages, but clearly demonstrated intracerebral blood in other locations. T1-weighted images were insensitive to hemorrhage in the acute state but very useful in subacute and chronic hematomas. Conclusion: The safe and reliable diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage is probably possible with MR imaging at 1.5 T and 0.5 T even of hematomas less than 90 min old, but requires the application of at least FLAIR, T2* FFE and T1 sequences and is therefore time consuming

  11. Increased signal intensity of the cochlea on pre- and post-contrast enhanced 3D-FLAIR in patients with vestibular schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Masahiro; Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi; Nihashi, Takashi [Nagoya University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Fukatsu, Hiroshi [Aichi Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Informatics, Nagakute (Japan); Nakashima, Tsutomu [Nagoya University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    In the vestibular schwannoma patients, the pathophysiologic mechanism of inner ear involvement is still unclear. We investigated the status of the cochleae in patients with vestibular schwannoma by evaluating the signal intensity of cochlear fluid on pre- and post-contrast enhanced thin section three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR). Twenty-eight patients were retrospectively analyzed. Post-contrast images were obtained in 18 patients, and 20 patients had the records of their pure-tone audiometry. Regions of interest of both cochleae (C) and of the medulla oblongata (M) were determined on 3D-FLAIR images by referring to 3D heavily T2-weighted images on a workstation. The signal intensity ratio between C and M on the 3D-FLAIR images (CM ratio) was then evaluated. In addition, correlation between the CM ratio and the hearing level was also evaluated. The CM ratio of the affected side was significantly higher than that of the unaffected side (p < 0.001). In the affected side, post-contrast signal elevation was observed (p < 0.005). In 13 patients (26 cochleae) who underwent both gadolinium injection and the pure-tone audiometry, the post-contrast CM ratio correlated with hearing level (p < 0.05). The results of the present study suggest that alteration of cochlear fluid composition and increased permeability of the blood-labyrinthine barrier exist in the affected side in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Furthermore, although weak, positive correlation between post-contrast cochlear signal intensity on 3D-FLAIR and hearing level warrants further study to clarify the relationship between 3D-FLAIR findings and prognosis of hearing preservation surgery. (orig.)

  12. Increased signal intensity of the cochlea on pre- and post-contrast enhanced 3D-FLAIR in patients with vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Masahiro; Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi; Nihashi, Takashi; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    In the vestibular schwannoma patients, the pathophysiologic mechanism of inner ear involvement is still unclear. We investigated the status of the cochleae in patients with vestibular schwannoma by evaluating the signal intensity of cochlear fluid on pre- and post-contrast enhanced thin section three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR). Twenty-eight patients were retrospectively analyzed. Post-contrast images were obtained in 18 patients, and 20 patients had the records of their pure-tone audiometry. Regions of interest of both cochleae (C) and of the medulla oblongata (M) were determined on 3D-FLAIR images by referring to 3D heavily T2-weighted images on a workstation. The signal intensity ratio between C and M on the 3D-FLAIR images (CM ratio) was then evaluated. In addition, correlation between the CM ratio and the hearing level was also evaluated. The CM ratio of the affected side was significantly higher than that of the unaffected side (p < 0.001). In the affected side, post-contrast signal elevation was observed (p < 0.005). In 13 patients (26 cochleae) who underwent both gadolinium injection and the pure-tone audiometry, the post-contrast CM ratio correlated with hearing level (p < 0.05). The results of the present study suggest that alteration of cochlear fluid composition and increased permeability of the blood-labyrinthine barrier exist in the affected side in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Furthermore, although weak, positive correlation between post-contrast cochlear signal intensity on 3D-FLAIR and hearing level warrants further study to clarify the relationship between 3D-FLAIR findings and prognosis of hearing preservation surgery. (orig.)

  13. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Cao, Hong; Song, Yindi; Feng, Yue; Ding, Xiaoxue; Pang, Mingjie; Zhang, Yunmei; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jiahuan; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-06-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit  (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our

  14. Cell culture isolation and sequence analysis of genetically diverse US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains including a novel strain with a large deletion in the spike gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Saif, Linda J; Marthaler, Douglas; Esseili, Malak A; Meulia, Tea; Lin, Chun-Ming; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Jung, Kwonil; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong

    2014-10-10

    The highly contagious and deadly porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first appeared in the US in April 2013. Since then the virus has spread rapidly nationwide and to Canada and Mexico causing high mortality among nursing piglets and significant economic losses. Currently there are no efficacious preventive measures or therapeutic tools to control PEDV in the US. The isolation of PEDV in cell culture is the first step toward the development of an attenuated vaccine, to study the biology of PEDV and to develop in vitro PEDV immunoassays, inactivation assays and screen for PEDV antivirals. In this study, nine of 88 US PEDV strains were isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin and subjected to genomic sequence analysis. They differed genetically mainly in the N-terminal S protein region as follows: (1) strains (n=7) similar to the highly virulent US PEDV strains; (2) one similar to the reportedly US S INDEL PEDV strain; and (3) one novel strain most closely related to highly virulent US PEDV strains, but with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. Representative strains of these three genetic groups were passaged serially and grew to titers of ∼5-6log10 plaque forming units/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation in cell culture of an S INDEL PEDV strain and a PEDV strain with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. We also designed primer sets to detect these genetically diverse US PEDV strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MR features of the developing perianterior horn structure including subcallosal fasciculus in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    To describe the changes in the magnetic resonance (MR) signal of the perianterior horn structure (PAS) with increasing age, we studied 69 infants and children aged between 3 days and 9.4 years (average: 2.8 years) without any neurological deficits. T1- and T2-weighted images and FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) images were obtained in the axial plane. Based on a comparison of the intensity of the PAS with that of the cortex in each sequence (T1-WI/FLAIR/T2-WI), we classified the signal-intensity patterns into four types: I, low/low/high; II, low/high/high; III, iso/high/high; IV, high/low/low. Signal-intensity types I, II, III and IV were seen in 22, 8, 17, and 22 subjects, respectively, with younger subjects showing type I or II intensity patterns and older subjects showing type III or IV. In addition, T1-weighted and FLAIR images of subjects with a type I intensity pattern showed a rim of an isointensity component around the PAS that histologically coincided with migrating glial cells. The low-intensity area on FLAIR and T2-WI images of subjects with a type IV intensity pattern may represent myelinated fibers of the subcallosal fasciculus (ScF). The intensity of the MR signals of the PAS changes with increasing age, and this change may reflect histological features. A better understanding of these characteristics may help us to clarify myelination abnormalities, particularly those related to the ScF in the frontal lobe in infants and children. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of multimodal segmentation based on 3D T1-, T2- and FLAIR-weighted images - the difficulty of choosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindig, Tobias; Kotikalapudi, Raviteja; Schweikardt, Daniel; Martin, Pascal; Bender, Friedemann; Klose, Uwe; Ernemann, Ulrike; Focke, Niels K; Bender, Benjamin

    2018-04-15

    Voxel-based morphometry is still mainly based on T1-weighted MRI scans. Misclassification of vessels and dura mater as gray matter has been previously reported. Goal of the present work was to evaluate the effect of multimodal segmentation methods available in SPM12, and their influence on identification of age related atrophy and lesion detection in epilepsy patients. 3D T1-, T2- and FLAIR-images of 77 healthy adults (mean age 35.8 years, 19-66 years, 45 females), 7 patients with malformation of cortical development (MCD) (mean age 28.1 years,19-40 years, 3 females), and 5 patients with left hippocampal sclerosis (LHS) (mean age 49.0 years, 25-67 years, 3 females) from a 3T scanner were evaluated. Segmentation based on T1-only, T1+T2, T1+FLAIR, T2+FLAIR, and T1+T2+FLAIR were compared in the healthy subjects. Clinical VBM results based on the different segmentation approaches for MCD and for LHS were compared. T1-only segmentation overestimated total intracranial volume by about 80ml compared to the other segmentation methods. This was due to misclassification of dura mater and vessels as GM and CSF. Significant differences were found for several anatomical regions: the occipital lobe, the basal ganglia/thalamus, the pre- and postcentral gyrus, the cerebellum, and the brainstem. None of the segmentation methods yielded completely satisfying results for the basal ganglia/thalamus and the brainstem. The best correlation with age could be found for the multimodal T1+T2+FLAIR segmentation. Highest T-scores for identification of LHS were found for T1+T2 segmentation, while highest T-scores for MCD were dependent on lesion and anatomical location. Multimodal segmentation is superior to T1-only segmentation and reduces the misclassification of dura mater and vessels as GM and CSF. Depending on the anatomical region and the pathology of interest (atrophy, lesion detection, etc.), different combinations of T1, T2 and FLAIR yield optimal results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  17. MRI Sequences in Head & Neck Radiology - State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Henninger, Benjamin; Kremser, Christian; Jaschke, Werner

    2017-05-01

    Background  Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of head & neck pathologies. However, the diagnostic power of MRI is strongly related to the appropriate selection and interpretation of imaging protocols and sequences. The aim of this article is to review state-of-the-art sequences for the clinical routine in head & neck MRI and to describe the evidence for which medical question these sequences and techniques are useful. Method  Literature review of state-of-the-art sequences in head & neck MRI. Results and Conclusion  Basic sequences (T1w, T2w, T1wC+) and fat suppression techniques (TIRM/STIR, Dixon, Spectral Fat sat) are important tools in the diagnostic workup of inflammation, congenital lesions and tumors including staging. Additional sequences (SSFP (CISS, FIESTA), SPACE, VISTA, 3D-FLAIR) are used for pathologies of the cranial nerves, labyrinth and evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in Menière's disease. Vessel and perfusion sequences (3D-TOF, TWIST/TRICKS angiography, DCE) are used in vascular contact syndromes, vascular malformations and analysis of microvascular parameters of tissue perfusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging (EPI-DWI, non-EPI-DWI, RESOLVE) is helpful in cholesteatoma imaging, estimation of malignancy, and evaluation of treatment response and posttreatment recurrence in head & neck cancer. Understanding of MRI sequences and close collaboration with referring physicians improves the diagnostic confidence of MRI in the daily routine and drives further research in this fascinating image modality. Key Points:   · Understanding of MRI sequences is essential for the correct and reliable interpretation of MRI findings.. · MRI protocols have to be carefully selected based on relevant clinical information.. · Close collaboration with referring physicians improves the output obtained from the diagnostic possibilities of MRI.. Citation Format · Widmann G, Henninger B, Kremser C et

  18. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos Varella

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10 were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE -MTS group (p<0.001, suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05 demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  19. Comparative analysis of MR sequences to detect structural brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Gama, Hugo Pereira; Campos Meirelles, Rogerio Goncalves de; Mendonca do Rego, Jose Iram; Rocha, Antonio Jose da; Silva, Carlos Jorge da; Braga, Flavio Tulio; Martins Maia, Antonio Carlos; Lederman, Henrique Manoel

    2006-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a neurocutaneous genetically inherited disease with variable penetrance characterized by dysplasias and hamartomas affecting multiple organs. MR is the imaging method of choice to demonstrate structural brain lesions in TS. To compare MR sequences and determine which is most useful for the demonstration of each type of brain lesion in TS patients. We reviewed MR scans of 18 TS patients for the presence of cortical tubers, white matter lesions (radial bands), subependymal nodules, and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA) on the following sequences: (1) T1-weighted spin-echo (T1 SE) images before and after gadolinium (Gd) injection; (2) nonenhanced T1 SE sequence with an additional magnetization transfer contrast medium pulse on resonance (T1 SE/MTC); and (3) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Cortical tubers were found in significantly (P<0.05) larger numbers and more conspicuously in FLAIR and T1 SE/MTC sequences. The T1 SE/MTC sequence was far superior to other methods in detecting white matter lesions (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the T1 SE/MTC and T1 SE (before and after Gd injection) sequences in the detection of subependymal nodules; FLAIR sequence showed less sensitivity than the others in identifying the nodules. T1 SE sequences after Gd injection demonstrated better the limits of the SGCA. We demonstrated the importance of appropriate MRI sequences for diagnosis of the most frequent brain lesions in TS. Our study reinforces the fact that each sequence has a particular application according to the type of TS lesion. Gd injection might be useful in detecting SGCA; however, the parameters of size and location are also important for a presumptive diagnosis of these tumors. (orig.)

  20. Quantification of traumatic meningeal injury using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Williford, Joshua P.; Cota, Martin R.; MacLaren, Judy M.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Latour, Lawrence L.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic meningeal injury is a novel imaging marker of traumatic brain injury, which appears as enhancement of the dura on post-contrast T2-weighted FLAIR images, and is likely associated with inflammation of the meninges. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI provides a better discrimination of abnormally perfused regions. A method to properly identify those regions is presented. Images of seventeen patients scanned within 96 hours of head injury with positive traumatic meningeal injury were normalized and aligned. The difference between the pre- and last post-contrast acquisitions was segmented and voxels in the higher class were spatially clustered. Spatial and morphological descriptors were used to identify the regions of enhancement: a) centroid; b) distance to the brain mask from external voxels; c) distance from internal voxels; d) size; e) shape. The method properly identified thirteen regions among all patients. The method failed in one case due to the presence of a large brain lesion that altered the mask boundaries. Most false detections were correctly rejected resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9% and 93.6%, respectively.

  1. Fast spine echo and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paolillo, Andrea; Giugni, Elisabetta; Bozzao, Alessandro; Bastianello, Stefano

    1997-01-01

    Fast spin echo (FSE) and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast-FLAIR) sequences, were compared with conventional spin echo (CSE) in quantitating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion burden. For each sequence, the total number and volume of MS lesions were calculated in 38 remitting multiple sclerosis patients using a semiautomated lesion detection program. Conventional spin echo, fast spin echo, and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery image were reported on randomly and at different times by two expert observers. Interobserver differences, the time needed to quantitative multiple sclerosis lesions and lesion signal intensity (contrast-to-noise ratio and overall contrast) were considered. The lesions were classified by site into infratentorial, white matter and cortical/subcortical. A total of 2970 lesions with a volume of 961.7 cm 3 was calculated on conventional spin echo images. Fast spin echo images depicted fewer (16.6%; p < .005) and smaller (24.9%; p < .0001) lesions and the differences were statistically significant. Despite an overall nonsignificant reduction for fast-FLAIR images (-5% and 4.8% for lesion number and volume, respectively), significantly lower values (lesion number: p < 0.1; volume: p < .04)were observed for infratentorial lesions, while significantly higher values were seen for cortical/subcortical lesions (lesion number: p < .01; volume: p < .02). A higher lesion/white matter contrast (p < .002), a significant time saving for lesion burden quantitation (p < .05) and very low interobserver variability were found in favor of fast-FLAIR. Our data suggest that, despite the limitations regarding infratentorial lesions, fast-FLAIR sequences are indicated in R studies because of their good identification of cortical/subcortical lesions, almost complete interobserver agreement, higher contrast-to-noise ratio and limited time needed for semiautomated quantitation

  2. A de novo 1.58 Mb deletion, including MAP2K6 and mapping 1.28 Mb upstream to SOX9, identified in a patient with Pierre Robin sequence and osteopenia with multiple fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Marta; Roeder, Elizabeth; Cheung, Sau Wai; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2015-08-01

    Defects of long-range regulatory elements of dosage-sensitive genes represent an under-recognized mechanism underlying genetic diseases. Haploinsufficiency of SOX9, the gene essential for development of testes and differentiation of chondrocytes, results in campomelic dysplasia, a skeletal malformation syndrome often associated with sex reversal. Chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints mapping up to 1.6 Mb up- and downstream to SOX9, and disrupting its distant cis-regulatory elements, have been described in patients with milder forms of campomelic dysplasia, Pierre Robin sequence, and sex reversal. We present an ∼1.58 Mb deletion mapping ∼1.28 Mb upstream to SOX9 that encompasses its putative long-range cis-regulatory element(s) and MAP2K6 in a patient with Pierre Robin sequence and osteopenia with multiple fractures. Low bone mass panel testing using massively parallel sequencing of 23 nuclear genes, including COL1A1 and COL1A2 was negative. Based on the previous mouse model of Map2k6, suggesting that Sox9 is likely a downstream target of the p38 MAPK pathway, and our previous chromosome conformation capture-on-chip (4C) data showing potential interactions between SOX9 promoter and MAP2K6, we hypothesize that deletion of MAP2K6 might have affected SOX9 expression and contributed to our patient's phenotype. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities and dynamic 4D angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in posterior circulation occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Kerl, Hans Ulrich; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Habich, Sonia; Groden, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to assess collateral blood flow in posterior circulation occlusion by MRI-based approaches (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms) and investigate its relation to ischemic lesion size and growth. In 28 patients with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and 10 patients with basilar artery (BA) occlusion, MRI findings were analyzed, with emphasis on distal FVH and collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms. In PCA occlusion, distal FVH was observed in 18/29 (62.1 %), in BA occlusion, in 8/10 (80 %) cases. Collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms was graded 1 in 8 (27.6 %) patients, 2 in 1 (3.4 %) patient, 3 in 12 (41.4 %) patients, and 4 in 8 (27.6 %) patients with PCA occlusion and 0 in 1 (10 %) patient, 2 in 3 (30 %) patients, 3 in 1 (10 %) patient, and 4 in 5 (50 %) patients with BA occlusion. FVH grade showed neither correlation with initial or follow-up diffusion-weighted image (DWI) lesion size nor DWI-perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) mismatch ratio. Collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms correlated inversely with initial DWI lesion size and moderately with the DWI-(PWI) mismatch ratio. The combination of distal FVH and collateralization grade on dynamic 4D angiograms correlated inversely with initial as well as follow-up DWI lesion size and highly with the DWI-PWI mismatch ratio. In posterior circulation occlusion, FVH is a frequent finding, but its prognostic value is limited. Dynamic 4D angiograms are advantageous to examine and graduate collateral blood flow. The combination of both parameters results in an improved characterization of collateral blood flow and might have prognostic relevance. (orig.)

  4. Age-related signal intensity changes in the corpus callosum: assessment with three orthogonal FLAIR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Haque, Tabassum Laz; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Tomimoto, Hidekazu [Kyoto University, Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Konishi, Junya [Kobe University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The presence of age-related hyperintensities of the corpus callosum has not been thoroughly evaluated. Fifty-two patients of 50 years of age or older (mean, 71 years; range, 50-87 years) were included in this study. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were obtained in three orthogonal planes. Periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs) were graded according to Fazekas' rating scale. Correlations between the presence of hyperintensities in the corpus callosum and age, and the grade of PVH and DWMH were statistically analyzed. PVH was categorized as grade 0 (n=4), grade 1 (n=28), grade 2 (n=10), or grade 3 (n=10). DWMH was categorized as grade 0 (n=4), grade 1 (n=25), grade 2 (n=8), or grade 3 (n=15). Hyperintensity was considered present in the corpus callosum in 31 of the 52 patients (60%). In these 31 patients, PVH was categorized as grade 1 (n=16), grade 2 (n=7), or grade 3 (n=8), while DWMH was categorized as grade 0 (n=1), grade 1 (n=10), grade 2 (n=7), or grade 3 (n=13). The presence of callosal hyperintensities was significantly correlated with age (p=0.001), and with PVH (p=0.04) and DWMH grades (p=0.004). Hyperintensities may be present in the corpus callosum with aging, and are correlated with PVH and DWMH. (orig.)

  5. Age-related signal intensity changes in the corpus callosum: assessment with three orthogonal FLAIR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Haque, Tabassum Laz; Togashi, Kaori; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Konishi, Junya

    2005-01-01

    The presence of age-related hyperintensities of the corpus callosum has not been thoroughly evaluated. Fifty-two patients of 50 years of age or older (mean, 71 years; range, 50-87 years) were included in this study. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were obtained in three orthogonal planes. Periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs) were graded according to Fazekas' rating scale. Correlations between the presence of hyperintensities in the corpus callosum and age, and the grade of PVH and DWMH were statistically analyzed. PVH was categorized as grade 0 (n=4), grade 1 (n=28), grade 2 (n=10), or grade 3 (n=10). DWMH was categorized as grade 0 (n=4), grade 1 (n=25), grade 2 (n=8), or grade 3 (n=15). Hyperintensity was considered present in the corpus callosum in 31 of the 52 patients (60%). In these 31 patients, PVH was categorized as grade 1 (n=16), grade 2 (n=7), or grade 3 (n=8), while DWMH was categorized as grade 0 (n=1), grade 1 (n=10), grade 2 (n=7), or grade 3 (n=13). The presence of callosal hyperintensities was significantly correlated with age (p=0.001), and with PVH (p=0.04) and DWMH grades (p=0.004). Hyperintensities may be present in the corpus callosum with aging, and are correlated with PVH and DWMH. (orig.)

  6. Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores raw sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome...

  7. Variability in a three-generation family with Pierre Robin sequence, acampomelic campomelic dysplasia, and intellectual disability due to a novel ∼1 Mb deletion upstream of SOX9, and including KCNJ2 and KCNJ16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Bottillo, Irene; Morlino, Silvia; Barone, Chiara; Cascone, Piero; Grammatico, Paola; Laino, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia and acampomelic campomelic dysplasia (ACD) are allelic disorders due to heterozygous mutations in or around SOX9. Translocations and deletions involving the SOX9 5' regulatory region are rare causes of these disorders, as well as Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) and 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. Genotype-phenotype correlations are not straightforward due to the complex epigenetic regulation of SOX9 expression during development. We report a three-generation pedigree with a novel ∼1 Mb deletion upstream of SOX9 and including KCNJ2 and KCNJ16, and ascertained for dominant transmission of PRS. Further characterization of the family identified subtle appendicular anomalies and a variable constellation of axial skeletal features evocative of ACD in several members. Affected males showed learning disability. The identified deletion was smaller than all other chromosome rearrangements associated with ACD. Comparison with other reported translocations and deletions involving this region allowed further refining of genotype-phenotype correlations and an update of the smallest regions of overlap associated with the different phenotypes. Intrafamilial variability in this pedigree suggests a phenotypic continuity between ACD and PRS in patients carrying mutations in the SOX9 5' regulatory region. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Amino-terminal domain of the v-fms oncogene product includes a functional signal peptide that directs synthesis of a transforming glycoprotein in the absence of feline leukemia virus gag sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, E.F.; Roussel, M.F.; Hampe, A.; Walker, M.H.; Fried, V.A.; Look, A.T.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Sherr, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 5' segment of the human genomic c-fms proto-oncogene suggested that recombination between feline leukemia virus and feline c-fms sequences might have occurred in a region encoding the 5' untranslated portion of c-fms mRNA. The polyprotein precursor gP180/sup gag-fms/ encoded by the McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus was therefore predicted to contain 34 v-fms-coded amino acids derived from sequences of the c-fms gene that are not ordinarily translated from the proto-oncogene mRNA. The (gP180/sup gag-fms/) polyprotein was cotranslationally cleaved near the gag-fms junction to remove its gag gene-coded portion. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the resulting v-fms-coded glycoprotein, gp120/sup v-fms/, showed that the site of proteolysis corresponded to a predicted signal peptidase cleavage site within the c-fms gene product. Together, these analyses suggested that the linked gag sequences may not be necessary for expression of a biologically active v-fms gene product. The gag-fms sequences of feline sarcoma virus strain McDonough and the v-fms sequences alone were inserted into a murine retroviral vector containing a neomycin resistance gene. The authors conclude that a cryptic hydrophobic signal peptide sequence in v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms gene product within membranous organelles. It seems likely that the proteolytic cleavage of gP180/gag-fms/ is mediated by signal peptidase and that the amino termini of gp140/sup v-fms/ and the c-fms gene product are identical

  9. Amino-terminal domain of the v-fms oncogene product includes a functional signal peptide that directs synthesis of a transforming glycoprotein in the absence of feline leukemia virus gag sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E.F.; Roussel, M.F.; Hampe, A.; Walker, M.H.; Fried, V.A.; Look, A.T.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Sherr, C.J.

    1986-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 5' segment of the human genomic c-fms proto-oncogene suggested that recombination between feline leukemia virus and feline c-fms sequences might have occurred in a region encoding the 5' untranslated portion of c-fms mRNA. The polyprotein precursor gP180/sup gag-fms/ encoded by the McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus was therefore predicted to contain 34 v-fms-coded amino acids derived from sequences of the c-fms gene that are not ordinarily translated from the proto-oncogene mRNA. The (gP180/sup gag-fms/) polyprotein was cotranslationally cleaved near the gag-fms junction to remove its gag gene-coded portion. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the resulting v-fms-coded glycoprotein, gp120/sup v-fms/, showed that the site of proteolysis corresponded to a predicted signal peptidase cleavage site within the c-fms gene product. Together, these analyses suggested that the linked gag sequences may not be necessary for expression of a biologically active v-fms gene product. The gag-fms sequences of feline sarcoma virus strain McDonough and the v-fms sequences alone were inserted into a murine retroviral vector containing a neomycin resistance gene. The authors conclude that a cryptic hydrophobic signal peptide sequence in v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms gene product within membranous organelles. It seems likely that the proteolytic cleavage of gP180/gag-fms/ is mediated by signal peptidase and that the amino termini of gp140/sup v-fms/ and the c-fms gene product are identical.

  10. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Hasboun, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France); Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M. [Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France)

    1999-07-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  11. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Hasboun, D.; Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  12. Cerebral staging of lung cancer: is one single contrast-enhanced T1-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence sufficient?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael; Jeung, Mi-Young; Roy, Catherine [Nouvel Hopital Civil-Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B/Radiology Department, Strasbourg (France); Bazille, Gauthier [Clinique Saint Anne-Groupe Radiologique MIM, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-08-15

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for cerebral staging in thoracic oncology. We hypothesize that a minimalist examination, consisting of a single contrast-enhanced T1-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence (CE 3D-GRE), would be sufficient for the cerebral staging of nonsymptomatic lung cancer patients. Seventy nonsymptomatic patients (50 % men; 62 years ± 10.2) referred for cerebral staging of a lung cancer were retrospectively included. All underwent a standard 3 T MRI examination with T1, FLAIR, T2* GRE, diffusion, and CE 3D-GRE sequences, for a total examination time of 20 min. The sole CE 3D-GRE (acquisition time: 6 min) was extracted and blindly interpreted by two radiologists in search of brain metastases. Hemorrhagic features of potential lesions and relevant incidental findings were also noted. Discrepant cases were reviewed by a third reader. The full MRI examination and follow-up studies were used as a reference to calculate sensitivity and specificity of the sole CE 3D-GRE. Thirty-eight point six percent (27 out of 70) of the patients had brain metastases. Performances and reader's agreement with the sole CE 3D-GRE sequence were excellent for the diagnosis of brain metastases (sensitivity = 96.3 %, specificity = 100 %, κ = 0.91) and incidental findings (sensitivity = 85.7 %, specificity = 100 %, κ = 0.62) but insufficient for the identification of hemorrhages within the metastases (sensitivity = 33.3 %, specificity = 85.7 %, κ = 0.47). In the specific case of lung cancer, cerebral staging in nonsymptomatic patients can be efficiently achieved with a minimalistic protocol consisting of a single CE 3D-GRE sequence, completed if positive with a T2* sequence for hemorrhagic assessment, thus halving appointment delays. (orig.)

