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Sample records for included calcium binding

  1. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  2. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article d...

  3. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-01-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with 45 Ca 2 + and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with 45 Ca 2 + . These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4 Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with 45 Ca 2 + prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was wekly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelt-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of 45 Ca 2 + . (orig.)

  4. Apolipoprotein B is a calcium binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashti, N.; Lee, D.M.; Mok, T.

    1986-05-29

    Human hepatocarcinoma Hep G2 cells were grown in culture medium containing (/sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/). The secreted lipoproteins of d < 1.063 g/ml and d 1.063-1.21 g/ml were isolated from the culture media and analyzed by 3.3% and 7% SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Radioactivity profiles of (/sup 45/Ca) from the gels showed that the peak of radioactivity corresponded to the apolipoprotein B band. The molar ratio of the incorporated (/sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/) and apolipoprotein B was close to unity. No radioactivity was found associated with any other secreted apolipoproteins. To confirm these findings, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins were precipitated with anti-apolipoprotein B and high density lipoproteins were precipitated with anti-apolipoprotein A-I. Only the former precipitate was radioactive. These results suggest that apolipoprotein B is a calcium binding protein.

  5. Identification and quantification of calcium-binding proteins in squid axoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinks, M.H.; Klee, C.B.; Pant, H.C.; Gainer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The identities and quantities of calcium-binding proteins were determined in axoplasm isolated from the squid giant axon. 45 Ca-binding assays on nitrocellulose filters containing axoplasm proteins separated by SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis revealed 4 major calcium-binding bands. These included the high-molecular-weight (Mr greater than 330 and 220 X 10(3] neurofilament proteins, an unidentified protein band that migrated around Mr 55,000, and a diverse group of proteins that migrated together around Mr 17,000. The low-molecular-weight (Mr 17,000) calcium-binding proteins could be resolved into calmodulin (ca. 120 mumol/kg axoplasm), 2 other Mr 17,000 calcium-binding proteins, and a small amount of calcineurin B. It is estimated that these calcium-binding proteins in squid axoplasm could theoretically bind about 1 mmol Ca 2+ /kg axoplasm. 125 I-Calmodulin overlay and Western blot analyses disclosed a number of calmodulin-binding proteins in axoplasm. These included fodrin, calcineurin A, and Ca 2+ /CaM protein kinase II subunits

  6. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main...... calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly...... lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms...

  7. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: implications for inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Daniel J; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D; Coonrod, Scott A; Lewis, Huw D; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L; Thompson, Paul R

    2015-04-17

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  8. Evolution and functional diversity of the Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee P Haynes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system (CNS exhibits a remarkable ability to process, store and transfer information. Key to these activities is the use of highly regulated and unique patterns of calcium signals encoded by calcium channels and decoded by families of specific calcium-sensing proteins. The largest family of eukaryotic calcium sensors are those related to the small EF-hand containing protein calmodulin (CaM. In order to maximise the usefulness of calcium as a signalling species and to permit the evolution and fine tuning of the mammalian CNS, families of related proteins have arisen that exhibit characteristic calcium binding properties and tissue-, cellular- and sub-cellular distribution profiles. The Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs represent one such family of vertebrate specific calmodulin like proteins that have emerged in recent years as important regulators of essential neuronal target proteins. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that the CaBPs consist of two subfamilies and that the ancestral members of these are CaBP1 and CaBP8. The CaBPs have distinct intracellular localisations based on different targeting mechanisms including a novel type-II transmembrane domain in CaBPs 7 and 8. Recent work has led to the identification of new target interactions and possible functions for the CaBPs suggesting that they have multiple physiological roles with relevance for the normal functioning of the CNS.

  9. Calcium binding to calmodulin by molecular dynamics with effective polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 22 (2014), s. 3964-3969 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : EF-hand motif * free energy calculations * charge scaling * calcium -binding protein * umbrella sampling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  10. Antioxidant activity and calcium binding of isomeric hydroxybenzoates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zichen Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The association constant for calcium binding to hydroxybenzoates in aqueous 0.16 M NaCl at 25 °C was found electrochemically to have the value Kass = 280 mol L−1 with ΔHo = −51 kJ mol−1, ΔSo = −122 J mol−1 K−1 for the 2-isomer (salicylate, Kass = 7 mol L−1 with ΔHo = −39 kJ mol−1, ΔSo = −116 J mol−1 K−1 for the 3-isomer, and Kass = 8 mol L−1 with ΔHo = −51 kJ mol−1, ΔSo = −155 J mol−1 K−1 for the 4-isomer. The 3- and 4-isomers were found more efficient as antioxidants than the 2-isomer in decreasing oxygen consumption rate in a peroxidating methyl linoleate emulsion and less sensitive to presence of calcium. All isomers were found prooxidative for iron-catalyzed initiation of oxidation due to enhanced radical formation as shown by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Calcium salicylate was found to have low solubility with a solubility product Ksp = 4.49·10−6 based on activity with ΔHo = 67 kJ mol−1, ΔSo = 123 J mol−1 K−1 for dissolution in water, when corrected for the strong complex formation. Calcium in food and beverages may thus lower antioxidant activity of plant phenols through complexation or by precipitation. Keywords: Antioxidant activity, Calcium binding, 2-Hydroxybenzoate, 3-Hydroxybenzoate, 4-Hydroxybenzoate

  11. Asporin competes with decorin for collagen binding, binds calcium and promotes osteoblast collagen mineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Lindblom, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of the ECM (extracellular matrix) protein asporin with ECM components have previously not been investigated. Here, we show that asporin binds collagen type I. This binding is inhibited by recombinant asporin fragment LRR (leucine-rich repeat) 10-12 and by full-length decorin......, but not by biglycan. We demonstrate that the polyaspartate domain binds calcium and regulates hydroxyapatite formation in vitro. In the presence of asporin, the number of collagen nodules, and mRNA of osteoblastic markers Osterix and Runx2, were increased. Moreover, decorin or the collagen-binding asporin fragment...... LRR 10-12 inhibited the pro-osteoblastic activity of full-length asporin. Our results suggest that asporin and decorin compete for binding to collagen and that the polyaspartate in asporin directly regulates collagen mineralization. Therefore asporin has a role in osteoblast-driven collagen...

  12. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  13. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Kaftan, Edward J; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1.

  14. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... absorb calcium as well. Sufficient calcium intake from food, and supplements if needed, can slow the rate of bone loss. Women of childbearing ... calcium absorption. People who eat a variety of foods don't have to consider ... include consumption of alcohol- and caffeine-containing beverages as well ...

  15. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives.

  16. Calcium Binding by Ro 60 Multiple Antigenic Peptides on PVDF Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Bachmann, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies directed against ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles are observed in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ro RNP particle is one such target. It is composed of a 60 kDa protein (Ro 60 or SS-A) that is non-covalently associated with at least one of the four short uridine-rich RNAs (the hY RNAs). Previously, we showed that multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) made from the sequence of the Ro 60 autoantigen could be used, using double-immunodiffusion studies, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, affinity chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance, to show intramolecular and intermolecular protein-protein interaction within the Ro 60 RNP particle. We also observed that calcium is important in mediating this interaction. We hypothesized, therefore, that 60 kDa Ro is a calcium-binding protein. To investigate this, we electrophoresed 60 kDa Ro MAPs, transferred them to PVDF membrane, and assayed calcium binding using the Quin-2 system. Several Ro 60 MAPs were found to bind calcium using this assay, as well as bovine serum albumin, another calcium-binding protein. However, a MAP constructed from the Sm autoantigen did not bind to calcium. These data, along with our observation regarding the involvement of calcium in protein-protein interaction occurring between Ro 60 antigen and Ro 60 MAPs, makes us propose that Ro 60 antigen is a calcium-binding protein.

  17. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennick, A.; McLaughlin, A.C.; Grey, A.A.; Madapallimattam, G.

    1981-01-01

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing 45 Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH 2 -terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 μM and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 μM and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 μM. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that β-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids

  18. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  19. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  20. Studies on two calcium-binding proteins from squid optic lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, A.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations focused on the physicochemical and functional properties of squid calcium-binding protein (SCaBP) and squid calmodulin (SCaM). The physiochemical studies included characterization of Ca 2+ - and Mg 2+ -binding properties, and the effects of metal ion-binding on protein conformation. These studies were performed using various ionic conditions, including those physiological for the squid. Ca 2+ -binding by SCaBP, SCaM, and bovine brain calmodulin (BCaM) (for comparison) was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three proteins bound 4 Ca 2+ per mol protein under each set of ionic conditions. Under conditions physiological for the squid, both the squid proteins bound Ca 2+ over a similar range of free Ca 2+ concentrations. Ca 2+ - and Mg 2+ -induced changes in the conformation of the proteins were studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, fluphenazine-Sepharose affinity chromatography, and ultraviolet absorption difference spectroscopy. The functional studies focused on the identification of squid optic lobe proteins which interacted with SCaBP and SCaM in a Ca 2+ - dependent manner. These proteins were identified by SCaBP- and SCaM-Sepharose affinity chromatography, an immunoblotting technique using a polyclonal anti-SCaBP antibody, and a 125 I-calmodulin overlay procedure

  1. Calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds and health promoting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavrusova, Martina

    food. Therefore, an understanding of the basic chemistry of calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds can contribute to a general knowledge about calcium bioavailability and also to product improvement. Calcium precipitation with palmitate was described by a first-order reaction for conditions...... only slowly precipitated after a lag phase. On the other hand, the slow dissolution of calcium D-gluconate by sodium L-lactate in aqueous solution with the reverse lactate/gluconate ratio did not result in a similar solution since fast precipitation prevented formation of a homogenous solution....

  2. Calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds and health promoting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavrusova, Martina

    of excess calcium in neutral aqueous solutions with a stoichiometry Ca:Pal lower than 1:2. Increasing pH during aging of the precipitate and solubility product determination lead to a suggestion of an initial precipitation of calcium hydroxy palmitate as a possible precursor phase. The binding of calcium...... to acidic amino acids and dipeptides was also investigated. It was found that aspartate binds calcium stronger than glutamate. This was confirmed by electrochemical determination of the association constants for aqueous solutions at ionic strength 0.20 and 1.0. The mixed dipeptides Asp/Glu showed additive...... solutions clearly indicated a 1:1 stoichiometry for the complex formation as determined electrochemically and also by the iodometric titration for both ionic strengths of 0.20 and 1.0 at 25 °C. Therefore, the increased solubility in the mixed solutions of calcium hydroxycarboxylates was due to complex...

  3. Distribution of calcium-binding proteins in the chick visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Pfeiffer

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR, and parvalbumin (PV have been extensively studied over the last decade since they appear to be important as buffers of intracellular calcium. In the present study we investigated the distribution of these proteins in the chick visual system by means of conventional immunocytochemistry. The results indicated that CB, CR, and PV are widely distributed in retinorecipient areas of the chick brain. In some regions, all three calcium-binding proteins were present at different intensities and often in different neurons such as in the dorsolateral thalamic complex. In other areas, such as the nucleus geniculatus lateralis ventralis, only CB and CR were detected, whereas PV was absent. These results show that these three calcium-binding proteins are differentially distributed in the visual system of the chick, with varying degrees of co-localization

  4. Structural insights into binding of STAC proteins to voltage-gated calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong King Yuen, Siobhan M.; Campiglio, Marta; Tung, Ching-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Excitation–contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal muscle requires functional and mechanical coupling between L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV1.1) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). Recently, STAC3 was identified as an essential protein for EC coupling and is part of a group of three proteins that can bind and modulate L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Here, we report crystal structures of tandem-SH3 domains of different STAC isoforms up to 1.2-Å resolution. These form a rigid interaction through a conserved interdomain interface. We identify the linker connecting transmembrane repeats II and III in two different CaV isoforms as a binding site for the SH3 domains and report a crystal structure of the complex with the STAC2 isoform. The interaction site includes the location for a disease variant in STAC3 that has been linked to Native American myopathy (NAM). Introducing the mutation does not cause misfolding of the SH3 domains, but abolishes the interaction. Disruption of the interaction via mutations in the II–III loop perturbs skeletal muscle EC coupling, but preserves the ability of STAC3 to slow down inactivation of CaV1.2. PMID:29078335

  5. Biophysical characterization and functional studies on calbindin-D28K: A vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leathers, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein, or calbindin-D, is the principal protein induced in the intestine in response to the steroid hormone 1,25(OH) 2 -vitamin D 3 . A definitive role for calbindin-D in vitamin D 3 mediated biological responses remains unclear. Biophysical and functional studies on chick intestinal calbindin-D 28K (CaBP) were initiated so that some insight might be gained into its relevance to the process of intestinal calcium transport. Calbindin-D belongs to a class of high affinity calcium binding proteins which includes calmodulin, parvalbumin and troponin C. The Ca 2+ binding stoichiometry and binding constants for calbindin-D 28K were quantitated by Quin 2 titration analysis. The protein was found to bind 5-6 Ca 2+ ions with a K D on the order of 10 -8 , in agreement with the 6 domains identified from the amino acid sequence. A slow Ca 2+ exchange rate (80 s -1 ) as assessed by 43 Ca NMR and extensive calcium dependent conformational changes in 1 H NMR spectra were also observed. Functional studies on chick intestinal CaBP were carried out by two different methods. Interactions between CaBP and intestinal cellular components were assessed via photoaffinity labeling techniques. Specific calcium dependent complexes for CaBP were identified with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase and brush border membrane proteins of 60 and 150 kD. CaBP was also found to co-migrate with the alkaline phosphatase activity of chick intestinal brush border membranes as evaluated by gel filtration chromatography. The second procedure for evaluating CaBP functionality has involved the quantitation of CaBP association with vesicular transport components as assessed by ELISA. CaBP, immunoreactivity was observed in purified lysosomes, microsomes and microtubules

  6. Identification of calcium-binding proteins in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumley, L.M.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    In human platelets, intracellular Ca 2+ is a second messenger for platelet agonists. Two targets for the Ca 2+ signal are calmodulin and the C-,inase; however, other Ca 2+ -binding proteins may also play a role in platelet function. The Western blotting technique of Maruyama et al., which utilizes 45 Ca 2+ to detect Ca 2+ -binding proteins, has been used to identify numerous platelet Ca 2+ -binding proteins ranging in molecular weight from 165K to 15K. The greatest quantity of 45 Ca 2+ was bound to a 165 kilodalton protein which has been identified as thrombospondin based upon its release from thrombin-stimulated platelets and its comigration on SDS gels with purified thrombospondin. Two other major sites for 45 Ca 2+ -binding correspond to proteins of 120K and 108K which are present only in the platelet particulate fraction; they have been identified as glycoproteins IIb and IIIa based upon their labeling by 125 I-concanavalin A. Two proteins with molecular weights of 20K and 15K bound much less 45 Ca 2+ and correspond on SDS gels to calmodulin and subunit B of the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. A number of other, yet to be identified, Ca 2+ -binding proteins were also detected. These data indicate that human platelets contain numerous Ca 2+ -binding proteins and that Western blotting techniques utilizing 45 Ca 2+ may be useful as an assay system in future attempts to purify platelet Ca 2+ -binding proteins

  7. Aptamer-Conjugated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Reducing Diabetes Risk via Retinol Binding Protein 4 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Raheleh; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud; Pasalar, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Inhibition of the binding of retinol to its carrier, retinol binding protein 4, is a new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes; for this purpose, we have provided an aptamer-functionalized multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticle. First, calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated to the aptamer. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles releases the process of aptamer from nanoparticles and their inhibition function of binding retinol to retinol binding protein 4. After synthesizing and characterizing the multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticles and observing the noncytotoxicity of conjugate, the optimum time (48 hours) and the pH (7.4) for releasing the aptamer from the nanoparticles was determined. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value for inhibition of retinol binding to retinol binding protein 4 was 210 femtomolar (fmol). The results revealed that the aptamer could prevent connection between retinol and retinol binding protein 4 at a very low IC 50 value (210 fmol) compared to other reported inhibitors. It seems that this aptamer could be used as an efficient candidate not only for decreasing the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but also for inhibiting the other retinol binding protein 4-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. All three Ca[superscript 2+]-binding loops of photoproteins bind calcium ions: The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apo-aequorin and apo-obelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Lu; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Lee, John; Rose, John; Wang, Bi-Cheng (Georgia)

    2010-07-13

    The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apoaequorin and apo-obelin have been determined at resolutions 1.7 {angstrom} and 2.2 {angstrom}, respectively. A calcium ion is observed in each of the three EF-hand loops that have the canonical calcium-binding sequence, and each is coordinated in the characteristic pentagonal bipyramidal configuration. The calcium-loaded apo-proteins retain the same compact scaffold and overall fold as the unreacted photoproteins containing the bound substrate, 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, and also the same as the Ca{sup 2+}-discharged obelin bound with the product, coelenteramide. Nevertheless, there are easily discerned shifts in both helix and loop regions, and the shifts are not the same between the two proteins. It is suggested that these subtle shifts are the basis of the ability of these photoproteins to sense Ca{sup 2+} concentration transients and to produce their bioluminescence response on the millisecond timescale. A mechanism of intrastructural transmission of the calcium signal is proposed.

  9. Increased Binding of Calcium Ions at Positively Curved Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magarkar, Aniket; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Allolio, Christoph; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2017), s. 518-523 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1102 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : molecular dynamics * fluorescence spectroscopy * calcium * phospholipids Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry ; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry ; Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  10. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two-Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Ariane; Gonçalves, Stéphane; Autefage, Helène; Briand-Mesange, Fabienne; Lignon, Olivier; Fitremann, Juliette

    2010-12-02

    Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  11. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two—Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Briand-Mesange

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  12. Serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and total calcium levels predict the calcaneal speed of sound in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana; Mohamed, Isa Naina; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2012-08-01

    Variations in sex hormones and the calcium balance can influence bone health in men. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between the calcaneal speed of sound and biochemical determinants of bone mass, such as sex hormones, parathyroid hormones and serum calcium. Data from 549 subjects from the Malaysian Aging Male Study, which included Malay and Chinese men aged 20 years and older residing in the Klang Valley, were used for analysis. The subjects' calcaneal speed of sound was measured, and their blood was collected for biochemical analysis. Two sets of multiple regression models were generated for the total/bioavailable testosterone and estradiol to avoid multicollinearity. The multiple regression results revealed that bioavailable testosterone and serum total calcium were significant predictors of the calcaneal speed of sound in the adjusted model. After adjustment for ethnicity and body mass index, only bioavailable testosterone remained significant; the total serum calcium was marginally insignificant. In a separate model, the total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were significant predictors, whereas the total serum calcium was marginally insignificant. After adjustment for ethnicity and body mass index (BMI), the significance persisted for total testosterone and SHBG. After further adjustment for age, none of the serum biochemical determinants was a significant predictor of the calcaneal speed of sound. There is a significant age-dependent relationship between the calcaneal speed of sound and total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in Chinese and Malay men in Malaysia. The relationship between total serum calcium and calcaneal speed of sound is ethnicity-dependent.

  13. Influence of calcium depletion on iron-binding properties of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, V A; Ellis, A; Ye, A; Das, S; Singh, H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effects of calcium depletion on the binding of iron in milk. A weakly acidic cation-exchange resin was used to remove 3 different levels (18-22, 50-55, and 68-72%) of calcium from milk. Five levels of iron (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mM) were added to each of these calcium-depleted milks (CDM) and the resultant milks were analyzed for particle size, microstructure, and the distribution of protein and minerals between the colloidal and soluble phases. The depletion of calcium affected the distribution of protein and minerals in normal milk. Iron added to normal milk and low-CDM (~20% calcium depletion) bound mainly to the colloidal phase (material sedimented at 100,000 × g for 1 h at 20 °C), with little effect on the integrity of the casein micelles. Depletion of ~70% of the calcium from milk resulted in almost complete disintegration of the casein micelles, as indicated by all the protein remaining in the soluble phase upon ultracentrifugation. Addition of up to ~20 mM iron to high CDM resulted in the formation of small fibrous structures that remained in the soluble phase of milk. It appeared that the iron bound to soluble (nonsedimentable) caseins in high-CDM. We observed a decrease in the aqueous phosphorus content of all milks upon iron addition, irrespective of their calcium content. We considered the interaction between aqueous phosphorus and added iron to be responsible for the high iron-binding capacity of the proteins in milk. The soluble protein-iron complexes formed in high-CDM (~70% calcium depletion) could be used as an effective iron fortificant for a range of food products because of their good solubility characteristics. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium-dependent binding of Myc to calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffeiner, Philipp; Schraffl, Andrea; Schwarz, Thomas; Röck, Ruth; Ledolter, Karin; Hartl, Markus; Konrat, Robert; Stefan, Eduard; Bister, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The bHLH-LZ (basic region/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper) oncoprotein Myc and the bHLH-LZ protein Max form a binary transcription factor complex controlling fundamental cellular processes. Deregulated Myc expression leads to neoplastic transformation and is a hallmark of most human cancers. The dynamics of Myc transcription factor activity are post-translationally coordinated by defined protein-protein interactions. Here, we present evidence for a second messenger controlled physical interaction between the Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) and all Myc variants (v-Myc, c-Myc, N-Myc, and L-Myc). The predominantly cytoplasmic Myc:CaM interaction is Ca2+-dependent, and the binding site maps to the conserved bHLH domain of Myc. Ca2+-loaded CaM binds the monomeric and intrinsically disordered Myc protein with high affinity, whereas Myc:Max heterodimers show less, and Max homodimers no affinity for CaM. NMR spectroscopic analyses using alternating mixtures of 15N-labeled and unlabeled preparations of CaM and a monomeric Myc fragment containing the bHLH-LZ domain corroborate the biochemical results on the Myc:CaM interaction and confirm the interaction site mapping. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, addition of CaM does not affect high-affinity DNA-binding of Myc:Max heterodimers. However, cell-based reporter analyses and cell transformation assays suggest that increasing CaM levels enhance Myc transcriptional and oncogenic activities. Our results point to a possible involvement of Ca2+ sensing CaM in the fine-tuning of Myc function. PMID:27926480

  15. Calcium binding by human erythrocyte membranes. Significance of carboxyl, amino and thiol groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, J; Manery, J F

    1971-11-01

    1. The role of the ionized carboxyl groups of proteins of the erythrocyte membrane as Ca(2+) receptor sites was investigated. A water-soluble carbodi-imide [1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodi-imide methotoluene-p-sulphonate], referred to as carbodi-imide reagent, and glycine methyl ester were used to modify the free carboxyl groups of the membrane. The degree of modification was estimated from amino acid analyses, which showed the amount of glycine incorporated. As the concentration of carbodi-imide reagent was raised (0.1-0.4m) incorporation of glycine increased and Ca(2+) binding decreased by about 77%. At 0.4m-carbodi-imide reagent all of the binding of Ca(2+) to protein was abolished and it was estimated that about 37% of the side-chain carboxyl groups of aspartic acid plus glutamic acid had been blocked by glycine. 2. Acetylation of all of the free amino groups was achieved by incubating the erythrocyte ;ghosts' at pH10.3 with acetic anhydride (10-15mg/10mg of ;ghost' protein). Acetylation increased by 1.5-fold the capacity of the ;ghost' to bind Ca(2+), indicating that the remaining carboxyl groups of aspartic acid and glutamic acid were made available for Ca(2+) binding by this procedure. These findings support the concept that in normal ;ghosts', at pH7.4, Ca(2+) binding to free carboxyl groups is partially hindered by the presence of charged amino groups. 3. Treatment of ;ghosts' with N-acetylneuraminidase, which removed 94% of sialic acid residues, and treatment with 1mm-p-chloromercuribenzoate did not alter Ca(2+) binding. The major effect of 5.8mm-p-chloromercuribenzoate upon ;ghosts' was to cause a solubilization of a calcium-membrane complex, which included about one-third of the ;ghost' protein. The molar ratio of Ca(2+): protein in the solubilized material was the same as that in the intact (untreated) ;ghosts'.

  16. The BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Binds to Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors to Stimulate Apoptotic Calcium Release*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, Serena C.; Garcia, M. Iveth; Wagner, Larry E.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Snyder, Russell R.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Henderson, Beric R.; Brodie, Kirsty M.; Yule, David I.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Boehning, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is a ubiquitously expressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium channel. Calcium release mediated by IP3Rs influences many signaling pathways, including those regulating apoptosis. IP3R activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, including binding to proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death. Here we show that the IP3R binds to the tumor suppressor BRCA1. BRCA1 binding directly sensitizes the IP3R to its ligand, IP3. BRCA1 is recruited to the ER during apoptosis in an IP3R-dependent manner, and, in addition, a pool of BRCA1 protein is constitutively associated with the ER under non-apoptotic conditions. This is likely mediated by a novel lipid binding activity of the first BRCA1 C terminus domain of BRCA1. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation by which BRCA1 can act as a proapoptotic protein. PMID:25645916

  17. Subcellular distribution of calcium-binding proteins and a calcium-ATPase in canine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, S.K.; Towers, T.

    1990-01-01

    Using a 45Ca blot-overlay assay, we monitored the subcellular fractionation pattern of several Ca binding proteins of apparent molecular masses 94, 61, and 59 kD. These proteins also appeared to stain blue with Stains-All. Additionally, using a monoclonal antiserum raised against canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase, we examined the subcellular distribution of a canine pancreatic 110-kD protein recognized by this antiserum. This protein had the same electrophoretic mobility as the cardiac protein against which the antiserum was raised. The three Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase cofractionated into the rough microsomal fraction (RM), previously shown to consist of highly purified RER, in a pattern highly similar to that of the RER marker, ribophorin I. To provide further evidence for an RER localization, native RM were subjected to isopycnic flotation in sucrose gradients. The Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase were found in dense fractions, along with ribophorin I. When RM were stripped of ribosomes with puromycin/high salt, the Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase exhibited a shift to less dense fractions, as did ribophorin I. We conclude that, in pancreas, the Ca binding proteins and Ca-ATPase we detect are localized to the RER (conceivably a subcompartment of the RER) or, possibly, a structure intimately associated with the RER

  18. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca 2+ ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  19. Analysis of Perforin Assembly by Quartz Crystal Microbalance Reveals a Role for Cholesterol and Calcium-independent Membrane Binding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah E.; Bird, Catherina H.; Tabor, Rico F.; D'Angelo, Michael E.; Piantavigna, Stefania; Whisstock, James C.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Bird, Phillip I.

    2015-01-01

    Perforin is an essential component in the cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated cell death pathway. The traditional view holds that perforin monomers assemble into pores in the target cell membrane via a calcium-dependent process and facilitate translocation of cytotoxic proteases into the cytoplasm to induce apoptosis. Although many studies have examined the structure and role of perforin, the mechanics of pore assembly and granzyme delivery remain unclear. Here we have employed quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate binding and assembly of perforin on lipid membranes, and show that perforin monomers bind to the membrane in a cooperative manner. We also found that cholesterol influences perforin binding and activity on intact cells and model membranes. Finally, contrary to current thinking, perforin efficiently binds membranes in the absence of calcium. When calcium is added to perforin already on the membrane, the QCM-D response changes significantly, indicating that perforin becomes membranolytic only after calcium binding. PMID:26542805

  20. Preparation of an ultra fast binding cement from calcium silicate-based mixed oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, S C; Brunner, T J; Grass, R N; Bohner, M; Stark, W J

    2007-10-03

    Building construction takes time, in part because the binding process of cement is based on the slow re-crystallization and precipitation of calcium silicate species. Since the material's reactivity is surface area limited, a reduction in particle size of Portland cements has been used to prepare faster binding formulations. The present work investigates a new and direct, one-step preparation of calcium silicate-based nanoparticles of a typical Portland cement composition by flame spray synthesis. Isothermal calorimetry revealed that the hardening of this new nano-cement corroborated a more than tenfold increase of initial reactivity with different reaction kinetics if compared to conventionally prepared cements. At present, the unfavourably high porosity of nano-cements, however, underlines the need for additional improvements of chemical composition and formulation to make these highly reactive materials applicable to modern construction work, where load-bearing strength is of importance.

  1. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrance Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 90 (1993) 567... coagulation cascade in blood and the chaperoning of membrane interactions inside cells.4 Common to these diverse functions is the ability to bind...are quickly resolved restoring the permeability barrier. In vivo, such a transient breakdown of the membrane might constitute a significant initial cost

  2. The Calcium-Binding Activity of a Vacuole-Associated, Dehydrin-Like Protein Is Regulated by Phosphorylation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyen, Bruce J.; Alsheikh, Muath K.; Smith, Elizabeth A.; Torvik, Carl F.; Seals, Darren F.; Randall, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    A vacuole membrane-associated calcium-binding protein with an apparent mass of 45 kD was purified from celery (Apium graveolens). This protein, VCaB45, is enriched in highly vacuolate tissues and is located within the lumen of vacuoles. Antigenically related proteins are present in many dicotyledonous plants. VCaB45 contains significant amino acid identity with the dehydrin family signature motif, is antigenically related to dehydrins, and has a variety of biochemical properties similar to dehydrins. VCaB45 migrates anomalously in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis having an apparent molecular mass of 45 kD. The true mass as determined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time of flight was 16.45 kD. VCaB45 has two characteristic dissociation constants for calcium of 0.22 ± 0.142 mm and 0.64 ± 0.08 mm, and has an estimated 24.7 ± 11.7 calcium-binding sites per protein. The calcium-binding properties of VCaB45 are modulated by phosphorylation; the phosphorylated protein binds up to 100-fold more calcium than the dephosphorylated protein. VCaB45 is an “in vitro” substrate of casein kinase II (a ubiquitous eukaryotic kinase), the phosphorylation resulting in a partial activation of calcium-binding activity. The vacuole localization, calcium binding, and phosphorylation of VCaB45 suggest potential functions. PMID:12376635

  3. The calcium-binding protein complex S100A8/A9 has a crucial role in controlling macrophage-mediated renal repair following ischemia/reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessing, M.C.; Tammaro, A.; Pulskens, W.P.C.; Teske, G.J.; Butter, L.M.; Claessen, N.; Eijk, M. van; Poll, T. van der; Vogl, T.; Roth, J.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Upon ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury, several damage-associated molecular patterns are expressed including the calcium-binding protein S100A8/A9 complex. S100A8/A9 can be recognized by Toll-like receptor-4 and its activation is known to deleteriously contribute to renal I/R-induced injury.

  4. Site I Inactivation Impacts Calmodulin Calcium Binding and Activation of Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Christian W; Finley, Natosha L

    2017-11-30

    Site I inactivation of calmodulin (CaM) was used to examine the importance of aspartic acid 22 at position 3 in CaM calcium binding, protein folding, and activation of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin domain (CyaA-ACD). NMR calcium titration experiments showed that site I in the CaM mutant (D22A) remained largely unperturbed, while sites II, III, and IV exhibited calcium-induced conformational changes similar to wild-type CaM (CaMWt). Circular dichroism analyses revealed that D22A had comparable α -helical content to CaMWt, and only modest differences in α -helical composition were detected between CaMWt-CyaA-ACD and D22A-CyaA-ACD complexes. However, the thermal stability of the D22A-CyaA-ACD complex was reduced, as compared to the CaMWt-CyaA-ACD complex. Moreover, CaM-dependent activity of CyaA-ACD decreased 87% in the presence of D22A. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that D22A engages CyaA-ACD, likely through C -terminal mediated binding, and that site I inactivation exerts functional effects through the modification of stabilizing interactions that occur between N -terminal CaM and CyaA-ACD.

  5. Calcium-dependent and calcium-independent signals in the conglutinin-binding assay (KgBa) for immune complexes. Influence of anti-collagen-antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Haas, Henning de; Teisner, B

    1992-01-01

    G to solid phase bovine conglutinin was also observed to a variable degree in normal and pathological sera. However, in this situation the IgG binding was largely calcium-independent, was not inhibited by GlcNAc and did not decrease after prolonged incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C. The reactive Ig...... been "solubilized" (i.e., complement treated by incubation with serum) was employed as a reference. The binding of the complement-reacted IgG to solid phase conglutinin was found to be calcium-dependent and inhibitable with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc). Prolonged incubation (4 days) of aggregated Ig...

  6. A Specific Peptide with Calcium-Binding Capacity from Defatted Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and the Molecular Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms have been proposed as a new kind of protein source. Efforts are needed in order to transform the protein-rich biological wastes left after lipid extraction into value-added bio-products. Thus, the utilization of protein recovered from defatted Schizochytrium sp. by-products presents an opportunity. A specific peptide Tyr-Leu (YL with calcium-binding capacity was purified from defatted Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. The calcium-binding activity of YL reached 126.34 ± 3.40 μg/mg. The calcium-binding mechanism was investigated through ultraviolet, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that calcium ions could form dative bonds with carboxyl oxygen atoms and amino nitrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of amide bonds. YL-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which was beneficial for its absorption and transport in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the cellular uptake of calcium in Caco-2 cells showed that YL-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency and protect calcium ions against precipitation caused by dietary inhibitors such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate and metal ions. The findings indicate that the by-product of Schizochytrium sp. is a promising source for making peptide-calcium bio-products as algae-based functional supplements for human beings.

  7. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  8. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  9. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  10. Engineering of specific uranyl-coordination sites in the calcium-binding motif of Calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccia, M.; Pardoux, R.; Sauge-Merle, S.; Bremond, N.; Lemaire, D.; Berthomieu, C.; Delangle, P.; Guilbaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Characterization of heavy metals interactions with proteins is fundamental for understanding the molecular factors and mechanisms governing ions toxicity and speciation in cells. This line of research will also help in developing new molecules able to selectively and efficiently bind toxic metal ions, which could find application for bio-detection or bioremediation purposes. We have used the regulatory calcium-binding protein Calmodulin (CaM) from A. thaliana as a structural model and, starting from it, we have designed various mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. We have analysed thermodynamics of uranyl ion binding to both sites I and II of CaM N-terminal domain and we have identified structural factors governing this interaction. Selectivity for uranyl ion has been tested by studying reactions of the investigated peptides with Ca 2+ , in the same conditions used for UO 2 2+ . Spectro-fluorimetric titrations and FTIR analysis have shown that the affinity for uranyl increases by phosphorylation of a threonine in site I, especially approaching the physiological pH, where the phospho-threonine side chain is deprotonated. Based on structural models obtained by Molecular Dynamics, we tested the effect of a two residues deletion on site I properties. We obtained an almost two orders of magnitude increase in affinity for uranyl, with a sub-nanomolar dissociation constant for the uranyl complex with the non phosphorylated peptide, and an improved uranyl/calcium selectivity. Allosteric effects depending on Ca 2+ and UO 2 2+ binding have been investigated by comparing thermodynamic parameters obtained for mutants having both sites I and II able to chelate metal ions with those of mutants consisting of just one active site

  11. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  12. Calcium-protein interactions in the extracellular environment: calcium binding, activation, and immunolocalization of a collagenase/gelatinase activity expressed in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, J; Robinson, J J

    1998-12-15

    We have purified and characterized a collagenase/gelatinase activity expressed during sea urchin embryonic development. The native molecular mass was determined to be 160 kDa, while gelatin substrate gel zymography revealed an active species of 41 kDa, suggesting that the native enzyme is a tetramer of active subunits. Incubation in the presence of EGTA resulted in nearly complete loss of activity and this effect could be reversed by calcium. Calcium-induced reactivation appeared to be cooperative and occurred with an apparent kd value of 3.7 mM. Two modes of calcium binding to the 41-kDa subunit were detected; up to 80 moles of calcium bound with a kd value of 0.5 mM, while an additional 120 moles bound with a kd value of 5 mM. Amino acid analysis revealed a carboxy plus carboxyamide content of 24.3 mol/100 mol, indicating the availability of substantial numbers of weak Ca2+-binding sites. Calcium binding did not result in either secondary or quaternary structural changes in the collagenase/gelatinase, suggesting that Ca2+ may facilitate activation through directly mediating the binding of substrate to the enzyme. The collagenase/gelatinase activity was detected in blastocoelic fluid and in the hyalin fraction dissociated from 1-h-old embryos. Immunolocalization studies revealed two storage compartments in the egg; cortical granules and small granules/vesicles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. After fertilization, the antigen was detected in both the apical and basal extracellular matrices, the hyaline layer, and basal lamina, respectively.

  13. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica

    2009-07-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca{sup 2+} ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  14. A short introduction to the new principle of binding ration calcium with sodium zeolite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R J; Bjerrum, M J; Classen, H

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarise the development of the new principle of preventing parturient hypocalcaemia by reducing the bioavailability of ration calcium with calcium binders, based on the idea that a negative calcium balance would stimulate natural defence mechanisms against threatening hypocalcaemia. ...

  15. In vitro phosphate-binding ability of calcium-based agents is augmented by co-administration of activated charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Meng; Cheng, Xu-Yang; Zuo, Li

    2013-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is widely used as a phosphate binder in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. An unwanted side effect of calcium carbonate is hypercalcemia and vascular calcification. Oral activated charcoal (AC) is a non-selective and highly effective adsorbent. We hypothesized that AC augments the phosphate binding capacity of calcium-based agents. We performed an in vitro study to test this hypothesis. Simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid were prepared with a phosphate concentration of 10 mmol/l. Different dosages of calcium chloride (0.083 g, 0.167 g, and 0.250 g), AC (0.15 g, 0.30 g, and 0.45 g) or a combination of both were added to either gastric or intestinal fluid for phosphate binding. After a reaction time of 2 hours, phosphate concentrations in the supernatant were measured, and absolute reduction and percent reduction of phosphate were calculated. The phosphate-binding abilities of calcium chloride, AC, and a combination of both were compared. In simulated intestinal fluid there was no significant difference in the percent reduction of phosphate concentrations among the different calcium chloride concentration groups (28.90 ± 2.04 vs. 33.33 ± 3.90 vs. 31.86 ± 5.23) and there was still no significant difference in phosphate concentrations among the different AC groups (3.33 ± 0.08 vs. 3.26 ± 0.01 vs. 3.36 ± 0.11). In simulated gastric fluid phosphate concentrations at each of the time points (before the reaction, 1 hour after calcium chloride was added, and 2 hours after AC was added) were not significantly different. In simulated intestinal fluid the percent decrease in phosphate concentration in the calcium chloride + AC group was significantly higher than that in the calcium chloride group (48.23 ± 5.55 vs. 30.72 ± 6.11). AC alone had no phosphate-binding ability in either gastric or intestinal fluid. The phosphate-binding ability of calcium chloride was improved by AC in intestinal fluid.

  16. Localisation of calcium-binding proteins in ram spermatozoa using the immunofluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabrina Sukardi; Watson, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Localization of two calcium-binding proteins (proteins A and B) believed to be involve in membrane fusion on whole spermatozoa were carried out in two stages; before and after the acrosome reaction, the reaction being a prerequisite to fertilization. Determination of the acrosome reaction and sperm viability is carried out using fluorescent dyes i.e., FITC-conjugated Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) and propidium iodide (PI) respectively. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits. Ejaculated semen was diluted in buffer and loaded into tubes. Acrosome reaction was induced with calcium ionophore A23187 at 390 degree C. PI was added to the sub-samples at time 0 and 45 minutes. Excess PI, ionophore and seminal plasma was filtered out with a syringe. Smears were made on slides and air-dried. The cells were pemeabilised with ethanol and rinsed in PBS. Batch 1 slides were incubated with FITC-PSA in the dark while batch H slides were incubated in 1% sheep serum. Batch II slides were then rinsed in PBS twice and incubated in both antiserum and pre-immune serum (negative control). These slides were then incubated in FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (anti-rabbit IgG) and kept in the dark. After final washing and mounted, both batches of slides were viewed immediately using fluorescence microscope. Results obtained before acrosome reaction showed localization of both antibodies to the whole sperm head, along the midpiece and tail. The acrosomes were also intact and cells were viable. After the acrosome reaction, localization of both antibodies were observed at the post-acrosomal region, midpiece, tail and the equatorial segment with no binding to the acrosome. Cells were mainly acrosome-reacted and dying. No binding was observed with pre-immune serum. Results indicate that the antigens were present in the acrosome and the change in binding suggests that the antigens have been redistributed after commencement of the acrosome reaction. The findings suggest that the proteins

  17. Calcium carbonate phosphate binding ion exchange filtration and accelerated denitrification improve public health standards and combat eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Hektoen agar. Initial analyses suggest a strong correlation between phosphate concentrations and bacterial populations; a 66% decrease in phosphate resulted in a 35% reduction in bacterial populations and a 45% reduction in enteropathogenic populations. Likewise, a strong correlation was shown between calcium carbonate concentrations and bacterial reduction greater than that which can be attributed to the phosphate reduction alone. This was followed by the construction of various phosphate binding calcium carbonate filters, which used the ion exchange principle, including a spring loading filter, PVC pipe filter, and a galvanized filter. All were tested with the aid of Stoke's law formulation. The experiment was extremely successful in designing a working phosphate-binding and ammonia-reducing filter, and a large-scale agitator-clarifier filter system is currently being planned for construction in Madrona Marsh; this filter will reduce phosphate and ammonia levels substantially in the following years, bringing ecological, economical, and health-related improvements to the overall ecosystem and habitat.

  18. Calcium-binding proteins in the laterodorsal thalamic nucleus during development of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakowski, Witold; Bogus-Nowakowska, Krystyna; Wasilewska, Barbara; Hermanowicz, Beata; Robak, Anna

    2014-11-01

    The laterodorsal thalamic nucleus (LD) is often treated as a part of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) because of its location and similar connectivity. Our previous studies have shown that distribution of three calcium-binding proteins, i.e. calbindin D28k (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), changes within the ATN during development of the guinea pig. The aim of this study is to examine the immunoreactivity pattern of these proteins in the LD in the guinea pig ontogeny. Brains from animals ranging from 40th embryonic day to 80th postnatal day were used in the study. Two methods were applied: a single-labelling immunoenzymatic method and double-labelling immunofluorescence. No changes of the distribution pattern of the substances were observed throughout the examined developmental stages. CB and CR were the most abundantly expressed proteins in perikarya of the LD. Numerous CB- and CR-immunoreactive cell bodies were found throughout the whole extent of the nucleus. In most of these cell bodies both proteins colocalized vastly. The highest immunoreactivity of the perikarya containing CB and CR was observed in the mediodorsal part of the LD and in its rostral portion. In regard to PV, single cell bodies were observed mostly in the dorsal part of the nucleus. PV did not colocalize with the other proteins. In summary, all the studied calcium-binding proteins were already present in the LD at prenatal developmental stages and the pattern of distribution remained virtually constant until adulthood. Thus, the LD differs considerably from the ATN in an aspect of neurochemical cell differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The calcium binding protein ALG-2 binds and stabilizes Scotin, a p53-inducible gene product localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draeby, Ingrid; Woods, Yvonne L; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2007-01-01

    101, respectively. An in vitro synthesized C-terminal fragment of Scotin bound specifically to immobilized recombinant ALG-2 and tagged ALG-2 and Scotin were shown by immunoprecipitation to interact in MCF7 and U2OS cell lines. Furthermore ALG-2 bound to endogenous Scotin in extracts from mouse NIH3T3...... cells. Overexpression of ALG-2 led to accumulation of Scotin in MCF7 and H1299 cells. In vitro and in vivo binding of ALG-2 to Scotin was demonstrated to be strictly calcium dependent indicating a role of this interaction in calcium signaling pathways....

  20. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  1. Calcium-dependent displacement of haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor binding in rat hippocampal slices following tissue depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, J F; Chavkin, C

    1989-10-23

    To evaluate the possible existence of an endogenous ligand for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor, we developed an in vitro competition assay to measure endogenous ligand release. Depolarization of in vitro hippocampal slices by either veratridine or potassium reduced [3H]ditolylguanidine binding in a calcium-dependent and transient manner. None of the drugs or iron substitutions directly affected [3H]ditolylguanidine binding to rat brain membranes. Veratridine-induced depolarization also reduced the binding of [3H](+)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine, another sigma radioligand, in a calcium-dependent manner. Radioligand displacement was not associated with alteration in sigma receptor dissociation kinetics or receptor degradation in the hippocampal slice. In contrast, KC1 depolarization had no effect on [3H]ditolyguanidine binding to sigma receptors in liver slices. The results suggest that a calcium-dependent, depolarization-induced reduction in sigma receptor binding may have been caused by the release of an endogenous sigma ligand in rat hippocampal tissue.

