WorldWideScience

Sample records for included advanced age

  1. Developing a patient and family research advisory panel to include people with significant disease, multimorbidity and advanced age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portalupi, Laura B; Lewis, Carmen L; Miller, Carl D; Whiteman-Jones, Kerry L; Sather, Kay A; Nease, Donald E; Matlock, Daniel D

    2017-06-01

    People who have experienced illness due to significant disease, multimorbidity and/or advanced age are high utilizers of the health care system. Yet this population has had little formal opportunity to participate in guiding the health care research agenda, and few mechanisms exist for researchers to engage this population in an efficient way. We describe the process of developing a standing patient and family advisory panel to incorporate this population's voice into research in the USA. The panel was created at the University of Colorado. Preliminary panel development consisted of a needs assessment, information gathering and participant recruitment. We collected feedback from researchers who consulted with the panel and from panel members in order to better understand the experience from the patient and family member perspective. The patient and family research advisory panel consists of eight advisors who have experience with significant disease, multimorbidity and/or advanced age, two physicians and a program manager. The panel meets every other month for 2 hours with the main purpose of advising diverse researchers on health care studies. People with significant disease, multimorbidity and/or advanced age represent a growing demographic in the USA, and their engagement in research is essential as the model of health care delivery moves from volume to value. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cardiovascular KATPchannels and advanced aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-Qian; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Coetzee, William A

    2016-01-01

    With advanced aging, there is a decline in innate cardiovascular function. This decline is not general in nature. Instead, specific changes occur that impact the basic cardiovascular function, which include alterations in biochemical pathways and ion channel function. This review focuses on a particular ion channel that couple the latter two processes, namely the K ATP channel, which opening is promoted by alterations in intracellular energy metabolism. We show that the intrinsic properties of the K ATP channel changes with advanced aging and argue that the channel can be further modulated by biochemical changes. The importance is widespread, given the ubiquitous nature of the K ATP channel in the cardiovascular system where it can regulate processes as diverse as cardiac function, blood flow and protection mechanisms against superimposed stress, such as cardiac ischemia. We highlight questions that remain to be answered before the K ATP channel can be considered as a viable target for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Advanced reproductive age and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kimberly; Case, Allison

    2011-11-01

    To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and provide recommendations for their management, and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging. This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility. The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words (ovarian aging, ovarian reserve, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, ART). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table). Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for assisted reproductive technology. 1. Women in their 20s and 30s should be counselled about the age-related risk of infertility when other reproductive health issues, such as sexual health or contraception, are addressed as part of their primary well-woman care. Reproductive-age women should be aware that natural fertility and assisted reproductive technology success (except with egg donation) is significantly lower for women in their late 30s and 40s. (II-2A) 2. Because of the decline in fertility and the

  4. Advanced Maternal Age Worsens Postpartum Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude S. Morton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The age at which women experience their first pregnancy has increased throughout the decades. Pregnancy has an important influence on maternal short- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Pregnancy at an advanced maternal age increases maternal risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, placenta previa and caesarian delivery; complications which predict worsened cardiovascular health in later years. Aging also independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease; therefore, combined risk in women of advanced maternal age may lead to detrimental cardiovascular outcomes later in life. We hypothesized that pregnancy at an advanced maternal age would lead to postpartum vascular dysfunction. We used a reproductively aged rat model to investigate vascular function in never pregnant (virgin, previously pregnant (postpartum and previously mated but never delivered (nulliparous rats at approximately 13.5 months of age (3 months postpartum or equivalent. Nulliparous rats, in which pregnancy was spontaneously lost, demonstrated significantly reduced aortic relaxation responses (methylcholine [MCh] Emax: 54.2 ± 12.6% vs. virgin and postpartum rats (MCh Emax: 84.8 ± 3.5% and 84.7 ± 3.2% respectively; suggesting pregnancy loss causes a worsened vascular pathology. Oxidized LDL reduced relaxation to MCh in aorta from virgin and postpartum, but not nulliparous rats, with an increased contribution of the LOX-1 receptor in the postpartum group. Further, in mesenteric arteries from postpartum rats, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH-mediated vasodilation was reduced and a constrictive prostaglandin effect was apparent. In conclusion, aged postpartum rats exhibited vascular dysfunction, while rats which had pregnancy loss demonstrated a distinct vascular pathology. These data demonstrate mechanisms which may lead to worsened outcomes at an advanced maternal age; including early pregnancy loss and later life cardiovascular dysfunction.

  5. Arithmetic learning in advanced age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Christian; Pertl, Marie-Theres; Gizewski, Elke; Benke, Thomas; Delazer, Margarete

    2018-01-01

    Acquisition of numerical knowledge and understanding of numerical information are crucial for coping with the changing demands of our digital society. In this study, we assessed arithmetic learning in older and younger individuals in a training experiment including brain imaging. In particular, we assessed age-related effects of training intensity, prior arithmetic competence, and neuropsychological variables on the acquisition of new arithmetic knowledge and on the transfer to new, unknown problems. Effects were assessed immediately after training and after 3 months. Behavioural results showed higher training effects for younger individuals than for older individuals and significantly better performance after 90 problem repetitions than after 30 repetitions in both age groups. A correlation analysis indicated that older adults with lower memory and executive functions at baseline could profit more from intensive training. Similarly, training effects in the younger group were higher for those individuals who had lower arithmetic competence and executive functions prior to intervention. In younger adults, successful transfer was associated with higher executive functions. Memory and set-shifting emerged as significant predictors of training effects in the older group. For the younger group, prior arithmetic competence was a significant predictor of training effects, while cognitive flexibility was a predictor of transfer effects. After training, a subgroup of participants underwent an MRI assessment. A voxel-based morphometry analysis showed a significant interaction between training effects and grey matter volume of the right middle temporal gyrus extending to the angular gyrus for the younger group relative to the older group. The reverse contrast (older group vs. younger group) did not yield any significant results. These results suggest that improvements in arithmetic competence are supported by temporo-parietal areas in the right hemisphere in younger

  6. Male sexuality with advancing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Andreas; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2004-04-15

    People aged 60 years or older are commonly given the image of grandparents who are sexually rather inactive. However, a high percentage of men over 60 years have sexual desires and are sexually active. Aging men need more time and more direct stimulation of the penis to achieve full erection. The risk of developing erectile dysfunction increases with age. Almost one man in 22 aged 60-69 years without previous erection problems develops erectile dysfunction within 1 year. Hormone replacement therapy is only indicated if testosterone deficiency is combined with the syndrome of the "aging male" and lack of other disorders that are possibly causative and could be treated. For hormone replacement therapy testosterone gel preparations are preferable because they have a short half-time and can be immediately discontinued in the event that a pre-existing occult prostate carcinoma is stimulated.

  7. Kalaeloa Energy System Redevelopment Options Including Advanced Microgrids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, Marion Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baca, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanderMey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    In June 2016, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) in collaboration with the Renewable Energy Branch for the Hawaii State Energy Office (HSEO), the Hawaii Community Development Authority (HCDA), the United States Navy (Navy), and Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) established a project to 1) assess the current functionality of the energy infrastructure at the Kalaeloa Community Development District, and 2) evaluate options to use both existing and new distributed and renewable energy generation and storage resources within advanced microgrid frameworks to cost-effectively enhance energy security and reliability for critical stakeholder needs during both short-term and extended electric power outages. This report discusses the results of a stakeholder workshop and associated site visits conducted by Sandia in October 2016 to identify major Kalaeloa stakeholder and tenant energy issues, concerns, and priorities. The report also documents information on the performance and cost benefits of a range of possible energy system improvement options including traditional electric grid upgrade approaches, advanced microgrid upgrades, and combined grid/microgrid improvements. The costs and benefits of the different improvement options are presented, comparing options to see how well they address the energy system reliability, sustainability, and resiliency priorities identified by the Kalaeloa stakeholders.

  8. Advanced methodology for generation expansion planning including interconnected systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, M.; Yokoyama, R.; Yasuda, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Sasaki, H. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Ogimoto, K. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews advanced methodology for generation expansion planning including interconnected systems developed in Japan, putting focus on flexibility and efficiency in a practical application. First, criteria for evaluating flexibility of generation planning considering uncertainties are introduced. Secondly, the flexible generation mix problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization with more than two objective functions. The multi-objective optimization problem is then transformed into a single objective problem by using the weighting method, to obtain the Pareto optimal solution, and solved by a dynamics programming technique. Thirdly, a new approach for electric generation expansion planning of interconnected systems is presented, based on the Benders Decomposition technique. That is, large scale generation problem constituted by the general economic load dispatch problem, and several sub problems which are composed of smaller scale isolated system generation expansion plans. Finally, the generation expansion plan solved by an artificial neural network is presented. In conclusion, the advantages and disadvantages of this method from the viewpoint of flexibility and applicability to practical generation expansion planning are presented. (author) 29 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Influence of advancing age on clinical presentation, treatment efficacy and safety, and long-term outcome of inducible paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia without pre-excitation syndromes: A cohort study of 1960 patients included over 25 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brembilla-Perrot, Béatrice; Sellal, Jean Marc; Olivier, Arnaud; Villemin, Thibaut; Beurrier, Daniel; Vincent, Julie; Manenti, Vladimir; de Chillou, Christian; Bozec, Erwan

    2018-01-01

    Aim To investigate the influence of increasing age on clinical presentation, treatment and long-term outcome in patients with inducible paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) without pre-excitation syndromes. Methods Clinical and electrophysiological study (EPS) data, as well as long-term clinical outcome (mean follow-up 2.4±4.0 years) were collected in patients referred for regular tachycardia with inducible SVT during EPS without pre-excitation. Results Among 1960 referred patients, 301 patients (15.4%) were aged ≥70 (70–97). In this subset, anticoagulants were prescribed in 49 patients following an erroneous diagnosis of atrial tachycardia and 14 were previously erroneously diagnosed with ventricular tachycardia because of wide QRS. Ablation was performed more frequently in patients ≥70 despite more frequent failure and complications. During follow-up, higher risks of AF, stroke, pacemaker implantation and death were observed in patients ≥70 whereas SVT recurrences were similar in both age groups. In multivariable analysis, age ≥70 was independently associated with higher risks of SVT-related adverse events prior to ablation (OR = 1.93, 1.41–2.62, pSVT without pre-excitation syndromes are elderly. These patients exhibit higher risks of erroneous tachycardia diagnosis prior to EPS as well as failure and/or complication of ablation, but similar risk of SVT recurrence. These results support performing transesophageal EPS in most patients and intracardiac EPS in selected patients. EPS may furthermore prove useful in elderly patients with regular tachycardia, mainly by avoiding treatment based on an erroneous diagnosis. PMID:29304037

  10. Perinatal Outcomes in Advanced Age Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Yılmaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of advanced maternal age on pregnancy outcomes Methods: A retrospective analysis of 951 birth registry records of Zeynep Kamil Hospital, were analyzed between Janu­ary 2003 and December 2007. Study group was made up of women ≥40 years old and control group was made up of women younger than 40 years. Results: Mean maternal age was 41.48 years in the study group and 26.41 years in the control group. Mean gesta­tional age at the time of delivery is 37.73 weeks in study group and 38.10 weeks in the control group. There was no statistical difference in terms of preterm delivery, multiple pregnancy, fetal anomaly, IUGR, superimpose preeclampsia oligohidramnios, presentation anomaly and placenta previa rates between the study and control groups. Incidence of preeclampsia (p=0.041, Chronic hypertension (p=0.001, GDM (p= 0.003,is found to be higher in study group. Cesar­ean birth rate is higher (p<0.05 and hospitalization time is longer in study group (p=0.001. 1st minute and 5th minute APGAR scores of the study group (6.99±2, 8.27±2 was lower than the 1st minute and 5th Minutes APGAR scores of the control group (7.38±1.6, 8.58±1.7. Neonatal intensive care unit administration rate is seen also higher in study group (p<0.01. Conclusion: Advanced maternal age was related to increased pregnancy complications and poor perinatal outcome. Preeclampsia, GDM, chronic hypertension is seen more common in advanced age pregnancies. Neonatal intensive care administration is higher and APGAR scores are lower; cesarean delivery was performed more common, and hospitaliza­tion time was longer in advanced age pregnancies. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (2: 157-162

  11. Dietary advanced glycation end products and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food) and endogenously (in humans) with greater concentrations found in older adults. While higher AGEs occur in both healthy older adults and those with chronic diseases, research is progressing to both quantify AGEs in food and in people, and to identify mechanisms that would explain why some human tissues are damaged, and others are not. In the last twenty years, there has been increased evidence that AGEs could be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease and with complications of diabetes mellitus. Results of several studies in animal models and humans show that the restriction of dietary AGEs has positive effects on wound healing, insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the effect of restriction in AGEs intake has been reported to increase the lifespan in animal models. This paper will summarize the work that has been published for both food AGEs and in vivo AGEs and their relation with aging, as well as provide suggestions for future research.

  12. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Chapman-Novakofski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food and endogenously (in humans with greater concentrations found in older adults. While higher AGEs occur in both healthy older adults and those with chronic diseases, research is progressing to both quantify AGEs in food and in people, and to identify mechanisms that would explain why some human tissues are damaged, and others are not. In the last twenty years, there has been increased evidence that AGEs could be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and with complications of diabetes mellitus. Results of several studies in animal models and humans show that the restriction of dietary AGEs has positive effects on wound healing, insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the effect of restriction in AGEs intake has been reported to increase the lifespan in animal models. This paper will summarize the work that has been published for both food AGEs and in vivo AGEs and their relation with aging, as well as provide suggestions for future research.

  13. Advantageous developmental outcomes of advancing paternal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, M; Rijsdijk, F; Rai, D; Modabbernia, A; Reichenberg, A

    2017-06-20

    Advanced paternal age (APA) at conception has been associated with negative outcomes in offspring, raising concerns about increasing age at fatherhood. Evidence from evolutionary and psychological research, however, suggests possible link between APA and a phenotypic advantage. We defined such advantage as educational success, which is positively associated with future socioeconomic status. We hypothesised that high IQ, strong focus on the subject of interest and little concern about 'fitting in' will be associated with such success. Although these traits are continuously distributed in the population, they cluster together in so-called 'geeks'. We used these measures to compute a 'geek index' (GI), and showed it to be strongly predictive of future academic attainment, beyond the independent contribution of the individual traits. GI was associated with paternal age in male offspring only, and mediated the positive effects of APA on education outcomes, in a similar sexually dimorphic manner. The association between paternal age and GI was partly mediated by genetic factors not correlated with age at fatherhood, suggesting contribution of de novo factors to the 'geeky' phenotype. Our study sheds new light on the multifaceted nature of the APA effects and explores the intricate links between APA, autism and talent.

  14. Reproduction at an advanced maternal age and maternal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Mark V

    2015-05-01

    Advanced age is a risk factor for female infertility, pregnancy loss, fetal anomalies, stillbirth, and obstetric complications. These concerns are based on centuries-old observations, yet women are delaying childbearing to pursue educational and career goals in greater numbers than ever before. As a result, reproductive medicine specialists are treating more patients with age-related infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss, while obstetricians are faced with managing pregnancies often complicated by both age and comorbidities. The media portrayal of a youthful but older woman, able to schedule her reproductive needs and balance family and job, has fueled the myth that "you can have it all," rarely characterizing the perils inherent to advanced-age reproduction. Reproductive medicine specialists and obstetrician/gynecologists should promote more realistic views of the evidence-based realities of advanced maternal age pregnancy, including its high-risk nature and often compromised outcomes. Doctors should also actively educate both patients and the public that there is a real danger of childlessness if individuals choose to delay reproduction. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extending PSA models including ageing and asset management - 15291

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martorell, S.; Marton, I.; Carlos, S.; Sanchez, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to Ageing Probabilistic Safety Assessment (APSA) modelling, which is intended to be used to support risk-informed decisions on the effectiveness of maintenance management programs and technical specification requirements of critical equipment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) within the framework of the Risk Informed Decision Making according to R.G. 1.174 principles. This approach focuses on the incorporation of not only equipment ageing but also effectiveness of maintenance and efficiency of surveillance testing explicitly into APSA models and data. This methodology is applied to a motor-operated valve of the auxiliary feed water system (AFWS) of a PWR. This simple example of application focuses on a critical safety-related equipment of a NPP in order to evaluate the risk impact of considering different approaches to APSA and the combined effect of equipment ageing and maintenance and testing alternatives along NPP design life. The risk impact of several alternatives in maintenance strategy is discussed

  16. Infection susceptibility and immune senescence with advancing age replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lijun; Jiang, Tony T; Kinder, Jeremy M; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-12-01

    Aging confers increased susceptibility to common pathogens including influenza A virus. Despite shared vulnerability to infection with advancing age in humans and rodents, the relatively long time required for immune senescence to take hold practically restricts the use of naturally aged mice to investigate aging-induced immunological shifts. Here, we show accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice with spontaneous mutation in the nuclear scaffolding protein, lamin A, replicate infection susceptibility, and substantial immune cell shifts that occur with advancing age. Naturally aged (≥ 20 month) and 2- to 3-month-old Lmna(Dhe) mice share near identically increased influenza A susceptibility compared with age-matched Lmna(WT) control mice. Increased mortality and higher viral burden after influenza infection in Lmna(Dhe) mice parallel reduced accumulation of lung alveolar macrophage cells, systemic expansion of immune suppressive Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells, and skewed immune dominance among viral-specific CD8⁺T cells similar to the immunological phenotype of naturally aged mice. Thus, aging-induced infection susceptibility and immune senescence are replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. End-of-Life Decisions and Advanced Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that most people die in advanced old age, little attention is given to cases involving older people in debates about the moral and legal dimensions of end-of-life decision making. The purpose of this paper is to establish some of the ways our discussions should change as we pay attention to important factors influencing end-of-life decisions for people in advanced old age. Focusing on the prevalence of comorbidities and the likelihood that people in advanced old age will experience an extended period of declining function before death, I argue that our debates should be expanded to include greater consideration of how we want to live in the final stages of life. With this, I am arguing against the tendency to think that “end-of-life” decision making concerns only making decisions about when and how it is appropriate to terminate a person’s life. I argue, further, that we should move away from the medicalization of dying.

  18. Primigravida at Advanced Maternal Age | Adefuye | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evolving socioeconomic development and its challenges, and advances in medical science have led to increasing proportion of women delaying childbearing ... diabetes and its complications, uteroplacental bleeding, preterm birth, low birth weight, still birth, chromosomal defects, labour complications, and caesarean ...

  19. Advanced paternal age and stillbirth rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urhøj, Stine Kjær; Andersen, Per Kragh; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2017-01-01

    the association between paternal age and stillbirth rate in a large nationwide cohort. We identified all pregnancies in Denmark from 1994 to 2010 carried to a gestational age of at least 22 completed weeks (n = 944,031) as registered in national registers and linked to individual register data about the parents....... The hazard ratio of stillbirth according to paternal age was estimated, adjusted for maternal age in 1-year categories, year of outcome, and additionally parental educational levels. The relative rate of stillbirth (n = 4946) according to paternal age was found to be J-shaped with the highest hazard ratio.......41 (95% CI 1.26–1.59); 45–49, 1.20 (95% CI 0.97–1.49); 50+, 1.58 (95% CI 1.18–2.11), compared with fathers aged 30–34 years. These estimates attenuated slightly when further adjusted for parental education. Our study showed that paternal age was associated with the relative rate of stillbirth in a J...

  20. Further advances in aging studies for RPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Stante, L; Liberti, B; Paoloni, A; Pastori, E; Santonico, R

    2003-01-01

    Aging phenomena in RPCs have been studied since 1996 in the framework of the ATLAS experiment with small-size detectors, irradiated with a **6**0Co source. The results evidenced a decrease of the detector rate capability at fixed electric field, due to an increase of the total resistance of electrodes. This was confirmed by an extensive aging test performed on the ATLAS RPC "module-0" at GIF-X5, the CERN irradiation facility. A primary cause for this effect was previously shown to be the degradation of the anodic graphite coating, which distributes the electric field on the bakelite electrode. We present here a systematic study of the graphite aging which fully confirms this interpretation. Moreover, we show that detectors with improved graphite coating allow to gain a factor of at least two in lifetime. In the framework of these tests, we also show that the aging behavior of a detector working at high current induced by heavy irradiation can be reproduced by operating the detector, filled with pure Argon, in...

  1. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes at Advanced Maternal Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Line Elmerdahl; Ernst, Andreas; Brix, Nis

    2018-01-01

    . Pregnant women aged 35 years or older were divided into two advanced maternal age groups, 35-39 years and 40 years or older, and compared with pregnant women aged 20-34 years. Adverse pregnancy outcomes were chromosomal abnormalities, congenital malformations, miscarriage, stillbirth, and birth before 34......OBJECTIVE: To study the possible associations between advanced maternal age and risk of selected adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: The study used a nationwide cohort of 369,516 singleton pregnancies in Denmark followed from 11-14 weeks of gestation to delivery or termination of pregnancy...... weeks of gestation. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, a risk prediction model for a composite adverse pregnancy outcome was made with prespecified predicting factors. RESULTS...

  2. The association between location, age and advanced colorectal adenoma characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence supports an association between certain colorectal adenoma characteristics and predisposition to cancer. The association between anatomical location of colorectal adenoma, age and advanced adenomas needs attention. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible....... Inclusion criteria for patients were one adenoma of >1 cm in diameter or multiple adenomas of any size, or an adenoma of any size and familial disposition for colorectal cancer. Multivariate regression and propensity score-matched analyses were used to correlate location of adenomas and age with advanced...... adenoma features. RESULTS: In this study, 2149 adenomas were removed in 1215 patients. Advanced colorectal adenomas primarily occurred in the anal part of the colon. Older age was associated with more adenomas and more oral occurrence of adenomas, as well as a higher risk of advanced adenomas...

  3. FY 2017 – Thermal Aging Effects on Advanced Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of the effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of existing laboratory-sized heats of Alloy 709 austenitic stainless steel and the completion of effort on the thermal aging effect on the tensile properties of optimized G92 ferritic-martensitic steel. The report is a Level 3 deliverable in FY17 (M3AT-17AN1602081), under the Work Package AT-17AN160208, “Advanced Alloy Testing - ANL” performed by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  4. The perinatal and maternal outcome in pregnancy with advanced maternal age 35 years and >35 years

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi S. Kalewad; Trupti Nadkarni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Purpose of this study is to evaluate maternal and perinatal outcome in advanced maternal age women. As numbers of pregnancies in advanced maternal age continue to grow, obstetric care provider would benefit from up to date outcome data to enhance their preconceptional and antenatal counseling. Methods: It is observational prospective analytic study, conducted in Nowrosjee Wadia maternity hospital, Parel, Mumbai. Total 100 patients were included in study, fulfilling inclusion cr...

  5. Does Volunteering Experience Influence Advance Care Planning in Old Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huei-Wern; Khosla, Nidhi

    2016-07-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood patients will receive end-of-life care that is congruent with their preferences and lowers stress among both patients and caregivers. Previous efforts to increase ACP have mainly focused on information provision in the very late stage of life. This study examines whether a relationship exists between volunteering and ACP, and whether this relationship is associated with social support. The sample comprises 877 individuals who were aged 55+ in 2008, and were deceased before 2010. The sample is derived from seven waves (1998-2010) of data from the Health and Retirement Study. Logistic regression results showed that overall ACP and durable power of attorney for health care (DPAHC) were both higher (OR = 1.61 and 1.71, respectively) for older adults with volunteering experience in the past 10 years than those without such experience. Available social support (relatives and friends living nearby) was not associated with the relationship between volunteering and ACP. Other factors related to ACP included poorer health, death being expected, death due to cancer, older age, and being a racial minority. Involving older people in volunteer work may help to increase ACP. Future research is encouraged to identify reasons for the association between volunteering and ACP.