  13. MRI assessment of relapsed glioblastoma during treatment with bevacizumab: Volumetric measurement of enhanced and FLAIR lesions for evaluation of response and progression—A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, Josef; Pachinger, Corinna; Pelz, Manuela; Kleiser, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metric that is useful for therapy monitoring in patients with relapsed glioblastoma (GBM) during treatment with the antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (Bev). We evaluated the feasibility of tumour volume measurement with our software tool in clinical routine and tried to establish reproducible and quantitative parameters for surveillance of patients on treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. Materials and methods: In this retrospective institutional pilot study, 18 patients (11 men, 7 women; mean age 53.5) with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and irinotecan every two weeks as second line therapy. Follow up scans were assessed every two to four months. Data were collected on a 1.5 T MR System (Siemens, Symphony) with the standard head coil using our standardized tumour protocol. Volumetric measurement was performed with a commercial available software stroketool in FLAIR and T1-c imaging with following procedure: Pre-processing involved cutting noise and electing a Gaussian of 3 × 3 to smooth images, selecting a ROI (region of interest) in healthy brain area of the contra lateral side with quantifying the intensity value, adding 20% to this value to define the threshold level. Only values above this threshold are left corresponding to the tumour lesion. For the volumetric measurement the detected tumour area was circuited in all slices and finally summing up all values and multiplied by slice thickness to get the whole volume. Results: With McDonalds criteria progression was indicated in 14 out of 18 patients. In contrast, volumetric measurement showed an increase of contrast enhancement of >25%, defined as threshold for progression, in 11 patients (78%) and in 12 patients (85%) in FLAIR volume, respectively. 6 patients revealed that volumes in MRI increased earlier than the last scan, which was primarily defined as the date of progression with McDonald criteria, changing PFS after re-evaluation of

  14. MRI assessment of relapsed glioblastoma during treatment with bevacizumab: volumetric measurement of enhanced and FLAIR lesions for evaluation of response and progression--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Josef; Pachinger, Corinna; Pelz, Manuela; Kleiser, Raimund

    2013-05-01

    To develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metric that is useful for therapy monitoring in patients with relapsed glioblastoma (GBM) during treatment with the antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (Bev). We evaluated the feasibility of tumour volume measurement with our software tool in clinical routine and tried to establish reproducible and quantitative parameters for surveillance of patients on treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. In this retrospective institutional pilot study, 18 patients (11 men, 7 women; mean age 53.5) with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and irinotecan every two weeks as second line therapy. Follow up scans were assessed every two to four months. Data were collected on a 1.5 T MR System (Siemens, Symphony) with the standard head coil using our standardized tumour protocol. Volumetric measurement was performed with a commercial available software stroketool in FLAIR and T1-c imaging with following procedure: Pre-processing involved cutting noise and electing a Gaussian of 3 × 3 to smooth images, selecting a ROI (region of interest) in healthy brain area of the contra lateral side with quantifying the intensity value, adding 20% to this value to define the threshold level. Only values above this threshold are left corresponding to the tumour lesion. For the volumetric measurement the detected tumour area was circuited in all slices and finally summing up all values and multiplied by slice thickness to get the whole volume. With McDonalds criteria progression was indicated in 14 out of 18 patients. In contrast, volumetric measurement showed an increase of contrast enhancement of >25%, defined as threshold for progression, in 11 patients (78%) and in 12 patients (85%) in FLAIR volume, respectively. 6 patients revealed that volumes in MRI increased earlier than the last scan, which was primarily defined as the date of progression with McDonald criteria, changing PFS after re-evaluation of the tumour volumes from 6.8 to 5.6 months

  15. MRI assessment of relapsed glioblastoma during treatment with bevacizumab: Volumetric measurement of enhanced and FLAIR lesions for evaluation of response and progression—A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichler, Josef, E-mail: josef.pichler@gespag.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria); Pachinger, Corinna, E-mail: pachingercorinna@gmx.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria); Pelz, Manuela, E-mail: mauela.pelz@gespag.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria); Kleiser, Raimund, E-mail: raimund.kleiser@gespag.at [Wagner Jauregg Weg 15, 4020 Linz, Landesnervenklinik Linz (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metric that is useful for therapy monitoring in patients with relapsed glioblastoma (GBM) during treatment with the antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (Bev). We evaluated the feasibility of tumour volume measurement with our software tool in clinical routine and tried to establish reproducible and quantitative parameters for surveillance of patients on treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. Materials and methods: In this retrospective institutional pilot study, 18 patients (11 men, 7 women; mean age 53.5) with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and irinotecan every two weeks as second line therapy. Follow up scans were assessed every two to four months. Data were collected on a 1.5 T MR System (Siemens, Symphony) with the standard head coil using our standardized tumour protocol. Volumetric measurement was performed with a commercial available software stroketool in FLAIR and T1-c imaging with following procedure: Pre-processing involved cutting noise and electing a Gaussian of 3 × 3 to smooth images, selecting a ROI (region of interest) in healthy brain area of the contra lateral side with quantifying the intensity value, adding 20% to this value to define the threshold level. Only values above this threshold are left corresponding to the tumour lesion. For the volumetric measurement the detected tumour area was circuited in all slices and finally summing up all values and multiplied by slice thickness to get the whole volume. Results: With McDonalds criteria progression was indicated in 14 out of 18 patients. In contrast, volumetric measurement showed an increase of contrast enhancement of >25%, defined as threshold for progression, in 11 patients (78%) and in 12 patients (85%) in FLAIR volume, respectively. 6 patients revealed that volumes in MRI increased earlier than the last scan, which was primarily defined as the date of progression with McDonald criteria, changing PFS after re-evaluation of

  16. Irradiation hardening of Fe–9Cr-based alloys and ODS Eurofer: Effect of helium implantation and iron-ion irradiation at 300 °C including sequence effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintze, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Hernández-Mayoral, M. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kögler, R.; Müller, G.; Ulbricht, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Single-beam, dual-beam and sequential iron- and/or helium-ion irradiations are widely accepted to emulate more application-relevant but hardly accessible irradiation conditions of generation-IV fission and fusion candidate materials for certain purposes such as material pre-selection, identification of basic mechanisms or model calibration. However, systematic investigations of sequence effects capable to critically question individual approaches are largely missing. In the present study, sequence effects of iron-ion irradiations at 300 °C up to 5 dpa and helium implantations up to 100 appm He are investigated by means of post-irradiation nanoindentation of an Fe9%Cr model alloy, ferritic/martensitic 9%Cr steels T91 and Eurofer97 and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer. Different types of sequence effects, both synergistic and antagonistic, are identified and tentative interpretations are suggested. It is found that different accelerated irradiation approaches have a great impact on the mechanical hardening. This stresses the importance of experimental design in attempts to emulate in-reactor conditions. - Highlights: • The single-beam He-ion implantations do not give rise to significant hardening. • The single-beam Fe-ion irradiations give rise to significant hardening, ΔH{sub Fe}. • Hardening due to sequential He-/Fe-ion irradiation is smaller than ΔH{sub Fe}. • Hardening due to simultaneous He-/Fe-ion irradiation is larger than ΔH{sub Fe}. • The He–Fe synergism for ODS-Eurofer is less pronounced than for Eurofer97.

  17. DWI-ASPECTS (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Scores) and DWI-FLAIR (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) Mismatch in Thrombectomy Candidates: An Intrarater and Interrater Agreement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahed, Robert; Lecler, Augustin; Sabben, Candice; Khoury, Naim; Ducroux, Célina; Chalumeau, Vanessa; Botta, Daniele; Kalsoum, Erwah; Boisseau, William; Duron, Loïc; Cabral, Dominique; Koskas, Patricia; Benaïssa, Azzedine; Koulakian, Hasmik; Obadia, Michael; Maïer, Benjamin; Weisenburger-Lile, David; Lapergue, Bertrand; Wang, Adrien; Redjem, Hocine; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Mazighi, Mikaël; Ben Maacha, Malek; Akkari, Inès; Zuber, Kevin; Blanc, Raphaël; Raymond, Jean; Piotin, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to study the intrarater and interrater agreement of clinicians attributing DWI-ASPECTS (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Scores) and DWI-FLAIR (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) mismatch in patients with acute ischemic stroke referred for mechanical thrombectomy. Eighteen raters independently scored anonymized magnetic resonance imaging scans of 30 participants from a multicentre thrombectomy trial, in 2 different reading sessions. Agreement was measured using Fleiss κ and Cohen κ statistics. Interrater agreement for DWI-ASPECTS was slight (κ=0.17 [0.14-0.21]). Four raters (22.2%) had a substantial (or higher) intrarater agreement. Dichotomization of the DWI-ASPECTS (0-5 versus 6-10 or 0-6 versus 7-10) increased the interrater agreement to a substantial level (κ=0.62 [0.48-0.75] and 0.68 [0.55-0.79], respectively) and more raters reached a substantial (or higher) intrarater agreement (17/18 raters [94.4%]). Interrater agreement for DWI-FLAIR mismatch was moderate (κ=0.43 [0.33-0.57]); 11 raters (61.1%) reached a substantial (or higher) intrarater agreement. Agreement between clinicians assessing DWI-ASPECTS and DWI-FLAIR mismatch may not be sufficient to make repeatable clinical decisions in mechanical thrombectomy. The dichotomization of the DWI-ASPECTS (0-5 versus 0-6 or 0-6 versus 7-10) improved interrater and intrarater agreement, however, its relevance for patients selection for mechanical thrombectomy needs to be validated in a randomized trial. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. MRI investigation of normal fetal lung maturation using signal intensities on different imaging sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Csapo, Bence; Mittermayer, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    To purpose of this paper is to study the relation between normal lung maturation signal and changes in intensity ratios (SIR) and to determine which magnetic resonance imaging sequence provides the strongest correlation of normal lung SIs with gestational age. 126 normal singleton pregnancies (20-37 weeks) were examined with a 1.5 Tesla unit. Mean SIs for lungs, liver, and gastric fluid were assessed on six different sequences, and SIRs of lung/liver (LLSIR) and lung/gastric fluid (LGSIR) were correlated with gestational age for each sequence. To evaluate the feasibility of SIRs in the prediction of the state of the lung maturity, accuracy of the predicted SIRs (D*) was measured by calculating relative residuals (D*-D)/D for each sequence. LLSIRs showed significant changes in every sequence (p<0.05), while LGSIRs only on two sequences. Significant differences were shown for the mean of absolute residuals for both LLSIRs (p<0.001) and for LGSIRs (p=0.003). Relative residuals of LLSIRs were significantly smaller on T1-weighted sequence, whereas they were significantly higher for LGSIRs on FLAIR sequence. Fetal liver seems to be adequate reference for the investigation of lung maturation. T1-weighted sequence was the most accurate for the measurement of the lung SIs; thus, we propose to determine LLSIR on T1-weighted sequence when evaluating lung development. (orig.)

  19. MRI investigation of normal fetal lung maturation using signal intensities on different imaging sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Csapo, Bence [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    To purpose of this paper is to study the relation between normal lung maturation signal and changes in intensity ratios (SIR) and to determine which magnetic resonance imaging sequence provides the strongest correlation of normal lung SIs with gestational age. 126 normal singleton pregnancies (20-37 weeks) were examined with a 1.5 Tesla unit. Mean SIs for lungs, liver, and gastric fluid were assessed on six different sequences, and SIRs of lung/liver (LLSIR) and lung/gastric fluid (LGSIR) were correlated with gestational age for each sequence. To evaluate the feasibility of SIRs in the prediction of the state of the lung maturity, accuracy of the predicted SIRs (D*) was measured by calculating relative residuals (D*-D)/D for each sequence. LLSIRs showed significant changes in every sequence (p<0.05), while LGSIRs only on two sequences. Significant differences were shown for the mean of absolute residuals for both LLSIRs (p<0.001) and for LGSIRs (p=0.003). Relative residuals of LLSIRs were significantly smaller on T1-weighted sequence, whereas they were significantly higher for LGSIRs on FLAIR sequence. Fetal liver seems to be adequate reference for the investigation of lung maturation. T1-weighted sequence was the most accurate for the measurement of the lung SIs; thus, we propose to determine LLSIR on T1-weighted sequence when evaluating lung development. (orig.)

  20. Adaptive Processing for Sequence Alignment

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.; Bonny, Talal; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments for adaptive processing for sequence alignment. In one embodiment, among others, a method includes obtaining a query sequence and a plurality of database sequences. A first portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a central processing unit (CPU) and a second portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a graphical processing unit (GPU) based upon a predetermined splitting ratio associated with the plurality of database sequences, where the database sequences of the first portion are shorter than the database sequences of the second portion. A first alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the CPU based upon the first portion of the plurality of database sequences and a second alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the GPU based upon the second portion of the plurality of database sequences.

  1. Adaptive Processing for Sequence Alignment

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for adaptive processing for sequence alignment. In one embodiment, among others, a method includes obtaining a query sequence and a plurality of database sequences. A first portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a central processing unit (CPU) and a second portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a graphical processing unit (GPU) based upon a predetermined splitting ratio associated with the plurality of database sequences, where the database sequences of the first portion are shorter than the database sequences of the second portion. A first alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the CPU based upon the first portion of the plurality of database sequences and a second alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the GPU based upon the second portion of the plurality of database sequences.

  2. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eul Kyu; Choi, Kwan Woo; Jeong, Hoi Woun; Jang, Seo Goo; Kim, Ki Won; Son, Soon Yong; Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development

  3. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [The Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [The Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development.

  4. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  5. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  6. Visualization of the internal globus pallidus: sequence and orientation for deep brain stimulation using a standard installation protocol at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölte, Ingo S; Gerigk, Lars; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Groden, Christoph; Kerl, Hans U

    2012-03-01

    Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the internal globus pallidus (GPi) has shown remarkable therapeutic benefits for treatment-resistant neurological disorders including dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD). The success of the DBS is critically dependent on the reliable visualization of the GPi. The aim of the study was to evaluate promising 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for pre-stereotactic visualization of the GPi using a standard installation protocol. MRI at 3.0 T of nine healthy individuals and of one patient with PD was acquired (FLAIR, T1-MPRAGE, T2-SPACE, T2*-FLASH2D, susceptibility-weighted imaging mapping (SWI)). Image quality and visualization of the GPi for each sequence were assessed by two neuroradiologists independently using a 6-point scale. Axial, coronal, and sagittal planes of the T2*-FLASH2D images were compared. Inter-rater reliability, contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for the GPi were determined. For illustration, axial T2*-FLASH2D images were fused with a section schema of the Schaltenbrand-Wahren stereotactic atlas. The GPi was best and reliably visualized in axial and to a lesser degree on coronal T2*-FLASH2D images. No major artifacts in the GPi were observed in any of the sequences. SWI offered a significantly higher CNR for the GPi compared to standard T2-weighted imaging using the standard parameters. The fusion of the axial T2*-FLASH2D images and the atlas projected the GPi clearly in the boundaries of the section schema. Using a standard installation protocol at 3.0 T T2*-FLASH2D imaging (particularly axial view) provides optimal and reliable delineation of the GPi.

  7. Foundations of Sequence-to-Sequence Modeling for Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsov, Vitaly; Mariet, Zelda

    2018-01-01

    The availability of large amounts of time series data, paired with the performance of deep-learning algorithms on a broad class of problems, has recently led to significant interest in the use of sequence-to-sequence models for time series forecasting. We provide the first theoretical analysis of this time series forecasting framework. We include a comparison of sequence-to-sequence modeling to classical time series models, and as such our theory can serve as a quantitative guide for practiti...

  8. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  9. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Christian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  10. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  11. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  12. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  13. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  14. Biological sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durbin, Richard; Eddy, Sean; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis, and phylogene...

  15. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  16. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study; Anormalidade de sinal na imagem por RM do polo temporal na epilepsia do lobo temporal com esclerose hipocampal: um estudo pela sequencia inversao recuperacao com supressao da agua livre (FLAIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrete Junior, Henrique; Abdala, Nitamar; Szjenfeld, Jacob; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Lin, Katia; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Americo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Marcia Targas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia

    2007-09-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA) in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. Method: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. Results: Ninety (75%) of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, {chi}{sup 2} test). The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30%) out of 90 patients. In 63 (70%) patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018), but without association with duration of epilepsy. Conclusion: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved. (author)

  17. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerema, S.J.; Dekker, C.

    2016-01-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with

  18. Reduction of MRI acoustic noise achieved by manipulation of scan parameters – A study using veterinary MR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Sound pressure levels were measured within an MR scan room for a range of sequences employed in veterinary brain scanning, using a test phantom in an extremity coil. Variation of TR and TE, and use of a quieter gradient mode (‘whisper’ mode) were evaluated to determine their effect on sound pressure levels (SPLs). Use of a human head coil and a human brain sequence was also evaluated. Significant differences in SPL were achieved for T2, T1, T2* gradient echo and VIBE sequences by varying TR or TE, or by selecting the ‘whisper’ gradient mode. An appreciable reduction was achieved for the FLAIR sequence. Noise levels were not affected when a head coil was used in place of an extremity coil. Due to sequence parameters employed, veterinary patients and anaesthetists may be exposed to higher sound levels than those experienced in human MR examinations. The techniques described are particularly valuable in small animal MR scanning where ear protection is not routinely provided for the patient.

  19. [Contrastive analysis of artifacts produced by metal dental crowns in 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging with six sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Gao; Yunmin, Lian; Pu, Wang; Haili, Huai

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to observe and evaluate six 3.0 T sequences of metallic artifacts produced by metal dental crowns. Dental crowns fabricated with four different materials (Co-Gr, Ni-Gr, Ti alloy and pure Ti) were evaluated. A mature crossbreed dog was used as the experimental animal, and crowns were fabricated for its upper right second premolar. Each crown was examined through head MRI (3.0 T) with six sequences, namely, T₁ weighted-imaging of spin echo (T₁W/SE), T₂ weighted-imaging of inversion recovery (T₂W/IR), T₂ star gradient echo (T₂*/GRE), T2 weighted-imaging of fast spin echo (T₂W/FSE), T₁ weighted-imaging of fluid attenuate inversion recovery (T₂W/FLAIR), and T₂ weighted-imaging of propeller (T₂W/PROP). The largest area and layers of artifacts were assessed and compared. The artifact in the T₂*/GRE sequence was significantly wider than those in the other sequences (P 0.05). T₂*/GRE exhibit the strongest influence on the artifact, whereas the five other sequences contribute equally to artifact generation.

  20. Microdeletion del(22(q12.2 encompassing the facial development-associated gene, MN1 (meningioma 1 in a child with Pierre-Robin sequence (including cleft palate and neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Tom B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS is defined by micro- and/or retrognathia, glossoptosis and cleft soft palate, either caused by deformational defect or part of a malformation syndrome. Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q12.2. NF2 is characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas, spinal cord schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas, and juvenile cataracts. To date, NF2 and PRS have not been described together in the same patient. Case presentation We report a female with PRS (micrognathia, cleft palate, microcephaly, ocular hypertelorism, mental retardation and bilateral hearing loss, who at age 15 was also diagnosed with severe NF2 (bilateral cerebellopontine schwannomas and multiple extramedullary/intradural spine tumors. This is the first published report of an individual with both diagnosed PRS and NF2. High resolution karyotype revealed 46, XX, del(22(q12.1q12.3, FISH confirmed a deletion encompassing NF2, and chromosomal microarray identified a 3,693 kb deletion encompassing multiple genes including NF2 and MN1 (meningioma 1. Five additional patients with craniofacial dysmorphism and deletion in chromosome 22-adjacent-to or containing NF2 were identified in PubMed and the DECIPHER clinical chromosomal database. Their shared chromosomal deletion encompassed MN1, PITPNB and TTC28. MN1, initially cloned from a patient with meningioma, is an oncogene in murine hematopoiesis and participates as a fusion gene (TEL/MN1 in human myeloid leukemias. Interestingly, Mn1-haploinsufficient mice have abnormal skull development and secondary cleft palate. Additionally, Mn1 regulates maturation and function of calvarial osteoblasts and is an upstream regulator of Tbx22, a gene associated with murine and human cleft palate. This suggests that deletion of MN1 in the six patients we describe may be causally linked to their cleft palates and/or craniofacial

  1. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  2. Multimodal sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. "First generation" automated DNA sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatko, Barton E; Kieleczawa, Jan; Ju, Jingyue; Gardner, Andrew F; Hendrickson, Cynthia L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2011-10-01

    Beginning in the 1980s, automation of DNA sequencing has greatly increased throughput, reduced costs, and enabled large projects to be completed more easily. The development of automation technology paralleled the development of other aspects of DNA sequencing: better enzymes and chemistry, separation and imaging technology, sequencing protocols, robotics, and computational advancements (including base-calling algorithms with quality scores, database developments, and sequence analysis programs). Despite the emergence of high-throughput sequencing platforms, automated Sanger sequencing technology remains useful for many applications. This unit provides background and a description of the "First-Generation" automated DNA sequencing technology. It also includes protocols for using the current Applied Biosystems (ABI) automated DNA sequencing machines. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Weak disorder in Fibonacci sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Naim, E [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Krapivsky, P L [Department of Physics and Center for Molecular Cybernetics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2006-05-19

    We study how weak disorder affects the growth of the Fibonacci series. We introduce a family of stochastic sequences that grow by the normal Fibonacci recursion with probability 1 - {epsilon}, but follow a different recursion rule with a small probability {epsilon}. We focus on the weak disorder limit and obtain the Lyapunov exponent that characterizes the typical growth of the sequence elements, using perturbation theory. The limiting distribution for the ratio of consecutive sequence elements is obtained as well. A number of variations to the basic Fibonacci recursion including shift, doubling and copying are considered. (letter to the editor)

  5. Recent progress in the use of in vitro isotopic methods for studying the bioavailability of trace elements: Activities being undertaken within EC: Flair concerted action no. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairweather Tait, S.; Aggett, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The action is entitled ''The Measurement of Micronutrient Absorption and Status'' and is due to finish at the end of 1993. Participants from 28 centres in Europe (representing 11 EC and 2 EFTA countries) belong to the action, some of whom are interested in mineral nutrition and/or inorganic stable isotope methodology, and others who are primarily interested in vitamins. Within the Action several sub-groups have been set up including (a) micronutrient status (b) stable isotope methodology and (c) in vitro assessment of mineral availability. The major thrusts within this Action have been analytical method development and critical appraisal of research techniques. Where no standard reference materials are available, interlaboratory comparisons have been carried out using materials generated within participants' research programmes and the results compared and reasons for differences sought. A number of exchange visits have been made in order to facilitate technology transfer. Several internal reports have been written, describing methods used by each laboratory for the measurement of mineral status, mineral content of biological samples, inorganic stable isotopic analysis of enriched sources of biological materials, and in vitro measures of dialysable iron in foods. Final reports on the findings of the Action will be submitted to the EC and papers will be published in scientific journals. These will include recommendations of the members of the Action on methodology for research into mineral absorption and status, and a literature review and hand book on the use of stable isotopes to study mineral absorption. This report will describe the Action's initiative to refine the classical approach to the assessment in vitro of bioavailability and will show the value of quality control exercises standardizing methodologies in collaborating laboratories

  6. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  7. Rapid Diagnostics of Onboard Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbird, Thomas W.; Morris, John R.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Maimone, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Keeping track of sequences onboard a spacecraft is challenging. When reviewing Event Verification Records (EVRs) of sequence executions on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER), operators often found themselves wondering which version of a named sequence the EVR corresponded to. The lack of this information drastically impacts the operators diagnostic capabilities as well as their situational awareness with respect to the commands the spacecraft has executed, since the EVRs do not provide argument values or explanatory comments. Having this information immediately available can be instrumental in diagnosing critical events and can significantly enhance the overall safety of the spacecraft. This software provides auditing capability that can eliminate that uncertainty while diagnosing critical conditions. Furthermore, the Restful interface provides a simple way for sequencing tools to automatically retrieve binary compiled sequence SCMFs (Space Command Message Files) on demand. It also enables developers to change the underlying database, while maintaining the same interface to the existing applications. The logging capabilities are also beneficial to operators when they are trying to recall how they solved a similar problem many days ago: this software enables automatic recovery of SCMF and RML (Robot Markup Language) sequence files directly from the command EVRs, eliminating the need for people to find and validate the corresponding sequences. To address the lack of auditing capability for sequences onboard a spacecraft during earlier missions, extensive logging support was added on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sequencing server. This server is responsible for generating all MSL binary SCMFs from RML input sequences. The sequencing server logs every SCMF it generates into a MySQL database, as well as the high-level RML file and dictionary name inputs used to create the SCMF. The SCMF is then indexed by a hash value that is automatically included in all command

  8. Memory and learning with rapid audiovisual sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arielle S.; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We examined short-term memory for sequences of visual stimuli embedded in varying multisensory contexts. In two experiments, subjects judged the structure of the visual sequences while disregarding concurrent, but task-irrelevant auditory sequences. Stimuli were eight-item sequences in which varying luminances and frequencies were presented concurrently and rapidly (at 8 Hz). Subjects judged whether the final four items in a visual sequence identically replicated the first four items. Luminances and frequencies in each sequence were either perceptually correlated (Congruent) or were unrelated to one another (Incongruent). Experiment 1 showed that, despite encouragement to ignore the auditory stream, subjects' categorization of visual sequences was strongly influenced by the accompanying auditory sequences. Moreover, this influence tracked the similarity between a stimulus's separate audio and visual sequences, demonstrating that task-irrelevant auditory sequences underwent a considerable degree of processing. Using a variant of Hebb's repetition design, Experiment 2 compared musically trained subjects and subjects who had little or no musical training on the same task as used in Experiment 1. Test sequences included some that intermittently and randomly recurred, which produced better performance than sequences that were generated anew for each trial. The auditory component of a recurring audiovisual sequence influenced musically trained subjects more than it did other subjects. This result demonstrates that stimulus-selective, task-irrelevant learning of sequences can occur even when such learning is an incidental by-product of the task being performed. PMID:26575193

  9. Memory and learning with rapid audiovisual sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arielle S; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We examined short-term memory for sequences of visual stimuli embedded in varying multisensory contexts. In two experiments, subjects judged the structure of the visual sequences while disregarding concurrent, but task-irrelevant auditory sequences. Stimuli were eight-item sequences in which varying luminances and frequencies were presented concurrently and rapidly (at 8 Hz). Subjects judged whether the final four items in a visual sequence identically replicated the first four items. Luminances and frequencies in each sequence were either perceptually correlated (Congruent) or were unrelated to one another (Incongruent). Experiment 1 showed that, despite encouragement to ignore the auditory stream, subjects' categorization of visual sequences was strongly influenced by the accompanying auditory sequences. Moreover, this influence tracked the similarity between a stimulus's separate audio and visual sequences, demonstrating that task-irrelevant auditory sequences underwent a considerable degree of processing. Using a variant of Hebb's repetition design, Experiment 2 compared musically trained subjects and subjects who had little or no musical training on the same task as used in Experiment 1. Test sequences included some that intermittently and randomly recurred, which produced better performance than sequences that were generated anew for each trial. The auditory component of a recurring audiovisual sequence influenced musically trained subjects more than it did other subjects. This result demonstrates that stimulus-selective, task-irrelevant learning of sequences can occur even when such learning is an incidental by-product of the task being performed.

  10. Multineuronal Spike Sequences Repeat with Millisecond Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki eMatsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microcircuits are nonrandomly wired by neurons. As a natural consequence, spikes emitted by microcircuits are also nonrandomly patterned in time and space. One of the prominent spike organizations is a repetition of fixed patterns of spike series across multiple neurons. However, several questions remain unsolved, including how precisely spike sequences repeat, how the sequences are spatially organized, how many neurons participate in sequences, and how different sequences are functionally linked. To address these questions, we monitored spontaneous spikes of hippocampal CA3 neurons ex vivo using a high-speed functional multineuron calcium imaging technique that allowed us to monitor spikes with millisecond resolution and to record the location of spiking and nonspiking neurons. Multineuronal spike sequences were overrepresented in spontaneous activity compared to the statistical chance level. Approximately 75% of neurons participated in at least one sequence during our observation period. The participants were sparsely dispersed and did not show specific spatial organization. The number of sequences relative to the chance level decreased when larger time frames were used to detect sequences. Thus, sequences were precise at the millisecond level. Sequences often shared common spikes with other sequences; parts of sequences were subsequently relayed by following sequences, generating complex chains of multiple sequences.