  2. The ability of AIF-1 to activate human vascular smooth muscle cells is lost by mutations in the EF-hand calcium-binding region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autieri, Michael V.; Chen Xing

    2005-01-01

    Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic calcium-binding protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in response to injury or cytokine stimulation. AIF-1 contains a partially conserved EF-hand calcium-binding domain, and participates in VSMC activation by activation of Rac1 and induction of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression; however, the mechanism whereby AIF-1 mediates these effects is presently uncharacterized. To determine if calcium binding plays a functional role in AIF-1 activity, a single site-specific mutation was made in the EF-hand calcium-binding domain to abrogate binding of calcium (AIF-1ΔA), which was confirmed by calcium overlay. Functionally, similar to wild-type AIF-1, AIF-1ΔA was able to polymerize F-actin in vitro. However, in contrast to wild-type AIF-1, over-expression of AIF-1ΔA was unable to increase migration or proliferation of primary human VSMC. Further, it was unable to activate Rac1, or induce G-CSF expression to the degree as wild-type AIF-1. Taken together, modification of the wild-type EF-hand domain and native calcium-binding activity results in a loss of AIF-1 function. We conclude that appropriate calcium-binding potential is critical in AIF-1-mediated effects on VSMC pathophysiology, and that AIF-1 activity is mediated by Rac1 activation and G-CSF expression

  3. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Calcium Binding Properties and Allosteric Regulation of Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Craig, Theodore A; Kumar, Rajiv; Gross, Michael L

    2017-07-18

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) is an EF-hand Ca 2+ -binding protein that also binds to a specific DNA sequence, downstream regulatory elements (DRE), and thereby regulates transcription in a calcium-dependent fashion. DREAM binds to DRE in the absence of Ca 2+ but detaches from DRE under Ca 2+ stimulation, allowing gene expression. The Ca 2+ binding properties of DREAM and the consequences of the binding on protein structure are key to understanding the function of DREAM. Here we describe the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the Ca 2+ binding properties and the subsequent conformational changes of full-length DREAM. We demonstrate that all EF-hands undergo large conformation changes upon calcium binding even though the EF-1 hand is not capable of binding to Ca 2+ . Moreover, EF-2 is a lower-affinity site compared to EF-3 and -4 hands. Comparison of HDX profiles between wild-type DREAM and two EF-1 mutated constructs illustrates that the conformational changes in the EF-1 hand are induced by long-range structural interactions. HDX analyses also reveal a conformational change in an N-terminal leucine-charged residue-rich domain (LCD) remote from Ca 2+ -binding EF-hands. This LCD domain is responsible for the direct interaction between DREAM and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and regulates the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB-binding protein. These long-range interactions strongly suggest how conformational changes transmit the Ca 2+ signal to CREB-mediated gene transcription.

  4. The calcium-binding protein ALG-2 regulates protein secretion and trafficking via interactions with MISSL and MAP1B proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Terunao; Inoue, Kuniko; Arai, Yumika; Kuwata, Keiko; Shibata, Hideki; Maki, Masatoshi

    2017-10-13

    Mobilization of intracellular calcium is essential for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, apoptosis, and vesicular trafficking. Several lines of evidence have suggested that apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2, also known as PDCD6 ), a calcium-binding protein, acts as a calcium sensor linking calcium levels with efficient vesicular trafficking, especially at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport step. However, how ALG-2 regulates these processes remains largely unclear. Here, we report that M APK1- i nteracting and s pindle- s tabilizing (MISS)- l ike (MISSL), a previously uncharacterized protein, interacts with ALG-2 in a calcium-dependent manner. Live-cell imaging revealed that upon a rise in intracellular calcium levels, GFP-tagged MISSL (GFP-MISSL) dynamically relocalizes in a punctate pattern and colocalizes with ALG-2. MISSL knockdown caused disorganization of the components of the ER exit site, the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, and Golgi. Importantly, knockdown of either MISSL or ALG-2 attenuated the secretion of se creted a lkaline p hosphatase (SEAP), a model secreted cargo protein, with similar reductions in secretion by single- and double-protein knockdowns, suggesting that MISSL and ALG-2 act in the same pathway to regulate the secretion process. Furthermore, ALG-2 or MISSL knockdown delayed ER-to-Golgi transport of procollagen type I. We also found that ALG-2 and MISSL interact with microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) and that MAP1B knockdown reverts the reduced secretion of SEAP caused by MISSL or ALG-2 depletion. These results suggest that a change in the intracellular calcium level plays a role in regulation of the secretory pathway via interaction of ALG-2 with MISSL and MAP1B. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Structural properties of the intrinsically disordered, multiple calcium ion-binding otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznar, Monika; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Wojtas, Magdalena; Gapiński, Jacek; Banachowicz, Ewa; Patkowski, Adam; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    Fish otoliths are calcium carbonate biominerals that are involved in hearing and balance sensing. An organic matrix plays a crucial role in their formation. Otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64) is a highly acidic, calcium-binding protein (CBP) found in rainbow trout otoliths. It is a component of high-molecular-weight aggregates, which influence the size, shape and polymorph of calcium carbonate in vitro. In this study, a protocol for the efficient expression and purification of OMM-64 was developed. For the first time, the complete structural characteristics of OMM-64 were described. Various biophysical methods were combined to show that OMM-64 occurs as an intrinsically disordered monomer. Under denaturing conditions (pH, temperature) OMM-64 exhibits folding propensity. It was determined that OMM-64 binds approximately 61 calcium ions with millimolar affinity. The folding-unfolding experiments showed that calcium ions induced the collapse of OMM-64. The effect of other counter ions present in trout endolymph on OMM-64 conformational changes was studied. The significance of disordered properties of OMM-64 and the possible function of this protein is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with {sup 41}Ca tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.P.H.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); King, J.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nutritional Science; Vieira, N.E. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States); Woodhouse, L.R. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nutritional Science; Yergey, A.L. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of {sup 41}Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, {sup 41}Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  7. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J

    1998-01-01

    , diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion...

  8. Sequential binding of calcium ions to the B-repeat domain of SdrD from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Andrei Yu; Devred, François; Lobatchov, Vladimir M; Makarov, Alexander A; Peyrot, Vincent; Kubatiev, Aslan A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms of live bacteria forming on medical devices and implants contribute significantly to bacterial blood dissemination and to the spread of nosocomial infections. Cell surface SdrD protein plays a key role in the attachment of Staphylococcus aureus to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in the formation of biofilm. SdrD binds calcium ions using its B1-B5 region bearing EF-hand Ca-binding sites, leading to conformational changes in the structure of SdrD. This alters the distance between the bacterial surface and the ECM-interacting domain of SdrD in a spring-like fashion, participating in bacterial attachment. In this study we investigated calcium binding to EF-hand sites of SdrD using isothermal titration calorimetry and determined the impact of this process on SdrD's thermodynamic stability. This allowed us to propose a model of B1-B5 reorganization upon binding of calcium and to get new insight into the molecular mechanism of SdrD's action.

  9. Distribution and Morphology of Calcium-Binding Proteins Immunoreactive Neurons following Chronic Tungsten Multielectrode Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    Full Text Available The development of therapeutic approaches to improve the life quality of people suffering from different types of body paralysis is a current major medical challenge. Brain-machine interface (BMI can potentially help reestablishing lost sensory and motor functions, allowing patients to use their own brain activity to restore sensorimotor control of paralyzed body parts. Chronic implants of multielectrodes, employed to record neural activity directly from the brain parenchyma, constitute the fundamental component of a BMI. However, before this technique may be effectively available to human clinical trials, it is essential to characterize its long-term impact on the nervous tissue in animal models. In the present study we evaluated how chronic implanted tungsten microelectrode arrays impact the distribution and morphology of interneurons reactive to calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR and parvalbumin (PV across the rat's motor cortex. Our results revealed that chronic microelectrode arrays were well tolerated by the nervous tissue, with recordings remaining viable for up to 6 months after implantation. Furthermore, neither the morphology nor the distribution of inhibitory neurons were broadly impacted. Moreover, restricted microglial activation was observed on the implanted sites. On the whole, our results confirm and expand the notion that tungsten multielectrodes can be deemed as a feasible candidate to future human BMI studies.

  10. Auditory hindbrain atrophy and anomalous calcium binding protein expression after neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Lindsey; Blackburn, Kaitlyn; Kulesza, Randy J

    2017-03-06

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is stored and released by both neurons and astrocytes. Despite the important role of glutamate as a neurotransmitter, elevated extracellular glutamate can result in excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a naturally occurring sodium salt of glutamic acid that is used as a flavor enhancer in many processed foods. Previous studies have shown that MSG administration during the early postnatal period results in neurodegenerative changes in several forebrain regions, characterized by neuronal loss and neuroendocrine abnormalities. Systemic delivery of MSG during the neonatal period and induction of glutamate neurotoxicity in the cochlea have both been shown to result in fewer neurons in the spiral ganglion. We hypothesized that an MSG-induced loss of neurons in the spiral ganglion would have a significant impact on the number of neurons in the cochlear nuclei and superior olivary complex (SOC). Indeed, we found that exposure to MSG from postnatal days 4 through 10 resulted in significantly fewer neurons in the cochlear nuclei and SOC and significant dysmorphology in surviving neurons. Moreover, we found that neonatal MSG exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of both calretinin and calbindin. These results suggest that neonatal exposure to MSG interferes with early development of the auditory brainstem and impacts expression of calcium binding proteins, both of which may lead to diminished auditory function. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of [125I]omega-conotoxin binding to brain N calcium channels and (-)[3H] desmethoxyverapamil binding to novel calcium channels in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation provides molecular evidence for a diversity of Ca 2+ channels in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. First, I demonstrated specific, reversible, saturable binding sites for omega [ 125 I]conotoxin GVIA (omega[ 125 I]CTX) in rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglion. Omega [ 125 I]CTX binding has a unique pharmacology, ion selectivity, and anatomical distribution in rat brain. Omega [ 125 I]CTX binding was solubilized, retaining an appropriate pharmacology and ion selectivity. Omega[ 125 I]CTX binding may be associated with a Ca 2+ channel because the K/sub D/ of omega [ 125 I]CTX is similar to the IC 50 of inhibition of depolarization-induced 45 Ca 2+ flux into rat brain synaptosomes. Specific (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxyverapamil ((-)[ 3 H]DMV) binding sites were demonstrated on osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell membranes

  12. Comparative Analysis of Calcium-Binding Myeloid-Related Protein-8/14 in Saliva and Serum of Patients With Periodontitis and Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haririan, Hady; Andrukhov, Oleh; Pablik, Eleonore; Neuhofer, Michaela; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to investigate calcium-binding myeloid-related protein (MRP)-8/14 in the saliva and serum of individuals with periodontitis and periodontally healthy individuals for the assessment of its role in the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of periodontitis. This cross-sectional study includes 56 patients with periodontitis and 44 periodontally healthy individuals. Saliva and serum were collected for the detection of MRP-8/14 and calcium levels. Periodontopathic bacteria were determined by polymerase chain reaction in saliva. Correlations between salivary and serum MRP-8/14 levels and clinical parameters, bacteria, and calcium were analyzed with Pearson correlation in a multiple regression model. MRP-8/14 levels were documented with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Compared with healthy individuals, MRP-8/14 levels were significantly higher in both the saliva and serum of patients with periodontitis, but calcium was increased only in saliva. A high diagnostic potential of salivary MRP-8/14 was detected for periodontitis (ROC = 0.86). Salivary MRP-8/14 levels correlated significantly with the presence of the periodontopathogen Treponema denticola, as well as with the clinical parameters of periodontitis. MRP-8/14 in saliva might be a potential diagnostic parameter for periodontal disease.

  13. Structure of the plasminogen kringle 4 binding calcium-free form of the C-type lectin-like domain of tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Steen; Thomsen, Jens K; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2004-01-01

    4). The structure of the calcium free-form of TN3 (apoTN3) has been determined by NMR. Compared to the structure of the calcium-bound form of TN3 (holoTN3), the core region of secondary structural elements is conserved, while large displacements occur in the loops involved in calcium or K4 binding......Tetranectin is a homotrimeric protein containing a C-type lectin-like domain. This domain (TN3) can bind calcium, but in the absence of calcium, the domain binds a number of kringle-type protein ligands. Two of the calcium-coordinating residues are also critical for binding plasminogen kringle 4 (K....... A conserved proline, which was found to be in the cis conformation in holoTN3, is in apoTN3 predominantly in the trans conformation. Backbone dynamics indicate that, in apoTN3 especially, two of the three calcium-binding loops and two of the three K4-binding residues exhibit increased flexibility, whereas...

  14. Generalized Fracture Toughness and Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Including Low Calcium Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golewski, Grzegorz Ludwik

    2017-12-06

    The paper presents the results of tests on the effect of the low calcium fly ash (LCFA) addition, in the amounts of: 0% (LCFA-00), 20% (LCFA-20) and 30% (LCFA-30) by weight of cement, on fracture processes in structural concretes. In the course of the experiments, compressive strength of concrete and fracture toughness for: I (tensile), II (in-plane shear) and III (anti-plane shear) models of cracking were measured. The tests determined the effect of age of concretes modified with LCFA on the analyzed parameters. The experiments were carried out after: 3, 7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of curing. Fracture toughness of concretes was determined in terms of the critical stress intensity factors: K I c S , K I I c , K I I I c and then a generalized fracture toughness K c was specified. The obtained results are significant for the analysis of concrete structures subjected to complex loading. The properties of composites with the additive of LCFA depend on the age of the concrete tested. Mature concretes exhibit high fracture toughness at 20% additive of LCFA, while the additive of LCFA in the amount of 30% weight of cement has a beneficial effect on the parameters of concrete only after half a year of curing.

  15. Generalized Fracture Toughness and Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Including Low Calcium Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Ludwik Golewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of tests on the effect of the low calcium fly ash (LCFA addition, in the amounts of: 0% (LCFA-00, 20% (LCFA-20 and 30% (LCFA-30 by weight of cement, on fracture processes in structural concretes. In the course of the experiments, compressive strength of concrete and fracture toughness for: I (tensile, II (in-plane shear and III (anti-plane shear models of cracking were measured. The tests determined the effect of age of concretes modified with LCFA on the analyzed parameters. The experiments were carried out after: 3, 7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of curing. Fracture toughness of concretes was determined in terms of the critical stress intensity factors: K I c S , K I I c , K I I I c and then a generalized fracture toughness K c was specified. The obtained results are significant for the analysis of concrete structures subjected to complex loading. The properties of composites with the additive of LCFA depend on the age of the concrete tested. Mature concretes exhibit high fracture toughness at 20% additive of LCFA, while the additive of LCFA in the amount of 30% weight of cement has a beneficial effect on the parameters of concrete only after half a year of curing.

  16. Hinderin, a five-domains protein including coiled-coil motifs that binds to SMC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiselli Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural maintenance of chromosome proteins SMC1 and SMC3 play an important role in the maintenance of chromosomal integrity by preventing the premature separation of the sister chromatids at the onset of anaphase. The two proteins are constitutive components of the multimeric complex cohesin and form dimers by interacting at their central globular regions. Results In order to identify proteins that by binding to SMC3 may interfere with the protein dimerization process, a human cDNA library was screened by the yeast two-hybrid system by using the hinge region of SMC3 as bait. This has lead to the identification of Hinderin, a novel five domains protein including two coiled-coil motifs and sharing a strikingly structural similarity to the SMC family of proteins. Hinderin is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Orthologue forms of the protein are present in other vertebrates but not in lower organisms. A mapping of the interaction sites revealed that the N- and C-terminal globular domains mediate the binding of Hinderin to SMC3. Hinderin/SMC3 complexes could be recovered by immunoprecipitation from cell lysates using an anti-SMC3 antibody, thus demonstrating that the two proteins interact in vivo. On the contrary, Hinderin did not interact with SMC1. In vivo the rate of SMC1/SMC3 interaction was decreased by the ectopic expression of Hinderin. Conclusions Hinderin is a novel binding partner of SMC3. Based on its ability to modulate SMC1/SMC3 interaction we postulate that Hinderin affects the availability of SMC3 to engage in the formation of multimeric protein complexes.

  17. Vestibular nuclei characterized by calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity and tract tracing in Gekko gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Wang, Wenbo; Carr, Catherine E; Dai, Zhendong; Tang, Yezhong

    2013-02-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were used to describe the distribution of the calcium binding proteins calretinin, calbindin and parvalbumin as well as synaptic vesicle protein 2 in the vestibular nuclei of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). In addition, tract tracing was used to investigate connections between the vestibular nerves and brainstem nuclei. Seven vestibular nuclei were recognized: the nuclei cerebellaris lateralis (Cerl), vestibularis dorsolateralis (Vedl), ventrolateralis (Vevl), ventromedialis (Vevm), tangentialis (Vetg), ovalis (VeO) and descendens (Veds). Vestibular fibers entered the brainstem with the ascending branch projecting to Vedl and Cerl, the lateral descending branch to Veds, and the medial descending branch to ipsilateral Vevl. Cerl lay most rostral, in the cerebellar peduncle. Vedl, located rostrally, was ventral to the cerebellar peduncle, and consisted of loosely arranged multipolar and monopolar cells. Vevl was found at the level of the vestibular nerve root and contained conspicuously large cells and medium-sized cells. Veds is a large nucleus, the most rostral portion of which is situated lateral and ventral to Vevl, and occupies much of the dorsal brainstem extending caudally through the medulla. VeO is a spherically shaped cell group lateral to the auditory nucleus magnocellularis and dorsal to the caudal part of Vevl. Vevm and Vetg were small in the present study. Except for VeO, all other vestibular nuclei appear directly comparable to counterparts in other reptiles and birds based on their location, cytoarchitecture, and connections, indicating these are conserved features of the vestibular system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium-binding protein expression in peritoneal endometriosis-associated nerve fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcena de Arellano, M L; Münch, S; Arnold, J; Helbig, S; Schneider, A; Mechsner, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies demonstrated the potential involvement of nerve fibres in the chronic inflammatory process of endometriosis. We aimed to characterize nerve fibres in the proximal and distal areas of the peritoneal endometriotic lesions in order to understand the chronic inflammatory process in endometriosis. Peritoneal endometriotic lesions (proximal area) (n = 17), the matching unaffected peritoneum (distal area) and healthy peritoneum of patients without endometriosis (n = 15) were analysed with the neuronal markers PGP 9.5, calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin. Peritoneal fluids of women with and without endometriosis were used for Western blot analysis and for the neuronal growth assay. The protein expression of neuronal PC-12 cells incubated with peritoneal fluids was analysed. The overall nerve fibre density was significantly reduced in the distal area of the lesion when compared with the proximal area or with healthy peritoneum. The density of calbindin-, calretinin- and parvalbumin-positive nerve fibres was significantly increased in the endometriosis group. Calretinin expression was elevated in the peritoneal fluid of women with symptomatic endometriosis when compared with women with asymptomatic endometriosis. Furthermore, PC-12 cells incubated with peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis showed a higher proliferation rate and a stronger neurite outgrowth than the control group. PC-12 cells incubated in peritoneal fluids of women with endometriosis expressed less calretinin but more calbindin than the control group. Calcium-binding proteins seem to be increased in endometriosis-associated nerve fibres and might play an important role in the chronic inflammatory condition and the pain pathogenesis of endometriosis. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  19. Morphological features of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins in the human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Parent, A

    1998-01-26

    An immunohistochemical approach was used to characterize the morphological phenotype of neurons containing the calcium-binding proteins calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV), or calbindin-D28k (CB) in the normal human striatum. The protein CR occurs in at least four morphologically distinct types of neurons. Apart from the numerous medium-sized aspiny interneurons and the less abundant giant aspiny interneurons, CR also labels some medium-sized spiny neurons morphologically identical to striatal projection neurons. This finding indicates that CR is not only confined to striatal interneurons but also may be involved in the function of certain projection neurons. Some small and peculiar bushy-like aspiny neurons also are enriched with CR. These neurons could correspond to the dwarf or neurogliform neurons first described by Ramón y Cajal (1911). Three types of PV-immunoreactive striatal neurons can be visualized in the human striatum: 1) the common medium-sized aspiny leptodendritic neurons, 2) some smaller and profusely arborized aspiny neurons, and 3) a few large and intensely stained neurons with conspicuously beaded and poorly branched dendrites. The protein CB labels virtually all medium-sized spiny projection neurons located in the striatal matrix but also identifies a small subset of large and more intensely immunostained aspiny neurons. The latter finding indicates that CB is not entirely confined to striatal projection neurons but also may play a role in local circuit neurons. These normative data should help our understanding of the chemical anatomy of the human striatum in both health and disease.

  20. Characterization of P2X4 receptor agonists and antagonists by calcium influx and radioligand binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Aliaa; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Hinz, Sonja; Schiedel, Anke C; Köse, Meryem; Burton, Maggi; El-Tayeb, Ali; Gillard, Michel; Bajorath, Jürgen; de Ryck, Marc; Müller, Christa E

    2017-02-01

    Antagonists for ATP-activated P2X4 ion channel receptors are currently in the focus as novel drug targets, in particular for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. We stably expressed the human, rat and mouse P2X4 receptors in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, which is devoid of functional nucleotide receptors, by retroviral transfection, and established monoclonal cell lines. Calcium flux assay conditions were optimized for high-throughput screening resulting in a Z'-factor of >0.8. The application of ready-to-use frozen cells did not negatively affect the results of the calcium assays, which is of great advantage for the screening of compound libraries. Species differences were observed, the rat P2X4 receptor being particularly insensitive to many ATP derivatives. Membrane preparations of the cell lines showed high levels of specific [ 35 S]ATPγS binding with low nonspecific binding (antagonist TNP-ATP displaced [ 35 S]ATPγS from its binding site at human P2X4 receptors, the non-nucleotidic antagonists paroxetine and 5-BDBD did not compete with radioligand binding and were therefore characterized as allosteric antagonists. Homology modeling was applied to find an explanation for the observed species differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutation/SNP analysis in EF-hand calcium binding domain of mitochondrial Ca[Formula: see text] uptake 1 gene in bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Salimi, Reza; Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Sakizli, Meral

    2016-06-01

    Calcium signaling is important for synaptic plasticity, generation of brain rhythms, regulating neuronal excitability, data processing and cognition. Impairment in calcium homeostasis contributed to the development of psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (BP). MCU is the most important calcium transporter in mitochondria inner membrane responsible for influx of Ca[Formula: see text]. MICU1 is linked with MCU and has two canonical EF hands that are vital for its activity and regulates MCU-mediated Ca[Formula: see text] influx. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic alteration of EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1 on the development of BP. We examined patients with BP, first degree relatives of these patients and healthy volunteers for mutations and polymorphisms in EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1. The result showed no SNP/mutation in BP patients, in healthy subjects and in first degree relatives. Additionally, alignment of the EF hand calcium binding regions among species (Gallus-gallus, Canis-lupus-familiaris, Bos-taurus, Mus-musculus, Rattus-norvegicus, Pan-troglodytes, Homosapiens and Danio-rerio) showed exactly the same amino acids (DLNGDGEVDMEE and DCDGNGELSNKE) except in one of the calcium binding domain of Danio-rerio that there was only one difference; leucine instead of Methionine. Our results showed that the SNP on EF-hand Ca[Formula: see text] binding domains of MICU1 gene had no effect in phenotypic characters of BP patients.

  2. The C-terminal portion of BM-40 (SPARC/osteonectin) is an autonomously folding and crystallisable domain that binds calcium and collagen IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, P; Hohenadl, C; Hohenester, E; Göhring, W; Timpl, R; Engel, J

    1995-10-20

    The extracellular glycoprotein BM-40 consists of three domains, an acidic domain I, a follistatin (FS)-like domain II and a calcium-binding EC domain with an EF-hand related motif. BM-40 and several other related proteins (QR1, SC1/hevin, testican and tsc-36/FRP) are members of a novel modular protein family that share the FS domain followed by an EC domain. We have expressed this pair of FS and EC domains (mutant delta I) and the calcium-binding EC domain alone (mutant delta I, II) of human BM-40 as recombinant proteins in human 293 cells. Circular dichroism demonstrated that both mutants were obtained as folded proteins with a distinct three-dimensional conformation. In addition, mutant delta I, II could be readily crystallized and diffraction patterns with a resolution limit of 2.4 A resolution were obtained. Calcium binding to this fragment was ten times weaker (Kd = 0.8 microM) than for the wild-type protein. Identical reversible increases in alpha-helicity upon calcium binding were observed for the 150-residue long mutant delta I, II and for BM-40 (286 residues). A 26-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the EF-hand related motif exhibited much weaker calcium binding. The apparent dissociation constant decreased with increasing peptide concentration (from Kd 2.4 mM at 1 microM, to Kd 0.3 mM at 100 microM peptide concentration) and calcium binding was accompanied by dimerization of the peptide. This suggests that for strong calcium binding the EF-hand related motif has to be embedded into a larger protein domain that can form an autonomously folding protein module. The EC domain was also shown by surface plasmon resonance assay to be responsible for calcium-dependent binding to collagen IV with an affinity (Kd = 19 microM) only sixfold lower than that of intact human BM-40.

  3. A Procedure to Determine the Coordinated Chromium and Calcium Isotopic Composition of Astromaterials Including the Chelyabinsk Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappa, M. J.; Mills, R. D.; Ware, B.; Simon, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of elements are often used to characterize nucelosynthetic contributions in early Solar System objects. Coordinated multiple middle-mass elements with differing volatilities may provide information regarding the location of condensation of early Solar System solids. Here we detail new procedures that we have developed to make high-precision multi-isotope measurements of chromium and calcium using thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and characterize a suite of chondritic and terrestrial material including two fragments of the Chelyabinsk LL-chondrite.

  4. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacopino, A.M.; Christakos, S.

    1990-01-01

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin·mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  5. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A Eyford

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests.Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay.The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome-infected cattle

  6. Four novel FBN1 mutations: Significance for mutant transcript level and EGF-like domain calcium binding in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, H.C.; McIntosh, I.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Francomano, C.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Sakai, L.Y.; Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Defects of fibrillin (FBN1), a glycoprotein component of the extracellular microfibril, cause Marfan syndrome. This disorder is characterized by marked inter- and intrafamilial variation in phenotypic severity. To understand the molecular basis for this clinical observation, the authors have screened the fibrillin gene (FBN1) on chromosome 15, including the newly cloned 5[prime] coding sequence, for disease-producing alterations in a panel of patients with a wide range of manifestations and clinical severity. All the missense mutations identified to date, including two novel mutations discussed here, are associated with classic and moderate to severe disease and occur at residues with putative significance for calcium binding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. In contrast, two new mutations that create premature signals for termination of translation of mRNA and are associated with reduction in the amount of mutant allele transcript produce a range of phenotypic severity. The patient with the lowest amount of mutant transcript has the mildest disease. These data support a role for altered calcium binding to EGF-like domains in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome and suggest a dominant negative mechanism for the pathogenesis of this disorder. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The role of solvation in the binding selectivity of the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Dezső; Henderson, Douglas; Gillespie, Dirk

    2013-08-07

    We present grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation results for a reduced model of the L-type calcium channel. While charged residues of the protein amino acids in the selectivity filter are treated explicitly, most of the degrees of freedom (including the rest of the protein and the solvent) are represented by their dielectric response, i.e., dielectric continua. The new aspect of this paper is that the dielectric coefficient in the channel is different from that in the baths. The ions entering the channel, thus, cross a dielectric boundary at the entrance of the channel. Simulating this case has been made possible by our recent methodological development [D. Boda, D. Henderson, B. Eisenberg, and D. Gillespie, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064105 (2011)]. Our main focus is on the effect of solvation energy (represented by the Born energy) on monovalent vs. divalent ion selectivity in the channel. We find no significant change in selectivity by changing the dielectric coefficient in the channel because the larger solvation penalty is counterbalanced by the enhanced Coulomb attraction inside the channel as soon as we use the Born radii (fitted to experimental hydration energies) to compute the solvation penalty from the Born equation.

  8. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  9. FhCaBP1 (FH22): A Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sarah; Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2016-11-01

    FH22 has been previously identified as a calcium-binding protein from the common liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica. It is part of a family of at least four proteins in this organism which combine an EF-hand containing N-terminal domain with a C-terminal dynein light chain-like domain. Here we report further biochemical properties of FH22, which we propose should be renamed FhCaBP1 for consistency with other family members. Molecular modelling predicted that the two domains are linked by a flexible region and that the second EF-hand in the N-terminal domain is most likely the calcium ion binding site. Native gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the protein binds both calcium and manganese ions, but not cadmium, magnesium, strontium, barium, cobalt, copper(II), iron (II), nickel, zinc, lead or potassium ions. Calcium ion binding alters the conformation of the protein and increases its stability towards thermal denaturation. FhCaBP1 is a dimer in solution and calcium ions have no detectable effect on the protein's ability to dimerise. FhCaBP1 binds to the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and chlorpromazine. Overall, the FhCaBP1's biochemical properties are most similar to FhCaBP2 a fact consistent with the close sequence and predicted structural similarity between the two proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  11. Calcium regulates ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakato, Miho; King, Stephen M

    2003-10-31

    The Chlamydomonas outer dynein arm contains three distinct heavy chains (alpha, beta, and gamma) that exhibit different motor properties. The LC4 protein, which binds 1-2 Ca2+ with KCa = 3 x 10-5 m, is associated with the gamma heavy chain and has been proposed to act as a sensor to regulate dynein motor function in response to alterations in intraflagellar Ca2+ levels. Here we genetically dissect the outer arm to yield subparticles containing different motor unit combinations and assess the microtubule-binding properties of these complexes both prior to and following preincubation with tubulin and ATP, which was used to inhibit ATP-insensitive (structural) microtubule binding. We observed that the alpha heavy chain exhibits a dominant Ca2+-independent ATP-sensitive MT binding activity in vitro that is inhibited by attachment of tubulin to the structural microtubule-binding domain. Furthermore, we show that ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by a dynein subparticle containing only the beta and gamma heavy chains does not occur at Ca2+ concentrations below pCa 6 but is maximally activated above pCa 5. This activity was not observed in mutant dyneins containing small deletions in the microtubule-binding region of the beta heavy chain or in dyneins that lack both the alpha heavy chain and the motor domain of the beta heavy chain. These findings strongly suggest that Ca2+ binding directly to a component of the dynein complex regulates ATP-sensitive interactions between the beta heavy chain and microtubules and lead to a model for how individual motor units are controlled within the outer dynein arm.

  12. Structure of thrombospondin type 3 repeats in bacterial outer membrane protein A reveals its intra-repeat disulfide bond-dependent calcium-binding capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuyan; Sun, Cancan; Tan, Kemin; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2017-09-01

    Eukaryotic thrombospondin type 3 repeat (TT3R) is an efficient calcium ion (Ca2+) binding motif only found in mammalian thrombospondin family. TT3R has also been found in prokaryotic cellulase Cel5G, which was thought to forfeit the Ca2+-binding capability due to the formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, instead of the inter-repeat ones possessed by eukaryotic TT3Rs. In this study, we have identified an enormous number of prokaryotic TT3R-containing proteins belonging to several different protein families, including outer membrane protein A (OmpA), an important structural protein connecting the outer membrane and the periplasmic peptidoglycan layer in gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic region of OmpA from Capnocytophaga gingivalis, which contains a linker region comprising five consecutive TT3Rs. The structure of OmpA-TT3R exhibits a well-ordered architecture organized around two tightly-coordinated Ca2+ and confirms the presence of abnormal intra-repeat disulfide bonds. Further mutagenesis studies showed that the Ca2+-binding capability of OmpA-TT3R is indeed dependent on the proper formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, which help to fix a conserved glycine residue at its proper position for Ca2+ coordination. Additionally, despite lacking inter repeat disulfide bonds, the interfaces between adjacent OmpA-TT3Rs are enhanced by both hydrophobic and conserved aromatic-proline interactions.

  13. The dyad palindromic glutathione transferase P enhancer binds multiple factors including AP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diccianni, M B; Imagawa, M; Muramatsu, M

    1992-10-11

    Glutathione Transferase P (GST-P) gene expression is dominantly regulated by an upstream enhancer (GPEI) consisting of a dyad of palindromically oriented imperfect TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate)-responsive elements (TRE). GPEI is active in AP1-lacking F9 cells as well in AP1-containing HeLa cells. Despite GPEI's similarity to a TRE, c-jun co-transfection has only a minimal effect on transactivation. Antisense c-jun and c-fos co-transfection experiments further demonstrate the lack of a role for AP1 in GPEI mediated trans-activation in F9 cells, although endogenously present AP1 can influence GPEI in HeLa cells. Co-transfection of delta fosB with c-jun, which forms an inactive c-Jun/delta FosB heterodimer that binds TRE sequences, inhibits GPEI-mediated transcription in AP1-lacking F9 cells as well as AP1-containing HeLa cells. These data suggest novel factor(s) other than AP1 are influencing GPEI. Binding studies reveal multiple nucleoproteins bind to GPEI. These factors are likely responsible for the high level of GPEI-mediated transcription observed in the absence of AP1 and during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  14. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  15. Networks of enzymatically oxidized membrane lipids support calcium-dependent coagulation factor binding to maintain hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Sarah N; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Slatter, David A; Aldrovandi, Maceler; O'Connor, Anne; Farewell, Daniel; Percy, Charles L; Molhoek, Jessica E; Rannikko, Sirpa; Tyrrell, Victoria J; Ferla, Salvatore; Milne, Ginger L; Poole, Alastair W; Thomas, Christopher P; Obaji, Samya; Taylor, Philip R; Jones, Simon A; de Groot, Phillip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Uderhardt, Stefan; Ackermann, Jochen; Vince Jenkins, P; Brancale, Andrea; Krönke, Gerhard; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2017-11-28

    Blood coagulation functions as part of the innate immune system by preventing bacterial invasion, and it is critical to stopping blood loss (hemostasis). Coagulation involves the external membrane surface of activated platelets and leukocytes. Using lipidomic, genetic, biochemical, and mathematical modeling approaches, we found that enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPLs) generated by the activity of leukocyte or platelet lipoxygenases (LOXs) were required for normal hemostasis and promoted coagulation factor activities in a Ca 2+ - and phosphatidylserine (PS)-dependent manner. In wild-type mice, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phospholipids (HETE-PLs) enhanced coagulation and restored normal hemostasis in clotting-deficient animals genetically lacking p12-LOX or 12/15-LOX activity. Murine platelets generated 22 eoxPL species, all of which were missing in the absence of p12-LOX. Humans with the thrombotic disorder antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had statistically significantly increased HETE-PLs in platelets and leukocytes, as well as greater HETE-PL immunoreactivity, than healthy controls. HETE-PLs enhanced membrane binding of the serum protein β2GP1 (β2-glycoprotein 1), an event considered central to the autoimmune reactivity responsible for APS symptoms. Correlation network analysis of 47 platelet eoxPL species in platelets from APS and control subjects identified their enzymatic origin and revealed a complex network of regulation, with the abundance of 31 p12-LOX-derived eoxPL molecules substantially increased in APS. In summary, circulating blood cells generate networks of eoxPL molecules, including HETE-PLs, which change membrane properties to enhance blood coagulation and contribute to the excessive clotting and immunoreactivity of patients with APS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  17. Comparative distribution of relaxin-3 inputs and calcium-binding protein-positive neurons in rat amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio N Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or ‘hubs’ within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin, calretinin and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST and in the endopiriform

  18. VSNL1 Co-expression networks in aging include calcium signaling, synaptic plasticity, and Alzheimer’s disease pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C W Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visinin-like 1 (VSNL1 gene encodes Visinin-like protein 1, a peripheral biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD. Little is known, however, about normal VSNL1 expression in brain and the biologic networks in which it participates. Frontal cortex gray matter from 209 subjects without neurodegenerative or psychiatric illness, ranging in age from 16–91, were processed on Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1 ST and Human SNP Array 6.0. VSNL1 expression was unaffected by age and sex, and not significantly associated with SNPs in cis or trans. VSNL1 was significantly co-expressed with genes in pathways for Calcium Signaling, AD, Long Term Potentiation, Long Term Depression, and Trafficking of AMPA Receptors. The association with AD was driven, in part, by correlation with amyloid precursor protein (APP expression. These findings provide an unbiased link between VSNL1 and molecular mechanisms of AD, including pathways implicated in synaptic pathology in AD. Whether APP may drive increased VSNL1 expression, VSNL1 drives increased APP expression, or both are downstream of common pathogenic regulators will need to be evaluated in model systems.

  19. Molecular cloning of the apoptosis-related calcium-binding protein AsALG-2 in Avena sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoat, Trinh Xuan; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Yang, Qian; Tosa, Yukio; Mayama, Shigeyuki

    2013-04-01

    Victorin, the host-selective toxin produced by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, induces programmed cell death (PCD) in victorin-sensitive oat lines with characteristic features of animal apoptosis, such as mitochondrial permeability transition, chromatin condensation, nuclear DNA laddering and rRNA/mRNA degradation. In this study, we characterized a calcium-binding protein, namely AsALG-2, which might have a role in the victorin-induced PCD. AsALG-2 is homologous to the Apoptosis-Linked Gene ALG-2 identified in mammalian cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that the accumulation of AsALG-2 transcripts increased during victorin-induced PCD, but not during necrotic cell death. Salicylic acid, chitosan and chitin strongly activated the expression of general defence response genes, such as PR-10; however, neither induced cell death nor the accumulation of AsALG-2 mRNA. Pharmacological studies indicated that victorin-induced DNA laddering and AsALG-2 expression were regulated through similar pathways. The calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, moderately inhibited the accumulation of AsALG-2 mRNA during cell death. Trifluoperazine (calmodulin antagonist) and K252a (serine-threonine kinase inhibitor) reduced the victorin-induced phytoalexin accumulation, but did not prevent the victorin-induced DNA laddering or accumulation of AsALG-2 mRNA. Taken together, our investigations suggest that there is a calcium-mediated signalling pathway in animal and plant PCD in common. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  20. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O

    2017-01-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand...... the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hours. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage...... marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. RESULTS: iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep...

  1. Immunomicroscopic localization of the 10,000 molecular weight calcium-binding protein in the human enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M; Friis, S; Dabelsteen, E

    1989-01-01

    The cellular localization of the 10,000 molecular weight calcium-binding protein (CaBP or Calbindin-D) in the small intestinal epithelium of man was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunogold staining). Indirect immunofluorescence on frozen sections showed...... intracellular staining in the enterocyte. The fluorescence was evenly distributed and no significant differences were observed between crypt and villus cells. No staining was found in goblet cells or in the submucosa. Correspondingly, immunogold labeled antibodies were scattered over the cytoplasm...... of the enterocyte. The terminal region appeared to be the most intensely decorated and the brush border region showed labeling above the background level. No labeling was associated with intracellular membranes or the basolateral membrane....

  2. Ectopic expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in mouse liver endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, M B; Berchtold, M W; Rülicke, T

    1997-01-01

    To elucidate the physiological role of the Ca2+ binding protein parvalbumin, we have generated transgenic mice carrying the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of rat parvalbumin under the control of the heavy-metal inducible metallothionein IIA promoter. Immunohistochemical and biochemical...

  3. Transplacental effects of thyrocalcitonin on intestinal calcium-binding protein, alkaline phosphatase activity and ossification of long bones in rat fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshin, J; Ornoy, A; Menczel, J

    1976-03-01

    Pregnant rats were treated with 44, 88 and 176 Medical Research Council munits of thyrocalcitonin (TCT) twice daily during days 10 to 21 of gestation. Nonpregnant rats received the same treatment for 12 days. Administration of TCT to the pregnant rats increased the ash and calcium content of fetal bones and decreased the phosphorus content. The diaphyses were short and contained many persisting enchondral trabeculae and a reduced number of osteoclasts. TCT reduced the fetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity but elevated the intestinal calcium-binding protein content. In the pregnant and nonpregnant rats, treatment with TCT resulted in hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia, and increased the calcium-binding protein content of the duodenal mucosa. In the fetuses, the calcium-binding protein content and alkaline phosphatase activity were higher in the jejunum and ileum than in the duodenum, and were much higher than the values found in adult animals. Our findings indicate that TCT passes through the rat placenta and affects the fetal skeleton and calcium metabolism directly, resulting primarily in decreased bone resorption.

  4. Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Christian; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Nilsson, Emil K; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Vågesjö, Evelina; Massena, Sara; Pettersson, Ulrika; Christoffersson, Gustaf; Phillipson, Mia; Broman, Jan-Erik; Lannfelt, Lars; Zetterberg, Henrik; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) affects circulating concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in humans. These factors are usually found in the cytoplasm of neurons and glia cells. Increasing concentrations of these factors in blood may be therefore indicative for either neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or both. In addition, amyloid β (Aβ) peptides 1-42 and 1-40 were measured in plasma to calculate their ratio. A reduced plasma ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 is considered an indirect measure of increased deposition of Aβ 1-42 peptide in the brain. Subjects participated in two conditions (including either 8-h of nocturnal sleep [22:30-06:30] or TSD). Fasting blood samples were drawn before and after sleep interventions (19:30 and 07:30, respectively). Sleep laboratory. 15 healthy young men. TSD increased morning serum levels of NSE (P = 0.002) and S-100B (P = 0.02) by approximately 20%, compared with values obtained after a night of sleep. In contrast, the ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 did not differ between the sleep interventions. Future studies in which both serum and cerebrospinal fluid are sampled after sleep loss should elucidate whether the increase in serum neuron-specific enolase and S100 calcium binding protein B is primarily caused by neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or is just a consequence of increased gene expression in non-neuronal cells, such as leukocytes.

  5. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (psalt stresses than wild type plants (psalt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus after Radiofrequency Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Maskey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins (CaBPs such as calbindin D28-k, parvalbumin, and calretinin are able to bind Ca2+ with high affinity. Changes in Ca2+ concentrations via CaBPs can disturb Ca2+ homeostasis. Brain damage can be induced by the prolonged electromagnetic field (EMF exposure with loss of interacellular Ca2+ balance. The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of ginseng in regard to CaBPs immunoreactivity (IR in the hippocampus through immunohistochemistry after one-month exposure at 1.6 SAR value by comparing sham control with exposed and ginseng-treated exposed groups separately. Loss of dendritic arborization was noted with the CaBPs in the Cornu Ammonis areas as well as a decrease of staining intensity of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus after exposure while no loss was observed in the ginseng-treated group. A significant difference in the relative mean density was noted between control and exposed groups but was nonsignificant in the ginseng-treated group. Decrease in CaBP IR with changes in the neuronal staining as observed in the exposed group would affect the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit by alteration of the Ca2+ concentration which could be prevented by ginseng. Hence, ginseng could contribute as a radioprotective agent against EMF exposure, contributing to the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis by preventing impairment of intracellular Ca2+ levels in the hippocampus.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourinath, S., E-mail: sgourinath@mail.jnu.ac.in; Padhan, Narendra; Alam, Neelima; Bhattacharya, Alok [School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2005-04-01

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°.

  8. Cartilage Acidic Protein 2 a hyperthermostable, high affinity calcium-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Liliana; Gomes, Ana S; Melo, Eduardo P; Canário, Adelino V; Power, Deborah M

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage Acidic Protein 2 (CRTAC2) is a novel protein present from prokaryotes to vertebrates with abundant expression in the teleost fish pituitary gland and an isoform of CRTAC1, a chondrocyte marker in humans. The two proteins are non-integrins containing N-terminal integrin-like Ca(2+)-binding motifs and their structure and function remain to be assigned. Structural studies of recombinant sea bream (sb)CRTAC2 revealed it is composed of 8.8% α-helix, 33.4% β-sheet and 57.8% unordered protein. sbCRTAC2 bound Ca(2+) with high affinity (K(d)=1.46nM) and favourable Gibbs free energy (∆G=-12.4kcal/mol). The stoichiometry for Ca(2+) bound to sbCRTAC2 at saturation indicated six Ca(2+) ligand-binding sites exist per protein molecule. No conformational change in sbCRTAC2 occurred in the presence of Ca(2+). Fluorescence emission revealed that the tertiary structure of the protein is hyperthermostable between 25°C and 95°C and the fully unfolded state is only induced by chemical denaturing (4M GndCl). sbCRTAC has a widespread tissue distribution and is present as high molecular weight aggregates, although strong reducing conditions promote formation of the monomer. sbCRTAC2 promotes epithelial cell outgrowth in vitro suggesting it may share functional homology with mammalian CRTAC1, recently implicated in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Binding of alphaherpesvirus glycoprotein H to surface α4β1-integrins activates calcium-signaling pathways and induces phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Walid; Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca(2+) release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca(2+) release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca(2+) release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca(2+) release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca(2+) release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. Herpesviruses are a large family of enveloped viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, causing a variety of diseases. These viruses have developed a number of strategies for successful entry into different cell types. We and others have shown that alphaherpesviruses, including EHV-1 and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), can route their entry pathway and do so by manipulation of cell signaling cascades to ensure viral genome delivery to nuclei. We show here that the interaction between EHV-1 gH and cellular α4β1-integrins is necessary to induce emptying of ER calcium stores, which induces phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane

  10. FhCaBP2: a Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2015-09-01

    FhCaBP2 is a Fasciola hepatica protein which belongs to a family of helminth calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain containing two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal dynein light chain-like (DLC-like) domain. Its predicted structure showed two globular domains joined by a flexible linker. Recombinant FhCaBP2 interacted reversibly with calcium and manganese ions, but not with magnesium, barium, strontium, copper (II), colbalt (II), iron (II), nickel, lead or potassium ions. Cadmium (II) ions appeared to bind non-site-specifically and destabilize the protein. Interaction with either calcium or magnesium ions results in a conformational change in which the protein's surface becomes more hydrophobic. The EF-hand domain alone was able to interact with calcium and manganese ions; the DLC-like domain was not. Alteration of a residue (Asp-58 to Ala) in the second EF-hand motif in this domain abolished ion-binding activity. This suggests that the second EF-hand is the one responsible for ion-binding. FhCaBP2 homodimerizes and the extent of dimerization was not affected by calcium ions or by the aspartate to alanine substitution in the second EF-hand. The isolated EF-hand and DLC-like domains are both capable of homodimerization. FhCaBP2 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, thiamylal and W7. Interestingly, while chlorpromazine and thiamylal interacted with the EF-hand domain (as expected), trifluoperazine and W7 bound to the DLC-like domain. Overall, FhCaBP2 has distinct biochemical properties compared with other members of this protein family from Fasciola hepatica, a fact which supports the hypothesis that these proteins have different physiological roles.