  6. Advanced maternal age and risk perception: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Advanced maternal age (AMA) is associated with several adverse pregnancy outcomes, hence these pregnancies are considered to be “high risk.” A review of the empirical literature suggests that it is not clear how women of AMA evaluate their pregnancy risk. This study aimed to address this gap by exploring the risk perception of pregnant women of AMA. Methods A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken to obtain a rich and detailed source of explanatory data regarding perceived pregnancy risk of 15 women of AMA. The sample was recruited from a variety of settings in Winnipeg, Canada. In-depth interviews were conducted with nulliparous women aged 35 years or older, in their third trimester, and with singleton pregnancies. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and content analysis was used to identify themes and categories. Results Four main themes emerged: definition of pregnancy risk, factors influencing risk perception, risk alleviation strategies, and risk communication with health professionals. Conclusions Several factors may influence women's perception of pregnancy risk including medical risk, psychological elements, characteristics of the risk, stage of pregnancy, and health care provider’s opinion. Understanding these influential factors may help health professionals who care for pregnant women of AMA to gain insight into their perspectives on pregnancy risk and improve the effectiveness of risk communication strategies with this group. PMID:22988825

  7. Advancing paternal age and schizophrenia: the impact of delayed fatherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Mats; Wicks, Susanne; Svensson, Anna C; Idring, Selma; Dalman, Christina

    2015-05-01

    It is well known that advancing paternal age is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring, but the mechanism behind this association remains unknown. This study investigates if delayed fatherhood rather than advancing paternal age per se might explain the increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring associated with advancing paternal age. This is a register-based study of the Swedish population looking at people born 1955-1985 who have 1 or 2 siblings (n = 2 589 502). The main analysis investigated whether the association between advancing paternal age and schizophrenia was explained by delayed fatherhood. Possible confounding factors were taken into account. Cox regression was used throughout. In the main analysis the association between advancing paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring disappeared after controlling for delayed fatherhood (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.72-1.21 comparing 45+ years old fathers to those 25-29), whereas delayed fatherhood showed an association with increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring comparing 35-39 and 40-44 years old fathers to 25-29 year olds (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.18-1.58; HR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.44-2.28, respectively). The results remained when controlling for possible confounders. This study suggests that the association between paternal age and schizophrenia is not due to paternal age per se, but rather to an unknown factor associated with both delayed fatherhood and schizophrenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes at Advanced Maternal Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Line Elmerdahl; Ernst, Andreas; Brix, Nis; Braskhøj Lauridsen, Lea Lykke; Roos, Laura; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist

    2018-03-01

    To study the possible associations between advanced maternal age and risk of selected adverse pregnancy outcomes. The study used a nationwide cohort of 369,516 singleton pregnancies in Denmark followed from 11-14 weeks of gestation to delivery or termination of pregnancy. Pregnant women aged 35 years or older were divided into two advanced maternal age groups, 35-39 years and 40 years or older, and compared with pregnant women aged 20-34 years. Adverse pregnancy outcomes were chromosomal abnormalities, congenital malformations, miscarriage, stillbirth, and birth before 34 weeks of gestation. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, a risk prediction model for a composite adverse pregnancy outcome was made with prespecified predicting factors. Among the pregnant women aged 40 years or older, 10.82% experienced one or more of the selected adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with 5.46% of pregnant women aged 20-34 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 99.8% CI 1.78-2.29). When pregnant women 40 years or older were compared with women aged 20-34 years, they had a higher risk of chromosomal abnormalities (3.83% vs 0.56%, OR 7.44 [CI 5.93-9.34]), miscarriage (1.68% vs 0.42%, OR 3.10 [CI 2.19-4.38]), and birth before 34 weeks of gestation (2.01% vs 1.21%, OR 1.66 [CI 1.23-2.24]), but no increased risk of congenital malformations and stillbirth. The risk prediction chart showed that advanced maternal age, use of assisted reproductive technology, nulliparous pregnancy, smoking during pregnancy, and obesity increased the absolute predictive risk of an adverse pregnancy outcome. Women older than 40 years have a higher risk of chromosomal abnormalities, miscarriage, and birth before 34 weeks of gestation than younger women and should be monitored accordingly. No increased risk was observed for stillbirth and other congenital malformations. Several factors increase the

  9. Is advanced paternal age a health risk for the offspring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Urhoj, Stine Kjaer

    2017-01-01

    In this article we review the epidemiologic evidence for adverse health effects in offspring of fathers of advanced age. First the evidence regarding fetal survival is addressed, and afterward we review the evidence regarding morbidity in children with older fathers. The adverse conditions most...... consistently associated with increased paternal age are stillbirths, musculo-skeletal syndromes, cleft palate, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and retinoblastoma, and neurodevelopmental disorders in the autism spectrum and schizophrenia. Finally, we consider the public health impact of the increasing paternal age...

  10. Preimplantation development of embryos in women of advanced maternal age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Chaplia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the influence of genetic component on the early embryo development, the retrospective study of morphokinetic characteristics of 717 embryos subjected to preimplantation genetic testing was conducted. Blastomere biopsy for FISH-based preimplantation genetic screening of 7 chromosomes was performed on the third day of culture, while embryo developmental potential and morphological features at the cleavage and blastulation stage were studied regarding maternal age particularly in the group of younger women and patients older than 36. Results of genetic testing revealed that euploid embryos rate gradually decreased with maternal age comprising 39.9% in young women group and 25.3% of specimen belonging to elder patients. At the cleavage stage, morphological characteristics of aneuploid and euploid embryos didn’t differ significantly regardless of the age of patients that could be accounted for the transcriptional silence of embryo genome till the third day of its development. However, in case of prolonged culture chromosomally balanced embryos rarely faced developmental arrest (in 7.9% and formed blastocysts half more frequently compared to aberrant embryos (respectively 75.6 versus 49.8%. Nevertheless, no substantial difference was found between blastocyst formation rate among embryos with similar genetic component regardless of the maternal age. Taking into consideration high rate of chromosomally unbalanced embryos specific to patients of advanced maternal age, the relative proportion of aneuplouid blastocysts was significantly higher in this group of embryos. Thus, without genetic screening there is a possibility of inaccurate selection of embryos for women of advanced reproductive age for transfer procedure even in case of prolonged culture. Consequently, increase of aneuploid embryos frequency associated with permanent preimplantation natural selection effectiveness along with the postimplantation natural selection failure

  11. Is the relationship between BMI and mortality increasingly U-shaped with advancing age? A 10-year follow-up of persons aged 70-95 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Mikael; Jacobsen, Rune; Jeune, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    (BMI [kilogram per square meter]) and mortality becomes increasingly U-shaped with advancing age. The aim of this study is to examine the association between BMI and mortality and to test whether the association is changing with advancing age for persons aged 70-95 years in Denmark. METHODS: The study....... The information in both surveys included self-reported weight and height. With virtually no loss to follow-up, survival was assessed through a 10-year follow-up period, during which 4,664 (72%) of the persons died. RESULTS: The association between BMI and mortality is changing with advancing age for people aged...... 70-95 years. There was a significant decrease in the association between mortality and low BMI with advancing age for both genders (p BMI to decrease with advancing age for males (p = .06). CONCLUSION: In a large...

  12. Permanent atrial fibrillation ablation surgery in patients with advanced age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Geidel

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even if permanent atrial fibrillation (pAF is a frequent concomitant problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery and particularly in those with advanced age, data of pAF ablation surgery in older aged patients are scarce. This study was performed to assess early and late results of combined open heart surgery and pAF ablation procedures in patients with advanced aged, compared to young patients. Material and Methods: A selective group of 126 patients (Group A: age ≥70 [76.4±4.8] years, n=70; Group B: age <70 [62.0±6.2] years: n=56 with pAF (≥6 months underwent either monopolar (Group A, B: n=51 vs. n=44 or bipolar (Group A, B: n=19 vs. n=12 radiofrequency (RF ablation procedures concomitant to open heart surgery. Regular follow-up was performed 3 to 36 months after surgery to assess survival, New York Heart Association (NYHA class and conversion rate to stable sinus rhythm (SR. Results: Early mortality (<30 days was 2.9% in Group A (Group B: 0%, cumulative survival at long-term follow up was 0.78 vs. 0.98 (p=0.03 and NYHA-class improved significantly in both groups, particularly in cases with stable SR. At 12-months follow-up 73% of Group A patients were in stable SR (Group B 78%. Conclusions: Concomitant mono- and bipolar RF ablation surgery represents a safe option to cure pAF during open heart surgery with a very low risk, even in patients with advanced age.

  13. Aging ovary and the role for advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2017-03-01

    The hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator, the pituitary gonadotropes, the ovaries, and the uterus play a crucial role in female fertility. A decline in reproductive performance represents a complex interplay of actions at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Recently, in the field of female reproductive aging attention is drawn to the carbonyl stress theory. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute directly to protein damage, induce a chain of oxidative stress (OS) reactions, and increase inflammatory reactions. Here, we highlight some of the mechanisms underlying glycation damage in the ovary. Searches of electronic databases were performed. Articles relevant to possible role of OS, AGEs, and receptor for AGE (RAGE) in aging ovary were summarized in this interpretive literature review. Follicular microenvironment undergoes an increase in OS with aging. Data support the role of OS in ovulatory dysfunction because AGEs are well-recognized mediators of increased OS. RAGE and AGE-modified proteins with activated nuclear factor-kappa B are expressed in human ovarian tissue. It was suggested that accumulation of AGEs products at the level of the ovarian follicle might trigger early ovarian aging or could be responsible for reduced glucose uptake by granulosa cells, potentially altering follicular growth. Moreover, impaired methylglyoxal detoxification causing relevant damage to the ovarian proteome might be one of the mechanisms underlying reproductive aging. Further investigation of the role for the AGE-RAGE axis in the ovarian follicular environment is needed, and results could relate to assisted reproduction technology outcomes and new measures of ovarian reserve.

  14. Microscopic age determination of human skeletons including an unknown but calculable variable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Johan Albert; Tkocz, Izabella; Kristensen, Gustav

    1994-01-01

    estimation, which includes the covariance matrix of four single equation residuals, improves the accuracy of age determination. The standard deviation, however, of age prediction remains 12.58 years. An experimental split of the data was made in order to demonstrate that the use of subgroups gives a false...

  15. Age correction in monitoring audiometry: method to update OSHA age-correction tables to include older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Robert A; Wojcik, Nancy C

    2015-07-13

    The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Noise Standard provides the option for employers to apply age corrections to employee audiograms to consider the contribution of ageing when determining whether a standard threshold shift has occurred. Current OSHA age-correction tables are based on 40-year-old data, with small samples and an upper age limit of 60 years. By comparison, recent data (1999-2006) show that hearing thresholds in the US population have improved. Because hearing thresholds have improved, and because older people are increasingly represented in noisy occupations, the OSHA tables no longer represent the current US workforce. This paper presents 2 options for updating the age-correction tables and extending values to age 75 years using recent population-based hearing survey data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Both options provide scientifically derived age-correction values that can be easily adopted by OSHA to expand their regulatory guidance to include older workers. Regression analysis was used to derive new age-correction values using audiometric data from the 1999-2006 US NHANES. Using the NHANES median, better-ear thresholds fit to simple polynomial equations, new age-correction values were generated for both men and women for ages 20-75 years. The new age-correction values are presented as 2 options. The preferred option is to replace the current OSHA tables with the values derived from the NHANES median better-ear thresholds for ages 20-75 years. The alternative option is to retain the current OSHA age-correction values up to age 60 years and use the NHANES-based values for ages 61-75 years. Recent NHANES data offer a simple solution to the need for updated, population-based, age-correction tables for OSHA. The options presented here provide scientifically valid and relevant age-correction values which can be easily adopted by OSHA to expand their regulatory guidance to

  16. Oxidative Stress in Aging: Advances in Proteomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ortuño-Sahagún

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a gradual, complex process in which cells, tissues, organs, and the whole organism itself deteriorate in a progressive and irreversible manner that, in the majority of cases, implies pathological conditions that affect the individual’s Quality of Life (QOL. Although extensive research efforts in recent years have been made, the anticipation of aging and prophylactic or treatment strategies continue to experience major limitations. In this review, the focus is essentially on the compilation of the advances generated by cellular expression profile analysis through proteomics studies (two-dimensional [2D] electrophoresis and mass spectrometry [MS], which are currently used as an integral approach to study the aging process. Additionally, the relevance of the oxidative stress factors is discussed. Emphasis is placed on postmitotic tissues, such as neuronal, muscular, and red blood cells, which appear to be those most frequently studied with respect to aging. Additionally, models for the study of aging are discussed in a number of organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, senescence-accelerated probe-8 mice (SAMP8, naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber, and the beagle canine. Proteomic studies in specific tissues and organisms have revealed the extensive involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress in aging.

  17. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology, including advanced validation concepts, to license evolving nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Williams, B.; Hemez, F.; Atamturktur, S.H.; McClure, P.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The best estimate plus uncertainty methodology (BEPU) is one option in the licensing of nuclear reactors. → The challenges for extending the BEPU method for fuel qualification for an advanced reactor fuel are primarily driven by schedule, the need for data, and the sufficiency of the data. → In this paper we develop an extended BEPU methodology that can potentially be used to address these new challenges in the design and licensing of advanced nuclear reactors. → The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. → The methodology includes a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to existing data, so that required new testing can be minimized, saving cost by demonstrating that further testing will not enhance the quality of the predictive tools. - Abstract: Many evolving nuclear energy technologies use advanced predictive multiscale, multiphysics modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to reduce the cost and schedule of design and licensing. Historically, the role of experiments has been as a primary tool for the design and understanding of nuclear system behavior, while M and S played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multiscale, multiphysics computational-based technology development, this role has been reversed. The experiments will still be needed, but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate the models leading to predictive simulations for design and licensing. Minimizing the required number of validation experiments produces cost and time savings. The use of multiscale, multiphysics models introduces challenges in validating these predictive tools - traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these challenges. This paper gives the basic aspects of a methodology that can potentially be used to address these new challenges in

  18. Microscopic age determination of human skeletons including an unknown but calculable variable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Johan Albert; Tkocz, Izabella; Kristensen, Gustav

    1994-01-01

    estimation, which includes the covariance matrix of four single equation residuals, improves the accuracy of age determination. The standard deviation, however, of age prediction remains 12.58 years. An experimental split of the data was made in order to demonstrate that the use of subgroups gives a false...... impression of higher precision of age determination. The present study demonstrates that determination of age at death through microscopic bone morphometry is considerably less precise than generally stated in the literature.......Histomorphometric semi-automatic image analysis of cross-sections of 101 femoral diaphyseal bone sections were performed to reconsider to what degree osteon remodelling in the outer cortex is affected by age. The data were analysed statistically using the generalized least squares method. The model...

  19. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated the rela......Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated...... the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher...... than HFD The mice were sacrificed at week 40 and Achilles and tail tendons were carefully excised to compare weight and nonweight-bearing tendons. The amount of the AGEs carboxymethyllysine (CML), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) and carboxyethyllysine (CEL) in Achilles and tail tendon...

  20. Closely approaching advanced age in a supermax prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynd, Staughton

    2014-01-01

    When a Social Security recipient reaches the age of 50 years, he or she is classified as "closely approaching advanced age." Todd Ashker is passing this tipping point at Pelican Bay State Prison in California, a supermaximum security facility. My wife and I have corresponded with Mr. Ashker for more than half a dozen years. Although I cannot verify the details of his account, we believe that his representation of facts is generally reliable. He is one of the spokespersons for prisoners who conducted two hunger strikes in 2011 protesting conditions of their confinement. Another, sixty-day hunger strike took place in 2013. Thus, what follows is a story of resilience as well as victimization.

  1. Analysis of advanced european nuclear fuel cycle scenarios including transmutation and economical estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino Rodriguez, I.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the transition from the existing Light Water Reactors (LWR) to the advanced reactors is analyzed, including Generation III+ reactors in a European framework. Four European fuel cycle scenarios involving transmutation options have been addressed. The first scenario (i.e., reference) is the current fleet using LWR technology and open fuel cycle. The second scenario assumes a full replacement of the initial fleet with Fast Reactors (FR) burning U-Pu MOX fuel. The third scenario is a modification of the second one introducing Minor Actinide (MA) transmutation in a fraction of the FR fleet. Finally, in the fourth scenario, the LWR fleet is replaced using FR with MOX fuel as well as Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) for MA transmutation. All scenarios consider an intermediate period of GEN-III+ LWR deployment and they extend for a period of 200 years looking for equilibrium mass flows. The simulations were made using the TR-EVOL code, a tool for fuel cycle studies developed by CIEMAT. The results reveal that all scenarios are feasible according to nuclear resources demand (U and Pu). Concerning to no transmutation cases, the second scenario reduces considerably the Pu inventory in repositories compared to the reference scenario, although the MA inventory increases. The transmutation scenarios show that elimination of the LWR MA legacy requires on one hand a maximum of 33% fraction (i.e., a peak value of 26 FR units) of the FR fleet dedicated to transmutation (MA in MOX fuel, homogeneous transmutation). On the other hand a maximum number of ADS plants accounting for 5% of electricity generation are predicted in the fourth scenario (i.e., 35 ADS units). Regarding the economic analysis, the estimations show an increase of LCOE (Levelized cost of electricity) - averaged over the whole period - with respect to the reference scenario of 21% and 29% for FR and FR with transmutation scenarios respectively, and 34% for the fourth scenario. (authors)

  2. Aging and physiological changes of the kidneys including changes in glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the structural changes in the kidney associated with aging, physiological changes in renal function are also found in older adults, such as decreased glomerular filtration rate, vascular dysautonomia, altered tubular handling of creatinine, reduction in sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion, and diminished renal reserve. These alterations make aged individuals susceptible to the development of clinical conditions in response to usual stimuli that would otherwise be compensated for in younger individuals, including acute kidney injury, volume depletion and overload, disorders of serum sodium and potassium concentration, and toxic reactions to water-soluble drugs excreted by the kidneys. Additionally, the preservation with aging of a normal urinalysis, normal serum urea and creatinine values, erythropoietin synthesis, and normal phosphorus, calcium and magnesium tubular handling distinguishes decreased GFR due to normal aging from that due to chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Prospective validation of criteria, including age, for safe, nonsurgical management of the ruptured spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.S. Jr.; Wengrovitz, M.A.; DeLong, B.S.

    1992-01-01

    One hundred twelve cases of blunt splenic rupture were prospectively entered (October 1987-October 1991) into surgical or nonsurgical management groups using these criteria for the nonsurgical group: hemodynamic stability-age less than 55 years-CT scan appearance of grade I, II, or III injury-absence of concomitant injuries precluding abdominal assessment+absence of other documented abdominal injuries. All ages were included and AAST injury scaling was used. Patients were grouped from the trauma room. The surgical treatment group included 66 patients (49 splenectomies, 17 splenorraphies). These patients were generally older and more severely injured, required more transfused blood, and a longer ICU stay. The nonsurgical group included 46 patients with 33 older than 14 years. There were 3 patients over the age of 55 years inappropriately included in this group, and nonsurgical therapy failed in all three. Statistical analysis (chi 2) showed that more splenic injuries were observed and more spleens were saved with these criteria applied prospectively compared with a previous retrospective series in the same institution. The series had a success rate of 93%, and validates the criteria used for safe, nonsurgical management of the ruptured spleen and adds a new criterion: a maximum age of 55 years

  4. Prospective validation of criteria, including age, for safe, nonsurgical management of the ruptured spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.S. Jr.; Wengrovitz, M.A.; DeLong, B.S. (Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey (United States))

    1992-09-01

    One hundred twelve cases of blunt splenic rupture were prospectively entered (October 1987-October 1991) into surgical or nonsurgical management groups using these criteria for the nonsurgical group: hemodynamic stability-age less than 55 years-CT scan appearance of grade I, II, or III injury-absence of concomitant injuries precluding abdominal assessment+absence of other documented abdominal injuries. All ages were included and AAST injury scaling was used. Patients were grouped from the trauma room. The surgical treatment group included 66 patients (49 splenectomies, 17 splenorraphies). These patients were generally older and more severely injured, required more transfused blood, and a longer ICU stay. The nonsurgical group included 46 patients with 33 older than 14 years. There were 3 patients over the age of 55 years inappropriately included in this group, and nonsurgical therapy failed in all three. Statistical analysis (chi 2) showed that more splenic injuries were observed and more spleens were saved with these criteria applied prospectively compared with a previous retrospective series in the same institution. The series had a success rate of 93%, and validates the criteria used for safe, nonsurgical management of the ruptured spleen and adds a new criterion: a maximum age of 55 years.

  5. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost

  6. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Cetin; Williams, Brian; McClure, Patrick; Nelson, Ralph A.

    2010-01-01

    Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for

  7. Advanced paternal age and mortality of offspring under 5 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urhoj, S. K.; Jespersen, L. N.; Nissen, M.

    2014-01-01

    splines and paternal age groups. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Compared with children born to fathers aged 30-34 years, a statistically significant excess risk was found for children born to fathers aged 40-44 years [HR: 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00-1.21)] and children born to fathers aged 45+ years [HR: 1.......16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.32)]. When only looking at 1-5 year olds, the relative risk (HR) among children born to fathers aged 40-44 years increased to 1.24 (95% CI: 1.00-1.53) and the risk in the oldest paternal age group (45+ years) rose to 1.65 (95% CI: 1.24-2.18). The results suggest that the elevated risk......STUDY QUESTION: Do children born to fathers of advanced age have an increased risk of dying before the age of 5 years? SUMMARY ANSWER: Children born to fathers aged 40 years or more have an increased risk of dying in early childhood due to an excess risk of fatal congenital anomalies, malignancies...

  8. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  9. Advanced age, constipation, depression: what are the ways of management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Chernus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is one of the key problems of modern therapy for elderly people. The research aim was to study the features of the psychological and microbiological status of the advanced and senile age patients with functional constipation and to see the effect of educational programmes on compliance of the patients with the therapy in the out!patient departments. The investigation showed that depression was more frequent in the patients of group 1 (68.4 % of the cases with compensated function of the large gut whereas in the 2nd group – 34.6 % (compensated and in the 3rd group – 41.5 % (subcompensatedcases. The 3rd degree dysbiosis was found in all patoents irrespective of the extern of disorder of the motor!kinetic function in the large gut.

  10. Recent female mouse models displaying advanced reproductive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilovich, Natalia; Ram Sairam, M

    2006-02-01

    Reproductive senescence occurs in all female mammals with resultant changes in numerous body functional systems and several important features may be species-specific. Those features that appear to parallel human menopause and aging include general similarity of hormone profiles across the menopausal transition, progression to cycle termination through irregular cycles, declining fertility with age, disturbances in thermogenesis, age-related gains in body weight, fat distribution and disposition towards metabolic syndrome. Structural and hormonal changes in the brain and ovary play a critical role in determining the onset of reproductive senescence. The short life span of rodents such as mice (compared to humans) and the ability to generate specific and timed gene deletions, provide powerful experimental paradigms to understand the molecular and functional changes that precede and follow the loss of reproductive capacity. In theory, any manipulation that compromises ovarian function either partly or totally would impact reproductive events at various levels followed by other dysfunctions. In this article, we provide an overview of three mouse models for the study of female reproductive aging. They are derived from different strategies and their age related phenotypes have been characterized to varying degrees. The follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO) mouse, in its null and haploinsufficient state as well as the dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mouse, serve as two examples of single gene deletions. A third model, using administration of a chemical toxicant such as 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) in the adult state, produces ovarian deficiencies accompanied by aging changes. These will serve as useful alternatives to previously used radical ovariectomy in young adults. It is anticipated that these new models and more that will be forthcoming will extend opportunities to understand reproductive aging and resolve controversies that abound on issues

  11. Surgical treatment of severe osteoporosis including new concept of advanced severe osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hwan Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe osteoporosis is classified as those with a bone mineral density (BMD T-score of −2.5 or lower, and demonstrate one or more of osteoporotic, low-trauma, fragility fractures. According to the general principle of surgical approach, patients with severe osteoporosis require not only more thorough pre- and postoperative treatment plans, but improvements in surgical fixtures and techniques such as the concept of a locking plate to prevent bone deformity and maximizing the blood flow to the fracture site by using a minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis. Arthroplasty is often performed in cases of displaced femoral neck fracture. Otherwise internal fixation for the goal of bone union is the generally accepted option for intertrochanteric, subtrochanteric, and femoral shaft fractures. Most of osteoporotic spine fracture is stable compression fracture, but vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty may be performed some selective patients. If neurological paralysis, severe spinal instability, or kyphotic deformity occurs, open decompression or fusion surgery may be considered. In order to overcome shortcomings of the World Health Organization definition of osteoporosis, we proposed a concept of ‘advanced severe osteoporosis,’ which is defined by the presence of proximal femur fragility fracture or two or more fragility fractures in addition to BMD T-score of −2.5 or less. In conclusion, we need more meticulous approach for surgical treatment of severe osteoporosis who had fragility fracture. In cases of advanced severe osteoporosis, we recommend more aggressive managements using parathyroid hormone and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand monoclonal antibody.

  12. Is advanced maternal age a risk factor for congenital heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Kate E; Rankin, Judith

    2016-06-01

    Studies have reported that advanced maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease (CHD), but none of these have been performed in the United Kingdom. Currently, women in the United Kingdom are not referred for specialist fetal echocardiography based on maternal age alone. The aim of this study is to examine the association between maternal age at delivery and CHD prevalence in the North of England. Singleton cases of CHD notified to the Northern Congenital Abnormality Survey and born between January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2013, were included. Cases with chromosomal anomalies were excluded. The relative risk (RR) of CHD according to maternal age at delivery was estimated using Poisson regression. There were 4024 singleton cases of nonchromosomal CHD, giving a prevalence of 8.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.8-8.3) per 1000 live and stillbirths. There was no association between maternal age at delivery and CHD prevalence (p = 0.97), with no evidence of an increased risk of CHD in mothers aged ≥35 compared to aged 25 to 29 (RR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.89-1.09). There were no significant associations between maternal age at delivery and severity III CHD (p = 0.84), severity II CHD (p = 0.74), or severity I CHD (p = 0.66), although there was a slight increased risk of severity I CHD in mothers aged ≥35 (RR = 1.27; 95% CI, 0.83-1.95). We found little evidence that advanced maternal age is a risk factor for CHD. There is no evidence that women in the United Kingdom should be referred for specialist prenatal cardiac screening based on their age. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:461-467, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Inflammation and premature aging in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Dekker, Marijke J; Usvyat, Len A; Kotanko, Peter; van der Sande, Frank M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease is an established risk factor for mortality and a catalyst for other complications, which are related to a premature aging phenotype, including muscle wasting, vascular calcification, and other forms of premature vascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, and frailty. Uremic inflammation is also mechanistically related to mechanisms involved in the aging process, such as telomere shortening, mitochondrial dysfunction, and altered nutrient sensing, which can have a direct effect on cellular and tissue function. In addition to uremia-specific causes, such as abnormalities in the phosphate-Klotho axis, there are remarkable similarities between the pathophysiology of uremic inflammation and so-called "inflammaging" in the general population. Potentially relevant, but still somewhat unexplored in this respect, are abnormal or misplaced protein structures, as well as abnormalities in tissue homeostasis, which evoke danger signals through damage-associated molecular patterns, as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Systemic inflammation, in combination with the loss of kidney function, can impair the resilience of the body to external and internal stressors by reduced functional and structural tissue reserves, and by impairing normal organ crosstalk, thus providing an explanation for the greatly increased risk of homeostatic breakdown in this population. In this review, the relationship between uremic inflammation and a premature aging phenotype, as well as potential causes and consequences, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Age correction in monitoring audiometry: method to update OSHA age-correction tables to include older workers

    OpenAIRE

    Dobie, Robert A; Wojcik, Nancy C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Noise Standard provides the option for employers to apply age corrections to employee audiograms to consider the contribution of ageing when determining whether a standard threshold shift has occurred. Current OSHA age-correction tables are based on 40-year-old data, with small samples and an upper age limit of 60?years. By comparison, recent data (1999?2006) show that hearing thresholds in the US population have improved....