  11. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study Anormalidade de sinal na imagem por RM do pólo temporal na epilepsia do lobo temporal com esclerose hipocampal: um estudo pela seqüência inversão recuperação com supressão da água livre (FLAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Carrete Junior

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. METHOD: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. RESULTS: Ninety (75% of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, chi2 test. The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30% out of 90 patients. In 63 (70% patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018, but without association with duration of epilepsy. CONCLUSION: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved.OBJETIVO: Determinar a freqüência e o envolvimento regional da anormalidade de sinal do pólo temporal (APT em pacientes com esclerose hipocampal (EH utilizando seqüência inversão recuperação com supressão da água (FLAIR por RM, e correlacioná-la com a história. MÉTODO: Foram analisadas as imagens coronais FLAIR dos pólos temporais de 120 pacientes com EH e de 30 indivíduos normais, para avaliar a demarcação entre substâncias branca e cinzenta. RESULTADOS: Noventa (75% dos 120 pacientes tinham APT associada. Houve prevalência do lado esquerdo (p=0.04, chi2 teste na relação entre APT e o lado da EH. A zona ântero-medial estava acometida em 27 (30% destes pacientes. Em 63 (70% pacientes também a zona lateral estava acometida. Pacientes com APT apresentaram início da epilepsia quando mais jovens (p=0.018, porém sem associação com a sua duração. CONCLUSÃO: A seqüência FLAIR mostra haver ATP em 3/4 dos pacientes com EH

  12. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P.

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 'integrated sequence analysis' (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term 'methodology' denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  13. Nonparametric combinatorial sequence models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, Fabian L; Jordan, Michael I; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2011-11-01

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This article presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three biological sequence families which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution over sequence representations induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior, our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  14. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  15. Optimization of sequence alignment for simple sequence repeat regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonnaya Francis C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs, are tandemly repeated DNA sequences, including tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases, that are distributed in the genome. SSR has been used as a molecular marker because it is easy to detect and is used in a range of applications, including genetic diversity, genome mapping, and marker assisted selection. It is also very mutable because of slipping in the DNA polymerase during DNA replication. This unique mutation increases the insertion/deletion (INDELs mutation frequency to a high ratio - more than other types of molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs. SNPs are more frequent than INDELs. Therefore, all designed algorithms for sequence alignment fit the vast majority of the genomic sequence without considering microsatellite regions, as unique sequences that require special consideration. The old algorithm is limited in its application because there are many overlaps between different repeat units which result in false evolutionary relationships. Findings To overcome the limitation of the aligning algorithm when dealing with SSR loci, a new algorithm was developed using PERL script with a Tk graphical interface. This program is based on aligning sequences after determining the repeated units first, and the last SSR nucleotides positions. This results in a shifting process according to the inserted repeated unit type. When studying the phylogenic relations before and after applying the new algorithm, many differences in the trees were obtained by increasing the SSR length and complexity. However, less distance between different linage had been observed after applying the new algorithm. Conclusions The new algorithm produces better estimates for aligning SSR loci because it reflects more reliable evolutionary relations between different linages. It reduces overlapping during SSR alignment, which results in a more realistic

  16. Long sequence correlation coprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1994-09-01

    A long sequence correlation coprocessor (LSCC) accelerates the bitwise correlation of arbitrarily long digital sequences by calculating in parallel the correlation score for 16, for example, adjacent bit alignments between two binary sequences. The LSCC integrated circuit is incorporated into a computer system with memory storage buffers and a separate general purpose computer processor which serves as its controller. Each of the LSCC's set of sequential counters simultaneously tallies a separate correlation coefficient. During each LSCC clock cycle, computer enable logic associated with each counter compares one bit of a first sequence with one bit of a second sequence to increment the counter if the bits are the same. A shift register assures that the same bit of the first sequence is simultaneously compared to different bits of the second sequence to simultaneously calculate the correlation coefficient by the different counters to represent different alignments of the two sequences.

  17. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  18. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  19. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  20. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  1. Using a biomimetic membrane surface experiment to investigate the activity of the magnetite biomineralisation protein Mms6† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Including Mms6 protein and peptide sequences, additional QCM-D and SEM data and protein modelling. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ra16469a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Scott M.; Rawlings, Andrea E.; Galloway, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are able to synthesise precise nanoparticles of the iron oxide magnetite within their cells. These particles are formed in dedicated organelles termed magnetosomes. These lipid membrane compartments use a range of biomineralisation proteins to nucleate and regulate the magnetite crystallisation process. A key component is the membrane protein Mms6, which binds to iron ions and helps to control the formation of the inorganic core. We have previously used Mms6 on gold surfaces patterned with a self-assembled monolayer to successfully produce arrays of magnetic nanoparticles. Here we use this surface system as a mimic of the interior face of the magnetosome membrane to study differences between intact Mms6 and the acid-rich C-terminal peptide subregion of the Mms6 protein. When immobilised on surfaces, the peptide is unable to reproduce the particle size or homogeneity control exhibited by the full Mms6 protein in our experimental setup. Moreover, the peptide is unable to support anchoring of a dense array of nanoparticles to the surface. This system also allows us to deconvolute particle binding from particle nucleation, and shows that Mms6 particle binding is less efficient when supplied with preformed magnetite nanoparticles when compared to particles precipitated from solution in the presence of the surface immobilised Mms6. This suggests that Mms6 binds to iron ions rather than to magnetite surfaces in our system, and is perhaps a nucleating agent rather than a controller of magnetite crystal growth. The comparison between the peptide and the protein under identical experimental conditions indicates that the full length sequence is required to support the full function of Mms6 on surfaces. PMID:27019707

  2. Revisiting the relationship of three-dimensional fluid attenuation inversion recovery imaging and hearing outcomes in adults with idiopathic unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Wen-Huei [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hsiu-Mei [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hung-Yi [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Tu, Tzong-Yang; Shiao, An-Suey [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Castillo, Mauricio [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7510 (United States); Hung, Sheng-Che, E-mail: hsz829@gmail.com [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-15

    Background and purpose: Three-dimensional fluid attenuation inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) may demonstrate high signal in the inner ears of patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), but the correlations of this finding with outcomes are still controversial. Here we compared 4 3D MRI sequences with the outcomes of patients with ISSNHL. Materials and methods: 77 adult patients with ISSNHL underwent MRI with pre contrast FLAIR, fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition images (FIESTA-C), post contrast T1WI and post contrast FLAIR. The extent and degree of high signal in both cochleas were evaluated in all patients, and asymmetry ratios between the affected ears and the normal ones were calculated. The relationships among MRI findings, including extent and asymmetry of abnormal cochlear high signals, degree of FLAIR enhancement, and clinical information, including age, vestibular symptoms, baseline hearing loss, and final hearing outcomes were analyzed. Results: 54 patients (28 men; age, 52.1 ± 15.5 years) were included in our study. Asymmetric cochlear signal intensities were more frequently observed in pre contrast and post contrast FLAIR (79.6% and 68.5%) than in FIESTA-C (61.1%) and T1WI (51.9%) (p < 0.001). Age, baseline hearing loss, extent of high signal and asymmetry ratios of pre contrast and post contrast FLAIR were all correlated with final hearing outcomes. In multivariate analysis, age and the extent of high signals were the most significant predictors of final hearing outcomes. Conclusion: 3D FLAIR provides a higher sensitivity in detecting the asymmetric cochlear signal abnormality. The more asymmetric FLAIR signals and presence of high signals beyond cochlea indicated a poorer prognosis.

  3. Sequences, groups, and number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rigo, Michel

    2018-01-01

    This collaborative book presents recent trends on the study of sequences, including combinatorics on words and symbolic dynamics, and new interdisciplinary links to group theory and number theory. Other chapters branch out from those areas into subfields of theoretical computer science, such as complexity theory and theory of automata. The book is built around four general themes: number theory and sequences, word combinatorics, normal numbers, and group theory. Those topics are rounded out by investigations into automatic and regular sequences, tilings and theory of computation, discrete dynamical systems, ergodic theory, numeration systems, automaton semigroups, and amenable groups.  This volume is intended for use by graduate students or research mathematicians, as well as computer scientists who are working in automata theory and formal language theory. With its organization around unified themes, it would also be appropriate as a supplemental text for graduate level courses.

  4. Genome Sequences of Oryza Species

    KAUST Repository

    Kumagai, Masahiko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Hsing, Yue-Ie C.; Itoh, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    This chapter summarizes recent data obtained from genome sequencing, annotation projects, and studies on the genome diversity of Oryza sativa and related Oryza species. O. sativa, commonly known as Asian rice, is the first monocot species whose complete genome sequence was deciphered based on physical mapping by an international collaborative effort. This genome, along with its accurate and comprehensive annotation, has become an indispensable foundation for crop genomics and breeding. With the development of innovative sequencing technologies, genomic studies of O. sativa have dramatically increased; in particular, a large number of cultivars and wild accessions have been sequenced and compared with the reference rice genome. Since de novo genome sequencing has become cost-effective, the genome of African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima, has also been determined. Comparative genomic studies have highlighted the independent domestication processes of different rice species, but it also turned out that Asian and African rice share a common gene set that has experienced similar artificial selection. An international project aimed at constructing reference genomes and examining the genome diversity of wild Oryza species is currently underway, and the genomes of some species are publicly available. This project provides a platform for investigations such as the evolution, development, polyploidization, and improvement of crops. Studies on the genomic diversity of Oryza species, including wild species, should provide new insights to solve the problem of growing food demands in the face of rapid climatic changes.

  5. Genome Sequences of Oryza Species

    KAUST Repository

    Kumagai, Masahiko

    2018-02-14

    This chapter summarizes recent data obtained from genome sequencing, annotation projects, and studies on the genome diversity of Oryza sativa and related Oryza species. O. sativa, commonly known as Asian rice, is the first monocot species whose complete genome sequence was deciphered based on physical mapping by an international collaborative effort. This genome, along with its accurate and comprehensive annotation, has become an indispensable foundation for crop genomics and breeding. With the development of innovative sequencing technologies, genomic studies of O. sativa have dramatically increased; in particular, a large number of cultivars and wild accessions have been sequenced and compared with the reference rice genome. Since de novo genome sequencing has become cost-effective, the genome of African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima, has also been determined. Comparative genomic studies have highlighted the independent domestication processes of different rice species, but it also turned out that Asian and African rice share a common gene set that has experienced similar artificial selection. An international project aimed at constructing reference genomes and examining the genome diversity of wild Oryza species is currently underway, and the genomes of some species are publicly available. This project provides a platform for investigations such as the evolution, development, polyploidization, and improvement of crops. Studies on the genomic diversity of Oryza species, including wild species, should provide new insights to solve the problem of growing food demands in the face of rapid climatic changes.

  6. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brozynska

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent (Life Technology sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare. Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  7. Rapid Multiplex Small DNA Sequencing on the MinION Nanopore Sequencing Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Real-time sequencing of short DNA reads has a wide variety of clinical and research applications including screening for mutations, target sequences and aneuploidy. We recently demonstrated that MinION, a nanopore-based DNA sequencing device the size of a USB drive, could be used for short-read DNA sequencing. In this study, an ultra-rapid multiplex library preparation and sequencing method for the MinION is presented and applied to accurately test normal diploid and aneuploidy samples’ genomic DNA in under three hours, including library preparation and sequencing. This novel method shows great promise as a clinical diagnostic test for applications requiring rapid short-read DNA sequencing.

  8. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  9. Occupational Sequences: Auto Engines 1. AT 121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, A. W.; And Others

    In an attempt to individualize an automotive course, the Vocational-Technical Division of Northern Montana College has developed Occupational Sequences for an engine rebuilding course. Occupational Sequences, a learning or teaching aid, is an analysis of numbered operations involved in engine rebuilding. Job sheets, included in the book, provide a…

  10. CORRELATION BETWEEN INTERESTS, FLAIRS AND VOCATIONAL PREFERENCES WITH THE PROFESSIONAL CAREER ELECTION WHEN GRADUATED FROM THE TECHNOLOGIC AGRICULTURE COLLEGE, MEXICO / LA CORRELACIÓN ENTRE LOS INTERESES, APTITUDES Y PREFERENCIAS VOCACIONALES CON LA CARRERA QUE ELIGEN AL EGRESAR LOS ALUMNOS DEL CENTRO DE BACHILLERATO TECNOLÓGICO AGROPECUARIO, MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa De León Mendoza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An activity required in the educational field is the vocational counseling, which is considered fundamental because of the importance on the future of the students. Nevertheless there are only a few researches that meassure the correlation between the dominant areas identified by the career adviser and with the professional career election taken by the student at the end of high scholl degree.The methodology used in this research allow the vocational counseling or career adviser to provide the student with information of the specific area attached to their interests and flairs. The results of this research work, demonstrate that there is a correlation between the interests, skills and specific areas identified in the student, with the race which elects the graduation of his high school.

  11. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 `integrated sequence analysis` (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term `methodology` denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  12. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  13. Sequences for Student Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  14. Advantages of genome sequencing by long-read sequencer using SMRT technology in medical area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Minami, Maiko; Nakanishi, Tetsuhiro; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    PacBio RS II is the first commercialized third-generation DNA sequencer able to sequence a single molecule DNA in real-time without amplification. PacBio RS II's sequencing technology is novel and unique, enabling the direct observation of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase. PacBio RS II confers four major advantages compared to other sequencing technologies: long read lengths, high consensus accuracy, a low degree of bias, and simultaneous capability of epigenetic characterization. These advantages surmount the obstacle of sequencing genomic regions such as high/low G+C, tandem repeat, and interspersed repeat regions. Moreover, PacBio RS II is ideal for whole genome sequencing, targeted sequencing, complex population analysis, RNA sequencing, and epigenetics characterization. With PacBio RS II, we have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of many species, from viruses to humans. Herein, we summarize and review some of our key genome sequencing projects, including full-length viral sequencing, complete bacterial genome and almost-complete plant genome assemblies, and long amplicon sequencing of a disease-associated gene region. We believe that PacBio RS II is not only an effective tool for use in the basic biological sciences but also in the medical/clinical setting.

  15. Sequence History Update Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  16. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area......The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of the test sample by movement of the probe relative to the surface of the test sample into the specific orientation.; The probe may further comprise a contact detector (14) extending from the supporting body arranged so as to contact the surface of the test sample prior to any one of the plurality...

  17. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  18. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas Kenneth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Cristian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  19. Mapping sequences by parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guziolowski Carito

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: We present the N-map method, a pairwise and asymmetrical approach which allows us to compare sequences by taking into account evolutionary events that produce shuffled, reversed or repeated elements. Basically, the optimal N-map of a sequence s over a sequence t is the best way of partitioning the first sequence into N parts and placing them, possibly complementary reversed, over the second sequence in order to maximize the sum of their gapless alignment scores. Results: We introduce an algorithm computing an optimal N-map with time complexity O (|s| × |t| × N using O (|s| × |t| × N memory space. Among all the numbers of parts taken in a reasonable range, we select the value N for which the optimal N-map has the most significant score. To evaluate this significance, we study the empirical distributions of the scores of optimal N-maps and show that they can be approximated by normal distributions with a reasonable accuracy. We test the functionality of the approach over random sequences on which we apply artificial evolutionary events. Practical Application: The method is illustrated with four case studies of pairs of sequences involving non-standard evolutionary events.

  20. Phylogenetic Trees From Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Paul; Wang, Li-San

    In this chapter, we review important concepts and approaches for phylogeny reconstruction from sequence data.We first cover some basic definitions and properties of phylogenetics, and briefly explain how scientists model sequence evolution and measure sequence divergence. We then discuss three major approaches for phylogenetic reconstruction: distance-based phylogenetic reconstruction, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood. In the third part of the chapter, we review how multiple phylogenies are compared by consensus methods and how to assess confidence using bootstrapping. At the end of the chapter are two sections that list popular software packages and additional reading.

  1. Quantitative phenotyping via deep barcode sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Heisler, Lawrence E; Mellor, Joseph; Kaper, Fiona; Thompson, Michael J; Chee, Mark; Roth, Frederick P; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2009-10-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized diverse genomics applications, including de novo genome sequencing, SNP detection, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transcriptome analysis. Here we apply deep sequencing to genome-scale fitness profiling to evaluate yeast strain collections in parallel. This method, Barcode analysis by Sequencing, or "Bar-seq," outperforms the current benchmark barcode microarray assay in terms of both dynamic range and throughput. When applied to a complex chemogenomic assay, Bar-seq quantitatively identifies drug targets, with performance superior to the benchmark microarray assay. We also show that Bar-seq is well-suited for a multiplex format. We completely re-sequenced and re-annotated the yeast deletion collection using deep sequencing, found that approximately 20% of the barcodes and common priming sequences varied from expectation, and used this revised list of barcode sequences to improve data quality. Together, this new assay and analysis routine provide a deep-sequencing-based toolkit for identifying gene-environment interactions on a genome-wide scale.

  2. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  3. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  4. Dynamic Sequence Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    D-136 548 DYNAMIIC SEQUENCE ASSIGNMENT(U) ADVANCED INFORMATION AND 1/2 DECISION SYSTEMS MOUNTAIN YIELW CA C A 0 REILLY ET AL. UNCLSSIIED DEC 83 AI/DS...I ADVANCED INFORMATION & DECISION SYSTEMS Mountain View. CA 94040 84 u ,53 V,..’. Unclassified _____ SCURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE REPORT...reviews some important heuristic algorithms developed for fas- ter solution of the sequence assignment problem. 3.1. DINAMIC MOGRAMUNIG FORMULATION FOR

  5. General LTE Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Billal, Masum

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,we have characterized sequences which maintain the same property described in Lifting the Exponent Lemma. Lifting the Exponent Lemma is a very powerful tool in olympiad number theory and recently it has become very popular. We generalize it to all sequences that maintain a property like it i.e. if p^{\\alpha}||a_k and p^\\b{eta}||n, then p^{{\\alpha}+\\b{eta}}||a_{nk}.

  6. Amplicon sequencing for the quantification of spoilage microbiota in complex foods including bacterial spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de P.; Caspers, M.; Sanders, J.W.; Kemperman, R.; Wijman, J.; Lommerse, G.; Roeselers, G.; Montijn, R.; Abee, T.; Kort, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background
    Spoilage of food products is frequently caused by bacterial spores and lactic acid bacteria. Identification of these organisms by classic cultivation methods is limited by their ability to form colonies on nutrient agar plates. In this study, we adapted and optimized 16S rRNA amplicon

  7. The contribution of next generation sequencing to epilepsy genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Dahl, Hans A.; Helbig, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, next generation sequencing technologies such as targeted gene panels, whole exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing have led to an explosion of gene identifications in monogenic epilepsies including both familial epilepsies and severe epilepsies, often referred to as ...

  8. Main sequence mass loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunish, W.M.; Guzik, J.A.; Willson, L.A.; Bowen, G.

    1987-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that variable stars may experience mass loss, driven, at least in part, by oscillations. The class of stars we are discussing here are the δ Scuti variables. These are variable stars with masses between about 1.2 and 2.25 M/sub θ/, lying on or very near the main sequence. According to this theory, high rotation rates enhance the rate of mass loss, so main sequence stars born in this mass range would have a range of mass loss rates, depending on their initial rotation velocity and the amplitude of the oscillations. The stars would evolve rapidly down the main sequence until (at about 1.25 M/sub θ/) a surface convection zone began to form. The presence of this convective region would slow the rotation, perhaps allowing magnetic braking to occur, and thus sharply reduce the mass loss rate. 7 refs

  9. Computer simulation of replacement sequences in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Schwartz, D.W.; Ariyasu, R.G.; Cascadden, S.E.

    1978-01-01

    Results of computer simulations of , , and replacement sequences in copper are presented, including displacement thresholds, focusing energies, energy losses per replacement, and replacement sequence lengths. These parameters are tabulated for six interatomic potentials and shown to vary in a systematic way with potential stiffness and range. Comparisons of results from calculations made with ADDES, a quasi-dynamical code, and COMENT, a dynamical code, show excellent agreement, demonstrating that the former can be calibrated and used satisfactorily in the analysis of low energy displacement cascades. Upper limits on , , and replacement sequences were found to be approximately 10, approximately 30, and approximately 14 replacements, respectively. (author)

  10. Electricity sequence control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Heung Ryeol

    2010-03-01

    The contents of the book are introduction of control system, like classification and control signal, introduction of electricity power switch, such as push-button and detection switch sensor for induction type and capacitance type machinery for control, solenoid valve, expression of sequence and type of electricity circuit about using diagram, time chart, marking and term, logic circuit like Yes, No, and, or and equivalence logic, basic electricity circuit, electricity sequence control, added condition, special program control about choice and jump of program, motor control, extra circuit on repeat circuit, pause circuit in a conveyer, safety regulations and rule about classification of electricity disaster and protective device for insulation.

  11. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    , Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence...... information obtained allows well for statistical analysis of the data. This general approach can be integrated into current laboratory practice and has numerous applications. Besides DNA-based predictions of blood group phenotypes, platelet phenotypes, or sickle cell anemia, and the determination of zygosity...

  12. Human Chromosome 7: DNA Sequence and Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Stephen W.; Cheung, Joseph; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Osborne, Lucy R.; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Herbrick, Jo-Anne; Carson, Andrew R.; Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Skaug, Jennifer; Khaja, Razi; Zhang, Junjun; Hudek, Alexander K.; Li, Martin; Haddad, May; Duggan, Gavin E.

    2003-01-01

    DNA sequence and annotation of the entire human chromosome 7, encompassing nearly 158 million nucleotides of DNA and 1917 gene structures, are presented. To generate a higher order description, additional structural features such as imprinted genes, fragile sites, and segmental duplications were integrated at the level of the DNA sequence with medical genetic data, including 440 chromosome rearrangement breakpoints associated with disease. This approach enabled the discovery of candidate gene...

  13. Infinite matrices and sequence spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    This clear and correct summation of basic results from a specialized field focuses on the behavior of infinite matrices in general, rather than on properties of special matrices. Three introductory chapters guide students to the manipulation of infinite matrices, covering definitions and preliminary ideas, reciprocals of infinite matrices, and linear equations involving infinite matrices.From the fourth chapter onward, the author treats the application of infinite matrices to the summability of divergent sequences and series from various points of view. Topics include consistency, mutual consi

  14. THE RHIC SEQUENCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN ZEIJTS, J.; DOTTAVIO, T.; FRAK, B.; MICHNOFF, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has a high level asynchronous time-line driven by a controlling program called the ''Sequencer''. Most high-level magnet and beam related issues are orchestrated by this system. The system also plays an important task in coordinated data acquisition and saving. We present the program, operator interface, operational impact and experience

  15. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak

  16. simple sequence repeat (SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, 78 mapped simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers representing 11 linkage groups of adzuki bean were evaluated for transferability to mungbean and related Vigna spp. 41 markers amplified characteristic bands in at least one Vigna species. The transferability percentage across the genotypes ranged ...

  17. Targeted sequencing of plant genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Huynh

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the field of genetics by providing a means for fast and relatively affordable sequencing. With the advancement of NGS, wholegenome sequencing (WGS) has become more commonplace. However, sequencing an entire genome is still not cost effective or even beneficial in all cases. In studies that do not require a whole-...

  18. Almost convergence of triple sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ayhan Esi; M.Necdet Catalbas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce and study the concepts of almost convergence and almost Cauchy for triple sequences. Weshow that the set of almost convergent triple sequences of 0's and 1's is of the first category and also almost everytriple sequence of 0's and 1's is not almost convergent.Keywords: almost convergence, P-convergent, triple sequence.

  19. A few Smarandache Integer Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ibstedt, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of a few Smarandache Integer Sequences which first appeared in Properties or the Numbers, F. Smarandache, University or Craiova Archives, 1975. The first four sequences are recurrence generated sequences while the last three are concatenation sequences.

  20. CATEGORIZATION OF EVENT SEQUENCES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.E. Ragan; P. Mecheret; D. Dexheimer

    2005-04-14

    The purposes of this analysis are: (1) Categorize (as Category 1, Category 2, or Beyond Category 2) internal event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. (2) Categorize external event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. This includes examining DBGM-1 seismic classifications and upgrading to DBGM-2, if appropriate, to ensure Beyond Category 2 categorization. (3) State the design and operational requirements that are invoked to make the categorization assignments valid. (4) Indicate the amount of material put at risk by Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences. (5) Estimate frequencies of Category 1 event sequences at the maximum capacity and receipt rate of the repository. (6) Distinguish occurrences associated with normal operations from event sequences. It is beyond the scope of the analysis to propose design requirements that may be required to control radiological exposure associated with normal operations. (7) Provide a convenient compilation of the results of the analysis in tabular form. The results of this analysis are used as inputs to the consequence analyses in an iterative design process that is depicted in Figure 1. Categorization of event sequences for permanent retrieval of waste from the repository is beyond the scope of this analysis. Cleanup activities that take place after an event sequence and other responses to abnormal events are also beyond the scope of the analysis.

  1. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Tobar-Tosse

    Full Text Available Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C content, Codon Usage (Cd, Trinucleotide Usage (Tn, and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment.

  2. CATEGORIZATION OF EVENT SEQUENCES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.E. Ragan; P. Mecheret; D. Dexheimer

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this analysis are: (1) Categorize (as Category 1, Category 2, or Beyond Category 2) internal event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. (2) Categorize external event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. This includes examining DBGM-1 seismic classifications and upgrading to DBGM-2, if appropriate, to ensure Beyond Category 2 categorization. (3) State the design and operational requirements that are invoked to make the categorization assignments valid. (4) Indicate the amount of material put at risk by Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences. (5) Estimate frequencies of Category 1 event sequences at the maximum capacity and receipt rate of the repository. (6) Distinguish occurrences associated with normal operations from event sequences. It is beyond the scope of the analysis to propose design requirements that may be required to control radiological exposure associated with normal operations. (7) Provide a convenient compilation of the results of the analysis in tabular form. The results of this analysis are used as inputs to the consequence analyses in an iterative design process that is depicted in Figure 1. Categorization of event sequences for permanent retrieval of waste from the repository is beyond the scope of this analysis. Cleanup activities that take place after an event sequence and other responses to abnormal events are also beyond the scope of the analysis

  3. On site DNA barcoding by nanopore sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Menegon

    Full Text Available Biodiversity research is becoming increasingly dependent on genomics, which allows the unprecedented digitization and understanding of the planet's biological heritage. The use of genetic markers i.e. DNA barcoding, has proved to be a powerful tool in species identification. However, full exploitation of this approach is hampered by the high sequencing costs and the absence of equipped facilities in biodiversity-rich countries. In the present work, we developed a portable sequencing laboratory based on the portable DNA sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies, the MinION. Complementary laboratory equipment and reagents were selected to be used in remote and tough environmental conditions. The performance of the MinION sequencer and the portable laboratory was tested for DNA barcoding in a mimicking tropical environment, as well as in a remote rainforest of Tanzania lacking electricity. Despite the relatively high sequencing error-rate of the MinION, the development of a suitable pipeline for data analysis allowed the accurate identification of different species of vertebrates including amphibians, reptiles and mammals. In situ sequencing of a wild frog allowed us to rapidly identify the species captured, thus confirming that effective DNA barcoding in the field is possible. These results open new perspectives for real-time-on-site DNA sequencing thus potentially increasing opportunities for the understanding of biodiversity in areas lacking conventional laboratory facilities.

  4. Detection of M-Sequences from Spike Sequence in Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshi Nishitani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In circuit theory, it is well known that a linear feedback shift register (LFSR circuit generates pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS, including an M-sequence with the maximum period of length. In this study, we tried to detect M-sequences known as a pseudorandom sequence generated by the LFSR circuit from time series patterns of stimulated action potentials. Stimulated action potentials were recorded from dissociated cultures of hippocampal neurons grown on a multielectrode array. We could find several M-sequences from a 3-stage LFSR circuit (M3. These results show the possibility of assembling LFSR circuits or its equivalent ones in a neuronal network. However, since the M3 pattern was composed of only four spike intervals, the possibility of an accidental detection was not zero. Then, we detected M-sequences from random spike sequences which were not generated from an LFSR circuit and compare the result with the number of M-sequences from the originally observed raster data. As a result, a significant difference was confirmed: a greater number of “0–1” reversed the 3-stage M-sequences occurred than would have accidentally be detected. This result suggests that some LFSR equivalent circuits are assembled in neuronal networks.