  11. Lead content of calcium supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, E A; Szabo, N J; Tebbett, I R

    2000-09-20

    Substantial quantities of lead have been reported in some over-the-counter calcium supplement preparations, including not only bone-meal and dolomite, but also over-the-counter natural and refined calcium carbonate formulations. Examination of this issue is warranted given recent increases in physician recommendations for calcium supplements for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. To determine the lead content of calcium supplements and to quantify the lead exposure from popular brands of calcium in dosages used for childhood recommended daily allowance, osteoporosis, and phosphate binding in dialysis patients. Analysis of lead content in 21 formulations of nonprescription calcium carbonate (including 7 natural [ie, oyster shell] and 14 refined), 1 brand of prescription-only calcium acetate, and 1 noncalcium synthetic phosphate binder conducted in March 2000. Lead content, assayed using electrothermal atomic absorption, expressed as micrograms of lead per 800 mg/d of elemental calcium, per 1500 mg/d of calcium, and for a range of dosages for patients with renal failure. Six microg/d of lead was considered the absolute dietary limit, with no more than 1 microg/d being the goal for supplements. Four of 7 natural products had measurable lead content, amounting to approximately 1 microg/d for 800 mg/d of calcium, between 1 and 2 microg/d for 1500 mg/d of calcium, and up to 10 microg/d for renal dosages. Four of the 14 refined products had similar lead content, including up to 3 microg/d of lead in osteoporosis calcium dosages and up to 20 microg/d in high renal dosages. No lead was detected in the calcium acetate or polymer products. Lead was present even in some brand name products from major pharmaceutical companies not of natural oyster shell derivation. Despite increasingly stringent limits of lead exposure, many calcium supplement formulations contain lead and thereby may pose an easily avoidable public health concern. JAMA. 2000;284:1425-1429.

  12. Calcium and initial surface binding phase of pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prusch, R.D.

    1986-08-01

    The uptake of membrane-bound solute and external medium by bulk-phase pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus is influenced by the level of Ca/sup 2 +/ in the external medium. Increasing external Ca/sup 2 +/ to approx.10/sup -4/ M increases pinocytotic intensity, while increases in Ca/sup 2 +/ above this level decrease the intensity of pinocytosis. The initial interaction of pinocytotic inducers and Ca/sup +2/ at the surface of A moeba proteus was therefore examined. Alcain blue and Na/sup +/, both inducers of pinocytosis, differ in the manner with which they associate with the amoeba surface, suggesting the possibility of different pinocytosis-inducing sites on the amoeba surface. Low levels of external Ca/sup 2 +/ in the range of 3 x 10/sup -5/ to 4.5 x 10/sup -4/ M increase the amount of cationic inducer associated with the cell surface while, at the same time, decreasing anion association with the cell surface. It is suggested that Ca/sup 2 +/ influences ion association with the cell surface by controlling the availability of negative surface sites, which in turn influences pinocytotic intensity. Surface binding of Na/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Cl/sup -/ was determined by adding /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca or /sup 36/Cl.

  13. MHC class II-derived peptides can bind to class II molecules, including self molecules, and prevent antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosloniec, E F; Vitez, L J; Buus, S

    1990-01-01

    the alpha k-3 peptide binds slightly less well. These combined data, suggesting that class II-derived peptides can bind to MHC class II molecules, including the autologous molecule from which they are derived, have important implications for the molecular basis of alloreactivity and autoreactivity. Further...... found in the first and third polymorphic regions (PMR) of the A alpha k chain (alpha k-1 and alpha k-3) were capable of inhibiting the presentation of three different HEL-derived peptide antigens to their appropriate T cells. In addition, the alpha k-1 peptide inhibited the presentation of the OVA(323......-339) immunodominant peptide to the I-Ad-restricted T cell hybridomas specific for it. Prepulsing experiments demonstrated that the PMR peptides were interacting with the APC and not with the T cell hybridomas. These observations were confirmed and extended by the demonstration that the alpha k-1 and alpha k-3...

  14. Structural model for dihydropyridine binding to L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2009-07-10

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) constitute a major class of ligands for L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC). The DHPs have a boat-like, six-membered ring with an NH group at the stern, an aromatic moiety at the bow, and substituents at the port and starboard sides. Various DHPs exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activities, which were previously explained as stabilization or destabilization, respectively, of the closed activation gate by the portside substituents. Here we report a novel structural model in which agonist and antagonist activities are determined by different parts of the DHP molecule and have different mechanisms. In our model, which is based on Monte Carlo minimizations of DHP-LTCC complexes, the DHP moieties at the stern, bow, and starboard form H-bonds with side chains of the key DHP-sensing residues Tyr_IIIS6, Tyr_IVS6, and Gln_IIIS5, respectively. We propose that these H-bonds, which are common for agonists and antagonists, stabilize the LTCC conformation with the open activation gate. This explains why both agonists and antagonists increase probability of the long lasting channel openings and why even partial disruption of the contacts eliminates the agonistic action. In our model, the portside approaches the selectivity filter. Hydrophobic portside of antagonists may induce long lasting channel closings by destabilizing Ca(2+) binding to the selectivity filter glutamates. Agonists have either hydrophilic substituents or a hydrogen atom at their portside, and thus lack this destabilizing effect. The predicted orientation of the DHP core allows accommodation of long substituents in the domain interface or in the inner pore. Our model may be useful for developing novel clinically relevant LTCC blockers.

  15. Structural Model for Dihydropyridine Binding to L-type Calcium Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B.; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2009-01-01

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) constitute a major class of ligands for L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC). The DHPs have a boat-like, six-membered ring with an NH group at the stern, an aromatic moiety at the bow, and substituents at the port and starboard sides. Various DHPs exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activities, which were previously explained as stabilization or destabilization, respectively, of the closed activation gate by the portside substituents. Here we report a novel structural model in which agonist and antagonist activities are determined by different parts of the DHP molecule and have different mechanisms. In our model, which is based on Monte Carlo minimizations of DHP-LTCC complexes, the DHP moieties at the stern, bow, and starboard form H-bonds with side chains of the key DHP-sensing residues Tyr_IIIS6, Tyr_IVS6, and Gln_IIIS5, respectively. We propose that these H-bonds, which are common for agonists and antagonists, stabilize the LTCC conformation with the open activation gate. This explains why both agonists and antagonists increase probability of the long lasting channel openings and why even partial disruption of the contacts eliminates the agonistic action. In our model, the portside approaches the selectivity filter. Hydrophobic portside of antagonists may induce long lasting channel closings by destabilizing Ca2+ binding to the selectivity filter glutamates. Agonists have either hydrophilic substituents or a hydrogen atom at their portside, and thus lack this destabilizing effect. The predicted orientation of the DHP core allows accommodation of long substituents in the domain interface or in the inner pore. Our model may be useful for developing novel clinically relevant LTCC blockers. PMID:19416978

  16. Subdivisions of the auditory midbrain (n. mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis in zebra finches using calcium-binding protein immunocytochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Logerot

    Full Text Available The midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd is thought to be the avian homologue of the central nucleus of the mammalian inferior colliculus. As such, it is a major relay in the ascending auditory pathway of all birds and in songbirds mediates the auditory feedback necessary for the learning and maintenance of song. To clarify the organization of MLd, we applied three calcium binding protein antibodies to tissue sections from the brains of adult male and female zebra finches. The staining patterns resulting from the application of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin antibodies differed from each other and in different parts of the nucleus. Parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the whole nucleus, as defined by the totality of the terminations of brainstem auditory afferents; in other words parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity defines the boundaries of MLd. Staining patterns of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin defined two regions of MLd: inner (MLd.I and outer (MLd.O. MLd.O largely surrounds MLd.I and is distinct from the surrounding intercollicular nucleus. Unlike the case in some non-songbirds, however, the two MLd regions do not correspond to the terminal zones of the projections of the brainstem auditory nuclei angularis and laminaris, which have been found to overlap substantially throughout the nucleus in zebra finches.

  17. Assessment of the relationship between the molecular properties of calcium channel blockers and plasma protein binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odović Jadranka V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the relationship between the calcium channel blockers (CCBs, amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, nicardipine, nifedipine, nimodipine, nisoldipine, verapamil and diltiazem, and their calculated molecular descriptors: polar surface area (PSA, molecular weight (Mw, volume value (Vol, aqueous solubility data (logS, lipophilicity (logP, acidity (pKa values and plasma protein binding (PPB data, obtained from relevant literature. The relationships between the computed molecular properties of selected CCBs and their PPB data were investigated by simple linear regression analysis that revealed very low correlations (R2<0.35. When multiple linear regression (MLR analysis was applied to investigate reliable correlations between the CCBs’ calculated molecular descriptors and PPB data, the best correlations were found for the relationships between CCBs, and PPB data and lipophilicity, and with application of the molecular descriptor (Mw, Vol, or pKa data as additional independent variables (R2=0.623; R2=0.741; R2=0.657, respectively, with an acceptable probability value (P<0.05, confirming that lipophilicity, together with other molecular properties, are essential for the drugs’ PPB. We conclude that this could be considered as an additional in vitro approach for modeling CCBs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR34031

  18. GsCML27, a Gene Encoding a Calcium-Binding Ef-Hand Protein from Glycine soja, Plays Differential Roles in Plant Responses to Bicarbonate, Salt and Osmotic Stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chen

    Full Text Available Calcium, as the most widely accepted messenger, plays an important role in plant stress responses through calcium-dependent signaling pathways. The calmodulin-like family genes (CMLs encode Ca2+ sensors and function in signaling transduction in response to environmental stimuli. However, until now, the function of plant CML proteins, especially soybean CMLs, is largely unknown. Here, we isolated a Glycine soja CML protein GsCML27, with four conserved EF-hands domains, and identified it as a calcium-binding protein through far-UV CD spectroscopy. We further found that expression of GsCML27 was induced by bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GsCML27 in Arabidopsis enhanced plant tolerance to bicarbonate stress, but decreased the salt and osmotic tolerance during the seed germination and early growth stages. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of GsCML27 decreases salt tolerance through modifying both the cellular ionic (Na+, K+ content and the osmotic stress regulation. GsCML27 ectopic expression also decreased the expression levels of osmotic stress-responsive genes. Moreover, we also showed that GsCML27 localized in the whole cell, including cytoplasm, plasma membrane and nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts and onion epidermal cells, and displayed high expression in roots and embryos. Together, these data present evidence that GsCML27 as a Ca2+-binding EF-hand protein plays a role in plant responses to bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses.

  19. GsCML27, a Gene Encoding a Calcium-Binding Ef-Hand Protein from Glycine soja, Plays Differential Roles in Plant Responses to Bicarbonate, Salt and Osmotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Dan; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Liu, Ailin; Jia, Bowei; Xiao, Jialei; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, as the most widely accepted messenger, plays an important role in plant stress responses through calcium-dependent signaling pathways. The calmodulin-like family genes (CMLs) encode Ca2+ sensors and function in signaling transduction in response to environmental stimuli. However, until now, the function of plant CML proteins, especially soybean CMLs, is largely unknown. Here, we isolated a Glycine soja CML protein GsCML27, with four conserved EF-hands domains, and identified it as a calcium-binding protein through far-UV CD spectroscopy. We further found that expression of GsCML27 was induced by bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GsCML27 in Arabidopsis enhanced plant tolerance to bicarbonate stress, but decreased the salt and osmotic tolerance during the seed germination and early growth stages. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of GsCML27 decreases salt tolerance through modifying both the cellular ionic (Na+, K+) content and the osmotic stress regulation. GsCML27 ectopic expression also decreased the expression levels of osmotic stress-responsive genes. Moreover, we also showed that GsCML27 localized in the whole cell, including cytoplasm, plasma membrane and nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts and onion epidermal cells, and displayed high expression in roots and embryos. Together, these data present evidence that GsCML27 as a Ca2+-binding EF-hand protein plays a role in plant responses to bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses.

  20. Phosphorylation of SOS3-LIKE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN8 by SOS2 protein kinase stabilizes their protein complex and regulates salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huixin; Yang, Yongqing; Quan, Ruidang; Mendoza, Imelda; Wu, Yisheng; Du, Wenming; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Schumaker, Karen S; Pardo, José M; Guo, Yan

    2009-05-01

    The Salt Overly Sensitive (SOS) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of Na+/K+ ion homeostasis and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Previously, we reported that the calcium binding proteins SOS3 and SOS3-LIKE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN8 (SCaBP8) nonredundantly activate the protein kinase SOS2. Here, we show that SOS2 phosphorylates SCaBP8 at its C terminus but does not phosphorylate SOS3. In vitro, SOS2 phosphorylation of SCaBP8 was enhanced by the bimolecular interaction of SOS2 and SCaBP8 and did not require calcium ions. In vivo, this phosphorylation was induced by salt stress, occurred at the membrane, stabilized the SCaBP8-SOS2 interaction, and enhanced plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchange activity. When a Ser at position 237 in the SCaBP8 protein (the SOS2 phosphorylation target) was mutated to Ala, SCaBP8 was no longer phosphorylated by SOS2 and the mutant protein could not fully rescue the salt-sensitive phenotype of the scabp8 mutant. By contrast, when Ser-237 was mutated to Asp to mimic the charge of a phosphorylated Ser residue, the mutant protein rescued the scabp8 salt sensitivity. These data demonstrate that calcium sensor phosphorylation is a critical component of SOS pathway regulation of salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  1. The Calmodulin-like calcium binding protein EhCaBP3 of Entamoeba histolytica regulates phagocytosis and is involved in actin dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Aslam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is required for proliferation and pathogenesis of Entamoeba histolytica and erythrophagocytosis is considered to be a marker of invasive amoebiasis. Ca²⁺ has been found to play a central role in the process of phagocytosis. However, the molecular mechanisms and the signalling mediated by Ca²⁺ still remain largely unknown. Here we show that Calmodulin-like calcium binding protein EhCaBP3 of E. histolytica is directly involved in disease pathomechanism by its capacity to participate in cytoskeleton dynamics and scission machinery during erythrophagocytosis. Using imaging techniques EhCaBP3 was found in phagocytic cups and newly formed phagosomes along with actin and myosin IB. In vitro studies confirmed that EhCaBP3 directly binds actin, and affected both its polymerization and bundling activity. Moreover, it also binds myosin 1B in the presence of Ca²⁺. In cells where EhCaBP3 expression was down regulated by antisense RNA, the level of RBC uptake was reduced, myosin IB was found to be absent at the site of pseudopod cup closure and the time taken for phagocytosis increased, suggesting that EhCaBP3 along with myosin 1B mediate the closure of phagocytic cups. Experiments with EhCaBP3 mutant defective in Ca²⁺-binding showed that Ca²⁺ binding is required for phagosome formation. Liposome binding assay revealed that EhCaBP3 recruitment and enrichment to membrane is independent of any cellular protein as it binds directly to phosphatidylserine. Taken together, our results suggest a novel pathway mediating phagocytosis in E. histolytica, and an unusual mechanism of modulation of cytoskeleton dynamics by two calcium binding proteins, EhCaBP1 and EhCaBP3 with mostly non-overlapping functions.

  2. The toposome, essential for sea urchin cell adhesion and development, is a modified iron-less calcium-binding transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Hans; Alcedo, Joy; Daube, Michael; Frei, Erich; Schiltz, Emile; Hunt, John; Humphries, Tom; Matranga, Valeria; Hochstrasser, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Lee, Hookeun; Noll, Markus

    2007-10-01

    We describe the structure and function of the toposome, a modified calcium-binding, iron-less transferrin, the first member of a new class of cell adhesion proteins. In addition to the amino acid sequence of the precursor, we determined by Edman degradation the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the mature hexameric glycoprotein present in the egg as well as that of its derived proteolytically modified fragments necessary for development beyond the blastula stage. The approximate C-termini of the fragments were determined by a combination of mass spectrometry and migration in reducing gels before and after deglycosylation. This new member of the transferrin family shows special features which explain its evolutionary adaptation to development and adhesive function in sea urchin embryos: (i) a protease-inhibiting WAP domain, (ii) a 280 amino acid cysteine-less insertion in the C-terminal lobe, and (iii) a 240 residue C-terminal extension with a modified cystine knot motif found in multisubunit external cell surface glycoproteins. Proteolytic removal of the N-terminal WAP domain generates the mature toposome present in the oocyte. The modified cystine knot motif stabilizes cell-bound trimers upon Ca-dependent dissociation of hexamer-linked cells. We determined the positions of the developmentally regulated cuts in the cysteine-less insertion, which produce the fragments observed previously. These fragments remain bound to the hexameric 22S particle in vivo and are released only after treatment of the purified toposome with reducing agents. In addition, some soluble smaller fragments with possible signal function are produced. Sequence comparison of five sea urchin species reveals the location of the cell-cell contact site targeted by the species-specific embryo dissociating antibodies. The evolutionary tree of 2-, 1-, and 0-ferric transferrins implies their evolution from a basic cation-activated allosteric design modified to serve multiple functions.

  3. Calcium binding proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perm︠i︡akov, E. A; Kretsinger, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    .... It summarizes ongoing research and presents general hypotheses that help to focus future research, and also provides a conceptual framework and a description of the underlying techniques that permits someone entering the field to become conversant."--Provided by publisher.

  4. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P2 preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P 2 preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine

  5. Nacre calcification in the freshwater mussel Unio pictorum: carbonic anhydrase activity and purification of a 95 kDa calcium-binding glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Benjamin; Luquet, Gilles; Bédouet, Laurent; Milet, Christian; Guichard, Nathalie; Medakovic, Davorin; Marin, Frédéric

    2008-10-13

    The formation of the molluscan shell is finely tuned by macromolecules of the shell organic matrix. Previous results have shown that the acid-soluble fraction of the nacre matrix of the freshwater paleoheterodont bivalve Unio pictorum shell displays a number of remarkable properties, such as calcium-binding activity, the presence of extensive glycosylations and the capacity to interfere at low concentration with in vitro calcium carbonate precipitation. Here we have found that the nacre-soluble matrix exhibits a carbonic anhydrase activity, an important function in calcification processes. This matrix is composed of three main proteinaceous discrete fractions. The one with the highest apparent molecular weight is a 95 kDa glycoprotein that is specific to the nacreous layer. P95, as it is provisionally named, is enriched in Gly, Glx and Asx and exhibits an apparent pI value of approximately 4, or approximately 7 when chemically deglycosylated. Furthermore, its glycosyl moiety, consisting of sulfated polysaccharides, is involved in calcium binding. Purified fractions of the three main proteins were digested with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were analysed by mass spectrometry. Our results suggest that identical peptides are constitutive domains of the different proteins. Partial primary structures were obtained by de novo sequencing and compared with known sequences from other mollusc shell proteins. Our results are discussed from an evolutionary viewpoint.

  6. The plasminogen binding site of the C-type lectin tetranectin is located in the carbohydrate recognition domain, and binding is sensitive to both calcium and lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Lorentsen, R H; Jacobsen, C

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin, a homotrimeric protein belonging to the family of C-type lectins and structurally highly related to corresponding regions of the mannose-binding proteins, is known specifically to bind the plasminogen kringle 4 protein domain, an interaction sensitive to lysine. Surface plasmon...

  7. A computational method for designing diverse linear epitopes including citrullinated peptides with desired binding affinities to intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Rob; Norel, Raquel; Prill, Robert J; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lorenz, Peter; Steinbeck, Felix; Ziems, Bjoern; Luštrek, Mitja; Barbarini, Nicola; Tiengo, Alessandra; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-04-08

    Understanding the interactions between antibodies and the linear epitopes that they recognize is an important task in the study of immunological diseases. We present a novel computational method for the design of linear epitopes of specified binding affinity to Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIg). We show that the method, called Pythia-design can accurately design peptides with both high-binding affinity and low binding affinity to IVIg. To show this, we experimentally constructed and tested the computationally constructed designs. We further show experimentally that these designed peptides are more accurate that those produced by a recent method for the same task. Pythia-design is based on combining random walks with an ensemble of probabilistic support vector machines (SVM) classifiers, and we show that it produces a diverse set of designed peptides, an important property to develop robust sets of candidates for construction. We show that by combining Pythia-design and the method of (PloS ONE 6(8):23616, 2011), we are able to produce an even more accurate collection of designed peptides. Analysis of the experimental validation of Pythia-design peptides indicates that binding of IVIg is favored by epitopes that contain trypthophan and cysteine. Our method, Pythia-design, is able to generate a diverse set of binding and non-binding peptides, and its designs have been experimentally shown to be accurate.

  8. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  9. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Fibrillin binds calcium and is coded by cDNAs that reveal a multidomain structure and alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C.; Charbonneau, N.L.; Sakai, L.Y. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States)); Dietz, H.C. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Fibrillin is an important structural protein of the extracellular matrix. It is a large cysteine-rich glycoprotein with extensive intrachain disulfide bonds, likely contributed by multiple EGF-like repeats. The authors have previously published 6.9 kb of FBN1 cDNA sequence. FBN1 cDNA clones that extend the sequence 3089 bp in the 5[prime] direction are described in this report. The deduced primary structure suggests that fibrillin in composed of multiple domains. The most predominant features the presence of 43 calcium binding EGF-like repeats. They demonstrate here that fibrillin molecules bind calcium. In addition, three alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end are described. Analysis of 5.8 kb of surrounding genomic sequence revealed a 1.8-kb CpG island spanning the alternatively spliced exons and the next downstream exon. Since FBN1 is the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, the information presented here will be useful in identifying new mutations and in understanding the function of fibrillin in the pathogenesis of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase-producing neurons in the human cerebral cortex do not colocalize with calcium-binding proteins or the serotonin 3A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Stephen E; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Beyerle, Eric R; Fleming-Beattie, Julia C; Hawkins, Sarah M; McKernan, Courtney M; Rauh, Nicholas A

    2016-12-01

    Interneurons of the cerebral cortex play a significant role in cortical information processing and are of clinical interest due to their involvement in neurological disorders. In the human neocortex, three subsets of interneurons can be identified based on the production of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calretinin or calbindin. A subset of interneurons in the mouse cortex expresses the serotonin 3A receptor (5-HT 3A R). Previous work in humans has also demonstrated the presence of a subgroup of cortical neurons that produces the catecholaminergic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Many TH-producing cells in the rat cortex coexpress calretinin and are adjacent to blood vessels. However, little is known about the phenotype of these TH interneurons in humans. Here we immunohistochemically examined the coexpression of TH with parvalbumin, calretinin, calbindin or 5-HT 3A R in human Brodmann's areas 10 and 24, cortical regions with high densities of TH-containing neurons. Colocalization of TH with these calcium-binding proteins and with 5-HT 3A R was not detected in either area. Cortical TH cells were rarely apposed to blood vessels, denoted by immunolabeling for the gliovascular marker aquaporin-4. Our results suggest that the TH-immunoreactive cells in the human cortex do not overlap with any known neurochemically-defined subsets of interneurons and provide further evidence of differences in the phenotype of these cells across species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuronal calcium-binding proteins 1/2 localize to dorsal root ganglia and excitatory spinal neurons and are regulated by nerve injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ming Dong; Tortoriello, Giuseppe; Hsueh, Brian

    2014-01-01

    /2 neurons are much more abundant in DRGs than the Ca2+-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and secretagogin) studied to date. In the spinal cord, the NECAB1/2 distribution is mainly complementary. NECAB1 labels interneurons and a plexus of processes in superficial layers of the dorsal horn......Neuronal calcium (Ca2+)-binding proteins 1 and 2 (NECAB1/2) are members of the phylogenetically conserved EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein superfamily. To date, NECABs have been explored only to a limited extent and, so far, not at all at the spinal level. Here, we describe the distribution, phenotype....... In the dorsal horn, most NECAB1/2 neurons are glutamatergic. Both NECAB1/2 are transported into dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerve injury reduces NECAB2, but not NECAB1, expression in DRG neurons. Our study identifies NECAB1/2 as abundant Ca2+-binding proteins in pain-related DRG neurons...

  13. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of the pentraxin serum amyloid P component to glycosaminoglycans and amyloid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, B; Sørensen, I J; Nybo, Mads

    1997-01-01

    and beta2M) by ELISA. An increase in the dose-dependent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, AA-protein and beta2M was observed as the pH decreased from 8.0 to 5.0. Furthermore, a lower, but significant Ca2(+)-independent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, AA protein and the amyloid...... precursor protein beta2M was observed. This binding was also enhanced at slightly acid pH, most pronounced at pH 5.0. The results of this study indicate that SAP can exhibit both Ca2(+)-dependent and -independent binding to ligands involved in amyloid fibril formation and that the binding is enhanced under...

  14. Membrane binding of the neuronal calcium sensor recoverin – modulatory role of the charged carboxy-terminus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippov Pavel P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ca2+-binding protein recoverin operates as a Ca2+-sensor in vertebrate photoreceptor cells. It undergoes a so-called Ca2+-myristoyl switch when cytoplasmic Ca2+-concentrations fluctuate in the cell. Its covalently attached myristoyl-group is exposed at high Ca2+-concentrations and enables recoverin to associate with lipid bilayers and to inhibit its target rhodopsin kinase. At low Ca2+-concentrations the myristoyl group is inserted into a hydrophobic pocket of recoverin thereby relieving inhibitory constraint on rhodopsin kinase. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions of recoverin with membranes have not been clearly determined, in particular the function of the positively charged carboxy-terminus in recoverin 191QKVKEKLKEKKL202 in this context is poorly understood. Results Binding of myristoylated recoverin to lipid bilayer depends on the charge distribution in phospholipids. Binding was tested by equilibrium centrifugation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR assays. It is enhanced to a certain degree by the inclusion of phosphatidylserine (up to 60% in the lipid mixture. However, a recoverin mutant that lacked the charged carboxy-terminus displayed the same relative binding amplitudes as wildtype (WT recoverin when bound to neutral or acidic lipids. Instead, the charged carboxy-terminus of recoverin has a significant impact on the biphasic dissociation of recoverin from membranes. On the other hand, the nonmyristoylated WT and truncated mutant form of recoverin did not bind to lipid bilayers to a substantial amount as binding amplitudes observed in SPR measurements are similar to bulk refractive index changes. Conclusion Our data indicate a small, but evident electrostatic contribution to the overall binding energy of recoverin association with lipid bilayer. Properties of the charged carboxy-terminus are consistent with a role of this region as an internal effector region that prolongs the time recoverin stays on

  15. Glycosaminoglycans are interactants of Langerin: comparison with gp120 highlights an unexpected calcium-independent binding mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chabrol

    Full Text Available Langerin is a C-type lectin specifically expressed in Langerhans cells. As recently shown for HIV, Langerin is thought to capture pathogens and mediate their internalisation into Birbeck Granules for elimination. However, the precise functions of Langerin remain elusive, mostly because of the lack of information on its binding properties and physiological ligands. Based on recent reports that Langerin binds to sulfated sugars, we conducted here a comparative analysis of Langerin interaction with mannose-rich HIV glycoprotein gp120 and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs, a family of sulfated polysaccharides expressed at the surface of most mammalian cells. Our results first revealed that Langerin bound to these different glycans through very distinct mechanisms and led to the identification of a novel, GAG-specific binding mode within Langerin. In contrast to the canonical lectin domain, this new binding site showed no Ca(2+-dependency, and could only be detected in entire, trimeric extracellular domains of Langerin. Interestingly binding to GAGs, did not simply rely on a net charge effect, but rather on more discrete saccharide features, such as 6-O-sulfation, or iduronic acid content. Using molecular modelling simulations, we proposed a model of Langerin/heparin complex, which located the GAG binding site at the interface of two of the three Carbohydrate-recognition domains of the protein, at the edge of the a-helix coiled-coil. To our knowledge, the binding properties that we have highlighted here for Langerin, have never been reported for C-type lectins before. These findings provide new insights towards the understanding of Langerin biological functions.

  16. Deciphering ligand specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum family 35 carbohydrate binding module (CtCBM35 for gluco- and galacto- substituted mannans and its calcium induced stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabinda Ghosh

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35 in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+ vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC. Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displaying significant association with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 14.3×10(4 M(-1, carob galactomannan (Ka = 12.4×10(4 M(-1 and negligible association (Ka = 12 µM(-1 with insoluble mannan. Binding of CtCBM35 with polysaccharides which was calcium dependent exhibited two fold higher association in presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ion with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 41×10(4 M(-1 and carob galactomannan (Ka = 30×10(4 M(-1. The polysaccharide binding was further investigated by fluorescence spectrophotometric studies. On binding with carob galactomannan and konjac glucomannan the conformation of CtCBM35 changed significantly with regular 21 nm peak shifts towards lower quantum yield. The degree of association (K a with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan, 14.3×10(4 M(-1 and 11.4×10(4 M(-1, respectively, corroborated the findings from affinity electrophoresis. The association of CtCBM35with konjac glucomannan led to higher free energy of binding (ΔG -25 kJ mole(-1 as compared to carob galactomannan (ΔG -22 kJ mole(-1. On binding CtCBM35 with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan the hydrodynamic radius (RH as analysed by dynamic light scattering (DLS study, increased to 8 nm and 6 nm, respectively, from 4.25 nm in absence of ligand. The presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ions imparted stiffer orientation of CtCBM35 particles with increased RH of 4.52 nm. Due to such stiffer orientation CtCBM35 became more thermostable and its melting temperature was

  17. Bioinformatic analysis and molecular modelling of human ameloblastin suggest a two-domain intrinsically unstructured calcium-binding protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymětal, Jiří; Slabý, I.; Spahr, A.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Lyngstadaas, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 2 (2008), s. 124-134 ISSN 0909-8836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR GA203/06/1727; GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:EU(XE) QLK3-CT-2001-00090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ameloblastin * bioinformatic modelling * calcium * intrinsically unstructured protein Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2008

  18. Integrin binding and MAPK signal pathways in primary cell responses to surface chemistry of calcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2013-09-01

    Cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation on different materials depend largely on the surface properties of the materials. This study sheds light on the mechanism by which the modulation of the chemical composition of calcium silicate cements with different Si/Ca molar ratios could produce different cell responses. Two primary cell types (human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human dental pulp cells (hDPCs)) were used to elicit the changes in total DNA content, integrin subunit levels, phosphor-focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) levels, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway activity at the cell attachment stage. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting collagen type I (COL I) and fibronectin (FN) was also evaluated. The results indicated that increased total DNA content, pFAK and total integrin levels were observed upon an increase in cement Si content. Cements with different Si/Ca ratios did not cause the variations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) ligands. The Si-rich cement facilitated COL I and α2β1 subintegrin expression, while Ca-rich cement promoted FN and αvβ3 subintegrin expression. Si component of the calcium silicates stimulated cell adhesion via activation of MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways more effectively than did by Ca component, but it did not affect c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Inhibition of MAPK/ERK and MAPK/p38 signaling pathways in hMSCs and hDPCs significantly attenuated adhesion, proliferation and differentiation as assessed according to total DNA content and alkaline phosphatase activity. hMSCs and hDPCs from the three different donors exhibited a similar preference for cell behaviors. The results of the current study suggest that calcium silicate cements with a higher Si content have the potential to serve as excellent supports for primary cells. Unraveling the

  19. Novel control of cardiac myofilament response to calcium by S-glutahionylation at specific sites of myosin binding protein C

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    Bindiya G Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies demonstrated a relation between glutathionylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C and diastolic dysfunction in a hypertensive mouse model stressed by treatment with salt, deoxycorticosterone acetate, and unilateral nephrectomy. Although these results strongly indicated an important role for S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C as a modifier of myofilament function, indirect effects of other post-translational modifications may have occurred. Moreover, we did not determine the sites of thiol modification by glutathionylation. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro method to mimic the in situ S-glutathionylation of myofilament proteins and determined direct functional effects and sites of oxidative modification employing Western blotting and mass spectrometry. We induced glutathionylation in vitro by treatment of isolated myofibrils and detergent extracted fiber bundles (skinned fibers with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Immuno-blotting results revealed increased glutathionylation with GSSG treatment of a protein band around 140 kDa. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the 140 kDa band as cardiac myosin binding protein C and determined the sites of glutathionylation to be at cysteines 655, 479, and 627. Determination of the relation between Ca2+-activation of myofibrillar acto-myosin ATPase rate demonstrated an increased Ca2+-sensitivity induced by the S-glutathionylation. Force generating skinned fiber bundles also showed an increase in Ca-sensitivity when treated with oxidized glutathione, which was reversed with the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Our data demonstrate that a specific and direct effect of S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C is a significant increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. Our data also provide new insights into the functional significance of oxidative modification of myosin binding protein C and the potential role of domains not previously considered to

  20. A role for calcium in the regulation of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 3 (ABCC3) gene expression in a model of epidermal growth factor-mediated breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Azimi, Iman; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-03-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process implicated in cancer metastasis, is associated with the transcriptional regulation of members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux pumps, and drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent. In this study induction of EMT was shown to result in the transcriptional up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 3 (ABCC3), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, which has a recognized role in multidrug resistance. Buffering of cytosolic free calcium inhibited EGF-mediated ABCC3 increases, indicating a calcium-dependent mode of regulation. Silencing of TRPM7 (an ion channel involved in EMT associated vimentin induction) did not inhibit ABCC3 up-regulation. Silencing of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway components ORAI1 and STIM1 also did not alter ABCC3 induction by EGF. However, the calcium permeable ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1) appears to contribute to the regulation of both basal and EGF-induced ABCC3 mRNA. Improved understanding of the relationship between calcium signaling, EMT and the regulation of genes important in therapeutic resistance may help identify novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcium in plant cells

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    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  2. Trifluoperazine, a Well-Known Antipsychotic, Inhibits Glioblastoma Invasion by Binding to Calmodulin and Disinhibiting Calcium Release Channel IP3R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seokmin; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jung Moo; Moon, Hyo Eun; Jeon, Borami; Choi, Jungil; Yoon, Nal Ae; Paek, Sun Ha; Roh, Eun Joo; Lee, C Justin; Kang, Sang Soo

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling is an important signaling process, implicated in cancer cell proliferation and motility of the deadly glioblastomas that aggressively invade neighboring brain tissue. We have previously demonstrated that caffeine blocks glioblastoma invasion and extends survival by inhibiting Ca 2+ release channel inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP 3 R) subtype 3. Trifluoperazine (TFP) is an FDA-approved antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia. Interestingly, TFP has been recently reported to show a strong anticancer effect on lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and T-cell lymphoma. However, the possible anticancer effect of TFP on glioblastoma has not been tested. Here, we report that TFP potently suppresses proliferation, motility, and invasion of glioblastoma cells in vitro, and tumor growth in in vivo xenograft mouse model. Unlike caffeine, TFP triggers massive and irreversible release of Ca 2+ from intracellular stores by IP 3 R subtype 1 and 2 by directly interacting at the TFP-binding site of a Ca 2+ -binding protein, calmodulin subtype 2 (CaM2). TFP binding to CaM2 causes a dissociation of CaM2 from IP 3 R and subsequent opening of IP 3 R. Compared with the control neural stem cells, various glioblastoma cell lines showed enhanced expression of CaM2 and thus enhanced sensitivity to TFP. On the basis of these findings, we propose TFP as a potential therapeutic drug for glioblastoma by aberrantly and irreversibly increasing Ca 2+ in glioblastoma cells. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 217-27. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Synaptotagmin I regulates patterned spontaneous activity in the developing rat retina via calcium binding to the C2AB domains.

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    Chung-Wei Chiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In neonatal binocular animals, the developing retina displays patterned spontaneous activity termed retinal waves, which are initiated by a single class of interneurons (starburst amacrine cells, SACs that release neurotransmitters. Although SACs are shown to regulate wave dynamics, little is known regarding how altering the proteins involved in neurotransmitter release may affect wave dynamics. Synaptotagmin (Syt family harbors two Ca(2+-binding domains (C2A and C2B which serve as Ca(2+ sensors in neurotransmitter release. However, it remains unclear whether SACs express any specific Syt isoform mediating retinal waves. Moreover, it is unknown how Ca(2+ binding to C2A and C2B of Syt affects wave dynamics. Here, we investigated the expression of Syt I in the neonatal rat retina and examined the roles of C2A and C2B in regulating wave dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunostaining and confocal microscopy showed that Syt I was expressed in neonatal rat SACs and cholinergic synapses, consistent with its potential role as a Ca(2+ sensor mediating retinal waves. By combining a horizontal electroporation strategy with the SAC-specific promoter, we specifically expressed Syt I mutants with weakened Ca(2+-binding ability in C2A or C2B in SACs. Subsequent live Ca(2+ imaging was used to monitor the effects of these molecular perturbations on wave-associated spontaneous Ca(2+ transients. We found that targeted expression of Syt I C2A or C2B mutants in SACs significantly reduced the frequency, duration, and amplitude of wave-associated Ca(2+ transients, suggesting that both C2 domains regulate wave temporal properties. In contrast, these C2 mutants had relatively minor effects on pairwise correlations over distance for wave-associated Ca(2+ transients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through Ca(2+ binding to C2A or C2B, the Ca(2+ sensor Syt I in SACs may regulate patterned spontaneous activity to shape network activity during development

  4. Stimulation of a Cd-binding protein, and inhibition of the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, by zinc or cadmium in organ-cultured embryonic chick duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradino, R.A.; Fullmer, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Embryonic chick duodenum maintained in organ culture responds to 1 α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 in the culture medium by de novo synthesis of a specific calcium-binding protein (CaBP). The addition of Cd 2+ (3-5 x 10 -5 M) or Zn 2+ (10 -5 -10 -4 M) to the medium inhibited CaBP, but stimulated biosynthesis of a Cd-binding protein (CdBP). CdBP in duodenal homogenate supernatants was assessed in two ways: first, by its 109 Cd-binding activity ( 109 CdBA) using a competitive ion exchange procedure; and, second, by the extent of [ 35 S]-cystine incorporation into a specific peak or band after gel filtration or analytical polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, respectively. Regardless of whether cadmium- or zinc-stimulated, the 35 S-labeled CdBP - the only protein significantly labeled under the conditions employed - migrated identically upon gel filtration and electrophoresis, and comigrated with purified chick liver Cd-metallothionein. Neither actinomycin D nor α-amanitin, in concentrations sufficient to severely inhibit CaBP, significantly reduced CdBP production. However, cycloheximide did inhibit either Cd 2+ - or Zn 2+ -stimulated CdBP by about 50% at an inhibitor concentration which abolished CaBP. The inhibitor studies, coupled with the observations of extensive incorporation of [ 35 S]cystine into CdBP, suggest that the metals stimulated biosynthesis by a mechanism operating at the translational level. The organ-cultured duodenum seems well suited for studies of the regulation of CdBP biosynthesis especially since it responds predictably to the steroid hormone, 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 , in the induction of another specific protein, CaBP, at the transcriptional level. The biosynthesis of CaBP thus may serve as a convenient control in studies of CdBP production under various experimental conditions

  5. Calcium binding to beta-2-microglobulin at physiological pH drives the occurrence of conformational changes which cause the protein to precipitate into amorphous forms that subsequently transform into amyloid aggregates.

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    Sukhdeep Kumar

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD varieties. We establish (a that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT, resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis.

  6. Prenatal acoustic stimulation influences neuronal size and the expression of calcium-binding proteins (calbindin D-28K and parvalbumin) in chick hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2006-12-01

    Prenatal auditory enrichment by species-specific sounds and sitar music enhances the expression of immediate early genes, synaptic proteins and calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) as well as modifies the structural components of the brainstem auditory nuclei and auditory imprinting area in chicks. There is also facilitation of postnatal auditory preference of the chicks to maternal calls following both types of sound stimulation indicating prenatal perceptual learning. To examine whether the sound enrichment protocol also affects the areas related to learning and memory, we assessed morphological changes in the hippocampus at post-hatch day 1 of control and prenatally sound-stimulated chicks. Additionally, the proportions of neurons containing calbindin D-28K and parvalbumin immunoreactivity as well as their protein levels were determined. Fertilized eggs of domestic chick were incubated under normal conditions of temperature, humidity, forced draft of air as well as light and dark (12:12h) photoperiods. They were exposed to patterned sounds of species-specific and sitar music at 65 dB for 15 min per hour over a day/night cycle from day 10 of incubation till hatching. The hippocampal volume, neuronal nuclear size and total number of neurons showed a significant increase in the music-stimulated group as compared to the species-specific sound-stimulated and control groups. However, in both the auditory-stimulated groups the protein levels of calbindin and parvalbumin as well as the percentage of the immunopositive neurons were increased. The enhanced proportion of CaBPs in the sound-enriched groups suggests greater Ca(2+) influx, which may influence long-term potentiation and short-term memory.

  7. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  8. Local Chromatin Features Including PU.1 and IKAROS Binding and H3K4 Methylation Shape the Repertoire of Immunoglobulin Kappa Genes Chosen for V(DJ Recombination

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    Louise S. Matheson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available V(DJ recombination is essential for the generation of diverse antigen receptor (AgR repertoires. In B cells, immunoglobulin kappa (Igκ light chain recombination follows immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh recombination. We recently developed the DNA-based VDJ-seq assay for the unbiased quantitation of Igh VH and DH repertoires. Integration of VDJ-seq data with genome-wide datasets revealed that two chromatin states at the recombination signal sequence (RSS of VH genes are highly predictive of recombination in mouse pro-B cells. It is unknown whether local chromatin states contribute to Vκ gene choice during Igκ recombination. Here we adapt VDJ-seq to profile the Igκ VκJκ repertoire and present a comprehensive readout in mouse pre-B cells, revealing highly variable Vκ gene usage. Integration with genome-wide datasets for histone modifications, DNase hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding and germline transcription identified PU.1 binding at the RSS, which was unimportant for Igh, as highly predictive of whether a Vκ gene will recombine or not, suggesting that it plays a binary, all-or-nothing role, priming genes for recombination. Thereafter, the frequency with which these genes recombine was shaped both by the presence and level of enrichment of several other chromatin features, including H3K4 methylation and IKAROS binding. Moreover, in contrast to the Igh locus, the chromatin landscape of the promoter, as well as of the RSS, contributes to Vκ gene recombination. Thus, multiple facets of local chromatin features explain much of the variation in Vκ gene usage. Together, these findings reveal shared and divergent roles for epigenetic features and transcription factors in AgR V(DJ recombination and provide avenues for further investigation of chromatin signatures that may underpin V(DJ-mediated chromosomal translocations.

  9. Labeling by ( sup 3 H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. (Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)). Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that ({sup 3}H)DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels.

  10. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  11. Calcium, An Overview-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercinski, Floyd J

    1989-06-01

    An overview of calcium is presented including introduction, pre-history, chronology of the research recorded in the literature, discussion, summary, recent references, literature cited, acknowledgments, and appendix. Elemental calcium began with the Earth's formation. Calcium was used for utilitarian purposes in B.C. times. In the 12th and 13th centuries A.D., calcium oxide was formed by roasting limestone to form calcium carbonate. A test for calcium was found in the 17th century, and "stones" were observed in humans (see appendix). In the 19th century, calcium was isolated and chemically identified by electrolysis, and later in that century calcium was found to be needed in a physiological solution similar to the ionic content of blood. In the 20th century it was found that, in the absence of calcium, living cells pulled away from one another. Anesthesia was produced by massive injection of magnesium salts into a mammal-conciousness could be restored by the addition of calcium, which neutralized the magnesium. Finally, calcium out of control in necrosis has an invasive action. Calcium antagonists and their mode of action were described in 1986.