  15. The includence of soci-economic and nutritional status on the age of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 3 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Stimulatory effects of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) on fibronectin matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastino, Alexandra K; Greco, Todd M; Mathias, Rommel A; Cristea, Ileana M; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2017-05-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds that form via non-enzymatic glycation of proteins throughout our lifespan and at a higher rate in certain chronic diseases such as diabetes. AGEs contribute to the progression of fibrosis, in part by stimulating cellular pathways that affect gene expression. Long-lived ECM proteins are targets for non-enzymatic glycation but the question of whether the AGE-modified ECM leads to excess ECM accumulation and fibrosis remains unanswered. In this study, cellular changes due to AGE accretion in the ECM were investigated. Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins in a decellularized fibroblast ECM was achieved by incubating the ECM in a solution of methylglyoxal (MGO). Mass spectrometry of fibronectin (FN) isolated from the glycated matrix identified twenty-eight previously unidentified MGO-derived AGE modification sites including functional sites such as the RGD integrin-binding sequence. Mesangial cells grown on the glycated, decellularized matrix assembled increased amounts of FN matrix. Soluble AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) also stimulated FN matrix assembly and this effect was reduced by function-blocking antibodies against the receptor for AGE (RAGE). These results indicate that cells respond to AGEs by increasing matrix assembly and that RAGE is involved in this response. This raises the possibility that the accumulation of ECM during the progression of fibrosis may be enhanced by cell interactions with AGEs on a glycated ECM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. End of life care preferences among people of advanced age: LiLACS NZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Merryn; Frey, Rosemary; Wiles, Janine; Rolleston, Anna; Teh, Ruth; Moeke-Maxwell, Tess; Kerse, Ngaire

    2017-12-19

    Understanding end of life preferences amongst the oldest old is crucial to informing appropriate palliative and end of life care internationally. However, little has been reported in the academic literature about the end of life preferences of people in advanced age, particularly the preferences of indigenous older people, including New Zealand Māori. Data on end of life preferences were gathered from 147 Māori (aged >80 years) and 291 non- Māori aged (>85 years), during three waves of Te Puawaitangi O Nga Tapuwae Kia Ora Tonu, Life and Living in Advanced Age (LiLACs NZ). An interviewer-led questionnaire using standardised tools and including Māori specific subsections was used. The top priority for both Māori and non-Māori participants at end of life was 'not being a burden to my family'. Interestingly, a home death was not a high priority for either group. End of life preferences differed by gender, however these differences were culturally contingent. More female Māori participants wanted spiritual practices at end of life than male Māori participants. More male non-Māori participants wanted to be resuscitated than female non- Māori participants. That a home death was not in the top three end of life priorities for our participants is not consistent with palliative care policy in most developed countries where place of death, and particularly home death, is a central concern. Conversely our participants' top concern - namely not being a burden - has received little research or policy attention. Our results also indicate a need to pay attention to diversity in end of life preferences amongst people of advanced age, as well as the socio-cultural context within which preferences are formulated.

  18. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Brittany J; Hilton, Tara N; Rivière, Raphaël N; Ferraro, Zachary M; Deonandan, Raywat; Walker, Mark C

    2017-01-01

    This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved. A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical) were included in the review. There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal) complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old). This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a pregnancy with a similar risk profile to that of her younger counterparts when using donated oocytes.

  19. [Advanced age--indication or contraindication for laparoscopic colorectal surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunka, I; Dostalík, J; Martínek, L; Guńková, P; Mazur, M; Vávra, P

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of laparoscopically-assisted (LAC) and open (OC) colorectal surgery in elderly patients (a 75 years) and to compare them to a cohort of younger patients (Patients who underwent elective laparoscopically-assisted or open colorectal surgery in the period between January 2001 and December 2009 were included in the analysis. The primary end point was the incidence of short-term postoperative morbidity and mortality, long-term overall and colorectal cancer specific survival which were analyzed in relation to the age and operative technique. During the study period, 557 elective laparoscopic and 404 elective open colorectal operations were performed. 190 patients (20 %) were older than 75 years, 99 of which underwent laparoscopic and 91 open surgery. In geriatric patients, the open approach was associated with increase of postoperative morbidity, statistically nonsignificant (LAC > or = 75 years 30% vs. OC or = 75 years 30% vs. LAC patients were associated with a significant increase of postoperative complications compared to younger patients (OC > or = 75 years 40% vs. OC geriatric patients (LAC > or = 75 years 5% vs. OC > or = 75 years 3%, p=0,548). Mortality rate did not differ in both age groups operated laparoscopically (LAC > or = 75 years 5% vs. LAC or = 75 years 3% vs. OC or = 75 years 43 +/- 8% vs. LAC or = 75 years 76 +/- 9% vs. LAC or = 75 years 67 +/- 7% vs. OC patients surgical technique did not influenced overall five year survival (LAC > or = 75 years 43 +/- 8% vs. OC > or = 75 years 35 +/- 7%, p = 0,428), even five year colorectal cancer specific survival (LAC . or = 75 years 76 +/- 9% vs. OC a 75 years 69 +/- 7%, p = 0,393). Laparoscopically-assisted colorectal surgery should be particularly considered in geriatric patients, for the reason of lower incidence of postoperative complications. Oncological safety of miniinvasive approach in the treatment of colorectal cancer is valid also for the specific

  20. Systematic review, including meta-analyses, on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer using radiation/combined modality therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, A; Tudur Smith, C; Cunningham, D; Starling, N; Tait, D; Neoptolemos, J P; Ghaneh, P

    2007-01-01

    There is no consensus on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, with either chemotherapy or combined modality approaches being employed (Maheshwari and Moser, 2005). No published meta-analysis (Fung et al, 2003; Banu et al, 2005; Liang, 2005; Bria et al, 2006; Milella et al, 2006) has included randomised controlled trials employing radiation therapy. The aim of this systematic review was to compare the following: (i) chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy (combined modality th...

  1. Gender differences in episodic memory and visual working memory including the effects of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Franz; Petermann, Franz; Lepach, Anja Christina

    2013-01-01

    Analysing the relationship between gender and memory, and examining the effects of age on the overall memory-related functioning, are the ongoing goals of psychological research. The present study examined gender and age group differences in episodic memory with respect to the type of task. In addition, these subgroup differences were also analysed in visual working memory. A sample of 366 women and 330 men, aged between 16 and 69 years of age, participated in the current study. Results indicate that women outperformed men on auditory memory tasks, whereas male adolescents and older male adults showed higher level performances on visual episodic and visual working memory measures. However, the size of gender-linked effects varied somewhat across age groups. Furthermore, results partly support a declining performance on episodic memory and visual working memory measures with increasing age. Although age-related losses in episodic memory could not be explained by a decreasing verbal and visuospatial ability with age, women's advantage in auditory episodic memory could be explained by their advantage in verbal ability. Men's higher level visual episodic memory performance was found to result from their advantage in visuospatial ability. Finally, possible methodological, biological, and cognitive explanations for the current findings are discussed.

  2. Impact of age on functional exercise correlates in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang LY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Ying Wang,1,2 Huey-Dong Wu,3 Kuan-Yu Chen,4 Chen-Hsi Hsieh,5–7 Chung-Chun Lai21School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; 2Physical Therapy Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Integrated Diagnostic & Therapeutics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROCBackground: The functional exercise capacity and its correlates in advanced cancer patients in stratified age groups were examined.Materials and methods: A total of 105 patients with advanced lung cancer were recruited prospectively and stratified into young (≤50 years, middle (51–65 years, and old (>65 years age groups. Respiratory performances, which included maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and forced vital capacity were measured. The distance ambulated in a 6-minute walk test was used as an indicator for functional capacity.Results: The young age group had lowest baseline pulmonary function and performed worse on the 6-minute walk test among the three age groups. The risk factors for poor functional capacity were female, lower percent predicted maximal expiratory pressure, worse dyspnea, and lower hemoglobin in the young age group; lower percent predicated forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity, and greater weight loss in the middle age group; and only worse dyspnea in the old age group. The above identified risk factors accounted for 73.6%, 58.5%, and 42.1% variance in 6-minute walk distance for the young, middle, and old age group

  3. Attachment to place in advanced age: A study of the LiLACS NZ cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Janine L; Rolleston, Anna; Pillai, Avinesh; Broad, Joanna; Teh, Ruth; Gott, Merryn; Kerse, Ngaire

    2017-07-01

    An extensive body of research theorises that attachment to place is positively associated with health, particularly for older people. Building on this, we measure how indicators of attachment to place are associated with health for in people of advanced age in New Zealand. We use data from a cohort study (LiLACS NZ), which includes an indigenous Māori cohort aged 80-90 years and a non-Māori cohort aged 85 years from a mixed urban/rural region in New Zealand. Each cohort undertook a comprehensive interview and health assessment (n = 267 Māori and n = 404 non-Māori). Using multivariate regression analyses, we explore participants' feelings for and connectedness with their home, community and neighbourhood; nature and the outdoors; expectations about and enthusiasm for residential mobility; and how all these are associated with measures of health (e.g., SF-12 physical and mental health related quality of life) and functional status (e.g., NEADL). We demonstrate that people in advanced age hold strong feelings of attachment to place. We also establish some positive associations between attachment to place and health in advanced age, and show how these differ for the indigenous and non-indigenous cohorts. For older Māori there were strong associations between various health measures and the importance of nature and the outdoors, and connectedness to neighbourhood and community. For older non-Māori, there were strong associations between health and liking home and neighbourhood, and feeling connected to their community and neighbourhood. Place attachment, and particularly its relationship to health, operates in different ways for different groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phytochemicals Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) and the Receptor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Ishibashi, Yuji; Isami, Fumiyuki; Abe, Yumi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Higashimoto, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Reducing sugars can react non-enzymatically with amino groups of proteins and lipids to form irreversibly cross-linked macroprotein derivatives called as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Cross-linking modification of extracellular matrix proteins by AGEs deteriorate their tertiary structural integrity and function, contributing to aging-related organ damage and diabetes-associated complications, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, engagement of receptor for AGEs, RAGE with the ligands evoke oxidative stress generation and inflammatory, thrombotic and fibrotic reactions in various kinds of tissues, further exacerbating the deleterious effects of AGEs on multiple organ systems. So the AGE-RAGE axis is a novel therapeutic target for numerous devastating disorders. Several observational studies have shown the association of dietary consumption of fruits and vegetables with the reduced risk of CVD in a general population. Although beneficial effects of fruits and vegetables against CVD could mainly be ascribed to its anti-oxidative properties, blockade of the AGERAGE axis by phytochemicals may also contribute to cardiovascular event protection. Therefore, in this review, we focus on 4 phytochemicals (quercetin, sulforaphane, iridoids, and curcumin) and summarize their effects on AGE formation as well as RAGE-mediated signaling pathway in various cell types and organs, including endothelial cells, vessels, and heart. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Characteristics of positive-interaction parenting style among primiparous teenage, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa H M; Connolly, Jennifer A; Rotondi, Michael; Tamim, Hala

    2018-01-08

    Positive-interaction parenting early in childhood is encouraged due to its association with behavioural development later in life. The objective of this study was to examine if the level of positive-interaction parenting style differs among teen, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada, and to identify the characteristics associated with positive-interaction parenting style separately for each age group. This was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. First-time mothers with children 0-23 months were grouped into: teen (15-19 years, N = 53,409), optimal age (20-34 years, N = 790,960), and advanced age (35 years and older, N = 106,536). The outcome was positive-interaction parenting style (Parenting Practices Scale); maternal socio-demographics, health, social, and child characteristics were considered for backward stepwise multiple linear regression modeling, stratified for each of the age groups. Teen, optimal age, and advanced age mothers reported similar levels of positive- interaction parenting style. Covariates differed across the three age groups. Among optimal age mothers, being an ever-landed immigrant, childcare use, and being devoted to religion were found to decrease positive-interaction parenting style, whereas, higher education was found to increase positive-interaction parenting style. Teen mothers were not found to have any characteristics uniquely associated with positive-interaction parenting. Among advanced age mothers, social support was uniquely associated with an increase in positive-interaction parenting. Very good/excellent health was found to be positively associated with parenting in teens but negatively associated with parenting in advanced age mothers. Characteristics associated with positive-interaction parenting varied among the three age groups. Findings may have public health implications through information dissemination to first-time mothers, clinicians

  6. Lumbar spinal mobility changes among adults with advancing age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Adamu Saidu

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Using these data, we developed normative values of spinal mobility for each sex and age group. This study helps the clinicians to understand and correlate the restrictions of lumbar spinal mobility due to age and differentiate the limitations due to disease.

  7. Reassessing the NTCTCS Staging Systems for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Including Age at Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Donald S.A.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Brierley, James D.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Cooper, David S.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Xing, Mingzhao; Litofsky, Danielle R.; Maxon, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is unique for having age as a staging variable. Recently, the commonly used age cut-point of 45 years has been questioned. Objective: This study assessed alternate staging systems on the outcome of overall survival, and compared these with current National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study (NTCTCS) staging systems for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. Methods: A total of 4721 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed. Five potential alternate staging systems were generated at age cut-points in five-year increments from 35 to 70 years, and tested for model discrimination (Harrell's C-statistic) and calibration (R2). The best five models for papillary and follicular cancer were further tested with bootstrap resampling and significance testing for discrimination. Results: The best five alternate papillary cancer systems had age cut-points of 45–50 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. No significant difference in C-statistic was found between the best alternate and current NTCTCS systems (p = 0.200). The best five alternate follicular cancer systems had age cut-points of 50–55 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. All five best alternate staging systems performed better compared with the current system (p = 0.003–0.035). There was no significant difference in discrimination between the best alternate system (cut-point age 50 years) and the best system of cut-point age 45 years (p = 0.197). Conclusions: No alternate papillary cancer systems assessed were significantly better than the current system. New alternate staging systems for follicular cancer appear to be better than the current NTCTCS system, although they require external validation. PMID:26203804

  8. Physical Activity in Advanced Age: Physical Activity, Function, and Mortality in Advanced Age: A Longitudinal Follow Up (LiLACS NZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace Firebaugh, Casey; Moyes, Simon; Jatrana, Santosh; Rolleston, Anna; Kerse, Ngaire

    2018-01-18

    The relationship between physical activity, function, and mortality is not established in advanced age. Physical activity, function, and mortality were followed in a cohort of Māori and non-Māori adults living in advanced age for a period of six years. Generalised Linear regression models were used to analyse the association between physical activity and NEADL while Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox-proportional hazard models were used to assess the association between the physical activity and mortality. The Hazard Ratio for mortality for those in the least active physical activity quartile was 4.1 for Māori and 1.8 for non- Māori compared to the most active physical activity quartile. There was an inverse relationship between physical activity and mortality, with lower hazard ratios for mortality at all levels of physical activity. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with lower mortality and higher functional status in advanced aged adults.

  9. Characteristics of positive-interaction parenting style among primiparous teenage, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Theresa H. M.; Connolly, Jennifer A.; Rotondi, Michael; Tamim, Hala

    2018-01-01

    Background Positive-interaction parenting early in childhood is encouraged due to its association with behavioural development later in life. The objective of this study was to examine if the level of positive-interaction parenting style differs among teen, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada, and to identify the characteristics associated with positive-interaction parenting style separately for each age group. Methods This was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the National ...

  10. Tell me your life: including life stories in an adult development and aging course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Celdran, Montserrat; Fabà, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the learning impact of an assignment that consisted of interviewing and analyzing older people's life stories, and to explore how the assignment was evaluated by students. Participants in the study were 122 first-year social education students enrolled in an adult development and aging course. They evaluated the assignment using an eight-adjective questionnaire and were asked about the benefits of the task. Their answers to the questionnaire were then reviewed using content analysis. The results indicated that marks on the life story assignment predicted marks on an exam about basic course concepts. Students considered that the assignment was interesting, useful, and integrated into the course, although most of them also thought that it was very time-consuming. They identified benefits related to the explicit goals of the course (improvement in the learning of developmental concepts, the acquisition of research-related skills, and the deactivation of aging stereotypes) and personal, growth-related benefits. The authors discuss the difficulties posed by the assignment and its usefulness as a complement to more traditional, lecture-based teaching methods in adult development and aging courses.

  11. New Perspectives on Rodent Models of Advanced Paternal Age: Relevance to Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire J Foldi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Offspring of older fathers have an increased risk of various adverse health outcomes, including autism and schizophrenia. With respect to biological mechanisms for this association, there are many more germline cell divisions in the life history of a sperm relative to that of an oocyte. This leads to more opportunities for copy error mutations in germ cells from older fathers. Evidence also suggests that epigenetic patterning in the sperm from older men is altered. Rodent models provide an experimental platform to examine the association between paternal age and brain development. Several rodent models of advanced paternal age (APA have been published with relevance to intermediate phenotypes related to autism. All four published APA models vary in key features creating a lack of consistency with respect to behavioural phenotypes. A consideration of common phenotypes that emerge from these APA-related mouse models may be informative in the exploration of the molecular and neurobiological correlates of APA.

  12. Effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Abbreviations: AGEs, Glycation end-products; SD, Sprague-. Dawley; STZ, streptozotocin; EGF, epidermal growth factor; NF-. kB, nuclear factor-kappa B. result in significant morbidity. Impaired wound healing is a common vascular complication of diabetes mellitus and constitutes a major clinical problem ...

  13. Advancing age progressively affects obstacle avoidance skills in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to adequately avoid obstacles while walking is an important skill that allows safe locomotion over uneven terrain. The high proportion of falls in the elderly that is associated to tripping over obstacles potentially illustrates an age-related deterioration of this locomotor skill. Some

  14. Perceptual restoration of degraded speech is preserved with advancing age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saija, Jefta D; Akyürek, Elkan G; Andringa, Tjeerd C; Başkent, Deniz

    Cognitive skills, such as processing speed, memory functioning, and the ability to divide attention, are known to diminish with aging. The present study shows that, despite these changes, older adults can successfully compensate for degradations in speech perception. Critically, the older

  15. Effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kappa B (NF-κB) localization and cell viability were measured in vivo. Keratinocytes from normal skin were cultured in AGE-enriched conditional media, and the cell viability, apoptosis, adhesion and migration were detected in order to find the ...

  16. Occupational social and mental stimulation and cognitive decline with advancing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotz, Catherine; Meillon, Céline; Amieva, Hélène; Andel, Ross; Dartigues, Jean-François; Adam, Stéphane; Letenneur, Luc

    2018-01-01

    this study investigates the role of social and mental occupational characteristics in cognitive decline after retirement. the study included 1,048 subjects aged ≥65 years from the Three City cohort. Participants were evaluated at home at the initial visit and at 2-year intervals for a period of 12 years. The study includes detailed assessments of cognition, health and information about the subjects' main occupation. The four cognitive tests have been grouped into one latent factor. Three independent raters specialised in employment were asked to evaluate the level of social and intellectual stimulation for each occupation, which was then rated as low, medium and high. after controlling for potential confounding factors, no association was found between higher levels of social stimulation at work and baseline cognition (medium score, P = 0.440; high score, P = 0.700) as compared with a low level. While cognitive trajectories were initially similar between high and medium levels of social stimulation compared with that of a low level, with advancing age this association diverged whereby more social stimulation during work years was related to accelerated cognitive decline that further grew in magnitude with older age. For mental stimulation, differences were only observed at baseline, with greater levels of mental stimulation during work years being associated with better cognitive performance (medium score, β = 0.573, P = 0.015; and high score, β = 0.510; P = 0.090) compared with a low level of mental stimulation. workers retiring from occupations characterised by high levels of social stimulation may be at risk of accelerated cognitive decline with advancing age. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Extracellular superoxide dismutase deficiency impairs wound healing in advanced age by reducing neovascularization and fibroblast function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Duscher, Dominik; Rustad, Kristine C; Kosaraju, Revanth; Rodrigues, Melanie; Whittam, Alexander J; Januszyk, Michael; Maan, Zeshaan N; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-03-01

    Advanced age is characterized by impairments in wound healing, and evidence is accumulating that this may be due in part to a concomitant increase in oxidative stress. Extended exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to lead to cellular dysfunction and organismal death via the destructive oxidation of intra-cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD/SOD3) is a prime antioxidant enzyme in the extracellular space that eliminates ROS. Here, we demonstrate that reduced SOD3 levels contribute to healing impairments in aged mice. These impairments include delayed wound closure, reduced neovascularization, impaired fibroblast proliferation and increased neutrophil recruitment. We further establish that SOD3 KO and aged fibroblasts both display reduced production of TGF-β1, leading to decreased differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that wound healing impairments in ageing are associated with increased levels of ROS, decreased SOD3 expression and impaired extracellular oxidative stress regulation. Our results identify SOD3 as a possible target to correct age-related cellular dysfunction in wound healing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Contribution of Advanced Glycation End product (AGE) accumulation to the decline in motor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, Hans; Zuidema, Sytse; Bunt, Steven; Bautmans, Ivan; van der Schans, Cees; Hobbelen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Diminishing motor function is commonly observed in the elderly population and is associated with a wide range of adverse health consequences. Advanced Glycation End products (AGE's) may contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal ageing. Although the negative

  19. Advanced glycation end-products (AGES) and heart failure : Pathophysiology and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Smit, Andries J.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are molecules formed during a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and sugar residues, called the Maillard reaction. AGEs accumulate in the human body with age, and accumulation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In patients with diabetes,

  20. Advanced Glycation End Product (AGE) Accumulation in the Skin is Associated with Depression: The Maastricht Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, Fleur E P; Pouwer, Frans; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Sep, Simone J S; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Henry, Ronald M A; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Schaper, Nicolaas C; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Koster, Annemarie; Denollet, Johan; Verhey, Frans R J; Schram, Miranda T

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent disease with a high morbidity and mortality risk. Its pathophysiology is not entirely clear. However, type 2 diabetes is an important risk factor for depression. One mechanism that may explain this association may include the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We therefore investigated the association of AGEs with depressive symptoms and depressive disorder. In addition, we examined whether the potential association was present for somatic and/or cognitive symptoms of depression. Cross-sectional data were used from the Maastricht Study (N = 862, mean age 59.8 ± 8.5 years, 55% men). AGE accumulation was measured with skin autofluorescence (SAF) by use of the AGE Reader. Plasma levels of protein-bound pentosidine were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) were measured with ultraperformance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorder were assessed by the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Higher SAF was associated with depressive symptoms (β = 0.42, 95% CI 0.12-0.73, P = .007) and depressive disorder (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.04-1.95, P = .028) after adjustment for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, smoking, BMI, and kidney function. Plasma pentosidine, CML, and CEL were not independently associated with depressive symptoms and depressive disorder. This study shows that AGE accumulation in the skin is independently associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms and depressive disorder. This association is present for both somatic and cognitive symptoms of depression. This might suggest that AGEs are involved in the development of depression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jonathan [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Xu, Beibei [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Division of Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Martinez, Maria Elena [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  2. Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Advanced Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Meredith; Justice, Amy C.; Lampiris, Harry W.; Valcour, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Importance Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients treated with antiretroviral therapy now have increased life expectancy and develop chronic illnesses that are often seen in older HIV-negative patients. Objective To address emerging issues related to aging with HIV. Screening older adults for HIV, diagnosis of concomitant diseases, management of multiple comorbid medical illnesses, social isolation, polypharmacy, and factors associated with end-of-life care are reviewed. Evidence Acquisition Published guidelines and consensus statements were reviewed. PubMed and PsycINFO were searched between January 2000 and February 2013. Articles not appearing in the search that were referenced by reviewed articles were also evaluated. Findings The population of older HIV-positive patients is rapidly expanding. It is estimated that by 2015 one-half of the individuals in the United States with HIV will be older than age 50. Older HIV-infected patients are prone to having similar chronic diseases as their HIV-negative counterparts, as well as illnesses associated with co-infections. Medical treatments associated with these conditions, when added to an antiretroviral regimen, increase risk for polypharmacy. Care of aging HIV-infected patients involves a need to balance a number of concurrent comorbid medical conditions. Conclusions and Relevance HIV is no longer a fatal disease. Management of multiple comorbid diseases is a common feature associated with longer life expectancy in HIV-positive patients. There is a need to better understand how to optimize the care of these patients. PMID:23549585

  3. Enduring effects of severe developmental adversity, including nutritional deprivation, on cortisol metabolism in aging Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bierer, Linda M; Andrew, Ruth; Schmeidler, James; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2009-06-01

    In animal models, early life exposure to major environmental challenges such as malnutrition and stress results in persisting cardiometabolic, neuroendocrine and affective effects. While such effects have been associated with pathogenesis, the widespread occurrence of 'developmental programming' suggests it has adaptive function. Glucocorticoids may mediate 'programming' and their metabolism is known to be affected by early life events in rodents. To examine these relationships in humans, cortisol metabolism and cardiometabolic disease manifestations were examined in Holocaust survivors in relation to age at exposure and affective dysfunction, notably lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifty-one Holocaust survivors and 22 controls without Axis I disorder collected 24-h urine samples and were evaluated for psychiatric disorders and cardiometabolic diagnoses. Corticosteroids and their metabolites were assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS); cortisol was also measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Holocaust survivors showed reduced cortisol by RIA, and decreased levels of 5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol (5alpha-THF) and total glucocorticoid production by GC-MS. The latter was associated with lower cortisol metabolism by 5alpha-reductase and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) type-2. The greatest decrements were associated with earliest age of Holocaust exposure and less severe PTSD symptomatology. Cardiometabolic manifestations were associated with decreased 11beta-HSD-2 activity. In controls, 5alpha-reductase was positively associated with trauma-related symptoms (i.e., to traumatic exposures unrelated to the Holocaust). Extreme malnutrition and related stress during development is associated with long-lived alterations in specific pathways of glucocorticoid metabolism. These effects may be adaptive and link with lower risks of cardiometabolic and stress-related disorders in later life.