  5. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  6. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Peter V; Postis, Vincent Lg; Ashworth, Denise; Baldwin, Stephen A; McPherson, Michael J; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2011-03-07

    Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  7. Allele Re-sequencing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Farrell, Jacqueline Danielle; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing technologies has made sequencing an affordable approach for detection of genetic variations associated with various traits. However, the cost of whole genome re-sequencing still remains too high to be feasible for many plant species with large...... alternative to whole genome re-sequencing to identify causative genetic variations in plants. One challenge, however, will be efficient bioinformatics strategies for data handling and analysis from the increasing amount of sequence information....

  8. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  9. A neurocomputational model of automatic sequence production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helie, Sebastien; Roeder, Jessica L; Vucovich, Lauren; Rünger, Dennis; Ashby, F Gregory

    2015-07-01

    Most behaviors unfold in time and include a sequence of submovements or cognitive activities. In addition, most behaviors are automatic and repeated daily throughout life. Yet, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of automatic sequence production. Past research suggests a gradual transfer from the associative striatum to the sensorimotor striatum, but a number of more recent studies challenge this role of the BG in automatic sequence production. In this article, we propose a new neurocomputational model of automatic sequence production in which the main role of the BG is to train cortical-cortical connections within the premotor areas that are responsible for automatic sequence production. The new model is used to simulate four different data sets from human and nonhuman animals, including (1) behavioral data (e.g., RTs), (2) electrophysiology data (e.g., single-neuron recordings), (3) macrostructure data (e.g., TMS), and (4) neurological circuit data (e.g., inactivation studies). We conclude with a comparison of the new model with existing models of automatic sequence production and discuss a possible new role for the BG in automaticity and its implication for Parkinson's disease.

  10. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  11. Multilocus Sequence Typing

    OpenAIRE

    Belén, Ana; Pavón, Ibarz; Maiden, Martin C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was first proposed in 1998 as a typing approach that enables the unambiguous characterization of bacterial isolates in a standardized, reproducible, and portable manner using the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis as the exemplar organism. Since then, the approach has been applied to a large and growing number of organisms by public health laboratories and research institutions. MLST data, shared by investigators over the world via the Internet, have been ...

  12. Achalasia Carcinoma Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Makmun, Dadang

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of carcinoma of the esophagus in a 58 years old woman with achalasia, who has been diagnosed since 30 years ago, which initiated by surgical treatment (myotomy) and the symptoms recurred since 3 years ago. According to the progress of the disease, Malignancy was strongly suspected due to prolonged stasis and mucosal irritation caused by achalasia (achalasia carcinoma sequence). Because of these contributing factors for the development of serious complications such as Malignan...

  13. Sequencing BPS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gukov, Sergei [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik,Vivatsgasse 7, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Nawata, Satoshi [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Centre for Quantum Geometry of Moduli Spaces, University of Aarhus,Nordre Ringgade 1, DK-8000 (Denmark); Saberi, Ingmar [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stošić, Marko [CAMGSD, Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Superior Técnico,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Mathematical Institute SANU,Knez Mihajlova 36, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sułkowski, Piotr [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-03-02

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel “sliding” property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  14. Sequencing BPS spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel “sliding” property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  15. Preliminary hazard analysis using sequence tree method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Huiwen; Shih Chunkuan; Hung Hungchih; Chen Minghuei; Yih Swu; Lin Jiinming

    2007-01-01

    A system level PHA using sequence tree method was developed to perform Safety Related digital I and C system SSA. The conventional PHA is a brainstorming session among experts on various portions of the system to identify hazards through discussions. However, this conventional PHA is not a systematic technique, the analysis results strongly depend on the experts' subjective opinions. The analysis quality cannot be appropriately controlled. Thereby, this research developed a system level sequence tree based PHA, which can clarify the relationship among the major digital I and C systems. Two major phases are included in this sequence tree based technique. The first phase uses a table to analyze each event in SAR Chapter 15 for a specific safety related I and C system, such as RPS. The second phase uses sequence tree to recognize what I and C systems are involved in the event, how the safety related systems work, and how the backup systems can be activated to mitigate the consequence if the primary safety systems fail. In the sequence tree, the defense-in-depth echelons, including Control echelon, Reactor trip echelon, ESFAS echelon, and Indication and display echelon, are arranged to construct the sequence tree structure. All the related I and C systems, include digital system and the analog back-up systems are allocated in their specific echelon. By this system centric sequence tree based analysis, not only preliminary hazard can be identified systematically, the vulnerability of the nuclear power plant can also be recognized. Therefore, an effective simplified D3 evaluation can be performed as well. (author)

  16. Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard Brian; Summers, Anne O.; Rugh, Clayton L.

    1999-10-12

    The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

  17. Droplet Digital™ PCR Next-Generation Sequencing Library QC Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Nicholas J

    2018-01-01

    Digital PCR is a valuable tool to quantify next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries precisely and accurately. Accurately quantifying NGS libraries enable accurate loading of the libraries on to the sequencer and thus improve sequencing performance by reducing under and overloading error. Accurate quantification also benefits users by enabling uniform loading of indexed/barcoded libraries which in turn greatly improves sequencing uniformity of the indexed/barcoded samples. The advantages gained by employing the Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR™) library QC assay includes the precise and accurate quantification in addition to size quality assessment, enabling users to QC their sequencing libraries with confidence.

  18. Novel expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using different bioinformatic criteria, the SUCEST database was used to mine for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Among 42,189 clusters, 1,425 expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) were identified in silico. Trinucleotide repeats were the most abundant SSRs detected. Of 212 primer pairs ...

  19. Comparison of next generation sequencing technologies for transcriptome characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltis Douglas E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a simulation approach to help determine the optimal mixture of sequencing methods for most complete and cost effective transcriptome sequencing. We compared simulation results for traditional capillary sequencing with "Next Generation" (NG ultra high-throughput technologies. The simulation model was parameterized using mappings of 130,000 cDNA sequence reads to the Arabidopsis genome (NCBI Accession SRA008180.19. We also generated 454-GS20 sequences and de novo assemblies for the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica and the magnoliid avocado (Persea americana using a variety of methods for cDNA synthesis. Results The Arabidopsis reads tagged more than 15,000 genes, including new splice variants and extended UTR regions. Of the total 134,791 reads (13.8 MB, 119,518 (88.7% mapped exactly to known exons, while 1,117 (0.8% mapped to introns, 11,524 (8.6% spanned annotated intron/exon boundaries, and 3,066 (2.3% extended beyond the end of annotated UTRs. Sequence-based inference of relative gene expression levels correlated significantly with microarray data. As expected, NG sequencing of normalized libraries tagged more genes than non-normalized libraries, although non-normalized libraries yielded more full-length cDNA sequences. The Arabidopsis data were used to simulate additional rounds of NG and traditional EST sequencing, and various combinations of each. Our simulations suggest a combination of FLX and Solexa sequencing for optimal transcriptome coverage at modest cost. We have also developed ESTcalc http://fgp.huck.psu.edu/NG_Sims/ngsim.pl, an online webtool, which allows users to explore the results of this study by specifying individualized costs and sequencing characteristics. Conclusion NG sequencing technologies are a highly flexible set of platforms that can be scaled to suit different project goals. In terms of sequence coverage alone, the NG sequencing is a dramatic advance

  20. Abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space evaluated by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MR imaging: a spectrum of central nervous system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Sakuma, H.; Takeda, K.; Yagishita, A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of central nervous system (CNS) diseases are associated with abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space (SAS) by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging. Careful attention to the SAS can provide additional useful information that may not be available with conventional MR sequences. The purpose of this article is to provide a pictorial essay about CNS diseases and FLAIR images with abnormal hyperintensity within the SAS. We present several CNS diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage, meningitis, leptomeningeal metastases, acute infarction, and severe arterial occlusive diseases such as moya-moya disease. We also review miscellaneous diseases or normal conditions that may exhibit cerebrospinal fluid hyperintensity on FLAIR images. Although the detection of abnormal hyperintensity suggests the underlying CNS diseases and narrows differential diagnoses, FLAIR imaging sometimes presents artifactual hyperintensity within the SAS that can cause the misinterpretation of normal SAS as pathologic conditions; therefore, radiologists should be familiar with such artifactual conditions as well as pathologic conditions shown as hyperintensity by FLAIR images. This knowledge is helpful in establishing the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Infinite sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Knopp, Konrad

    1956-01-01

    One of the finest expositors in the field of modern mathematics, Dr. Konrad Knopp here concentrates on a topic that is of particular interest to 20th-century mathematicians and students. He develops the theory of infinite sequences and series from its beginnings to a point where the reader will be in a position to investigate more advanced stages on his own. The foundations of the theory are therefore presented with special care, while the developmental aspects are limited by the scope and purpose of the book. All definitions are clearly stated; all theorems are proved with enough detail to ma

  2. Leaf sequencing algorithms for segmented multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Srijit; Sahni, Sartaj; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Ranka, Sanjay

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator (MLC) requires the conversion of a radiation fluence map into a leaf sequence file that controls the movement of the MLC during radiation delivery. It is imperative that the fluence map delivered using the leaf sequence file is as close as possible to the fluence map generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. Optimization of the leaf sequencing algorithm has been the subject of several recent investigations. In this work, we present a systematic study of the optimization of leaf sequencing algorithms for segmental multileaf collimator beam delivery and provide rigorous mathematical proofs of optimized leaf sequence settings in terms of monitor unit (MU) efficiency under most common leaf movement constraints that include minimum leaf separation constraint and leaf interdigitation constraint. Our analytical analysis shows that leaf sequencing based on unidirectional movement of the MLC leaves is as MU efficient as bidirectional movement of the MLC leaves

  3. Leaf sequencing algorithms for segmented multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, Srijit [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sahni, Sartaj [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ranka, Sanjay [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2003-02-07

    The delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator (MLC) requires the conversion of a radiation fluence map into a leaf sequence file that controls the movement of the MLC during radiation delivery. It is imperative that the fluence map delivered using the leaf sequence file is as close as possible to the fluence map generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. Optimization of the leaf sequencing algorithm has been the subject of several recent investigations. In this work, we present a systematic study of the optimization of leaf sequencing algorithms for segmental multileaf collimator beam delivery and provide rigorous mathematical proofs of optimized leaf sequence settings in terms of monitor unit (MU) efficiency under most common leaf movement constraints that include minimum leaf separation constraint and leaf interdigitation constraint. Our analytical analysis shows that leaf sequencing based on unidirectional movement of the MLC leaves is as MU efficient as bidirectional movement of the MLC leaves.

  4. Continuous Online Sequence Learning with an Unsupervised Neural Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuwei; Ahmad, Subutar; Hawkins, Jeff

    2016-09-14

    The ability to recognize and predict temporal sequences of sensory inputs is vital for survival in natural environments. Based on many known properties of cortical neurons, hierarchical temporal memory (HTM) sequence memory recently has been proposed as a theoretical framework for sequence learning in the cortex. In this letter, we analyze properties of HTM sequence memory and apply it to sequence learning and prediction problems with streaming data. We show the model is able to continuously learn a large number of variableorder temporal sequences using an unsupervised Hebbian-like learning rule. The sparse temporal codes formed by the model can robustly handle branching temporal sequences by maintaining multiple predictions until there is sufficient disambiguating evidence. We compare the HTM sequence memory with other sequence learning algorithms, including statistical methods: autoregressive integrated moving average; feedforward neural networks-time delay neural network and online sequential extreme learning machine; and recurrent neural networks-long short-term memory and echo-state networks on sequence prediction problems with both artificial and real-world data. The HTM model achieves comparable accuracy to other state-of-the-art algorithms. The model also exhibits properties that are critical for sequence learning, including continuous online learning, the ability to handle multiple predictions and branching sequences with high-order statistics, robustness to sensor noise and fault tolerance, and good performance without task-specific hyperparameter tuning. Therefore, the HTM sequence memory not only advances our understanding of how the brain may solve the sequence learning problem but is also applicable to real-world sequence learning problems from continuous data streams.

  5. Fast global sequence alignment technique

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    fast alignment algorithm, called 'Alignment By Scanning' (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the wellknown sequence alignment algorithms, the 'GAP' (which is heuristic) and the 'Needleman

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Elaine R.

    2013-06-01

    Automated DNA sequencing instruments embody an elegant interplay among chemistry, engineering, software, and molecular biology and have built upon Sanger's founding discovery of dideoxynucleotide sequencing to perform once-unfathomable tasks. Combined with innovative physical mapping approaches that helped to establish long-range relationships between cloned stretches of genomic DNA, fluorescent DNA sequencers produced reference genome sequences for model organisms and for the reference human genome. New types of sequencing instruments that permit amazing acceleration of data-collection rates for DNA sequencing have been developed. The ability to generate genome-scale data sets is now transforming the nature of biological inquiry. Here, I provide an historical perspective of the field, focusing on the fundamental developments that predated the advent of next-generation sequencing instruments and providing information about how these instruments work, their application to biological research, and the newest types of sequencers that can extract data from single DNA molecules.

  7. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  8. The advantages of SMRT sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Richard J; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Schatz, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Of the current next-generation sequencing technologies, SMRT sequencing is sometimes overlooked. However, attributes such as long reads, modified base detection and high accuracy make SMRT a useful technology and an ideal approach to the complete sequencing of small genomes.

  9. Putting instruction sequences into effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    An attempt is made to define the concept of execution of an instruction sequence. It is found to be a special case of directly putting into effect of an instruction sequence. Directly putting into effect of an instruction sequences comprises interpretation as well as execution. Directly putting into

  10. Region segmentation along image sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monchal, L.; Aubry, P.

    1995-01-01

    A method to extract regions in sequence of images is proposed. Regions are not matched from one image to the following one. The result of a region segmentation is used as an initialization to segment the following and image to track the region along the sequence. The image sequence is exploited as a spatio-temporal event. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs

  11. ASAP: Amplification, sequencing & annotation of plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folta Kevin M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of DNA sequence information is vital for pursuing structural, functional and comparative genomics studies in plastids. Traditionally, the first step in mining the valuable information within a chloroplast genome requires sequencing a chloroplast plasmid library or BAC clones. These activities involve complicated preparatory procedures like chloroplast DNA isolation or identification of the appropriate BAC clones to be sequenced. Rolling circle amplification (RCA is being used currently to amplify the chloroplast genome from purified chloroplast DNA and the resulting products are sheared and cloned prior to sequencing. Herein we present a universal high-throughput, rapid PCR-based technique to amplify, sequence and assemble plastid genome sequence from diverse species in a short time and at reasonable cost from total plant DNA, using the large inverted repeat region from strawberry and peach as proof of concept. The method exploits the highly conserved coding regions or intergenic regions of plastid genes. Using an informatics approach, chloroplast DNA sequence information from 5 available eudicot plastomes was aligned to identify the most conserved regions. Cognate primer pairs were then designed to generate ~1 – 1.2 kb overlapping amplicons from the inverted repeat region in 14 diverse genera. Results 100% coverage of the inverted repeat region was obtained from Arabidopsis, tobacco, orange, strawberry, peach, lettuce, tomato and Amaranthus. Over 80% coverage was obtained from distant species, including Ginkgo, loblolly pine and Equisetum. Sequence from the inverted repeat region of strawberry and peach plastome was obtained, annotated and analyzed. Additionally, a polymorphic region identified from gel electrophoresis was sequenced from tomato and Amaranthus. Sequence analysis revealed large deletions in these species relative to tobacco plastome thus exhibiting the utility of this method for structural and

  12. Progressive multiple sequence alignments from triplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Peter F

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of progressive sequence alignments strongly depends on the accuracy of the individual pairwise alignment steps since gaps that are introduced at one step cannot be removed at later aggregation steps. Adjacent insertions and deletions necessarily appear in arbitrary order in pairwise alignments and hence form an unavoidable source of errors. Research Here we present a modified variant of progressive sequence alignments that addresses both issues. Instead of pairwise alignments we use exact dynamic programming to align sequence or profile triples. This avoids a large fractions of the ambiguities arising in pairwise alignments. In the subsequent aggregation steps we follow the logic of the Neighbor-Net algorithm, which constructs a phylogenetic network by step-wisely replacing triples by pairs instead of combining pairs to singletons. To this end the three-way alignments are subdivided into two partial alignments, at which stage all-gap columns are naturally removed. This alleviates the "once a gap, always a gap" problem of progressive alignment procedures. Conclusion The three-way Neighbor-Net based alignment program aln3nn is shown to compare favorably on both protein sequences and nucleic acids sequences to other progressive alignment tools. In the latter case one easily can include scoring terms that consider secondary structure features. Overall, the quality of resulting alignments in general exceeds that of clustalw or other multiple alignments tools even though our software does not included heuristics for context dependent (mismatch scores.

  13. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Aitaro; Nakamura, Kouji; Hiyama, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in April 2016, a series of shallow, moderate to large earthquakes with associated strong aftershocks struck the Kumamoto area of Kyushu, SW Japan. An M j 7.3 mainshock occurred on 16 April 2016, close to the epicenter of an M j 6.5 foreshock that occurred about 28 hours earlier. The intense seismicity released the accumulated elastic energy by right-lateral strike slip, mainly along two known, active faults. The mainshock rupture propagated along multiple fault segments with different geometries. The faulting style is reasonably consistent with regional deformation observed on geologic timescales and with the stress field estimated from seismic observations. One striking feature of this sequence is intense seismic activity, including a dynamically triggered earthquake in the Oita region. Following the mainshock rupture, postseismic deformation has been observed, as well as expansion of the seismicity front toward the southwest and northwest.

  14. A main sequence for quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziani, Paola; Dultzin, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.; Del Olmo, Ascensión; Negrete, C. A.; Martínez-Aldama, Mary L.; D'Onofrio, Mauro; Bon, Edi; Bon, Natasa; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2018-03-01

    The last 25 years saw a major step forward in the analysis of optical and UV spectroscopic data of large quasar samples. Multivariate statistical approaches have led to the definition of systematic trends in observational properties that are the basis of physical and dynamical modeling of quasar structure. We discuss the empirical correlates of the so-called “main sequence” associated with the quasar Eigenvector 1, its governing physical parameters and several implications on our view of the quasar structure, as well as some luminosity effects associated with the virialized component of the line emitting regions. We also briefly discuss quasars in a segment of the main sequence that includes the strongest FeII emitters. These sources show a small dispersion around a well-defined Eddington ratio value, a property which makes them potential Eddington standard candles.

  15. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    KATO, Aitaro; NAKAMURA, Kouji; HIYAMA, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in April 2016, a series of shallow, moderate to large earthquakes with associated strong aftershocks struck the Kumamoto area of Kyushu, SW Japan. An Mj 7.3 mainshock occurred on 16 April 2016, close to the epicenter of an Mj 6.5 foreshock that occurred about 28 hours earlier. The intense seismicity released the accumulated elastic energy by right-lateral strike slip, mainly along two known, active faults. The mainshock rupture propagated along multiple fault segments with different geometries. The faulting style is reasonably consistent with regional deformation observed on geologic timescales and with the stress field estimated from seismic observations. One striking feature of this sequence is intense seismic activity, including a dynamically triggered earthquake in the Oita region. Following the mainshock rupture, postseismic deformation has been observed, as well as expansion of the seismicity front toward the southwest and northwest. PMID:27725474

  16. A Main Sequence for Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marziani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The last 25 years saw a major step forward in the analysis of optical and UV spectroscopic data of large quasar samples. Multivariate statistical approaches have led to the definition of systematic trends in observational properties that are the basis of physical and dynamical modeling of quasar structure. We discuss the empirical correlates of the so-called “main sequence” associated with the quasar Eigenvector 1, its governing physical parameters and several implications on our view of the quasar structure, as well as some luminosity effects associated with the virialized component of the line emitting regions. We also briefly discuss quasars in a segment of the main sequence that includes the strongest FeII emitters. These sources show a small dispersion around a well-defined Eddington ratio value, a property which makes them potential Eddington standard candles.

  17. Spent fuel bundle counter sequence error manual - BRUCE NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Bundle Counter (SFBC) is used to count the number and type of spent fuel transfers that occur into or out of controlled areas at CANDU reactor sites. However if the transfers are executed in a non-standard manner or the SFBC is malfunctioning, the transfers are recorded as sequence errors. Each sequence error message typically contains adequate information to determine the cause of the message. This manual provides a guide to interpret the various sequence error messages that can occur and suggests probable cause or causes of the sequence errors. Each likely sequence error is presented on a 'card' in Appendix A. Note that it would be impractical to generate a sequence error card file with entries for all possible combinations of faults. Therefore the card file contains sequences with only one fault at a time. Some exceptions have been included however where experience has indicated that several faults can occur simultaneously

  18. Spent fuel bundle counter sequence error manual - DARLINGTON NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Bundle Counter (SFBC) is used to count the number and type of spent fuel transfers that occur into or out of controlled areas at CANDU reactor sites. However if the transfers are executed in a non-standard manner or the SFBC is malfunctioning, the transfers are recorded as sequence errors. Each sequence error message typically contains adequate information to determine the cause of the message. This manual provides a guide to interpret the various sequence error messages that can occur and suggests probable cause or causes of the sequence errors. Each likely sequence error is presented on a 'card' in Appendix A. Note that it would be impractical to generate a sequence error card file with entries for all possible combinations of faults. Therefore the card file contains sequences with only one fault at a time. Some exceptions have been included however where experience has indicated that several faults can occur simultaneously

  19. Log-balanced combinatorial sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Došlic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider log-convex sequences that satisfy an additional constraint imposed on their rate of growth. We call such sequences log-balanced. It is shown that all such sequences satisfy a pair of double inequalities. Sufficient conditions for log-balancedness are given for the case when the sequence satisfies a two- (or more- term linear recurrence. It is shown that many combinatorially interesting sequences belong to this class, and, as a consequence, that the above-mentioned double inequalities are valid for all of them.

  20. New MR pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Flamig, D.P.; Griffey, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method for fat suppression for three-dimensional MR imaging. The FATS (fat-suppressed acquisition with echo time shortened) sequence employs a pair of opposing adiabatic half-passage RF pulses tuned on fat resonance. The imaging parameters are as follows: TR, 20 msec; TE, 21.7-3.2 msec; 1,024 x 128 x 128 acquired matrix; imaging time, approximately 11 minutes. A series of 54 examinations were performed. Excellent fat suppression with water excitation is achieved in all cases. The orbital images demonstrate superior resolution of small orbital lesions. The high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in cranial studies demonstrates excellent petrous bone and internal auditory canal anatomy

  1. Memory for sequences of events impaired in typical aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Timothy A.; Morris, Andrea M.; Stark, Shauna M.; Fortin, Norbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Typical aging is associated with diminished episodic memory performance. To improve our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms underlying this age-related memory deficit, we previously developed an integrated, cross-species approach to link converging evidence from human and animal research. This novel approach focuses on the ability to remember sequences of events, an important feature of episodic memory. Unlike existing paradigms, this task is nonspatial, nonverbal, and can be used to isolate different cognitive processes that may be differentially affected in aging. Here, we used this task to make a comprehensive comparison of sequence memory performance between younger (18–22 yr) and older adults (62–86 yr). Specifically, participants viewed repeated sequences of six colored, fractal images and indicated whether each item was presented “in sequence” or “out of sequence.” Several out of sequence probe trials were used to provide a detailed assessment of sequence memory, including: (i) repeating an item from earlier in the sequence (“Repeats”; e.g., ABADEF), (ii) skipping ahead in the sequence (“Skips”; e.g., ABDDEF), and (iii) inserting an item from a different sequence into the same ordinal position (“Ordinal Transfers”; e.g., AB3DEF). We found that older adults performed as well as younger controls when tested on well-known and predictable sequences, but were severely impaired when tested using novel sequences. Importantly, overall sequence memory performance in older adults steadily declined with age, a decline not detected with other measures (RAVLT or BPS-O). We further characterized this deficit by showing that performance of older adults was severely impaired on specific probe trials that required detailed knowledge of the sequence (Skips and Ordinal Transfers), and was associated with a shift in their underlying mnemonic representation of the sequences. Collectively, these findings provide unambiguous evidence that the

  2. Tools for integrated sequence-structure analysis with UCSF Chimera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Conrad C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparing related structures and viewing the structures in the context of sequence alignments are important tasks in protein structure-function research. While many programs exist for individual aspects of such work, there is a need for interactive visualization tools that: (a provide a deep integration of sequence and structure, far beyond mapping where a sequence region falls in the structure and vice versa; (b facilitate changing data of one type based on the other (for example, using only sequence-conserved residues to match structures, or adjusting a sequence alignment based on spatial fit; (c can be used with a researcher's own data, including arbitrary sequence alignments and annotations, closely or distantly related sets of proteins, etc.; and (d interoperate with each other and with a full complement of molecular graphics features. We describe enhancements to UCSF Chimera to achieve these goals. Results The molecular graphics program UCSF Chimera includes a suite of tools for interactive analyses of sequences and structures. Structures automatically associate with sequences in imported alignments, allowing many kinds of crosstalk. A novel method is provided to superimpose structures in the absence of a pre-existing sequence alignment. The method uses both sequence and secondary structure, and can match even structures with very low sequence identity. Another tool constructs structure-based sequence alignments from superpositions of two or more proteins. Chimera is designed to be extensible, and mechanisms for incorporating user-specific data without Chimera code development are also provided. Conclusion The tools described here apply to many problems involving comparison and analysis of protein structures and their sequences. Chimera includes complete documentation and is intended for use by a wide range of scientists, not just those in the computational disciplines. UCSF Chimera is free for non-commercial use and is

  3. MIPS: a database for protein sequences and complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Hani, J; Pfeiffer, F; Frishman, D

    1998-01-01

    The MIPS group [Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences of the German National Center for Environment and Health (GSF)] at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried near Munich, Germany, is involved in a number of data collection activities, including a comprehensive database of the yeast genome, a database reflecting the progress in sequencing the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, the systematic analysis of other small genomes and the collection of protein sequence data within the framework of the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database (described elsewhere in this volume). Through its WWW server (http://www.mips.biochem.mpg.de ) MIPS provides access to a variety of generic databases, including a database of protein families as well as automatically generated data by the systematic application of sequence analysis algorithms. The yeast genome sequence and its related information was also compiled on CD-ROM to provide dynamic interactive access to the 16 chromosomes of the first eukaryotic genome unraveled. PMID:9399795

  4. Management of High-Throughput DNA Sequencing Projects: Alpheus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Neil A; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Farmer, Andrew; Langley, Raymond J; Mudge, Joann; Crow, John A; Gonzalez, Alvaro J; Schilkey, Faye D; Kim, Ryan J; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer; May, Gregory D; Black, C Forrest; Myers, M Kathy; Utsey, John P; Frost, Nicholas S; Sugarbaker, David J; Bueno, Raphael; Gullans, Stephen R; Baxter, Susan M; Day, Steve W; Retzel, Ernest F

    2008-12-26

    High-throughput DNA sequencing has enabled systems biology to begin to address areas in health, agricultural and basic biological research. Concomitant with the opportunities is an absolute necessity to manage significant volumes of high-dimensional and inter-related data and analysis. Alpheus is an analysis pipeline, database and visualization software for use with massively parallel DNA sequencing technologies that feature multi-gigabase throughput characterized by relatively short reads, such as Illumina-Solexa (sequencing-by-synthesis), Roche-454 (pyrosequencing) and Applied Biosystem's SOLiD (sequencing-by-ligation). Alpheus enables alignment to reference sequence(s), detection of variants and enumeration of sequence abundance, including expression levels in transcriptome sequence. Alpheus is able to detect several types of variants, including non-synonymous and synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions/deletions (indels), premature stop codons, and splice isoforms. Variant detection is aided by the ability to filter variant calls based on consistency, expected allele frequency, sequence quality, coverage, and variant type in order to minimize false positives while maximizing the identification of true positives. Alpheus also enables comparisons of genes with variants between cases and controls or bulk segregant pools. Sequence-based differential expression comparisons can be developed, with data export to SAS JMP Genomics for statistical analysis.