  12. Expression of calcium-binding proteins S100A8, S100A9 and S100A12 in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wenzhou; Khampang, Pawjai; Samuels, Tina L; Kerschner, Joseph E; Yan, Ke; Simpson, Pippa

    2017-10-01

    Calgranulins (calcium-binding proteins S100A8, S100A9 and S100A12) are predominant cytoplasmic proteins of neutrophils and produced by various cells, playing multiple functions in innate immunity and the inflammatory process. Although up-regulated expression of S100A8 and S100A9 genes were observed in an animal model of otitis media (OM), their expressions have not been studied in human middle ear epithelial cells in response to the OM pathogen or in patients with recurrent or chronic OM (recurrent OM/RecOM or chronic OM with effusion/COME). Gene expressions were compared between Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP)-infected and non-infected human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs) as well as between chronic OM patients and control patients (CI). Gene expressions were profiled by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). S100 proteins in OM patient and CI middle ear biopsies were detected by immunostaining. S100A8, S100A9 and S100A12 gene expressions were elevated in SP-infected HMEECs in time-dependent manner. S100A8 and S100A9 but not S100A12 gene expression was significantly elevated in the middle ear mucosa of OM patients. S100A8 and S100A9 protein were observed in middle ear mucosa of OM, but not CI patients. Minimal co-localization was observed between S100A8 and S100A9 with neutrophil elastase and cytokeratin in ME sections of OM patients. Elevated S100A8 and S100A9 gene expression in SP-infected HMEECs and in the middle ear mucosa of OM, minor co-localized with neutrophil markers suggests that middle ear epithelial cell secretion of S100A8 and S100A9 may play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent and chronic OM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. S100 calcium binding protein B as a biomarker of delirium duration in the intensive care unit – an exploratory analysis

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    Khan BA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Babar A Khan,1–3 Mark O Farber,1 Noll Campbell,2–5 Anthony Perkins,2,3 Nagendra K Prasad,6 Siu L Hui,1–3 Douglas K Miller,1–3 Enrique Calvo-Ayala,1 John D Buckley,1 Ruxandra Ionescu,1 Anantha Shekhar,1 E Wesley Ely,7,8 Malaz A Boustani1–3 1Indiana University School of Medicine, 2Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 3Regenstrief Institute, Inc., 4Wishard Health Services, Indianapolis, 5Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, 6Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, 7Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 8VA Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center (GRECC, Nashville, TN, USA Background: Currently, there are no valid and reliable biomarkers to identify delirious patients predisposed to longer delirium duration. We investigated the hypothesis that elevated S100 calcium binding protein B (S100β levels will be associated with longer delirium duration in critically ill patients. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was performed in the medical, surgical, and progressive intensive care units (ICUs of a tertiary care, university affiliated, and urban hospital. Sixty-three delirious patients were selected for the analysis, with two samples of S100β collected on days 1 and 8 of enrollment. The main outcome measure was delirium duration. Using the cutoff of <0.1 ng/mL and $0.1 ng/mL as normal and abnormal levels of S100β, respectively, on day 1 and day 8, four exposure groups were created: Group A, normal S100β levels on day 1 and day 8; Group B, normal S100β level on day 1 and abnormal S100β level on day 8; Group C, abnormal S100β level on day 1 and normal on day 8; and Group D, abnormal S100β levels on both day 1 and day 8. Results: Patients with abnormal levels of S100β showed a trend towards higher delirium duration (P=0.076; Group B (standard deviation (7.0 [3.2] days, Group C (5.5 [6.3] days, and Group D

  14. Participation of the oviductal s100 calcium binding protein G in the genomic effect of estradiol that accelerates oviductal embryo transport in mated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croxatto Horacio B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mating changes the mechanism by which E2 regulates oviductal egg transport, from a non-genomic to a genomic mode. Previously, we found that E2 increased the expression of several genes in the oviduct of mated rats, but not in unmated rats. Among the transcripts that increased its level by E2 only in mated rats was the one coding for an s100 calcium binding protein G (s100 g whose functional role in the oviduct is unknown. Methods Herein, we investigated the participation of s100 g on the E2 genomic effect that accelerates oviductal transport in mated rats. Thus, we determined the effect of E2 on the mRNA and protein level of s100 g in the oviduct of mated and unmated rats. Then, we explored the effect of E2 on egg transport in unmated and mated rats under conditions in which s100 g protein was knockdown in the oviduct by a morpholino oligonucleotide against s100 g (s100 g-MO. In addition, the localization of s100 g in the oviduct of mated and unmated rats following treatment with E2 was also examined. Results Expression of s100 g mRNA progressively increased at 3-24 h after E2 treatment in the oviduct of mated rats while in unmated rats s100 g increased only at 12 and 24 hours. Oviductal s100 g protein increased 6 h following E2 and continued elevated at 12 and 24 h in mated rats, whereas in unmated rats s100 g protein increased at the same time points as its transcript. Administration of a morpholino oligonucleotide against s100 g transcript blocked the effect of E2 on egg transport in mated, but not in unmated rats. Finally, immunoreactivity of s100 g was observed only in epithelial cells of the oviducts of mated and unmated rats and it was unchanged after E2 treatment. Conclusions Mating affects the kinetic of E2-induced expression of s100 g although it not changed the cellular localization of s100 g in the oviduct after E2 . On the other hand, s100 g is a functional component of E2 genomic effect that accelerates egg

  15. Determination of thermodynamic parameters for complexation of calcium and magnesium with chondroitin sulfate isomers using isothermal titration calorimetry: Implications for calcium kidney-stone research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Allen L.; Jackson, Graham E.

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) occurs in human urine. It has several potential binding sites for calcium and as such may play an inhibitory role in calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate (kidney stone disease by reducing the supersaturation (SS) and crystallization of these salts. Urinary magnesium is also a role player in determining speciation in stone forming processes. This study was undertaken to determine the thermodynamic parameters for binding of the disaccharide unit of two different CS isomers with calcium and magnesium. These included the binding constant K. Experiments were performed using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) at 3 different pH levels in the physiological range in human urine. Data showed that interactions between the CS isomers and calcium and magnesium occur via one binding site, thought to be sulfate, and that log K values are 1.17-1.93 and 1.77-1.80 for these two metals respectively. Binding was significantly stronger in Mg-CS than in Ca-CS complexes and was found to be dependent on pH in the latter but not in the former. Furthermore, binding in Ca-CS complexes was dependent on the location of the sulfate binding site. This was not the case in the Mg-CS complexes. Interactions were shown to be entropy driven and enthalpy unfavourable. These findings can be used in computational modeling studies to predict the effects of the calcium and magnesium CS complexes on the speciation of calcium and the SS of calcium salts in real urine samples.

  16. Analysis of the key elements of FFAT-like motifs identifies new proteins that potentially bind VAP on the ER, including two AKAPs and FAPP2.

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    Veronika Mikitova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two phenylalanines (FF in an acidic tract (FFAT-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA-E. Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP. Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bind VAP. Among other proteins that bind VAP, some contain FFAT-like motifs that are missing one or more of the seven elements. Defining how much variation is tolerated in FFAT-like motifs is a preliminary step prior to the identification of the full range of VAP interactors. RESULTS: We used a quantifiable in vivo system that measured ER targeting in a reporter yeast strain that over-expressed VAP to study the effect of substituting different elements of FFAT-like motifs in turn. By defining FFAT-like motifs more widely than before, we found them in novel proteins the functions of which had not previously been directly linked to the ER, including: two PKA anchoring proteins, AKAP220 and AKAP110; a family of plant LTPs; and the glycolipid LTP phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor-protein-2 (FAPP-2. CONCLUSION: All of the seven essential elements of a FFAT motif tolerate variation, and weak targeting to the ER via VAP is still detected if two elements are substituted. In addition to the strong FFAT motifs already known, there are additional proteins with weaker FFAT-like motifs, which might be functionally important VAP interactors.

  17. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  18. Metal binding by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning

    For calcium binding: Electrochemical method (calcium ion selective electrode) combined with quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) were used to investigate the calcium binding affinity of the amino acids and small glycine peptides. The effects of the ionic strength and p......, synergistic effect in calcium binding was found for the small glycine peptide rather than amino acids mixtures with the enhanced driving force up to -6 kJ/mol. Such study provides useful information for the future development of calcium supplements. For zinc binding: Isothermal titration calorimetry...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  19. Brain calbindin-D28k and an Mr 29,000 calcium binding protein in cerebellum are different but related proteins: Evidence obtained from sequence analysis by tandem mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielides, C.; Christakos, S.; McCormack, A.L.; Hunt, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    A calcium binding protein of M r 29,000 which cross-reacts with antibodies raised against chick calbindin-D 28k was previously reported to be present in rat cerebellum. It was suggested that the M r 29,000 protein represents another form of calbindin-D 28k . In the authors laboratory they were able to identify M r 28,000 and 29,000 proteins in rat, human, and chick cerebellum by their ability to bind 45 Ca in a 45 Ca blot assay. Two calcium binding proteins of M r 27,680 and 29,450 were isolated from rat cerebelli by the use of gel permeation chromatography and preparative gel electrophoresis. After reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) the proteins were sequenced. Sequence analysis by tandem mass spectrometry indicated only 52% identity between the rat cerebellar M r 28,000 and 29,000 proteins. Thus they are not different forms of the same protein, as previously suggested. Eighty-nine percent identity was observed between the rate cerebellar M r 29,000 protein and chick calretinin. The difference in identity between the rat cerebellar M r 29,000 protein and chick calretinin may be due to species differences, and thus this protein is most likely rat calretinin. These results suggest either posttranscriptional regulation of calretinin in cerebellum or species differences. The study also suggests that previous immunocytochemical mapping for calbindin using antisera which cross-reacted with both proteins detected brain regions that expressed not only calbindin but also calretinin or a calretinin-like protein

  20. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  1. Sensitivity of docetaxel-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells to microtubule-destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and colchicine-site binding agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Wang

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for disease recurrence in the curative breast cancer treatment setting is the development of drug resistance. Microtubule targeted agents (MTAs are among the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of breaset cancer and therefore overcoming taxane resistance is of primary clinical importance. Our group has previously demonstrated that the microtubule dynamics of docetaxel-resistant MCF-7TXT cells are insensitivity to docetaxel due to the distinct expression profiles of β-tubulin isotypes in addition to the high expression of p-glycoprotein (ABCB1. In the present investigation we examined whether taxane-resistant breast cancer cells are more sensitive to microtubule destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and colchicine-site binding agents (CSBAs than the non-resistant cells.Two isogenic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were selected for resistance to docetaxel (MCF-7TXT and the wild type parental cell line (MCF-7CC to examine if taxane-resistant breast cancer cells are sensitive to microtubule-destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and CSBAs. Cytotoxicity assays, immunoblotting, indirect immunofluorescence and live imaging were used to study drug resistance, apoptosis, mitotic arrest, microtubule formation, and microtubule dynamics.MCF-7TXT cells were demonstrated to be cross resistant to vinca alkaloids, but were more sensitive to treatment with colchicine compared to parental non-resistant MCF-7CC cells. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that the IC50 of MCF-7TXT cell to vinorelbine and vinblastine was more than 6 and 3 times higher, respectively, than that of MCF-7CC cells. By contrast, the IC50 of MCF-7TXT cell for colchincine was 4 times lower than that of MCF-7CC cells. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that all MTAs induced the disorganization of microtubules and the chromatin morphology and interestingly each with a unique pattern. In terms of microtubule and chromain morphology, MCF-7TXT cells were

  2. Functional SNP in the microRNA-367 binding site in the 3'UTR of the calcium channel ryanodine receptor gene 3 (RYR3) affects breast cancer risk and calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; Liu, Yuexin; Song, Fengju; Zheng, Hong; Hu, Limei; Lu, Hong; Liu, Peifang; Hao, Xishan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kexin

    2011-08-16

    We have evaluated and provided evidence that the ryanodine receptor 3 gene (RYR3), which encodes a large protein that forms a calcium channel, is important for the growth, morphology, and migration of breast cancer cells. A putative binding site for microRNA-367 (miR-367) exists in the 3'UTR of RYR3, and a genetic variant, rs1044129 A→G, is present in this binding region. We confirmed that miR-367 regulates the expression of a reporter gene driven by the RYR3 3'UTR and that the regulation was affected by the RYR3 genotype. A thermodynamic model based on base pairing and the secondary structure of the RYR3 mRNA and miR-367 miRNA showed that miR-367 had a higher binding affinity for the A genotype than for the G genotype. The rs1044129 SNP was genotyped in 1,532 breast cancer cases and 1,600 healthy Chinese women. The results showed that compared with the AA genotype, G was a risk genotype for breast cancer development and was also associated with breast cancer calcification and poor survival. Thus, rs1044129 is a unique SNP that resides in a miRNA-gene regulatory loop that affects breast cancer risk, calcification, and survival.

  3. Absence of the calcium-binding protein calretinin, not of calbindin D-28k, causes a permanent impairment of murine adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran eTodkar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Calretinin (CR and calbindin D-28k (CB are cytosolic EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins and function as Ca2+ buffers affecting the spatiotemporal aspects of Ca2+ transients and possibly also as Ca2+ sensors modulating signaling cascades. In the adult hippocampal circuitry, CR and CB are expressed in specific principal neurons and subsets of interneurons. In addition, CR is transiently expressed within the neurogenic dentate gyrus (DG niche. CR and CB expression during adult neurogenesis mark critical transition stages, onset of differentiation for CR and the switch to adult-like connectivity for CB. Absence of either protein during these stages in null-mutant mice may have functional consequences and contribute to some aspects of the identified phenotypes. We report the impact of CR- and CB-deficiency on the proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells within the subgranular zone (SGZ neurogenic niche of the DG. Effects were evaluated I 2 and 4 weeks postnatally, during the transition period of the proliferative matrix to the adult state, and II in adult animals (3 months to trace possible permanent changes in adult neurogenesis. The absence of CB from differentiated DG granule cells has no retrograde effect on the proliferative activity of progenitor cells, nor affects survival or migration/differentiation of newborn neurons in the adult DG including the SGZ. On the contrary, lack of CR from immature early postmitotic granule cells causes an early loss in proliferative capacity of the SGZ that is maintained into adult age, when it has a further impact on the migration/survival of newborn granule cells. The transient CR expression at the onset of adult neurogenesis differentiation may thus have two functions: I to serve as a self-maintenance signal for the pool of cells at the same stage of neurogenesis contributing to their survival/differentiation, and II it may contribute to retrograde signaling required for maintenance of the progenitor

  4. Design, Synthesis, and in Vitro Pharmacology of New Radiolabeled γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogues Including Photolabile Analogues with Irreversible Binding to the High-Affinity γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabbatini, Paola; Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe

    2010-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a psychotropic compound endogenous to the brain. Despite its potential physiological significance, the complete molecular mechanisms of action remain unexplained. To facilitate the isolation and identification of the high-affinity GHB binding site, we herein report...

  5. Cooperative transcriptional activation of ATP-binding cassette sterol transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 genes by nuclear receptors including Liver-X-Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Sun Back

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 formheterodimers that limit absorption of dietary sterols in theintestine and promote cholesterol elimination from the bodythrough hepatobiliary secretion. To identify cis-regulatoryelements of the two genes, we have cloned and analyzedtwenty-three evolutionary conserved region (ECR fragmentsusing the CMV-luciferase reporter system in HepG2 cells. TwoECRs were found to be responsive to the Liver-X-Receptor (LXR.Through elaborate deletion studies, regions containing putativeLXREs were identified and the binding of LXRα wasdemonstrated by EMSA and ChIP assay. When the LXREs wereinserted upstream of the intergenic promoter, synergisticactivation by LXRα/RXRα in combination with GATA4, HNF4α,and LRH-1, which had been shown to bind to the intergenicregion, was observed. In conclusion, we have identified twoLXREs in ABCG5/ABCG8 genes for the first time and proposethat these LXREs, especially in the ECR20, play major roles inregulating these genes. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(6: 322-327

  6. Mannose-Binding Lectin Binds to Amyloid Protein and Modulates Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykol Larvie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a soluble factor of the innate immune system, is a pattern recognition molecule with a number of known ligands, including viruses, bacteria, and molecules from abnormal self tissues. In addition to its role in immunity, MBL also functions in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. We present evidence here that MBL binds to amyloid β peptides. MBL binding to other known carbohydrate ligands is calcium-dependent and has been attributed to the carbohydrate-recognition domain, a common feature of other C-type lectins. In contrast, we find that the features of MBL binding to Aβ are more similar to the reported binding characteristics of the cysteine-rich domain of the unrelated mannose receptor and therefore may involve the MBL cysteine-rich domain. Differences in MBL ligand binding may contribute to modulation of inflammatory response and may correlate with the function of MBL in processes such as coagulation and tissue homeostasis.

  7. Effects of vanadium on different adenosinetriphosphatases and binding of 3H-labeled ouabain and calcium-45 to rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Osborn, R.L.; Desaiah, D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of vanadium chloride on rat brain synaptosomal adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activities was determined in vitro and in rats treated at 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg for 10 d. Additional experiments were conducted to determine the effect of vanadium chloride on binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 45 Ca to rat brain synaptosomes. Na + + K + - and Ca 2+ -ATPase activities were inhibited significantly in a concentration-dependent manner by V in vitro. Mg 2+ -ATPase inhibition was neither dose-dependent nor significant except at 10 -5 M. Na + + K + -ATPase inhibition by V was more pronounced than that of other ATPases studied. Vanadium inhibited [ 3 H]ouabain binding to synaptosomes by 90% at 10 -3 M; the inhibition was concentration-dependent. Binding of 45 Ca was inhibited 50% at 10 -4 M; but concentration-dependent inhibition was not evident. Rats treated with vanadium chloride neither became myotonic nor showed any changes in ATPase activities or binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 45 Ca to brain synaptosomes. Line-weaver-Burke plots of the in vitro inhibition of Na + + K + -ATPase and [ 3 H]ouabain binding revealed that (1) Na + + K + -ATPase activation by ATP was inhibited by V with an increase in K/sub m/ and a decrease in V/sub max/; (2) Na + activation was inhibited noncompetitively by V, as evidenced by a decrease in V/sub max/ and no change in K/sub m/; (3) K + activation was inhibited by V with a decrease in both V/sub max/ and K/sub m/; (4) noncompetitive inhibition of Mg 2+ -ATPase by V was observed; and (5) the kinetic behavior of [ 3 H]ouabain binding inhibition by V with respect to ATP and Na + activation was mixed and noncompetitive, respectively

  8. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone...... in the renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis....

  9. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  10. Abnormal secretion and function of recombinant human factor VII as the result of modification to a calcium binding site caused by a 15-base pair insertion in the F7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, F; Carew, J A; Perry, D J; Hunault, M; Khanduri, U; Perkins, S J; Mannucci, P M; Bauer, K A

    2001-02-15

    A case of a novel mutation in the F7 gene that results in factor VII coagulant activity (VII:c) of less than 1% and VII antigen (VII:Ag) levels of 10% is presented. DNA analysis revealed a homozygous 15-base pair (bp) in-frame insertion-type mutation at nucleotide 10554. This insertion consisted of a duplication of residues leucine (L)213 to aspartic acid (D)217 (leucine, serine, glutamic acid, histidine, and aspartic acid), probably arising by slipped mispairing between 2 copies of a direct repeat (GCGAGCACGAC) separated by 4 bp. Molecular graphic analyses showed that the insertion is located at the surface of the catalytic domain in an exposed loop stabilized by extensive salt-bridge and hydrogen bond formation at which the calcium binding site is located. The mutation probably interferes with protein folding during VII biosynthesis and/or diminishes functional activity through the loss of calcium binding. In vitro expression studies demonstrated that the levels of VII:Ag in lysates of cells transfected with wild type VII (VIIWT) were equivalent to those with mutant type VII (VIIMT), but the level of secreted VIIMT was 5% to 10% that of VIIWT. Pulse chase studies demonstrated that VIIMT did not accumulate intracellularly, and studies with inhibitors of protein degradation showed that recombinant VIIMT was partially degraded in the pre-Golgi compartment. Accordingly, only small amounts of VIIMT with undetectable procoagulant activity were secreted into conditioned media. These results demonstrate that a combination of secretion and functional defects is the mechanism whereby this insertion causes VII deficiency.

  11. A novel Glycine soja cysteine proteinase inhibitor GsCPI14, interacting with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK, regulated plant tolerance to alkali stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yang, Shanshan; Sun, Mingzhe; Wang, Sunting; Ding, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dan; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Zhao, Chaoyue; Wang, Xuedong; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-05-01

    It has been well demonstrated that cystatins regulated plant stress tolerance through inhibiting the cysteine proteinase activity under environmental stress. However, there was limited information about the role of cystatins in plant alkali stress response, especially in wild soybean. Here, in this study, we focused on the biological characterization of a novel Glycine soja cystatin protein GsCPI14, which interacted with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK and positively regulated plant alkali stress tolerance. The protein-protein interaction between GsCBRLK and GsCPI14 was confirmed by using split-ubiquitin based membrane yeast two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Expression of GsCPI14 was greatly induced by salt, ABA and alkali stress in G. soja, and GsCBRLK overexpression (OX) in Glycine max promoted the stress induction of GmCPI14 expression under stress conditions. Furthermore, we found that GsCPI14-eGFP fusion protein localized in the entire Arabidopsis protoplast and onion epidermal cell, and GsCPI14 showed ubiquitous expression in different tissues of G. soja. In addition, we gave evidence that the GST-GsCPI14 fusion protein inhibited the proteolytic activity of papain in vitro. At last, we demonstrated that OX of GsCPI14 in Arabidopsis promoted the seed germination under alkali stress, as evidenced by higher germination rates. GsCPI14 transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings also displayed better growth performance and physiological index under alkali stress. Taken together, results presented in this study demonstrated that the G. soja cysteine proteinase inhibitor GsCPI14 interacted with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK and regulated plant tolerance to alkali stress.

  12. Posttranslational Control of ALA Synthesis Includes GluTR Degradation by Clp Protease and Stabilization by GluTR-Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Janina; Nishimura, Kenji; Schmied, Judith; Wolf, Anja; Hedtke, Boris; van Wijk, Klaas J; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the first committed substrate of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and is formed from glutamyl-tRNA by two enzymatic steps. Glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) as the first enzyme of ALA synthesis is encoded by HEMA genes and tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Here, we show that the caseinolytic protease (Clp) substrate adaptor ClpS1 and the ClpC1 chaperone as well as the GluTR-binding protein (GBP) interact with the N terminus of GluTR Loss-of function mutants of ClpR2 and ClpC1 proteins show increased GluTR stability, whereas absence of GBP results in decreased GluTR stability. Thus, the Clp protease system and GBP contribute to GluTR accumulation levels, and thereby the rate-limiting ALA synthesis. These findings are supported with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hema1 mutants expressing a truncated GluTR lacking the 29 N-terminal amino acid residues of the mature protein. Accumulation of this truncated GluTR is higher in dark periods, resulting in increased protochlorophyllide content. It is proposed that the proteolytic activity of Clp protease counteracts GBP binding to assure the appropriate content of GluTR and the adequate ALA synthesis for chlorophyll and heme in higher plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Mucins and calcium phosphate precipitates additively stimulate cholesterol crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A. A.; van Buul, J. D.; Tytgat, G. N.; Groen, A. K.; Ostrow, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    Human biliary mucin and calcium binding protein (CBP) influence formation of both calcium salt precipitates and cholesterol crystals and colocalize in the center of cholesterol gallstones. We investigated how physiological concentrations of these proteins regulate cholesterol crystallization in

  14. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement thickening products, and many others) Many hair relaxers and straighteners Slaked lime This list may not include all sources of ...

  15. Calcium channel activity of purified human synexin and structure of the human synexin gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, A.L.; Magendzo, K.; Shirvan, A.; Srivastava, M.; Rojas, E.; Alijani, M.R.; Pollard, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    Synexin is a calcium-dependent membrane binding protein that not only fuses membranes but also acts as a voltage-dependent calcium channel. The authors have isolated and sequenced a set of overlapping cDNA clones for human synexin. The derived amino acid sequence of synexin reveals strong homology in the C-terminal domain with a previously identified class of calcium-dependent membrane binding proteins. These include endonexin II, lipocortin I, calpactin I heavy chain (p36), protein II, and calelectrin 67K. The M r 51,000 synexin molecule can be divided into a unique, highly hydrophobic N-terminal domain of 167 amino acids and a conserved C-terminal region of 299 amino acids. The latter domain is composed of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Analysis of the entire structure reveals possible insights into such diverse properties as voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, ion selectivity, affinity for phospholipids, and membrane fusion

  16. Infrared study of synthetic peptide analogues of the calcium-binding site III of troponin C: The role of helix F of an EF-hand motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Masayuki; Morii, Hisayuki; Tanokura, Masaru

    2013-05-01

    The EF-hand motif (helix-loop-helix) is a Ca(2+)-binding domain that is common among many intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins. We applied Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to study the synthetic peptide analogues of site III of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C (helix E-loop-helix F). The 17-residue peptides corresponding to loop-helix F (DRDADGYIDAEELAEIF), where one residue is substituted by the D-type amino acid, were investigated to disturb the α-helical conformation of helix F systematically. These D-type-substituted peptides showed no band at about 1555 cm(-1) even in the Ca(2+)-loaded state although the native peptide (L-type only) showed a band at about 1555 cm(-1) in the Ca(2+)-loaded state, which is assigned to the side-chain COO(-) group of Glu at the 12th position, serving as the ligand for Ca(2+) in the bidentate coordination mode. Therefore, helix F is vital to the interaction between the Ca(2+) and the side-chain COO(-) group of Glu at the 12th position. Implications of the COO(-) antisymmetric stretch and the amide-I' of the synthetic peptide analogues of the Ca(2+)-binding sites are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Calcium antagonist binding sites in the rat brain: Quantitative autoradiographic mapping using the 1, 4-Dihydropyridines [3H]PN 200-110 and [3H]PY 108-068

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, R.; Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.; Palacios, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    An in vitro autoradiographic technique has been used for the quantitative mapping of calcium antagonist binding sites (CABS) in the rat brain, using the 1, 4-dihydropyridines [ 3 H]PN 200-110 and [ 3 H]PY 108-068 as ligands. CABS were distributed throughout the brain in a highly heterogeneous fashion. The highest densities of CABS were observed in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus and parts of the amygdala. The neocortex was also rich in CABS. The basal ganglia, thalamus and hypothalamus presented intermediate levels of CABS while low densities of sites were seen in areas such as the cerebellum, pons and white matter tracts. The distributions of CABS in brain does not correlate with indexes of brain blood flow, regional glucose utilization or the distributions of receptor binding sites for drugs and neurotransmitters analyzed until now. No correlation exists between CABS distribution and that of any neurotransmitter or brain enzyme described so far. The heterogeneous distributions of CABS is suggestive of a neuronal localization, an idea supported by lesion experiments. (Author)

  18. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  19. Mutations in CIB2, a calcium and integrin binding protein, cause Usher syndrome type 1J and nonsyndromic deafness DFNB48

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazuddin, Saima; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Giese, Arnaud; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Indzhykulian, Artur A.; Nandamuri, Sri Pratima; Yousaf, Rizwan; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Lee, Sue; Terrell, David; Hegde, Rashmi S.; Ali, Rana A.; Anwar, Saima; Andrade-Elizondo, Paula B.; Sirmaci, Asli; Parise, Leslie V.; Basit, Sulman; Wali, Abdul; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Tekin, Mustafa; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Cook, Tiffany; Buschbeck, Elke K.; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Ahmed, Zubair M.

    2012-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is genetically heterogeneous. Here we report that mutations in CIB2, encoding a Ca2+- and integrin-binding protein, are associated with nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB48) and Usher syndrome type 1J (USH1J). There is one mutation of CIB2 that is a prevalent cause of DFNB48 deafness in Pakistan; other CIB2 mutations contribute to deafness elsewhere in the world. In rodents, CIB2 is localized in the mechanosensory stereocilia of inner ear hair cells and in retinal photoreceptor and pigmented epithelium cells. Consistent with molecular modeling predictions of Ca2+ binding, CIB2 significantly decreased the ATP-induced Ca2+ responses in heterologous cells, while DFNB48 mutations altered CIB2 effects on Ca2+ responses. Furthermore, in zebrafish and Drosophila, CIB2 is essential for the function and proper development of hair cells and retinal photoreceptor cells. We show that CIB2 is a new member of the vertebrate Usher interactome. PMID:23023331

  20. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  1. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  2. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  3. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    ), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p...-malignant as well as normal. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate......BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...

  4. In Vitro binding capacity of zeolite A to calcium, phosphorus and magnesium in rumen fluid as influenced by changes in pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing, Trine; Jørgensen, Rolf Jess; Poulsen, H.D.

    2006-01-01

    centrifuged and the supernatant analysed for Ca, P and Mg as indicators of the amount of unbound mineral. The addition of zeolite to rumen fluid solutions reduced the amount of supernatant Ca and Mg at rumen pH, whereas the level of P was not reduced. After adding HCl, a large proportion of the zeolite......An in vitro experiment was designed to mimic the transport of ingested zeolite A in the forestomachs and proximal part of the small intestine so as to evaluate the binding capacity of zeolite A to Ca, P and Mg as influenced by changes in pH. This was done by incubation of rumen fluid solutions...... with and without zeolite, as well as varying the content of Ca and/or P. The pH was lowered by addition of HCl so as to mimic abomasal conditions, followed by subsequent HCO3- addition to mimic small intestinal pH. Rumen fluid samples were taken at strategic time points in the experiment. All samples were...

  5. Proteomic Identification of Annexins, Calcium-Dependent Membrane Binding Proteins That Mediate Osmotic Stress and Abscisic Acid Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sumin; Lee, Eun Jung; Yang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Ae Ran; Song, Won Hyun; Park, Ohkmae K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteomic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root microsomal fraction was performed to identify novel components of salt stress signaling. Among the salt-responsive microsomal proteins, two spots that increased upon salt treatment on a two-dimensional gel were identified as the same protein, designated annexin 1 (AnnAt1). Annexins comprise a multigene family of Ca2+-dependent membrane binding proteins and have been extensively studied in animal cells. AnnAt1 is strongly expressed in root but rarely in flower tissue. In this study, the results suggest that salt stress induces translocation from the cytosol to the membrane and potential turnover of existing protein. This process is blocked by EGTA treatment, implying that AnnAt1 functions in stress response are tightly associated with Ca2+. T-DNA insertion mutants of annAt1 and a different isoform, annAt4, displayed hypersensitivity to osmotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) during germination and early seedling growth. The results collectively suggest that AnnAt1 and AnnAt4 play important roles in osmotic stress and ABA signaling in a Ca2+-dependent manner. PMID:15161963

  6. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  7. Calcium channel blockers in cardiovascular pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfraind, Theophile

    2014-11-01

    This paper summarizes the pharmacological properties of calcium channel blockers (CCBs), their established therapeutic uses for cardiovascular disorders and the current improvement of their clinical effects through drug combinations. Their identification resulted from study of small molecules including coronary dilators, which were named calcium antagonists. Further experiments showed that they reduced contraction of arteries by inhibiting calcium entry and by interacting with binding sites identified on voltage-dependent calcium channels. This led to the denomination calcium channel blockers. In short-term studies, by decreasing total peripheral resistance, CCBs lower arterial pressure. By unloading the heart and increasing coronary blood flow, CCBs improve myocardial oxygenation. In long-term treatment, the decrease in blood pressure is more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive patients. A controversy on the safety of CCBs ended after a large antihypertensive trial (ALLHAT) sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. There are two main types of CCBs: dihydopyridine and non-dihydropyridine; the first type is vascular selective. Dihydropyrines are indicated for hypertension, chronic, stable and vasospastic angina. Non-dihydropyridines have the same indications plus antiarrythmic effects in atrial fibrillation or flutter and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In addition, CCBs reduced newly formed coronary lesions in atherosclerosis. In order to reach recommended blood pressure goals, there is a recent therapeutic move by combination of CCBs with other antihypertensive agents particularly with inhibitors acting at the level of the renin-angiotensin system. They are also combined with statins. Prevention of dementia has been reported in hypertensive patients treated with nitrendipine, opening a way for further studies on CCBs' beneficial effect in cognitive deterioration associated with aging. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  9. Determination of percent calcium carbonate in calcium chromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The precision, accuracy and reliability of the macro-combustion method is superior to the Knorr alkalimetric method, and it is faster. It also significantly reduces the calcium chromate waste accrual problem. The macro-combustion method has been adopted as the official method for determination of percent calcium carbonate in thermal battery grade anhydrous calcium chromate and percent calcium carbonate in quicklime used in the production of calcium chromate. The apparatus and procedure can be used to measure the percent carbonate in inorganic materials other than calcium chromate. With simple modifications in the basic apparatus and procedure, the percent carbon and hydrogen can be measured in many organic material, including polymers and polymeric formulations. 5 figures, 5 tables

  10. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  11. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss ...

  12. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss ...

  13. Dissociation of charge movement from calcium release and calcium current in skeletal myotubes by gabapentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Kris J; García, Jesús

    2002-09-01

    The skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel or dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) plays an integral role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Its activation initiates three sequential events: charge movement (Q(r)), calcium release, and calcium current (I(Ca,L)). This relationship suggests that changes in Q(r) might affect release and I(Ca,L). Here we studied the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on the three events generated by DHPRs in skeletal myotubes in culture. GBP specifically binds to the alpha(2)/delta(1) subunit of the brain and skeletal muscle DHPR. Myotubes were stimulated with a protocol that included a depolarizing prepulse to inactivate voltage-dependent proteins other than DHPRs. Gabapentin (50 microM) significantly increased Q(r) while decreasing the rate of rise of calcium transients. Gabapentin also reduced the maximum amplitude of the I(Ca,L) (as we previously reported) without modifying the kinetics of activation. Exposure of GBP-treated myotubes to 10 microM nifedipine prevented the increase of Q(r) promoted by this drug, indicating that the extra charge recorded originated from DHPRs. Our data suggest that GBP dissociates the functions of the DHPR from the initial voltage-sensing step and implicates a role for the alpha(2)/delta(1) subunit in E-C coupling.

  14. Binding affinity of surface functionalized gold nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ryan D; Roeder, Ryan K

    2011-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications, including drug and gene delivery vehicles, thermal ablation therapy, diagnostic sensors, and imaging contrast agents. Surface functionalization with molecular groups exhibiting calcium affinity can enable targeted delivery of Au NPs to calcified tissue, including damaged bone tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the binding affinity of functionalized Au NPs for targeted delivery to bone mineral, using hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals as a synthetic analog in vitro. Au NPs were synthesized to a mean particle size of 10-15 nm and surface functionalized with either L-glutamic acid, 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid, or alendronate, which exhibit a primary amine for binding gold opposite carboxylate, phosphonate, or bisphosphonate groups, respectively, for targeting calcium. Bisphosphonate functionalized Au NPs exhibited the most rapid binding kinetics and greatest binding affinity to HA, followed by glutamic acid and phosphonic acid. All functional groups reached complete binding after 24 h. Equilibrium binding constants in de-ionized water, determined by nonlinear regression of Langmuir isotherms, were 3.40, 0.69, and 0.25 mg/L for bisphosphonate, carboxylate, and phosphonate functionalized Au NPs, respectively. Functionalized Au NPs exhibited lower overall binding in fetal bovine serum compared to de-ionized water, but relative differences between functional groups were similar. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Assay method for organic calcium antagonist drugs and a kit for such an assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S. H.; Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring the level of organic calcium antagonist drug in a body fluid comprises preparing a mixture of a radioactive calcium antagonist drug, a body fluid containing a calcium antagonist drug and a calcium antagonist receptor material, measuring the radioactivity of the radioactive calcium antagonist drug bound to said calcium antagonist receptor material and deriving the concentration of the calcium antagonist drug in the body fluid from a standard curve indicating the concentration of calcium antagonist drug versus inhibition of binding of said radioactive calcium antagonist drug to said receptor sites caused by the calcium antagonist drug in said body fluid. A kit for measuring the level of an organic calcium drug comprises a receptacle containing a radioactive calcium antagonist drug, a calcium antagonist receptor material and a standard amount of a nonradioactive calcium antagonist drug

  16. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and over: 1,200 mg/day The body needs vitamin D to help absorb calcium. You can get ... from your diet. Ask your provider whether you need to take a vitamin D supplement. SIDE EFFECTS AND SAFETY DO NOT ...

  17. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-01-01

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10 -3 M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. 45 Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m 2 surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10 -3 M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue

  18. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...... transfected. Parvalbumin-transfected and mock-transfected cells were loaded with the calcium indicator fura-2 and were exposed, in the same dish, to different concentrations of the calcium ionophore A23187 or to KCI. The results show that parvalbumin-transfected PCC7 cells had much better calcium buffering...

  19. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  20. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  1. Local Chromatin Features Including PU.1 and IKAROS Binding and H3K4 Methylation Shape the Repertoire of Immunoglobulin Kappa Genes Chosen for V(D)J Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Louise S.; Bolland, Daniel J.; Chovanec, Peter; Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon; Koohy, Hashem; Corcoran, Anne E.

    2017-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is essential for the generation of diverse antigen receptor (AgR) repertoires. In B cells, immunoglobulin kappa (Igκ) light chain recombination follows immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) recombination. We recently developed the DNA-based VDJ-seq assay for the unbiased quantitation of Igh VH and DH repertoires. Integration of VDJ-seq data with genome-wide datasets revealed that two chromatin states at the recombination signal sequence (RSS) of VH genes are highly predictive of recombination in mouse pro-B cells. It is unknown whether local chromatin states contribute to Vκ gene choice during Igκ recombination. Here we adapt VDJ-seq to profile the Igκ VκJκ repertoire and present a comprehensive readout in mouse pre-B cells, revealing highly variable Vκ gene usage. Integration with genome-wide datasets for histone modifications, DNase hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding and germline transcription identified PU.1 binding at the RSS, which was unimportant for Igh, as highly predictive of whether a Vκ gene will recombine or not, suggesting that it plays a binary, all-or-nothing role, priming genes for recombination. Thereafter, the frequency with which these genes recombine was shaped both by the presence and level of enrichment of several other chromatin features, including H3K4 methylation and IKAROS binding. Moreover, in contrast to the Igh locus, the chromatin landscape of the promoter, as well as of the RSS, contributes to Vκ gene recombination. Thus, multiple facets of local chromatin features explain much of the variation in Vκ gene usage. Together, these findings reveal shared and divergent roles for epigenetic features and transcription factors in AgR V(D)J recombination and provide avenues for further investigation of chromatin signatures that may underpin V(D)J-mediated chromosomal translocations. PMID:29204143

  2. Local Chromatin Features Including PU.1 and IKAROS Binding and H3K4 Methylation Shape the Repertoire of Immunoglobulin Kappa Genes Chosen for V(D)J Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Louise S; Bolland, Daniel J; Chovanec, Peter; Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon; Koohy, Hashem; Corcoran, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is essential for the generation of diverse antigen receptor (AgR) repertoires. In B cells, immunoglobulin kappa ( Igκ ) light chain recombination follows immunoglobulin heavy chain ( Igh ) recombination. We recently developed the DNA-based VDJ-seq assay for the unbiased quantitation of Igh VH and DH repertoires. Integration of VDJ-seq data with genome-wide datasets revealed that two chromatin states at the recombination signal sequence (RSS) of VH genes are highly predictive of recombination in mouse pro-B cells. It is unknown whether local chromatin states contribute to Vκ gene choice during Igκ recombination. Here we adapt VDJ-seq to profile the Igκ VκJκ repertoire and present a comprehensive readout in mouse pre-B cells, revealing highly variable Vκ gene usage. Integration with genome-wide datasets for histone modifications, DNase hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding and germline transcription identified PU.1 binding at the RSS, which was unimportant for Igh , as highly predictive of whether a Vκ gene will recombine or not, suggesting that it plays a binary, all-or-nothing role, priming genes for recombination. Thereafter, the frequency with which these genes recombine was shaped both by the presence and level of enrichment of several other chromatin features, including H3K4 methylation and IKAROS binding. Moreover, in contrast to the Igh locus, the chromatin landscape of the promoter, as well as of the RSS, contributes to Vκ gene recombination. Thus, multiple facets of local chromatin features explain much of the variation in Vκ gene usage. Together, these findings reveal shared and divergent roles for epigenetic features and transcription factors in AgR V(D)J recombination and provide avenues for further investigation of chromatin signatures that may underpin V(D)J-mediated chromosomal translocations.

  3. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  4. Blood Levels of S-100 Calcium-Binding Protein B, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, and Interleukin-6 for Changes in Depressive Symptom Severity after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: Prospective Cohort Nested within a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Daniel M.; Brown, Jeremiah R.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Hernandez, Felix; Najjar, Souhel

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional and retrospective studies have associated major depressive disorder with glial activation and injury as well as blood–brain barrier disruption, but these associations have not been assessed prospectively. Here, we aimed to determine the relationship between changes in depressive symptom severity and in blood levels of S-100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100B), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 following an inflammatory challenge. Methods Fifty unselected participants were recruited from a randomized, controlled trial comparing coronary artery bypass grafting procedures performed with versus without cardiopulmonary bypass for the risk of neurocognitive decline. Depressive symptom severity was measured at baseline, discharge, and six-month follow-up using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). The primary outcome of the present biomarker study was acute change in depressive symptom severity, defined as the intra-subject difference between baseline and discharge BDI-II scores. Blood biomarker levels were determined at baseline and 2 days postoperative. Results Changes in S-100B levels correlated positively with acute changes in depressive symptom severity (Spearman ρ, 0.62; P = 0.0004) and accounted for about one-fourth of their observed variance (R2, 0.23; P = 0.0105). This association remained statistically significant after adjusting for baseline S-100B levels, age, weight, body-mass index, or β-blocker use, but not baseline BDI-II scores (P = 0.064). There was no statistically significant association between the primary outcome and baseline S-100B levels, baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or interleukin-6 levels, or changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or interleukin-6 levels. Among most participants, levels of all three biomarkers were normal at baseline and markedly elevated at 2 days postoperative. Conclusions Acute changes in depressive symptom severity were specifically

  5. Calcium antagonists: a ready prescription for treating infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin B; Eisenstein, Edward M; Krahl, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of new and medically resistant pathogenic microbes continues to escalate toward worldwide public health, wild habitat, and commercial crop and livestock catastrophes. Attempts at solving this problem with sophisticated modern biotechnologies, such as smart vaccines and microbicidal and microbistatic drugs that precisely target parasitic bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, remain promising without major clinical and industrial successes. However, discovery of a more immediate, broad spectrum prophylaxis beyond conventional epidemiological approaches might take no longer than the time required to fill a prescription at your neighborhood pharmacy. Findings from a growing body of research suggest calcium antagonists, long approved and marketed for various human cardiovascular and neurological indications, may produce safe, efficacious antimicrobial effects. As a general category of drugs, calcium antagonists include compounds that disrupt passage of Ca(2+) molecules across cell membranes and walls, sequestration and mobilization of free intracellular Ca(2+), and downstream binding proteins and sensors of Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory pathways important for proper cell function. Administration of calcium antagonists alone at current therapeutically relevant doses and schedules, or with synergistic compounds and additional antimicrobial medications, figures to enhance host immunoprotection by directly altering pathogen infection sequences, life cycles, homeostasis, antibiotic tolerances, and numerous other infective, survival, and reproductive processes. Short of being miracle drugs, calcium antagonists are welcome old drugs with new tricks capable of controlling some of the most virulent and pervasive global infectious diseases of plants, animals, and humans, including Chagas' disease, malaria, and tuberculosis.

  6. Codissolution of calcium hydrogenphosphate and sodium hydrogencitrate in water. Spontaneous supersaturation of calcium citrate increasing calcium bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Danielsen, Bente Pia; Garcia, André Castilho

    2018-01-01

    . The supersaturated solutions had a pH around 4.7, and calcium binding to hydrogencitrate as the dominant citrate species during precipitation was found to be exothermic with a determined association constant of 357 L mol-1 at 25 °C for unit ionic strength, and δH° = -22 ± 2 kJ mol-1, δS° = -26 ± 8 J K-1 mol-1......The sparingly soluble calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate, co-dissolving in water during dissolution of freely soluble sodium hydrogencitrate sesquihydrate as caused by proton transfer from hydrogencitrate to hydrogenphosphate, was found to form homogenous solutions supersaturated by a factor up...... to 8 in calcium citrate tetrahydrate. A critical hydrogencitrate concentration for formation of homogeneous solutions was found to depend linearly on dissolved calcium hydrogenphosphate: [HCitr2-] = 14[CaHPO4] - 0.05 at 25 °C. The lag phase for precipitation of calcium citrate tetrahydrate...