  4. Recommendations for managing cutaneous disorders associated with advancing age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humbert P

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Philippe Humbert,1 Brigitte Dréno,2 Jean Krutmann,3 Thomas Anton Luger,4 Raoul Triller,5 Sylvie Meaume,6 Sophie Seité71Research and Studies Centre on the Integument (CERT, Clinical Investigation Centre (CIC BT506, Department of Dermatology, Besançon University Hospital, University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 2Department of Dermato-Cancerology, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France; 3IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany; 4Department of Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 5International Centre of Dermatology, Hertford British Hospital, Levallois, France; 6Geriatric Service, Wounds and Healing, Rothschild Hôspital, Paris, France; 7La Roche-Posay Dermatological Laboratories, Asnières, FranceAbstract: The increasingly aged population worldwide means more people are living with chronic diseases, reduced autonomy, and taking various medications. Health professionals should take these into consideration when managing dermatological problems in elderly patients. Accordingly, current research is investigating the dermatological problems associated with the loss of cutaneous function with age. As cell renewal slows, the physical and chemical barrier function declines, cutaneous permeability increases, and the skin becomes increasingly vulnerable to external factors. In geriatric dermatology, the consequences of cutaneous aging lead to xerosis, skin folding, moisture-associated skin damage, and impaired wound healing. These problems pose significant challenges for both the elderly and their carers. Most often, nurses manage skin care in the elderly. However, until recently, little attention has been paid to developing appropriate, evidence-based, skincare protocols. The objective of this paper is to highlight common clinical problems with aging skin and provide some appropriate advice on cosmetic protocols for managing them. A review of the

  5. PREFERENCE THEORY IN ADVANCED AGE AND THE OLDER CZECH WORKFORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vidovićová

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we make use of preference theory developed by Hakim (2000 in the context of reconciling work and family to cover and explain different patterns of retirement exit paths and retirement satisfaction levels in the Czech Republic. We propose that lifestyle preferences and values may help to explain why some older workers continue to work while others are determined to retire as early as possible. Three types are identified among the 55–65 age group: work oriented, retirement oriented, and adaptive. The data shows that self-perception of the respondent as being active or more rest-oriented is associated with actual labour market activity of the respondent. Different types also perceive and evaluate labour market exit differently, and most importantly they differ in their reaction to various labour market and pension policies and family/partnership conditions. In the discussion we challenge the notion of active ageing as a general “one-size-fits-all” policy and urge that more attention be paid to the role of individual values and preferences when looking at the organisation of latter life roles.

  6. Advancing the Aging and Technology Agenda in Gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Richard; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Matthews, Judith T; De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Beach, Scott R; Czaja, Sara J

    2015-10-01

    Interest in technology for older adults is driven by multiple converging trends: the rapid pace of technological development; the unprecedented growth of the aging population in the United States and worldwide; the increase in the number and survival of persons with disability; the growing and unsustainable costs of caring for the elderly people; and the increasing interest on the part of business, industry, and government agencies in addressing health care needs with technology. These trends have contributed to the strong conviction that technology can play an important role in enhancing quality of life and independence of older individuals with high levels of efficiency, potentially reducing individual and societal costs of caring for the elderly people. The purpose of this "Forum" position article is to integrate what we know about older adults and technology systems in order to provide direction to this vital enterprise. We define what we mean by technology for an aging population, provide a brief history of its development, introduce a taxonomy for characterizing current technology applications to older adults, summarize research in this area, describe existing development and evaluation processes, identify factors important for the acceptance of technology among older individuals, and recommend future directions for research in this area. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prenatal Exposure to Organohalogens, Including Brominated Flame Retardants, Influences Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance at School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roze, Elise; Meijer, Lisethe; Bakker, Attie; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are known to have neurotoxic effects on the developing brain. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of prenatal exposure to OHCs, including brominated flame retardants, on motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcome in healthy children of school age.

  8. Design and modeling of an advanced marine machinery system including waste heat recovery and removal of sulphur oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann Nielsen, Rasmus; Haglind, Fredrik; Larsen, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    of the machinery system. The wet sulphuric acid process has shown to be an effective way of removing sulphur oxides from flue gas of land-based coal fired power plants. Moreover, organic Rankine cycles are suitable for heat to power conversion for low temperature heat sources. This paper is aimed at designing...... consists of a two-stroke diesel engine, the wet sulphuric process for sulphur removal and an advanced waste heat recovery system including a conventional steam Rankine cycle and an organic Rankine cycle. The results are compared with those of a state-of-the-art machinery system featuring a two......-stroke diesel engine and a conventional waste heat recovery system. The results suggest that an organic Rankine cycle placed after the conventional waste heat recovery system is able to extract the sulphuric acid from the exhaust gas, while at the same time increase power generation from waste heat by 32...

  9. Therapeutic Potential and Recent Advances of Curcumin in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Sundar Dhilip Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a low molecular weight, lipophilic, major yellow natural polyphenolic, and the most well-known plant-derived compound, is extracted from the rhizomes of the turmeric (Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic agent in traditional medicine for the treatment and prevention of different diseases. It has also shown a wide range of biological and pharmacological effects in drug delivery, and has actively been used for the treatment of aging-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, ocular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney diseases, chronic inflammation and infection. The functional application and therapeutic potential of curcumin in the treatment of aging-associated diseases is well documented in the literature. This review article focuses mainly on the potential role of plant-derived natural compounds such as curcumin, their mechanism of action and recent advances in the treatment of aging-associated diseases. Moreover, the review briefly recaps on the recent progress made in the preparation of nanocurcumins and their therapeutic potential in clinical research for the treatment of aging-associated diseases.

  10. High proportion of genetic cases in patients with advanced cardiomyopathy including a novel homozygous Plakophilin 2-gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerbel Klauke

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies might lead to end-stage heart disease with the requirement of drastic treatments like bridging up to transplant or heart transplantation. A not precisely known proportion of these diseases are genetically determined. We genotyped 43 index-patients (30 DCM, 10 ARVC, 3 RCM with advanced or end stage cardiomyopathy using a gene panel which covered 46 known cardiomyopathy disease genes. Fifty-three variants with possible impact on disease in 33 patients were identified. Of these 27 (51% were classified as likely pathogenic or pathogenic in the MYH7, MYL2, MYL3, NEXN, TNNC1, TNNI3, DES, LMNA, PKP2, PLN, RBM20, TTN, and CRYAB genes. Fifty-six percent (n = 24 of index-patients carried a likely pathogenic or pathogenic mutation. Of these 75% (n = 18 were familial and 25% (n = 6 sporadic cases. However, severe cardiomyopathy seemed to be not characterized by a specific mutation profile. Remarkably, we identified a novel homozygous PKP2-missense variant in a large consanguineous family with sudden death in early childhood and several members with heart transplantation in adolescent age.

  11. Hirschsprung’s Disease in Patients of Advanced Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Vrints

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung’s disease is a congenital motility disorder that is easily overlooked as a cause of chronic refractory constipation in adults. We present a case of Hirschsprung’s disease in a patient 70 years of age with a history of long-standing constipation, chronic use of laxatives, and recurrent episodes of colonic obstruction. Presumptive preoperative diagnosis was chronic ischemic sigmoid stenosis or intermittent sigmoid volvulus before Hirschsprung’s disease was suspected based on intraoperative colonoscopy and surgical findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by the absence of intrinsic ganglion cells on histopathologic examination of the surgical specimen and the absence of the rectoanal inhibitory reflex on postoperative manometry. A conservative surgical approach that limited the resection to the grossly diseased rectum successfully restored normal defecation despite the anastomosis being performed on the distal aganglionic rectum. This approach, which avoids extensive rectal dissection, may be suitable for older or frail patients. Heightened awareness of Hirschsprung’s disease is necessary to ensure its prompt recognition in the elderly.

  12. Obstetric outcomes of twin pregnancies at advanced maternal age: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caixia; Wang, Malie; Niu, Gang; Yang, Juan; Wang, Zilian

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate obstetric outcomes in twin pregnancies of advanced maternal age (≥35 years). A retrospective study involved 470 twin pregnancies in a single center from Sep. 1, 2012 to Mar. 31, 2015. Clinical characteristics and obstetric outcomes were recorded and compared among twin pregnancies who were classified as follows: age 20-29, 30-34, 35-39 and ≥40 years. The incidence of gestational diabetes (age 20-29 years 15.8%; 30-34 years 24.3%; 35-39 years 30.4%; ≥40 years 57.1%; p = 0.004) and premature delivery (20-29 years 58.6%; 30-34 years 69.1%; 35-39 years 72.2%; ≥40 years 85.7%; p = 0.001) significantly increased with increasing age whereas spontaneous abortion (20-29 years 27.6%; 30-34 years 11.6%; 35-39 years 11.4%; ≥40 years 0.0%; p = 0.021) decreased in twin pregnancies of advanced maternal age. In addition, the rate of postpartum hemorrhage increased almost continuously by age and advanced maternal age was described as a risk factor for postpartum hemorrhage (age 35-39, adjusted OR 3.377; 95% confidence interval 1729-6.598; p age ≥ 40, adjusted OR 10.520; 95% CI 1.147-96.492; p = 0.037). However, there was no significant difference between advanced maternal age and adverse neonatal outcomes. In twin pregnancies, advanced maternal age experienced significant higher risk of postpartum hemorrhage, gestational diabetes and premature delivery. Neither adverse neonatal outcomes nor stillbirth was significantly associated with maternal age. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBangen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors, advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor. This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus, inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus, and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines.

  14. Advanced paternal age is a risk factor for schizophrenia in Iranians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokri Bahareh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1958 many, but not all studies have demonstrated that paternal age is a risk factor for schizophrenia. There may be many different explanations for differences between studies, including study design, sample size, collection criteria, heterogeneity and the confounding effects of environmental factors that can for example perturb epigenetic programming and lead to an increase in disease risk. The small number of children in Western families makes risk comparisons between siblings born at different paternal ages difficult. In contrast, more Eastern families have children both at early and later periods of life. In the present study, a cross-sectional population study in an Iranian population was performed to compare frequency of schizophrenia in younger offspring (that is, older paternal age versus older offspring. Methods A total of 220 patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia (cases from both psychiatric hospitals and private clinics and 220 individuals from other hospital wards (controls, matched for sex and age were recruited for this study. Patients with neurological problem, substance abuse, mental retardation and mood disorder were excluded from both groups. Results Birth rank comparisons revealed that 35% vs 24% of the cases vs the controls were in the third or upper birth rank (P = 0.01. Also, the mean age of fathers at birth in case group (30 ± 6.26 years was significantly more than the control group (26.45 ± 5.64 years; P = 0.0001. The age of 76 fathers at birth in case group was over 32 versus 33 fathers in control group. Individuals whose fathers' age was more than 32 (at birth were at higher risk (2.77 times for schizophrenia versus others (P P = 0.02. Logistic regression analysis suggests that maternal age is less likely to be involved in the higher risk of schizophrenia than advanced parental age. Discussion This study demonstrates a relationship between paternal age and schizophrenia in large

  15. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison BJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brittany J Harrison,1 Tara N Hilton,1 Raphaël N Rivière,1 Zachary M Ferraro,1–3 Raywat Deonandan,4 Mark C Walker1–3,51Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 4University of Ottawa Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 5Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, CanadaObjectives: This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved.Methods: A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical were included in the review.Conclusion: There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old. This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a

  16. Advanced bone age as an indicator facilitates the diagnosis of precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Qin Xu

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Diagnosis of central precocious puberty has always been challenging in clinical practice. As an important method in the diagnosis of central precocious puberty, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test is complex and time-consuming. In many cases, clinical traits are inconsistent with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test results, therefore not reliable for diagnosis. In this study, the authors intended to find an indicator that predicts the results of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test among subjects with early pubertal signs. Methods: Cases of 382 girls with early breast development before 8 years old and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test before 9 years old were included and underwent follow-up tests. Patients with peak luteinizing hormone level ≥5 IU/L were considered positive in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test. Anthropometric data, body mass index, bone age evaluation, blood hormones levels of luteinizing hormone, estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, and uterine and ovarian volumes were analyzed. Results: Subjects with positive results in the initial test demonstrated early bone maturation, accelerated growth, and elevated basal blood luteinizing hormone, estradiol, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels, when compared with subjects with negative results in the initial test. Subjects with positive results in the follow-up test presented a more advanced bone age and more accelerated linear growth, when compared with subjects with negative results in the follow-up test. Conclusions: According to the statistical analysis, advanced bone age is the most effective predictor of the result of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test.

  17. Advanced Paternal Age and Risk of Musculoskeletal Congenital Anomalies in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urhøj, Stine Kjær; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous research suggests that advanced paternal age increases the risk of musculoskeletal congenitalanomalies (CAs) in offspring, but findings are inconsistent. This study aims to investigate the risk of musculoskeletal CAsaccording to paternal age at birth in an unselected population...

  18. How novice, skilled and advanced clinical researchers include variables in a case report form for clinical research: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongling; Zeng, Lin; Fetters, Micheal D; Li, Nan; Tao, Liyuan; Shi, Yanyan; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Fengwei; Zhao, Yiming

    2017-09-18

    Despite varying degrees in research training, most academic clinicians are expected to conduct clinical research. The objective of this research was to understand how clinical researchers of different skill levels include variables in a case report form for their clinical research. The setting for this research was a major academic institution in Beijing, China. The target population was clinical researchers with three levels of experience, namely, limited clinical research experience, clinicians with rich clinical research experience and clinical research experts. Using a qualitative approach, we conducted 13 individual interviews (face to face) and one group interview (n=4) with clinical researchers from June to September 2016. Based on maximum variation sampling to identify researchers with three levels of research experience: eight clinicians with limited clinical research experience, five clinicians with rich clinical research experience and four clinical research experts. These 17 researchers had diverse hospital-based medical specialties and or specialisation in clinical research. Our analysis yields a typology of three processes developing a case report form that varies according to research experience level. Novice clinician researchers often have an incomplete protocol or none at all, and conduct data collection and publication based on a general framework. Experienced clinician researchers include variables in the case report form based on previous experience with attention to including domains or items at risk for omission and by eliminating unnecessary variables. Expert researchers consider comprehensively in advance data collection and implementation needs and plan accordingly. These results illustrate increasing levels of sophistication in research planning that increase sophistication in selection for variables in the case report form. These findings suggest that novice and intermediate-level researchers could benefit by emulating the comprehensive

  19. Systematic review, including meta-analyses, on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer using radiation/combined modality therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, A; Tudur Smith, C; Cunningham, D; Starling, N; Tait, D; Neoptolemos, J P; Ghaneh, P

    2007-04-23

    There is no consensus on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, with either chemotherapy or combined modality approaches being employed (Maheshwari and Moser, 2005). No published meta-analysis (Fung et al, 2003; Banu et al, 2005; Liang, 2005; Bria et al, 2006; Milella et al, 2006) has included randomised controlled trials employing radiation therapy. The aim of this systematic review was to compare the following: (i) chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy (combined modality therapy) vs best supportive care (ii) radiotherapy vs chemoradiation (iii) radiotherapy vs combined modality therapy (iv) chemotherapy vs combined modality therapy (v) 5FU-based combined modality treatment vs another-agent-based combined modality therapy. Relevant randomised controlled trials were identified by searching databases, trial registers and conference proceedings. The primary end point was overall survival and secondary end points were progression-free survival/time-to-progression, response rate and adverse events. Survival data were summarised using hazard ratio (HR) and response-rate/adverse-event data with relative risk. Eleven trials involving 794 patients met the inclusion criteria. Length of survival with chemoradiation was increased compared with radiotherapy alone (two trials, 168 patients, HR 0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51-0.94), but chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy did not lead to a survival advantage over chemotherapy alone (two trials, 134 patients, HR 0.79; CI 0.32-1.95). Meta-analyses could not be performed for the other comparisons. A survival benefit was demonstrated for chemoradiation over radiotherapy alone. Chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy did not demonstrate any survival advantage over chemotherapy alone, but important clinical differences cannot be ruled out due to the wide CI.

  20. Nutritional status and feeding-tube placement in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy-based larynx preservation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Alexandre; Benezery, Karen; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Ettaiche, Marc; Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Riss, Jean-Christophe; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Leysalle, Axel; Saada, Esma; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Hebert, Christophe; Falewee, Marie-Noelle; Demard, François; Santini, José; Peyrade, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the nutritional status and determine its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy (ICT)-based larynx preservation program without prophylactic feeding-tube placement. All patients with locally advanced (T3/4, N0-3, M0) hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, technically suitable for total pharyngolaryngectomy, treated by docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF)-ICT for larynx preservation at our institution between 2004 and 2013, were included in this retrospective study. Patients' nutritional status was closely monitored. Enteral nutrition was used if and when a patient was unable to sustain per-oral nutrition and hydration. The impact of nutritional status on clinical outcomes was investigated in univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 53 patients (42 men and 11 women, mean age = 58.6 ± 8.2 years) were included in this study. Six (11.3 %) patients had lost more than 10 % of their usual body weight before therapy. Compared with patients' usual weight, the mean maximum patient weight loss during therapeutic management was 8.7 ± 4.5 kg. Enteral nutrition was required in 17 patients (32 %). We found no influence of the tested nutritional status-related factors on response to ICT, toxicity of ICT, overall, cause-specific and recurrence-free survival, and on post-therapeutic swallowing outcome. Maximum weight loss was significantly associated with a higher risk of enteral tube feeding during therapy (p = 0.03) and of complications (grade ≥3, p = 0.006) during RT. Without prophylactic feeding-tube placement, approximately one-third of the patients required enteral nutrition. There was no significant impact of nutritional status on oncologic or functional outcomes.

  1. Advanced age, cardiovascular risk burden, and timed up and go test performance in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Vikas; Albin, Roger L; Müller, Martijn L T M; Koeppe, Robert A; Studenski, Stephanie; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular comorbidities are a known risk factor for impaired mobility in elderly individuals. Motor impairments in Parkinson disease are conventionally ascribed to nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation although progressive gait and balance impairments become more common with aging and often show limited response to dopaminergic replacement therapies. We explored the association between elevated cardiovascular risk factors and performance on the Timed Up and Go test in cross-sectional of Parkinson disease subjects (n = 83). Cardiovascular risk factor status was estimated using the Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease risk-scoring algorithm in order to dichotomize the cohort into those with and without elevated modifiable cardiovascular risk compared with normative scores for age and gender. All subjects underwent clinical and neuroimaging evaluations including a 3-m Timed Up and Go test, [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine positron emission tomography imaging to estimate nigrostriatal dopamine terminal loss, and an magnetic resonance imaging assessment of leukoaraiosis. A similar analysis was performed in 49 healthy controls. After adjusting for disease duration, leukoaraiosis, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, Parkinson disease subjects with elevated Framingham risk scores (n = 61) displayed slower Timed Up and Go test performance (β = 1.86, t = 2.41, p = .018) compared with subjects with normal range Framingham risk scores (n = 22). When age ≥65 was added to the model in a post hoc analysis, the strength of effect seen with older age (β = 1.51, t = 2.44, p = .017) was similar to that of elevated Framingham risk scoring (β = 1.87, t = 2.51, p = .014). In a multivariable regression model studying the healthy control population, advanced age (t = 2.15, p = .037) was a significant predictor of Timed Up and Go speed though striatal [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine (t = -1.30, p = .19) and elevated Framingham risk scores (t = 1.32, p = .19) were not

  2. Negative fateful life events in midlife and advanced predicted brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Sean N; Franz, Carol E; Elman, Jeremy A; Panizzon, Matthew S; Hagler, Donald J; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Eyler, Lisa T; McEvoy, Linda K; Lyons, Michael J; Dale, Anders M; Kremen, William S

    2018-03-08

    Negative fateful life events (FLEs) such as interpersonal conflict, death in the family, financial hardship, and serious medical emergencies can act as allostatic stressors that accelerate biological aging. However, the relationship between FLEs and neuroanatomical aging is not well understood. We examined 359 men (mean age 62 years) participating in the Vietnam Era twin study of aging (VETSA) to determine whether negative midlife FLEs are associated with advanced brain aging after controlling for physical, psychological, and lifestyle factors. At two different time points, participants were assessed for negative FLEs, health and well-being, general cognitive ability, socioeconomic status, depression, and ethnicity. Participants underwent a magnetic resonance imaging examination, and T1-weighted images were processed with FreeSurfer. Subsequent neuroanatomical measurements were entered into the Brain-Age Regression Analysis and Computation Utility software (BARACUS) to predict brain age. Having more midlife FLEs, particularly relating to interpersonal relationships, was associated with advanced predicted brain aging (i.e., higher predicted brain age relative to chronological age). This association remained after controlling for the significant covariates of alcohol consumption, cardiovascular risk, adult socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Challenges for INAA in studies of materials from advanced material research including rare earth concentrates and carbon based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.; Van Meerten, Th.G.

    2000-01-01

    Rare-earth elements are increasingly applied in advanced materials to be used, e.g., in electronic industry, automobile catalysts, or lamps and optical devices. Trace element analysis of these materials might be an interesting niche for NAA because of the intrinsic high accuracy of this technique, and the shortage of matrix matching reference materials with other methods for elemental analysis. The carbon composite materials form another category of advanced materials, where sometimes a very high degree of purity is required. Also for these materials, NAA has favorable analytical characteristics. Examples are given of the use of NAA in the analysis of both categories of materials. (author)

  4. Advanced glycation end-products: Mechanics of aged collagen from molecule to tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Passini, Fabian S; Silván, Unai; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero; Moretti, Matteo; Schoenhuber, Herbert; Redaelli, Alberto; Berli, Martin; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-05-01

    Concurrent with a progressive loss of regenerative capacity, connective tissue aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). Besides being part of the typical aging process, type II diabetics are particularly affected by AGE accumulation due to abnormally high levels of systemic glucose that increases the glycation rate of long-lived proteins such as collagen. Although AGEs are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders, the mechanisms by which AGEs contribute to connective tissue disease in aging and diabetes are still poorly understood. The present study harnesses advanced multiscale imaging techniques to characterize a widely employed in vitro model of ribose induced collagen aging and further benchmarks these data against experiments on native human tissues from donors of different age. These efforts yield unprecedented insight into the mechanical changes in collagen tissues across hierarchical scales from molecular, to fiber, to tissue-levels. We observed a linear increase in molecular spacing (from 1.45nm to 1.5nm) and a decrease in the D-period length (from 67.5nm to 67.1nm) in aged tissues, both using the ribose model of in vitro glycation and in native human probes. Multiscale mechanical analysis of in vitro glycated tendons strongly suggests that AGEs reduce tissue viscoelasticity by severely limiting fiber-fiber and fibril-fibril sliding. This study lays an important foundation for interpreting the functional and biological effects of AGEs in collagen connective tissues, by exploiting experimental models of AGEs crosslinking and benchmarking them for the first time against endogenous AGEs in native tissue. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Li,D.X.; Deng,T.Z.; Lv,J.; Ke,J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts t...

  6. Do Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Contribute to the Comorbidities of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra Zofia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed both during the endogenous and exogenous reactions and are implicated in the process of ageing, pathogenesis of diabetes, atherosclerosis, female fertility, and cancers. Food and smoking are the most important sources of exogenous AGEs in daily life. The biochemical composition of meal, cooking methods, time and temperature of food preparation may impact AGEs formation, therefore Western-type diet, rich in animal-derived products as well as in fast foods seems to be the main source of AGEs. Both, endogenous and exogenous AGEs can act intracellularly or during serum interaction with cell surface receptors called RAGE influencing variety of molecular pathways. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. The aetiology of this disorder remains unclear, however the environmental and genetic factors may play an important role in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, PCOS women have increased factors for reproductive and cardiometabolic comorbidities. AGEs can contribute to the pathogenesis of PCOS as well as its consequences. It has been shown that chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress may be a link between the mechanisms of AGEs action and the metabolic and reproductive consequences of PCOS. This review highlights that high dietary AGEs intake promotes deteriorating biological effects in women with PCOS, whereas AGEs restriction seems to have beneficial impact on women health. Better understanding AGEs formation and biochemistry as well as AGE-mediated pathophysiological mechanisms may open new therapeutic avenues converging to the achievement of the complete treatment of PCOS and its consequences.

  7. Prenatal Exposure to Organohalogens, Including Brominated Flame Retardants, Influences Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance at School Age

    OpenAIRE

    Roze, Elise; Meijer, Lisethe; Bakker, Attie; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N.J.A.; Sauer, Pieter J.J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are known to have neurotoxic effects on the developing brain. Objective We investigated the influence of prenatal exposure to OHCs, including brominated flame retardants, on motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcome in healthy children of school age. Methods This study was part of the prospective Groningen infant COMPARE (Comparison of Exposure-Effect Pathways to Improve the Assessment of Human Health Risks of Complex Environmental Mixtures of Organoha...