  5. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  6. Inverted temperature sequences: role of deformation partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujic, D.; Ashley, K. T.; Coble, M. A.; Coutand, I.; Kellett, D.; Whynot, N.

    2015-12-01

    The inverted metamorphism associated with the Main Central thrust zone in the Himalaya has been historically attributed to a number of tectonic processes. Here we show that there is actually a composite peak and deformation temperature sequence that formed in succession via different tectonic processes. The deformation partitioning seems to the have played a key role, and the magnitude of each process has varied along strike of the orogen. To explain the formation of the inverted metamorphic sequence across the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) in eastern Bhutan, we used Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material (RSCM) to determine the peak metamorphic temperatures and Ti-in-quartz thermobarometry to determine the deformation temperatures combined with thermochronology including published apatite and zircon U-Th/He and fission-track data and new 40Ar/39Ar dating of muscovite. The dataset was inverted using 3D-thermal-kinematic modeling to constrain the ranges of geological parameters such as fault geometry and slip rates, location and rates of localized basal accretion, and thermal properties of the crust. RSCM results indicate that there are two peak temperature sequences separated by a major thrust within the LHS. The internal temperature sequence shows an inverted peak temperature gradient of 12 °C/km; in the external (southern) sequence, the peak temperatures are constant across the structural sequence. Thermo-kinematic modeling suggest that the thermochronologic and thermobarometric data are compatible with a two-stage scenario: an Early-Middle Miocene phase of fast overthrusting of a hot hanging wall over a downgoing footwall and inversion of the synkinematic isotherms, followed by the formation of the external duplex developed by dominant underthrusting and basal accretion. To reconcile our observations with the experimental data, we suggest that pervasive ductile deformation within the upper LHS and along the Main Central thrust zone at its top stopped at

  7. Universal sequence map (USM of arbitrary discrete sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jonas S

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For over a decade the idea of representing biological sequences in a continuous coordinate space has maintained its appeal but not been fully realized. The basic idea is that any sequence of symbols may define trajectories in the continuous space conserving all its statistical properties. Ideally, such a representation would allow scale independent sequence analysis – without the context of fixed memory length. A simple example would consist on being able to infer the homology between two sequences solely by comparing the coordinates of any two homologous units. Results We have successfully identified such an iterative function for bijective mappingψ of discrete sequences into objects of continuous state space that enable scale-independent sequence analysis. The technique, named Universal Sequence Mapping (USM, is applicable to sequences with an arbitrary length and arbitrary number of unique units and generates a representation where map distance estimates sequence similarity. The novel USM procedure is based on earlier work by these and other authors on the properties of Chaos Game Representation (CGR. The latter enables the representation of 4 unit type sequences (like DNA as an order free Markov Chain transition table. The properties of USM are illustrated with test data and can be verified for other data by using the accompanying web-based tool:http://bioinformatics.musc.edu/~jonas/usm/. Conclusions USM is shown to enable a statistical mechanics approach to sequence analysis. The scale independent representation frees sequence analysis from the need to assume a memory length in the investigation of syntactic rules.

  8. 10KP: A phylodiverse genome sequencing plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shifeng; Melkonian, Michael; Brockington, Samuel; Archibald, John M; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Melkonian, Barbara; Mavrodiev, Evgeny V; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Yuan; Yang, Huanming; Soltis, Douglas E; Graham, Sean W; Soltis, Pamela S; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Understanding plant evolution and diversity in a phylogenomic context is an enormous challenge due, in part, to limited availability of genome-scale data across phylodiverse species. The 10KP (10,000 Plants) Genome Sequencing Project will sequence and characterize representative genomes from every major clade of embryophytes, green algae, and protists (excluding fungi) within the next 5 years. By implementing and continuously improving leading-edge sequencing technologies and bioinformatics tools, 10KP will catalogue the genome content of plant and protist diversity and make these data freely available as an enduring foundation for future scientific discoveries and applications. 10KP is structured as an international consortium, open to the global community, including botanical gardens, plant research institutes, universities, and private industry. Our immediate goal is to establish a policy framework for this endeavor, the principles of which are outlined here. PMID:29618049

  9. 10KP: A phylodiverse genome sequencing plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shifeng; Melkonian, Michael; Smith, Stephen A; Brockington, Samuel; Archibald, John M; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Li, Fay-Wei; Melkonian, Barbara; Mavrodiev, Evgeny V; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Yuan; Yang, Huanming; Soltis, Douglas E; Graham, Sean W; Soltis, Pamela S; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2018-03-01

    Understanding plant evolution and diversity in a phylogenomic context is an enormous challenge due, in part, to limited availability of genome-scale data across phylodiverse species. The 10KP (10,000 Plants) Genome Sequencing Project will sequence and characterize representative genomes from every major clade of embryophytes, green algae, and protists (excluding fungi) within the next 5 years. By implementing and continuously improving leading-edge sequencing technologies and bioinformatics tools, 10KP will catalogue the genome content of plant and protist diversity and make these data freely available as an enduring foundation for future scientific discoveries and applications. 10KP is structured as an international consortium, open to the global community, including botanical gardens, plant research institutes, universities, and private industry. Our immediate goal is to establish a policy framework for this endeavor, the principles of which are outlined here.

  10. Contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Na, Dong Gyu; Ryoo, Wook Jae; Byun Hong Sik; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Jong hyun

    2000-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) MR imaging in patients with brain tumors. This study involved 31 patients with pathologically proven brain tumors and nine with clinically diagnosed metastases. In all patients, T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, images were visual contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images were obtained. Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were visually compared with other MR sequences in terms of tumor conspicuity. In order to distinguish tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were compared with fast FLAIR and T2-weighted images. The tumor-to- white matter contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), as demonstrated by T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, were quantitatively assessed and compared. For the visual assessment of tumor conspicuity, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image imaging superior to fast FLAIR in 60% of cases (24/40), and superior to T2-weighted in 70% (28/40). Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was inferior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted in 58% of cases (23/40). For distinguishing between tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was superior to fast FLAIR or T2-weighted in 22 of 27 tumors with peritumoral edema (81%). Quantitatively, CNR was the highest on contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image and the lowest on fast FLAIR. For the detection of leptomeningeal metastases, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR was partially superior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging in two of three high-grade gliomas. Although contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging should not be seen as a replacement for conventional modalities, it provides additional informaton for assessment of the extent of glial cell tumors and leptomeningeal metastases in patients with brain tumors. (author)

  11. Transcriptome sequencing of the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC RNA reference samples using next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry-Mieg Danielle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome sequencing using next-generation sequencing platforms will soon be competing with DNA microarray technologies for global gene expression analysis. As a preliminary evaluation of these promising technologies, we performed deep sequencing of cDNA synthesized from the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC reference RNA samples using Roche's 454 Genome Sequencer FLX. Results We generated more that 3.6 million sequence reads of average length 250 bp for the MAQC A and B samples and introduced a data analysis pipeline for translating cDNA read counts into gene expression levels. Using BLAST, 90% of the reads mapped to the human genome and 64% of the reads mapped to the RefSeq database of well annotated genes with e-values ≤ 10-20. We measured gene expression levels in the A and B samples by counting the numbers of reads that mapped to individual RefSeq genes in multiple sequencing runs to evaluate the MAQC quality metrics for reproducibility, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy and compared the results with DNA microarrays and Quantitative RT-PCR (QRTPCR from the MAQC studies. In addition, 88% of the reads were successfully aligned directly to the human genome using the AceView alignment programs with an average 90% sequence similarity to identify 137,899 unique exon junctions, including 22,193 new exon junctions not yet contained in the RefSeq database. Conclusion Using the MAQC metrics for evaluating the performance of gene expression platforms, the ExpressSeq results for gene expression levels showed excellent reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity that improved systematically with increasing shotgun sequencing depth, and quantitative accuracy that was comparable to DNA microarrays and QRTPCR. In addition, a careful mapping of the reads to the genome using the AceView alignment programs shed new light on the complexity of the human transcriptome including the discovery of thousands of new splice variants.

  12. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by

  13. Genomic sequencing in clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Mestan, Karen K; Ilkhanoff, Leonard; Mouli, Samdeep; Lin, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Human genome sequencing is the process by which the exact order of nucleic acid base pairs in the 24 human chromosomes is determined. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, genomic sequencing is rapidly becoming a major part of our translational research efforts to understand and improve human health and disease. This article reviews the current and future directions of clinical research with respect to genomic sequencing, a technology that is just beginning to fin...

  14. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  15. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-08-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the 'Needleman-Wunsch' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Fast global sequence alignment technique

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-11-01

    Bioinformatics database is growing exponentially in size. Processing these large amount of data may take hours of time even if super computers are used. One of the most important processing tool in Bioinformatics is sequence alignment. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called \\'Alignment By Scanning\\' (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the wellknown sequence alignment algorithms, the \\'GAP\\' (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 51% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the GAP Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  18. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS...

  19. Sequence Classification: 894222 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the holoenzyme also contains CKA1, CKA2 and CKB1, the many substrates include transcription factors and all RNA polymerases; Ckb2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324613 ...

  20. Biological sequence analysis: probabilistic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Durbin, Richard

    1998-01-01

    ... analysis methods are now based on principles of probabilistic modelling. Examples of such methods include the use of probabilistically derived score matrices to determine the significance of sequence alignments, the use of hidden Markov models as the basis for profile searches to identify distant members of sequence families, and the inference...

  1. The value of qualitative and quantitative assessment of lesion to cerebral cortex signal ratio on double inversion recovery sequence in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques from non-specific T2 hyperintensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamcan, Salih; Battal, Bilal; Akgun, Veysel; Sari, Sebahattin; Tasar, Mustafa [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Oz, Oguzhan; Tasdemir, Serdar [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Bozkurt, Yalcin [Golcuk Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the usefulness of the visual assessment and to determine diagnostic value of the lesion-to-cerebral cortex signal ratio (LCSR) measurement in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2 hyperintensities on double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence. DIR and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences of 25 clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 25 non-MS patients with non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were evaluated visually and LCSRs were measured by two observers independently. On DIR sequence, the calculated mean LCSR ± SD for demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were 1.60 ± 0.26 and 0.75 ± 0.19 for observer1, and 1.61 ± 0.27 and 0.74 ± 0.19 for observer2. LCSRs of demyelinating plaques were significantly higher than other non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions on DIR sequence. By using the visual assessment demyelinating plaques were differentiated from non-specific T2-hyperintensities with 92.8 % sensitivity, 97.5 % specificity and 95.1 % accuracy for observer1 and 92.8 % sensitivity, 95 % specificity and 93.9 % accuracy for observer2. Visual assessment and LCSR measurement on DIR sequence seems to be useful for differentiating demyelinating MS plaques from supratentorial non-specific T2 hyperintensities. This feature can be used for diagnosis of MS particularly in patients with only supratentorial T2-hyperintense lesions who are categorized as radiologically possible MS. (orig.)

  2. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkness Ewen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromosome sequence and the search for polymorphisms therein. The genome has been only partially sequenced for one male dog, disallowing mapping of the sequence into specific chromosomes. However, by comparing the male genome sequence to the complete female dog genome sequence, candidate Y-chromosome sequence may be identified by exclusion. Results The male dog genome sequence was analysed by Blast search against the human genome to identify sequences with a best match to the human Y chromosome and to the female dog genome to identify those absent in the female genome. Candidate sequences were then tested for male specificity by PCR of five male and five female dogs. 32 sequences from the male genome, with a total length of 24 kbp, were identified as male specific, based on a match to the human Y chromosome, absence in the female dog genome and male specific PCR results. 14437 bp were then sequenced for 10 male dogs originating from Europe, Southwest Asia, Siberia, East Asia, Africa and America. Nine haplotypes were found, which were defined by 14 substitutions. The genetic distance between the haplotypes indicates that they originate from at least five wolf haplotypes. There was no obvious trend in the geographic distribution of the haplotypes. Conclusion We have identified 24159 bp of dog Y-chromosome sequence to be used for population genetic studies. We sequenced 14437 bp in a worldwide collection of dogs, identifying 14 SNPs for future SNP analyses, and

  3. Design of Mariner 9 Science Sequences using Interactive Graphics Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J. E.; Sturms, F. M, Jr.; Webb, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses the analyst/computer system used to design the daily science sequences required to carry out the desired Mariner 9 science plan. The Mariner 9 computer environment, the development and capabilities of the science sequence design software, and the techniques followed in the daily mission operations are discussed. Included is a discussion of the overall mission operations organization and the individual components which played an essential role in the sequence design process. A summary of actual sequences processed, a discussion of problems encountered, and recommendations for future applications are given.

  4. GuiTope: an application for mapping random-sequence peptides to protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Rebecca F; Stafford, Phillip; Emery, Jack S; Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephen Albert

    2012-01-03

    Random-sequence peptide libraries are a commonly used tool to identify novel ligands for binding antibodies, other proteins, and small molecules. It is often of interest to compare the selected peptide sequences to the natural protein binding partners to infer the exact binding site or the importance of particular residues. The ability to search a set of sequences for similarity to a set of peptides may sometimes enable the prediction of an antibody epitope or a novel binding partner. We have developed a software application designed specifically for this task. GuiTope provides a graphical user interface for aligning peptide sequences to protein sequences. All alignment parameters are accessible to the user including the ability to specify the amino acid frequency in the peptide library; these frequencies often differ significantly from those assumed by popular alignment programs. It also includes a novel feature to align di-peptide inversions, which we have found improves the accuracy of antibody epitope prediction from peptide microarray data and shows utility in analyzing phage display datasets. Finally, GuiTope can randomly select peptides from a given library to estimate a null distribution of scores and calculate statistical significance. GuiTope provides a convenient method for comparing selected peptide sequences to protein sequences, including flexible alignment parameters, novel alignment features, ability to search a database, and statistical significance of results. The software is available as an executable (for PC) at http://www.immunosignature.com/software and ongoing updates and source code will be available at sourceforge.net.

  5. GuiTope: an application for mapping random-sequence peptides to protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin Rebecca F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random-sequence peptide libraries are a commonly used tool to identify novel ligands for binding antibodies, other proteins, and small molecules. It is often of interest to compare the selected peptide sequences to the natural protein binding partners to infer the exact binding site or the importance of particular residues. The ability to search a set of sequences for similarity to a set of peptides may sometimes enable the prediction of an antibody epitope or a novel binding partner. We have developed a software application designed specifically for this task. Results GuiTope provides a graphical user interface for aligning peptide sequences to protein sequences. All alignment parameters are accessible to the user including the ability to specify the amino acid frequency in the peptide library; these frequencies often differ significantly from those assumed by popular alignment programs. It also includes a novel feature to align di-peptide inversions, which we have found improves the accuracy of antibody epitope prediction from peptide microarray data and shows utility in analyzing phage display datasets. Finally, GuiTope can randomly select peptides from a given library to estimate a null distribution of scores and calculate statistical significance. Conclusions GuiTope provides a convenient method for comparing selected peptide sequences to protein sequences, including flexible alignment parameters, novel alignment features, ability to search a database, and statistical significance of results. The software is available as an executable (for PC at http://www.immunosignature.com/software and ongoing updates and source code will be available at sourceforge.net.

  6. SVX Sequencer Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utes, M.

    1997-01-01

    The SVX Sequencer boards are 9U by 280mm circuit boards that reside in slots 2 through 21 of each of eight Eurocard crates in the D0 Detector Platform. The basic purpose is to control the SVX chips for data acquisition and when a trigger occurs, to gather the SVX data and relay the data to the VRB boards in the Movable Counting House. Functions and features are as follows: (1) Initialization of eight SVX chip strings using the MIL-STD-1553 data bus; (2) Real time manipulation of the SVX control lines to effect data acquisition, digitization, and readout based on the NRZ/Clock signals from the Controller; (3) Conversion of 8-bit electrical SVX readout data to an optical signal operating at 1.062 Gbit/sec, sent to the VRB. Eight HDIs will be serviced per board; (4) Built-in logic analyzer which can record the most important control and data lines during a data acquisition cycle and put this recorded information onto the 1553 bus; (5) Identification header and end of data trailer tacked onto data stream; (6) 1553 register which can read the current values of the control and data lines; (7) 1553 register which can test the optical link; (8) 1553 registers for crossing pulse width, calibration pulse voltage, and calibration pipeline select; (9) 1553 register for reading the optical drivers status link; (10) 1553 register for power control of SVX chips and ignoring bad SVX strings; (11) Front panel displays and LEDs show the board status at a glance; (12) In-system programmable EPLDs are programmed via 1553 or Altera's 'Bitblaster'; (13) Automatic readout abort after 45us; (14) Supplies BUSY signal back to Trigger Framework; (15) Supports a heartbeat system to prevent excessive SVX current draw; and (16) Supports a SVX power trip feature if heartbeat failure occurs.

  7. Sequence Algebra, Sequence Decision Diagrams and Dynamic Fault Trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauzy, Antoine B.

    2011-01-01

    A large attention has been focused on the Dynamic Fault Trees in the past few years. By adding new gates to static (regular) Fault Trees, Dynamic Fault Trees aim to take into account dependencies among events. Merle et al. proposed recently an algebraic framework to give a formal interpretation to these gates. In this article, we extend Merle et al.'s work by adopting a slightly different perspective. We introduce Sequence Algebras that can be seen as Algebras of Basic Events, representing failures of non-repairable components. We show how to interpret Dynamic Fault Trees within this framework. Finally, we propose a new data structure to encode sets of sequences of Basic Events: Sequence Decision Diagrams. Sequence Decision Diagrams are very much inspired from Minato's Zero-Suppressed Binary Decision Diagrams. We show that all operations of Sequence Algebras can be performed on this data structure.

  8. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service; however, maintenance therapy itself is not covered as part of these services. (c) Occupational... increase respiratory function, such as graded activity services; these services include physiologic... rehabilitation plan of treatment, including physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, speech...

  9. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  10. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  11. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  12. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  13. Sequence Quality Analysis Tool for HIV Type 1 Protease and Reverse Transcriptase

    OpenAIRE

    DeLong, Allison K.; Wu, Mingham; Bennett, Diane; Parkin, Neil; Wu, Zhijin; Hogan, Joseph W.; Kantor, Rami

    2012-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy is increasing globally and drug resistance evolution is anticipated. Currently, protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence generation is increasing, including the use of in-house sequencing assays, and quality assessment prior to sequence analysis is essential. We created a computational HIV PR/RT Sequence Quality Analysis Tool (SQUAT) that runs in the R statistical environment. Sequence quality thresholds are calculated from a large dataset (46,802...

  14. Phylogenomics of Phrynosomatid Lizards: Conflicting Signals from Sequence Capture versus Restriction Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaché, Adam D.; Chavez, Andreas S.; Jones, Leonard N.; Grummer, Jared A.; Gottscho, Andrew D.; Linkem, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Sequence capture and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) are popular methods for obtaining large numbers of loci for phylogenetic analysis. These methods are typically used to collect data at different evolutionary timescales; sequence capture is primarily used for obtaining conserved loci, whereas RADseq is designed for discovering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) suitable for population genetic or phylogeographic analyses. Phylogenetic questions that span both “recent” and “deep” timescales could benefit from either type of data, but studies that directly compare the two approaches are lacking. We compared phylogenies estimated from sequence capture and double digest RADseq (ddRADseq) data for North American phrynosomatid lizards, a species-rich and diverse group containing nine genera that began diversifying approximately 55 Ma. Sequence capture resulted in 584 loci that provided a consistent and strong phylogeny using concatenation and species tree inference. However, the phylogeny estimated from the ddRADseq data was sensitive to the bioinformatics steps used for determining homology, detecting paralogs, and filtering missing data. The topological conflicts among the SNP trees were not restricted to any particular timescale, but instead were associated with short internal branches. Species tree analysis of the largest SNP assembly, which also included the most missing data, supported a topology that matched the sequence capture tree. This preferred phylogeny provides strong support for the paraphyly of the earless lizard genera Holbrookia and Cophosaurus, suggesting that the earless morphology either evolved twice or evolved once and was subsequently lost in Callisaurus. PMID:25663487

  15. Pairwise local structural alignment of RNA sequences with sequence similarity less than 40%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Lyngsø, Rune B.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    detect two genes with low sequence similarity, where the genes are part of a larger genomic region. Results: Here we present such an approach for pairwise local alignment which is based on FILDALIGN and the Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous structural alignment of multiple sequences. We include...... the ability to conduct mutual scans of two sequences of arbitrary length while searching for common local structural motifs of some maximum length. This drastically reduces the complexity of the algorithm. The scoring scheme includes structural parameters corresponding to those available for free energy....... The structure prediction performance for a family is typically around 0.7 using Matthews correlation coefficient. In case (2), the algorithm is successful at locating RNA families with an average sensitivity of 0.8 and a positive predictive value of 0.9 using a BLAST-like hit selection scheme. Availability...

  16. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Salari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to “helix to strand (HE)”, “helix to coil (HC)” and “strand to coil (CE)” alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Direct, rapid RNA sequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peattie, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The original methods of RNA sequence analysis were based on enzymatic production and chromatographic separation of overlapping oligonucleotide fragments from within an RNA molecule followed by identification of the mononucleotides comprising the oligomer. Over the past decade the field of nucleic acid sequencing has changed dramatically, however, and RNA molecules now can be sequenced in a variety of more streamlined fashions. Most of the more recent advances in RNA sequencing have involved one-dimensional electrophoretic separation of 32 P-end-labeled oligoribonucleotides on polyacrylamide gels. In this chapter the author discusses two of these methods for determining the nucleotide sequences of RNA molecules rapidly: the chemical method and the enzymatic method. Both methods are direct and degradative, i.e., they rely on fragmatic and chemical approaches should be utilized. The single-strand-specific ribonucleases (A, T 1 , T 2 , and S 1 ) provide an efficient means to locate double-helical regions rapidly, and the chemical reactions provide a means to determine the RNA sequence within these regions. In addition, the chemical reactions allow one to assign interactions to specific atoms and to distinguish secondary interactions from tertiary ones. If the RNA molecule is small enough to be sequenced directly by the enzymatic or chemical method, the probing reactions can be done easily at the same time as sequencing reactions

  18. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Salari, Ali

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to "helix to strand (HE)", "helix to coil (HC)" and "strand to coil (CE)" alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Farey sequences and resistor networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Green's function, while the perturbation of a network is investigated in [3]. ... In Theorem 1 below, we employ the Farey sequence to establish a strict .... We next show that the Farey sequence method is applicable for circuits with n or fewer.

  20. DNA Sequencing by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L.; Guttman, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA sequencing methods have evolved from the labor intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multicapillary electrophoresis systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the “next generation” technologies of cyclic array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes was only possible by the advent of modern sequencing technologies that was a result of step by step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next generation sequencing is moving ahead at break-neck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of capillary electrophoresis in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal. PMID:19517496

  1. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahramali, Golnaz [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Goliaei, Bahram, E-mail: goliaei@ut.ac.ir [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minuchehr, Zarrin, E-mail: minuchehr@nigeb.ac.ir [Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salari, Ali [Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to “helix to strand (HE)”, “helix to coil (HC)” and “strand to coil (CE)” alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Commercial Art: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a commercial art vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  3. New Sequences with Low Correlation and Large Family Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanxin

    In direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) communication systems and direct-sequence ultra wideband (DS-UWB) radios, sequences with low correlation and large family size are important for reducing multiple access interference (MAI) and accepting more active users, respectively. In this paper, a new collection of families of sequences of length pn-1, which includes three constructions, is proposed. The maximum number of cyclically distinct families without GMW sequences in each construction is φ(pn-1)/n·φ(pm-1)/m, where p is a prime number, n is an even number, and n=2m, and these sequences can be binary or polyphase depending upon choice of the parameter p. In Construction I, there are pn distinct sequences within each family and the new sequences have at most d+2 nontrivial periodic correlation {-pm-1, -1, pm-1, 2pm-1,…,dpm-1}. In Construction II, the new sequences have large family size p2n and possibly take the nontrivial correlation values in {-pm-1, -1, pm-1, 2pm-1,…,(3d-4)pm-1}. In Construction III, the new sequences possess the largest family size p(d-1)n and have at most 2d correlation levels {-pm-1, -1,pm-1, 2pm-1,…,(2d-2)pm-1}. Three constructions are near-optimal with respect to the Welch bound because the values of their Welch-Ratios are moderate, WR_??_d, WR_??_3d-4 and WR_??_2d-2, respectively. Each family in Constructions I, II and III contains a GMW sequence. In addition, Helleseth sequences and Niho sequences are special cases in Constructions I and III, and their restriction conditions to the integers m and n, pm≠2 (mod 3) and n≅0 (mod 4), respectively, are removed in our sequences. Our sequences in Construction III include the sequences with Niho type decimation 3·2m-2, too. Finally, some open questions are pointed out and an example that illustrates the performance of these sequences is given.

  4. Accident sequence quantification with KIRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Un; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kil You; Yang, Jun Eon; Jeong, Won Dae; Chang, Seung Cheol; Sung, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan; Hwang, Mi Jeong.

    1997-01-01

    The tasks of probabilistic safety assessment(PSA) consists of the identification of initiating events, the construction of event tree for each initiating event, construction of fault trees for event tree logics, the analysis of reliability data and finally the accident sequence quantification. In the PSA, the accident sequence quantification is to calculate the core damage frequency, importance analysis and uncertainty analysis. Accident sequence quantification requires to understand the whole model of the PSA because it has to combine all event tree and fault tree models, and requires the excellent computer code because it takes long computation time. Advanced Research Group of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) has developed PSA workstation KIRAP(Korea Integrated Reliability Analysis Code Package) for the PSA work. This report describes the procedures to perform accident sequence quantification, the method to use KIRAP's cut set generator, and method to perform the accident sequence quantification with KIRAP. (author). 6 refs

  5. Accident sequence quantification with KIRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Un; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kil You; Yang, Jun Eon; Jeong, Won Dae; Chang, Seung Cheol; Sung, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan; Hwang, Mi Jeong

    1997-01-01

    The tasks of probabilistic safety assessment(PSA) consists of the identification of initiating events, the construction of event tree for each initiating event, construction of fault trees for event tree logics, the analysis of reliability data and finally the accident sequence quantification. In the PSA, the accident sequence quantification is to calculate the core damage frequency, importance analysis and uncertainty analysis. Accident sequence quantification requires to understand the whole model of the PSA because it has to combine all event tree and fault tree models, and requires the excellent computer code because it takes long computation time. Advanced Research Group of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) has developed PSA workstation KIRAP(Korea Integrated Reliability Analysis Code Package) for the PSA work. This report describes the procedures to perform accident sequence quantification, the method to use KIRAP`s cut set generator, and method to perform the accident sequence quantification with KIRAP. (author). 6 refs.

  6. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S K

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  7. Sequence Classification: 732582 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|45443438|ref|NP_994977.1| riboflavin... biosynthesis protein (includes: riboflavin kinase and FMN adenyltransferase) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/45443438 ...

  8. Sequence Classification: 721488 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|16120803|ref|NP_404116.1| riboflavin... biosynthesis protein (includes: riboflavin kinase and FMN adenyltransferase) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/16120803 ...

  9. Sequence Classification: 565019 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|15964332|ref|NP_384685.1| PROBABLE PYRAZINAMIDAS...E/NICOTINAMIDASE (INCLUDES: PYRAZINAMIDASE, NICOTINAMIDASE) PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15964332 ...

  10. [Complete genome sequencing and sequence analysis of BCG Tice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiming; Pan, Yuanlong; Wu, Jun; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-10-04

    The objective of this study is to obtain the complete genome sequence of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Tice (BCG Tice), in order to provide more information about the molecular biology of BCG Tice and design more reasonable vaccines to prevent tuberculosis. We assembled the data from high-throughput sequencing with SOAPdenovo software, with many contigs and scaffolds obtained. There are many sequence gaps and physical gaps remained as a result of regional low coverage and low quality. We designed primers at the end of contigs and performed PCR amplification in order to link these contigs and scaffolds. With various enzymes to perform PCR amplification, adjustment of PCR reaction conditions, and combined with clone construction to sequence, all the gaps were finished. We obtained the complete genome sequence of BCG Tice and submitted it to GenBank of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The genome of BCG Tice is 4334064 base pairs in length, with GC content 65.65%. The problems and strategies during the finishing step of BCG Tice sequencing are illuminated here, with the hope of affording some experience to those who are involved in the finishing step of genome sequencing. The microarray data were verified by our results.