  7. Extra-intestinal calcium handling contributes to normal serum calcium levels when intestinal calcium absorption is suboptimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieben, Liesbet; Verlinden, Lieve; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Torrekens, Sophie; Moermans, Karen; Schoonjans, Luc; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-12-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, is a crucial regulator of calcium homeostasis, especially through stimulation of intestinal calcium transport. Lack of intestinal vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling does however not result in hypocalcemia, because the increased 1,25(OH)2D levels stimulate calcium handling in extra-intestinal tissues. Systemic VDR deficiency, on the other hand, results in hypocalcemia because calcium handling is impaired not only in the intestine, but also in kidney and bone. It remains however unclear whether low intestinal VDR activity, as observed during aging, is sufficient for intestinal calcium transport and for mineral and bone homeostasis. To this end, we generated mice that expressed the Vdr exclusively in the gut, but at reduced levels. We found that ~15% of intestinal VDR expression greatly prevented the Vdr null phenotype in young-adult mice, including the severe hypocalcemia. Serum calcium levels were, however, in the low-normal range, which may be due to the suboptimal intestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium loss, insufficient increase in bone resorption and normal calcium incorporation in the bone matrix. In conclusion, our results indicate that low intestinal VDR levels improve intestinal calcium absorption compared to Vdr null mice, but also show that 1,25(OH)2D-mediated fine-tuning of renal calcium reabsorption and bone mineralization and resorption is required to maintain fully normal serum calcium levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  9. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Calcium Intake in the Moroccan Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebbar El-houcine

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcium intakes of elderly people are often below the recommendations which are 1200 mg/day. The advancing age may be accompanied by a loss of capacity to absorb additional calcium in case of deficiency. The aim of our work is to evaluate the calcium intake in the Moroccan elderly. Methods: The version translated into Arabic dialect Fardellone questionnaire is tested on a sample of 159 subjects aged over 60 years. Results: The study population includes 87 women (55%, 72 men (45%. The mean calcium intake was respectively 3078 mg by week (that means 440 mg/day. The assessment of calcium intake showed a deficiency and the average consumption of calcium per day is significantly lower than the recommended daily amount for this population. The comparison of both gender found a deficit higher among women than among men. Conclusion: Evaluation of the calcium intake is an essential tool for better management of metabolic bone diseases.

  11. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-07-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed).

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  13. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  14. Structure-activity relationship study and discovery of indazole 3-carboxamides as calcium-release activated calcium channel blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Sha; Nagai, Masazumi; Koerner, Steffi K.; Veves, Aristidis; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of mast cells contributes to the development of numerous diseases including cancer, autoimmune disorders, as well as diabetes and its complications. The influx of extracellular calcium via the highly calcium selective calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channel controls mast cell functions. Intracellular calcium homeostasis in mast cells can be maintained via the modulation of the CRAC channel, representing a critical point for therapeutic interventions. We describe t...

  15. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    -saccharate becomes spontaneously supersaturated with both d-gluconate and d-saccharate calcium salts, from which only calcium d-saccharate slowly precipitates. Calcium d-saccharate is suggested to act as a stabilizer of supersaturated solutions of other calcium hydroxycarboxylates with endothermic complex formation......Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc...

  16. Glucocorticoids specifically enhance L-type calcium current amplitude and affect calcium channel subunit expression in the mouse hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chameau, P.; Qin, Y.; Spijker, S.; Smit, A.B.; Joels, M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that corticosterone enhances whole cell calcium currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, through a pathway involving binding of glucocorticoid receptor homodimers to the DNA. We examined whether glucocorticoids show selectivity for L- over N-type of calcium currents. Moreover,

  17. Glucocorticoids specifically enhance L-type calcium current amplitude and affect calcium channel subunit expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chameau, P.J.P.; Qin, Y.J.; Smit, G.; Joëls, M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that corticosterone enhances whole cell calcium currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, through a pathway involving binding of glucocorticoid receptor homodimers to the DNA. We examined whether glucocorticoids show selectivity for L- over N-type of calcium currents. Moreover,

  18. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Herv?r L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.; Ahmed, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including the cell membrane potential, proliferation and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We sho...

  19. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  20. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  1. Calcium affects on vascular endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vaishali B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the body and its metabolism is one of the basic biologic processes in humans. Although historically linked primarily to bone structural development and maintenance, calcium is now recognized as a key component of many physiologic pathways necessary for optimum health including cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, renal, and gastrointestinal systems. A recent meta-analysis published in August 2011 showed a potential increase in cardiovascular events related to calcium supplementation. The possible mechanism of action of this correlation has not been well elucidated. This topic has generated intense interest due to the widespread use of calcium supplements, particularly among the middle aged and elderly who are at the most risk from cardiac events. Prior studies did not control for potential confounding factors such as the use of statins, aspirin or other medications. These controversial results warrant additional well-designed studies to investigate the relationship between calcium supplementation and cardiovascular outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the current literature in regards to calcium supplementation and cardiovascular health; and to identify areas of future research.

  2. The Risks and Benefits of Calcium Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Soo Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events has recently become a topic of debate due to the publication of two epidemiological studies and one meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. The reports indicate that there is a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events following supplementation with calcium; however, a number of experts have raised several issues with these reports such as inconsistencies in attempts to reproduce the findings in other populations and questions concerning the validity of the data due to low compliance, biases in case ascertainment, and/or a lack of adjustment. Additionally, the Auckland Calcium Study, the Women's Health Initiative, and many other studies included in the meta-analysis obtained data from calcium-replete subjects and it is not clear whether the same risk profile would be observed in populations with low calcium intakes. Dietary calcium intake varies widely throughout the world and it is especially low in East Asia, although the risk of cardiovascular events is less prominent in this region. Therefore, clarification is necessary regarding the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events following calcium supplementation and whether this relationship can be generalized to populations with low calcium intakes. Additionally, the skeletal benefits from calcium supplementation are greater in subjects with low calcium intakes and, therefore, the risk-benefit ratio of calcium supplementation is likely to differ based on the dietary calcium intake and risks of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases of various populations. Further studies investigating the risk-benefit profiles of calcium supplementation in various populations are required to develop population-specific guidelines for individuals of different genders, ages, ethnicities, and risk profiles around the world.

  3. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to “non-digestible oligo- and polysaccharides including galactooligosaccharides, oligofructose, polyfructose and inulin” and “increase in calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to “non-digestible oligo- and polysaccharides including galacto-oligosaccharides, oligofructose, polyfructose and inulin” and “increase in calcium absorption”. The scope of the application was proposed to fall under a health...... claim referring to children’s development and health. The food constituents that are proposed by the applicant to be the subject of the health claim are “non-digestible oligo- and polysaccharides including galacto-oligosaccharides, oligofructose, polyfructose and inulin”. Upon requests by EFSA...... for clarification on the food constituent, the applicant did not clarify the food constituent that is the subject of the health claim. The Panel considers that the food constituents, “non-digestible oligo- and polysaccharides including galacto-oligosaccharides, oligofructose, polyfructose and inulin”, which...

  4. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o homeostasis and many (pathophysiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR’s cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics.

  5. Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions, such as Raynaud's disease For people of African heritage and older people, calcium channel blockers might ... high-blood-pressure/in-depth/calcium-channel-blockers/ART-20047605 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  6. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  7. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  8. Calcium - Function and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jianfen; He, Yifan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Nout, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the primary food source for more than half of the world population. Levels of calcium contents and inhibitor - phytic acid are summarized in this chapter. Phytic acid has a very strong chelating ability and it is the main inhibit factor for calcium in rice products. Calcium contents in

  9. Magnesium-dependent non-specific binding of [125I]prolactin to myelinated tracts in the rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangurian, L.P.; Walsh, R.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    An in vitro autoradiographic assay was used in identifying a magnesium-dependent, non-specific binding of [ 125 I] prolactin to myelinated fiber tracts in the rat brain. Frozen tissue sections were incubated for 18 h at 4 degrees C in media which included [ 125 I]prolactin alone or with a 500 fold excess of unlabelled prolactin. Magnesium in the incubation medium caused a non-specific binding of radiolabelled prolactin to the myelinated fiber tracts in the brain. In contrast, calcium did not facilitate prolactin non-specific binding to myelin. Hence, calcium should optimize the detection of specific prolactin binding sites in the brain by in vitro autoradiographic or radioreceptor assays

  10. Induction of Calcium Flux and Enhancement of Cytolytic Activity in Natural Killer Cells by Cross-Linking of the Sheep Erythrocyte Binding Protein (CD2) and the Fc-Receptor (CD16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-15

    Withleuikocytes. rosette blocking properties . Induction of positive modu- lation of the molecule and trigguering 1 cell activation. lIn Lcukcocyte...Desayrnard, and MI. D. Scharff. 1981. Use of Annat . Rev. Imintinol. 3:31. inonoclonalR anti-10LS iousenimiunoglobullai to detect mouse antibodies. 6...Spooner, J. A. of Cit’ Indicator with greatly Imtproved fluorescent properties . J. Hlansen, and K. C. Meier. 1986, Valeacy of CD3 binding and fitter

  11. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    binding to SRCR domain 3 exhibited effective inhibition of ligand binding. Furthermore, analysis of purified native CD163 revealed that proteolytic cleavage in SRCR domain 3 inactivates ligand binding. Calcium protects against cleavage in this domain. Analysis of the calcium sensitivity of ligand binding...

  12. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  13. Calcium Phosphates as Delivery Systems for Bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bigi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs are the most utilized drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis, and are usefully employed also for other pathologies characterized by abnormally high bone resorption, including bone metastases. Due to the great affinity of these drugs for calcium ions, calcium phosphates are ideal delivery systems for local administration of BPs to bone, which is aimed to avoid/limit the undesirable side effects of their prolonged systemic use. Direct synthesis in aqueous medium and chemisorptions from solution are the two main routes proposed to synthesize BP functionalized calcium phosphates. The present review overviews the information acquired through the studies on the interaction between bisphosphonate molecules and calcium phosphates. Moreover, particular attention is addressed to some important recent achievements on the applications of BP functionalized calcium phosphates as biomaterials for bone substitution/repair.

  14. Appendix 1. The initial and final state of the nuclear facility and the planned follow-on and time-binding activities to achieve the ultimate state of the nuclear facility in that phase, including their impact on employees of nuclear facilities and surroundings nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter the initial and final state of the NPP A-1 and the planned follow-on and time-binding activities to achieve the ultimate state of the nuclear facility in that phase, including their impact on employees of nuclear facilities and surroundings nuclear facility are reviewed.

  15. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  16. Functions of Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Plant Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiquan Gao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ is generated by diverse physiological stimuli and stresses, including pathogen attack. Plants have evolved two branches of the immune system to defend against pathogen infections. The primary innate immune response is triggered by the detection of evolutionarily conserved pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP, which is called PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. The second branch of plant innate immunity is triggered by the recognition of specific pathogen effector proteins and known as effector-triggered immunity (ETI. Calcium (Ca2+ signaling is essential in both plant PTI and ETI responses. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs have emerged as important Ca2+ sensor proteins in transducing differential Ca2+ signatures, triggered by PAMPs or effectors and activating complex downstream responses. CDPKs directly transmit calcium signals by calcium binding to the elongation factor (EF-hand domain at the C-terminus and substrate phosphorylation by the catalytic kinase domain at the N-terminus. Emerging evidence suggests that specific and overlapping CDPKs phosphorylate distinct substrates in PTI and ETI to regulate diverse plant immune responses, including production of reactive oxygen species, transcriptional reprogramming of immune genes, and the hypersensitive response.

  17. Parathyroid hormone binding to cultured avian osteoclasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teti, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Zambonin Zallone, A. (Univ. of Bari (Italy))

    1991-02-14

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases serum calcium concentration via a controversial cellular mechanism. We investigated whether PTH binds avian osteoclasts. Isolated hypocalcaemic hen osteoclasts were incubated with ({sup 125}I)--bovine PTH (1-84). Specific binding of the hormone to the cells, which reached the equilibrium within 60 min, was observed. Half maximal binding was reached by 10 min. Binding was competitively inhibited by increasing doses of unlabeled PTH, and was about 55% displaced by adding, at the equilibrium, 10(-6) M unlabeled PTH. Autoradiography demonstrated specific label on the osteoclast. The cellular mechanism activated by the hormone remains to be elucidated.

  18. Embryonic mobilization of calcium in a viviparous reptile: evidence for a novel pattern of placental calcium secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, Santiago P; Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W

    2010-05-01

    Yolk reserves supply the majority of embryonic nutrition in squamate reptiles, including calcium. Embryos of oviparous squamates exploit the eggshell for supplemental calcium, while embryos of viviparous species may receive additional calcium via the placenta. Developmental uptake of calcium in oviparous snakes increases during the interval of greatest embryonic growth (stage 35 to parturition). However, the pattern of embryonic calcium acquisition is unknown for viviparous snakes. Furthermore, while the uterus of oviparous species transports calcium early in embryonic development during mineralization of the eggshell, the timing of uterine calcium secretion in viviparous snakes is unknown. We studied a viviparous snake, Virginia striatula, to determine the ontogenetic pattern of yolk and embryonic calcium content. The pattern of embryonic calcium uptake of V. striatula is similar to that of oviparous snakes but the sources of calcium differ. In contrast to oviparous species, embryos of V. striatula acquire half of total neonatal calcium via placental provision, of which 71% is mobilized between stage 35 and parturition. Furthermore, we report for the first time in a viviparous squamate an increase in yolk calcium content during early stages of embryonic development, indicating that uterine secretion of calcium occurs in V. striatula coincident with shelling in oviparous squamates. Thus, uterine calcium secretion in this viviparous species may either occur continuously or in two phases, coincident with the timing of shelling in oviparous species and again during the last stages of development. Whereas, the pattern of embryonic calcium acquisition in V. striatula is plesiomorphic for squamates, the pattern of uterine calcium secretion includes both retention of a plesiomorphic trait and the evolution of a novel trait. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analytical solution of reaction-diffusion equations for calcium wave propagation in a starburst amacrine cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, R R

    2010-09-01

    A reaction-diffusion model is presented to encapsulate calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) as a potential mechanism for somatofugal bias of dendritic calcium movement in starburst amacrine cells. Calcium dynamics involves a simple calcium extrusion (pump) and a buffering mechanism of calcium binding proteins homogeneously distributed over the plasma membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum within starburst amacrine cells. The system of reaction-diffusion equations in the excess buffer (or low calcium concentration) approximation are reformulated as a nonlinear Volterra integral equation which is solved analytically via a regular perturbation series expansion in response to calcium feedback from a continuously and uniformly distributed calcium sources. Calculation of luminal calcium diffusion in the absence of buffering enables a wave to travel at distances of 120 μm from the soma to distal tips of a starburst amacrine cell dendrite in 100 msec, yet in the presence of discretely distributed calcium-binding proteins it is unknown whether the propagating calcium wave-front in the somatofugal direction is further impeded by endogenous buffers. If so, this would indicate CICR to be an unlikely mechanism of retinal direction selectivity in starburst amacrine cells.

  20. Study on the Effect of Calcium and Potassium Spray on Date Bunch Fading Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Shekofteh

    2017-02-01

    weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, stone weight, stone diameter, and bunch fading percentage at 1℅ level. The highest wet fruit weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, stone weight, and stone diameter were attained in the treatment containing combined application of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate. Furthermore, the lowest amounts of these traits were obtained in control. The lowest and highest percentage of date bunch fading belonged to the combined treatment of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate, and control, respectively. In general, application of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate with each other improved fruit traits and reduced bunch fading percentage. Calcium mobility in the plant takes place mainly in the xylem, together with water. Therefore, calcium uptake is directly related to plant transpiration rate. Conditions of high humidity, cold and low transpiration rates may result in calcium deficiency. Salinity might also cause calcium deficiency because it decreases water uptake by the plant. Since calcium mobility in plants is limited, calcium deficiency appears in younger leaves and in fruits, because they have a very low transpiration rate. Therefore, it is necessary to have a constant supply of calcium for continued growth. Calcium deficiency is usually caused by low calcium availability or water stress which results in low transpiration rates. Calcium is an essential plant nutrient with many roles including participation in metabolic processes of other nutrients uptake, promotion of proper plant cell elongation, and improvement of cell wall structure – calcium is an essential part of plant cell wall. It forms calcium pectate compounds which give stability to cell walls and bind cells together. It also helps protecting the plant against heat stress - calcium improves stomata function and participates in induction of heat shock proteins. In addition, it helps protecting the plant against diseases - numerous fungi and bacteria secret enzymes

  1. Insulin induces calcium signals in the nucleus of rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michele A; Gomes, Dawidson A; Andrade, Viviane A; Leite, M Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    Insulin is an hepatic mitogen that promotes liver regeneration. Actions of insulin are mediated by the insulin receptor, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase. It is currently thought that signaling via the insulin receptor occurs at the plasma membrane, where it binds to insulin. Here we report that insulin induces calcium oscillations in isolated rat hepatocytes, and that these calcium signals depend upon activation of phospholipase C and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, but not upon extracellular calcium. Furthermore, insulin-induced calcium signals occur in the nucleus, and are temporally associated with selective depletion of nuclear phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and translocation of the insulin receptor to the nucleus. These findings suggest that the insulin receptor translocates to the nucleus to initiate nuclear, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signals in rat hepatocytes. This novel signaling mechanism may be responsible for insulin's effects on liver growth and regeneration.

  2. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  4. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  5. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  6. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM- CHANNELBLOCKERSFOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and degenerative dementias the calcium-channel blocker nimodipine, compared with placebo, slightly improved the. MMSE scores." Thus, an additional or alternative explanation, albeit still unproven, could involve specific neuroprotection conferred by calcium-channel blockade.~Indeed, the ageing brain loses its ability to ...

  7. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this ... vary. However, the main ingredient is called a calcium-channel antagonist. It helps decrease the heart's pumping strength, which ...

  8. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  9. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  10. Calcium: A Nutrient Deserving a Special Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Whiting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in calcium has continued since the 1980s when its role in promoting bone growth and retention was established in clinical trials of children and postmenopausal women. The human nutrition functions now attributed to calcium have expanded beyond bone health to include other conditions such as body weight maintenance. While most efforts have been focused on the findings that dietary intakes are low, there are emerging data on safety concerns of excess amounts. This Special Issue on calcium nutrition, spanning the lifecycle from critically ill neonates through to older adults, has been written by some of the leading researchers in this field.

  11. Transformations of calcium sulphates in solidified carbonated volatile fluidized ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Jacek Łączny

    2017-01-01

    During the investigation it was assumed that calcium carbonate, being poorly water-soluble, would not react with the remaining components of the porous water of the volatile fluidized ash. Crystalline phases of calcium sulphates, anhydrite, gypsum and bassanite occurring in bound volatile fluidized ashes after carbonation demonstrate the possibility of crystallization in the presence of calcium carbonate. In particular, a change in the concentration of bassanite indicates that this phase, as a precursor to the crystallization of gypsum, may play a significant role in the process of binding carbonated volatile ashes.

  12. C2-domain containing calcium sensors in neuroendocrine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Houy, Sébastien; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for calcium-triggered membrane fusion have long been sought for, and detailed models now exist that account for at least some of the functions of the many proteins involved in the process. Key players in the fusion reaction are a group of proteins that, upon binding to ca...... the properties and possible interplay of (some of) the major C2-domain containing calcium sensors in calcium-triggered exocytosis. This article is part of a mini review series: "Synaptic Function and Dysfunction in Brain Diseases"....

  13. Calcium Orthophosphate-Based Bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of grafts have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A bit later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. In principle, bioceramics can be prepared from diverse materials but this review is limited to calcium orthophosphate-based formulations only, which possess the specific advantages due to the chemical similarity to mammalian bones and teeth. During the past 40 years, there have been a number of important achievements in this field. Namely, after the initial development of bioceramics that was just tolerated in the physiological environment, an emphasis was shifted towards the formulations able to form direct chemical bonds with the adjacent bones. Afterwards, by the structural and compositional controls, it became possible to choose whether the calcium orthophosphate-based implants remain biologically stable once incorporated into the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of regenerative bioceramics was developed and such formulations became an integrated part of the tissue engineering approach. Now calcium orthophosphate scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous and harbor different biomolecules and/or cells. Therefore, current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include bone augmentations, artificial bone grafts, maxillofacial reconstruction, spinal fusion, periodontal disease repairs and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Perspective future applications comprise drug delivery and tissue engineering purposes because calcium orthophosphates appear to be promising carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and various types of cells.

  14. Mineralization Process of Biocemented Sand and Impact of Bacteria and Calcium Ions Concentrations on Crystal Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobin Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial-induced calcite precipitation (MICP is a sustainable technique used to improve sandy soil. Analysis of the mineralization process, as well as different bacterial suspensions and calcium concentrations on the crystal morphology, revealed that the mineralization process included four stages: self-organised hydrolysis of microorganisms, molecular recognition and interface interaction, growth modulation, and epitaxial growth. By increasing bacterial suspensions and calcium concentrations, the crystal morphology changed from hexahedron to oblique polyhedron to ellipsoid; the best crystal structure occurs at OD600 = 1.0 and [Ca2+] = 0.75 mol/l. It should be noted that interfacial hydrogen bonding is the main force that binds the loose sand particles. These results will help in understanding the mechanism of MICP.

  15. Trafficking of neuronal calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiss, Norbert; Zamponi, G. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), č. článku NS20160003. ISSN 2059-6553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * neuron * trafficing Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) http://www. neuron alsignaling.org/content/1/1/NS20160003

  16. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  17. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollido-Rios, Rocio; Bandari, Shyam; Wilms, Christoph; Jakuschev, Stanislav; Vortkamp, Andrea; Grobe, Kay; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN) is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog), of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1) a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2) a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  18. Modulation of elementary calcium release mediates a transition from puffs to waves in an IP3R cluster model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rückl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oscillating concentration of intracellular calcium is one of the most important examples for collective dynamics in cell biology. Localized releases of calcium through clusters of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channels constitute elementary signals called calcium puffs. Coupling by diffusing calcium leads to global releases and waves, but the exact mechanism of inter-cluster coupling and triggering of waves is unknown. To elucidate the relation of puffs and waves, we here model a cluster of IP3R channels using a gating scheme with variable non-equilibrium IP3 binding. Hybrid stochastic and deterministic simulations show that puffs are not stereotyped events of constant duration but are sensitive to stimulation strength and residual calcium. For increasing IP3 concentration, the release events become modulated at a timescale of minutes, with repetitive wave-like releases interspersed with several puffs. This modulation is consistent with experimental observations we present, including refractoriness and increase of puff frequency during the inter-wave interval. Our results suggest that waves are established by a random but time-modulated appearance of sustained release events, which have a high potential to trigger and synchronize activity throughout the cell.

  19. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects...

  20. The effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus supplementation in zeolite A treated dry cows on periparturient calcium and phosphorus homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing, Trine; Larsen, T.; Jørgensen, Rolf Jess

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have proved the possibility of preventing parturient hypocalcaemia by zeolite A supplementation during the dry period, and a recent in vitro study has indicated a marked calcium (Ca) as well as phosphorus (P) binding effect of zeolite A in rumen fluid solutions. Because of the co......Previous studies have proved the possibility of preventing parturient hypocalcaemia by zeolite A supplementation during the dry period, and a recent in vitro study has indicated a marked calcium (Ca) as well as phosphorus (P) binding effect of zeolite A in rumen fluid solutions. Because...

  1. Sources and timing of calcium mobilization during embryonic development of the corn snake, Pantherophis guttatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W; Blackburn, Daniel G

    2004-11-01

    Embryos of oviparous Reptilia (=turtles, lepidosaurs, crocodilians and birds) extract calcium for growth and development from reserves in the yolk and eggshell. Yolk provides most of the calcium to embryos of lizards and snakes. In contrast, the eggshell supplies most of the calcium for embryonic development of turtles, crocodilians and birds. The yolk sac and chorioallantoic membrane of birds recover and transport calcium from the yolk and eggshell and homologous membranes of squamates (lizards and snakes) probably transport calcium from these two sources as well. We studied calcium mobilization by embryos of the snake Pantherophis guttatus during the interval of greatest embryonic growth and found that the pattern of calcium transfer was similar to other snakes. Calcium recovery from the yolk is relatively low until the penultimate embryonic stage. Calcium removal from the eggshell begins during the same embryonic stage and total eggshell calcium drops in each of the final 2 weeks prior to hatching. The eggshell supplies 28% of the calcium of hatchlings. The timing of calcium transport from the yolk and eggshell is coincident with the timing of growth of the yolk sac and chorioallantoic membrane and expression of the calcium binding protein, calbindin-D28K, in these tissues as reported in previous studies. In the context of earlier work, our findings suggest that the timing and mechanism of calcium transport from the yolk sac of P. guttatus is similar to birds, but that both the timing and mechanism of calcium transport by the chorioallantoic membrane differs. Based on the coincident timing of eggshell calcium loss and embryonic calcium accumulation, we also conclude that recovery of eggshell calcium in P. guttatus is regulated by the embryo.

  2. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Lee

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day (intervention to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control. At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P <0.0001 or control diets (775 mg/d, P = 0.0001 periods. Furthermore, the addition of 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily for the 3 week intervention did not significantly increase total energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  3. Intestinal absorption and renal reabsorption of calcium throughout postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Megan R; Alexander, R Todd

    2017-04-01

    Calcium is vital for many physiological functions including bone mineralization. Postnatal deposition of calcium into bone is greatest in infancy and continues through childhood and adolescence until peek mineral density is reached in early adulthood. Thereafter, bone mineral density remains static until it eventually declines in later life. A positive calcium balance, i.e. more calcium absorbed than excreted, is crucial to bone deposition during growth and thus to peek bone mineral density. Dietary calcium is absorbed from the intestine into the blood. It is then filtered by the renal glomerulus and either reabsorbed by the tubule or excreted in the urine. Calcium can be (re)absorbed across intestinal and renal epithelia via both transcellular and paracellular pathways. Current evidence suggests that significant intestinal and renal calcium transport changes occur throughout development. However, the molecular details of these alterations are incompletely delineated. Here we first briefly review the current model of calcium transport in the intestine and renal tubule in the adult. Then, we describe what is known with regard to calcium handling through postnatal development, and how alterations may aid in mediating a positive calcium balance. The role of transcellular and paracellular calcium transport pathways and the contribution of specific intestinal and tubular segments vary with age. However, the current literature highlights knowledge gaps in how specifically intestinal and renal calcium (re)absorption occurs early in postnatal development. Future research should clarify the specific changes in calcium transport throughout early postnatal development including mediators of these alterations enabling appropriate bone mineralization. Impact statement This mini review outlines the current state of knowledge pertaining to the molecules and mechanisms maintaining a positive calcium balance throughout postnatal development. This process is essential to achieving

  4. The influence of calcium signaling on the regulation of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    In this review the influence of calcium signaling on the regulation of alternative splicing is discussed with respect to its influence on cell- and developmental-specific expression of different isoforms of the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). In a second part the possibility is discussed that due to the interaction of the calcium-binding protein ALG-2 with a spliceosomal regulator of alternative splicing, RBM22, Ca2+-signaling may thus influence its regulatory property.

  5. Modeling and analysis of calcium bromide hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, Steven A.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Panchal, Chandrakant B.; Doctor, Richard D. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The main focus of this paper is the modeling, simulation, and analysis of the calcium bromide hydrolysis reactor stage in the calcium-bromine thermochemical water-splitting cycle for nuclear hydrogen production. One reactor concept is to use a spray of calcium bromide into steam, in which the heat of fusion supplies the heat of reaction. Droplet models were built up in a series of steps incorporating various physical phenomena, including droplet flow, heat transfer, phase change, and reaction, separately. Given the large heat reservoir contained in a pool of molten calcium bromide that allows bubbles to rise easily, using a bubble column reactor for the hydrolysis appears to be a feasible and promising alternative to the spray reactor concept. The two limiting cases of bubble geometry, spherical and spherical-cap, are considered in the modeling. Results for both droplet and bubble modeling with COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS trademark are presented, with recommendations for the path forward. (author)

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by supporting muscles needed to avoid falls. Children need vitamin D to build strong bones, and adults need ... be taken at one time. While your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium, you do not need ...

  7. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney function and levels of calcium in your urine. Your provider may do other tests to further assess your condition, such as checking your blood levels of phosphorus (a mineral). Imaging studies also may be helpful, ...

  8. The initial and subsequent inflammatory events during calcium oxalate lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, John W M; Gohel, Mayur-Danny I; Poon, Ngork-Wah; Shum, Daisy K Y; Tam, Po-Chor; Au, Doris W T

    2010-08-05

    Crystallization is believed to be the initiation step of urolithiasis, even though it is unknown where inside the nephron the first crystal nucleation occurs. Direct nucleation of calcium oxalate and subsequent events including crystal retention, cellular damage, endocytosis, and hyaluronan (HA) expression, were tested in a two-compartment culture system with intact human proximal tubular HK-2 cell monolayer. Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) was nucleated and bound onto the apical surface of the HK-2 cells under hypercalciuric and hyperoxaluric conditions. These cells displayed mild cellular damage and internalized some of the adhered crystals within 18h post-COD-exposure, as revealed by electron microscopy. Prolonged incubation in complete medium caused significant damage to disrupt the monolayer integrity. Furthermore, hyaluronan disaccharides were detected in the harvested media, and were associated with HAS-3 mRNA expression. Human proximal cells were able to internalize COD crystals which nucleated directly onto the apical surface, subsequently triggering cellular damage and HAS-3 specific hyaluronan synthesis as an inflammatory response. The proximal tubule cells here demonstrate that it plays an important role in facilitating urolithiasis via endocytosis and creating an inflammatory environment whereby free hyaluronan in tubular fluid can act as crystal-binding molecule at the later segments of distal and collecting tubules. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Calcium bioaccessibility and uptake by human intestinal like cells following in vitro digestion of casein phosphopeptide-calcium aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Silvia; Del Favero, Elena; De Luca, Paola; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Fiorilli, Amelia; Cantu', Laura; Ferraretto, Anita

    2015-06-01

    Casein phosphopeptides (CPPs), derived by casein proteolysis, can bind calcium ions and keep them in solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated CPP-induced cell calcium uptake, depending on the formation of (CPP + calcium) complexes and on the degree of differentiation of the intestinal cells. With the present study, we address the persistence of the complexes and of the CPP-induced calcium uptake in intestinal like cells after the digestion process, thus examining their eligibility to serve as nutraceuticals. A calcium-preloaded CPP preparation of commercial origin (Ca-CPPs) was subjected to in vitro digestion. The evolution of the supramolecular structure of the Ca-CPP complexes was studied using laser-light and X-ray scattering. The bioactivity of the pre- and post-digestion Ca-CPPs was determined in differentiated Caco2 and HT-29 cells by video imaging experiments using Fura-2. We found that Ca-CPP aggregates keep a complex supramolecular organization upon digestion, despite getting smaller in size and increasing internal calcium dispersion. Concomitantly and most interestingly, digested Ca-CPPs clearly enhance the uptake of calcium ions, especially in Caco2 cells. In contrast, digestion depletes the ability of post-loaded decalcified-CPPs (Ca-dekCPPs), with a weaker internal structure, to induce calcium uptake. The enhanced bioactivity reached upon digestion strongly suggests a recognized role of Ca-CPPs, in the form used here, as nutraceuticals.

  10. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  11. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R; Ashmore, Jonathan F; Ahmed, Aamir

    2017-02-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca 2+ ] i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca 2+ ] i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca 2+ ] i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca 2+ ] i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca 2+ ] i We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  12. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  13. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  14. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer T; Moore, Carolyn E; Radcliffe, John D

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day) (intervention) to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control). At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d) when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01508689.

  16. High-capacity Ca2+ binding of human skeletal calsequestrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Emiliano J; Lewis, Kevin M; Danna, Benjamin R; Kang, Chulhee

    2012-03-30

    Calsequestrin, the major calcium storage protein in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, binds large amounts of Ca(2+) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and releases them during muscle contraction. For the first time, the crystal structures of Ca(2+) complexes for both human (hCASQ1) and rabbit (rCASQ1) skeletal calsequestrin were determined, clearly defining their Ca(2+) sequestration capabilities through resolution of high- and low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites. rCASQ1 crystallized in low CaCl(2) buffer reveals three high-affinity Ca(2+) sites with trigonal bipyramidal, octahedral, and pentagonal bipyramidal coordination geometries, along with three low-affinity Ca(2+) sites. hCASQ1 crystallized in high CaCl(2) shows 15 Ca(2+) ions, including the six Ca(2+) ions in rCASQ1. Most of the low-affinity sites, some of which are μ-carboxylate-bridged, are established by the rotation of dimer interfaces, indicating cooperative Ca(2+) binding that is consistent with our atomic absorption spectroscopic data. On the basis of these findings, we propose a mechanism for the observed in vitro and in vivo dynamic high-capacity and low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding activity of calsequestrin.

  17. High-capacity Ca2+ Binding of Human Skeletal Calsequestrin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Danna, Benjamin R.; Kang, ChulHee

    2012-01-01

    Calsequestrin, the major calcium storage protein in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, binds large amounts of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and releases them during muscle contraction. For the first time, the crystal structures of Ca2+ complexes for both human (hCASQ1) and rabbit (rCASQ1) skeletal calsequestrin were determined, clearly defining their Ca2+ sequestration capabilities through resolution of high- and low-affinity Ca2+-binding sites. rCASQ1 crystallized in low CaCl2 buffer reveals three high-affinity Ca2+ sites with trigonal bipyramidal, octahedral, and pentagonal bipyramidal coordination geometries, along with three low-affinity Ca2+ sites. hCASQ1 crystallized in high CaCl2 shows 15 Ca2+ ions, including the six Ca2+ ions in rCASQ1. Most of the low-affinity sites, some of which are μ-carboxylate-bridged, are established by the rotation of dimer interfaces, indicating cooperative Ca2+ binding that is consistent with our atomic absorption spectroscopic data. On the basis of these findings, we propose a mechanism for the observed in vitro and in vivo dynamic high-capacity and low-affinity Ca2+-binding activity of calsequestrin. PMID:22337878

  18. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Management of secondary hyperparathyroidism: the importance and the challenge of controlling parathyroid hormone levels without elevating calcium, phosphorus, and calcium-phosphorus product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Sharon M; Drüeke, Tilman B

    2003-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that can lead to clinically significant bone disease. Additional consequences of secondary HPT, such as soft-tissue and vascular calcification, cardiovascular disease, and calcific uremic arteriolopathy, may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among CKD patients. Secondary HPT arises from disturbances in calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D and parathyroid hormone metabolism, which develop early in the course of CKD and become more prominent as kidney function declines. The standard therapies currently recommended to correct mineral metabolism and bone disease in these patients include calcium supplementation, dietary phosphorus restriction, phosphate-binding agents, and treatment with vitamin D sterols. However, such medications often have significant effects on the serum levels of calcium and phosphorus, which result in exacerbation of the disease and significant extraskeletal morbidity and mortality. Thus, there is a need to identify more effective treatment approaches. This review discusses the pathophysiology of secondary HPT, the challenges faced in the management of this disorder, and the impact of current treatment options on patients' risks of morbidity and mortality. In addition, the development of new, more physiologically relevant therapies, which may lead to successful management of secondary HPT, is reviewed. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Z; Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5...

  1. Calcium decorated and doped phosphorene for gas adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, Murugan; Nataraj, Yuvarani; Lakshmipathi, Senthilkumar, E-mail: lsenthilkumar@buc.edu.in

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • Phosphorene exhibits n-type/p-type nature on decorating/doping calcium respectively. • Gas molecules (CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}) are physisorbed on phosphorene. • Ca decorated Phosphorene is recommended for high density hydrogen storage applications. • Calcium doping on zigzag and armchair sites makes phosphorene more reactive. • CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} prefer Ca-doped on zigzag1 site, whereas ammonia prefers Ca-doped on armchair. - Abstract: In this paper, we present the results from first-principles study based on the electronic structure and adsorption characteristics of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} adsorbed on Ca decorated/doped phosphorene. Our study finds that phosphorene exhibits n-type behaviour on decorating calcium, and p-type on doping calcium. Gas molecules are physisorbed on both pristine and calcium-mediated phosphorene, visible through their lower binding energy and charge transfer values. Ca decorated phosphorene is suitable for hydrogen storage due to its higher binding energy for H{sub 2}. Ca doped structures shows increased binding affinity towards CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} in zigzag1 direction and armchair directions respectively. The extracts of our study implies that Ca doped phosphorene possess increased binding affinity towards gas molecules, and the results are highly helpful for gas adsorption and to design gas sensors based on calcium doped or decorated phosphorene.

  2. Effects of oral calcium supplementation on intestinal bile-acids and cytolytic activity of fecal water in patients with adenomatous polyps of the colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welberg, J. W. M.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; van der Meer, R.; Kuipers, F.; Cats, A.; van Rijsbergen, H.; Termont, D. S. M. L.; Boersma-van Ek, W.; Vonk, R. J.; Mulder, N. H.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    Calcium has been proposed to prevent colon cancer in subjects at risk for this tumour. This effect is supposed to be due at least in part to binding the bile acids to calcium, making them insoluble and harmless. To evaluate the effects of oral calcium supplementation on intestinal bile acids, 19

  3. Dietary Calcium Intake in Sample of School Age Children in City of Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bouziani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important mineral playing a vital role to maintain bone health. Calcium intake is considered as one of the most important determinants to assess the calcium status and to evaluate the calcium deficiency in the human body. Our study aims at estimating calcium intake in a sample of children and adolescent to be used in the global strategy to reduce calcium deficiency disorders in Morocco. Thus, 131 children and adolescents were recruited from public schools at Rabat and its regions in the framework of a descriptive cross-sectional study. For each participant, anthropometric parameters were measured. Calcium status was assessed by 24 h dietary recall. Food frequency questionnaire was used to evaluate children’s nutritional habits and to assess the consumption of calcium-rich food. Overall, the mean calcium intake was 522.0 ± 297.0 mg/day, and 85.5% of subjects highlighted calcium deficiency, with no significant difference between boys and girls. Calcium intake was significantly different according to age groups, and high consumption of calcium was found in subjects aged from 14 to 18 years (776.86 ±290.07 mg/day, giving evidence of the low calcium status of the studied population. Daily food intake and food frequency analysis showed that bread, vegetables, and fruits are the most consumed food and the main source of daily calcium intake. Consumption of dairy products, considered as the best source of calcium, is lower and represents only 14% of total calcium intake. Our study clearly showed that calcium status is very lower in Moroccan children and adolescents and a large proportion of this population have inadequate calcium intake. Hence, there’s an urgent need of specific strategies, including children sensitisation and nutritional education, to increase calcium intake and therefore reduce calcium deficiency disorders impacting the whole body during childhood and in adult age.

  4. [3H]nitrendipine binding to adrenal capsular membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, M.S.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.; Keiser, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The physiologic regulation of aldosterone secretion is dependent on extracellular calcium and appears to be mediated by increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration in the zona glomerulosa cell. A specific role for voltage-dependent calcium channels was suggested by previous studies with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil. The authors therefore studied the [ 3 H]nitrendipine calcium channel binding site in adrenal capsules. These studies revealed a single class of saturable, high affinity sites with K/sub D/ = .26 +/- .04 nM and B/sub max/ = 105 +/- 5.7 fmol/mg protein. Specific binding of [ 3 H]nitrendipine was inhibited by calcium channel antagonists with potencies nitrendipine = nifedipine >> verapamil, while diltiazem had no inhibitory effect. In the rat, binding sites for [ 3 H]nitrendipine were located in the adrenal capsule and medulla and were undetectable in the zona fasciculata. Physiologic studies with collagenase-dispersed adrenal glomerulosa cells demonstrated that nifedipine selectively inhibited angiotensin-II and potassium-stimulated steroidogenesis. These observations suggest both a pharmacologic and physiologic role for the nitrendipine binding site in aldosterone production. 17 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  6. Antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide in endodontics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Z; Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial.

  7. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  8. Diagram of Calcium Movement in the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This diagram shows the normal pathways of calcium movement in the body and indicates changes (green arrows) seen during preliminary space flight experiments. Calcium plays a central role because 1) it gives strength and structure to bone and 2) all types of cells require it to function normally. To better understand how and why weightlessness induces bone loss, astronauts have participated in a study of calcium kinetics -- that is, the movement of calcium through the body, including absorption from food, and its role in the formation and breakdown of bone.

  9. Estimation of ionized calcium, total calcium and albumin corrected calcium for the diagnosis of hypocalcaemia of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, A.; Mehmood, T.; Qureshi, A.H.; Anwar, M.; Dilawar, M.; Hussain, I.; Khan, F.A.; Khan, D.A.; Hussain, S.; Khan, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To measure levels of ionized calcium, total calcium and albumin corrected calcium in patients with different malignant disorders for the diagnosis of hypercalcaemia of malignancy. Design: A case control comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in the Department of Pathology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and Department of Oncology CMH, Rawalpindi from March 2003 to December 2003. Subjects and Methods: Ninety-seven patients of various malignant disorders, admitted in the Department of Oncology, CMH, Rawalpindi, and 39 age and gender-matched disease-free persons (as control) were included in the study. Blood ionized calcium (Ca/sup ++/), pH, sodium (Na/sup +/) and potassium (K/sup +/) were analysed by Ion selective electrode (ISE) on Easylyte> auto analyser. Other related parameters were measured by colorimetric methods. Results: Blood Ca/sup ++/ levels in patients suffering from malignant disorders were found significantly high (mean +- j 1.30+017 mmoV/L) as compared to control subjects (mean +- 1.23+0.03 mmoV/L) (p<0.001). The number of patients with hypercalcaemia of malignancy detected by Ca/sup ++/ estimation was significantly higher (38%) as compared to total calcium (8.4%) and albumin corrected calcium ACC (10.6%) (p<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in other parameters e.g. phosphate, urea, creatinine, pH, Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/ levels in study subjects and controls. Conclusion: Detection of hypercalcaemia can be markedly improved if ionized calcium estimation is used in patients with malignant disorders. (author)

  10. Fermentation of calcium-fortified soymilk with Lactobacillus: effects on calcium solubility, isoflavone conversion, and production of organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, A L; Shah, N P; Wilcox, G; Walker, K Z; Stojanovska, L

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance calcium solubility and bioavailability from calcium-fortified soymilk by fermentation with 7 strains of Lactobacillus, namely, L. acidophilus ATCC 4962, ATCC33200, ATCC 4356, ATCC 4461, L. casei ASCC 290, L. plantarum ASCC 276, and L. fermentum VRI-003. The parameters that were used are viability, pH, calcium solubility, organic acid, and biologically active isoflavone aglycone content. Calcium-fortified soymilk made from soy protein isolate was inoculated with these probiotic strains, incubated for 24 h at 37 degrees C, then stored for 14 d at 4 degrees C. Soluble calcium was measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AA). Organic acids and bioactive isoflavone aglycones, including diadzein, genistein, and glycetein, were measured using HPLC. Viability of the strains in the fermented calcium-fortified soymilk was > 8.5 log(10) CFU/g after 24 h fermentation and this was maintained for 14-d storage at 4 degrees C. After 24 h, there was a significant increase (P casei ASCC 290 demonstrated the highest increase with 89.3% and 87.0% soluble calcium after 24 h, respectively. The increase in calcium solubility observed was related to lowered pH associated with production of lactic and acetic acids. Fermentation significantly increased (P < 0.05) the level of conversion of isoflavones into biologically active aglycones, including diadzein, genistein, and glycetein. Our results show that fermenting calcium-fortified soymilk with the selected probiotics can potentially enhance the calcium bioavailability of calcium-fortified soymilk due to increased calcium solubility and bioactive isoflavone aglycone enrichment.

  11. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  12. Calcium in aardappel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velvis, H.

    2001-01-01

    Een overzicht wordt gegeven van de literatuur m.b.t. het element calcium in aardappel. Daarbij wordt gekeken naar de functie in de plant, de opname en het interne transport, en de gevolgen van tekorten voor de opbrengst en de vatbaarheid voor pathogenen

  13. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling...

  14. Development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A study on the development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for orthopedic and dental applications is presented. The paper describes its characteristic properties including results of bio- compatibility studies. A conventional two-component calcium phosphate cement formulation (having a powder part ...

  15. Development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2003-01-27

    Jan 27, 2003 ... Abstract. A study on the development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for orthopedic and dental applications is presented. The paper describes its characteristic properties including results of bio- compatibility studies. A conventional two-component calcium phosphate cement formulation ...

  16. Probable functions of calcium oxalate crystals in different tissues of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Representatives of seven major edible aroid accessions were screened for calcium oxalate using standard histochemical methods. All the accessions were noted to contain calcium oxalate in the forms of raphide bundles and intra-amylar crystals. The crystals were widely present in all parts of the plants including spongy ...

  17. Involvement of calcium signalling in dormancy release of grape buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuequn; Halaly, Tamar; Crane, Omer; Keilin, Tsvicka; Keren-Keiserman, Alexandra; Ogrodovitch, Aliza; Galbraith, David; Or, Etti

    2007-01-01

    Artificial induction of grape bud dormancy release by hydrogen cyanamide (HC) serves as a reliable model system to explore the events occurring shortly after the induction of dormancy release. Recently, a group of genes with remarkable differences in expression level between HC-treated and control buds was identified. The identification of several calcium signalling-related genes within that group raised the hypothesis of the involvement of Ca(2+) signalling in grape bud dormancy release. Therefore, the effects of HC treatment on the expression profiles of several calcium sensors, the effect of the plasma membrane calcium channel blocker LaCl(3) and the calcium chelator EGTA on HC-induced and chilling-induced bud-break, and the effect of HC application on calcium-dependent protein phosphorylation activities in the bud tissue were studied. Here the HC-induced expression of Ca(2+)-ATPase is described, indicating that this treatment might evoke an increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt. Similar induction was confirmed for calmodulin, calmodulin-binding protein, and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). Both LaCl(3) and EGTA blocked the inducing effect of HC on bud-break, and their inhibitory effects were removed by supplying exogenous Ca(2+). Calcium-dependent histone phosphorylation was up to 70% higher in HC-treated buds. Endogenous protein phosphorylation assays detected four proteins exhibiting increased phosphorylation following HC treatment, of which two were phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner. One of these, a 47 kDa protein, presented strong and Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation only in HC-treated buds. The potential role of CDPK in the phosphorylation of this protein was supported by an immunoprecipitation assay. The data suggest, for the first time, that calcium signalling is involved in the mechanism of bud dormancy release.