  8. Advanced paternal age is associated with impaired neurocognitive outcomes during infancy and childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanta Saha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced paternal age (APA is associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, as well as with dyslexia and reduced intelligence. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between paternal age and performance on neurocognitive measures during infancy and childhood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A sample of singleton children (n = 33,437 was drawn from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. The outcome measures were assessed at 8 mo, 4 y, and 7 y (Bayley scales, Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale, Graham-Ernhart Block Sort Test, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Wide Range Achievement Test. The main analyses examined the relationship between neurocognitive measures and paternal or maternal age when adjusted for potential confounding factors. Advanced paternal age showed significant associations with poorer scores on all of the neurocognitive measures apart from the Bayley Motor score. The findings were broadly consistent in direction and effect size at all three ages. In contrast, advanced maternal age was generally associated with better scores on these same measures. CONCLUSIONS: The offspring of older fathers show subtle impairments on tests of neurocognitive ability during infancy and childhood. In light of secular trends related to delayed fatherhood, the clinical implications and the mechanisms underlying these findings warrant closer scrutiny.

  9. PSEUDOAFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY ENRICHMENT OF GLYCATED PEPTIDES FOR MONITORING ADVANCED GLYCATION END PRODUCTS (AGES IN METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar R. Prasanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Glycation End (AGE products are produced due to diabetic progression and they are responsible for many complications in the diabetic disorder. The diabetic progression is measured, particularly following glycated hemoglobin using specific antibodies. However, the most abundant protein in blood, human serum albumin, is also found to be glycated which has a much shorter half life and gives information on short term glycemic control. In addition, glycated albumins are considered as markers of diabetic complications such as nephropathy, peripheral vascular calcification and also in Alzheimer’s disease. The glycation proceeds from the interaction between aldehyde group of sugar and the free amino group of the protein, resulting in the formation of Schiff’s base, which undergoes a series of modifications leading to generation of imidazoyl derivatives of amino acids known as Amadori rearrangement products. The imidazoyl derivatives from arginine and lysine are the most prominent modifications observed in proteins in the presence of reducing sugar and these imidazoyl derivatives have an affinity towards certain transition metal ions. Based on our earlier exhaustive work on trapping the histidine peptides using transition metal ion, Cu(II linked to imino-diacetate complex, we explored Cu(II immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC as a potential tool for specific detection of glycated peptides of human serum albumin. Our results clearly demonstrate that Cu(II IMAC is able to detect glycated peptides very efficiently while the non-glycated forms were not retained on the Cu (II column as confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. We further discuss the utility of IMAC technology to enrich the detection of AGE products in plasma. We anticipate that these studies may provide valuable information on understanding disease pathologies and the potential of AGE products as biomarkers of various diseases including neurodegenerative, renal and

  10. Advanced maternal age and its association with placenta praevia and placental abruption: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrini Guidolini Martinelli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the existence and magnitude of the association between advanced maternal age (AMA and occurrence of placenta praevia (PP and placental abruption (PA among nulliparous and multiparous women, by a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched articles published between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2015, in any language, in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS. Women were grouped into two age categories: up to 34 years old and 35 years or older. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the studies. A meta-analysis was conducted for the PP and PA outcomes, using a meta-regression model to find possible covariates associated with heterogeneity among the studies and Egger’s test to assess publication bias. The protocol of this systematic review was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO system (CRD42016045594. Twenty-three studies met the criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. For both outcomes, an increase in age increased the magnitude of association strength, and PP (OR = 3.16, 95%CI: 2.79-3.57 was more strongly associated with AMA than PA (OR = 1.44, 95%CI: 1.35-1.54. For parity, there was no difference between nulliparous and multiparous women considered older for the PP and PA outcomes. Our review provided very low-quality evidence for both outcomes, since it encompasses observational studies with high statistical heterogeneity, diversity of populations, no control of confounding factors in several cases, and publication bias. However, the confidence intervals were small and there is a dose-response gradient, as well as a large magnitude of effect for PP.

  11. Advanced glycation end products and their receptor contribute to ovarian ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensen, Mette Haug; Tanbo, Tom; Storeng, Ritsa; Fedorcsak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Do advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) affect the cells of the human ovarian follicle? AGE accumulate on the surface of ovarian granulosa-lutein (GL) cells and monocytes by binding to RAGE and other receptors with possible functional effects on these cells. AGE and RAGE are expressed in granulosa and theca cells, as well as in luteinized cells derived from the ovary. In this prospective cohort study, human follicle fluid-derived cells were isolated from aspirates of ovarian follicles of women who underwent assisted reproduction treatment. Immunofluorescence microscopy and multi-colour flow cytometry were used to determine the presence of AGE and RAGE on the surface of follicular fluid-derived cells and to characterize downstream effects of RAGE activation. GL cells and ovarian monocytes were found to contain AGE and RAGE and to bind AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in correlation with the patients' chronological age. AGE-BSA and BSA failed to induce significantly the cleavage of caspase-3, phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB or the binding of annexin V (the latter was marginally increased). AGE-fibronectin was found to induce detachment of cultured GL cells in vitro. The impact of AGE and RAGE in the ovary, shown here in cells in culture, remains to be affirmed in clinical settings. The ligands of RAGE and their effects in the ovary remain uncertain but this study implies that AGEs in the form of structural long-lived extracellular matrix proteins, rather than soluble AGEs, may play a role in the decline of ovarian function during ageing. The project was funded by the Norwegian Resource Centre for Women's Health, Oslo University Hospital. The authors have no conflicts of interests.

  12. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-12-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80 ± 5.50%, PRAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  13. Polypharmacy including falls risk-increasing medications and subsequent falls in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kathryn; Bennett, Kathleen; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2015-01-01

    polypharmacy is an important risk factor for falls, but recent studies suggest only when including medications associated with increasing the risk of falls. a prospective, population-based cohort study. 6,666 adults aged ≥50 years from The Irish Longitudinal study on Ageing. participants reported regular medication use at baseline. Any subsequent falls, any injurious falls and the number of falls were reported 2 years later. The association between polypharmacy (>4 medications) or fall risk-increasing medications and subsequent falls or injurious falls was assessed using modified Poisson regression. The association with the number of falls was assessed using negative binomial regression. during follow-up, 231 falls per 1,000 person-years were reported. Polypharmacy including antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of any fall (adjusted relative risk (aRR) 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.54), of injurious falls (aRR 1.51, 95% CI 1.10-2.07) and a greater number of falls (adjusted incident rate ratio (aIRR) 1.60, 95% CI 1.19-2.15), but antidepressant use without polypharmacy and polypharmacy without antidepressants were not. The use of benzodiazepines was associated with injurious falls when coupled with polypharmacy (aRR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04-1.87), but was associated with a greater number of falls (aIRR 1.32, 95% CI 1.05-1.65), independent of polypharmacy. Other medications assessed, including antihypertensives, diuretics and antipsychotics, were not associated with outcomes. in middle-aged and older adults, polypharmacy, including antidepressant or benzodiazepine use, was associated with injurious falls and a greater number of falls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Concurrent hippocampal induction of MHC II pathway components and glial activation with advanced aging is not correlated with cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonntag William E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related cognitive dysfunction, including impairment of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory, affects approximately half of the aged population. Induction of a variety of neuroinflammatory measures has been reported with brain aging but the relationship between neuroinflammation and cognitive decline with non-neurodegenerative, normative aging remains largely unexplored. This study sought to comprehensively investigate expression of the MHC II immune response pathway and glial activation in the hippocampus in the context of both aging and age-related cognitive decline. Methods Three independent cohorts of adult (12-13 months and aged (26-28 months F344xBN rats were behaviorally characterized by Morris water maze testing. Expression of MHC II pathway-associated genes identified by transcriptomic analysis as upregulated with advanced aging was quantified by qPCR in synaptosomal fractions derived from whole hippocampus and in hippocampal subregion dissections (CA1, CA3, and DG. Activation of astrocytes and microglia was assessed by GFAP and Iba1 protein expression, and by immunohistochemical visualization of GFAP and both CD74 (Ox6 and Iba1. Results We report a marked age-related induction of neuroinflammatory signaling transcripts (i.e., MHC II components, toll-like receptors, complement, and downstream signaling factors throughout the hippocampus in all aged rats regardless of cognitive status. Astrocyte and microglial activation was evident in CA1, CA3 and DG of intact and impaired aged rat groups, in the absence of differences in total numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes or Iba1+ microglia. Both mild and moderate microglial activation was significantly increased in all three hippocampal subregions in aged cognitively intact and cognitively impaired rats compared to adults. Neither induction of MHCII pathway gene expression nor glial activation correlated to cognitive performance. Conclusions These data demonstrate a

  15. Effects of zinc and manganese on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation and AGEs-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiuyuan; Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Wenbin; Zhao, Jingjing; Yang, Huangjian; Qu, Weijing

    2012-01-16

    The present study investigated the effects of ZnCl₂ and MnCl₂ supplementations on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation and AGEs-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction. Fluorescence detection was used to monitor the Maillard reaction. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to test cellular zinc and manganese levels. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot were used to analyze the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB), and receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, NOS activity were determined by fluorescent probe assay, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was determined by water soluble tetrazolium salt assay. MnCl₂ showed excellent inhibitory effect on AGEs formation. Primary cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were exposed to AGEs for 30 min, followed by trace element treatments. Cell viability and the zinc levels declined due to AGEs exposure, which were improved with the supplementations of ZnCl₂ and MnCl₂. Furthermore, ZnCl₂ supplementation effectively enhanced intracellular NO production, elevated eNOS expression and enzymatic activity, and down-regulated NF-κB activation and RAGE expression. MnCl₂ dose-dependently impaired ROS formation, down-regulated NF-κB protein expression and nuclear translocation, as well as restored Mn-SOD enzymatic capability. Our findings suggested that trace elements relevant to diabetic, such as zinc and manganese played different roles in the formation of AGEs. Both the elements benefited the AGEs-injured BAECs through different mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implications of advancing paternal age: does it affect offspring school performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Svensson

    Full Text Available Average paternal age is increasing in many high income countries, but the implications of this demographic shift for child health and welfare are poorly understood. There is equivocal evidence that children of older fathers are at increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and reduced IQ. We therefore report here on the relationship between paternal age and a composite indicator of scholastic achievement during adolescence, i.e. compulsory school leaving grades, among recent birth cohorts in Stockholm County where delayed paternity is notably common. We performed a record-linkage study comprising all individuals in Stockholm County who finished 9 years of compulsory school from 2000 through 2007 (n = 155,875. Data on school leaving grades and parental characteristics were retrieved from administrative and health service registers and analyzed using multiple linear regression. Advancing paternal age at birth was not associated with a decrease in school leaving grades in adolescent offspring. After adjustment for year of graduation, maternal age and parental education, country of birth and parental mental health service use, offspring of fathers aged 50 years or older had on average 0.3 (95% CI -3.8, 4.4 points higher grades than those of fathers aged 30-34 years. In conclusion, advancing paternal age is not associated with poorer school performance in adolescence. Adverse effects of delayed paternity on offspring cognitive function, if any, may be counterbalanced by other potential advantages for children born to older fathers.

  17. Implications of advancing paternal age: does it affect offspring school performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Anna C; Abel, Kathryn; Dalman, Christina; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Average paternal age is increasing in many high income countries, but the implications of this demographic shift for child health and welfare are poorly understood. There is equivocal evidence that children of older fathers are at increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and reduced IQ. We therefore report here on the relationship between paternal age and a composite indicator of scholastic achievement during adolescence, i.e. compulsory school leaving grades, among recent birth cohorts in Stockholm County where delayed paternity is notably common. We performed a record-linkage study comprising all individuals in Stockholm County who finished 9 years of compulsory school from 2000 through 2007 (n = 155,875). Data on school leaving grades and parental characteristics were retrieved from administrative and health service registers and analyzed using multiple linear regression. Advancing paternal age at birth was not associated with a decrease in school leaving grades in adolescent offspring. After adjustment for year of graduation, maternal age and parental education, country of birth and parental mental health service use, offspring of fathers aged 50 years or older had on average 0.3 (95% CI -3.8, 4.4) points higher grades than those of fathers aged 30-34 years. In conclusion, advancing paternal age is not associated with poorer school performance in adolescence. Adverse effects of delayed paternity on offspring cognitive function, if any, may be counterbalanced by other potential advantages for children born to older fathers.

  18. Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy in preschool age children with kidney calculi (including stones induced by melamine-contaminated milk powder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiang; Al-Hayek, Samih; Gan, Weidong; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xiaogong; Guo, Hongqian

    2012-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PCNL) using ureteroscope and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy in preschool age children with kidney calculi. We studied 27 renal units in 20 patients of preschool age (≤ 6 years) who underwent mini-PCNL at our institute. The mean age was 42.6 months (range 14-68 months). The average stone burden was 1.85 cm (range 0.9-2.8 cm). Eight patients aged 14 to 58 months had been exposed to melamine-tainted powdered formula. The mini-PCNL was performed with an X-ray-guided peripheral puncture. Minimal tract dilatation was undertaken to fit a 14-16 Fr peel-away sheath. Ureteroscope and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy were used to fragment the stones. Complete clearance was achieved in 23 renal units (85.2 %) with mini-PCNL monotherapy. This has increased to 92.6 % after adjunctive ESWL. The average fall in hemoglobin was 1.28 g/dL. None of the patients required blood transfusion. The median length of hospital stay was 8.2 days. Patients were followed up every 6 months for 2 years. There has been only one recurrence of stone and no long-term complications. Mini-PCNL is a effective treatment for pediatric kidney stones refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, including stones induced by melamine-contaminated milk powder. The "mini-PCNL" technique, which uses ureteroscope and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy, is a safe and feasible modality for treating renal calculi in preschool age children.

  19. Advanced glycation end products overload might explain intracellular cobalamin deficiency in renal dysfunction, diabetes and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Rima; Shannan, Batool; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to aging. Cobalamin (Cbl) is required for cell growth and functions, and its deficiency causes serious complications. Diabetics and renal patients show high concentrations of Cbl, but metabolic evidence of Cbl deficiency that is reversible after Cbl treatment. Cbl might be sequestered in blood and cannot be delivered to the cell. Megalin mediates the uptake of transcobalamin-Cbl complex into the proximal tubule cells. Megalin is involved in the uptake and degradation of AGEs. In aging, diabetes or renal dysfunction, AGEs might overload megalin thus lowering Cbl uptake. Transcobalamin-Cbl might retain in blood. Shedding of megalin and transcobalamin receptor under glycation conditions is also a possible mechanism of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sexual Health questions included in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study: an international methodological pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Honor; Költő, András; Reis, Marta; Saewyc, Elizabeth M; Moreau, Nathalie; Burke, Lorraine; Cosma, Alina; Windlin, Béat; Gabhainn, Saoirse Nic; Godeau, Emmanuelle

    2016-12-05

    This paper describes the methodological developments of the sexual health items included in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study since their mandatory inclusion in the study in 2002. The current methodological, ethical and pedagogical challenges in measuring young people's sexual health behaviours are discussed along with the issues associated with the sexual health items introduced to the HBSC study in 2002. The development and piloting of new cross-national items for use in the 2013/14 HBSC data collection are presented and discussed. An international pilot study was undertaken to determine the impact of these proposed changes. Questionnaires and classroom discussion groups were conducted in five pilot countries in 2012/2013 (France, Hungary, Ireland, Portugal and Romania) with a total of 612 school-aged children (age M = 15.55 years, SD = 0.95). The majority of participants in each country provided positive feedback about the appropriateness of the questions. Some small cross-national differences were found in the self-reported quantitative data relating to the appropriateness of the questions (χ 2  = 22.831, df = 9, p = .007, V = .117). Qualitative feedback suggests that for the vast majority of students the phrasing and age-targeting of the questions were considered appropriate. With the exception of a small number of respondents who commented on the clarity and/or personal nature of the content, no specific issues with the questions were identified. These findings provide guidance on the answerability (including the extent of missing and inconsistent data), understandability, acceptability (including in different cultures) and relevance of questions to potential participants. The findings from the pilot study suggest that in general, the questions are understandable, acceptable, and of a high priority to the target population, and that the simplification has significantly reduced the proportion of missing data

  1. Sexual Health questions included in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC Study: an international methodological pilot investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honor Young

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the methodological developments of the sexual health items included in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC study since their mandatory inclusion in the study in 2002. The current methodological, ethical and pedagogical challenges in measuring young people’s sexual health behaviours are discussed along with the issues associated with the sexual health items introduced to the HBSC study in 2002. The development and piloting of new cross-national items for use in the 2013/14 HBSC data collection are presented and discussed. Methods An international pilot study was undertaken to determine the impact of these proposed changes. Questionnaires and classroom discussion groups were conducted in five pilot countries in 2012/2013 (France, Hungary, Ireland, Portugal and Romania with a total of 612 school-aged children (age M = 15.55 years, SD = 0.95. Results The majority of participants in each country provided positive feedback about the appropriateness of the questions. Some small cross-national differences were found in the self-reported quantitative data relating to the appropriateness of the questions (χ2 = 22.831, df = 9, p = .007, V = .117. Qualitative feedback suggests that for the vast majority of students the phrasing and age-targeting of the questions were considered appropriate. With the exception of a small number of respondents who commented on the clarity and/or personal nature of the content, no specific issues with the questions were identified. Conclusions These findings provide guidance on the answerability (including the extent of missing and inconsistent data, understandability, acceptability (including in different cultures and relevance of questions to potential participants. The findings from the pilot study suggest that in general, the questions are understandable, acceptable, and of a high priority to the target population, and that the

  2. Advanced glycation End-products (AGEs): an emerging concern for processed food industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Kaur, Amarjeet; Thind, S S; Singh, Baljit; Raina, Shiveta

    2015-12-01

    The global food industry is expected to increase more than US $ 7 trillion by 2014. This rise in processed food sector shows that more and more people are diverging towards modern processed foods. As modern diets are largely heat processed, they are more prone to contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are a group of complex and heterogeneous compounds which are known as brown and fluorescent cross-linking substances such as pentosidine, non-fluorescent cross-linking products such as methylglyoxal-lysine dimers (MOLD), or non-fluorescent, non-cross linking adducts such as carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (a pyrrole aldehyde). The chemistry of the AGEs formation, absorption and bioavailability and their patho-biochemistry particularly in relation to different complications like diabetes and ageing discussed. The concept of AGEs receptor - RAGE is mentioned. AGEs contribute to a variety of microvascular and macrovascular complications through the formation of cross-links between molecules in the basement membrane of the extracellular matrix and by engaging the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Different methods of detection and quantification along with types of agents used for the treatment of AGEs are reviewed. Generally, ELISA or LC-MS methods are used for analysis of foods and body fluids, however lack of universally established method highlighted. The inhibitory effect of bioactive components on AGEs by trapping variety of chemical moieties discussed. The emerging evidence about the adverse effects of AGEs makes it necessary to investigate the different therapies to inhibit AGEs.

  3. Advanced BrainAGE in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Katja eFranke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging alters brain structure and function and diabetes mellitus (DM may accelerate this process. This study investigated the effects of type 2 DM on individual brain aging as well as the relationships between individual brain aging, risk factors and functional measures. To differentiate a pattern of brain atrophy that deviates from normal brain aging, we used the novel BrainAGE approach, which determines the complex multidimensional aging pattern within the whole brain by applying established kernel regression methods to anatomical brain MRIs. The Brain Age Gap Estimation (i.e., BrainAGE score was then calculated as the difference between chronological age and estimated brain age. 185 subjects (98 with type 2 DM completed an MRI at 3T, laboratory and clinical assessments. Twenty-five subjects (12 with type 2 DM also completed a follow-up visit after 3.8 ± 1.5 years. The estimated brain age of DM subjects was 4.6 ± 7.2 years greater than their chronological age (p = 0.0001, whereas within the control group, estimated brain age was similar to chronological age. As compared to baseline, the average BrainAGE scores of DM subjects increased by 0.2 years per follow-up year (p = 0.034, whereas the BrainAGE scores of controls did not change between baseline and follow-up. At baseline, across all subjects, higher BrainAGE scores were associated with greater smoking and alcohol consumption, higher tumor necrosis factor (TNFα levels, lower verbal fluency scores and more severe depression. Within the DM group, higher BrainAGE scores were associated with longer diabetes duration (r = 0.31, p = 0.019 and increased fasting blood glucose levels (r = 0.34, p = 0.025. In conclusion, type 2 DM is independently associated with structural changes in the brain that reflect advanced aging. The BrainAGE approach may thus serve as a clinically relevant biomarker for the detection of abnormal patterns of brain aging associated with type 2 DM.

  4. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction

  5. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs and their receptor (RAGE induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.X. Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs and their receptor (RAGE. We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA, bovine serum albumin (BSA alone, or given no treatment (control. Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01 and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05. Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  6. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J. [Department of Stomatology, Air Force General Hospital PLA, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

    2014-09-19

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  7. Experiences regarding maternal age-specific risks and prenatal testing of women of advanced maternal age in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kyoko; Turale, Sue; Skirton, Heather; Doris, Faye; Tsujino, Kumiko; Ito, Misae; Kutsunugi, Saeko

    2016-03-01

    The number of pregnant women of advanced maternal age has increased worldwide. Women in this group have an increased chance of fetal abnormality. To explore Japanese women's experiences regarding maternal age-specific risks and prenatal testing, we conducted a descriptive qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 women aged 35 years or over who had given birth within the previous three months to a healthy, term infant. Thematic analysis of transcribed interview data was performed and three major themes were identified: inadequate understanding of genetic risks; insufficiently informed choice regarding prenatal testing; and need for more information from health professionals. Some participants were not aware of maternal age-specific risks to the fetus. Many took their cues from health professionals and did not raise the topic themselves, but would have considered prenatal testing if made aware of the risks. Nurses, midwives and other health professionals need to adequately inform pregnant women about the genetic risks to the fetus and offer testing at an appropriate stage early in the pregnancy. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Changes in glomerular parietal epithelial cells in mouse kidneys with advanced age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Sebastian S; Stefanska, Ania; Eng, Diana G; Kaverina, Natalya; Sunseri, Maria W; McNicholas, Bairbre A; Rabinovitch, Peter; Engel, Felix B; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Lichtnekert, Julia; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Shankland, Stuart J

    2015-07-15

    Kidney aging is accompanied by characteristic changes in the glomerulus, but little is known about the effect of aging on glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs), nor if the characteristic glomerular changes in humans and rats also occur in very old mice. Accordingly, a descriptive analysis was undertaken in 27-mo-old C57B6 mice, considered advanced age. PEC density was significantly lower in older mice compared with young mice (aged 3 mo), and the decrease was more pronounced in juxtamedullary glomeruli compared with outer cortical glomeruli. In addition to segmental and global glomerulosclerosis in older mice, staining for matrix proteins collagen type IV and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were markedly increased in Bowman's capsules of older mouse glomeruli, consistent with increased extracellular matrix production by PECs. De novo staining for CD44, a marker of activated and profibrotic PECs, was significantly increased in aged glomeruli. CD44 staining was more pronounced in the juxtamedullary region and colocalized with phosphorylated ERK. Additionally, a subset of aged PECs de novo expressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers α-smooth muscle and vimentin, with no changes in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and β-catenin. The mural cell markers neural/glial antigen 2, PDGF receptor-β, and CD146 as well as Notch 3 were also substantially increased in aged PECs. These data show that mice can be used to better understand the aging kidney and that PECs undergo substantial changes, especially in juxtamedullary glomeruli, that may participate in the overall decline in glomerular structure and function with advancing age. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Treatment of Myasthenia Gravis in Patients with Elderly Onset at Advanced Age

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    Noriko Nishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with late-onset myasthenia gravis (MG among patients ≥50 years has been increasing recently. We encountered three patients who developed elderly-onset MG at a particularly advanced age (≥80 years. All were female and positive for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. About 4 years have passed since MG onset in all three patients and symptoms have been controlled without recurrence using a combination of oral low-dose prednisolone and tacrolimus. As many cases of elderly-onset MG do not require strong immunosuppression, we recommend minimum immunosuppressive treatment to avoid adverse events, particularly in patients at an advanced age of ≥80 years.

  10. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  11. Advancing maternal age and trisomy screening: the practice challenges of facilitating choice and gaining consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Antenatal screening for chromosomal anomalies such as Trisomy 13, 18 and 21 (Patau's, Edward's and Down's syndrome respectively) is offered to all pregnant women in the first two trimesters.This article explores the varying considerations of consent for this type of screening, particularly in relation to women of advancing age who are at increased risk of carrying a pregnancy affected by a trisomy. The practical challenges or barriers of gaining valid, meaningful informed consent are discussed.

  12. VSNL1 Co-expression networks in aging include calcium signaling, synaptic plasticity, and Alzheimer’s disease pathways

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    C W Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visinin-like 1 (VSNL1 gene encodes Visinin-like protein 1, a peripheral biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD. Little is known, however, about normal VSNL1 expression in brain and the biologic networks in which it participates. Frontal cortex gray matter from 209 subjects without neurodegenerative or psychiatric illness, ranging in age from 16–91, were processed on Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1 ST and Human SNP Array 6.0. VSNL1 expression was unaffected by age and sex, and not significantly associated with SNPs in cis or trans. VSNL1 was significantly co-expressed with genes in pathways for Calcium Signaling, AD, Long Term Potentiation, Long Term Depression, and Trafficking of AMPA Receptors. The association with AD was driven, in part, by correlation with amyloid precursor protein (APP expression. These findings provide an unbiased link between VSNL1 and molecular mechanisms of AD, including pathways implicated in synaptic pathology in AD. Whether APP may drive increased VSNL1 expression, VSNL1 drives increased APP expression, or both are downstream of common pathogenic regulators will need to be evaluated in model systems.