  11. The COG database: an updated version includes eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverdlov Alexander V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple, essentially complete genome sequences of prokaryotes and eukaryotes spurred both the demand and the opportunity for the construction of an evolutionary classification of genes from these genomes. Such a classification system based on orthologous relationships between genes appears to be a natural framework for comparative genomics and should facilitate both functional annotation of genomes and large-scale evolutionary studies. Results We describe here a major update of the previously developed system for delineation of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs from the sequenced genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes and the construction of clusters of predicted orthologs for 7 eukaryotic genomes, which we named KOGs after eukaryotic orthologous groups. The COG collection currently consists of 138,458 proteins, which form 4873 COGs and comprise 75% of the 185,505 (predicted proteins encoded in 66 genomes of unicellular organisms. The eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs include proteins from 7 eukaryotic genomes: three animals (the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens, one plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, two fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the intracellular microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi. The current KOG set consists of 4852 clusters of orthologs, which include 59,838 proteins, or ~54% of the analyzed eukaryotic 110,655 gene products. Compared to the coverage of the prokaryotic genomes with COGs, a considerably smaller fraction of eukaryotic genes could be included into the KOGs; addition of new eukaryotic genomes is expected to result in substantial increase in the coverage of eukaryotic genomes with KOGs. Examination of the phyletic patterns of KOGs reveals a conserved core represented in all analyzed species and consisting of ~20% of the KOG set. This conserved portion of the

  12. Analysis of Neuronal Sequences Using Pairwise Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    semantic memory (knowledge of facts) and implicit memory (e.g., how to ride a bike ). Evidence for the participation of the hippocampus in the formation of...hippocampal formation in an attempt to be cured of severe epileptic seizures. Although the surgery was successful in regards to reducing the frequency and...very different from each other in many ways including duration and number of spikes. Still, these sequences share a similar trend in the general order

  13. GROUPING WEB ACCESS SEQUENCES uSING SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    BHUPENDRA S CHORDIA; KRISHNAKANT P ADHIYA

    2011-01-01

    In web usage mining grouping of web access sequences can be used to determine the behavior or intent of a set of users. Grouping websessions is how to measure the similarity between web sessions. There are many shortcomings in traditional measurement methods. The taskof grouping web sessions based on similarity and consists of maximizing the intra-group similarity while minimizing the inter-groupsimilarity is done using sequence alignment method. This paper introduces a new method to group we...

  14. Sequence and Chance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Millar, Philip; Nuñez, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes innovative approaches to the design and control of entertainment robots. Live performance is a useful testbed for developing and evaluating what makes robots expressive [10] [13] [18]; it is also a platform for designing creative solutions for robot design and control...... mechanisms for believable and expressive robots. Entertainment robots require creative approaches to robot design and control, including motion planning, coordination and hybrid control systems. The exigencies of live performance require situated, embodied robots to move autonomously or semi......, and consider potential applications beyond entertainment to the fields of human-robot interaction and motion planning....

  15. LPTAU, Quasi Random Sequence Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobol, Ilya M.

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LPTAU generates quasi random sequences. These are uniformly distributed sets of L=M N points in the N-dimensional unit cube: I N =[0,1]x...x[0,1]. These sequences are used as nodes for multidimensional integration; as searching points in global optimization; as trial points in multi-criteria decision making; as quasi-random points for quasi Monte Carlo algorithms. 2 - Method of solution: Uses LP-TAU sequence generation (see references). 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The number of points that can be generated is L 30 . The dimension of the space cannot exceed 51

  16. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  17. Sequencing genes in silico using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high throughput sequencing technology has enabled the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 to generate complete sequence data for more than 906 genes and 8,140 exons representing 697 subjects. The 1000 Genomes database provides a critical opportunity for further interpreting disease associations with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered from genetic association studies. Currently, direct sequencing of candidate genes or regions on a large number of subjects remains both cost- and time-prohibitive. Results To accelerate the translation from discovery to functional studies, we propose an in silico gene sequencing method (ISS, which predicts phased sequences of intragenic regions, using SNPs. The key underlying idea of our method is to infer diploid sequences (a pair of phased sequences/alleles at every functional locus utilizing the deep sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project and SNP data from the HapMap Project, and to build prediction models using flanking SNPs. Using this method, we have developed a database of prediction models for 611 known genes. Sequence prediction accuracy for these genes is 96.26% on average (ranges 79%-100%. This database of prediction models can be enhanced and scaled up to include new genes as the 1000 Genomes Project sequences additional genes on additional individuals. Applying our predictive model for the KCNJ11 gene to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC Type 2 diabetes cohort, we demonstrate how the prediction of phased sequences inferred from GWAS SNP genotype data can be used to facilitate interpretation and identify a probable functional mechanism such as protein changes. Conclusions Prior to the general availability of routine sequencing of all subjects, the ISS method proposed here provides a time- and cost-effective approach to broadening the characterization of disease associated SNPs and regions, and facilitating the prioritization of candidate

  18. Sequencing of the Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Jacka

    Full Text Available Since the identification of hepatitis C virus (HCV, viral sequencing has been important in understanding HCV classification, epidemiology, evolution, transmission clustering, treatment response and natural history. The length and diversity of the HCV genome has resulted in analysis of certain regions of the virus, however there has been little standardisation of protocols. This systematic review was undertaken to map the location and frequency of sequencing on the HCV genome in peer reviewed publications, with the aim to produce a database of sequencing primers and amplicons to inform future research. Medline and Scopus databases were searched for English language publications based on keyword/MeSH terms related to sequence analysis (9 terms or HCV (3 terms, plus "primer" as a general search term. Exclusion criteria included non-HCV research, review articles, duplicate records, and incomplete description of HCV sequencing methods. The PCR primer locations of accepted publications were noted, and purpose of sequencing was determined. A total of 450 studies were accepted from the 2099 identified, with 629 HCV sequencing amplicons identified and mapped on the HCV genome. The most commonly sequenced region was the HVR-1 region, often utilised for studies of natural history, clustering/transmission, evolution and treatment response. Studies related to genotyping/classification or epidemiology of HCV genotype generally targeted the 5'UTR, Core and NS5B regions, while treatment response/resistance was assessed mainly in the NS3-NS5B region with emphasis on the Interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR region of NS5A. While the sequencing of HCV is generally constricted to certain regions of the HCV genome there is little consistency in the positioning of sequencing primers, with the exception of a few highly referenced manuscripts. This study demonstrates the heterogeneity of HCV sequencing, providing a comprehensive database of previously

  19. High-throughput sequence alignment using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapnell Cole

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent availability of new, less expensive high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies has yielded a dramatic increase in the volume of sequence data that must be analyzed. These data are being generated for several purposes, including genotyping, genome resequencing, metagenomics, and de novo genome assembly projects. Sequence alignment programs such as MUMmer have proven essential for analysis of these data, but researchers will need ever faster, high-throughput alignment tools running on inexpensive hardware to keep up with new sequence technologies. Results This paper describes MUMmerGPU, an open-source high-throughput parallel pairwise local sequence alignment program that runs on commodity Graphics Processing Units (GPUs in common workstations. MUMmerGPU uses the new Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA from nVidia to align multiple query sequences against a single reference sequence stored as a suffix tree. By processing the queries in parallel on the highly parallel graphics card, MUMmerGPU achieves more than a 10-fold speedup over a serial CPU version of the sequence alignment kernel, and outperforms the exact alignment component of MUMmer on a high end CPU by 3.5-fold in total application time when aligning reads from recent sequencing projects using Solexa/Illumina, 454, and Sanger sequencing technologies. Conclusion MUMmerGPU is a low cost, ultra-fast sequence alignment program designed to handle the increasing volume of data produced by new, high-throughput sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU demonstrates that even memory-intensive applications can run significantly faster on the relatively low-cost GPU than on the CPU.

  20. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Roger A; Carlson, Joseph W; Wan, Kenneth H; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E; Booth, Benjamin W; Pfeiffer, Barret D; George, Reed A; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F; Rubin, Gerald M; Karpen, Gary H; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads. © 2015 Hoskins et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Roche genome sequencer FLX based high-throughput sequencing of ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alquezar-Planas, David E; Fordyce, Sarah Louise

    2012-01-01

    Since the development of so-called "next generation" high-throughput sequencing in 2005, this technology has been applied to a variety of fields. Such applications include disease studies, evolutionary investigations, and ancient DNA. Each application requires a specialized protocol to ensure...... that the data produced is optimal. Although much of the procedure can be followed directly from the manufacturer's protocols, the key differences lie in the library preparation steps. This chapter presents an optimized protocol for the sequencing of fossil remains and museum specimens, commonly referred...

  2. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  3. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand......Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  4. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  5. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  6. Multilocus Sequence Analysis and rpoB Sequencing of Mycobacterium abscessus (Sensu Lato) Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheras, Edouard; Roux, Anne-Laure; Bastian, Sylvaine; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Palaci, Moises; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Gutierrez, Cristina; Richter, Elvira; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Pfyffer, Gaby; Bodmer, Thomas; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii, and Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus sensu lato) are closely related species that currently are identified by the sequencing of the rpoB gene. However, recent studies show that rpoB sequencing alone is insufficient to discriminate between these species, and some authors have questioned their current taxonomic classification. We studied here a large collection of M. abscessus (sensu lato) strains by partial rpoB sequencing (752 bp) and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The final MLSA scheme developed was based on the partial sequences of eight housekeeping genes: argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pgm, pta, and purH. The strains studied included the three type strains (M. abscessus CIP 104536T, M. massiliense CIP 108297T, and M. bolletii CIP 108541T) and 120 isolates recovered between 1997 and 2007 in France, Germany, Switzerland, and Brazil. The rpoB phylogenetic tree confirmed the existence of three main clusters, each comprising the type strain of one species. However, divergence values between the M. massiliense and M. bolletii clusters all were below 3% and between the M. abscessus and M. massiliense clusters were from 2.66 to 3.59%. The tree produced using the concatenated MLSA gene sequences (4,071 bp) also showed three main clusters, each comprising the type strain of one species. The M. abscessus cluster had a bootstrap value of 100% and was mostly compact. Bootstrap values for the M. massiliense and M. bolletii branches were much lower (71 and 61%, respectively), with the M. massiliense cluster having a fuzzy aspect. Mean (range) divergence values were 2.17% (1.13 to 2.58%) between the M. abscessus and M. massiliense clusters, 2.37% (1.5 to 2.85%) between the M. abscessus and M. bolletii clusters, and 2.28% (0.86 to 2.68%) between the M. massiliense and M. bolletii clusters. Adding the rpoB sequence to the MLSA-concatenated sequence (total sequence, 4,823 bp) had little effect on the clustering

  7. Multilocus sequence analysis and rpoB sequencing of Mycobacterium abscessus (sensu lato) strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheras, Edouard; Roux, Anne-Laure; Bastian, Sylvaine; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Palaci, Moises; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Gutierrez, Cristina; Richter, Elvira; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Pfyffer, Gaby; Bodmer, Thomas; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate

    2011-02-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii, and Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus sensu lato) are closely related species that currently are identified by the sequencing of the rpoB gene. However, recent studies show that rpoB sequencing alone is insufficient to discriminate between these species, and some authors have questioned their current taxonomic classification. We studied here a large collection of M. abscessus (sensu lato) strains by partial rpoB sequencing (752 bp) and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The final MLSA scheme developed was based on the partial sequences of eight housekeeping genes: argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pgm, pta, and purH. The strains studied included the three type strains (M. abscessus CIP 104536(T), M. massiliense CIP 108297(T), and M. bolletii CIP 108541(T)) and 120 isolates recovered between 1997 and 2007 in France, Germany, Switzerland, and Brazil. The rpoB phylogenetic tree confirmed the existence of three main clusters, each comprising the type strain of one species. However, divergence values between the M. massiliense and M. bolletii clusters all were below 3% and between the M. abscessus and M. massiliense clusters were from 2.66 to 3.59%. The tree produced using the concatenated MLSA gene sequences (4,071 bp) also showed three main clusters, each comprising the type strain of one species. The M. abscessus cluster had a bootstrap value of 100% and was mostly compact. Bootstrap values for the M. massiliense and M. bolletii branches were much lower (71 and 61%, respectively), with the M. massiliense cluster having a fuzzy aspect. Mean (range) divergence values were 2.17% (1.13 to 2.58%) between the M. abscessus and M. massiliense clusters, 2.37% (1.5 to 2.85%) between the M. abscessus and M. bolletii clusters, and 2.28% (0.86 to 2.68%) between the M. massiliense and M. bolletii clusters. Adding the rpoB sequence to the MLSA-concatenated sequence (total sequence, 4,823 bp) had little effect on the

  8. ReRep: Computational detection of repetitive sequences in genome survey sequences (GSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves-Ferreira Marcelo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome survey sequences (GSS offer a preliminary global view of a genome since, unlike ESTs, they cover coding as well as non-coding DNA and include repetitive regions of the genome. A more precise estimation of the nature, quantity and variability of repetitive sequences very early in a genome sequencing project is of considerable importance, as such data strongly influence the estimation of genome coverage, library quality and progress in scaffold construction. Also, the elimination of repetitive sequences from the initial assembly process is important to avoid errors and unnecessary complexity. Repetitive sequences are also of interest in a variety of other studies, for instance as molecular markers. Results We designed and implemented a straightforward pipeline called ReRep, which combines bioinformatics tools for identifying repetitive structures in a GSS dataset. In a case study, we first applied the pipeline to a set of 970 GSSs, sequenced in our laboratory from the human pathogen Leishmania braziliensis, the causative agent of leishmaniosis, an important public health problem in Brazil. We also verified the applicability of ReRep to new sequencing technologies using a set of 454-reads of an Escheria coli. The behaviour of several parameters in the algorithm is evaluated and suggestions are made for tuning of the analysis. Conclusion The ReRep approach for identification of repetitive elements in GSS datasets proved to be straightforward and efficient. Several potential repetitive sequences were found in a L. braziliensis GSS dataset generated in our laboratory, and further validated by the analysis of a more complete genomic dataset from the EMBL and Sanger Centre databases. ReRep also identified most of the E. coli K12 repeats prior to assembly in an example dataset obtained by automated sequencing using 454 technology. The parameters controlling the algorithm behaved consistently and may be tuned to the properties

  9. Gamma spectrum analysis including NAA with SAMPO for Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarnio, P.A.; Nikkinen, M.T.; Routti, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    SAMPO for Windows is a high performance gamma spectrum analysis program. All the measurement, analysis and NAA phases can be done either under full interactive use control or user defined tasks can be used for automated measurement and analysis sequences including control of MCAs and sample changers. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy together with the possibility to resolve complex multiplets with high accuracy makes SAMPO very suitable for INAA. On the other hand, the possibility to automate analysis sequences allows it use effectively also in all routine NAA measurements. NAA in SAMPO is accomplished using comparative methods. Spectra of standards, flux monitors, controls and actual samples are analyzed normally to obtain the peak areas which are optionally corrected for decay. In the comparison the flux monitor results are used to correct for variations in the effective neutron flux. An optional irradiation position correction can also be applied. The controls are used to alarm for possible deviations in the results. The sophisticated spectrum analysis methods used together with the comparative NAA and monitors give accurate results limited by the systematic effects only. The Windows environment provides ease of use and further processing power is available through the interface to expert system identification of nuclides. (author) 19 refs.; 1 tab

  10. Sequence analysis of Leukemia DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacong, Nasria; Lusiyanti, Desy; Irawan, Muhammad. Isa

    2018-03-01

    Cancer is a very deadly disease, one of which is leukemia disease or better known as blood cancer. The cancer cell can be detected by taking DNA in laboratory test. This study focused on local alignment of leukemia and non leukemia data resulting from NCBI in the form of DNA sequences by using Smith-Waterman algorithm. SmithWaterman algorithm was invented by TF Smith and MS Waterman in 1981. These algorithms try to find as much as possible similarity of a pair of sequences, by giving a negative value to the unequal base pair (mismatch), and positive values on the same base pair (match). So that will obtain the maximum positive value as the end of the alignment, and the minimum value as the initial alignment. This study will use sequences of leukemia and 3 sequences of non leukemia.

  11. Winnowing DNA for rare sequences: highly specific sequence and methylation based enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Thompson

    Full Text Available Rare mutations in cell populations are known to be hallmarks of many diseases and cancers. Similarly, differential DNA methylation patterns arise in rare cell populations with diagnostic potential such as fetal cells circulating in maternal blood. Unfortunately, the frequency of alleles with diagnostic potential, relative to wild-type background sequence, is often well below the frequency of errors in currently available methods for sequence analysis, including very high throughput DNA sequencing. We demonstrate a DNA preparation and purification method that through non-linear electrophoretic separation in media containing oligonucleotide probes, achieves 10,000 fold enrichment of target DNA with single nucleotide specificity, and 100 fold enrichment of unmodified methylated DNA differing from the background by the methylation of a single cytosine residue.

  12. Winnowing DNA for rare sequences: highly specific sequence and methylation based enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason D; Shibahara, Gosuke; Rajan, Sweta; Pel, Joel; Marziali, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Rare mutations in cell populations are known to be hallmarks of many diseases and cancers. Similarly, differential DNA methylation patterns arise in rare cell populations with diagnostic potential such as fetal cells circulating in maternal blood. Unfortunately, the frequency of alleles with diagnostic potential, relative to wild-type background sequence, is often well below the frequency of errors in currently available methods for sequence analysis, including very high throughput DNA sequencing. We demonstrate a DNA preparation and purification method that through non-linear electrophoretic separation in media containing oligonucleotide probes, achieves 10,000 fold enrichment of target DNA with single nucleotide specificity, and 100 fold enrichment of unmodified methylated DNA differing from the background by the methylation of a single cytosine residue.

  13. Fibre-optic laser-assisted infrared tumour diagnostics (FLAIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindig, U.; Müller, G.

    2005-08-01

    Laser based fibre-optic surgery procedures are commonly used in minimal invasive surgery. Despite the development of precise and efficient laser systems there are also innovative attempts in the field of bio-medical diagnostics. As a direct result of the tissue's optical properties most applications are focused on the visible wavelength range of the spectrum. The extension of the spectrum up to the mid-infrared (IR) region will offer a broad range of possibilities for novel strategies with a view to non-invasive diagnostics in medicine. We describe a method to detect differences between diseased and normal tissues, which involve Fourier transform IR microspectroscopy and fibre-optics methods. Regions of interest on 10 µm thin tissue sections were mapped using an IR microscope in transmission mode. After IR-mapping, the samples were analysed using standard pathological techniques. Quadratic discriminant and correlation analyses were applied to the IR maps obtained allowing differentiation between cancerous and normal tissue. The use of optical fibres, transparent in the mid-IR, allowed measurements to be made in the attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-mode at a remote location. The IR sensor is in contact with the sample that shows characteristic absorption lines. The total transmission of the fibre and the sample will decrease at these lines. This method can be used to determine the absorption of a sample in a non-destructive manner. In this paper we report on our efforts to develop an IR fibre-optic sensor for tissue identification as well as to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissue in vivo. We also describe the technical design of the laboratory set-up and the results of developments made. Silver halide fibres and a special sensor tip were used for the ATR measurements on tissue specimens. The results indicate that fibre-optic IR spectrometry will be a useful tool for bio-diagnostics.

  14. Fibre-optic laser-assisted infrared tumour diagnostics (FLAIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindig, U; Mueller, G

    2005-01-01

    Laser based fibre-optic surgery procedures are commonly used in minimal invasive surgery. Despite the development of precise and efficient laser systems there are also innovative attempts in the field of bio-medical diagnostics. As a direct result of the tissue's optical properties most applications are focused on the visible wavelength range of the spectrum. The extension of the spectrum up to the mid-infrared (IR) region will offer a broad range of possibilities for novel strategies with a view to non-invasive diagnostics in medicine. We describe a method to detect differences between diseased and normal tissues, which involve Fourier transform IR microspectroscopy and fibre-optics methods. Regions of interest on 10 μm thin tissue sections were mapped using an IR microscope in transmission mode. After IR-mapping, the samples were analysed using standard pathological techniques. Quadratic discriminant and correlation analyses were applied to the IR maps obtained allowing differentiation between cancerous and normal tissue. The use of optical fibres, transparent in the mid-IR, allowed measurements to be made in the attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-mode at a remote location. The IR sensor is in contact with the sample that shows characteristic absorption lines. The total transmission of the fibre and the sample will decrease at these lines. This method can be used to determine the absorption of a sample in a non-destructive manner. In this paper we report on our efforts to develop an IR fibre-optic sensor for tissue identification as well as to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissue in vivo. We also describe the technical design of the laboratory set-up and the results of developments made. Silver halide fibres and a special sensor tip were used for the ATR measurements on tissue specimens. The results indicate that fibre-optic IR spectrometry will be a useful tool for bio-diagnostics

  15. Storytelling for Fluency and Flair: A Performance-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Terry; Hlusek, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    In the classroom experiences described in this article, grade three students were introduced to storytelling through the interactive read aloud of a mentor text and a storytelling demonstration, followed by daily collaborative activities involving listening, speaking, reading, and writing, culminating in dramatic storytelling performances. The…

  16. ADDRESS SEQUENCES FOR MULTI RUN RAM TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yarmolik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A universal approach for generation of address sequences with specified properties is proposed and analyzed. A modified version of the Antonov and Saleev algorithm for Sobol sequences genera-tion is chosen as a mathematical description of the proposed method. Within the framework of the proposed universal approach, the Sobol sequences form a subset of the address sequences. Other sub-sets are also formed, which are Gray sequences, anti-Gray sequences, counter sequences and sequenc-es with specified properties.

  17. Stress triggering and the Canterbury earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steacy, Sandy; Jiménez, Abigail; Holden, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The Canterbury earthquake sequence, which includes the devastating Christchurch event of 2011 February, has to date led to losses of around 40 billion NZ dollars. The location and severity of the earthquakes was a surprise to most inhabitants as the seismic hazard model was dominated by an expected Mw > 8 earthquake on the Alpine fault and an Mw 7.5 earthquake on the Porters Pass fault, 150 and 80 km to the west of Christchurch. The sequence to date has included an Mw = 7.1 earthquake and 3 Mw ≥ 5.9 events which migrated from west to east. Here we investigate whether the later events are consistent with stress triggering and whether a simple stress map produced shortly after the first earthquake would have accurately indicated the regions where the subsequent activity occurred. We find that 100 per cent of M > 5.5 earthquakes occurred in positive stress areas computed using a slip model for the first event that was available within 10 d of its occurrence. We further find that the stress changes at the starting points of major slip patches of post-Darfield main events are consistent with triggering although this is not always true at the hypocentral locations. Our results suggest that Coulomb stress changes contributed to the evolution of the Canterbury sequence and we note additional areas of increased stress in the Christchurch region and on the Porters Pass fault.

  18. Method for priming and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugasimangalam, R.C.; Ulanovsky, L.E.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented for improving the priming specificity of an oligonucleotide primer that is non-unique in a nucleic acid template which includes selecting a continuous stretch of several nucleotides in the template DNA where one of the four bases does not occur in the stretch. This also includes bringing the template DNA in contract with a non-unique primer partially or fully complimentary to the sequence immediately upstream of the selected sequence stretch. This results in polymerase-mediated differential extension of the primer in the presence of a subset of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates that does not contain the base complementary to the base absent in the selected sequence stretch. These reactions occur at a temperature sufficiently low for allowing the extension of the non-unique primer. The method causes polymerase-mediated extension reactions in the presence of all four natural deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates or modifications. At this high temperature discrimination occurs against priming sites of the non-unique primer where the differential extension has not made the primer sufficiently stable to prime. However, the primer extended at the selected stretch is sufficiently stable to prime.

  19. SeqLib: a C ++ API for rapid BAM manipulation, sequence alignment and sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2017-03-01

    We present SeqLib, a C ++ API and command line tool that provides a rapid and user-friendly interface to BAM/SAM/CRAM files, global sequence alignment operations and sequence assembly. Four C libraries perform core operations in SeqLib: HTSlib for BAM access, BWA-MEM and BLAT for sequence alignment and Fermi for error correction and sequence assembly. Benchmarking indicates that SeqLib has lower CPU and memory requirements than leading C ++ sequence analysis APIs. We demonstrate an example of how minimal SeqLib code can extract, error-correct and assemble reads from a CRAM file and then align with BWA-MEM. SeqLib also provides additional capabilities, including chromosome-aware interval queries and read plotting. Command line tools are available for performing integrated error correction, micro-assemblies and alignment. SeqLib is available on Linux and OSX for the C ++98 standard and later at github.com/walaj/SeqLib. SeqLib is released under the Apache2 license. Additional capabilities for BLAT alignment are available under the BLAT license. jwala@broadinstitue.org ; rameen@broadinstitute.org. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  1. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  2. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  3. Fast and secure retrieval of DNA sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Sequence models are retrieved from a sequences index. The sequence models model DNA or RNA sequences stored in a database, and each comprises a finite memory tree source model and parameters for the finite memory tree source model. One or more DNA or RNA sequences stored in the database are

  4. Decidability of uniform recurrence of morphic sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Durand , Fabien

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the uniform recurrence of morphic sequences is decidable. For this we show that the number of derived sequences of uniformly recurrent morphic sequences is bounded. As a corollary we obtain that uniformly recurrent morphic sequences are primitive substitutive sequences.

  5. Bioinformatics for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Magi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms imposes increasing demands on statistical methods and bioinformatic tools for the analysis and the management of the huge amounts of data generated by these technologies. Even at the early stages of their commercial availability, a large number of softwares already exist for analyzing NGS data. These tools can be fit into many general categories including alignment of sequence reads to a reference, base-calling and/or polymorphism detection, de novo assembly from paired or unpaired reads, structural variant detection and genome browsing. This manuscript aims to guide readers in the choice of the available computational tools that can be used to face the several steps of the data analysis workflow.

  6. Motif discovery in ranked lists of sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tataru, Paula; Madsen, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Motif analysis has long been an important method to characterize biological functionality and the current growth of sequencing-based genomics experiments further extends its potential. These diverse experiments often generate sequence lists ranked by some functional property. There is therefore...... advantage of the regular expression feature, including enrichments for combinations of different microRNA seed sites. The method is implemented and made publicly available as an R package and supports high parallelization on multi-core machinery....... a growing need for motif analysis methods that can exploit this coupled data structure and be tailored for specific biological questions. Here, we present an exploratory motif analysis tool, Regmex (REGular expression Motif EXplorer), which offers several methods to evaluate the correlation of motifs...

  7. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... vehicular manslaughter, driving under the influence of drugs or liquor, and hit and run), when unaccompanied by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records...

  8. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  9. Extending flood damage assessment methodology to include ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal and sustainable flood plain management, including flood control, can only be achieved when the impacts of flood control measures are considered for both the man-made and natural environments, and the sociological aspects are fully considered. Until now, methods/models developed to determine the influences ...