  18. MANAGING TIGHT BINDING RECEPTORS FOR NEW SPEARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DARYLE H BUSCH RICHARD S GIVENS

    2004-12-10

    even more interesting. They convert from rings to structures that wrap around a metal ion to form a cage. These ligands are called cryptands. Switch release is accomplished by photolytic cleavage of a bond to convert a cyclic ligand into a linear ligand or to break similar bonds in a cryptate. Our studies have demonstrated switch binding and switch release with cryptates of calcium. These remarkable cyclic ligands and cage-like ligands are indeed tight-binding and may, in principle, be incorporated in various separations methodologies, including the soil poultice. The soil poultice mimics the way in which microbes secrete extremely powerful ligands into the soil in order to harvest iron. The cellular membrane of the microbe recognizes the iron/ligand complex and admits it into the cell. The soil poultice uses molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to play the role of the cellular membrane. Imprinting involves creation of the polymer in the presence of the metal/ligand complex. In principle, a well design ligand/MIP combination can be highly selective toward almost any targeted metal ion. The principles for that design are the focus of these investigations. An imprinting molecule can interact with the polymer through any, some, or all of the so-called supramolecular modes; e.g., hydrogen bonding, electrostatic charge, minor ligand bonding, Pi-Pi stacking, and hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions. Historically these modes of binding have given MIPs only small re-binding capacities and very limited selectivities. This program has shown that each mode of interaction can be made more powerful than previously suspected and that combinations of different supramolecular interaction modes can produce remarkable synergisms. The results of this systematic study provide a firm foundation for tailoring molecular imprinted polymers for reclamation of specific metal ion, including those important to the DOE EM mission.

  19. Involvement of SNP marker located on the Calcium binding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olive trees importance is mainly due to the economic and health benefits, especially in the Mediterranean basin. Unfortunately, to enhance productivity and quality of olive oil, the study of both molecular and phenotypic characterizations of olive cultivars is crucial. We consider the analysis of 14 Tunisian olive cultivars of ...

  20. Quantitative in vivo Analyses Reveal Calcium-dependent Phosphorylation Sites and Identifies a Novel Component of the Toxoplasma Invasion Motor Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebl, Thomas; Prieto, Judith Helena; Kapp, Eugene; Smith, Brian J.; Williams, Melanie J.; Yates, John R.; Cowman, Alan F.; Tonkin, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites depend on the invasion of host cells for survival and proliferation. Calcium-dependent signaling pathways appear to be essential for micronemal release and gliding motility, yet the target of activated kinases remains largely unknown. We have characterized calcium-dependent phosphorylation events during Toxoplasma host cell invasion. Stimulation of live tachyzoites with Ca2+-mobilizing drugs leads to phosphorylation of numerous parasite proteins, as shown by differential 2-DE display of 32[P]-labeled protein extracts. Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) identified ∼546 phosphorylation sites on over 300 Toxoplasma proteins, including 10 sites on the actomyosin invasion motor. Using a Stable Isotope of Amino Acids in Culture (SILAC)-based quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses we monitored changes in the abundance and phosphorylation of the invasion motor complex and defined Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation patterns on three of its components - GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA. Furthermore, calcium-dependent phosphorylation of six residues across GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA is correlated with invasion motor activity. By analyzing proteins that appear to associate more strongly with the invasion motor upon calcium stimulation we have also identified a novel 15-kDa Calmodulin-like protein that likely represents the MyoA Essential Light Chain of the Toxoplasma invasion motor. This suggests that invasion motor activity could be regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by the direct binding of calcium ions to this new component. PMID:21980283

  1. Protection of tobacco cells from oxidative copper toxicity by catalytically active metal-binding DNA oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Junichiro; Furukawa, Hiroka; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Bouteau, François; Mancuso, Stefano; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-03-01

    The impact of copper ions on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions, leading to cell death in plant cells, have been documented. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species and the stimulation of calcium channel opening allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. These early events, completed within a few minutes after the contact with copper, are known to trigger the development of cell death. The effects of DNA fragments with copper-binding motifs as novel plant cell-protecting agents were assessed using cell suspension cultures of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. The addition of GC-rich double-stranded DNA fragments, prior to the addition of copper ions, effectively blocked both the copper-induced calcium influx and cell death. In addition, the DNA-Cu complex examined was shown to possess superoxide-scavenging catalytic activity, suggesting that DNA-mediated protection of the cells from copper toxicity is due to the removal of superoxide. Lastly, a possible mechanism of DNA-Cu interaction and future applications of these DNA fragments in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in aid of phyto-remediation processes are discussed.

  2. Role of claudins in renal calcium handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Luis Negri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paracellular channels occurring in tight junctions play a major role in transepithelial ionic flows. This pathway includes a high number of proteins, such as claudins. Within renal epithelium, claudins result in an ionic selectivity in tight junctions. Ascending thick limb of loop of Henle (ATLH is the most important segment for calcium reabsorption in renal tubules. Its cells create a water-proof barrier, actively transport sodium and chlorine through a transcellular pathway, and provide a paracellular pathway for selective calcium reabsorption. Several studies have led to a model of paracellular channel consisting of various claudins, particularly claudin-16 and 19. Claudin-16 mediates cationic paracellular permeability in ATLH, whereas claudin-19 increases cationic selectivity of claudin-16 by blocking anionic permeability. Recent studies have shown that claudin-14 promoting activity is only located in ATLH. When co-expressed with claudin-16, claudin-14 inhibits the permeability of claudin-16 and reduces paracellular permeability to calcium. Calcium reabsorption process in ATLH is closely regulated by calcium sensor receptor (CaSR, which monitors circulating Ca levels and adjusts renal excretion rate accordingly. Two microRNA, miR-9 and miR-374, are directly regulated by CaSR. Thus, miR-9 and miR-374 suppress mRNA translation for claudin-14 and induce claudin-14 decline.

  3. Calcium's Role in Mechanotransduction during Muscle Development

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    Tatiana Benavides Damm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue.

  4. Role of claudins in renal calcium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Armando Luis

    2015-01-01

    Paracellular channels occurring in tight junctions play a major role in transepithelial ionic flows. This pathway includes a high number of proteins, such as claudins. Within renal epithelium, claudins result in an ionic selectivity in tight junctions. Ascending thick limb of loop of Henle (ATLH) is the most important segment for calcium reabsorption in renal tubules. Its cells create a water-proof barrier, actively transport sodium and chlorine through a transcellular pathway, and provide a paracellular pathway for selective calcium reabsorption. Several studies have led to a model of paracellular channel consisting of various claudins, particularly claudin-16 and 19. Claudin-16 mediates cationic paracellular permeability in ATLH, whereas claudin-19 increases cationic selectivity of claudin-16 by blocking anionic permeability. Recent studies have shown that claudin-14 promoting activity is only located in ATLH. When co-expressed with claudin-16, claudin-14 inhibits the permeability of claudin-16 and reduces paracellular permeability to calcium. Calcium reabsorption process in ATLH is closely regulated by calcium sensor receptor (CaSR), which monitors circulating Ca levels and adjusts renal excretion rate accordingly. Two microRNA, miR-9 and miR-374, are directly regulated by CaSR. Thus, miR-9 and miR-374 suppress mRNA translation for claudin-14 and induce claudin-14 decline. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of ouabain and alpha angelica lactone on calcium metabolism of dog cardiac microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entman, Mark L.; Cook, Joseph W.; Bressler, Rubin

    1969-01-01

    The influence of ouabain and alpha angelica lactone on 45calcium accumulation in cardiac microsomes was studied. Calcium binding (accumulation in the absence of excess oxalate or phosphate) was augmented by both ouabain and alpha angelica lactone in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) but unaffected in its absence. Calcium turnover (defined as the change in 45Ca++ bound to the microsomes after the specific activity is changed) was studied to determine if the augmented bound pool was freely exchangeable at equilibrium. Ouabain and alpha angelica lactone augmented calcium turnover in both the presence and absence of ATP. Calcium-stimulated ATPase was increased by both agents. It is proposed that these two unsaturated lactones, with known cardiotonic activity, may exert their effects by providing an increased contraction-dependent calcium pool to be released upon systolic depolarization. PMID:4236805

  6. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian

    2016-01-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. PMID:26634999

  7. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokdarshi, Ansul; Conner, W Craig; McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian; Roberts, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Computational comparison of a calcium-dependent jellyfish protein (apoaequorin) and calmodulin-cholesterol in short-term memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2017-03-06

    Memory reconsolidation and maintenance depend on calcium channels and on calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases regulating protein turnover in the hippocampus. Ingestion of a jellyfish protein, apoaequorin, reportedly protects and/or improves verbal learning in adults and is currently widely advertised for use by the elderly. Apoaequorin is a member of the EF-hand calcium binding family of proteins that includes calmodulin. Calmodulin-1 (148 residues) differs from Apoaequorin (195 residues) in that it contains four rather than three Ca 2+ -binding sites and three rather than four cholesterol-binding (CRAC, CARC) domains. All three cholesterol-binding CARC domains in calmodulin have a high interaction affinity for cholesterol compared to only two high affinity CARC domains in apoaequorin. Both calmodulin and apoaequorin can form dimers with a potential of eight bound Ca 2+ ions and six high affinity-bound cholesterol molecules in calmodulin with six bound Ca 2+ ions and a mixed population of eight cholesterols bound to both CARC and CRAC domains in apoaqueorin. MEMSAT-SVM analysis indicates that both calmodulin and apoaqueorin have a pore-lining region. The Peptide-Cutter algorithm predicts that calmodulin-1 contains 11 trypsin-specific cleavage sites (compared to 21 in apoaqueorin), four of which are potentially blocked by cholesterol and three are within the Ca-binding domains and/or the pore-lining region. Three are clustered between the third and fourth Ca 2+ -binding sites. Only calmodulin pore-lining regions contain Ca 2+ binding sites and as dimers may insert into the plasma membrane of neural cells and act as Ca 2+ channels. In a dietary supplement, bound cholesterol may protect both apoaequorin and calmodulin from proteolysis in the gut as well as facilitate uptake across the blood-brain barrier. Our results suggest that a physiological calmodulin-cholesterol complex, not cholesterol-free jellyfish protein, may better serve as a dietary supplement to

  9. Concentração de lactato de cálcio e tempo de incubação sobre a capacidade de adesão e penetração de espermatozoides suínos na membrana perivitelina do ovo da galinha Calcium lactate concentration and incubation period on the binding and penetration capacity of swine sperm in the perivitelline membrane of chicken egg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Dahl Corcini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo testou o efeito de diferentes concentrações de lactato de cálcio e tempos de incubação sobre a capacidade de adesão e a penetração dos espermatozoides suínos nas membranas perivitelinas (MP de ovos de galinhas, na expectativa de desenvolver um teste para estimar o potencial de fertilidade de machos doadores de sêmen. No primeiro experimento, amostras de sêmen (n=12 foram incubadas em meio TCM com lactato de cálcio a 1,1 e 2,2µg mL-1. Posteriormente, após definida a concentração de 1,1µg mL-1 de lactato de cálcio, um segundo experimento comparou três períodos de incubação a 39°C: 10, 15 e 20min. As respostas testadas foram: a taxa de adesão (TA e o número de espermatozoides aderidos (NA na MP externa, e a taxa de penetração (TP e o número de orifícios (NO na MP interna. A TA na MP externa foi de 100%, independentemente da concentração e dos períodos testados. Com a concentração de lactato de cálcio de 1,1µg mL-1, o NA na membrana perivitelina externa e TP e NO na membrana perivitelina interna foram superiores (PThis study tested the effect of different calcium lactate concentrations and incubation periods on the binding and penetration capacity of swine sperm to the perivitelline layers (PL of chicken eggs, with the expectation of developing a test to estimate the potential fertility of boars used as sperm donors. In the first experiment, semen samples (n=12 were incubated with TCM medium ant two calcium lactate levels: 1.1 and 2.2µg mL-1. After the set up of fixed calcium lactate level (1.1µg mL-1, the second experiment compared three incubation periods: 10, 15 and 20min. The observed variables were binding rate (BR and number of bound sperm (NB in the outer PL, and penetration rate (PR and number of holes (NH in the inner PL. The BR to the outer MP was 100%, regardless of the tested concentrations and incubation periods. The NB to the outer perivitelline layer and the PR and the NH in the inner

  10. Properties of Calcium Acetate Manufactured with Etching Waste Solution and Limestone Sludge as a Cementitious High-Early-Strength Admixture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Deuck-Mo; Ryu, Hwa-Sung; Shin, Sang-Heon; Park, Won-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials. There are several methods available to improve its performance, with one of them being the use of high-early-strength admixtures (HESAs). Typical HESAs include calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, and calcium formate (CF). Industrial by-products, such as acetic acid and lime stone sludge (LSS), can be used together to produce calcium acetate (CA), which can subsequently be used as a cementitious HESA. In this study, calcium carbona...

  11. Characterization of feline serum-cobalt binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Amy N; Barger, Anne M; MacNeill, Amy L; Mitchell, Mark M; Solter, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress inhibits albumin's ability to complex with cobalt. Feline serum-cobalt binding has not been described. The objective was to develop a cobalt binding test for use with feline serum, and correlate the results with other biochemical and cellular constituents in blood, and with clinical diseases of cats. A colorimetric test of cobalt binding, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Co(+2) and dithiothreitol, was developed using feline serum. The test was used to measure cobalt binding in stored serum from 176 cats presented to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a variety of disease conditions. Time-matched hematology and biochemical data, and clinical information, were obtained from the medical record of each cat and correlated with the serum-cobalt binding results. Serial dilution of feline serum with phosphate-buffered saline resulted in a highly linear decrease in serum-cobalt binding (r(2)  = .9984). Serum-cobalt binding of the clinical samples also correlated with albumin concentrations in a stepwise linear regression model (r(2)  = .425), and both cobalt binding and albumin were significantly decreased in cases of inflammation. Albumin and cobalt binding also shared significant correlations with several erythron variables, and serum concentration of total calcium and bilirubin. The correlation of cobalt binding measured by a colorimetric test with albumin concentration in the clinical samples and with serum dilution is consistent with feline albumin-cobalt complex formation. Hypoalbuminemia is the likely cause of reduced serum-cobalt binding in inflammation and the correlations observed between cobalt binding and other variables. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  12. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

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    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  13. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B

  15. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  16. Calcium deprivation disrupts enlargement of Chara corallina cells: further evidence for the calcium pectate cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proseus, Timothy E; Boyer, John S

    2012-06-01

    Pectin is a normal constituent of cell walls of green plants. When supplied externally to live cells or walls isolated from the large-celled green alga Chara corallina, pectin removes calcium from load-bearing cross-links in the wall, loosening the structure and allowing it to deform more rapidly under the action of turgor pressure. New Ca(2+) enters the vacated positions in the wall and the externally supplied pectin binds to the wall, depositing new wall material that strengthens the wall. A calcium pectate cycle has been proposed for these sub-reactions. In the present work, the cycle was tested in C. corallina by depriving the wall of external Ca(2+) while allowing the cycle to run. The prediction is that growth would eventually be disrupted by a lack of adequate deposition of new wall. The test involved adding pectate or the calcium chelator EGTA to the Ca(2+)-containing culture medium to bind the calcium while the cycle ran in live cells. After growth accelerated, turgor and growth eventually decreased, followed by an abrupt turgor loss and growth cessation. The same experiment with isolated walls suggested the walls of live cells became unable to support the plasma membrane. If instead the pectate or EGTA was replaced with fresh Ca(2+)-containing culture medium during the initial acceleration in live cells, growth was not disrupted and returned to the original rates. The operation of the cycle was thus confirmed, providing further evidence that growth rates and wall biosynthesis are controlled by these sub-reactions in plant cell walls.

  17. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  18. Apo and calcium-bound crystal structures of cytoskeletal protein alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1) from the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Puja; Nguyen, Emily Tam; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Svärd, Staffan G; Luecke, Hartmut

    2009-01-30

    Alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1), a member of the alpha giardin family of annexins, has been shown to localize to the flagella of the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. Alpha giardins show a common ancestry with the annexins, a family of proteins most of which bind to phospholipids and cellular membranes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and are implicated in numerous membrane-related processes including cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane organization. It has been proposed that alpha-14 giardin may play a significant role during the cytoskeletal rearrangement during differentiation of Giardia. To gain a better understanding of alpha-14 giardin's mode of action and its biological role, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of alpha-14 giardin and its phospholipid-binding properties. Here, we report the apo crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin determined in two different crystal forms as well as the Ca(2+)-bound crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin, refined to 1.9, 1.6 and 1.65 A, respectively. Although the overall fold of alpha-14 giardin is similar to that of alpha-11 giardin, multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing was required to solve the alpha-14 giardin structure, indicating significant structural differences between these two members of the alpha giardin family. Unlike most annexin structures, which typically possess N-terminal domains, alpha-14 giardin is composed of only a core domain, followed by a C-terminal extension that may serve as a ligand for binding to cytoskeletal protein partners in Giardia. In the Ca(2+)-bound structure we detected five bound calcium ions, one of which is a novel, highly coordinated calcium-binding site not previously observed in annexin structures. This novel high-affinity calcium-binding site is composed of seven protein donor groups, a feature rarely observed in crystal structures. In addition, phospholipid-binding assays suggest that alpha-14 giardin exhibits calcium-dependent binding to

  19. Regulation of the reserve carbohydrate metabolism by alkaline pH and calcium in Neurospora crassa reveals a possible cross-regulation of both signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Ambrosio, Daniela Luz; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2017-06-09

    Glycogen and trehalose are storage carbohydrates and their levels in microorganisms vary according to environmental conditions. In Neurospora crassa, alkaline pH stress highly influences glycogen levels, and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the response to pH stress also involves the calcineurin signaling pathway mediated by the Crz1 transcription factor. Recently, in yeast, pH stress response genes were identified as targets of Crz1 including genes involved in glycogen and trehalose metabolism. In this work, we present evidence that in N. crassa the glycogen and trehalose metabolism is modulated by alkaline pH and calcium stresses. We demonstrated that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa controls the accumulation of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose via the PAC-3 transcription factor, which is the central regulator of the signaling pathway. The protein binds to the promoters of most of the genes encoding enzymes of glycogen and trehalose metabolism and regulates their expression. We also demonstrated that the reserve carbohydrate levels and gene expression are both modulated under calcium stress and that the response to calcium stress may involve the concerted action of PAC-3. Calcium activates growth of the Δpac-3 strain and influences its glycogen and trehalose accumulation. In addition, calcium stress differently regulates glycogen and trehalose metabolism in the mutant strain compared to the wild-type strain. While glycogen levels are decreased in both strains, the trehalose levels are significantly increased in the wild-type strain and not affected by calcium in the mutant strain when compared to mycelium not exposed to calcium. We previously reported the role of PAC-3 as a transcription factor involved in glycogen metabolism regulation by controlling the expression of the gsn gene, which encodes an enzyme of glycogen synthesis. In this work, we extended the investigation by studying in greater detail the effects of pH on the metabolism of the

  20. Characterisation of the interaction of the C-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor with neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Yun Lian

    Full Text Available NCS-1 is a member of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS family of EF-hand Ca(2+ binding proteins which has been implicated in several physiological functions including regulation of neurotransmitter release, membrane traffic, voltage gated Ca(2+ channels, neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and learning. NCS-1 binds to the dopamine D2 receptor, potentially affecting its internalisation and controlling dopamine D2 receptor surface expression. The D2 receptor binds NCS-1 via a short 16-residue cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. We have used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterise the interactions between the NCS-1/Ca(2+ and D2 peptide. The data show that NCS-1 binds D2 peptide with a K(d of ∼14.3 µM and stoichiometry of peptide binding to NCS-1 of 2:1. NMR chemical shift mapping confirms that D2 peptide binds to the large, solvent-exposed hydrophobic groove, on one face of the NCS-1 molecule, with residues affected by the presence of the peptide spanning both the N and C-terminal portions of the protein. The NMR and mutagenesis data further show that movement of the C-terminal helix 11 of NCS-1 to fully expose the hydrophobic groove is important for D2 peptide binding. Molecular docking using restraints derived from the NMR chemical shift data, together with the experimentally-derived stoichiometry, produced a model of the complex between NCS-1 and the dopamine receptor, in which two molecules of the receptor are able to simultaneously bind to the NCS-1 monomer.

  1. Alternative calcium source effects on commercial egg production and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pelícia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at verifying the possibility of replacing calcitic limestone by marine calcium in the diet of layers. A total number of 321 Hi-sex hens, with 40 weeks of age at the beginning of the experiment, was used. A completely randomized experimental design was applied, with 5 treatments (0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 % of calcitic limestone replacement by marine calcium source and eight replicates of eight birds each. Treatments significantly affected specific gravity (p<0.05, with the inclusion of 60% marine calcium (T5 presenting the worst result as compared to T1, which included only calcitic limestone as calcium source. It was concluded that marine calcium can replace up to 45% of calcitic limestone with no effects on performance or egg quality.

  2. Relation of Urinary Calcium and Magnesium Excretion to Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesteloot†, Hugo; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Brown, Ian J.; Chan, Queenie; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Zhao, Liancheng; Dyer, Alan R.; Unwin, Robert J.; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Data indicate an inverse association between dietary calcium and magnesium intakes and blood pressure (BP); however, much less is known about associations between urinary calcium and magnesium excretion and BP in general populations. The authors assessed the relation of BP to 24-hour excretion of calcium and magnesium in 2 cross-sectional studies. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) comprised 4,679 persons aged 40–59 years from 17 population samples in China, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and the International Cooperative Study on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure (INTERSALT) comprised 10,067 persons aged 20–59 years from 52 samples around the world. Timed 24-hour urine collections, BP measurements, and nutrient data from four 24-hour dietary recalls (INTERMAP) were collected. In multiple linear regression analyses, urinary calcium excretion was directly associated with BP. After adjustment for multiple confounders (including weight, height, alcohol intake, calcium intake, urinary sodium level, and urinary potassium intake), systolic BP was 1.9 mm Hg higher per each 4.1 mmol per 24 hours (2 standard deviations) of higher urinary calcium excretion (associations were smaller for diastolic BP) in INTERMAP. Qualitatively similar associations were observed in INTERSALT analyses. Associations between magnesium excretion and BP were small and nonsignificant for most of the models examined. The present data suggest that altered calcium homoeostasis, as exhibited by increased calcium excretion, is associated with higher BP levels. PMID:21624957

  3. Binding of diphtheria toxin to phospholipids in liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  4. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  5. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet.

  6. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...

  7. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  8. Structure-activity relationship study and discovery of indazole 3-carboxamides as calcium-release activated calcium channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Sha; Nagai, Masazumi; Koerner, Steffi K; Veves, Aristidis; Sun, Lijun

    2017-02-01

    Aberrant activation of mast cells contributes to the development of numerous diseases including cancer, autoimmune disorders, as well as diabetes and its complications. The influx of extracellular calcium via the highly calcium selective calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channel controls mast cell functions. Intracellular calcium homeostasis in mast cells can be maintained via the modulation of the CRAC channel, representing a critical point for therapeutic interventions. We describe the structure-activity relationship study (SAR) of indazole-3-carboxamides as potent CRAC channel blockers and their ability to stabilize mast cells. Our SAR results show that the unique regiochemistry of the amide linker is critical for the inhibition of calcium influx, the release of the pro-inflammatory mediators β-hexosaminidase and tumor necrosis factor α by activated mast cells. Thus, the indazole-3-carboxamide 12d actively inhibits calcium influx and stabilizes mast cells with sub-μM IC 50 . In contrast, its reverse amide isomer 9c is inactive in the calcium influx assay even at 100μM concentration. This requirement of the specific 3-carboxamide regiochemistry in indazoles is unprecedented in known CRAC channel blockers. The new structural scaffolds described in this report expand the structural diversity of the CRAC channel blockers and may lead to the discovery of novel immune modulators for the treatment of human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium oscillations. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms decoding these events. We show that ALG-2, a Ca2+-binding protein originally isolated as a protein associated with apoptosis, is directly linked to Ca2+ signalling. We...... localization in an oscillatory fashion unitemporally with Ca2+ oscillations, whereas a Ca2+-binding deficient mutant of ALG-2 did not redistribute. Using tagged ALG-2 as bait we identified its novel target protein Sec31A and based on the partial colocalization of endogenous ALG-2 and Sec31A we propose that ALG...

  10. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Deepak K; Chandran, Predeesh; Timm, Alicia E; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Smith, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion.

  11. Calcium hydroxylapatite for jawline rejuvenation: consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallara, Jean-Marie; Baspeyras, Martine; Bui, Patrick; Cartier, Hugues; Charavel, Marie-Hélène; Dumas, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    Age-associated volume loss is now known to play an important role in the structural changes of the aging face. In the lower face, this manifests as drooping of the corners of the mouth and jowl leading to a loss of the oval jawline of youth. Jawline reshaping by replacing volume has therefore become an indispensable component of modern facial rejuvenation. Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA; Radiesse® , Merz Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Frankfurt, Germany) is an injectable filler with a cosmetic indication for tissue augmentation. The ability of calcium hydroxylapatite to provide immediate and long-lasting volume enhancement makes it an ideal agent for restoring an oval jawline. This consensus statement has been developed to assist clinicians who would like to gain more experience in the use of volumizing agents to achieve an optimal outcome with this procedure. Using the recently developed Merz Aesthetics Scale® for jawline, the consensus provides a treatment protocol for individuals at each stage of oval loss and presents a series of before and after images to illustrate the improvements that can be achieved. Specific recommendations for calcium hydroxylapatite including type of anesthesia, injection techniques, volume for injection, use in combination with other procedures, and expected duration of corrections are provided. Techniques for minimizing and managing expected problems and potential complications are also described. Calcium hydroxylapatite is appropriate for treating patients at any stage of oval loss. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of structural modification of calcium spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from Spirulina platensis, on antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Srisomporn, P; Hayashi, K; Tanaka, T; Sankawa, U; Hayashi, T

    2001-01-01

    Calcium ion binding with the anionic part of a molecule was replaced with various metal cations and their inhibitory effects on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 were evaluated. Replacement of calcium ion with sodium and potassium ions maintained the antiviral activity while divalent and trivalent metal cations reduced the activity. Depolymerization of sodium spirulan with hydrogen peroxide decreased in antiviral activity as its molecular weight decreased.

  13. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    The use of (35)S-labeled calmodulin (CaM) to screen a corn root cDNA expression library has led to the isolation of a CaM-binding protein, encoded by a cDNA with sequence similarity to small auxin up RNAs (SAURs), a class of early auxin-responsive genes. The cDNA designated as ZmSAUR1 (Zea mays SAURs) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified by CaM affinity chromatography. The CaM binding assay revealed that the recombinant protein binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion analysis revealed that the CaM binding site was located at the NH(2)-terminal domain. A synthetic peptide of amino acids 20-45, corresponding to the potential CaM binding region, was used for calcium-dependent mobility shift assays. The synthetic peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of calcium. The CaM affinity assay indicated that ZmSAUR1 binds to CaM with high affinity (K(d) approximately 15 nM) in a calcium-dependent manner. Comparison of the NH(2)-terminal portions of all of the characterized SAURs revealed that they all contain a stretch of the basic alpha-amphiphilic helix similar to the CaM binding region of ZmSAUR1. CaM binds to the two synthetic peptides from the NH(2)-terminal regions of Arabidopsis SAUR-AC1 and soybean 10A5, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon for all SAURs. Northern analysis was carried out using the total RNA isolated from auxin-treated corn coleoptile segments. ZmSAUR1 gene expression began within 10 min, increased rapidly between 10 and 60 min, and peaked around 60 min after 10 microM alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid treatment. These results indicate that ZmSAUR1 is an early auxin-responsive gene. The CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride inhibited the auxin-induced cell elongation but not the auxin-induced expression of ZmSAUR1. This suggests that calcium/CaM do not regulate ZmSAUR1 at the transcriptional level. CaM binding to ZmSAUR1 in a calcium

  14. Effects of dietary bread crust Maillard reaction products on calcium and bone metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero-Ramos, Irene; Delgado-Andrade, Cristina; Haro, Ana; Ruiz-Roca, Beatriz; Morales, Francisco J; Navarro, María Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRP) consumption has been related with the development of bone degenerative disorders, probably linked to changes in calcium metabolism. We aimed to investigate the effects of MRP intake from bread crust on calcium balance and its distribution, and bone metabolism. During 88 days, rats were fed control diet or diets containing bread crust as source of MRP, or its soluble high molecular weight, soluble low molecular weight or insoluble fractions (bread crust, HMW, LMW and insoluble diets, respectively). In the final week, a calcium balance was performed, then animals were sacrified and some organs removed to analyse calcium levels. A second balance was carried out throughout the experimental period to calculate global calcium retention. Biochemical parameters and bone metabolism markers were measured in serum or urine. Global calcium bioavailability was unmodified by consumption of bread crust or its isolate fractions, corroborating the previously described low affinity of MRP to bind calcium. Despite this, a higher calcium concentration was found in femur due to smaller bones having a lower relative density. The isolate consumption of the fractions altered some bone markers, reflecting a situation of increased bone resorption or higher turnover; this did not take place in the animals fed the bread crust diet. Thus, the bread crust intake does not affect negatively calcium bioavailability and bone metabolism.

  15. Fluorescence measurement of calcium transients in perfused rabbit heart using rhod 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nido, P J; Glynn, P; Buenaventura, P; Salama, G; Koretsky, A P

    1998-02-01

    Surface fluorescence spectroscopy of the beating heart to measure cytosolic calcium has been limited by the need to use ultraviolet excitation light for many of the commonly used calcium indicators. Ultraviolet light in the heart produces a high level of background fluorescence and is highly absorbed, limiting tissue penetration. Visible wave-length fluorescence dyes such as rhod 2 are available; however, the lack of spectral shift with calcium binding precludes the use of ratio techniques to account for changes in cytosolic dye concentration. We have developed a method for in vivo quantitation of cytosolic rhod 2 concentration that in conjunction with calcium-dependent fluorescence measurements permits estimation of cytosolic calcium levels in perfused rabbit hearts. Reflective absorbance of excitation light by rhod 2 loaded into myocardium was used as an index of dye concentration and the ratio of fluorescence intensity to absorbance as a measure of cytosolic calcium concentration. Endothelial cell loading of rhod 2 was found to be minimal (calcium was measured in vitro to be 500 nM, and this value increased to 710 nM in the presence of 0.5 mM myoglobin. On the basis of this value and in vivo fluorescence measurements, cytosolic calcium concentration in the rabbit heart was found to be 229 +/- 90 nM at end diastole and 930 +/- 130 nM at peak systole, with peak fluorescence preceding peak ventricular pressure by approximately 40 ms. This technique should facilitate detailed analysis of calcium transients from the whole heart.

  16. Cadmium Induces Transcription Independently of Intracellular Calcium Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvermoes, Brooke E.; Bird, Gary S.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca2+]i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60), which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca2+]i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription. PMID:21694771

  17. The Role of Magnesium and Calcium in Governing Yeast Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosslyn M. Birch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available »Grit« formation by agglomerating cells of baker’s yeast is an idiosyncratic phenomenon of irreversible cellular aggregation that is detrimental to yeast quality. Agglomeration results in failure of rehydrated dried yeast to evenly resuspend and has economic consequences for both yeast manufacturers and bakers. Several environmental factors are implicated in governing yeast agglomeration, but no significant differences between 'gritty' and 'non-gritty' yeast in terms of cell hydrophobicity or flocculence have been reported. In this study, analysis of cellular metal ions has revealed high levels of calcium in 'gritty' strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which suggests that calcium ions may positively influence agglomeration. In contrast, it was found that cellular magnesium levels were higher in 'non-gritty' yeast. Furthermore, by increasing magnesium concentrations in molasses yeast growth media, a reduction in cellular calcium was observed and this concomitantly reduced the tendency of cells to agglomerate and form grit. Magnesium thus acted antagonistically against calcium-induced agglomeration, possibly by blocking calcium binding to yeast cell surface receptors. Results suggested that yeast agglomeration and metal ion bioavailability were inextricably linked and the findings are discussed in relation to possible measures of alleviating cellular agglomeration in the production of baker’s yeast.

  18. Pro DNS and BIND 10

    CERN Document Server

    Aitchison, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Pro DNS and BIND 10 guides you through the challenging array of features surrounding DNS with a special focus on the latest release of BIND, the world's most popular DNS implementation. This book unravels the mysteries of DNS, offering insight into origins, evolution, and key concepts like domain names and zone files. This book focuses on running DNS systems based on BIND 10, the first stable release that includes support for the latest DNSSEC standards. Whether you administer a DNS system, are thinking about running one, or you simply want to understand the DNS system, then this book for you.

  19. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  20. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of hydrothermal-electrochemical calcium titanate coatings on titanium and biomedical titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiff, J P [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas Matematicas, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Fuenzalida, V M [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias FIsicas Matematicas, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Zarate, R A [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas Matematicas, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Arias, J L [Centre for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research in Materials, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Fernandez, M S [Centre for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research in Materials, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-04-14

    Polycrystalline calcium titanate films up to 300 nm in thickness were grown on titanium and Ti6Al4V substrates by the hydrothermal-electrochemical technique in an autoclave at 200 deg. C. The films examined by x-ray diffraction exhibited reflections from orthorhombic calcium titanate on both substrates. The analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed calcium, titanium and oxygen at binding energies consistent with calcium titanate. The films grown on Ti6Al4V exhibited a small aluminium content but no vanadium. All films showed magnesium incorporation equivalent to a few per cent of the calcium content, which can be useful for the eventual use of the coating for biocompatible applications.

  2. Calcium kinetics in parathyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymling, J.F.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reports a study of calcium kinetics in twelve cases of parathyroid disease. The data suggest that hyperparathyroidism usually causes increased bone turnover. The study of calcium kinetics may be a valuable tool in the differential diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and in evaluating treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The bone turnover in one case of hypoparathyroidism was extremely low. 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a ... tion and development of tissues (bone and calcareous skeleton) (Ringer and Sainsbury 1894), conduction of nerve impulse to muscle, cell ...

  4. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. ... healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal bone ...

  5. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing features ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are given ...

  6. Single-molecule folding mechanism of an EF-hand neuronal calcium sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Otazo, Mariela R.; Bellucci, Luca

    2013-01-01

    EF-hand calcium sensors respond structurally to changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, triggering diverse cellular responses and resulting in broad interactomes. Despite impressive advances in decoding their structure-function relationships, the folding mechanism of neuronal calcium sensors...... is still elusive. We used single-molecule optical tweezers to study the folding mechanism of the human neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS1). Two intermediate structures induced by Ca2+ binding to the EF-hands were observed during refolding. The complete folding of the C domain is obligatory for the folding...

  7. Tx1, from Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom, interacts with dihydropyridine sensitive-calcium channels in GH3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouvea dos Santos, R.; Soares, M.A.; Pimenta, A.M.; De Lima, M.E.; ICB, UFMG, Belo Horizonte

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use the binding assay of tritiated-dihydropyridine and radioiodinated Tx1, isolated from the Phoneutria nigriventer venom, in order to show the presence of Ca v 1 calcium channels on pituitary tumour cell (GH3). We showed that GH3 cells have specific sites for 125 I-Tx1, which are sensitive to nifedipine (∼20%). Reverse competition assay with 3 H-PN200-110 (40% inhibition) and electrophysiological data (50% inhibition) suggest that Ca v 1 calcium channels are target sites for this toxin. To summarize, Tx1 binds to specific sites on GH3 cells and this interaction results in Ca v 1 calcium channel blockade. 3 H-PN200-110 and 125 I-Tx1 binding assays proved to be useful tools to show the presence of calcium channels on GH3 cells. (author)

  8. Specificity in calcium oxalate adherence to papillary epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, R.J.; Riese, J.W.; Kleinman, J.G.; Wiessner, J.H.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    Attachment of microcystallites to cellular membranes may be an important component of the pathophysiology of many diseases including urolithiasis. This study attempts to characterize the interaction of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and apatite (AP) crystals with renal papillary collecting tubule (RPCT) cells in primary culture. Primary cultures of RPCT cells showed the characteristic monolayer growth with sporadically interspersed clumped cells. Cultures were incubated with [ 14 C]CaOx crystals, and the crystals that bound were quantified by microscopy and adherent radioactivity. Per unit of cross-sectional area, 32 times more CaOx crystals were bound to the clumps than to the monolayer. CaOx adherence demonstrated concentration-dependent saturation with a β value (fraction of cell culture area binding CaOx crystals) of 0.179 and a 1/α ox value of 287 μg/cm 2 . On incubation with AP crystals, CaOx binding demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition with a 1/α AP value of 93 μg/cm 2 . Microcystallite adherence to RPCT cells demonstrates selectivity for cellular clumps, saturation, and inhibition. These features suggest specific binding

  9. 43. Calmodulin regulating calcium sensitivity of Na channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vegiraju

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available By extrapolating information from existing research and observing previous assumptions regarding the structure of the Na Channel, this experiment was conducted under the hypothesis that the Na Channel is in part regulated by the calmodulin protein, as a result proving calcium sensitivity of the Na Channel. Furthermore, we assume that there is a one to one stoichiometry between the Na Channel and the Calmodulin. There has been extensive research into the functionality and structure of sodium ion channels (Na channels, as several diseases are associated with the lack of regulation of sodium ions, that is caused by the disfunction of these Na channels. However, one highly controversial matter in the field is the importance of the protein calmodulin (CaM and calcium in Na channel function. Calmodulin is a protein that is well known for its role as a calcium binding messenger protein, and that association is believed to play an indirect role in regulating the Na channel through the Na channel’s supposed calcium sensitivity. While there are proponents for both sides, there has been relatively little research that provides strong evidence for either case. In this experiment, the effect of calmodulin on NaV 1.5 is tested by preparing a set of cardiac cells (of the human specie with the NaV 1.5 C-Termini and CaM protein, which were then to be placed in solutions with varying concentrations of calcium. We took special care to test multiple concentrations of calcium, as previous studies have tested very low concentrations, with Manu Ben-Johny’s team from the John Hopkins laboratory in particular testing up to a meager 50 micromolar, despite producing a well-respected paper (By comparison, the average Na channel can naturally sustain a concentration of almost 1-2 millimolar and on some occasions, reaching even higher concentrations. After using light scattering and observing the signals given off by the calcium interacting with these Nav1.5/Ca

  10. Annual Feedback Is an Effective Tool for a Sustained Increase in Calcium Intake among Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Nicholson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to optimize calcium intake among the 2,000+ older women taking part in the Vital D study. Calcium supplementation was not included in the study protocol. Our hypothesis was that annual feedback of calcium intake and informing women of strategies to improve calcium intake can lead to a sustained increase in the proportion of women who consume adequate levels of the mineral. Calcium intake was assessed on an annual basis using a validated short food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. Supplemental calcium intake was added to the dietary estimate. Participants and their nominated doctor were sent a letter that the participant’s estimated daily calcium intake was adequate or inadequate based on a cutoff threshold of 800 mg/day. General brief statements outlining the importance of an adequate calcium intake and bone health were included in all letters. At baseline, the median daily consumption of calcium was 980 mg/day and 67 percent of 1,951 participants had calcium intake of at least 800 mg per day. Of the 644 older women advised of an inadequate calcium intake at baseline (< 800 mg/day, 386 (60% had increased their intake by at least 100 mg/day when re-assessed twelve months later. This desirable change was sustained at 24 months after baseline with almost half of these women (303/644 consuming over 800 mg calcium per day. This study devised an efficient method to provide feedback on calcium intake to over 2,000 older women. The improvements were modest but significant and most apparent in those with a low intake at baseline. The decreased proportion of these women with an inadequate intake of calcium 12- and 24-months later, suggests this might be a practical, low cost strategy to maintain an adequate calcium intake among older women.

  11. IGF binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2017-12-18

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 bind IGFs but not insulin with high affinity. They were initially identified as serum carriers and passive inhibitors of IGF actions. However, subsequent studies showed that, although IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions in many circumstances, they may also potentiate these actions. IGFBPs are widely expressed in most tissues, and they are flexible endocrine and autocrine/paracrine regulators of IGF activity, which is essential for this important physiological system. More recently, individual IGFBPs have been shown to have IGF-independent actions. Mechanisms underlying these actions include (i) interaction with non-IGF proteins in compartments including the extracellular space and matrix, the cell surface and intracellularly; (ii) interaction with and modulation of other growth factor pathways including EGF, TGF- and VEGF; and (iii) direct or indirect transcriptional effects following nuclear entry of IGFBPs. Through these IGF-dependent and IGF-independent actions, IGFBPs modulate essential cellular processes including proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy and angiogenesis. They have been implicated in a range of disorders including malignant, metabolic, neurological and immune diseases. A more complete understanding of their cellular roles may lead to the development of novel IGFBP-based therapeutic opportunities.

  12. Nuclear Calcium Signaling Induces Expression of the Synaptic Organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Stefanie N.; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2–4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. PMID:25527504

  13. Nuclear calcium signaling induces expression of the synaptic organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Stefanie N; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-02-27

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2-4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  15. Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Insecticide-Induced Stimulation of Calcium Influx in Neocortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhengyu; Shafer, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated calcium channels. Therefore, the present study compared the ability of 11 structurally diverse pyrethroids to evoke Ca2+ influx in primary cultures of mouse neocortical neurons. Nine pyrethroids (tefluthrin, deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin, β-cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, S-bioallethrin, fenpropathrin, cypermethrin, and bifenthrin) produced concentration-dependent elevations in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neocortical neurons. Permethrin and resmethrin were without effect on [Ca2+]i. These pyrethroids displayed a range of efficacies on Ca2+ influx; however, the EC50 values for active pyrethroids all were within one order of magnitude. Tetrodotoxin blocked increases in [Ca2+]i caused by all nine active pyrethroids, indicating that the effects depended on VGSC activation. The pathways for deltamethrin- and tefluthrin-induced Ca2+ influx include N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors, L-type Ca2+ channels, and reverse mode of operation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inasmuch as antagonists of these sites blocked deltamethrin-induced Ca2+ influx. These data demonstrate that pyrethroids stimulate Ca2+ entry into neurons subsequent to their actions on VGSCs. PMID:20881019

  16. Voltage-gated calcium channels: Novel targets for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Nam Nhut; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Chien-Fu; Sun, Zhengda; Lai, Ming-Derg; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) comprise five subtypes: The L-type; R-type; N-type; P/Q-type; and T-type, which are encoded by ?1 subunit genes. Calcium ion channels also have confirmed roles in cellular functions, including mitogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metastasis. An association between VGCCs, a reduction in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in prostate cancer cells has also been reported. Therefore, in the present study, the online clinical data...

  17. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...... enriched dairy products. Calcium gels can be produced by addition of a calcium salt and heat treatment at temperatures higher than 70 oC for several minutes. The combination of heat treatment and calcium addition to milk with pH values between 6.6 and 5.6, will produce calcium milk gels with unique...... to be formed. In addition the low amount of micellar calcium caused a more compact gel structure with many protein aggregates. The results of this study highlighted the importance of calcium for the formation of acid, calcium and rennet gels. The content and the interactions of calcium with proteins during...

  18. Quail performance and egg quality at the end of production fed with varying levels of calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Santos de Souza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of increasing levels of dietary calcium on performance, egg quality, and the amount of calcium retained in the meat and excreted by Japanese quails at the final production. Four hundred 46-58-week-old Japanese quails were distributed in a completely randomized design consisting of five calcium level treatments: T1 = 2.95%, T2 = 3.25%, T3 = 3.55%, T4 = 3.85% and T5 = 4.15% calcium. The performance variables included feed intake (g bird-1 day-1, egg production (%, feed conversion by egg mass and per dozen eggs, egg mass (g, and viability. For egg quality, we assessed egg weight, percentage of albumen, yolk weight, percentage of shell, and shell thickness. We also evaluated the amount of calcium present in the meat and the amount of calcium excreted by quails. Increasing levels of calcium linearly influenced feed conversion, weight of yolk, and percentage of eggshell. Shell thickness increased up to the 3.85% calcium treatment. Calcium content of the meat differed among the quails; the quails fed the lowest level of calcium (2.95% showed higher calcium content in meat, whereas calcium excretion increased with increasing levels of calcium in the diet. In conclusion, the addition of 3.85% of calcium in quail feed at the end of production improved eggshell quality, and maintained internal quality and performance within the recommended standards for the production phase tested in quails. Levels higher than 3.85% calcium negatively influenced the parameters analyzed.