  13. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation in the skin is associated with depression : The maastricht study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dooren, F.E.P.; Pouwer, F.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Sep, S.J.S.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Henry, R.M.A.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Schaper, N.C.; Van Der Kallen, C.J.H.; Koster, A.; Denollet, J.K.L.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Schram, M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: depression is a highly prevalent disease with a high morbidity and mortality risk. Its pathophysiology is not entirely clear. However, type 2 diabetes is an important risk factor for depression. One mechanism that may explain this association may include the formation of advanced

  14. Sulforaphane reduces advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced inflammation in endothelial cells and rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Ojima, A; Nishino, Y; Yamagishi, S-I

    2016-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-receptor RAGE interaction evokes oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions, thereby being involved in endothelial cell (EC) damage in diabetes. Sulforaphane is generated from glucoraphanin, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, by myrosinase. Sulforaphane has been reported to protect against oxidative stress-mediated cell and tissue injury. However, effects of sulforaphane on AGEs-induced vascular damage remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether and how sulforaphane could inhibit inflammation in AGEs-exposed human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) and AGEs-injected rat aorta. Sulforaphane treatment for 4 or 24 h dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced increase in RAGE, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecular-1 (VCAM-1) gene expression in HUVECs. AGEs significantly stimulated MCP-1 production by, and THP-1 cell adhesion to, HUVECs, both of which were prevented by 1.6 μM sulforaphane. Sulforaphane significantly suppressed oxidative stress generation and NADPH oxidase activation evoked by AGEs in HUVECs. Furthermore, aortic RAGE, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in AGEs-injected rats were increased, which were suppressed by simultaneous infusion of sulforaphane. The present study demonstrated for the first time that sulforaphane could inhibit inflammation in AGEs-exposed HUVECs and AGEs-infused rat aorta partly by suppressing RAGE expression through its anti-oxidative properties. Inhibition of the AGEs-RAGE axis by sulforaphane might be a novel therapeutic target for vascular injury in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety and efficacy of vismodegib in patients aged ≥65 years with advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anne Lynn S; Lewis, Karl D; Arron, Sarah T; Migden, Michael R; Solomon, James A; Yoo, Simon; Day, Bann-Mo; McKenna, Edward F; Sekulic, Aleksandar

    2016-11-15

    Because many patients with unresectable basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are aged ≥65 years, this study explores the efficacy and safety of vismodegib in these patients with locally advanced (la) or metastatic (m) basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the ERIVANCE BCC trial and the expanded access study (EAS).We compared patients aged ≥65 years to patients aged <65 years taking vismodegib 150 mg/day, using descriptive statistics for response and safety. Patients aged ≥65 years (laBCC/mBCC) were enrolled in ERIVANCE BCC (33/14) and EAS (27/26). Investigator-assessed best overall response rate in patients ≥65 and <65 years was 46.7%/35.7% and 72.7%/52.6% (laBCC/mBCC), respectively, in ERIVANCE BCC and 45.8%/33.3% and 46.9%/28.6%, respectively, in EAS. These differences were not clinically meaningful. Safety was similar in both groups, although those aged ≥65 years had a higher percentage of grade 3-5 adverse events than those aged <65 years. Vismodegib demonstrated similar clinical activity and adverse events regardless of age.

  16. Changes in the perception and the psychological structure of musical emotions with advancing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillard, Sandrine; Didierjean, André; Maquestiaux, François

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: To date, little is known about how advancing age may impact perception of emotions in music. This study was designed to test whether there are age-related changes in emotional judgments and psychological structure for musical emotions. Twenty-five older (64-81 years) and 25 younger (18-30 years) listeners performed emotional judgments and free categorization tasks on happy, peaceful, sad, and threatening musical excerpts. Correlations, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and multidimensional scaling analyses were conducted to examine the effect of age on emotional judgments and categorization performances. Compared with younger adults, older adults did not discriminate the arousal difference between peaceful and threatening excerpts and showed higher association between arousal and valence judgments. The multidimensional scaling analysis indicated that the emotional space showed by older listeners did not fit younger listeners' bidimensional valence-arousal structure. There was also a better categorization for happy excerpts among the older group. Altogether, these data are consistent with the view that advancing age may result in the reduction of emotional complexity and a distortion of the emotional processing in a positive direction.

  17. Effects of metabolic syndrome on arterial function in different age groups: the Advanced Approach to Arterial Stiffness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topouchian, Jirar; Labat, Carlos; Gautier, Sylvie; Bäck, Magnus; Achimastos, Apostolos; Blacher, Jacques; Cwynar, Marcin; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Pall, Denes; Fantin, Francesco; Farkas, Katalin; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis; Hakobyan, Zoya; Jankowski, Piotr; Jelakovic, Ana; Kobalava, Zhanna; Konradi, Alexandra; Kotovskaya, Yulia; Kotsani, Marina; Lazareva, Irina; Litvin, Alexander; Milyagin, Viktor; Mintale, Iveta; Persson, Oscar; Ramos, Rafael; Rogoza, Anatoly; Ryliskyte, Ligita; Scuteri, Angelo; Sirenko, Yuriy; Soulis, Georges; Tasic, Nebojsa; Udovychenko, Maryna; Urazalina, Saule; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Zelveian, Parounak; Benetos, Athanase; Asmar, Roland

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the Advanced Approach to Arterial Stiffness study was to compare arterial stiffness measured simultaneously with two different methods in different age groups of middle-aged and older adults with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). The specific effects of the different MetS components on arterial stiffness were also studied. This prospective, multicentre, international study included 2224 patients aged 40 years and older, 1664 with and 560 without MetS. Patients were enrolled in 32 centres from 18 European countries affiliated to the International Society of Vascular Health & Aging. Arterial stiffness was evaluated using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) in four prespecified age groups: 40-49, 50-59, 60-74, 75-90 years. In this report, we present the baseline data of this study. Both CF-PWV and CAVI increased with age, with a higher correlation coefficient for CAVI (comparison of coefficients P Age-adjusted and sex-adjusted values of CF-PWV and CAVI were weakly intercorrelated (r = 0.06, P Age-adjusted and sex-adjusted values for CF-PWV but not CAVI were higher in presence of MetS (CF-PWV: 9.57 ± 0.06 vs. 8.65 ± 0.10, P age on CAVI and CF-PWV and suggests that age may have a more pronounced effect on CAVI, whereas MetS increases CF-PWV but not CAVI. This important finding may be due to heterogeneous effects of MetS components on CAVI. The clinical significance of these original results will be assessed during the longitudinal phase of the study.

  18. Retrospective cohort study shows that the risks for retinopathy of prematurity included birth age and weight, medical conditions and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aliaa A; Gomaa, Nancy A S; Awadein, Ahmed R; Al-Hayouti, Huda H; Hegazy, Ahmed I

    2017-12-01

    This study described the characteristics and risk factors of neonates who developed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and severe treatable ROP in two Egyptian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This retrospective cohort study comprised 108 preterm neonates who were screened for ROP after being admitted to the two NICUs run by Cairo University Hospital from June 2014 to May 2015. Patients were examined using digital fundus photography and indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed if ROP was detected. Retinopathy of prematurity occurred in 75 patients. Late-onset sepsis, ventilation and hypercapnia were independently associated with ROP. Patients who developed severe treatable ROP had a younger gestational age (GA) than patients who did not develop ROP or developed mild or moderate ROP (29 weeks, range 27-33 weeks versus 32 weeks, range 28-36 weeks, p = 0.002) and a lower birthweight (1200 g, range 980-1590 g versus 1460 g, range 770-2475 g, p = 0.029). The risk factors associated with severe treatable ROP included the duration of admission, the duration of incubator oxygen, late-onset sepsis, intraventricular haemorrhage, total parenteral nutrition and the duration of caffeine citrate therapy. This study showed that the risks for ROP were wide-ranging and included GA and weight, medical conditions and treatment. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Advanced Maternal Age and the Risk of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery: a Within-Family Analysis Using Finnish Population Registers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goisis, Alice; Remes, Hanna; Barclay, Kieron; Martikainen, Pekka; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Advanced maternal age at birth is considered a major risk factor for birth outcomes. It is unclear to what extent this association is confounded by maternal characteristics. To test whether advanced maternal age at birth independently increases the risk of low birth weight (family models (children born to different mothers at different ages) with within-family models (children born to the same mother at different ages). The latter procedure reduces confounding by unobserved parental characteristics that are shared by siblings. We used Finnish population registers, including 124,098 children born during 1987–2000. When compared with maternal ages 25–29 years in between-family models, maternal ages of 35–39 years and ≥40 years were associated with percentage increases of 1.1 points (95% confidence intervals: 0.8, 1.4) and 2.2 points (95% confidence intervals: 1.4, 2.9), respectively, in the probability of low birth weight. The associations are similar for the risk of preterm delivery. In within-family models, the relationship between advanced maternal age and low birth weight or preterm birth is statistically and substantively negligible. In Finland, advanced maternal age is not independently associated with the risk of low birth weight or preterm delivery among mothers who have had at least 2 live births. PMID:29206985

  20. Advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcome: evidence from a large contemporary cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C Kenny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent decades have witnessed an increase in mean maternal age at childbirth in most high-resourced countries. Advanced maternal age has been associated with several adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. Although there are many studies on this topic, data from large contemporary population-based cohorts that controls for demographic variables known to influence perinatal outcomes is limited. METHODS: We performed a population-based cohort study using data on all singleton births in 2004-2008 from the North Western Perinatal Survey based at The University of Manchester, UK. We compared pregnancy outcomes in women aged 30-34, 35-39 and ≥40 years with women aged 20-29 years using log-linear binomial regression. Models were adjusted for parity, ethnicity, social deprivation score and body mass index. RESULTS: The final study cohort consisted of 215,344 births; 122,307 mothers (54.19% were aged 20-29 years, 62,371(27.63% were aged 30-34 years, 33,966(15.05% were aged 35-39 years and 7,066(3.13% were aged ≥40 years. Women aged 40+ at delivery were at increased risk of stillbirth (RR = 1.83, [95% CI 1.37-2.43], pre-term (RR = 1.25, [95% CI: 1.14-1.36] and very pre-term birth (RR = 1.29, [95% CI:1.08-1.55], Macrosomia (RR = 1.31, [95% CI: 1.12-1.54], extremely large for gestational age (RR = 1.40, [95% CI: 1.25-1.58] and Caesarean delivery (RR = 1.83, [95% CI: 1.77-1.90]. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced maternal age is associated with a range of adverse pregnancy outcomes. These risks are independent of parity and remain after adjusting for the ameliorating effects of higher socioeconomic status. The data from this large contemporary cohort will be of interest to healthcare providers and women and will facilitate evidence based counselling of older expectant mothers.

  1. Relationship Between Advanced Maternal Age, Hiesho (Sensitivity to Cold) and Abnormal Delivery in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sachiyo; Horiuchi, Shigeko

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Japan, the proportion of women aged 35 and older giving birth has greatly increased in recent years, and maternal age is continuing to increase. Advanced maternal age is a risk factor for abnormal delivery, as is hiesho (sensitivity to cold). Research Question: This study aimed to assess whether advanced maternal age and hiesho precipitate premature delivery, premature rupture of membranes, weak labor pains, prolonged labor and atonic bleeding. Method: The study design was a descriptive comparative study with a retrospective cohort group design. Subjects in this study were 2,810 Japanese women in hospital after childbirth. The research methods employed were a paper questionnaire and extraction of data from medical records. Results: Comparing the rate of occurrence of abnormal delivery among women aged 35 to 39 according to whether or not they had hiesho, results were premature delivery OR: 3.51 (95% CI: 1.66-7.43), premature rupture of membranes OR: 1.25 (95% CI: 0.90-1.74), weak labor pains OR: 2.94 (95% CI: 1.65-5.24), prolonged labor OR: 2.56 (95% CI: 1.23-5.26), and atonic bleeding, OR: 1.65 (95% CI: 0.14-2.40) when hiesho was present. Among women aged 40 and over, results were premature delivery OR: 5.09 (95% CI: 1.16-22.20), premature rupture of membranes OR: 1.60 (95% CI: 0.73-3.46), weak labor pains OR: 7.02 (95% CI: 1.56-31.55), prolonged labor OR:7.19 (95% CI: 1.49-34.60) and atonic bleeding OR: 2.00 (95% CI: 0.64-6.23). Conclusions: Regardless of maternal age, the presence of hiesho is a risk factor that can precipitate premature delivery, premature rupture of membranes, weak labor pains, prolonged labor and atonic bleeding. Furthermore, hiesho coupled with advanced maternal age increases the incidence of premature delivery, weak labor pains and prolonged labor. PMID:24062862

  2. Subduction and Slab Advance at Orogen Syntaxes: Predicting Exhumation Rates and Thermochronometric Ages with Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettesheim, Matthias; Ehlers, Todd A.; Whipp, David M.

    2017-04-01

    The change in plate boundary orientation and subducting plate geometry along orogen syntaxes may have major control on the subduction and exhumation dynamics at these locations. Previous work documents that the curvature of subducting plates in 3D at orogen syntaxes forces a buckling and flexural stiffening of the downgoing plate. The geometry of this stiffened plate region, also called indenter, can be observed in various subduction zones around the world (e.g. St. Elias Range, Alaska; Cascadia, USA; Andean syntaxis, South America). The development of a subducting, flexurally stiffened indenter beneath orogen syntaxes influences deformation in the overriding plate and can lead to accelerated and focused rock uplift above its apex. Moreover, the style of deformation in the overriding plate is influenced by the amount of trench or slab advance, which is the amount of overall shortening not accommodated by underthrusting. While many subduction zones exhibit little to no slab advance, the Nazca-South America subduction and especially the early stages of the India-Eurasia collision provide end-member examples. Here, we use a transient, lithospheric-scale, thermomechanical 3D model of an orogen syntaxis to investigate the effects of subducting a flexurally stiffened plate geometry and slab advance on upper plate deformation. A visco-plastic upper-plate rheology is used, along with a buckled, rigid subducting plate. The free surface of the thermomechanical model is coupled to a landscape evolution model that accounts for erosion by fluvial and hillslope processes. The cooling histories of exhumed rocks are used to predict the evolution of low-temperature thermochronometer ages on the surface. With a constant overall shortening for all simulations, the magnitude of slab advance is varied stepwise from no advance, with all shortening accommodated by underthrusting, to full slab advance, i.e. no motion on the megathrust. We show that in models where most shortening is

  3. Age dependent prognosis in concurrent chemo-radiation of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    . Material and methods. Altogether, 478 patients completed radical radiotherapy in doses of 60-66 Gy/30-33 fractions from 1995 to June 2012; 137 of the patients had concurrent chemotherapy. The data was analyzed in age groups ... specific survival the hazard ratio was related to the use of concurrent chemotherapy was 0.49 (95% CI 0.29; 0.82), 0.68 (95% CI 0.48; 0.98) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.67; 1.51) for the age groups ..., the results might be due to selection bias, thus reports from a cohort of consecutively treated patients are warranted. The current single institution study reports on the influence of age on survival of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy combined with or without concurrent chemotherapy...

  4. Healthy Aging Actions to Advance the National Prevention Strategy: Healthy Heart-- Powerpoint presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Society on Aging is an association of professionals in the field of aging including practitioners, educators, administrators, policymakers, researchers and students. Attendees at this session will receive 1.5 Continuing educational credits and will have a better u...

  5. Multi-objective optimization of an advanced combined cycle power plant including CO{sub 2} separation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongtao; Marechal, Francois; Burer, Meinrad; Favrat, Daniel [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland). Laboratory for Industrial Energy Systems

    2006-12-15

    This paper illustrates a methodology developed to facilitate the analysis of complex systems characterized by a large number of technical, economical and environmental parameters. Thermo-economic modeling of a natural gas combined cycle including CO{sub 2} separation options has been coupled within a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to characterize the economic and environmental performances of such complex systems within various contexts. The method has been applied to a case of power generation in Germany. The optimum options for system integration under different boundary conditions are revealed by the Pareto Optimal Frontiers. Results show the influence of the configuration and technical parameters on the electrical efficiencies of the Pareto optimal plants and their sub-systems. The results provide information on the relationship between power generation cost and CO{sub 2} emissions, and allow sensitivity analyses of important economical parameters like natural gas and electricity prices. Such a tool is of interest for power generation technology suppliers, for utility owners or for project investors, and for policy makers in the context of CO{sub 2} mitigation schemes including emission trading. (author)

  6. The experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrighi, Juliane Dias; Wall, Marilene Loewen; Souza, Silvana Regina Rossi Kissula; Cancela, Franciane Zabloski Vieira

    2016-01-01

    To identify in the literature how the experiences of women age 35 or above are described in terms of pregnancy. Integrative review based on MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS, and SciELO databases, with no time period constraint. Eighteen studies that dealt with the experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age were selected and analyzed. The studies evidenced four theme categories: the search for information, which pointed to a deficit of information supplied by health care professionals; perceiving the risks, which pointed to women's concerns about their own health and their children's; the ideal moment for motherhood, with different reasons for postponing it; and adjusting to a new routine, showing a concern regarding changes in daily life. From the results, it was possible to understand that other factors, in addition to those that include risks, are present in the experiences of older pregnant women and point to a need to involve such aspects in nursing care to create comprehensive strategies that are aligned with these women's needs. Identificar na literatura como são descritas as experiências das mulheres com idade igual ou superior a 35 anos na gestação. Revisão integrativa realizada nas bases de dados MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS e SciELO, sem restrição de período. Foram selecionados e analisados 18 estudos que tratavam das experiências das mulheres na gestação em idade avançada. Os estudos evidenciaram quatro categorias temáticas: A busca por informações, que mostrou aspectos como deficit de informações fornecidas pelos profissionais da saúde;Percebendo os riscos, que apontou uma preocupação da mulher com a própria saúde e a do filho;Momento ideal para a maternidade, com diferentes motivos para o adiamento; e Adaptação à nova rotina, com a preocupação em relação às mudanças no cotidiano. A partir dos resultados, foi possível compreender que outros fatores, além dos que incluem os riscos, permeiam as experi

  7. Computed tomographic features of the feline brain change with advancing age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviam R. Babicsak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A better understanding of normal or expected encephalic changes with increasing age in cats is needed as a growing number of these animals is attended in veterinary clinics, and imaging data referring to normal age-associated changes are extremely scarce in the literature. The objective of this study was to identify age-related changes in feline brain using CT imaging. Fifteen non-brachycephalic healthy cats with age between 1 to 6 years (adult group and others over 12 years (geriatric group were submitted to CT scan of the brain. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups for the ability to identify the left lateral ventricle and for falx cerebri calcification, both identified in a greater number of cats of the geriatric group. A significantly higher mean width of the third ventricle was also detected in geriatric animals. There were no statistically significant differences between lateral ventricular dimensions and encephalic parenchymal attenuation on pre and post-contrast CT phases. The results of the present study show an increase in the incidence of falx cerebri calcification and a third ventricular dilatation with advancing age in cats. Future researches using MRI scanners and a greater quantity of cats are needed in order to identify supplementary age-related changes.

  8. PLANIMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CORPUS CALLOSUM SAGITTAL PROFILE IN MIDDLE- AND ADVANCED AGED MEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiagina, O; Kostilenko, Yu

    2017-10-01

    The sagittal profile of the corpus callosum is available for morphometric measurements of conditioned linear distances when elucidating its age-related changes and sexual dimorphism. But in this case, the opportunity to determine the total area of the sagittal profile of the corpus callosum is lost, while being a more full expression of its digital characteristics. We set the goal to establish the differences between planimetric indices of male corpus callosum of the first and second periods of adulthood and the advanced age. The work used 65 brain preparations of men aged 22 to 73 years who died for reasons unrelated to the pathology of the central nervous system. After a two-week fixation in a 10% solution of neutral formalin, the brain was dissected along the longitudinal sagittal fissure into two hemispheres, one of which was used to photograph its medial surface with an overlaid scale ruler. The received standardized photos were used to determine the basic metric parameters and conduct a planimetric study of the sagittal profile of the corpus callosum using the Adobe Photoshop CS6 Extended computer program. The overall evaluation of the results of planimetric analysis of the male corpus callosum sagittal profile we directed attention to the fact that within each age group there is a wide scatter of individual digital values of its area as well as random and irregular nature of their distribution that is completely independent of the intra-group age chronology. Thus, in the first period of adulthood, the minimum value of the area of the corpus callosum sagittal profile is 560 mm2, while the maximum value is 930 mm2 (the average statistical value is 747.5 ± 110.4 mm2). In the second period of adulthood, somewhat lower indicators are indicated; if the minimum value of it is equal to 412 mm2, then the maximum value is 868 mm2 (the average is 684.7 ± 130.0 mm2). In the advanced age, we find them in the range between 441 and 867 mm2 (the average value is 650.2

  9. Design and modeling of an advanced marine machinery system including waste heat recovery and removal of sulphur oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann Nielsen, Rasmus; Haglind, Fredrik; Larsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    the efficiency of machinery systems. The wet sulphuric acid process is an effective way of removing flue gas sulphur oxides from land-based coal-fired power plants. Moreover, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) are suitable for heat to power conversion for low temperature heat sources. This paper describes the design...... and modeling of a highly efficient machinery system which includes the removal of exhaust gas sulphur oxides. The system consists of a two-stroke diesel engine, the wet sulphuric process for sulphur removal, a conventional steam Rankine cycle and an ORC. Results of numerical modeling efforts suggest...... that an ORC placed after the conventional waste heat recovery system is able to extract the sulphuric acid from the exhaust gas, while at the same time increase the combined cycle thermal efficiency by 2.6%. The findings indicate that the technology has potential in marine applications regarding both energy...

  10. Advanced Maternal Age and Maternal Education Disparity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, For-Wey; Chiang, Tung-Liang; Lin, Shio-Jean; Lee, Meng-Chih; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2018-02-06

    Objective Previous studies have shown inconsistent results with regard to the association between advanced parental age and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The sociodemographic status of parents has been found to be associated with children with ASD, however. Therefore, a pathway analysis was undertaken of the roles of maternal age and education in ASD diagnosis and community screening, in a national birth cohort database, using a propensity score matching (PSM) method. Method The 6- and 66-month Taiwan Birth Cohort Study dataset was used (N = 20,095). The PSM exact matching method was used to select 1700 families (ratio of 1:4 between ASD diagnosis and control) from the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study dataset. Results (1) The results from the complete dataset and the PSM exact matching dataset both show that the risk of a child being diagnosed with ASD was increased by the mother being over 40 years old. (2) Although more children of mothers with lower-than-average education were positive on screening, more children of mothers with higher-than-average education were also diagnosed with ASD. Conclusions for Practice Advanced maternal age had a higher association with the diagnosis of ASD, and maternal educational disparity was found between ASD clinical diagnosis and community screening. Community and primary medical care services should pay more attention to children of parents with lower education during ASD screening to prevent delayed diagnosis.

  11. Factors influencing contraceptive use and non-use among women of advanced reproductive age in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanke, Bola Lukman

    2017-01-07

    Factors influencing contraceptive use and non-use among women of advanced reproductive age have been insufficiently researched in Nigeria. This study examines factors influencing contraceptive use and non-use among women of advanced reproductive age in Nigeria. Secondary data were pooled and extracted from 2008 and 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Surveys (NDHS). The weighted sample size was 14,450 women of advanced reproductive age. The dependent variable was current contraceptive use. The explanatory variables were selected socio-demographic characteristics and three control variables. Analyses were performed using Stata version 12. Multinomial logistic regression was applied in four models. Majority of the respondents are not using any method of contraceptive; the expected risk of using modern contraceptive relative to traditional method reduces by a factor of 0.676 for multiparous women (rrr = 0.676; CI: 0.464-0.985); the expected risk of using modern contraceptive relative to traditional method reduces by a factor of 0.611 for women who want more children (rrr = 0.611; CI: 0.493-0.757); the relative risk for using modern contraceptive relative to traditional method increases by a factor of 1.637 as maternal education reaches secondary education (rrr = 1.637; CI: 1.173-2.285); the relative risk for using modern contraceptive relative to traditional method increases by a factor of 1.726 for women in richest households (rrr = 1.726; CI: 1.038-2.871); and the expected risk of using modern contraceptive relative to traditional method increases by a factor of 1.250 for southern women (rrr = 1.250; CI: 1.200-1.818). Socio-demographic characteristics exert more influence on non-use than modern contraceptive use. The scope, content and coverage of existing BCC messages should be extended to cover the contraceptive needs and challenges of women of advanced reproductive age in the country.

  12. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoungwoo Shin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow’s feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation.

  13. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in children taking part in an oral health programme including fluoride tablet supplements from the age of 2 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersten, Charlotte; Pylvänen, Lena; Schröder, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years.......To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years....

  14. [Social and psychological motives of frequency of calls for emergency care in advanced age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleev, V B; Smirnov, A V; Williams, E V; Smirnov, A G

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation relates to the problem encountered by the elderly population. There is a current increase of the number of elderly people and the share of the elderly population in many countries of the world. Living on their own, people of advanced age create specific problems, both medically and socially. The current investigation presents the data showing their high and "ultrahigh" appliance for the emergency, which not always is a reflection of the level of a disease. Request for the emergency of this social category of the population is ten times higher than in other age groups. As a result, it causes unnecessary economical expenses and requires a correction of social programs.