  10. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  11. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  12. Experience of targeted Usher exome sequencing as a clinical test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Thomas; García-García, Gema; Baux, David; Vaché, Christel; Faugère, Valérie; Larrieu, Lise; Léonard, Susana; Millan, Jose M; Malcolm, Sue; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    We show that massively parallel targeted sequencing of 19 genes provides a new and reliable strategy for molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome (USH) and nonsyndromic deafness, particularly appropriate for these disorders characterized by a high clinical and genetic heterogeneity and a complex structure of several of the genes involved. A series of 71 patients including Usher patients previously screened by Sanger sequencing plus newly referred patients was studied. Ninety-eight percent of the variants previously identified by Sanger sequencing were found by next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS proved to be efficient as it offers analysis of all relevant genes which is laborious to reach with Sanger sequencing. Among the 13 newly referred Usher patients, both mutations in the same gene were identified in 77% of cases (10 patients) and one candidate pathogenic variant in two additional patients. This work can be considered as pilot for implementing NGS for genetically heterogeneous diseases in clinical service. PMID:24498627

  13. Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies to Diagnostic Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Palù

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel DNA sequencing techniques, referred to as “next-generation” sequencing (NGS, provide high speed and throughput that can produce an enormous volume of sequences with many possible applications in research and diagnostic settings. In this article, we provide an overview of the many applications of NGS in diagnostic virology. NGS techniques have been used for high-throughput whole viral genome sequencing, such as sequencing of new influenza viruses, for detection of viral genome variability and evolution within the host, such as investigation of human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis C virus quasispecies, and monitoring of low-abundance antiviral drug-resistance mutations. NGS techniques have been applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the detection of unexpected disease-associated viruses and for the discovery of novel human viruses, including cancer-related viruses. Finally, the human virome in healthy and disease conditions has been described by NGS-based metagenomics.

  14. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wandelt

    Full Text Available The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1 the size of the factorization, 2 the time for factorization, and 3 the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%, factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s, and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB. Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization.

  15. Implicit sequence learning in people with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R Gamble

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Implicit sequence learning involves learning about dependencies in sequences of events without intent to learn or awareness of what has been learned. Sequence learning is related to striatal dopamine levels, striatal activation, and integrity of white matter connections. People with Parkinson’s disease (PD have degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons, leading to dopamine deficiency and therefore striatal deficits, and they have difficulties with sequencing, including complex language comprehension and postural stability. Most research on implicit sequence learning in PD has used motor-based tasks. However, because PD presents with motor deficits, it is difficult to assess whether learning itself is impaired in these tasks. The present study used an implicit sequence learning task with a reduced motor component, the Triplets Learning Task (TLT. People with PD and age- and education-matched healthy older adults completed three sessions (each consisting of 10 blocks of 50 trials of the TLT. Results revealed that the PD group was able to learn the sequence, however, when learning was examined using a Half Blocks analysis (Nemeth et al., 2013, which compared learning in the 1st 25/50 trials of all blocks to that in the 2nd 25/50 trials, the PD group showed significantly less learning than Controls in the 2nd Half Blocks, but not in the 1st. Nemeth et al. hypothesized that the 1st Half Blocks involve recall and reactivation of the sequence learned, thus reflecting hippocampal-dependent learning, while the 2nd Half Blocks involve proceduralized behavior of learned sequences, reflecting striatal-based learning. The present results suggest that the PD group had intact hippocampal-dependent implicit sequence learning, but impaired striatal-dependent learning. Thus, sequencing deficits in PD are likely due to striatal impairments, but other brain systems, such as the hippocampus, may be able to partially compensate for striatal decline to improve

  16. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  17. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  18. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement is described for nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux. The reactor shielding includes means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron

  19. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository

  20. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  1. Analysis of Pteridium ribosomal RNA sequences by rapid direct sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M K

    1991-08-01

    A total of 864 bases from 5 regions interspersed in the 18S and 26S rRNA molecules from various clones of Pteridium covering the general geographical distribution of the genus was analysed using a rapid rRNA sequencing technique. No base difference has been detected amongst the three major lineages, two of which apparently separated before the breakup of the ancient supercontinent, Pangaea. These regions of the rRNA sequences have thus been conserved for at least 160 million years and are here compared with other eukaryotic, especially plant rRNAs.

  2. Sequence Capture versus Restriction Site Associated DNA Sequencing for Shallow Systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michael G; Smith, Brian Tilston; Glenn, Travis C; Faircloth, Brant C; Brumfield, Robb T

    2016-09-01

    Sequence capture and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) are two genomic enrichment strategies for applying next-generation sequencing technologies to systematics studies. At shallow timescales, such as within species, RAD-Seq has been widely adopted among researchers, although there has been little discussion of the potential limitations and benefits of RAD-Seq and sequence capture. We discuss a series of issues that may impact the utility of sequence capture and RAD-Seq data for shallow systematics in non-model species. We review prior studies that used both methods, and investigate differences between the methods by re-analyzing existing RAD-Seq and sequence capture data sets from a Neotropical bird (Xenops minutus). We suggest that the strengths of RAD-Seq data sets for shallow systematics are the wide dispersion of markers across the genome, the relative ease and cost of laboratory work, the deep coverage and read overlap at recovered loci, and the high overall information that results. Sequence capture's benefits include flexibility and repeatability in the genomic regions targeted, success using low-quality samples, more straightforward read orthology assessment, and higher per-locus information content. The utility of a method in systematics, however, rests not only on its performance within a study, but on the comparability of data sets and inferences with those of prior work. In RAD-Seq data sets, comparability is compromised by low overlap of orthologous markers across species and the sensitivity of genetic diversity in a data set to an interaction between the level of natural heterozygosity in the samples examined and the parameters used for orthology assessment. In contrast, sequence capture of conserved genomic regions permits interrogation of the same loci across divergent species, which is preferable for maintaining comparability among data sets and studies for the purpose of drawing general conclusions about the impact of

  3. How Next-Generation Sequencing Has Aided Our Understanding of the Sequence Composition and Origin of B Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alevtina Ruban

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accessory, supernumerary, or—most simply—B chromosomes, are found in many eukaryotic karyotypes. These small chromosomes do not follow the usual pattern of segregation, but rather are transmitted in a higher than expected frequency. As increasingly being demonstrated by next-generation sequencing (NGS, their structure comprises fragments of standard (A chromosomes, although in some plant species, their sequence also includes contributions from organellar genomes. Transcriptomic analyses of various animal and plant species have revealed that, contrary to what used to be the common belief, some of the B chromosome DNA is protein-encoding. This review summarizes the progress in understanding B chromosome biology enabled by the application of next-generation sequencing technology and state-of-the-art bioinformatics. In particular, a contrast is drawn between a direct sequencing approach and a strategy based on a comparative genomics as alternative routes that can be taken towards the identification of B chromosome sequences.

  4. Seismic sequences in the Sombrero Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, J.; Huerfano, V. A.; ten Brink, U.; von Hillebrandt, C.

    2007-05-01

    The northeastern Caribbean, in the vicinity of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, has a long and well-documented history of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, including major events in 1670, 1787, 1867, 1916, 1918, and 1943. Recently, seismicity has been concentrated to the north and west of the British Virgin Islands, in the region referred to as the Sombrero Seismic Zone by the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN). In the combined seismicity catalog maintained by the PRSN, several hundred small to moderate magnitude events can be found in this region prior to 2006. However, beginning in 2006 and continuing to the present, the rate of seismicity in the Sombrero suddenly increased, and a new locus of activity developed to the east of the previous location. Accurate estimates of seismic hazard, and the tsunamigenic potential of seismic events, depend on an accurate and comprehensive understanding of how strain is being accommodated in this corner region. Are faults locked and accumulating strain for release in a major event? Or is strain being released via slip over a diffuse system of faults? A careful analysis of seismicity patterns in the Sombrero region has the potential to both identify faults and modes of failure, provided the aggregation scheme is tuned to properly identify related events. To this end, we experimented with a scheme to identify seismic sequences based on physical and temporal proximity, under the assumptions that (a) events occur on related fault systems as stress is refocused by immediately previous events and (b) such 'stress waves' die out with time, so that two events that occur on the same system within a relatively short time window can be said to have a similar 'trigger' in ways that two nearby events that occurred years apart cannot. Patterns that emerge from the identification, temporal sequence, and refined locations of such sequences of events carry information about stress accommodation that is obscured by large clouds of

  5. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  6. A programmable method for massively parallel targeted sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Erik S.; Natsoulis, Georges; Bell, John M.; Grimes, Susan M.; Sieh, Weiva; Ji, Hanlee P.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a targeted resequencing approach referred to as Oligonucleotide-Selective Sequencing. In this study, we report a series of significant improvements and novel applications of this method whereby the surface of a sequencing flow cell is modified in situ to capture specific genomic regions of interest from a sample and then sequenced. These improvements include a fully automated targeted sequencing platform through the use of a standard Illumina cBot fluidics station. Targeting optimization increased the yield of total on-target sequencing data 2-fold compared to the previous iteration, while simultaneously increasing the percentage of reads that could be mapped to the human genome. The described assays cover up to 1421 genes with a total coverage of 5.5 Megabases (Mb). We demonstrate a 10-fold abundance uniformity of greater than 90% in 1 log distance from the median and a targeting rate of up to 95%. We also sequenced continuous genomic loci up to 1.5 Mb while simultaneously genotyping SNPs and genes. Variants with low minor allele fraction were sensitively detected at levels of 5%. Finally, we determined the exact breakpoint sequence of cancer rearrangements. Overall, this approach has high performance for selective sequencing of genome targets, configuration flexibility and variant calling accuracy. PMID:24782526

  7. Inaugural Genomics Automation Congress and the coming deluge of sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Chad J

    2010-10-01

    Presentations at Select Biosciences's first 'Genomics Automation Congress' (Boston, MA, USA) in 2010 focused on next-generation sequencing and the platforms and methodology around them. The meeting provided an overview of sequencing technologies, both new and emerging. Speakers shared their recent work on applying sequencing to profile cells for various levels of biomolecular complexity, including DNA sequences, DNA copy, DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA. With sequencing time and costs continuing to drop dramatically, a virtual explosion of very large sequencing datasets is at hand, which will probably present challenges and opportunities for high-level data analysis and interpretation, as well as for information technology infrastructure.

  8. Transformed composite sequences for improved qubit addressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J. True; Doret, S. Charles; Vittorini, Grahame; Addison, J. P.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-10-01

    Selective laser addressing of a single atom or atomic ion qubit can be improved using narrow-band composite pulse sequences. We describe a Lie-algebraic technique to generalize known narrow-band sequences and introduce sequences related by dilation and rotation of sequence generators. Our method improves known narrow-band sequences by decreasing both the pulse time and the residual error. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate these composite sequences using 40Ca+ ions trapped in a surface-electrode ion trap.

  9. Iterative normalization technique for reference sequence generation for zero-tail discrete fourier transform spread orthogonal frequency division multiplexing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    , and performing an iterative manipulation of the input sequence. The performing of the iterative manipulation of the input sequence may include, for example: computing frequency domain response of the sequence, normalizing elements of the computed frequency domain sequence to unitary power while maintaining phase...

  10. [Renal patient's diet: Can fish be included?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro González, M I; Maafs Rodríguez, A G; Galindo Gómez, C

    2012-01-01

    Medical and nutritional treatment for renal disease, now a major public health issue, is highly complicated. Nutritional therapy must seek to retard renal dysfunction, maintain an optimal nutritional status and prevent the development of underlying pathologies. To analyze ten fish species to identify those that, because of their low phosphorus content, high biological value protein and elevated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, could be included in renal patient's diet. The following fish species (Litte tunny, Red drum, Spotted eagleray, Escolar, Swordfish, Big-scale pomfret, Cortez flounder, Largemouth blackbass, Periche mojarra, Florida Pompano) were analyzed according to the AOAC and Keller techniques to determine their protein, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, vitamins D(3) and E, and n-3 EPA+DHA content. These results were used to calculate relations between nutrients. The protein in the analyzed species ranged from 16.5 g/100 g of fillet (Largemouth black bass) to 27.2 g/100 g (Red drum); the lowest phosphorus value was 28.6 mg/100 g (Periche mojarra) and the highest 216.3 mg/100 g (Spotted eagle ray). 80% of the fish presented > 100 mg EPA + DHA in 100 g of fillet. By its Phosphorus/gProtein ratio, Escolar and Swordfish could not be included in the renal diet; Little tunny, Escolar, Big-scale pomfret, Largemouth black-bass, Periche mojarra and Florida Pompano presented a lower Phosphorus/EPA + DHA ratio. Florida pompano is the most recommended specie for renal patients, due to its optimal nutrient relations. However, all analyzed species, except Escolar and Swordfish, could be included in renal diets.

  11. MOS modeling hierarchy including radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.R.; Turfler, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A hierarchy of modeling procedures has been developed for MOS transistors, circuit blocks, and integrated circuits which include the effects of total dose radiation and photocurrent response. The models were developed for use with the SCEPTRE circuit analysis program, but the techniques are suitable for other modern computer aided analysis programs. The modeling hierarchy permits the designer or analyst to select the level of modeling complexity consistent with circuit size, parametric information, and accuracy requirements. Improvements have been made in the implementation of important second order effects in the transistor MOS model, in the definition of MOS building block models, and in the development of composite terminal models for MOS integrated circuits

  12. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.; Buttner, Ulrich; Yi, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  13. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  14. Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequencesfrom the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubeso, Linda A.; Peery, Rhiannon; Chumley, Timothy W.; Dziubek,Chris; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2007-03-01

    The number of completely sequenced plastid genomes available is growing rapidly. This new array of sequences presents new opportunities to perform comparative analyses. In comparative studies, it is most useful to compare across wide phylogenetic spans and, within angiosperms, to include representatives from basally diverging lineages such as the new genomes reported here: Nuphar advena (from a basal-most lineage) and Ranunculus macranthus (from the basal group of eudicots). We report these two new plastid genome sequences and make comparisons (within angiosperms, seed plants, or all photosynthetic lineages) to evaluate features such as the status of ycf15 and ycf68 as protein coding genes, the distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and longer dispersed repeats (SDR), and patterns of nucleotide composition.

  15. The Development of a Course Sequence in Real-Time Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This project deals with the development of a senior level course sequence in software intensive real - time systems . The sequence consists of a course...for an engineering industrial career in real - time systems development. The course sequence emphasizes practical standards, techniques, and tools for...system development. Few universities include real - time systems development in their undergraduate Computer Engineering or Computer Science curriculum

  16. Explaining the harmonic sequence paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Zimper, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    According to the harmonic sequence paradox, an expected utility decision maker's willingness to pay for a gamble whose expected payoffs evolve according to the harmonic series is finite if and only if his marginal utility of additional income becomes zero for rather low payoff levels. Since the assumption of zero marginal utility is implausible for finite payoff levels, expected utility theory - as well as its standard generalizations such as cumulative prospect theory - are apparently unable to explain a finite willingness to pay. This paper presents first an experimental study of the harmonic sequence paradox. Additionally, it demonstrates that the theoretical argument of the harmonic sequence paradox only applies to time-patient decision makers, whereas the paradox is easily avoided if time-impatience is introduced. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Energy principle with included boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Earlier comments by the author on the limitations of the classical form of the extended energy principle are supported by a complementary analysis on the potential energy change arising from free-boundary displacements of a magnetically confined plasma. In the final formulation of the extended principle, restricted displacements, satisfying pressure continuity by means of plasma volume currents in a thin boundary layer, are replaced by unrestricted (arbitrary) displacements which can give rise to induced surface currents. It is found that these currents contribute to the change in potential energy, and that their contribution is not taken into account by such a formulation. A general expression is further given for surface currents induced by arbitrary displacements. The expression is used to reformulate the energy principle for the class of displacements which satisfy all necessary boundary conditions, including that of the pressure balance. This makes a minimization procedure of the potential energy possible, for the class of all physically relevant test functions which include the constraints imposed by the boundary conditions. Such a procedure is also consistent with a corresponding variational calculus. (Author)

  18. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  19. Addressing Stillbirth in India Must Include Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa; Montgomery, Susanne; Ganesh, Gayatri; Kaur, Harinder Pal; Singh, Ratan

    2017-07-01

    Millennium Development Goal 4, to reduce child mortality, can only be achieved by reducing stillbirths globally. A confluence of medical and sociocultural factors contribute to the high stillbirth rates in India. The psychosocial aftermath of stillbirth is a well-documented public health problem, though less is known of the experience for men, particularly outside of the Western context. Therefore, men's perceptions and knowledge regarding reproductive health, as well as maternal-child health are important. Key informant interviews (n = 5) were analyzed and 28 structured interviews were conducted using a survey based on qualitative themes. Qualitative themes included men's dual burden and right to medical and reproductive decision making power. Wives were discouraged from expressing grief and pushed to conceive again. If not successful, particularly if a son was not conceived, a second wife was considered a solution. Quantitative data revealed that men with a history of stillbirths had greater anxiety and depression, perceived less social support, but had more egalitarian views towards women than men without stillbirth experience. At the same time fathers of stillbirths were more likely to be emotionally or physically abusive. Predictors of mental health, attitudes towards women, and perceived support are discussed. Patriarchal societal values, son preference, deficient women's autonomy, and sex-selective abortion perpetuate the risk for future poor infant outcomes, including stillbirth, and compounds the already higher risk of stillbirth for males. Grief interventions should explore and take into account men's perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors towards reproductive decision making.

  20. Impact of Negative Sequence Current Injection by Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhary, Sanjay; Göksu, Ömer; Teodorescu, Remus

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the impact from negative sequence current injection by wind power plants in power systems under steady-state and short-term unbalanced conditions, including faults. The separate positive and negative sequence current control capability of the grid-side converters...... of full scale converter type wind turbines may be utilized to alter voltage imbalance at the point of connection and further into the grid, in turn changing the resultant negative sequence current flow in the grid. The effects of such control actions have been analyzed and discussed through theoretical...

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the triosephosphate isomerase gene from Macaca mulatta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Old, S.E.; Mohrenweiser, H.W. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1988-09-26

    The triosephosphate isomerase gene from a rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta, charon 34 library was sequenced. The human and chimpanzee enzymes differ from the rhesus enzyme at ASN 20 and GLU 198. The nucleotide sequence identity between rhesus and human is 97% in the coding region and >94% in the flanking regions. Comparison of the rhesus and chimp genes, including the intron and flanking sequences, does not suggest a mechanism for generating the two TPI peptides of proliferating cells from hominoids and a single peptide from the rhesus gene.

  2. Constrained Optimization of MIMO Training Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coon Justin P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems have shown a huge potential for increased spectral efficiency and throughput. With an increasing number of transmitting antennas comes the burden of providing training for channel estimation for coherent detection. In some special cases optimal, in the sense of mean-squared error (MSE, training sequences have been designed. However, in many practical systems it is not feasible to analytically find optimal solutions and numerical techniques must be used. In this paper, two systems (unique word (UW single carrier and OFDM with nulled subcarriers are considered and a method of designing near-optimal training sequences using nonlinear optimization techniques is proposed. In particular, interior-point (IP algorithms such as the barrier method are discussed. Although the two systems seem unrelated, the cost function, which is the MSE of the channel estimate, is shown to be effectively the same for each scenario. Also, additional constraints, such as peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR, are considered and shown to be easily included in the optimization process. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the designed training sequences, both in terms of MSE and bit-error rate (BER.

  3. Sequence of tenses: playing with possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan Ulašin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyse the sequence of tenses in Spanish, a phenomenon typical of the Romance languages. Our purpose is to systematize and formulate the rules of use by means of examples with graphical representations. We focus on such cases of use of the sequence of tenses where it is possible to apply a “double-access interpretation”, i. e. which allows the possibility of choosing between reference points: with the actual time (the moment of speech or with the main clause. This double interpretation is to be found in all three types of time relationships: simultaneousness, priority and posteriority. Some pairs differ semantically; others are used according to the preferences of the speaker with no change of meaning. Most examples are subordinate noun clauses, nonetheless we included examples of other types of clauses as well (e.g. relative, reason clauses. We also analyze the problem of the sequence of tenses where the main verb is in the conditional tense.

  4. Evolution of developmental sequences in lepidosaurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Skawiński

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Lepidosaurs, a group including rhynchocephalians and squamates, are one of the major clades of extant vertebrates. Although there has been extensive phylogenetic work on this clade, its interrelationships are a matter of debate. Morphological and molecular data suggest very different relationships within squamates. Despite this, relatively few studies have assessed the utility of other types of data for inferring squamate phylogeny. Methods We used developmental sequences of 20 events in 29 species of lepidosaurs. These sequences were analysed using event-pairing and continuous analysis. They were transformed into cladistic characters and analysed in TNT. Ancestral state reconstructions were performed on two main phylogenetic hypotheses of squamates (morphological and molecular. Results Cladistic analyses conducted using characters generated by these methods do not resemble any previously published phylogeny. Ancestral state reconstructions are equally consistent with both morphological and molecular hypotheses of squamate phylogeny. Only several inferred heterochronic events are common to all methods and phylogenies. Discussion Results of the cladistic analyses, and the fact that reconstructions of heterochronic events show more similarities between certain methods rather than phylogenetic hypotheses, suggest that phylogenetic signal is at best weak in the studied developmental events. Possibly the developmental sequences analysed here evolve too quickly to recover deep divergences within Squamata.

  5. Matrix transformations and sequence spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, S.

    1983-06-01

    In most cases the most general linear operator from one sequence space into another is actually given by an infinite matrix and therefore the theory of matrix transformations has always been of great interest in the study of sequence spaces. The study of general theory of matrix transformations was motivated by the special results in summability theory. This paper is a review article which gives almost all known results on matrix transformations. This also suggests a number of open problems for further study and will be very useful for research workers. (author)

  6. Green's theorem and Gorenstein sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jeaman; Migliore, Juan C.; Shin, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    We study consequences, for a standard graded algebra, of extremal behavior in Green's Hyperplane Restriction Theorem. First, we extend his Theorem 4 from the case of a plane curve to the case of a hypersurface in a linear space. Second, assuming a certain Lefschetz condition, we give a connection to extremal behavior in Macaulay's theorem. We apply these results to show that $(1,19,17,19,1)$ is not a Gorenstein sequence, and as a result we classify the sequences of the form $(1,a,a-2,a,1)$ th...

  7. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-05-17

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  8. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  9. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  10. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Allan, G L; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S J; Day, J P [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  11. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  12. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  13. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepares participants to develop test and measurement, da...

  14. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" trainings have been recently changed to include, respectively, an introduction and an expert training on the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to develop expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepare...

  15. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  16. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  17. Should Broca's area include Brodmann area 47?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain organization of speech production has been a principal goal of neuroscience. Historically, brain speech production has been associated with so-called Broca’s area (Brodmann area –BA- 44 and 45), however, modern neuroimaging developments suggest speech production is associated with networks rather than with areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of BA47 ( pars orbitalis) in relation to language . A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the language network in which BA47 is involved. The Brainmap database was used. Twenty papers corresponding to 29 experimental conditions with a total of 373 subjects were included. Our results suggest that BA47 participates in a “frontal language production system” (or extended Broca’s system). The BA47  connectivity found is also concordant with a minor role in language semantics. BA47 plays a central role in the language production system.

  18. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... in a short period of time. However, there are scarce data regarding its validity, reproducibility, and responsiveness to change, making interpretation and comparison of studies difficult. In particular, there are limited data describing standardized scanning methodology and standardized definitions of US...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  19. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  20. Including climate change in energy investment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ybema, J.R.; Boonekamp, P.G.M.; Smit, J.T.J.

    1995-08-01

    To properly take climate change into account in the analysis of energy investment decisions, it is required to apply decision analysis methods that are capable of considering the specific characteristics of climate change (large uncertainties, long term horizon). Such decision analysis methods do exist. They can explicitly include evolving uncertainties, multi-stage decisions, cumulative effects and risk averse attitudes. Various methods are considered in this report and two of these methods have been selected: hedging calculations and sensitivity analysis. These methods are applied to illustrative examples, and its limitations are discussed. The examples are (1a) space heating and hot water for new houses from a private investor perspective and (1b) as example (1a) but from a government perspective, (2) electricity production with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (ICGCC) with or without CO 2 removal, and (3) national energy strategy to hedge for climate change. 9 figs., 21 tabs., 42 refs., 1 appendix

  1. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  2. Six-term exact sequences for smooth generalized crossed products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Olivier; Grensing, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We define smooth generalized crossed products and prove six-term exact sequences of Pimsner–Voiculescu type. This sequence may, in particular, be applied to smooth subalgebras of the quantum Heisenberg manifolds in order to compute the generators of their cyclic cohomology. Further, our results...... include the known results for smooth crossed products. Our proof is based on a combination of arguments from the setting of (Cuntz–)Pimsner algebras and the Toeplitz proof of Bott periodicity....

  3. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P., E-mail: zhdanov@catalysis.r

    2011-03-15

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  4. Sequence quality analysis tool for HIV type 1 protease and reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Allison K; Wu, Mingham; Bennett, Diane; Parkin, Neil; Wu, Zhijin; Hogan, Joseph W; Kantor, Rami

    2012-08-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy is increasing globally and drug resistance evolution is anticipated. Currently, protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence generation is increasing, including the use of in-house sequencing assays, and quality assessment prior to sequence analysis is essential. We created a computational HIV PR/RT Sequence Quality Analysis Tool (SQUAT) that runs in the R statistical environment. Sequence quality thresholds are calculated from a large dataset (46,802 PR and 44,432 RT sequences) from the published literature ( http://hivdb.Stanford.edu ). Nucleic acid sequences are read into SQUAT, identified, aligned, and translated. Nucleic acid sequences are flagged if with >five 1-2-base insertions; >one 3-base insertion; >one deletion; >six PR or >18 RT ambiguous bases; >three consecutive PR or >four RT nucleic acid mutations; >zero stop codons; >three PR or >six RT ambiguous amino acids; >three consecutive PR or >four RT amino acid mutations; >zero unique amino acids; or 15% genetic distance from another submitted sequence. Thresholds are user modifiable. SQUAT output includes a summary report with detailed comments for troubleshooting of flagged sequences, histograms of pairwise genetic distances, neighbor joining phylogenetic trees, and aligned nucleic and amino acid sequences. SQUAT is a stand-alone, free, web-independent tool to ensure use of high-quality HIV PR/RT sequences in interpretation and reporting of drug resistance, while increasing awareness and expertise and facilitating troubleshooting of potentially problematic sequences.

  5. Validation of rice genome sequence by optical mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pape Louise

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice feeds much of the world, and possesses the simplest genome analyzed to date within the grass family, making it an economically relevant model system for other cereal crops. Although the rice genome is sequenced, validation and gap closing efforts require purely independent means for accurate finishing of sequence build data. Results To facilitate ongoing sequencing finishing and validation efforts, we have constructed a whole-genome SwaI optical restriction map of the rice genome. The physical map consists of 14 contigs, covering 12 chromosomes, with a total genome size of 382.17 Mb; this value is about 11% smaller than original estimates. 9 of the 14 optical map contigs are without gaps, covering chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 10, and 12 in their entirety – including centromeres and telomeres. Alignments between optical and in silico restriction maps constructed from IRGSP (International Rice Genome Sequencing Project and TIGR (The Institute for Genomic Research genome sequence sources are comprehensive and informative, evidenced by map coverage across virtually all published gaps, discovery of new ones, and characterization of sequence misassemblies; all totalling ~14 Mb. Furthermore, since optical maps are ordered restriction maps, identified discordances are pinpointed on a reliable physical scaffold providing an independent resource for closure of gaps and rectification of misassemblies. Conclusion Analysis of sequence and optical mapping data effectively validates genome sequence assemblies constructed from large, repeat-rich genomes. Given this conclusion we envision new applications of such single molecule analysis that will merge advantages offered by high-resolution optical maps with inexpensive, but short sequence reads generated by emerging sequencing platforms. Lastly, map construction techniques presented here points the way to new types of comparative genome analysis that would focus on discernment of

  6. Combinatorial Pooling Enables Selective Sequencing of the Barley Gene Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardi, Stefano; Duma, Denisa; Alpert, Matthew; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco; Bhat, Prasanna R.; Wu, Yonghui; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Alsaihati, Burair; Ma, Yaqin; Wanamaker, Steve; Resnik, Josh; Bozdag, Serdar; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Close, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    For the vast majority of species – including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution) so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:23592960

  7. Combinatorial pooling enables selective sequencing of the barley gene space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lonardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For the vast majority of species - including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding.