  19. [The calcium debate--strong bones at the expense of cardiovascular health?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Hadji, Peyman; Hahn, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Ensuring an adequate intake of calcium--by means of supplements, if necessary--is a well-established approach in prevention and therapy of osteoporosis. However, in the meantime concerns have been voiced doubting the safety of calcium supplements. The discussion commenced when a new evaluation of the Auckland calcium intervention study revealed a higher rate of myocardial infarction after administration of calcium, compared to placebo. Two meta-analyses on the cardiovascular risk of calcium supplements supported these findings. Nevertheless, these results are still discussed contentiously. Doubts were increased by the fact that neither a reevaluation of the WHI calcium vitamin D study, nor a current meta-analysis could identify calcium as a cardiovascular risk factor. Against this background the present article analyses the controversial data with respect to the well-known "Hill-criteria" of causality, including consistency of data, magnitude of association, dose-response relationship and biological plausibility.

  20. A model for human calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease: crystallization kinetics in a gelatin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, N S; Mandel, G S

    1984-01-01

    A model for the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in cartilage observed in human CPPD crystal deposition disease has been developed using diffusion of calcium and pyrophosphate ions through a denatured collagen matrix environment at physiologic pH. This model system uses biological grade gelatin and has allowed for the study of crystal deposition over a wide range of calcium and pyrophosphate concentrations, including physiologic levels. The model has reproducibly formed the two crystallographic dimorphs observed clinically: triclinic and monoclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. In addition, amorphous calcium pyrophosphate has been identified, and is the first species to form in the crystallization process and transforms to orthorhombic calcium pyrophosphate tetrahydrate. This in turn dissolves with a very localized increase in available pyrophosphate leading to the formation of triclinic and monoclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. The denatured collagen matrix has allowed for the formation of the two in vivo crystals at pyrophosphate concentrations lower than previously reported in solution studies.

  1. Binding sites and actions of Tx1, a neurotoxin from the venom of the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, in guinea pig ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Santos

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Tx1, a neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer, produces tail elevation, behavioral excitation and spastic paralysis of the hind limbs after intracerebroventricular injection in mice. Since Tx1 contracts isolated guinea pig ileum, we have investigated the effect of this toxin on acetylcholine release, as well as its binding to myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea pig ileum. [125I]-Tx1 binds specifically and with high affinity (Kd = 0.36 ± 0.02 nM to a single, non-interacting (nH = 1.1, low capacity (Bmax 1.1 pmol/mg protein binding site. In competition experiments using several compounds (including ion channel ligands, only PhTx2 and PhTx3 competed with [125I]-Tx1 for specific binding sites (K0.5 apparent = 7.50 x 10-4 g/l and 1.85 x 10-5 g/l, respectively. PhTx2 and PhTx3, fractions from P. nigriventer venom, contain toxins acting on sodium and calcium channels, respectively. However, the neurotoxin PhTx2-6, one of the isoforms found in the PhTx2 pool, did not affect [125I]-Tx1 binding. Tx1 reduced the [3H]-ACh release evoked by the PhTx2 pool by 33%, but did not affect basal or KCl-induced [3H]-ACh release. Based on these results, as well as on the homology of Tx1 with toxins acting on calcium channels (w-Aga IA and IB and its competition with [125I]-w-Cono GVIA in the central nervous system, we suggest that the target site for Tx1 may be calcium channels.

  2. Structural Insights into Calcium-Bound S100P and the V Domain of the RAGE Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumutchu, Srinivasa R.; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2014-01-01

    The S100P protein is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins and possesses both intracellular and extracellular functions. Extracellular S100P binds to the cell surface receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and activates its downstream signaling cascade to meditate tumor growth, drug resistance and metastasis. Preventing the formation of this S100P-RAGE complex is an effective strategy to treat various disease conditions. Despite its importance, the detailed structural characterization of the S100P-RAGE complex has not yet been reported. In this study, we report that S100P preferentially binds to the V domain of RAGE. Furthermore, we characterized the interactions between the RAGE V domain and Ca2+-bound S100P using various biophysical techniques, including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence spectroscopy, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, functional assays and site-directed mutagenesis. The entropy-driven binding between the V domain of RAGE and Ca+2-bound S100P was found to lie in the micromolar range (Kd of ∼6 µM). NMR data-driven HADDOCK modeling revealed the putative sites that interact to yield a proposed heterotetrameric model of the S100P-RAGE V domain complex. Our study on the spatial structural information of the proposed protein-protein complex has pharmaceutical relevance and will significantly contribute toward drug development for the prevention of RAGE-related multifarious diseases. PMID:25084534

  3. Structural insights into calcium-bound S100P and the V domain of the RAGE complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa R Penumutchu

    Full Text Available The S100P protein is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins and possesses both intracellular and extracellular functions. Extracellular S100P binds to the cell surface receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE and activates its downstream signaling cascade to meditate tumor growth, drug resistance and metastasis. Preventing the formation of this S100P-RAGE complex is an effective strategy to treat various disease conditions. Despite its importance, the detailed structural characterization of the S100P-RAGE complex has not yet been reported. In this study, we report that S100P preferentially binds to the V domain of RAGE. Furthermore, we characterized the interactions between the RAGE V domain and Ca(2+-bound S100P using various biophysical techniques, including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, fluorescence spectroscopy, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, functional assays and site-directed mutagenesis. The entropy-driven binding between the V domain of RAGE and Ca(+2-bound S100P was found to lie in the micromolar range (Kd of ∼ 6 µM. NMR data-driven HADDOCK modeling revealed the putative sites that interact to yield a proposed heterotetrameric model of the S100P-RAGE V domain complex. Our study on the spatial structural information of the proposed protein-protein complex has pharmaceutical relevance and will significantly contribute toward drug development for the prevention of RAGE-related multifarious diseases.

  4. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  5. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self -organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  6. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  7. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi 45 Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of 45 Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and 45 Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on 45 Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and 45 Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly

  8. Young Adults' Perceptions of Calcium Intake and Health: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinow, Michelle L; Randall Simpson, Janis A; Whiting, Susan J; Jung, Mary E; Buchholz, Andrea C

    2017-12-01

    Many young Canadian adults are not meeting dietary calcium recommendations. This is concerning as adequate calcium is important throughout young adulthood to maximize peak bone mass for osteoporosis prevention. There are limited studies that have explored young adults' perceptions toward calcium and health. Our objectives were to determine young adults' (18-34 years) knowledge of calcium in relation to health, facilitators and barriers to adequate calcium intake, and to explore both their suggestions for individual strategies to increase calcium intake and ways to communicate calcium-related messaging to this population. Eight gender-specific focus groups (18 men; 35 women) were conducted using a semistructured interview guide, guided by social cognitive theory. Deductive thematic analysis was used to generate themes. Participants perceived adequate calcium intake to be important for children and older adults but were uncertain of the benefits for their own age group. Perceived positive outcomes (e.g., aesthetics such as strong nails) associated with adequate calcium intake were cited as a motivator to increase intake. Perceived barriers to achieving increased calcium intake included the high cost and inconvenience of milk products and negative practices of dairy farmers. Participants suggested planning healthy well-balanced meals and forming a habit of consuming calcium-rich foods as individual strategies to increase calcium intake. Strategies to convey calcium-related information to young adults included increasing awareness of the importance of calcium via credible sources of information and developing nutrition education curricula. Social media and advertising were perceived as ineffective. Our findings provide key information for nutrition education initiatives.

  9. Morphologies and elemental compositions of calcium crystals in phyllodes and branchlets of Acacia robeorum (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Formation of calcium oxalate crystals is common in the plant kingdom, but biogenic formation of calcium sulfate crystals in plants is rare. We investigated the morphologies and elemental compositions of crystals found in phyllodes and branchlets of Acacia robeorum, a desert shrub of north-western Australia. Methods Morphologies of crystals in phyllodes and branchlets of A. robeorum were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and elemental compositions of the crystals were identified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Distributional patterns of the crystals were studied using optical microscopy together with SEM. Key Results According to the elemental compositions, the crystals were classified into three groups: (1) calcium oxalate; (2) calcium sulfate, which is a possible mixture of calcium sulfate and calcium oxalate with calcium sulfate being the major component; and (3) calcium sulfate · magnesium oxalate, presumably mixtures of calcium sulfate, calcium oxalate, magnesium oxalate and silica. The crystals were of various morphologies, including prisms, raphides, styloids, druses, crystal sand, spheres and clusters. Both calcium oxalate and calcium sulfate crystals were observed in almost all tissues, including mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex; calcium sulfate · magnesium oxalate crystals were only found in mesophyll and parenchyma cells in phyllodes. Conclusions The formation of most crystals was biologically induced, as confirmed by studying the crystals formed in the phyllodes from seedlings grown in a glasshouse. The crystals may have functions in removing excess calcium, magnesium and sulfur, protecting the plants against herbivory, and detoxifying aluminium and heavy metals. PMID:22294477

  10. High calcium concentration in bones promotes bone metastasis in renal cell carcinomas expressing calcium-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeckel, Elke; Haber, Tobias; Prawitt, Dirk; Junker, Kerstin; Hampel, Christian; Thüroff, Joachim W; Roos, Frederik C; Brenner, Walburgis

    2014-02-28

    The prognosis for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is related to a high rate of metastasis, including 30% of bone metastasis. Characteristic for bone tissue is a high concentration of calcium ions. In this study, we show a promoting effect of an enhanced extracellular calcium concentration on mechanisms of bone metastasis via the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and its downstream signaling molecules. Our analyses were performed using 33 (11/category) matched specimens of normal and tumor tissue and 9 (3/category) primary cells derived from RCC patients of the 3 categories: non-metastasized, metastasized into the lung and metastasized into bones during a five-year period after nephrectomy. Expression of CaSR was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot analyses and flow cytometry, respectively. Cells were treated by calcium and the CaSR inhibitor NPS 2143. Cell migration was measured in a Boyden chamber with calcium (10 μM) as chemotaxin and proliferation by BrdU incorporation. The activity of intracellular signaling mediators was quantified by a phospho-kinase array and Western blot. The expression of CaSR was highest in specimens and cells of patients with bone metastases. Calcium treatment induced an increased migration (19-fold) and proliferation (2.3-fold) exclusively in RCC cells from patients with bone metastases. The CaSR inhibitor NPS 2143 elucidated the role of CaSR on the calcium-dependent effects. After treatment with calcium, the activity of AKT, PLCγ-1, p38α and JNK was clearly enhanced and PTEN expression was almost completely abolished in bone metastasizing RCC cells. Our results indicate a promoting effect of extracellular calcium on cell migration and proliferation of bone metastasizing RCC cells via highly expressed CaSR and its downstream signaling pathways. Consequently, CaSR may be regarded as a new prognostic marker predicting RCC bone metastasis.

  11. Calcium Administration Is Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition: Results from a Natural Experiment Created by a Calcium Gluconate Shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Bryan; Larabell, Patrick; Patel, Jasmine U; Wong, Kristoffer; Qasem, Lina; Arthur, William; Leiberman, Chaim; Whittaker, Peter; Tennenberg, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral calcium is frequently administered to critically ill patients. However, animal studies demonstrate that calcium administration during critical illness heightens inflammation and leads to shock, organ dysfunction, and mortality. We sought to evaluate the association between calcium administration and adverse outcomes in critically ill patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN). Retrospective cohort examined before and during a calcium gluconate shortage. During the shortage, calcium was absent from PN, but calcium supplementation outside of PN was allowed. The shortage resulted in a natural experiment that included a group of patients who did not receive calcium. Intensive care units (ICUs) in three teaching hospitals. A total of 259 adults who received PN in the ICU for 48 hours or longer. Patients were divided into quartiles based on amount of parenteral calcium received; the lowest quartile received no calcium. End points were in-hospital mortality, acute respiratory failure, new-onset shock, and a composite of any one of these end points. For patients not on mechanical ventilation or vasoactive support when PN started, logistic regression revealed that calcium administration was associated with mortality (odds ratio [OR] 2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-5.69), acute respiratory failure (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.28-4.60), new-onset shock (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.22-6.44), and the combined end point (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.31-4.16). The odds of adverse outcomes increased as the calcium dose increased. Calcium administration correlated with adverse outcomes in critically ill patients receiving PN. The data suggest that administration of parenteral calcium to critically ill patients may be harmful. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  12. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  13. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    The regulation of bone turnover is a complex and finely tuned process. Many factors regulate bone remodeling, including hormones, growth factors, cytokines etc. However, little is known about the signals coupling bone formation to bone resorption, and how mechanical forces are translated...... into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...

  14. Differential sensitivity of [3H]nitrendipine binding to cations of toxicological interest in various rat brain areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, R.A.; Govoni, S.; Battaini, F.

    1985-01-01

    [ 3 H]Nitrendipine ([ 3 H]NTP) is a radiolabelled calcium antagonist which can be used to study neuronal calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels. The interaction of Mn 2+ , Zn 2+ , Pb 2+ and La 3+ on [ 3 H]NTP binding was studied in 3 brain areas particularly rich in [ 3 H]NTP binding sites. Differences were observed in the brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]NTP binding as well as in their sensitivity to the metal ions Pb, Mn and Zn. The binding data suggest that neuronal Ca 2+ channels in different brain areas display distinct sensitivity to selected divalent cations. (Auth.)

  15. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  16. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  17. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Canillas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies.

  18. Fortification of milk with calcium: effect on calcium bioavailability and interactions with iron and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Sara; Barberá, Reyes; Lagarda, María Jesús; Farré, Rosaura

    2006-06-28

    Calcium solubility, dialysability, and transport and uptake (retention + transport) by Caco-2 cells as indicators of calcium bioavailability have been estimated in the in vitro gastrointestinal digests of milk and calcium fortified milk. A significant linear correlation (p calcium uptake and the amount of soluble calcium added to the cells, and also between percentage calcium uptake and the calcium measured in the analyzed samples. The solubility, dialysis, transport, and uptake values are higher (p calcium fortified milks than for nonfortified milks; that is, calcium fortification increases not only calcium content but also its bioavailability. An inhibitory effect of calcium from fortified milks upon iron absorption was found. The observed effect of calcium from fortified milks upon zinc bioavailability depends on the in vitro method used, zinc solubility and dialysis decrease in calcium fortified milks, and percentage zinc uptake remains unchanged.

  19. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenton, Rod Russel R; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-04-04

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation.

  20. Lack of effect of chronic calcium antagonist treatment on beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in right atria from patients with or without heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodde, O. E.; Hundhausen, H. J.; Zerkowski, H. R.; Michel, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of chronic calcium antagonist (calcium entry blocker, CEB; nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem) treatment on beta-adrenoceptor density (assessed by (-)-[125I]-iodocyanopindolol [ICYP] binding) and subtype distribution in right atria from 65 patients without apparent heart

  1. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P metabolism (P metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  2. Urine Calcium and Bone Mineral Density in Calcium Stone-Forming Patients Treated with Alendronate and Hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; González-Torres, Samuel; Cano-García, María Del Carmen; De Haro-Muñoz, Tomás; Abad-Menor, Félix; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Cózar-Olmo, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of hydrochlorothiazide and alendronate on urine calcium and bone mineral density in calcium stone-forming patients. A prospective, non-randomized, non-observational comparative study was performed; this study included 111 patients with recurrent calcium stones, divided into 3 groups according to the treatment received. Group 1: 36 patients were treated with alendronate, 70 mg/week; Group 2: 34 patients were treated with alendronate, 70 mg/week + hydrochlorothiazide, 50 mg/day; Group 3: 41 patients were treated with hydrochlorothiazide, 50 mg/day. All patients received recommendations on diet and fluid intake. Other variables of bone mineral density were studied and analyzed, including bone remodeling markers and urinary calcium before and after 2 years of treatment. The statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 17.0 program, with a statistical significance of p hydrochlorothiazide treatment offers the best results along with the improvement in bone mineral density and decrease in urine calcium in patients with recurrent calcium stones. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Individual and family correlates of calcium-rich food intake among parents of early adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicks, Marla; Ballejos, Miriam Edlefsen; Goodell, L Suzanne; Gunther, Carolyn; Richards, Rickelle; Wong, Siew Sun; Auld, Garry; Boushey, Carol J; Bruhn, Christine; Cluskey, Mary; Misner, Scottie; Olson, Beth; Zaghloul, Sahar

    2011-03-01

    Most adults do not meet calcium intake recommendations. Little is known about how individual and family factors, including parenting practices that influence early adolescents' intake of calcium-rich foods, affect calcium intake of parents. This information could inform the development of effective nutrition education programs. To identify individual and family factors associated with intake of calcium-rich foods among parents of early adolescents (aged 10 to 13 years). A cross-sectional survey was used with 14 scales to assess attitudes/preferences and parenting practices regarding calcium-rich foods and a calcium-specific food frequency questionnaire (2006-2007). A convenience sample of self-reporting non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, and Asian (n=661) parents was recruited in nine states. Parents were the primary meal planner/preparer and completed questionnaires in homes or community settings. Predictors of calcium intake from three food groupings-all food sources, dairy foods, and milk. Multivariate regression analyses identified demographic, attitude/preference, and behavioral factors associated with calcium intake. Most respondents were women (∼90%) and 38% had a college degree. Education was positively associated with calcium intake from all three food groupings, whereas having an Asian spouse compared to a non-Hispanic white spouse was negatively associated with calcium intake only from all food sources and from dairy foods. Expectations for and encouragement of healthy beverage intake for early adolescents were positively associated with calcium intake from dairy foods and milk, respectively. Parental concern regarding adequacy of intake was negatively associated, whereas perception of health benefits from calcium-rich foods was positively associated with calcium intake from all food sources and from dairy foods. Between 20% and 32% of the variance in calcium intake from all food groupings was explained in these models. Individual factors and positive

  4. Effect of lactose on intestinal absorption of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labat, Marie-Louise

    1972-01-01

    Calcium absorption was immediately increased when lactose was administered in large amounts in the intestine of standard rats fed on a vitamin D diet. The same effect could be reproduced with lactulose, a glucid un-hydrolyzed by lactase and unabsorbed. The occurrence of a saturation process for high doses of calcium agrees with a biochemical process through a carrier; this process was not inhibited by actinomycin D, which does not agree with a 'de novo' synthesis of a calcium binding protein; yet activation of the preexisting protein cannot be excluded. The intestinal effect of lactose resulted in an inhibition of bone catabolism in the adult normocalcemic rat indicating a possible interference of thyrocalcitonin. Finally in the young rat, hypocalcemic by lack of vitamin D, on account of the lactose effect, calcium can be considered as a 'third messenger' in the chain of intracellular events between the interaction of the parathyroid hormone with the bone receptor and the expression of its activity. (author) [fr

  5. A ChIP-seq defined genome-wide map of vitamin D receptor binding: Associations with disease and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.; Heger, Andreas; Berlanga, Antonio J.; Maugeri, Narelle J.; Lincoln, Matthew R.; Burrell, Amy; Handunnetthi, Lahiru; Handel, Adam E.; Disanto, Giulio; Orton, Sarah-Michelle; Watson, Corey T.; Morahan, Julia M.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ponting, Chris P.; Ebers, George C.; Knight, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Initially thought to play a restricted role in calcium homeostasis, the pleiotropic actions of vitamin D in biology and their clinical significance are only now becoming apparent. However, the mode of action of vitamin D, through its cognate nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), and its contribution to diverse disorders, remain poorly understood. We determined VDR binding throughout the human genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). After calcitriol stimulation, we identified 2776 genomic positions occupied by the VDR and 229 genes with significant changes in expression in response to vitamin D. VDR binding sites were significantly enriched near autoimmune and cancer associated genes identified from genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Notable genes with VDR binding included IRF8, associated with MS, and PTPN2 associated with Crohn's disease and T1D. Furthermore, a number of single nucleotide polymorphism associations from GWA were located directly within VDR binding intervals, for example, rs13385731 associated with SLE and rs947474 associated with T1D. We also observed significant enrichment of VDR intervals within regions of positive selection among individuals of Asian and European descent. ChIP-seq determination of transcription factor binding, in combination with GWA data, provides a powerful approach to further understanding the molecular bases of complex diseases. PMID:20736230

  6. Pharmacological characterization of the involvement of protein kinase C in oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Morita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence increasingly shows that astrocytes play a pivotal role in brain physiology and pathology via calcium dependent processes, thus the characterization of the calcium dynamics in astrocytes is of growing importance. We have previously reported that the epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor up-regulate the oscillation of the calcium releases that are induced by stimuli, including glutamate in cultured astrocytes. This calcium oscillation is assumed to involve protein kinase C (PKC, which is activated together with the calcium releases as a consequence of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. In the present study, this issue has been investigated pharmacologically by using astrocytes cultured with and without the growth factors. The pharmacological activation of PKC largely reduced the glutamate-induced oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases. Meanwhile, PKC inhibitors increased the total amounts of both calcium increases without affecting the peak amplitudes and converted the calcium oscillations to non-oscillatory sustained calcium increases by abolishing the falling phases of the repetitive calcium increases. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects were consistent between both glutamate- and histamine-induced calcium oscillations. These results suggest that PKC up-regulates the removal of cytosolic calcium in astrocytes, and this up-regulation is essential for calcium oscillation in astrocytes cultured with growth factors.

  7. A histochemical and X-ray microanalysis study of calcium changes in insect flight muscle degeneration in Solenopsis, the queen fire ant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.; Vinson, S.B.

    1982-01-01

    Potassium pyroantimonate histochemistry, coupled with ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid (EGTA)-chelation and X-ray microprobe analysis, was employed to localize intracellular calcium binding sites in the normal and degenerating flight musculature in queens of Solenopsis, the fire ant. In normal animals, calcium distribution was light to moderate within myofibrils and mitochondria. In the early contracture stages of the insemination-induced degeneration, both myofilament and mitochondrial calcium loading was markedly increased. In the terminal stages of myofibril breakdown, only Z-lines (isolated or in clusters) with an associated filamentous residue persisted. These complexes were also intensely calcium positive. This study further documents the presence of increased sarcoplasmic calcium during muscle necrosis. Surface membrane defects, mitochondrial calcium overload, and calcium-activated proteases may all be involved in this ''normal'' breakdown process

  8. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  9. Thermodynamic study of the interaction between calcium and zoledronic acid by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostefa Side Larbi, Mohamed A.; Sauzet, Christophe; Piccerelle, Philippe; Cau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used to treat calcium disorders because of their structural and functional similarities with the organic pyrophosphates present in plasma and urine. BPs are well known for their strong interactions with calcium, and they have been shown to bind to hydroxyapatite or bone; however, no model exists for studying in greater detail how BPs and particularly amino-bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as zolendronate (Zol) bind to free calcium. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of pH on Ca 2+ /Zol complex formation using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) because these effects might have important implications for the future development of a solid dosage form. In this study, using a predictive model, we can observe, the existence of three Ca 2+ /Zol complexes. Knowledge of the binding constant for each complex is helpful for predicting the predominance of the different species at different Ca 2+ /Zol ratios. Binding is due to ionic interaction between Ca 2+ and the negative charges formed by dissociated Zol as a function of the pKa. Ca 2+ fixation induces a strong rearrangement of the surrounding water molecules and causes proton release or uptake. The pH-dependent affinity of calcium for each site based on the model used in this work is proposed in detail, which might facilitate the development of new bisphosphonates and enable further elucidation of their mode of action.

  10. TRIAL OF ASPIRIN AND CALCIUM ON PREVENTION OF PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI AKBA TAHERIAN

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction. Preelampsia is a common and serious complication of pregnancy that affects both mother and newborn. This study designed to determine whether low-dose aspirin or calcium supplements taken throughout pregnancy reduce the incidence of preeclampsia. Methods. The present study was a randomized controlled clinical trial. 990 healthy nulliparous women, who were pregnant for 13 to 20 weeks were chosen to receive daily treatment with low dose of aspirin 75 mg (330 patients, aspirin group, calcium D 500 mg (330 Patients, calcium group and no medication (330 patients, control group for remainder of theirs pregnancies. Data included demographic, obstetric, prenatal care, hospital records and final diagnosis were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Squre, ANOVA and Duncan test at significance level of 0.05. Results. Preeclampsia occurred in 15 of 330 women in the aspirin group (4.6%, 13 of 330 women in the calcium group (4% and in 33 of 330 women in control group (10.1%. There were significant differences between aspirin and control groups (4.6% vs. 10.1% P < 0.05 also between calcium and control group (4% vs. 10.1% P < 0.05. Discussion. These results suggest that low dose of aspirin or calcium D during pregnancy in healthy nulliparous women is effective to reduce the prevalence of preeclampsia.

  11. Anodic and cathodic reactions in molten calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fray, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Calcium chloride is a very interesting electrolyte in that it is available, virtually free, in high purity form as a waste product from the chemical industry. It has a very large solubility for oxide ions, far greater than many alkali halides and other divalent halides and has the same toxicity as sodium chloride and also a very high solubility in water. Intuitively, on the passage of current, it is expected that calcium would be deposited at the cathode and chlorine would evolve at the anode. However, if calcium oxide is added to the melt, it is possible to deposit calcium and evolve oxygen containing gases at the anode, making the process far less polluting than when chlorine is evolved. This process is discussed in terms of the addition of calcium to molten lead. Furthermore, these reactions can be altered dramatically depending upon the electrode materials and the other ions dissolved in the calcium chloride. As calcium is only deposited at very negative cathodic potentials, there are several interesting cathodic reactions that can occur and these include the decomposition of the carbonate ion and the ionization of oxygen, sulphur, selenium and tellurium. For example, if an oxide is used as the cathode in molten calcium chloride, the favoured reaction is shown to be the ionization of oxygen O + 2e - → O 2- rather than Ca 2+ + 2 e- → Ca. The oxygen ions dissolve in the salt leaving the metal behind, and this leads to the interesting hypothesis that metal oxides can be reduced directly to the metal purely by the use of electrons. Examples are given for the reduction of titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, chromium oxide and niobium oxide and by mixing oxide powders together and reducing the mixed compact, alloys and intermetallic compounds are formed. Preliminary calculations indicate that this new process should be much cheaper than conventional metallothermic reduction for these elements. (author)

  12. Modeling Calcium Microdomains using Homogenisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Erin R.; Goel, Pranay; Puglisi, Jose L.; Bers, Donald M.; Cannell, Mark; Sneyd, James

    2007-01-01

    Microdomains of calcium (i.e., areas on the nanometer scale that have qualitatively different calcium concentrations from that in the bulk cytosol) are known to be important in many situations. In cardiac cells, for instance, a calcium microdomain between the L-type channels and the ryanodine receptors, the so-called diadic cleft, is where the majority of the control of calcium release occurs. In other cell types that exhibit calcium oscillations and waves, the importance of microdomains in the vicinity of clusters of inositol trisphosphate receptors, or between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other internal organelles or the plasma membrane, is clear. Given the limits of computational power, it is not currently realistic to model an entire cellular cytoplasm by incorporating detailed structural information about the ER throughout the entire cytoplasm. Hence, most models use a homogenised approach, assuming that both cytoplasm and ER coexist at each point of the domain. Conversely, microdomain models can be constructed, in which detailed structural information can be incorporated, but, until now, methods have not been developed for linking such a microdomain model to a model at the level of the entire cell. Using the homogenisation approach we developed in an earlier paper (Goel P., A. Friedman and J. Sneyd. 2006. Homogenization of the cell cytoplasm: the calcium bidomain equations. SIAM J. on Multiscale Modeling and Simulation, in press) we show how a multiscale model of a calcium microdomain can be constructed. In this model a detailed model of the microdomain (in which the ER and the cytoplasm are separate compartments) is coupled to a homogenised model of the entire cell in a rigorous way. Our method is illustrated by a simple model of the diadic cleft of a cardiac half-sarcomere. PMID:17499276

  13. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  14. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  15. Characterization of the S100A1 protein binding site on TRPC6 C-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bily

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential (TRP protein superfamily consists of seven major groups, among them the "canonical TRP" family. The TRPC proteins are calcium-permeable nonselective cation channels activated after the emptying of intracellular calcium stores and appear to be gated by various types of messengers. The TRPC6 channel has been shown to be expressed in various tissues and cells, where it modulates the calcium level in response to external signals. Calcium binding proteins such as Calmodulin or the family of S100A proteins are regulators of TRPC channels. Here we characterized the overlapping integrative binding site for S100A1 at the C-tail of TRPC6, which is also able to accomodate various ligands such as Calmodulin and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5-bisphosphate. Several positively charged amino acid residues (Arg852, Lys856, Lys859, Arg860 and Arg864 were determined by fluorescence anisotropy measurements for their participation in the calcium-dependent binding of S100A1 to the C terminus of TRPC6. The triple mutation Arg852/Lys859/Arg860 exhibited significant disruption of the binding of S100A1 to TRPC6. This indicates a unique involvement of these three basic residues in the integrative overlapping binding site for S100A1 on the C tail of TRPC6.

  16. Characterization of the S100A1 protein binding site on TRPC6 C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bily, Jan; Grycova, Lenka; Holendova, Blanka; Jirku, Michaela; Janouskova, Hana; Bousova, Kristyna; Teisinger, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) protein superfamily consists of seven major groups, among them the "canonical TRP" family. The TRPC proteins are calcium-permeable nonselective cation channels activated after the emptying of intracellular calcium stores and appear to be gated by various types of messengers. The TRPC6 channel has been shown to be expressed in various tissues and cells, where it modulates the calcium level in response to external signals. Calcium binding proteins such as Calmodulin or the family of S100A proteins are regulators of TRPC channels. Here we characterized the overlapping integrative binding site for S100A1 at the C-tail of TRPC6, which is also able to accomodate various ligands such as Calmodulin and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Several positively charged amino acid residues (Arg852, Lys856, Lys859, Arg860 and Arg864) were determined by fluorescence anisotropy measurements for their participation in the calcium-dependent binding of S100A1 to the C terminus of TRPC6. The triple mutation Arg852/Lys859/Arg860 exhibited significant disruption of the binding of S100A1 to TRPC6. This indicates a unique involvement of these three basic residues in the integrative overlapping binding site for S100A1 on the C tail of TRPC6.

  17. Quantitative in vivo analyses reveal calcium-dependent phosphorylation sites and identifies a novel component of the Toxoplasma invasion motor complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nebl

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites depend on the invasion of host cells for survival and proliferation. Calcium-dependent signaling pathways appear to be essential for micronemal release and gliding motility, yet the target of activated kinases remains largely unknown. We have characterized calcium-dependent phosphorylation events during Toxoplasma host cell invasion. Stimulation of live tachyzoites with Ca²⁺-mobilizing drugs leads to phosphorylation of numerous parasite proteins, as shown by differential 2-DE display of ³²[P]-labeled protein extracts. Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT identified ∼546 phosphorylation sites on over 300 Toxoplasma proteins, including 10 sites on the actomyosin invasion motor. Using a Stable Isotope of Amino Acids in Culture (SILAC-based quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses we monitored changes in the abundance and phosphorylation of the invasion motor complex and defined Ca²⁺-dependent phosphorylation patterns on three of its components--GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA. Furthermore, calcium-dependent phosphorylation of six residues across GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA is correlated with invasion motor activity. By analyzing proteins that appear to associate more strongly with the invasion motor upon calcium stimulation we have also identified a novel 15-kDa Calmodulin-like protein that likely represents the MyoA Essential Light Chain of the Toxoplasma invasion motor. This suggests that invasion motor activity could be regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by the direct binding of calcium ions to this new component.

  18. Relationship between nutritional habits and hair calcium levels in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta; Brzozowska, Anna

    2011-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether hair calcium levels are related to nutritional habits, selected status parameters, and life-style factors in young women. Eighty-five healthy female students neither pregnant nor lactating, using no hair dyes or permanents were recruited for the study. Food consumption data, including fortified products and dietary supplements were collected with 4-day records. The calcium levels in hair and serum were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Serum osteocalcin and the C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen were assayed by ELISA. The women were divided into four groups according to their total vitamin D and calcium intakes and hair calcium levels. At adequate calcium intake and comparable serum bone biomarker levels, supplemental vitamin D increased the hair calcium levels. On the other hand, at lower than estimated adequate requirement of vitamin D intake the hair calcium levels were comparable in women with low calcium intakes but consuming high amounts of meat products or those whose diets were rich in dairy products, possibly due to homeostatic mechanisms. Elevated hair calcium was seen in 25% of subjects and could not be related to nutritional or life-style factors. The results show that the hair calcium levels were weakly related to the quality of diet, with some synergistic interactions between nutrients, especially vitamin D and magnesium.

  19. Lead in calcium supplements (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Khalid, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead present in calcium supplements is of grave concern as some lead levels have been measured up to the extent of regulatory limit set by the United States. Calcium supplements inevitably get contaminated with lead as both are naturally occurring elements. Therefore, it is imperative to indicate its level in these supplements in order to create awareness among consumers. In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Pb contents in 27 commonly consumed Ca supplements manufactured by different national and multinational companies. The daily intake of lead through these supplements was calculated. Only 10% of the calcium supplements analyzed met the criteria of acceptable Pb levels (1.5 mu g/daily dose) in supplements/consumer products set by the United States. It was also found that Pb intake was highest in chelated calcium supplements 28.5 mu g/daily dose, whereas lowest 0.47 mu g/daily dose through calcium supplements with vitamin D formulation. In order to validate our results from the study conducted, IAEA-certified reference material (animal bone, H-5) was analyzed for its Pb levels. The levels of Pb determined were quite in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  20. Citrate salts for preventing and treating calcium containing kidney stones in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rebecca; Hanchanale, Vishwanath S; Myatt, Andy; Somani, Bhaskar; Nabi, Ghulam; Biyani, C Shekhar

    2015-10-06

    Kidney stones affect people worldwide and have a high rate of recurrence even with treatment. Recurrences are particularly prevalent in people with low urinary citrate levels. These people have a higher incidence of calcium phosphate and calcium oxalate stones. Oral citrate therapy increases the urinary citrate levels, which in turn binds with calcium and inhibits the crystallisation thus reduces stone formation. Despite the widespread use of oral citrate therapy for prevention and treatment of calcium oxalate stones, the evidence to support its clinical efficacy remains uncertain. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy and adverse events associated with citrate salts for the treatment and prevention of calcium containing kidney stones. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 29 July 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy and adverse events associated with citrate salts for the treatment and prevention of calcium containing kidney stones in adults treated for a minimum of six months. Two authors assessed studies for inclusion in this review. Data were extracted according to predetermined criteria. Summary estimates of effect were obtained using a random-effects model, and results were expressed as risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) and 95% CI for continuous outcomes. We included seven studies that included a total of 477 participants, most of whom had oxalate stones. Of these, three studies (247 participants) compared potassium citrate with placebo or no intervention; three (166 participants) compared potassium-sodium citrate with no intervention; and one (64 participants) compared potassium-magnesium citrate with placebo. Overall, quality of the reporting of the included studies was considered moderate to

  1. Calcium balance in young adults on a vegan and lactovegetarian diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberg-Mueller, Kathrin; Raschka, Ladislav

    2003-01-01

    For people in Western countries, the vegan diet has the advantage of low energy intake, but the calcium status of this strictly plant-based diet is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the calcium balance of individuals on a vegan diet in comparison with a lactovegetarian diet in a short-term investigation. Seven women and one man, ranging in age from 19 to 24 years, received during the first 10 days a vegan diet based on plant foods and calcium-rich mineral water and a lactovegetarian diet during the following 10 days. Portion size was adapted to the subjects' individual energy requirements. Calcium status was assessed by means of calcium intake in food and calcium output in feces and urine as measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In addition, deoxypyridinoline was measured in urine as a marker of bone resorption. The results show a significantly smaller daily calcium intake with an average of 843 +/- 140 mg in the vegan versus 1322 +/- 303 mg in the lactovegetarian diet. Apparent calcium absorption rates were calculated as 26% +/- 15% in the vegan and 24% +/- 8% in the lactovegetarian group (NS). The calcium balance was positive both in the vegan diet (119 +/- 113 mg/day) and in the lactovegetarian diet (211 +/- 136 mg/day) (NS). Deoxypyridinoline excretion showed no significant difference between the two diets (105 +/- 31 and 98 +/- 23 nmol/day). The present results indicate that calcium balance and a marker of bone turnover are not affected significantly when calcium is provided either solely by plant foods or by a diet including dairy products, despite the significantly different calcium intake levels in the diets. We conclude that a well-selected vegan diet maintains calcium status, at least for a short-term period.

  2. Allopregnanolone-induced rise in intracellular calcium in embryonic hippocampal neurons parallels their proliferative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinton Roberta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that regulate intracellular calcium concentration are known to play a critical role in brain function and neural development, including neural plasticity and neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one promotes neural progenitor proliferation in vitro in cultures of rodent hippocampal and human cortical neural progenitors, and in vivo in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice dentate gyrus. We also found that APα-induced proliferation of neural progenitors is abolished by a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, indicating a calcium dependent mechanism for the proliferation. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effect of APα on the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in E18 rat hippocampal neurons using ratiometric Fura2-AM imaging. Results Results indicate that APα rapidly increased intracellular calcium concentration in a dose-dependent and developmentally regulated manner, with an EC50 of 110 ± 15 nM and a maximal response occurring at three days in vitro. The stereoisomers 3β-hydroxy-5α-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, and 3β-hydroxy-5β-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, as well as progesterone, were without significant effect. APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration increase was not observed in calcium depleted medium and was blocked in the presence of the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker La3+, or the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Furthermore, the GABAA receptor blockers bicuculline and picrotoxin abolished APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration rise. Conclusion Collectively, these data indicate that APα promotes a rapid, dose-dependent, stereo-specific, and developmentally regulated increase of intracellular calcium concentration in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons via a mechanism that requires both the GABAA receptor and L-type calcium channel. These data suggest that AP

  3. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P parathyroid hormone levels (P animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  4. p53 increases intra-cellular calcium release by transcriptional regulation of calcium channel TRPC6 in GaQ3-treated cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Madan

    Full Text Available p53 and calcium signaling are inter-dependent and are known to show both synergistic and antagonistic effects on each other in the cellular environment. However, no molecular mechanism or cellular pathway is known which shows direct regulation between these important cellular signaling molecules. Here we have shown that in cancer cells treated with anti-neoplastic drug GaQ3, p53, there is an increase in intracellular calcium levels by transcriptional regulation of a novel calcium channel gene TRPC6. p53 directly binds to a 22 bp response element in the TRPC6 gene promoter and increase its mRNA and protein expression. Over-expression of TRPC6 results in calcium-dependent apoptotic death and activation of apoptotic genes in a variety of cancer cells. This research work shows that p53 and its transcriptional activity is critical in regulation of calcium signaling and an increase in the intracellular calcium level might be one of the anti-cancer strategies to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.

  5. p53 increases intra-cellular calcium release by transcriptional regulation of calcium channel TRPC6 in GaQ3-treated cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Esha; Gogna, Rajan; Keppler, Bernhard; Pati, Uttam

    2013-01-01

    p53 and calcium signaling are inter-dependent and are known to show both synergistic and antagonistic effects on each other in the cellular environment. However, no molecular mechanism or cellular pathway is known which shows direct regulation between these important cellular signaling molecules. Here we have shown that in cancer cells treated with anti-neoplastic drug GaQ3, p53, there is an increase in intracellular calcium levels by transcriptional regulation of a novel calcium channel gene TRPC6. p53 directly binds to a 22 bp response element in the TRPC6 gene promoter and increase its mRNA and protein expression. Over-expression of TRPC6 results in calcium-dependent apoptotic death and activation of apoptotic genes in a variety of cancer cells. This research work shows that p53 and its transcriptional activity is critical in regulation of calcium signaling and an increase in the intracellular calcium level might be one of the anti-cancer strategies to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.

  6. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  7. Integration of Kinase and Calcium Signaling at the Level of Chromatin Underlies Inducible Gene Activation in T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brignall, Ruth; Cauchy, Pierre; Bevington, Sarah L.; Gorman, Bethany; Pisco, Angela O.; Bagnall, James; Boddington, Christopher; Rowe, William; England, Hazel; Rich, Kevin; Schmidt, Lorraine; Dyer, Nigel P.; Travis, Mark A.; Ott, Sascha; Jackson, Dean A.

    2017-01-01

    TCR signaling pathways cooperate to activate the inducible transcription factors NF-B, NFAT and AP-1. Here, using the calcium ionophore ionomycin and/or PMA on Jurkat T cells, we show that the gene expression program associated with activation of TCR signaling is closely related to specific chromatin landscapes. We find that calcium and kinase signaling cooperate to induce chromatin remodeling at ~2100 chromatin regions, which demonstrate enriched binding motifs for inducible factors and cor...

  8. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Calcium phosphate ceramics in drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman; Edgington, Joe; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) particulates, cements and scaffolds have attracted significant interest as drug delivery vehicles. CaP systems, including both hydroxyapaptite and tricalcium phosphates, possess variable stoichiometry, functionality and dissolution properties which make them suitable for cellular delivery. Their chemical similarity to bone and thus biocompatibility, as well as variable surface charge density contribute to their controlled release properties. Among specific research areas, nanoparticle size, morphology, surface area due to porosity, and chemistry controlled release kinetics are the most active. This article discusses CaP systems in their particulate, cements, and scaffold forms for drug, protein, and growth factor delivery toward orthopedic and dental applications.

  10. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  11. Dietary fat and not calcium supplementation or dairy product consumption is associated with changes in anthropometrics during a randomized, placebo-controlled energy-restriction trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insufficient calcium intake has been proposed to cause unbalanced energy partitioning leading to obesity. However, weight loss interventions including dietary calcium or dairy product consumption have not reported changes in lipid metabolism measured by the plasma lipidome. Methods. The objective ...

  12. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium......-phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm...

  13. Apo-states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks CDI and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca2+/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium binding properties. The observation that the apo-forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. PMID:23811053

  14. Leveraging the coronary calcium scan beyond the coronary calcium score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bos (Daniel); M.J.G. Leening (Maarten)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Non-contrast cardiac computed tomography in order to obtain the coronary artery calcium score has become an established diagnostic procedure in the clinical setting, and is commonly employed in clinical and population-based research. This state-of-the-art review paper

  15. Calcium fortification of breakfast cereal enhances calcium absorption in children without affecting iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, S A; Griffin, I J; Davila, P; Liang, L

    2001-10-01

    Provision of calcium-fortified foods may represent an important component of improving the calcium intake of children. We sought to determine whether the addition of calcium to cereal would have a net positive effect on calcium absorption without decreasing iron absorption. Twenty-seven children, 6 to 9 years of age, were provided two servings per day (30 g of cereal per serving) of either a low (39 mg/serving) or fortified (156 mg/serving) calcium-containing cereal product for 14 days. Calcium absorption was measured by using stable isotopes added to milk (extrinsically labeled) and to the calcium-fortified cereal (intrinsically labeled). Fractional calcium absorption from the fortified cereal was virtually identical to that from milk. Fractional absorption of calcium from milk did not differ significantly when given with enriched or low-calcium-containing cereal. Total calcium absorption increased from 215 +/- 45 mg/d to 269 +/- 45 mg/d with the addition of the calcium-fortified cereal (P Iron absorption was similar when children received the calcium-fortified cereal or unfortified cereal. The addition of a moderate amount of calcium to a cereal product was beneficial to calcium absorption and did not interfere with iron absorption. Use of calcium-fortified food products may be considered a practical approach to increasing the calcium intake of children.

  16. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Topological specificity and hierarchical network of the circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Ono, Daisuke; Hasan, Mazahir T; Ueda, Tetsuo; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-26

    The circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a hierarchical multioscillator system in which neuronal networks play crucial roles in expressing coherent rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, our understanding of the neuronal network is still incomplete. Intracellular calcium mediates the input signals, such as phase-resetting stimuli, to the core molecular loop involving clock genes for circadian rhythm generation and the output signals from the loop to various cellular functions, including changes in neurotransmitter release. Using a unique large-scale calcium imaging method with genetically encoded calcium sensors, we visualized intracellular calcium from the entire surface of SCN slice in culture including the regions where autonomous clock gene expression was undetectable. We found circadian calcium rhythms at a single-cell level in the SCN, which were topologically specific with a larger amplitude and more delayed phase in the ventral region than the dorsal. The robustness of the rhythm was reduced but persisted even after blocking the neuronal firing with tetrodotoxin (TTX). Notably, TTX dissociated the circadian calcium rhythms between the dorsal and ventral SCN. In contrast, a blocker of gap junctions, carbenoxolone, had only a minor effect on the calcium rhythms at both the single-cell and network levels. These results reveal the topological specificity of the circadian calcium rhythm in the SCN and the presence of coupled regional pacemakers in the dorsal and ventral regions. Neuronal firings are not necessary for the persistence of the calcium rhythms but indispensable for the hierarchical organization of rhythmicity in the SCN.