  15. Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes Among Primiparae at Very Advanced Maternal Age: At What Price?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Alon; Glasser, Saralee; Schiff, Eyal; Zahav, Aliza Segev; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2016-04-01

    In light of the potential physical and emotional costs to both woman and child, this study was conducted to assess pregnancy complications and birth outcomes in primiparae at very advanced maternal age (VAMA, aged ≥45) compared to younger primiparae. Retrospective cohort study comparing 222 VAMA primiparae and a reference group of 222 primiparae aged 30-35, delivering at Sheba Medical Center from 2008 through 2013. VAMA primiparae were more likely than younger primiparae to be single, to have chronic health conditions, and higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), gestational-hypertension (GHTN) and preeclampsia-eclampsia. VAMA primiparae conceived mostly by oocyte donation. They were more likely to be hospitalized during pregnancy, to deliver preterm and by cesarean birth. Infants of VAMA primiparae were at greater risk for low birthweight and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admission. There were no differences in outcomes between VAMA primiparae with or without preexisting chronic conditions, or between those aged 45-49 and ≥50. In multivariable analysis VAMA was an independent risk factor for GDM, GHTN and preeclamsia-eclampsia, with adjusted odds ratio of 2.38 (95 % CI 1.32, 4.29), 5.80 (95 % CI 2.66, 12.64) and 2.45 (95 % CI 1.03, 5.85); respectively. The effect of age disappeared in multiple pregnancies. Primiparity at VAMA holds a significant risk for adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. The absence of chronic medical conditions or the use of a young oocyte donor does not improve these outcomes. Multiple pregnancies hold additional risk and may diminish the effect of age. Primiparity at an earlier age should be encouraged.

  16. Advanced non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 45 years or younger: outcomes and prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chia-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer in young patients (less or equal to 45 years is uncommon and has clinical characteristics different from that in older patients. We investigated the outcomes and prognostic factors of young patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods From January 2000 to December 2009, we enrolled patients aged ≤45 years and diagnosed with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. Their clinical data, including age, gender, performance status, histologic types, disease stages, laboratory data at diagnosis, treatment modalities, and survival were reviewed and analyzed. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR and its 95% confidence interval (CI. Results A total of 144 patients with advanced NSCLC were included. Female patients were more prevalent (n = 74, 51.4%. Adenocarcinoma was the most common histologic type (n = 119, 82.6% in both genders (male, n = 54, 77.1%; female, n = 65, 87.8%. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR sequences were determined using tumor specimens from 58 patients, and 29 showed an EGFR mutation. No significant difference in median survival was found between patient groups with and without the EGFR mutation (798 vs. 708 days, p = 0.65. In multivariate analysis, male gender (HR, 1.70; 95% CI: 1.08-2.68, body mass index (BMI less than 25 kg/m2 (HR, 2.72; 95% CI: 1.39-5.30, stage IV disease (HR, 2.62; 95% CI: 1.50-4.57, and anemia (HR, 2.08; 95% CI: 1.15-3.77 were associated with a short survival time. Conclusions Low BMI, stage IV disease, anemia at diagnosis, and male gender were the negative prognostic factors for young patients with advanced NSCLC.

  17. Successful aging. How increased life expectancy and medical advances are changing geriatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, C K

    2001-01-01

    If the unprecedented increase in life expectancy has a downside, it is the exposure of risk to chronic age-related disorders. As clinicians work to foster healthy aging, we must also seek ways to prevent the disabling disorders that keep many older persons from enjoying their longevity. The high prevalence of chronic illness and functional limitation among older persons underscores the need for strategically directed health and social services. Successful patient management must extend beyond diagnosis and disease treatment and include promotion of function and prevention of decline. Achieving this goal requires a seamless continuum of management and interdisciplinary caregiving. There also must be a focus on improving the understanding of the science of aging. New treatment approaches for managing aging may one day include cognitive enhancers, designer hormones, telomerase, antioxidants, and gene therapy.

  18. Yearly Data for Spoken Language Preferences of Supplemental Security Income Aged Applicants (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides annual volume of SSI Aged initial claims at the national level from federal fiscal year 2016 shown two ways—we base one on a 52-week reporting...

  19. Quarterly Data for Asian & Pacific Islander Languages, Supplemental Security Income Initial Claims (Aged) (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides quarterly volumes of SSI Aged initial claims at the national level from federal fiscal year 2016 with quarter 4 shown two ways—we base one on a...

  20. Successful Aging: Advancing the Science of Physical Independence in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Stephen D.; Woods, Adam J.; Ashizawa, Tetso; Barb, Diana; Buford, Thomas W.; Carter, Christy S.; Clark, David J.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Corbett, Duane B.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Dotson, Vonetta; Ebner, Natalie; Efron, Philip A.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Foster, Thomas C.; Gundermann, David M.; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Karabetian, Christy; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Manini, Todd M.; Marsiske, Michael; Mankowski, Robert T.; Mutchie, Heather L.; Perri, Michael G.; Ranka, Sanjay; Rashidi, Parisa; Sandesara, Bhanuprasad; Scarpace, Philip J.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Solberg, Laurence M.; Someya, Shinichi; Uphold, Connie; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie; Wu, Samuel Shangwu; Pahor, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The concept of ‘Successful Aging’ has long intrigued the scientific community. Despite this long-standing interest, a consensus definition has proven to be a difficult task, due to the inherent challenge involved in defining such a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon. The lack of a clear set of defining characteristics for the construct of successful aging has made comparison of findings across studies difficult and has limited advances in aging research. The domain in which consensus on markers of successful aging is furthest developed is the domain of physical functioning. For example, walking speed appears to be an excellent surrogate marker of overall health and predicts the maintenance of physical independence, a cornerstone of successful aging. The purpose of the present article is to provide an overview and discussion of specific health conditions, behavioral factors, and biological mechanisms that mark declining mobility and physical function and promising interventions to counter these effects. With life expectancy continuing to increase in the United States and developed countries throughout the world, there is an increasing public health focus on the maintenance of physical independence among all older adults. PMID:26462882

  1. Role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and oxidative stress in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Ueda, Seiji; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Okuda, Seiya

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common and potentially devastating microvascular complication in diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness among the people of occupational age. However, current therapeutic options for the treatment of sight-threatening proliferative diabetic retinopathy such as photocoagulation and vitrectomy are limited by considerable side effects and far from satisfactory. Therefore, to develop novel therapeutic strategies that specifically target diabetic retinopathy is actually desired for most of the patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major initiator of diabetic retinopathy. However, recent clinical study has substantiated the concept of 'hyperglycemic memory' in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial-Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT-EDIC) Research, has revealed that the reduction in the risk of progressive retinopathy resulting from intensive therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes persisted for at least several years after the DCCT trial, despite increasing hyperglycemia. These findings suggest a long-term beneficial influence of early metabolic control on clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetic patients. Among various biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, the process of formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their mode of action are most compatible with the theory 'hyperglycemic memory'. Further, there is a growing body of evidence that AGEs-RAGE (receptor for AGEs) interaction-mediated oxidative stress generation plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. This article summarizes the role of AGEs and oxidative stress in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy and the therapeutic interventions that could prevent this devastating disorder. We also discuss here the pathological crosstalk between the AGEs-RAGE and the renin-angiotensin system in

  2. Effect of purpose in life on the relation between Alzheimer disease pathologic changes on cognitive function in advanced age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patricia A; Buchman, Aron S; Wilson, Robert S; Yu, Lei; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A

    2012-05-01

    Purpose in life is associated with a substantially reduced risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but the neurobiologic basis of this protective effect remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that purpose in life reduces the deleterious effects of AD pathologic changes on cognition in advanced age. A longitudinal, epidemiologic, clinicopathologic study of aging was conducted that included detailed annual clinical evaluations and brain autopsy. Two hundred forty-six community-based older persons from the Rush Memory and Aging Project participated. Purpose in life was assessed via structured interview, and cognitive function was evaluated annually and proximate to death. On postmortem examination, 3 indexes of AD pathologic features were quantified: global AD pathologic changes, amyloid, and tangles. The associations of disease pathologic changes and purpose in life with cognition were examined using linear regression and mixed models. Purpose in life modified the association between the global measure of AD pathologic changes and cognition (mean [SE] parameter estimate, 0.532 [0.211]; P = .01), such that participants who reported higher levels of purpose in life exhibited better cognitive function despite the burden of the disease. Purpose in life also reduced the association of tangles with cognition (parameter estimate, 0.042 [0.019]; P = .03), and the protective effect of purpose in life persisted even after controlling for several potentially confounding variables. Furthermore, in analyses examining whether purpose in life modified the association between AD pathologic effects and the rate of cognitive decline, we found that higher levels of purpose in life reduced the effect of AD pathologic changes on cognitive decline (parameter estimate, 0.085 [0.039]; P = .03). Higher levels of purpose in life reduce the deleterious effects of AD pathologic changes on cognition in advanced age.

  3. Preeclampsia complicated by advanced maternal age: a registry-based study on primiparous women in Finland 1997–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamminpää Reeta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preeclampsia is a frequent syndrome and its cause has been linked to multiple factors, making prevention of the syndrome a continuous challenge. One of the suggested risk factors for preeclampsia is advanced maternal age. In the Western countries, maternal age at first delivery has been steadily increasing, yet few studies have examined women of advanced maternal age with preeclampsia. The purpose of this registry-based study was to compare the obstetric outcomes in primiparous and preeclamptic women younger and older than 35 years. Methods The registry-based study used data from three Finnish health registries: Finnish Medical Birth Register, Finnish Hospital Discharge Register and Register of Congenital Malformations. The sample contained women under 35 years of age (N = 15,437 compared with those 35 and over (N = 2,387 who were diagnosed with preeclampsia and had their first singleton birth in Finland between 1997 and 2008. In multivariate modeling, the main outcome measures were Preterm delivery (before 34 and 37 weeks, low Apgar score (5 min., small-for-gestational-age, fetal death, asphyxia, Cesarean delivery, induction, blood transfusion and admission to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Results Women of advanced maternal age (AMA exhibited more preeclampsia (9.4% than younger women (6.4%. They had more prior terminations (25 ( Conclusions Preeclampsia is more common in women with advanced maternal age. Advanced maternal age is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in first-time mothers with preeclampsia.

  4. Advanced Mathematical-Thinking at Any Age: Its Nature and Its Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Guershon; Sowder, Larry

    2005-01-01

    This article argues that advanced mathematical thinking, usually conceived as thinking in advanced mathematics, might profitably be viewed as advanced thinking in mathematics (advanced mathematical-thinking). Hence, advanced mathematical-thinking can properly be viewed as potentially starting in elementary school. The definition of mathematical…

  5. Age does not influence efficacy of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer: Subgroup analyses of REGARD and RAINBOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Kei; Cho, Jae Yong; Bodoky, Gyorgy; Goswami, Chanchal; Chao, Yee; Dos Santos, Lucas V; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Topuzov, Eldar; Van Cutsem, Eric; Tabernero, Josep; Zalcberg, John; Chau, Ian; Cascinu, Stefano; Cheng, Rebecca; Hsu, Yanzhi; Emig, Michael; Orlando, Mauro; Fuchs, Charles

    2017-09-29

    REGARD and RAINBOW were global, phase 3, randomized, double-blind trials of second-line ramucirumab for metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Exploratory subgroup analyses were described to assess the efficacy and safety of ramucirumab in REGARD and RAINBOW in young (≤ 45 and RAINBOW). Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plots assessed efficacy and adverse events by age groups for ramucirumab versus placebo. The hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival favored treatment with ramucirumab: REGARD ≤ 45 years (HR: 0.59, 95% confidence interval: 0.27-1.26), RAINBOW ≤ 45 years (0.56, 0.33-0.93), RAINBOW (0.97, 0.47-2.01); however, patient numbers were low in this subgroup (n = 36). Similar findings were observed for progression-free survival, for which HRs numerically favored ramucirumab-treated patients. Adverse events (including grade ≥ 3) were not associated with age. In comparison with placebo, ramucirumab conferred improvements in efficacy across age groups with a tolerable safety profile. Despite some limitations, these exploratory analyses support the use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer, irrespective of age. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Rai, Bhavana; Cooper, Rachel; Dörr, Wolfgang; Nout, Remi A.; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Cancer Centre, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dörr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle; and others

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  8. Laser treatment of drusen to prevent progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgili, Gianni; Michelessi, Manuele; Parodi, Maurizio B; Bacherini, Daniela; Evans, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Background Drusen are amorphous yellowish deposits beneath the sensory retina. People with drusen, particularly large drusen, are at higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most common complication in AMD is choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), the growth of new blood vessels in the centre of the macula. The risk of CNV is higher among people who are already affected by CNV in one eye. It has been observed clinically that laser photocoagulation of drusen leads to their disappearance and may prevent the occurrence of advanced disease (CNV or geographic atrophy) associated with visual loss. Objectives To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of laser photocoagulation of drusen in AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 August 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment of drusen in AMD in which laser treatment had been compared with no intervention or sham treatment. Two types of trials were included. Some trials studied one eye of each participant (unilateral studies); other studies recruited participants with bilateral drusen and randomised one eye to photocoagulation or control and the fellow eye to the other group. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently

  9. Alterations in mouse hypothalamic adipokine gene expression and leptin signaling following chronic spinal cord injury and with advanced age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E Bigford

    Full Text Available Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI results in an accelerated trajectory of several cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors and related aging characteristics, however the molecular mechanisms that are activated have not been explored. Adipokines and leptin signaling are known to play a critical role in neuro-endocrine regulation of energy metabolism, and are now implicated in central inflammatory processes associated with CVD. Here, we examine hypothalamic adipokine gene expression and leptin signaling in response to chronic spinal cord injury and with advanced age. We demonstrate significant changes in fasting-induced adipose factor (FIAF, resistin (Rstn, long-form leptin receptor (LepRb and suppressor of cytokine-3 (SOCS3 gene expression following chronic SCI and with advanced age. LepRb and Jak2/stat3 signaling is significantly decreased and the leptin signaling inhibitor SOCS3 is significantly elevated with chronic SCI and advanced age. In addition, we investigate endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and activation of the uncoupled protein response (UPR as a biological hallmark of leptin resistance. We observe the activation of the ER stress/UPR proteins IRE1, PERK, and eIF2alpha, demonstrating leptin resistance in chronic SCI and with advanced age. These findings provide evidence for adipokine-mediated inflammatory responses and leptin resistance as contributing to neuro-endocrine dysfunction and CVD risk following SCI and with advanced age. Understanding the underlying mechanisms contributing to SCI and age related CVD may provide insight that will help direct specific therapeutic interventions.

  10. An overview on age related macular degeneration and recent advances in its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOBIA N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a condition characterized, in the early stages, by slow development and progression, absence of symptoms over a number of years, and extensive retinal deposits called drusen, often associated with pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD.There is strong and consistent evidence that increasing age, family history, obesity/high body mass index, and cataract surgery are associated with late AMD. Smoking is the strongest and most consistently found modifiable risk factor for late AMD.Age-related macular degeneration remains one of the most severe and profound disabilities encountered in medicine, particularly due to the loss of the central vision and the high economic burden it places on patients and societies.Recent advances in management of AMD is anti-angiogenic drugs. The identification of the crucial role played by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the pathogenesis of wet AMD hasallowed the development of VEGF-blocking agents such as bevacizumab, pegaptanib and ranibizumab.

  11. Cardiac disease and advanced age increase the mortality risk following surgery for periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märdian, S; Perka, C; Schaser, K-D; Gruner, J; Scheel, F; Schwabe, P

    2017-07-01

    Periprosthetic fracture is a significant complication of total hip and knee arthroplasty. This study aimed to describe the survival of patients sustaining periprosthetic femoral fractures and compare this with that of the general population, as well as to identify the factors that influence survival. A total of 151 patients (women: men 116:35, mean age 74.6 years, standard deviation 11.5) that sustained a periprosthetic fracture between January 2005 and October 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Epidemiological data, comorbidities, type of surgical management, type of implant, and mortality data were studied. The mean survival time was 77 months (95% confidence interval 71 to 84; numbers at risk: 73) and was lower than that of the general population. The risk analyses showed that previous cardiac disease, particularly ischaemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, and heart failure, age over 75 years and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores above 3 were associated with a significantly higher mortality. Periprosthetic fractures carry a high risk of post-operative mortality. Our data demonstrate that advanced age (> 75 years) and previous cardiac disease are associated with a significantly higher risk of mortality. The ASA score is an appropriate instrument for risk stratification. Pre-operative cardiac status should be optimised before surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:921-6. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. NUCare: Advancing research on technological integration for self-management in the aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Kristin E; Guthrie, Barbara J; Henderson, Elizabeth L; Jimison, Holly B; Sceppa, Carmen; Pavel, Misha; Gordon, Christine; Fulmer, Terry

    2017-11-15

    The Center for Technology in Support of Self-Management and Health (NUCare) is an exploratory research center funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research's P20 mechanism positioned to conduct rigorous research on the integration of technology in the self-management of the older adult population. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and application of an evaluation plan and preliminary evaluation results from the first year of implementation. This evaluation plan is derived from and is consistent with Dorsey et al.'s (2014) logic model. Dorsey's model provided guidelines for evaluating sustainability, leveraging of resources, and interdisciplinary collaboration within the center. Preliminary results and strategies for addressing findings from the first year of evaluation are discussed. A secondary aim of this paper is to showcase the relevance of this center to the advancement and maintenance of health in the aging population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cable aging and condition monitoring of radiation resistant nano-dielectrics in advanced reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) nanocomposites have been developed in an effort to improve cable insulation lifetime to serve in both instrument cables and auxiliary power systems in advanced reactor applications as well as to provide an alternative for new or retro-fit cable insulation installations. Nano-dielectrics composed of different weight percentages of MgO & SiO2 have been subjected to radiation at accumulated doses approaching 20 MRad and thermal aging temperatures exceeding 100 C. Depending on the composition, the performance of the nanodielectric insulation was influenced, both positively and negatively, when quantified with respect to its electrical and mechanical properties. For virgin unradiated or thermally aged samples, XLPE nanocomposites with 1wt.% SiO2 showed improvement in breakdown strength and reduction in its dissipation factor when compared to pure undoped XLPE, while XLPE 3wt.% SiO2 resulted in lower breakdown strength. When aged in air at 120 C, retention of electrical breakdown strength and dissipation factor was observed for XLPE 3wt.% MgO nanocomposites. Irrespective of the nanoparticle species, XLPE nanocomposites that were gamma irradiated up to the accumulated dose of 18 MRad showed a significant drop in breakdown strength especially for particle concentrations greater than 3 wt.%. Additional attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy measurements suggest changes in the structure of the XLPE SiO2 nanocomposites associated with the interaction of silicon and oxygen. Discussion on the relevance of property changes with respect to cable aging and condition monitoring is presented.

  14. Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End Products as a Molecular Mechanism for Aging as a Risk Factor in Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J. de; Verzijl, N.; Wenting-Wijk, M.J.G. van; Jacobs, K.M.G.; El, B. van; Roermund, P.M. van; Bank, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent and disabling chronic conditions affecting the elderly. Its etiology is largely unknown, but age is the most prominent risk factor. The current study was designed to test whether accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which

  15. Modelling 3D crack propagation in ageing graphite bricks of Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Tuyet-Giang Vo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, crack propagation in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR graphite bricks with ageing properties is studied using the eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM. A parametric study for crack propagation, including the influence of different initial crack shapes and propagation criteria, is conducted. The results obtained in the benchmark study show that the crack paths from X-FEM are similar to the experimental ones. The accuracy of the strain energy release rate computation in a heterogeneous material is also evaluated using a finite difference approach. Planar and non-planar 3D crack growth simulations are presented to demonstrate the robustness and the versatility of the method utilized. Finally, this work contributes to the better understanding of crack propagation behaviour in AGR graphite bricks and so contributes to the extension of the AGR plants’ lifetimes in the UK by reducing uncertainties.

  16. An advanced glycation end product (AGE)-receptor for AGEs (RAGE) axis restores adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes through modulation of p53 protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Abell, Allison Martorano; Moon, Yang Soo; Kim, Kee-Hong

    2012-12-28

    The impaired adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes is a hallmark of adipose aging and aging-related adipose dysfunction. Although advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from both foods and endogenous nonenzymatic glycation and AGE-associated signaling pathways are known to play a key role in aging and its related diseases, the role of AGEs in adipose aging remains elusive. We show a novel pro-adipogenic function of AGEs in replicative senescent preadipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as primary preadipocytes isolated from aged mice. Using glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein of AGEs, we found that glycated BSA restores the impaired adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes in vitro and ex vivo. However, glycated BSA showed no effect on adipogenesis in nonsenescent preadipocytes. The AGE-induced receptor for AGE (RAGE) expression is required for the pro-adipogenic function of AGEs in senescent preadipocytes. RAGE is required for impairment of p53 expression and p53 function in regulating p21 expression in senescent preadipocytes. We also observed a direct binding between RAGE and p53 in senescent preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel pro-adipogenic function of the AGE-RAGE axis in p53-regulated adipogenesis of senescent preadipocytes, providing new insights into aging-dependent adiposity by diet-driven and/or endogenous glycated proteins.

  17. The impact of advancing age on postoperative outcomes in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kevin; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Qin, Charles; Kim, John Y

    2015-11-01

    Age has been shown to be an independent predictor of complications in general surgery patients. In contrast, the effect of age on outcomes after plastic surgery has yet to be confirmed or refuted. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate a possible association between age and postoperative outcomes after plastic surgery. The 2005-2012 NSQIP database was retrospectively reviewed for all patients undergoing plastic surgery. Patients ≥60 years with procedures under the category of plastic surgery in NSQIP were selected for analysis. The primary outcome of interest was 30-day overall complication rates. Multivariate regression models were constructed to control for potential perioperative confounders. Of the 2,320,920 patients captured in the NSQIP database, 36,819 patients underwent plastic surgery and met inclusion criteria. The incidence of unadjusted overall complications increased with age with an overall complication rate of 9.0% in patients plastic surgery. Medical complications and mortality were more likely in extremes of age (>80 years). Age alone should not be included as a decisional factor in patients plastic surgery. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials In total, 744...... the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired...... treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema...

  19. Internet Use and Psychological Well-Being at Advanced Age: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, David; Cervantes, Alejandro; Sáez, Yago; Isasi, Pedro

    2018-03-09

    This work explores the connection between psychological well-being and Internet use in older adults. The study is based on a sample of 2314 participants in the English Longitudinal Study of Aging. The subjects, aged 50 years and older, were interviewed every two years over the 2006-2007 to 2014-2015 period. The connection between the use of Internet/Email and the main dimensions of psychological well-being (evaluative, hedonic and eudaimonic) was analyzed by means of three generalized estimating equation models that were fitted on 2-year lagged repeated measurements. The outcome variables, the scores on three well-being scales, were explained in terms of Internet/Email use, controlling for covariates that included health and socioeconomic indicators. The results support the existence of a direct relationship between Internet/Email use and psychological well-being. The connection between the main predictor and the score of the participants on the scale used to measure the eudaimonic aspect was positive and statistically significant at conventional levels ( p -value: 0.015). However, the relevance of digital literacy on the evaluative and the hedonic components could not be confirmed ( p -values for evaluative and hedonic dimensions were 0.078 and 0.192, respectively).

  20. Internet Use and Psychological Well-Being at Advanced Age: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quintana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the connection between psychological well-being and Internet use in older adults. The study is based on a sample of 2314 participants in the English Longitudinal Study of Aging. The subjects, aged 50 years and older, were interviewed every two years over the 2006–2007 to 2014–2015 period. The connection between the use of Internet/Email and the main dimensions of psychological well-being (evaluative, hedonic and eudaimonic was analyzed by means of three generalized estimating equation models that were fitted on 2-year lagged repeated measurements. The outcome variables, the scores on three well-being scales, were explained in terms of Internet/Email use, controlling for covariates that included health and socioeconomic indicators. The results support the existence of a direct relationship between Internet/Email use and psychological well-being. The connection between the main predictor and the score of the participants on the scale used to measure the eudaimonic aspect was positive and statistically significant at conventional levels (p-value: 0.015. However, the relevance of digital literacy on the evaluative and the hedonic components could not be confirmed (p-values for evaluative and hedonic dimensions were 0.078 and 0.192, respectively.

  1. Accumulation of advanced glycation end (AGEs products in intensive care patients: an observational, prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommes Johannes H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in the course and eventual outcome in a majority of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. Markers to estimate oxidative stress are not readily available in a clinical setting. AGEs accumulation has been merely described in chronic conditions, but can also occur acutely due to oxidative stress. Since AGEs have emerged to be stable end products, these can be a marker of oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (AF is a validated marker of tissue content of AGEs. We hypothesized that AGEs accumulate acutely in ICU patients. Methods We performed an observational prospective study in a medical surgical ICU in a university affiliated teaching hospital. All consecutively admitted ICU patients in a 2 month period were included. Skin AF was measured using an AGE reader in 35 consecutive ICU patients > 18 yrs. As a comparison, historical data of a control group (n = 231 were used. These were also used to calculate age-adjusted AF-levels (AFadj. Values are expressed as median and interquartile range [P25-P75]. Differences between groups were tested by non parametric tests. P Results AFadj values were higher in ICU patients (0.33 [0.00 - 0.68] than in controls (-0.07 [-0.29 - 0.24]; P adj were observed between acute or planned admissions, or presence of sepsis, nor was skin AFadj related to severity of disease as estimated by APACHE-II score, length of ICU, hospital stay or mortality. Conclusion Acute AGE accumulation in ICU patients was shown in this study, although group size was small. This can possibly reflect oxidative stress in ICU patients. Further studies should reveal whether AGE-accumulation will be a useful parameter in ICU patients and whether skin AF has a predictive value for outcome, which was not shown in this small study.