  8. Combinatorial pooling enables selective sequencing of the barley gene space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardi, Stefano; Duma, Denisa; Alpert, Matthew; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco; Bhat, Prasanna R; Wu, Yonghui; Ciardo, Gianfranco; Alsaihati, Burair; Ma, Yaqin; Wanamaker, Steve; Resnik, Josh; Bozdag, Serdar; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Close, Timothy J

    2013-04-01

    For the vast majority of species - including many economically or ecologically important organisms, progress in biological research is hampered due to the lack of a reference genome sequence. Despite recent advances in sequencing technologies, several factors still limit the availability of such a critical resource. At the same time, many research groups and international consortia have already produced BAC libraries and physical maps and now are in a position to proceed with the development of whole-genome sequences organized around a physical map anchored to a genetic map. We propose a BAC-by-BAC sequencing protocol that combines combinatorial pooling design and second-generation sequencing technology to efficiently approach denovo selective genome sequencing. We show that combinatorial pooling is a cost-effective and practical alternative to exhaustive DNA barcoding when preparing sequencing libraries for hundreds or thousands of DNA samples, such as in this case gene-bearing minimum-tiling-path BAC clones. The novelty of the protocol hinges on the computational ability to efficiently compare hundred millions of short reads and assign them to the correct BAC clones (deconvolution) so that the assembly can be carried out clone-by-clone. Experimental results on simulated data for the rice genome show that the deconvolution is very accurate, and the resulting BAC assemblies have high quality. Results on real data for a gene-rich subset of the barley genome confirm that the deconvolution is accurate and the BAC assemblies have good quality. While our method cannot provide the level of completeness that one would achieve with a comprehensive whole-genome sequencing project, we show that it is quite successful in reconstructing the gene sequences within BACs. In the case of plants such as barley, this level of sequence knowledge is sufficient to support critical end-point objectives such as map-based cloning and marker-assisted breeding.

  9. Short read sequence typing (SRST: multi-locus sequence types from short reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inouye Michael

    2012-07-01

    software tool for accurate assignment of sequence types using short read data. Several uses for the tool are demonstrated, including quality control for high-throughput sequencing projects, plasmid MLST and analysis of genomic data during outbreak investigation. SRST is open-source, requires Python, BWA and SamTools, and is available from http://srst.sourceforge.net.

  10. Homogeneity of the 16S rDNA sequence among geographically disparate isolates of Taylorella equigenitalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore JE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, six accessible sequences of 16S rDNA from Taylorella equigenitalis (T. equigenitalis are available, whose sequence differences occur at a few nucleotide positions. Thus it is important to determine these sequences from additional strains in other countries, if possible, in order to clarify any anomalies regarding 16S rDNA sequence heterogeneity. Here, we clone and sequence the approximate full-length 16S rDNA from additional strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan, Australia and France and compare these sequences to the existing published sequences. Results Clarification of any anomalies regarding 16S rDNA sequence heterogeneity of T. equigenitalis was carried out. When cloning, sequencing and comparison of the approximate full-length 16S rDNA from 17 strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan, Australia and France, nucleotide sequence differences were demonstrated at the six loci in the 1,469 nucleotide sequence. Moreover, 12 polymorphic sites occurred among 23 sequences of the 16S rDNA, including the six reference sequences. Conclusion High sequence similarity (99.5% or more was observed throughout, except from nucleotide positions 138 to 501 where substitutions and deletions were noted.

  11. Homogeneity of the 16S rDNA sequence among geographically disparate isolates of Taylorella equigenitalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Tazumi, A; Kagawa, S; Sekizuka, T; Murayama, O; Moore, JE; Millar, BC

    2006-01-01

    Background At present, six accessible sequences of 16S rDNA from Taylorella equigenitalis (T. equigenitalis) are available, whose sequence differences occur at a few nucleotide positions. Thus it is important to determine these sequences from additional strains in other countries, if possible, in order to clarify any anomalies regarding 16S rDNA sequence heterogeneity. Here, we clone and sequence the approximate full-length 16S rDNA from additional strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan, Australia and France and compare these sequences to the existing published sequences. Results Clarification of any anomalies regarding 16S rDNA sequence heterogeneity of T. equigenitalis was carried out. When cloning, sequencing and comparison of the approximate full-length 16S rDNA from 17 strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan, Australia and France, nucleotide sequence differences were demonstrated at the six loci in the 1,469 nucleotide sequence. Moreover, 12 polymorphic sites occurred among 23 sequences of the 16S rDNA, including the six reference sequences. Conclusion High sequence similarity (99.5% or more) was observed throughout, except from nucleotide positions 138 to 501 where substitutions and deletions were noted. PMID:16398935

  12. Digital PCR provides sensitive and absolute calibration for high throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan H Christina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation DNA sequencing on the 454, Solexa, and SOLiD platforms requires absolute calibration of the number of molecules to be sequenced. This requirement has two unfavorable consequences. First, large amounts of sample-typically micrograms-are needed for library preparation, thereby limiting the scope of samples which can be sequenced. For many applications, including metagenomics and the sequencing of ancient, forensic, and clinical samples, the quantity of input DNA can be critically limiting. Second, each library requires a titration sequencing run, thereby increasing the cost and lowering the throughput of sequencing. Results We demonstrate the use of digital PCR to accurately quantify 454 and Solexa sequencing libraries, enabling the preparation of sequencing libraries from nanogram quantities of input material while eliminating costly and time-consuming titration runs of the sequencer. We successfully sequenced low-nanogram scale bacterial and mammalian DNA samples on the 454 FLX and Solexa DNA sequencing platforms. This study is the first to definitively demonstrate the successful sequencing of picogram quantities of input DNA on the 454 platform, reducing the sample requirement more than 1000-fold without pre-amplification and the associated bias and reduction in library depth. Conclusion The digital PCR assay allows absolute quantification of sequencing libraries, eliminates uncertainties associated with the construction and application of standard curves to PCR-based quantification, and with a coefficient of variation close to 10%, is sufficiently precise to enable direct sequencing without titration runs.

  13. Zγ production at NNLO including anomalous couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John M.; Neumann, Tobias; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD calculation of the processes pp → l + l -γ and pp\\to ν \\overline{ν}γ that we have implemented in MCFM. Our calculation includes QCD corrections at NNLO both for the Standard Model (SM) and additionally in the presence of Zγγ and ZZγ anomalous couplings. We compare our implementation, obtained using the jettiness slicing approach, with a previous SM calculation and find broad agreement. Focusing on the sensitivity of our results to the slicing parameter, we show that using our setup we are able to compute NNLO cross sections with numerical uncertainties of about 0.1%, which is small compared to residual scale uncertainties of a few percent. We study potential improvements using two different jettiness definitions and the inclusion of power corrections. At √{s}=13 TeV we present phenomenological results and consider Zγ as a background to H → Zγ production. We find that, with typical cuts, the inclusion of NNLO corrections represents a small effect and loosens the extraction of limits on anomalous couplings by about 10%.

  14. Alternating phase focussing including space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, W.H.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal stability can be obtained in a non-relativistic drift tube accelerator by traversing each gap as the rf accelerating field rises. However, the rising accelerating field leads to a transverse defocusing force which is usually overcome by magnetic focussing inside the drift tubes. The radio frequency quadrupole is one way of providing simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing without the use of magnets. One can also avoid the use of magnets by traversing alternate gaps between drift tubes as the field is rising and falling, thus providing an alternation of focussing and defocusing forces in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The stable longitudinal phase space area is quite small, but recent efforts suggest that alternating phase focussing (APF) may permit low velocity acceleration of currents in the 100-300 ma range. This paper presents a study of the parameter space and a test of crude analytic predictions by adapting the code PARMILA, which includes space charge, to APF. 6 refs., 3 figs

  15. Probabilistic production simulation including CHP plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.V.; Palsson, H.; Ravn, H.F.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic production simulation method is presented for an energy system containing combined heat and power plants. The method permits incorporation of stochastic failures (forced outages) of the plants and is well suited for analysis of the dimensioning of the system, that is, for finding the appropriate types and capacities of production plants in relation to expansion planning. The method is in the tradition of similar approaches for the analysis of power systems, based on the load duration curve. The present method extends on this by considering a two-dimensional load duration curve where the two dimensions represent heat and power. The method permits the analysis of a combined heat and power system which includes all the basic relevant types of plants, viz., condensing plants, back pressure plants, extraction plants and heat plants. The focus of the method is on the situation where the heat side has priority. This implies that on the power side there may be imbalances between demand and production. The method permits quantification of the expected power overflow, the expected unserviced power demand, and the expected unserviced heat demand. It is shown that a discretization method as well as double Fourier series may be applied in algorithms based on the method. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 21 refs.

  16. Langevin simulations of QCD, including fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    We encounter critical slow down in updating when xi/a -> infinite and in matrix inversion (needed to include fermions) when msub(q)a -> 0. A simulation that purports to solve QCD numerically will encounter these limits, so to face the challenge in the title of this workshop, we must cure the disease of critical slow down. Physically, this critical slow down is due to the reluctance of changes at short distances to propagate to large distances. Numerically, the stability of an algorithm at short wavelengths requires a (moderately) small step size; critical slow down occurs when the effective long wavelength step size becomes tiny. The remedy for this disease is an algorithm that propagates signals quickly throughout the system; i.e. one whose effective step size is not reduced for the long wavelength conponents of the fields. (Here the effective ''step size'' is essentially an inverse decorrelation time.) To do so one must resolve various wavelengths of the system and modify the dynamics (in CPU time) of the simulation so that all modes evolve at roughly the same rate. This can be achieved by introducing Fourier transforms. I show how to implement Fourier acceleration for Langevin updating and for conjugate gradient matrix inversion. The crucial feature of these algorithms that lends them to Fourier acceleration is that they update the lattice globally; hence the Fourier transforms are computed once per sweep rather than once per hit. (orig./HSI)

  17. Sequences in language and text

    CERN Document Server

    Mikros, George K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to present the diverse but highly interesting area of the quantitative analysis of the sequence of various linguistic structures. The collected articles present a wide spectrum of quantitative analyses of linguistic syntagmatic structures and explore novel sequential linguistic entities. This volume will be interesting to all researchers studying linguistics using quantitative methods.

  18. Probabilistic studies of accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villemeur, A.; Berger, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    For several years, Electricite de France has carried out probabilistic assessment of accident sequences for nuclear power plants. In the framework of this program many methods were developed. As the interest in these studies was increasing and as adapted methods were developed, Electricite de France has undertaken a probabilistic safety assessment of a nuclear power plant [fr

  19. MRI sequences and their parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teissier, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Listing basic sequences and their present variants makes a synthetic classification of the various acquisition modes possible. The knowledge of the advantages of each of them, as well as of their disadvantages and restraints, seems to be an essential prerequisite to an optimal utilization of each magnetic resonance imaging system. (author)

  20. Degree sequence in message transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamuna, M.

    2017-11-01

    Message encryption is always an issue in current communication scenario. Methods are being devised using various domains. Graphs satisfy numerous unique properties which can be used for message transfer. In this paper, I propose a message encryption method based on degree sequence of graphs.

  1. Fractals in DNA sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zu-Guo(喻祖国); Vo Anh; Gong Zhi-Min(龚志民); Long Shun-Chao(龙顺潮)

    2002-01-01

    Fractal methods have been successfully used to study many problems in physics, mathematics, engineering, finance,and even in biology. There has been an increasing interest in unravelling the mysteries of DNA; for example, how can we distinguish coding and noncoding sequences, and the problems of classification and evolution relationship of organisms are key problems in bioinformatics. Although much research has been carried out by taking into consideration the long-range correlations in DNA sequences, and the global fractal dimension has been used in these works by other people, the models and methods are somewhat rough and the results are not satisfactory. In recent years, our group has introduced a time series model (statistical point of view) and a visual representation (geometrical point of view)to DNA sequence analysis. We have also used fractal dimension, correlation dimension, the Hurst exponent and the dimension spectrum (multifractal analysis) to discuss problems in this field. In this paper, we introduce these fractal models and methods and the results of DNA sequence analysis.

  2. On primes in Lucas sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Somer, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2015), s. 2-23 ISSN 0015-0517 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02067S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Lucas sequence * primes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.fq.math.ca/Abstracts/53-1/somer.pdf

  3. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable.

  4. Is sequence awareness mandatory for perceptual sequence learning: An assessment using a pure perceptual sequence learning design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroost, Natacha; Coomans, Daphné

    2018-02-01

    We examined the role of sequence awareness in a pure perceptual sequence learning design. Participants had to react to the target's colour that changed according to a perceptual sequence. By varying the mapping of the target's colour onto the response keys, motor responses changed randomly. The effect of sequence awareness on perceptual sequence learning was determined by manipulating the learning instructions (explicit versus implicit) and assessing the amount of sequence awareness after the experiment. In the explicit instruction condition (n = 15), participants were instructed to intentionally search for the colour sequence, whereas in the implicit instruction condition (n = 15), they were left uninformed about the sequenced nature of the task. Sequence awareness after the sequence learning task was tested by means of a questionnaire and the process-dissociation-procedure. The results showed that the instruction manipulation had no effect on the amount of perceptual sequence learning. Based on their report to have actively applied their sequence knowledge during the experiment, participants were subsequently regrouped in a sequence strategy group (n = 14, of which 4 participants from the implicit instruction condition and 10 participants from the explicit instruction condition) and a no-sequence strategy group (n = 16, of which 11 participants from the implicit instruction condition and 5 participants from the explicit instruction condition). Only participants of the sequence strategy group showed reliable perceptual sequence learning and sequence awareness. These results indicate that perceptual sequence learning depends upon the continuous employment of strategic cognitive control processes on sequence knowledge. Sequence awareness is suggested to be a necessary but not sufficient condition for perceptual learning to take place. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  6. Application of Quaternion in improving the quality of global sequence alignment scores for an ambiguous sequence target in Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, D.; Bustamam, A.; Novianti, T.; Ardaneswari, G.

    2017-07-01

    DNA sequence can be defined as a succession of letters, representing the order of nucleotides within DNA, using a permutation of four DNA base codes including adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). The precise code of the sequences is determined using DNA sequencing methods and technologies, which have been developed since the 1970s and currently become highly developed, advanced and highly throughput sequencing technologies. So far, DNA sequencing has greatly accelerated biological and medical research and discovery. However, in some cases DNA sequencing could produce any ambiguous and not clear enough sequencing results that make them quite difficult to be determined whether these codes are A, T, G, or C. To solve these problems, in this study we can introduce other representation of DNA codes namely Quaternion Q = (PA, PT, PG, PC), where PA, PT, PG, PC are the probability of A, T, G, C bases that could appear in Q and PA + PT + PG + PC = 1. Furthermore, using Quaternion representations we are able to construct the improved scoring matrix for global sequence alignment processes, by applying a dot product method. Moreover, this scoring matrix produces better and higher quality of the match and mismatch score between two DNA base codes. In implementation, we applied the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm using Octave, to analyze our target sequence which contains some ambiguous sequence data. The subject sequences are the DNA sequences of Streptococcus pneumoniae families obtained from the Genebank, meanwhile the target DNA sequence are received from our collaborator database. As the results we found the Quaternion representations improve the quality of the sequence alignment score and we can conclude that DNA sequence target has maximum similarity with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  7. Teaching Task Sequencing via Verbal Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Frank R.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Verbal sequence training was used to teach a moderately mentally retarded woman to sequence job-related tasks. Learning to say the tasks in the proper sequence resulted in the employee performing her tasks in that sequence, and the employee was capable of mediating her own work behavior when scheduled changes occurred. (Author/JDD)

  8. Repdigits in k-Lucas sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    57(2) 2000 243-254) proved that 11 is the largest number with only one distinct digit (the so-called repdigit) in the sequence ( L n ( 2 ) ) n . In this paper, we address a similar problem in the family of -Lucas sequences. We also show that the -Lucas sequences have similar properties to those of -Fibonacci sequences ...

  9. Universal sequence replication, reversible polymerization and early functional biopolymers: a model for the initiation of prebiotic sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Imari Walker

    Full Text Available Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for

  10. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  11. MANGO: a new approach to multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Li, Ming

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a classical and challenging task for biological sequence analysis. The problem is NP-hard. The full dynamic programming takes too much time. The progressive alignment heuristics adopted by most state of the art multiple sequence alignment programs suffer from the 'once a gap, always a gap' phenomenon. Is there a radically new way to do multiple sequence alignment? This paper introduces a novel and orthogonal multiple sequence alignment method, using multiple optimized spaced seeds and new algorithms to handle these seeds efficiently. Our new algorithm processes information of all sequences as a whole, avoiding problems caused by the popular progressive approaches. Because the optimized spaced seeds are provably significantly more sensitive than the consecutive k-mers, the new approach promises to be more accurate and reliable. To validate our new approach, we have implemented MANGO: Multiple Alignment with N Gapped Oligos. Experiments were carried out on large 16S RNA benchmarks showing that MANGO compares favorably, in both accuracy and speed, against state-of-art multiple sequence alignment methods, including ClustalW 1.83, MUSCLE 3.6, MAFFT 5.861, Prob-ConsRNA 1.11, Dialign 2.2.1, DIALIGN-T 0.2.1, T-Coffee 4.85, POA 2.0 and Kalign 2.0.

  12. HIV protein sequence hotspots for crosstalk with host hub proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available HIV proteins target host hub proteins for transient binding interactions. The presence of viral proteins in the infected cell results in out-competition of host proteins in their interaction with hub proteins, drastically affecting cell physiology. Functional genomics and interactome datasets can be used to quantify the sequence hotspots on the HIV proteome mediating interactions with host hub proteins. In this study, we used the HIV and human interactome databases to identify HIV targeted host hub proteins and their host binding partners (H2. We developed a high throughput computational procedure utilizing motif discovery algorithms on sets of protein sequences, including sequences of HIV and H2 proteins. We identified as HIV sequence hotspots those linear motifs that are highly conserved on HIV sequences and at the same time have a statistically enriched presence on the sequences of H2 proteins. The HIV protein motifs discovered in this study are expressed by subsets of H2 host proteins potentially outcompeted by HIV proteins. A large subset of these motifs is involved in cleavage, nuclear localization, phosphorylation, and transcription factor binding events. Many such motifs are clustered on an HIV sequence in the form of hotspots. The sequential positions of these hotspots are consistent with the curated literature on phenotype altering residue mutations, as well as with existing binding site data. The hotspot map produced in this study is the first global portrayal of HIV motifs involved in altering the host protein network at highly connected hub nodes.

  13. eShadow: A tool for comparing closely related sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharenko, Ivan; Boffelli, Dario; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2004-01-15

    Primate sequence comparisons are difficult to interpret due to the high degree of sequence similarity shared between such closely related species. Recently, a novel method, phylogenetic shadowing, has been pioneered for predicting functional elements in the human genome through the analysis of multiple primate sequence alignments. We have expanded this theoretical approach to create a computational tool, eShadow, for the identification of elements under selective pressure in multiple sequence alignments of closely related genomes, such as in comparisons of human to primate or mouse to rat DNA. This tool integrates two different statistical methods and allows for the dynamic visualization of the resulting conservation profile. eShadow also includes a versatile optimization module capable of training the underlying Hidden Markov Model to differentially predict functional sequences. This module grants the tool high flexibility in the analysis of multiple sequence alignments and in comparing sequences with different divergence rates. Here, we describe the eShadow comparative tool and its potential uses for analyzing both multiple nucleotide and protein alignments to predict putative functional elements. The eShadow tool is publicly available at http://eshadow.dcode.org/

  14. Unveiling Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Promoters: Sequence Definition and Genomic Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Shana de Souto; Sant'Anna, Fernando Hayashi; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Several Mycoplasma species have had their genome completely sequenced, including four strains of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Nevertheless, little is known about the nucleotide sequences that control transcriptional initiation in these microorganisms. Therefore, with the objective of investigating the promoter sequences of M. hyopneumoniae, 23 transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of distinct genes were mapped. A pattern that resembles the σ70 promoter −10 element was found upstream of the TSSs. However, no −35 element was distinguished. Instead, an AT-rich periodic signal was identified. About half of the experimentally defined promoters contained the motif 5′-TRTGn-3′, which was identical to the −16 element usually found in Gram-positive bacteria. The defined promoters were utilized to build position-specific scoring matrices in order to scan putative promoters upstream of all coding sequences (CDSs) in the M. hyopneumoniae genome. Two hundred and one signals were found associated with 169 CDSs. Most of these sequences were located within 100 nucleotides of the start codons. This study has shown that the number of promoter-like sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is more frequent than expected by chance, indicating that most of the sequences detected are probably biologically functional. PMID:22334569

  15. REFGEN and TREENAMER: Automated Sequence Data Handling for Phylogenetic Analysis in the Genomic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Guy; Stevens, Jamie R.; Richards, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences and increasingly that of amino acid sequences is used to address a number of biological questions. Access to extensive datasets, including numerous genome projects, means that standard phylogenetic analyses can include many hundreds of sequences. Unfortunately, most phylogenetic analysis programs do not tolerate the sequence naming conventions of genome databases. Managing large numbers of sequences and standardizing sequence labels for use in phylogenetic analysis programs can be a time consuming and laborious task. Here we report the availability of an online resource for the management of gene sequences recovered from public access genome databases such as GenBank. These web utilities include the facility for renaming every sequence in a FASTA alignment file, with each sequence label derived from a user-defined combination of the species name and/or database accession number. This facility enables the user to keep track of the branching order of the sequences/taxa during multiple tree calculations and re-optimisations. Post phylogenetic analysis, these webpages can then be used to rename every label in the subsequent tree files (with a user-defined combination of species name and/or database accession number). Together these programs drastically reduce the time required for managing sequence alignments and labelling phylogenetic figures. Additional features of our platform include the automatic removal of identical accession numbers (recorded in the report file) and generation of species and accession number lists for use in supplementary materials or figure legends. PMID:19812722

  16. REFGEN and TREENAMER: Automated Sequence Data Handling for Phylogenetic Analysis in the Genomic Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences and increasingly that of amino acid sequences is used to address a number of biological questions. Access to extensive datasets, including numerous genome projects, means that standard phylogenetic analyses can include many hundreds of sequences. Unfortunately, most phylogenetic analysis programs do not tolerate the sequence naming conventions of genome databases. Managing large numbers of sequences and standardizing sequence labels for use in phylogenetic analysis programs can be a time consuming and laborious task. Here we report the availability of an online resource for the management of gene sequences recovered from public access genome databases such as GenBank. These web utilities include the facility for renaming every sequence in a FASTA alignment fi le, with each sequence label derived from a user-defined combination of the species name and/or database accession number. This facility enables the user to keep track of the branching order of the sequences/taxa during multiple tree calculations and re-optimisations. Post phylogenetic analysis, these webpages can then be used to rename every label in the subsequent tree fi les (with a user-defined combination of species name and/or database accession number. Together these programs drastically reduce the time required for managing sequence alignments and labelling phylogenetic figures. Additional features of our platform include the automatic removal of identical accession numbers (recorded in the report file and generation of species and accession number lists for use in supplementary materials or figure legends.

  17. High-speed imaging at 3 tesla. A technical and clinical review with an emphasis on whole-brain 3D imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo; Komada, Tomomi

    2005-01-01

    Improvements to the inherently high specific-absorption rate (SAR) of high-speed imaging at 3T are necessary in order to render this method clinically feasible. Various efforts have been undertaken to improve the associated hardware and software. In this review, we focus on whole-brain isotropic 3D imaging with a turbo spin-echo sequence with variable flip-angle echo trains (3D-TSE-VFL) and present its technical and clinical features. This sequence can be used to acquire images of various contrasts including T 2 -weighted, fat-suppressed T 2 -weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), fat-suppressed FLAIR, and STIR (short tau inversion recovery). Various aspects of 3D-TSE-VFL are discussed, including CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) and metal artifacts, STIR contrast, small-part visualization other than brain, and the possibility of serial subtraction. Some images from clinical cases are presented. (author)

  18. Automation tools for accelerator control a network based sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.; Geib, M.; Westervelt, R.

    1991-01-01

    In conjunction with a major client, Vista Control Systems has developed a sequencer for control systems which works in conjunction with its realtime, distributed Vsystem database. Vsystem is a network-based data acquisition, monitoring and control system which has been applied successfully to both accelerator projects and projects outside this realm of research. The network-based sequencer allows a user to simply define a thread of execution in any supported computer on the network. The script defining a sequence has a simple syntax designed for non-programmers, with facilities for selectively abbreviating the channel names for easy reference. The semantics of the script contains most of the familiar capabilities of conventional programming languages, including standard stream I/O and the ability to start other processes with parameters passed. The script is compiled to threaded code for execution efficiency. The implementation is described in some detail and examples are given of applications for which the sequencer has been used

  19. Spreading Sequence System for Full Connectivity Relay Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuck M. (Inventor); Yang, Jie (Inventor); Pham, Khanh D. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Fully connected uplink and downlink fully connected relay network systems using pseudo-noise spreading and despreading sequences subjected to maximizing the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio. The relay network systems comprise one or more transmitting units, relays, and receiving units connected via a communication network. The transmitting units, relays, and receiving units each may include a computer for performing the methods and steps described herein and transceivers for transmitting and/or receiving signals. The computer encodes and/or decodes communication signals via optimum adaptive PN sequences found by employing Cholesky decompositions and singular value decompositions (SVD). The PN sequences employ channel state information (CSI) to more effectively and more securely computing the optimal sequences.

  20. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Schmutz, Jeremy; Wang, Hao; Percifield, Ryan; Hawkins, Jennifer; Pontaroli, Ana C; Estep, Matt; Feng, Liang; Vaughn, Justin N; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; Hellsten, Uffe; Deshpande, Shweta; Wang, Xuewen; Wu, Xiaomei; Mitros, Therese; Triplett, Jimmy; Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chu-Yu; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita; Wang, Lin; Li, Pinghua; Sharma, Manoj; Sharma, Rita; Ronald, Pamela C; Panaud, Olivier; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Brutnell, Thomas P; Doust, Andrew N; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rokhsar, Daniel; Devos, Katrien M

    2012-05-13

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The ∼400-Mb assembly covers ∼80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  1. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L [ORNL; Schmutz, Jeremy [Hudson Alpha Institute of Biotechnology; Wang, Hao [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Percifield, Ryan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hawkins, Jennifer [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Pontaroli, Ana C. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Estep, Matt [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Feng, Liang [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Vaughn, Justin N [ORNL; Grimwood, Jane [Hudson Alpha Institute of Biotechnology; Jenkins, Jerry [Hudson Alpha Institute of Biotechnology; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lindquist, Erika [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hellsten, Uffe [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wang, Xuewen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Wu, Xiaomei [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Mitros, Therese [University of California, Berkeley; Triplett, Jimmy [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita [Oklahoma State University; Wang, Lin [Cornell University; Li, Pinghua [Cornell University; Sharma, Manoj [University of California, Davis; Sharma, Rita [University of California, Davis; Ronald, Pamela [University of California, Davis; Panaud, Olivier [Universite de Perpignan, Perpignan, France; Kellogg, Elizabeth A. [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Brutnell, Thomas P. [Cornell University; Doust, Andrew N. [Oklahoma State University; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Rokhsar, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Devos, Katrien M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The ~400-Mb assembly covers ~80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  2. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The {approx}400-Mb assembly covers {approx}80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  3. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    of this class have very little homology to other known genomes making functional annotation based on sequence similarity very difficult. Inspired in part by this analysis, an approach for comparative functional annotation was created based public sequenced genomes, CMGfunc. Functionally related groups......In November 2013, there was around 21.000 different prokaryotic genomes sequenced and publicly available, and the number is growing daily with another 20.000 or more genomes expected to be sequenced and deposited by the end of 2014. An important part of the analysis of this data is the functional...... annotation of genes – the descriptions assigned to genes that describe the likely function of the encoded proteins. This process is limited by several factors, including the definition of a function which can be more or less specific as well as how many genes can actually be assigned a function based...

  4. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    /or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing......The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 2