  18. A Proposed Mechanism for the Thermal Denaturation of a Recombinant Bacillus Halmapalus Alpha-amylase - the Effect of Calcium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anders D.; Pusey, Marc L.; Fuglsang, Claus C.; Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stability of a recombinant alpha-amylase from Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) has been investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This alpha-amylase is homologous to other Bacillus alpha-amylases where previous crystallographic studies have identified the existence of 3 calcium binding sites in the structure. Denaturation of BHA is irreversible with a Tm of approximately 89 C, and DSC thermograms can be described using a one-step irreversible model. A 5 C increase in T(sub m) in the presence of 10 fold excess CaCl2 was observed. However, a concomitant increase in the tendency to aggregate was also observed. The presence of 30-40 fold excess calcium chelator (EDTA or EGTA) results in a large destabilization of BHA corresponding to about 40 C lower T(sub m), as determined by both CD and DSC. Ten fold excess EGTA reveals complex DSC thermograms corresponding to both reversible and irreversible transitions, which possibly originate from different populations of BHA:calcium complexes. The observations in the present study have, in combination with structural information of homologous alpha-amylases, provided the basis for the proposal of a simple denaturation mechanism of BHA. The proposed mechanism describes the irreversible thermal denaturation of different BHA:calcium complexes and the calcium binding equilibrium involved. Furthermore, the model accounts for a temperature induced reversible structural change associated with calcium binding.

  19. Should Trade Agreements Include Environmental Policy?

    OpenAIRE

    Josh Ederington

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which environmental and trade policies should be treated equally, or symmetrically, in international negotiations. It reviews the recent economics literature on trade and the environment to address two questions. First, should trade negotiations include negotiations over environmental policies and the setting of binding environmental standards? Second, if there are grounds for international environmental negotiations, should environmental agreements b...

  20. Nuclear calcium signalling in the regulation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bading, Hilmar

    2013-09-01

    Synaptic activity initiates biochemical processes that have various outcomes, including the formation of memories, increases in neuronal survival and the development of chronic pain and addiction. Virtually all activity-induced, long-lasting adaptations of brain functions require a dialogue between synapses and the nucleus that results in changes in gene expression. Calcium signals that are induced by synaptic activity and propagate into the nucleus are a major route for synapse-to-nucleus communication. Recent findings indicate that diverse forms of neuroadaptation require calcium transients in the nucleus to switch on the necessary genomic programme. Deficits in nuclear calcium signalling as a result of a reduction in synaptic activity or increased extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signalling may underlie the aetiologies of various diseases, including neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Structural models of intrinsically disordered and calcium-bound folded states of a protein adapted for secretion

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Darragh P.; Hernandez, Belen; Durand, Dominique; Hourdel, Véronique; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Vachette, Patrice; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Ladant, Daniel; Brier, Sébastien; Chenal, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type I secretion systems, T1SS, to secrete virulence factors that contain calcium-binding Repeat-in-ToXin (RTX) motifs. Here, we present structural models of an RTX protein, RD, in both its intrinsically disordered calcium-free Apo-state and its folded calcium-bound Holo-state. Apo-RD behaves as a disordered polymer chain comprising several statistical elements that exhibit local rigidity with residual secondary structure. Holo-RD is a f...

  2. Interleukin-11 binds specific EF-hand proteins via their conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Alexei S; Sokolov, Andrei S; Vologzhannikova, Alisa A; Permyakova, Maria E; Khorn, Polina A; Ismailov, Ramis G; Denessiouk, Konstantin A; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Rastrygina, Victoria A; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Glazatov, Vladimir V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a hematopoietic cytokine engaged in numerous biological processes and validated as a target for treatment of various cancers. IL-11 contains intrinsically disordered regions that might recognize multiple targets. Recently we found that aside from IL-11RA and gp130 receptors, IL-11 interacts with calcium sensor protein S100P. Strict calcium dependence of this interaction suggests a possibility of IL-11 interaction with other calcium sensor proteins. Here we probed specificity of IL-11 to calcium-binding proteins of various types: calcium sensors of the EF-hand family (calmodulin, S100B and neuronal calcium sensors: recoverin, NCS-1, GCAP-1, GCAP-2), calcium buffers of the EF-hand family (S100G, oncomodulin), and a non-EF-hand calcium buffer (α-lactalbumin). A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants of 1-19 μM. These proteins share several amino acid residues belonging to conservative structural motifs of the EF-hand proteins, 'black' and 'gray' clusters. Replacements of the respective S100P residues by alanine drastically decrease its affinity to IL-11, suggesting their involvement into the association process. Secondary structure and accessibility of the hinge region of the EF-hand proteins studied are predicted to control specificity and selectivity of their binding to IL-11. The IL-11 interaction with the EF-hand proteins is expected to occur under numerous pathological conditions, accompanied by disintegration of plasma membrane and efflux of cellular components into the extracellular milieu.

  3. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  4. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2014-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers-which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal-has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca(2+) currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  5. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  6. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Download PDFs English Espanol ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  7. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to grow and stay strong. The body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Nutrition surveys have shown ... found in dairy products. How much calcium and vitamin D you need depends on your age and other factors. If ...

  8. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  10. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  11. The characterization of a novel S100A1 binding site in the N-terminus of TRPM1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, M.; Lánský, Z.; Bednárová, Lucie; Šulc, M.; Monincová, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Vyklický, L.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Teisinger, J.; Boušová, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Sep (2016), s. 186-193 ISSN 1357-2725 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : TRPM1 channel * binding site * calcium-binding protein S100A1 * steady-state fluorescence anisotropy * molecular modeling * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2016

  12. Calcium-tolerant anionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, Alexander

    1995-01-01

    One of the problems of applying anionic surfactants in, for example, laundry detergents is the precipitation of calcium salts. Much effort has been directed towards avoiding precipitation. There are at least three ways for tackling the problem. The first involves the use of a large quantity of

  13. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    muscle cells, he demonstrated that it was only calcium that could cause the muscle fibre to contract (Heilbrunn and Wiercinski 1947). Later in 1952, Sandow proposed the term excitation-contraction coupling for this phe- nomenon. Heilbrunn's views are best summarized by the following statement published in 1937 in his ...

  14. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Godfraind, Théophile

    2017-01-01

    In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovere...

  15. Mineralization Process of Biocemented Sand and Impact of Bacteria and Calcium Ions Concentrations on Crystal Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Guobin; Tang, Yang; Lian, Jijian; Yan, Yue; Fu, Dengfeng

    2017-01-01

    Microbial-induced calcite precipitation (MICP) is a sustainable technique used to improve sandy soil. Analysis of the mineralization process, as well as different bacterial suspensions and calcium concentrations on the crystal morphology, revealed that the mineralization process included four stages: self-organised hydrolysis of microorganisms, molecular recognition and interface interaction, growth modulation, and epitaxial growth. By increasing bacterial suspensions and calcium concentratio...

  16. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids synergize with lipid droplet binding thalidomide analogs to induce oxidative stress in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madácsi Ramóna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoplasmic lipid-droplets are common inclusions of eukaryotic cells. Lipid-droplet binding thalidomide analogs (2,6-dialkylphenyl-4/5-amino-substituted-5,6,7-trifluorophthalimides with potent anticancer activities were synthesized. Results Cytotoxicity was detected in different cell lines including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocellular carcinoma, glioblastoma at micromolar concentrations. The synthesized analogs are non-toxic to adult animals up to 1 g/kg but are teratogenic to zebrafish embryos at micromolar concentrations with defects in the developing muscle. Treatment of tumor cells resulted in calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ER stress and cell death. Antioxidants could partially, while an intracellular calcium chelator almost completely diminish ROS production. Exogenous docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid induced calcium release and ROS generation, and synergized with the analogs in vitro, while oleic acid had no such an effect. Gene expression analysis confirmed the induction of ER stress-mediated apoptosis pathway components, such as GADD153, ATF3, Luman/CREB3 and the ER-associated degradation-related HERPUD1 genes. Tumor suppressors, P53, LATS2 and ING3 were also up-regulated in various cell lines after drug treatment. Amino-phthalimides down-regulated the expression of CCL2, which is implicated in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Conclusions Because of the anticancer, anti-angiogenic action and the wide range of applicability of the immunomodulatory drugs, including thalidomide analogs, lipid droplet-binding members of this family could represent a new class of agents by affecting ER-membrane integrity and perturbations of ER homeostasis.

  18. Experimental support for a desolvation energy term in governing equations for binding equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Brian M; Eggers, Daryl K

    2013-07-11

    This study introduces a new thermodynamic framework for aqueous reaction equilibria that treats water as a coreactant in the development of a general binding equation. The approach features an explicit consideration for the change in hydration that occurs when two solvated surfaces come into contact. As an outcome of this framework, the standard-state free energy of binding is defined by the summation of two terms: the traditional term (-RT ln Ki) plus a desolvation free-energy term that is weighted by the number of complexes formed at equilibrium. The new formalism suggests that the equilibrium ratio, Ki, is not a constant and that the observed concentration dependence of Ki may be used to obtain the molar desolvation energy and the standard-state free energy at infinite dilution. The governing equation is supported by results from isothermal titration calorimetry using the chelation of calcium(II) by EDTA as a model binding reaction. This work may have far-reaching implications for solution thermodynamics, including an explanation for the oft-noted discrepancy between the enthalpy values obtained by calorimetry and those from the van't Hoff approach.

  19. Experimental Support for Desolvation Energy Term in Governing Equations for Binding Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Brian M.; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new thermodynamic framework for aqueous reaction equilibria that treats water as a co-reactant in the development of a general binding equation. The approach features an explicit consideration for the change in hydration that occurs when two solvated surfaces come into contact. As an outcome of this framework, the standard state free energy of binding is defined by the summation of two terms, the traditional term (−RTlnKi) plus a desolvation free energy term that is weighted by the number of complexes formed at equilibrium. The new formalism suggests that the equilibrium ratio, Ki, is not a constant and that the observed concentration dependence of Ki may be used to obtain the molar desolvation energy and the standard state free energy at infinite dilution. The governing equation is supported by results from isothermal titration calorimetry using the chelation of calcium(II) by EDTA as a model binding reaction. This work may have far-reaching implications for solution thermodynamics, including an explanation for the oft-noted discrepancy between enthalpy values obtained by calorimetry and the van’t Hoff approach. PMID:23773139

  20. Absorbability of calcium from calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides in comparison with that from various calcium compounds in the rat ligated jejunum loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To-o, Kenji; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kuriki, Takashi; Saeki, Shigeru; Nakabou, Yukihiro

    2003-08-01

    Calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides (POs-Ca) were prepared from potato starch. Their solubility and in situ absorbability as a calcium source were investigated by comparing with the soluble calcium compounds, calcium chloride and calcium lactate, or insoluble calcium compounds, calcium carbonate and dibasic calcium phosphate. The solubility of POs-Ca was as high as that of calcium chloride and about 3-fold higher than that of calcium lactate. An in situ experiment showed that the intestinal calcium absorption rate of POs-Ca was almost comparable with that of the soluble calcium compounds, and was significantly higher (pcalcium groups. Moreover, the total absorption rate of a 1:1 mixture of the calcium from POs-Ca and a whey mineral complex (WMC) was significantly higher (psoluble calcium source with relatively high absorption in the intestinal tract.

  1. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  2. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the ...

  3. Physicochemical characterization of zinc-substituted calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to form synthetic calcium phosphates incorporated with. Zn, such as zinc acetate and calcium acetate, 65% nitric acid, sodium hydrogen phosphate, trietanoloamine, 0.025 M. EDTA, calcein indicator and 35–38% hydrochloric acid were purchased from POCh SA. Other reagents necessary for determining amount of calcium, ...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  6. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The idea is used here to break human calcium signalling pathway into simple entities known as ... [Nayak L and De R K 2007 Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway; J. Biosci. 32 1009–1017] http://www.ias.ac.in/ ..... cellular physiology of intracellular calcium stores; Physiol. Rev. 74 595–636. Bertram R ...

  7. Biophysical characterization of Ca2+-binding of S100A5 and Ca2+-induced interaction with RAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Iktae; Lee, Ko On; Yun, Young-Joo; Jeong, Jea Yeon; Kim, Eun-Hee; Cheong, Haekap; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Suh, Jeong-Yong

    2017-01-29

    S100A5 is a calcium-binding protein of S100 family, which represents a major ligand to the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE), a pattern recognition receptor engaged in diverse pathological processes. Here we have characterized calcium binding of S100A5 and the complex formation between S100A5 and RAGE using calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy. S100A5 binds to calcium ions in a sequential manner with the equilibrium dissociation constants (K D ) of 1.3 μM and 3.5 μM, which corresponds to the calcium-binding at the C-terminal and N-terminal EF-hands. Upon calcium binding, S100A5 interacts with the V domain of RAGE (RAGE-v) to form a heterotrimer (K D ∼5.9 μM) that is distinct among the S100 family proteins. Chemical shift perturbation data from NMR titration experiments indicates that S100A5 employs the periphery of the dimer interface to interact with RAGE-v. Distinct binding mode and stoichiometry of RAGE against different S100 family proteins could be important to modulate diverse RAGE signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of calcium signals in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dentate gyrus neuronal progenitors and mature neurons, stably expressing an advanced calcium indicator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vőfély, Gergő; Berecz, Tünde; Szabó, Eszter; Szebényi, Kornélia; Hathy, Edit; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Homolya, László; Marchetto, Maria C; Réthelyi, János M; Apáti, Ágota

    2018-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cell derived human neuronal progenitor cells (hPSC-NPCs) and their mature neuronal cell culture derivatives may efficiently be used for central nervous system (CNS) drug screening, including the investigation of ligand-induced calcium signalization. We have established hippocampal NPC cultures derived from human induced PSCs, which were previously generated by non-integrating Sendai virus reprogramming. Using established protocols these NPCs were differentiated into hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons. In order to study calcium signaling without the need of dye loading, we have stably expressed an advanced calcium indicator protein (GCaMP6fast) in the NPCs using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system. We observed no significant effects of the long-term GCaMP6 expression on NPC morphology, gene expression pattern or neural differentiation capacity. In order to compare the functional properties of GCaMP6-expressing neural cells and the corresponding parental cells loaded with calcium indicator dye Fluo-4, a detailed characterization of calcium signals was performed. We found that the calcium signals induced by ATP, glutamate, LPA, or proteases - were similar in these two systems. Moreover, the presence of the calcium indicator protein allowed for a sensitive, repeatable detection of changes in calcium signaling during the process of neurogenesis and neuronal maturation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis for serum calcium identifies significantly associated SNPs near the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kapur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has a pivotal role in biological functions, and serum calcium levels have been associated with numerous disorders of bone and mineral metabolism, as well as with cardiovascular mortality. Here we report results from a genome-wide association study of serum calcium, integrating data from four independent cohorts including a total of 12,865 individuals of European and Indian Asian descent. Our meta-analysis shows that serum calcium is associated with SNPs in or near the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene on 3q13. The top hit with a p-value of 6.3 x 10(-37 is rs1801725, a missense variant, explaining 1.26% of the variance in serum calcium. This SNP had the strongest association in individuals of European descent, while for individuals of Indian Asian descent the top hit was rs17251221 (p = 1.1 x 10(-21, a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs1801725. The strongest locus in CASR was shown to replicate in an independent Icelandic cohort of 4,126 individuals (p = 1.02 x 10(-4. This genome-wide meta-analysis shows that common CASR variants modulate serum calcium levels in the adult general population, which confirms previous results in some candidate gene studies of the CASR locus. This study highlights the key role of CASR in calcium regulation.

  10. Bruton's tyrosine kinase mediates the synergistic signalling between TLR9 and the B cell receptor by regulating calcium and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine F Kenny

    Full Text Available B cells signal through both the B cell receptor (BCR which binds antigens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs including TLR9 which recognises CpG DNA. Activation of TLR9 synergises with BCR signalling when the BCR and TLR9 co-localise within an auto-phagosome-like compartment. Here we report that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK is required for synergistic IL6 production and up-regulation of surface expression of MHC-class-II, CD69 and CD86 in primary murine and human B cells. We show that BTK is essential for co-localisation of the BCR and TLR9 within a potential auto-phagosome-like compartment in the Namalwa human B cell line. Downstream of BTK we find that calcium acting via calmodulin is required for this process. These data provide new insights into the role of BTK, an important target for autoimmune diseases, in B cell activation.

  11. How calmodulin binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) mediate auxin responses

    OpenAIRE

    Galon, Yael; Snir, Orli; Fromm, Hillel

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is an adaptive feature of all organisms, which, in land plants, entails changes in orientation of growth (tropism), patterns of development, organ architecture, timing of developmental processes and resource allocation. However, little is known about the molecular components that integrate exogenous environmental cues with internal hormonal signaling pathways. This addendum describes a role for calcium-regulated calmodulin-binding transcription 1 (CAMTA1) in auxin signal...

  12. Calcium dynamics predict direction of synaptic plasticity in striatal spiny projection neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędrzejewska-Szmek, Joanna; Damodaran, Sriraman; Dorman, Daniel B; Blackwell, Kim T

    2017-04-01

    The striatum is a major site of learning and memory formation for sensorimotor and cognitive association. One of the mechanisms used by the brain for memory storage is synaptic plasticity - the long-lasting, activity-dependent change in synaptic strength. All forms of synaptic plasticity require an elevation in intracellular calcium, and a common hypothesis is that the amplitude and duration of calcium transients can determine the direction of synaptic plasticity. The utility of this hypothesis in the striatum is unclear in part because dopamine is required for striatal plasticity and in part because of the diversity in stimulation protocols. To test whether calcium can predict plasticity direction, we developed a calcium-based plasticity rule using a spiny projection neuron model with sophisticated calcium dynamics including calcium diffusion, buffering and pump extrusion. We utilized three spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) induction protocols, in which postsynaptic potentials are paired with precisely timed action potentials and the timing of such pairing determines whether potentiation or depression will occur. Results show that despite the variation in calcium dynamics, a single, calcium-based plasticity rule, which explicitly considers duration of calcium elevations, can explain the direction of synaptic weight change for all three STDP protocols. Additional simulations show that the plasticity rule correctly predicts the NMDA receptor dependence of long-term potentiation and the L-type channel dependence of long-term depression. By utilizing realistic calcium dynamics, the model reveals mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity direction, and shows that the dynamics of calcium, not just calcium amplitude, are crucial for synaptic plasticity. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Correlation of Salivary Statherin and Calcium Levels with Dental Calculus Formation: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Gowda Sadashivappa Pateel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Salivary constituents have a wide range of functions including oral calcium homeostasis. Salivary proteins such as statherin inhibit crystal growth of calcium phosphate in supersaturated solutions and interact with several oral bacteria to adsorb on hydroxyapatite. Concurrently, saliva, which is supersaturated with respect to calcium phosphates, is the driving force for plaque mineralization and formation of calculus. Thus, the aim of the present study was to estimate and correlate salivary statherin and calcium concentration to the dental calculus formation. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the relationship between salivary statherin, calcium, and dental calculus among 70 subjects, aged 20–55 years. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on the calculus scores as interpreted by Calculus Index which was followed by collection of whole saliva using Super•SAL™. Salivary calcium levels were assessed by calorimetric method using Calcium Assay kit (Cayman Chemical, Michigan, USA and statherin levels by using ELISA Kit (Cusabio Biotech. Results. Statherin levels showed a weak negative correlation with the calcium levels and with calculus formation. The mean salivary statherin and calcium concentration were found to be 0.96 μg/ml and 3.87 mg/ml, respectively. Salivary statherin levels differed significantly among the three groups (p<0.05. Conclusions. Our preliminary data indicates that statherin could possibly play a role in the formation of dental calculus.

  14. A Markovian Entropy Measure for the Analysis of Calcium Activity Time Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Marken

    Full Text Available Methods to analyze the dynamics of calcium activity often rely on visually distinguishable features in time series data such as spikes, waves, or oscillations. However, systems such as the developing nervous system display a complex, irregular type of calcium activity which makes the use of such methods less appropriate. Instead, for such systems there exists a class of methods (including information theoretic, power spectral, and fractal analysis approaches which use more fundamental properties of the time series to analyze the observed calcium dynamics. We present a new analysis method in this class, the Markovian Entropy measure, which is an easily implementable calcium time series analysis method which represents the observed calcium activity as a realization of a Markov Process and describes its dynamics in terms of the level of predictability underlying the transitions between the states of the process. We applied our and other commonly used calcium analysis methods on a dataset from Xenopus laevis neural progenitors which displays irregular calcium activity and a dataset from murine synaptic neurons which displays activity time series that are well-described by visually-distinguishable features. We find that the Markovian Entropy measure is able to distinguish between biologically distinct populations in both datasets, and that it can separate biologically distinct populations to a greater extent than other methods in the dataset exhibiting irregular calcium activity. These results support the benefit of using the Markovian Entropy measure to analyze calcium dynamics, particularly for studies using time series data which do not exhibit easily distinguishable features.

  15. New insights into the role of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paupe, Vincent; Prudent, Julien

    2017-05-08

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles involved in numerous physiological functions. Beyond their function in ATP production, mitochondria regulate cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, immunity and metabolism. Mitochondria also play a key role in the buffering of cytosolic calcium, and calcium transported into the matrix regulates mitochondrial metabolism. Recently, the identification of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and associated regulators has allowed the characterization of new physiological roles for calcium in both mitochondrial and cellular homeostasis. Indeed, recent work has highlighted the importance of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis in regulating cell migration. Cell migration is a property common to all metazoans and is critical to embryogenesis, cancer progression, wound-healing and immune surveillance. Previous work has established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of cell migration, as oscillations in cytosolic calcium activate cytoskeletal remodelling, actin contraction and focal adhesion (FA) turnover necessary for cell movement. Recent work using animal models and in cellulo experiments to genetically modulate MCU and partners have shed new light on the role of mitochondrial calcium dynamics in cytoskeletal remodelling through the modulation of ATP and ROS production, as well as intracellular calcium signalling. This review focuses on MCU and its regulators in cell migration during physiological and pathophysiological processes including development and cancer. We also present hypotheses to explain the molecular mechanisms by which MCU may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and motility to drive cell migration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  17. Calcium Orthophosphates as Bioceramics: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the late 1960s, much interest was raised in regard to biomedical applications of various ceramic materials. A little bit later, such materials were named bioceramics. This review is limited to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates only, which belong to the categories of bioactive and bioresorbable compounds. There have been a number of important advances in this field during the past 30–40 years. Namely, by structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether calcium orthophosphate bioceramics were biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics—which is able to promote regeneration of bones—was developed. Presently, calcium orthophosphate bioceramics are available in the form of particulates, blocks, cements, coatings, customized designs for specific applications and as injectable composites in a polymer carrier. Current biomedical applications include artificial replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Exploratory studies demonstrate potential applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics as scaffolds, drug delivery systems, as well as carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  18. The effects of particle size and origin of calcium carbonate on performance and ossification characteristics in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinotte, F; Nys, Y; de Monredon, F

    1991-09-01

    The following physico-chemical characteristics of various calcium sources, differing in origin and particle size were determined: mineral composition, sieve and image analysis, apparent solubility (AS), surface area (SA), porous volume, specific gravity, and compressibility (C). The AS, SA, and C values were related more to the calcium particle size than to its origin and were higher in ground calcium sources. Calcium retention of seashells treated with phosphoric acid, oyster shells, and limestone using two particle sizes, ground or particulate, was assayed in 98 broiler chicks. Particulate marble was also tested in this experiment. Calcium retention expressed as a percentage of calcium ingestion was decreased when coarse particles of calcium were supplied in lieu of pulverized sources (40 versus 49%). An experiment with a 3 x 3 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments were tested using 576 broiler chicks. Treatments included three calcium sources (phosphorus-treated shell, oyster shell, and marble), three particle sizes [ground (less than .15 mm), medium (.6 to 1.18 mm) and coarse (greater than 1.18 mm)] and three levels of calcium (.5,.7, and .9%) with ground limestone as a reference. Performance, tibial morphometry, breaking strength variables, and ash content were measured at 4 wk of age. Weight gain and feed conversion were ameliorated with ground particles of calcium. Cortical thickness, length of the tibia, stiffness, stress, and tibia ash were diminished when coarse particles of calcium were incorporated in the diets. Conversely, the origin of the calcium source hardly affected these criteria. Additionally, the incorporation of phosphorus-treated shells was assayed in 112 broiler chicks. Coarse particles decreased calcium retention. Consequently, ultimate stress, the modulus of elasticity, and stress were impaired. It is concluded that differences in utilization of calcium carbonate sources by the broiler chick is primarily a result of particle size rather

  19. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  20. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  1. ATP stimulates calcium influx in primary astrocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neary, J.T.; van Breemen, C.; Forster, E.; Norenberg, L.O.; Norenberg, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ATP and other purines on 45 Ca uptake was studied in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Treatment of the cells with ATP for 1 to 30 min brought about an increase in cellular 45 Ca. Stimulation of calcium influx by ATP was investigated using a 90 sec exposure to 45 Ca and over a concentration range of 0.1 nM to 3 mM; a biphasic dose-response curve was obtained with EC50 values of 0.3 nM and 9 uM, indicating the presence of low and high affinity purinergic binding sites. Similar levels of 45 Ca influx at 90 sec were observed with ATP, ADP and adenosine (all at 100 uM). Prior treatment of the cultures with LaCl3 blocked the purine-induced 45 Ca influx. These findings indicate that one pathway for calcium entry in astrocytes involves purinergic receptor-operated, calcium channels

  2. Relation of urinary calcium and magnesium excretion to blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesteloot, Hugo; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Brown, Ian J

    2011-01-01

    on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure (INTERSALT) comprised 10,067 persons aged 20-59 years from 52 samples around the world. Timed 24-hour urine collections, BP measurements, and nutrient data from four 24-hour dietary recalls (INTERMAP) were collected. In multiple linear regression analyses......, urinary calcium excretion was directly associated with BP. After adjustment for multiple confounders (including weight, height, alcohol intake, calcium intake, urinary sodium level, and urinary potassium intake), systolic BP was 1.9 mm Hg higher per each 4.1 mmol per 24 hours (2 standard deviations...

  3. The Effect of Cell Immobilization by Calcium Alginate on Bacterially Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Seifan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbially induced mineral precipitation is recognized as a widespread phenomenon in nature. A diverse range of minerals including carbonate, sulphides, silicates, and phosphates can be produced through biomineralization. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 is one of the most common substances used in various industries and is mostly extracted by mining. In recent years, production of CaCO3 by bacteria has drawn much attention because it is an environmentally- and health-friendly pathway. Although CaCO3 can be produced by some genera of bacteria through autotrophic and heterotrophic pathways, the possibility of producing CaCO3 in different environmental conditions has remained a challenge to determine. In this study, calcium alginate was proposed as a protective carrier to increase the bacterial tolerance to extreme environmental conditions. The model showed that the highest concentration of CaCO3 is achieved when the bacterial cells are immobilized in the calcium alginate beads fabricated using 1.38% w/v Na-alginate and 0.13 M CaCl2.

  4. Total Calcium and Albumin Are Decreased in the Deeper Epidermis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease-Associated Pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Akishi; Shiraiwa, Yasuo; Narita, Satoshi; Kusumi, Tomomi; Goto, Shoko; Sera, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    In our earlier studies, we reported high concentrations of intra- and extracellular calcium ions (Ca2+) in the deeper epidermis of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated pruritus. To determine the cause of this phenomenon, we measured total calcium (TCa) concentrations in the deeper epidermis and performed immunostaining of epidermal albumin, which binds to Ca2+. This study included 45 patients with CKD-stage 5, which was defined as severely reduced kidney function (i.e., estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min or on dialysis). Subjects were divided into the pruritus group, consisting of patients with mild, moderate, or severe uremic pruritus, and the non-pruritus group, consisting of patients with no or slight pruritus. The particle-induced X-ray emission method was used to measure elements including TCa. Furthermore, we have immunostained epidermal albumin using anti-albumin antibodies and compared the results in the pruritus and non-pruritus groups. The TCa concentration in the spinous layer of patients with CKD with CKD-associated pruritus was lower than in patients with CKD without pruritus (median [range], 395 [235-1,063] vs. 476 [342-1,243] μg/g). The intensity of epidermal albumin expression in the spinous layer was weaker in patients with CKD with CKD-associated pruritus than in those without. Patients with CKD with CKD-associated pruritus demonstrated higher Ca2+ concentrations but lower TCa concentrations than patients without CKD-associated pruritus. This could be in part due to low concentrations of epidermal albumin, which binds to Ca2+, in those with CKD-associated pruritus. These results clarify the pathophysiology of CKD-associated pruritus, providing a valuable foundation for the future development of treatments for this condition. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD. Geydan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  6. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  7. DNS BIND Server Configuratio

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  8. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  9. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  10. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  11. Coronary artery calcium in breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Pilz, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Morris, Pamela B; Henzler, Thomas; Apfaltrer, Paul

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate whether breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy have a higher burden of coronary artery calcium as a potential surrogate of radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease. 333 patients were included. 54 patients underwent chest CT ae

  12. Calcium channel blockers for primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Holly; Hughes, Michael; Anderson, Marina E; Wilkinson, Jack; Herrick, Ariane L

    2016-02-25

    Calcium channel blockers are the most commonly prescribed drugs for people with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. Primary Raynaud's phenomenon is a common condition characterised by an exaggerated vasospastic response to cold or emotion: classically the digits (fingers and toes) turn white, then blue, then red. This is an update of the review first published in 2014. To assess the effects of different calcium channel blockers for primary Raynaud's phenomenon as determined by attack rates, severity scores, participant-preference scores and physiological measurements. For this update the Cochrane Vascular Trial Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (last searched January 2016) and the Cochrane Register of Studies (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 12). In addition the TSC searched clinical trials databases. Randomised controlled trials evaluating the effects of oral calcium channel blockers for the treatment of primary Raynaud's phenomenon. Three review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and their quality, and extracted the data. Data extraction included adverse events. We contacted trial authors for missing data. We included seven randomised trials with 296 participants. Four trials examined nifedipine and the remainder nicardipine. Comparisons were with placebo in six trials and with both dazoxiben and placebo in one trial (only the nifedipine versus placebo data were used within this review). Treatment with oral calcium channel blockers was minimally effective in primary Raynaud's phenomenon at decreasing the frequency of attacks (standardised mean difference of 0.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.38, P = 0.003). This translates to 1.72 (95% CI 0.60 to 2.84) fewer attacks per week on calcium channel blockers compared to placebo. One trial provided details on duration of attacks reporting no statistically significant difference between the nicardipine and placebo groups (no P value reported). Only two trials provided any detail of

  13. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Abo

    Full Text Available We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA, revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG, heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  14. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  15. Fouling control mechanisms of demineralized water backwash: Reduction of charge screening and calcium bridging effects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the ionic environment on the charge of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (charge screening effect) and the calcium adsorption/bridging on new and fouled membranes (calcium bridging effect) by measuring the zeta potentials of membranes and colloidal NOM. Fouling experiments were conducted with natural water to determine whether the reduction of the charge screening effect and/or calcium bridging effect by backwashing with demineralized water can explain the observed reduction in fouling. Results show that the charge of both membranes and NOM, as measured by the zeta potential, became more negative at a lower pH and a lower concentration of electrolytes, in particular, divalent electrolytes. In addition, calcium also adsorbed onto the membranes, and consequently bridged colloidal NOM and membranes via binding with functional groups. The charge screening effect could be eliminated by flushing NOM and membranes with demineralized water, since a cation-free environment was established. However, only a limited amount of the calcium bridging connection was removed with demineralized water backwashes, so the calcium bridging effect mostly could not be eliminated. As demineralized water backwash was found to be effective in fouling control, it can be concluded that the reduction of the charge screening is the dominant mechanism for this. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The effect of formulated goats' milk on calcium bioavailability in male growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Hilary; Kruger, Marlena; Prosser, Colin; Lowry, Dianne

    2010-01-15

    There are two main proteins in milk; whey and casein. Casein contains casein phosphopeptides (CPP), which are released on digestion of the milk. These may increase calcium solubility by binding calcium in the small intestine. Thus increasing casein in the diet may help to stimulate bioavailability of calcium and increase bone density. The present study tested this hypothesis in growing male rats fed diets containing three different concentrations of casein from goat milk. Rats fed the diet containing no casein had significantly lower calcium absorption when compared to rats fed the diets that contained 80% and 57% of goat milk protein as casein; however, no significant difference was observed between rats fed diets with 80% and 57% casein. The varying amounts of casein had no effect on mineral uptake or retention in the femur. Biomechanical testing and mineral analysis of the femurs showed no differences between diet groups. The mechanism to explain this lack of retention remains unclear. The diets containing 80% and 57% of goat milk protein as casein delivered increased calcium absorption compared to the diet containing no casein, suggesting a minimum level of casein is needed to optimize calcium absorption from goat milk. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. The effect of intracellular calcium oscillations on fluid secretion in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, N J; Tawhai, M H; Crampin, E J

    2010-08-07

    Airway epithelium has been shown to elicit fluid secretion after a rise in intracellular calcium. This rise in intracellular calcium has been shown to display complex oscillations in many species after the binding of particular agonists to extracellular receptors. Fluid secreted by the airway epithelium is used to maintain the depth of the periciliary liquid (PCL) above the apical membrane of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial airways. Previous mathematical models have been published which separately consider the electrophysiology involved in regulating periciliary liquid depth, and the transmission of intracellular calcium waves in airway epithelial tissue. In this paper we present a mathematical model that combines these previous models and allows the effect of oscillations in intracellular calcium on fluid secretion by airway epithelial cells to be investigated. We show that an oscillatory calcium response produces different fluid secretion properties to that elicited by a tonic rise in intracellular calcium. These differences are shown to be due to saturation of the Ca(2+) activated ion channels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical calcium indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, R Madelaine; Etzler, Julie C; Watts, Lora Talley; Zheng, Wei; Lechleiter, James D

    2008-11-01

    Our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling as well as our appreciation for its ubiquitous role in cellular processes has been rapidly advanced, in large part, due to the development of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators. In this chapter, we discuss some of the most common chemical Ca2+ indicators that are widely used for the investigation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Advantages, limitations and relevant procedures will be presented for each dye including their spectral qualities, dissociation constants, chemical forms, loading methods and equipment for optimal imaging. Chemical indicators now available allow for intracellular Ca2+ detection over a very large range (50 microM). High affinity indicators can be used to quantify Ca2+ levels in the cytosol while lower affinity indicators can be optimized for measuring Ca2+ in subcellular compartments with higher concentrations. Indicators can be classified into either single wavelength or ratiometric dyes. Both classes require specific lasers, filters, and/or detection methods that are dependent upon their spectral properties and both classes have advantages and limitations. Single wavelength indicators are generally very bright and optimal for Ca2+ detection when more than one fluorophore is being imaged. Ratiometric indicators can be calibrated very precisely and they minimize the most common problems associated with chemical Ca2+ indicators including uneven dye loading, leakage, photobleaching, and changes in cell volume. Recent technical advances that permit in vivo Ca2+ measurements will also be discussed.

  19. Calcium supplementation commencing before or early in pregnancy, or food fortification with calcium, for preventing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Manyame, Sarah

    2017-09-26

    Pre-eclampsia is considerably more prevalent in low- than high-income countries. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is dietary differences, particularly calcium deficiency. Calcium supplementation in the second half of pregnancy reduces the serious consequences of pre-eclampsia and is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for women with low dietary calcium intake, but has limited effect on the overall risk of pre-eclampsia. It is important to establish whether calcium supplementation before and in early pregnancy has added benefit. Such evidence would be justification for population-level fortification of staple foods with calcium. To determine the effect of calcium supplementation or food fortification with calcium, commenced before or early in pregnancy and continued at least until mid-pregnancy, on pre-eclampsia and other hypertensive disorders, maternal morbidity and mortality, as well as fetal and neonatal outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Trials Register (10 August 2017), PubMed (29 June 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (10 August 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials of calcium supplementation or food fortification which include women of child bearing age not yet pregnant, or in early pregnancy. Cluster-RCTs, quasi-RCTs and trials published in abstract form only would have been eligible for inclusion in this review but none were identified. Cross-over designs are not appropriate for this intervention.The scope of this review is to consider interventions including calcium supplementation with or without additional supplements or treatments, compared with placebo or no intervention. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. This review is based on one RCT (involving 60 women) which looked at calcium plus additional supplements

  20. Rate Constants and Mechanisms of Protein-Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-05-22

    Whereas protein-ligand binding affinities have long-established prominence, binding rate constants and binding mechanisms have gained increasing attention in recent years. Both new computational methods and new experimental techniques have been developed to characterize the latter properties. It is now realized that binding mechanisms, like binding rate constants, can and should be quantitatively determined. In this review, we summarize studies and synthesize ideas on several topics in the hope of providing a coherent picture of and physical insight into binding kinetics. The topics include microscopic formulation of the kinetic problem and its reduction to simple rate equations; computation of binding rate constants; quantitative determination of binding mechanisms; and elucidation of physical factors that control binding rate constants and mechanisms.

  1. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ( 171 EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF 195 ) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48 KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK 64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48 EF 49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48 EF 49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium

  2. Erythrocyte membrane ATPase and calcium pumping activities in porcine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatte, H.S.; Mickelson, J.R.; Addis, P.B.; Louis, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate possible abnormalities in erythrocyte membrane enzyme activities in the pharmacogenetic disorder MH, membrane ATPase activities have been examined in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from red blood cells of MHS and normal swine. While no differences were noted in Mg2+-ATPase activities, the (Na+, K+)-ATPase activity of MHS erythrocyte ghosts was less than that of normal ghosts. Ca2+-ATPase activity exhibited low- and high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites in both types of erythrocyte ghost. While the Km for Ca2+ was greater for normal than for MHS erythrocyte ghosts at the high-affinity Ca2+-binding site, the reverse was true at the low-affinity Ca2+-binding site. Irrespective of the type of calcium binding site occupied, the Vmax for normal erythrocyte ghost Ca2+-ATPase activity was greater than that for MHS ghosts. In the presence of calmodulin, there was now no difference between MHS and normal erythrocyte ghosts in either the Km for Ca2+ or the Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase activity. To determine if the calcium pumping activity of intact MHS and normal pig erythrocytes differed, calcium efflux from the 45 Ca-loaded erythrocytes was determined; this activity was significantly greater for MHS than for normal erythrocytes. Thus, the present study confirms that there are abnormalities in the membranes of MHS pig red blood cells. However, we conclude that these abnormalities are unlikely to result in an impaired ability of MHS erythrocytes to regulate their cytosolic Ca2+ concentration

  3. Heparin cofactor II-dependent antithrombin activity of calcium spirulan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Y; Hayashi, T; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, T; Ozawa, T; Niiya, K; Sakuragawa, N

    1996-07-01

    Calcium spirulan (Ca-SP), a novel sulfated polysaccharide isolated from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, enhanced the antithrombin activity of heparin cofactor II (HC II) more than 10000-fold. The apparent second-order rate constant of thrombin inhibition by HC II was calculated to be 4.2 x 10(4) M-1 min-1 in the absence of Ca-SP, and it increased in the presence of 50 micrograms/ml Ca-SP to 4.5 x 10(8) M-1 min-1. Ca-SP effectively induced the formation of a thrombin-HC II complex in plasma. In the presence of Ca-SP, both the recombinant HC II variants Lys173-->Leu and Arg 189-->His, which are defective in interactions with heparin and dermatan sulfate, respectively, inhibited thrombin in a manner similar to native rHC II. This result indicates that the binding site of HC II for Ca-SP is different from the heparin- or dermatan sulfate-binding site. When we removed the calcium from the Ca-SP, the compound did not exert any antithrombin activity. Furthermore, Na-SP, which was prepared by replacement of the calcium in Ca-SP with sodium, accelerated the antithrombin activity of HC II as Ca-SP did. We therefore suggest that the molecular conformation maintained by Ca or Na is indispensable to the antithrombin activity of Ca-SP. The HC II-dependent antithrombin activity of Ca-SP was almost totally abolished by treatment with chondroitinase AC I, heparinase or heparitinase, but not by treatment with chondroitinase ABC and chondroitinase AC II, suggesting that a heparin- or dermatan sulfate-like structure is not responsible for the activation of HC II by Ca-SP. Ca-SP is therefore thought to be a unique sulfated polysaccharide which shows a strong antithrombin effect in an exclusively HC II-dependent manner.

  4. Compton profile of calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Rajasekaran, L.; Ramamurthy, N.; Shivaramu

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Compton profile of polycrystalline calcium fluoride is measured using 661.6 keV γ- radiation from a 137 Cs source. The experimental data are compared with HF-LCAO model calculation computed using CRYSTAL98 program, Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values and with the other available experimental data. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the HF-LCAO model calculations and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values

  5. Adaptations in Maternofetal Calcium Transport in Relation to Placental Size and Fetal Sex in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E. Hayward

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate placental transport of calcium is essential for normal fetal skeletal mineralization. In fetal growth restriction (FGR, the failure of a fetus to achieve its growth potential, a number of placental nutrient transport systems show reduced activity but, in the case of calcium, placental transport is increased. In a genetic mouse model of FGR this increase, or adaptation, maintains appropriate fetal calcium content, relative to the size of the fetus, despite a small, dysfunctional placenta. It is unknown whether such an adaptation is also apparent in small, but normally functioning placentas. We tested the hypothesis that calcium transfer would be up-regulated in the lightest vs. heaviest placentas in the same C57Bl/6J wild-type (WT mouse litter. Since lightest placentas are often from females, we also assessed whether fetal sex influenced placental calcium transfer. Placentas and fetuses were collected at embryonic day (E16.5 and 18.5; the lightest and heaviest placentas, and female and male fetuses, were identified. Unidirectional maternofetal calcium clearance (CaKmf was assessed following 45Ca administration to the dam and subsequent radiolabel counts within the fetuses. Placental expression of calcium pathway components was measured by Western blot. Data (median are lightest placenta expressed as percentage of the heaviest within a litter and analyzed by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In WT mice having normally grown fetuses, CaKmf, per gram placenta near term, in the lightest placentas was increased (126%; P < 0.05 in association with reduced fetal calcium accretion earlier in gestation (92%; P < 0.05, that was subsequently normalized near term. Increased placental expression of calbindin-D9K, an important calcium binding protein, was observed in the lightest placentas near term (122%; P < 0.01. There was no difference in fetal calcium accretion between male and female littermates but a trend toward higher CaKmf in females (P = 0

  6. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of......The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite......-wollastonite-tridymite and that of anorthite-wollastonite-gehlenite. The series includes the eutectic compositions as end members. The second series consists of five compositions on a line parallel to the joining line on the alumina rich side. In the present work, GFA is described in terms of glass stability, i.e., the ability of a glass...... to resist crystallization during reheating. In addition, the fragility index (m) is derived by fitting the viscosity data with the Avramov-Milchev equation. The results show that m is inversely proportional to the glass stability for the two series of melts, implying that m is an indirect measure of GFA...

  7. Crystal structure of pira toxin-I: a calcium-independent, myotoxic phospholipase A2 - homologue from Bothrops pirajai venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canduri, R.J.; Ward, R.J.; Azevedo Junior, G.W.F. de; Arni, R.K.; Soares, A.M.; Giglio, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Phospho lipases A2 (PLA 2 ) are small enzymes that specifically hydrolysed the sn-2 ester bond of phospholipids, preferentially in lamellar or micellar aggregates at membrane surfaces. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have been extensively studied. Toxic proteins from venoms from Bothrops species include catalytically active PLA 2 s and calcium independent PLA 2L ys 49 homologues. The substitution of Asp49 by Lys greatly diminishes the ability of these PLA 2 to bind calcium, an ion that plays a critical role in the stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state intermediate in the catalytic mechanism. The Lys 49 PLA 2 homologues and therefore catalytically inactive yet maintain cytolytic and myotoxic activities and furthermore retain the ability to disrupt the integrity of both plasma membranes and model lipid bilayers by a poorly understood Ca 2+ independente mechanism. Lys49 PLA 2 homologues demonstrate a specific toxic activity against skeletal muscle, affecting only muscle fibers and leaving other tissue structure such as connective tissue, nerves and vessels essentially unharmed. In order to improve our understanding of the molecular basis of the myotoxic and Ca 2+ -independent membrane damaging activities, we have determined the crystal structure of Pr TX-I, a Lys49 variant from the venom of B. pirajai. The model presented has been determined at 2.8 angstrom resolution and refined to a crystallographic residual of 19.7% (R free =29.7%). (author)

  8. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... no effect. HEPG2 cells internalized FVIIa with a rate of 10 fmol 10(-5) cells h(-1). In contrast to HEPG2 cells, FVIIa binding to primary rat hepatocytes was completely independent of TF, and excess unlabeled FVIIa partly reduced the binding of 125I-FVIIa to rat hepatocytes. Further, compared with HEPG2...... cells, three- to fourfold more FVIIa bound to rat primary hepatocytes, and the bound FVIIa was internalized at a faster rate. Similar FVIIa binding and internalization profiles were observed in primary human hepatocytes. Plasma inhibitors had no effect on FVIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes...

  9. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  10. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an impo