  2. Resveratrol Enhances Neuroplastic Changes, Including Hippocampal Neurogenesis, and Memory in Balb/C Mice at Six Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pérez, Mario; Tellez-Ballesteros, Ruth Ivonne; Ortiz-López, Leonardo; Ichwan, Muhammad; Vega-Rivera, Nelly Maritza; Castro-García, Mario; Gómez-Sánchez, Ariadna; Kempermann, Gerd; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabe

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RVTL) is a flavonoid found in red wine and has been publicized heavily as an anti-aging compound. Indeed, basic research confirms that although there is much hype in the promotion of RVTL, flavonoids such as RVTL have a wide range of biological effects. We here investigated the effects of RVTL treatment on hippocampal plasticity and memory performance in female Balb/C mice, a strain with low baseline levels of adult neurogenesis. Two weeks of treatment with RVTL (40 mg/kg) induced the production of new neurons in vivo by increasing cell survival and possibly precursor cell proliferation. In addition, RVTL decreased the number of apoptotic cells. The number of doublecortin (DCX)-expressing intermediate cells was increased. RVTL stimulated neuronal differentiation in vitro without effects on proliferation. In the dentate gyrus, RVTL promoted the formation and maturation of spines on granule cell dendrites. RVTL also improved performance in the step down passive avoidance test. The RVTL-treated mice showed increase in the levels of two key signaling proteins, phospho-Akt and phospho-PKC, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways. Our results support the vision that flavonoids such as resveratrol deserve further examination as plasticity-inducing compounds in the context of successful cognitive aging. PMID:26695764

  3. Resveratrol Enhances Neuroplastic Changes, Including Hippocampal Neurogenesis, and Memory in Balb/C Mice at Six Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pérez, Mario; Tellez-Ballesteros, Ruth Ivonne; Ortiz-López, Leonardo; Ichwan, Muhammad; Vega-Rivera, Nelly Maritza; Castro-García, Mario; Gómez-Sánchez, Ariadna; Kempermann, Gerd; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabe

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RVTL) is a flavonoid found in red wine and has been publicized heavily as an anti-aging compound. Indeed, basic research confirms that although there is much hype in the promotion of RVTL, flavonoids such as RVTL have a wide range of biological effects. We here investigated the effects of RVTL treatment on hippocampal plasticity and memory performance in female Balb/C mice, a strain with low baseline levels of adult neurogenesis. Two weeks of treatment with RVTL (40 mg/kg) induced the production of new neurons in vivo by increasing cell survival and possibly precursor cell proliferation. In addition, RVTL decreased the number of apoptotic cells. The number of doublecortin (DCX)-expressing intermediate cells was increased. RVTL stimulated neuronal differentiation in vitro without effects on proliferation. In the dentate gyrus, RVTL promoted the formation and maturation of spines on granule cell dendrites. RVTL also improved performance in the step down passive avoidance test. The RVTL-treated mice showed increase in the levels of two key signaling proteins, phospho-Akt and phospho-PKC, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways. Our results support the vision that flavonoids such as resveratrol deserve further examination as plasticity-inducing compounds in the context of successful cognitive aging.

  4. Resveratrol Enhances Neuroplastic Changes, Including Hippocampal Neurogenesis, and Memory in Balb/C Mice at Six Months of Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Torres-Pérez

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RVTL is a flavonoid found in red wine and has been publicized heavily as an anti-aging compound. Indeed, basic research confirms that although there is much hype in the promotion of RVTL, flavonoids such as RVTL have a wide range of biological effects. We here investigated the effects of RVTL treatment on hippocampal plasticity and memory performance in female Balb/C mice, a strain with low baseline levels of adult neurogenesis. Two weeks of treatment with RVTL (40 mg/kg induced the production of new neurons in vivo by increasing cell survival and possibly precursor cell proliferation. In addition, RVTL decreased the number of apoptotic cells. The number of doublecortin (DCX-expressing intermediate cells was increased. RVTL stimulated neuronal differentiation in vitro without effects on proliferation. In the dentate gyrus, RVTL promoted the formation and maturation of spines on granule cell dendrites. RVTL also improved performance in the step down passive avoidance test. The RVTL-treated mice showed increase in the levels of two key signaling proteins, phospho-Akt and phospho-PKC, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways. Our results support the vision that flavonoids such as resveratrol deserve further examination as plasticity-inducing compounds in the context of successful cognitive aging.

  5. Age-related changes in trunk neuromuscular activation patterns during a controlled functional transfer task include amplitude and temporal synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, D Adam; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2014-12-01

    While healthy aging is associated with physiological changes that can impair control of trunk motion, few studies examine how spinal muscle responses change with increasing age. This study examined whether older (over 65 years) compared to younger (20-45 years) adults had higher overall amplitude and altered temporal recruitment patterns of trunk musculature when performing a functional transfer task. Surface electromyograms from twelve bilateral trunk muscle (24) sites were analyzed using principal component analysis, extracting amplitude and temporal features (PCs) from electromyographic waveforms. Two PCs explained 96% of the waveform variance. Three factor ANOVA models tested main effects (group, muscle and reach) and interactions for PC scores. Significant (pactivity, demonstrated continuous activation levels in specific muscle sites despite changing external moments, and had altered temporal synergies within abdominal and back musculature. In summary both older and younger adults recruit highly organized activation patterns in response to changing external moments. Differences in temporal trunk musculature recruitment patterns suggest that older adults experience different dynamic spinal stiffness and loading compared to younger adults during a functional lifting task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Revised stratigraphy of Area 123, Koobi Fora, Kenya, and new age estimates of its fossil mammals, including hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathogo, Patrick N; Brown, Francis H

    2006-11-01

    Recent geologic study shows that all hominins and nearly all other published mammalian fossils from Paleontological Collection Area 123, Koobi Fora, Kenya, derive from levels between the KBS Tuff (1.87+/-0.02 Ma) and the Lower Ileret Tuff (1.53+/-0.01 Ma). More specifically, the fossils derive from 53 m of section below the Lower Ileret Tuff, an interval in which beds vary markedly laterally, especially those units containing molluscs and algal stromatolites. The upper Burgi Member (approximately 2.00-1.87 Ma) crops out only in the southwestern part of Area 123. Adjacent Area 110 contains larger exposures of the member, and there the KBS Tuff is preserved as an airfall ash in lacustrine deposits and also as a fluvially redeposited ash. We observed no mammalian fossils in situ in this member in Area 123, but surface specimens have been documented in some monographic treatments. Fossil hominins from Area 123 were attributed to strata above the KBS Tuff in the 1970s, but later they were assigned to strata below the KBS Tuff (now called the upper Burgi Member). This study definitively places the Area 123 hominins in the KBS Member. Most of these hominins are between 1.60 and 1.65 myr in age, but the youngest may date to only 1.53 Ma, and the oldest, to 1.75 Ma. All are 0.15-0.30 myr younger than previously estimated. The new age estimates, in conjunction with published taxonomic attributions of fossils, suggest that at least two species of Homo coexisted in the region along with A. boisei until at least 1.65 Ma. Comparison of crania KNM-ER 1813 and KNM-ER 1470, which were believed to be of comparable age, is at the focus of the debate over whether Homo habilis sensu lato is in fact composed of two species: Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis. These two crania are separated in time by approximately 0.25 myr, and therefore, arguments for their conspecificity no longer need to confront the issue of unusually high contemporaneous variation within a single species.

  7. Recent advances in the study of age-related hearing loss - A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ambrose R; Bao, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common age-associated affliction that can result from the loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the cochlea. Although hair cells and SGNs are typically lost in the same cochlea, recent analysis suggests that they can occur independently, via unique mechanisms. Research has identified both environmental and genetic factors that contribute to degeneration of cochlear cells. Additionally, molecular analysis has identified multiple cell signaling mechanisms that likely contribute to pathological changes that result in hearing deficiencies. These analyses should serve as useful primers for future work, including genomic and proteomic analysis, to elucidate the mechanisms driving cell loss in the aging cochlea. Significant progress in this field has occurred in the past decade. As our understanding of aging-induced cochlear changes continues to improve, our ability to offer medical intervention will surely benefit the growing elderly population. PMID:22710288

  8. Morphometric changes in the aortic arch with advancing age in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Chihiro; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Tsunoda, Nobuo; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-28

    Aortic rupture is a well recognized cause of sudden death in thoroughbred horses. Some microscopic lesions, such as those caused by cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis, can lead to aortic rupture. However, these microscopic lesions are also observed in normal horses. On the other hand, a previous study of aortic rupture suggested that underlying elastin and collagen deposition disorders might be associated with aortic rupture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the structural components of the tunica media of the aortic arch, which is composed of elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells and mucopolysaccharides (MPS), in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses. The percentage area of elastin was greatest in the young horses and subsequently decreased with aging. The percentage area of collagen increased with aging, and the elderly horses (aged ≥20) exhibited significantly higher percentage areas of collagen than the young horses. The percentage area of smooth muscle cells did not change with age. The percentage area of MPS was inversely proportional to the percentage area of elastin. The fetuses exhibited a markedly larger percentage area of MPS than the mature horses. We concluded that the medial changes seen in the aortic arch, which included a reduction in the amount of elastin and increases in the amounts of collagen and MPS, were age-related variations.

  9. Multimodal Therapy including Yttrium-90 Radioembolization as a Bridging Therapy to Liver Transplantation for a Huge and Locally Advanced Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayar, Michel; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Houssel-Debry, Pauline; Camus, Christophe; Sulpice, Laurent; Boudjema, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma remains a major challenge. For an unresectable lesion without extrahepatic spread, liver transplantation could be a potential solution but it is still associated with poor oncologic results owing to the absence of effective neoadjuvant treatment. We report the case of a young man with locally advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting with multiple intrahepatic metastases and vascular structure involvement. The lesion was significantly downstaged by a multimodal therapy including intra-arterial Yttrium-90 radioembolization, systemic chemotherapy and external radiotherapy, allowing liver transplantation. Three years after the procedure, oncologic outcome is excellent with no sign of recurrence. Multimodal therapy including Yttrium-90 radioembolization could be relevant as neoadjuvant treatment before liver transplantation for unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

  10. Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program including the adjunct programs of design reconstitution and material condition and aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This standard presents program criteria and implementation guidance for an operational configuration management program for DOE nuclear and non-nuclear facilities in the operational phase. Portions of this standard are also useful for other DOE processes, activities, and programs. This Part 1 contains foreword, glossary, acronyms, bibliography, and Chapter 1 on operational configuration management program principles. Appendices are included on configuration management program interfaces, and background material and concepts for operational configuration management

  11. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs Antibody Protects Against AGEs-induced Apoptosis and NF-ĸB p65 Subunit Overexpression in Rat Glomerular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavia Rahayu Adianingsih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs have been thought to be a major cause of diabetic nephropathy (DN. The mechanisms underlying the involvement of AGEs antibody in diabetic nephropathy are not fully understood. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of AGEs antibody on AGEs-induced glomerular damage. Isolated glomeruli were pre-incubated either with 10 µg/mL polyclonal anti-AGEs antibody (AGE-pAb or monoclonal anti-Nɜ -carboxymethyl-lysine antibody (CML-mAb as a model of AGEs antibody to block interaction of AGEs with receptor for AGEs (RAGE and incubated afterwards either with 100 µg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA or AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA for 48 h. Annexin V/nephrin doublestaining was performed to determine apoptosis. Using immunofluorescence, we found that administration of AGE-BSA not only significantly increased glomerular cells apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-ĸB p65 expression, but also reduced expression of nephrin, an important structural and signal molecule of podocytes slit diaphragm. Blocking the interaction of AGE-RAGE with AGEs antibody significantly protected glomerular cells from AGEs-induced apoptosis and NF-ĸB p65 overexpression. We found that AGE-pAb conferred superior protective effect compared with CmL-mAb for the same reduction in apoptosis and NF-ĸB p65 expression. In sharp contrast, CmL-mAb led to preserve expression of podocytes nephrin better than AGE-pAb. These results demonstrate that the antibody against AGEs may be beneficial for preventing the glomerular damage in DN.

  12. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS - ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS. INCLUDES THE SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 01, 1998 - JUNE 30, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature; Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined; Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (T{sub cv}) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt; Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles; Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems; and Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

  13. Elemental Music and Dance Pedagogy (EMDP: Artistic and Pedagogical Opportunities for People in Advanced Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Schönherr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Age and ageing are issues of high significance in our times, and lead us to ask how this prolonged lifespan can be spent in a most self-determined, meaningful and satisfying way. The author’s personal approach to working with this age group is described and complemented by personal reflections on this subject. The many objectives include non-musical goals as well as music-oriented objectives which can instigate valuable and satisfying musical experiences of a high quality. Fundamental principles include: becoming a player – taking an active part; the interplay of music, speech, movement and dance; improvisation and forms. Important parts of sessions are described as well as their goals: the greeting ritual is of importance and warm-up exercises can be offered using movement or body percussion. Singing well-known songs as well as new ones, and playing Orff instruments are valuable activities. Movement is also an important part of the sessions where diverse objects such as gloves, sticks or peacock feathers are used. The Orff approach has the wonderful advantage of being multifaceted, putting emphasis on improvisation and individual creativity which allows making music according to one’s own abilities – something that is important for elderly people – and offering many different impulses to feel, to live and physically express music.

  14. Oocyte donation is an independent risk factor for pregnancy complications: the implications for women of advanced age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Johnny S; Laufer, Neri

    2015-02-01

    Maternal age at first pregnancy and age-related infertility are steadily increasing, and the demand for assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to treat age-related infertility is also on the rise. The latest registry findings from Europe and the United States show that the meager results of ART in women above 43 years of age have not improved much over the past 10 years. The latest evidence shows that the demand for oocyte donation (OD) is steadily increasing. Contrary to previous belief-attributing increased perinatal complications in OD recipients to advanced maternal age and multifetal pregnancy-accumulating evidence from the past few years suggests that OD itself is a significant and independent risk factor for pregnancy complications, mostly for pre-eclampsia. The increased rate of chronic maternal disease and medical complications in pregnancy observed in advanced maternal age, coupled with the growing demand for OD, with its independent association with pre-eclampsia, create an urgent need to adopt a clear policy taking these risks into account. We present recent evidence showing that OD is an independent risk factor for pre-eclampsia and suggest recommendations for women approaching OD treatment in advanced age.

  15. Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs Accumulation by Pyridoxamine Modulates Glomerular and Mesangial Cell Estrogen Receptor α Expression in Aged Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pereira-Simon

    Full Text Available Age-related increases in oxidant stress (OS play a role in regulation of estrogen receptor (ER expression in the kidneys. In this study, we establish that in vivo 17β-estradiol (E2 replacement can no longer upregulate glomerular ER expression by 21 months of age in female mice (anestrous. We hypothesized that advanced glycation end product (AGE accumulation, an important source of oxidant stress, contributes to these glomerular ER expression alterations. We treated 19-month old ovariectomized female mice with pyridoxamine (Pyr, a potent AGE inhibitor, in the presence or absence of E2 replacement. Glomerular ERα mRNA expression was upregulated in mice treated with both Pyr and E2 replacement and TGFβ mRNA expression decreased compared to controls. Histological sections of kidneys demonstrated decreased type IV collagen deposition in mice receiving Pyr and E2 compared to placebo control mice. In addition, anti-AGE defenses Sirtuin1 (SIRT1 and advanced glycation receptor 1 (AGER1 were also upregulated in glomeruli following treatment with Pyr and E2. Mesangial cells isolated from all groups of mice demonstrated similar ERα, SIRT1, and AGER1 expression changes to those of whole glomeruli. To demonstrate that AGE accumulation contributes to the observed age-related changes in the glomeruli of aged female mice, we treated mesangial cells from young female mice with AGE-BSA and found similar downregulation of ERα, SIRT1, and AGER1 expression. These results suggest that inhibition of intracellular AGE accumulation with pyridoxamine may protect glomeruli against age-related oxidant stress by preventing an increase of TGFβ production and by regulation of the estrogen receptor.

  16. Consequences of advanced aging on renal function in chronic hyperandrogenemic female rat model: implications for aging women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Chetan N; Racusen, Lorraine C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine and reproductive disorder in premenopausal women, characterized by hyperandrogenemia, metabolic syndrome, and inflammation. Women who had PCOS during their reproductive years remain hyperandrogenemic after menopause. The consequence of chronic hyperandrogenemia with advanced aging has not been studied to our knowledge. We have characterized a model of hyperandrogenemia in female rats and have aged them to 22-25 months to mimic advanced aging in hyperandrogenemic women, and tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to hyperandrogenemia with aging has a deleterious effect on renal function. Female rats were chronically implanted with dihydrotestosterone pellets (DHT 7.5 mg/90 days) that were changed every 85 days or placebo pellets, and renal function was measured by clearance methods. Aging DHT-treated females had a threefold higher level of DHT with significantly higher body weight, mean arterial pressure, left kidney weight, proteinuria, and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), than did age-matched controls. In addition, DHT-treated-old females had a 60% reduction in glomerular filtration rate, 40% reduction in renal plasma flow, and significant reduction in urinary nitrate and nitrite excretion (UNOxV), an index of nitric oxide production. Morphological examination of kidneys showed that old DHT-treated females had significant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, global sclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis compared to controls. Thus chronic hyperandrogenemia that persists into old age in females is associated with renal injury. These data suggest that women with chronic hyperandrogenemia such as in PCOS may be at increased risk for development of chronic kidney disease with advanced age. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Does advancing male age influence the expression levels and localisation patterns of phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) in human sperm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yelumalai, Suseela; Mounce, Ginny; da Silva, Sarah J Martins; Child, Tim; Coward, Kevin

    2016-06-08

    Socio-economic factors have led to an increasing trend for couples to delay parenthood. However, advancing age exerts detrimental effects upon gametes which can have serious consequences upon embryo viability. While such effects are well documented for the oocyte, relatively little is known with regard to the sperm. One fundamental role of sperm is to activate the oocyte at fertilisation, a process initiated by phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein. While PLCζ deficiency can lead to oocyte activation deficiency and infertility, it is currently unknown whether the expression or function of PLCζ is compromised by advancing male age. Here, we evaluate sperm motility and the proportion of sperm expressing PLCζ in 71 males (22-54 years; 44 fertile controls and 27 infertile patients), along with total levels and localisation patterns of PLCζ within the sperm head. Three different statistical approaches were deployed with male age considered both as a categorical and a continuous factor. While progressive motility was negatively correlated with male age, all three statistical models concurred that no PLCζ-related parameter was associated with male age, suggesting that advancing male age is unlikely to cause problems in terms of the sperm's fundamental ability to activate an oocyte.

  18. Back Translation: An Emerging Sophisticated Cyber Strategy to Subvert Advances in "Digital Age" Plagiarism Detection and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael; Sheridan, Lynnaire

    2015-01-01

    Advances have been made in detecting and deterring the student plagiarism that has accompanied the uptake and development of the internet. Many authors from the late 1990s onwards grappled with plagiarism in the digital age, presenting articles that were provoking and established the foundation for strategies to address cyber plagiarism, including…

  19. Normative Scores and Factor Structure of the Profile of Mood States for Women Seeking Prenatal Diagnosis for Advanced Maternal Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunis, Sandra L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A sample of pregnant women (N=705) was given the monopolar version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) in prenatal counseling for advanced maternal age to develop normative data and to determine the factor structure of the POMS for this group of women in the first trimester of pregnancy. (SLD)

  20. YOUNGER AGE AT PRESENTATION IN CHILDREN WITH COATS DISEASE IS ASSOCIATED WITH MORE ADVANCED STAGE AND WORSE VISUAL PROGNOSIS: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daruich, Alejandra; Matet, Alexandre; Munier, Francis L

    2017-10-23

    To determine the age distribution of children with Coats disease and the impact of age at diagnosis on the visual prognosis. Consecutive Coats disease cases aged 18 years or younger at diagnosis were retrospectively included. Clinical and imaging parameters were analyzed by comparative, correlation, survival, univariate, and multivariate statistics. Ninety-eight patients were included. At diagnosis, mean age was 5.4 years ± 4.3 years (1 month-18 years). Younger age at diagnosis was correlated with more severe disease stage (P presentation in patients younger than 4 years (P presentation in younger than older patients (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.039). Foveal sparing at diagnosis was less frequent in younger than older patients (2% vs. 23%, P = 0.002). The incidence of structural complications or enucleation during follow-up (mean duration: 5.9 years ± 4.5 years) was higher, and last-recorded visual acuity was lower in younger than older patients (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0009). Final logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution visual acuity was negatively correlated with age at diagnosis (P = 0.001, Spearman r = -0.42). Multivariate analysis indicated that disease stage (P visual acuity. Onset of Coats disease in children of younger age is associated with more severe manifestations, more advanced stage, and worse visual outcome. Age, correlated with disease stage, should be considered a prognostic marker in Coats disease.

  1. Delirium in advanced age and dementia: A prolonged refractory course of delirium and lower functional status

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOETTGER, SOENKE; JENEWEIN, JOSEF; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2017-01-01

    Objective The factors associated with persistent delirium, in contrast to resolved delirium, have not been studied well. The aim of our present study was to identify the factors associated with delirium resolution as measured by the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) and functional improvement as measured by the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scale. Method All subjects were recruited from psychiatric referrals at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The two study instruments were performed at baseline (T1), at 2–3 days (T2), and at 4–7 days (T3). Subjects with persistent delirium were compared to those with resolved delirium in respect to sociodemographic and medical variables. Results Overall, 26 out of 111 patients had persistent delirium. These patients were older, predominantly male, and had more frequently preexisting comorbid dementia. Among cancer diagnoses and stage of illness, brain cancer and terminal illness contributed to persistent delirium or late response, whereas gastrointestinal cancer was associated with resolved delirium. Among etiologies, infection responded late to delirium management, usually at one week. Furthermore, delirium was more severe in patients with persistent delirium from baseline through one week. At baseline, MDAS scores were 20.1 in persistent delirium compared to 17 to 18.8 in resolved delirium (T2 and T3), and at one week of management (T3), MDAS scores were 15.2 and 4.7 to 7.4, respectively. At one week of management, persistent delirium manifested in more severe impairment in the domains of consciousness, cognition, organization, perception, psychomotor behavior, and sleep–wake cycle. In addition, persistent delirium caused more severe functional impairment. Significance of results In this delirium sample, advanced age and preexisting dementia, as well as brain cancer, terminal illness, infection, and delirium severity contributed to persistent delirium or late response, indicating a prolonged

  2. Beneficial effects of metformin and irbesartan on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-RAGE-induced proximal tubular cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis contributes to diabetic nephropathy. An oral hypoglycemic agent, metformin may have a potential effect on the inhibition of glycation reactions. Further, since a pathophysiological crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and AGEs-RAGE axis is involved in diabetic nephropathy, it is conceivable that metformin and irbesartan additively could protect against the AGEs-RAGE-induced tubular cell injury. In this study, we addressed the issues. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited the formation of AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared with AGEs-modified BSA prepared without metformin (AGEs-MF0), those prepared in the presence of 30 mM or 100 mM metformin (AGEs-MF30 or AGEs-MF100) significantly reduced RAGE mRNA level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β mRNA level in tubular cells. Irbesartan further inhibited the harmful effects of AGEs-MF0 or AGEs-MF30 on tubular cells. Our present study suggests that combination therapy with metformin and irbesartan may have therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy; it could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetes not only by inhibiting AGEs formation, but also by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulating RAGE expression and subsequently suppressing ROS generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical Properties and Simulated Aging of Silicone Maxillofacial Elastomers: Advancements in the Past 45 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Polyzois, Gregory L; Nuseir, Amjad; Hatamleh, Khaldoun; Alnazzawi, Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    To identify and discuss the findings of publications on mechanical behavior of maxillofacial prosthetic materials published since 1969. Original experimental articles reporting on mechanical properties of maxillofacial prosthetic materials were included. A two-stage search of the literature, electronic and hand search, identified relevant published studies up to May 2015. An extensive electronic search was conducted of databases including PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Included primary studies (n = 63) reported on tensile strength, tear strength, and hardness of maxillofacial prosthetic materials at baseline and after aging. The search revealed 63 papers, with more than 28 papers being published in the past 10 years, which shows an increased number of publications when compared to only 6 papers published in the 1970s. The increase is linear with significant correlation (r = 0.85). Such an increase reflects great awareness and continued developments and warrants more research in the field of maxillofacial prosthetic materials properties; however, it is difficult to directly compare results, as studies varied in maxillofacial prosthetic materials tested with various silicone elastomers being heavily investigated, standards followed in preparing test specimens, experimental testing protocols, and parameters used in setting simulated aging conditionings. It is imperative to overcome the existing variability by establishing unified national or international standards/specifications for maxillofacial prosthetic materials. Standardization organizations or bodies, the scientific community, and academia need to be coordinated to achieve this goal. In the meantime and despite all of these theoretically significant alternatives, clinical practice still faces problems with serviceability of maxillofacial prostheses. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Neurologic Serious Adverse Events Associated with Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab or Nivolumab Alone in Advanced Melanoma, Including a Case Series of Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, James; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Lao, Christopher D; Hodi, F Stephen; Sharfman, William; Weber, Jeffrey; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P M; Azevedo, Sergio; Li, Hewei; Reshef, Daniel; Avila, Alexandre; Reardon, David A

    2017-06-01

    Despite unprecedented efficacy across multiple tumor types, immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy is associated with a unique and wide spectrum of immune-related adverse events (irAEs), including neurologic events ranging from mild headache to potentially life-threatening encephalitis. Here, we summarize neurologic irAEs associated with nivolumab and ipilimumab melanoma treatment, present cases of treatment-related encephalitis, and provide practical guidance on diagnosis and management. We searched a Global Pharmacovigilance and Epidemiology database for neurologic irAEs reported over an 8-year period in patients with advanced melanoma receiving nivolumab with or without ipilimumab from 12 studies sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Serious neurologic irAEs were reviewed, and relationship to nivolumab or ipilimumab was assigned. In our search of 3,763 patients, 35 patients (0.93%) presented with 43 serious neurologic irAEs, including neuropathy ( n  = 22), noninfective meningitis ( n  = 5), encephalitis ( n  = 6), neuromuscular disorders ( n  = 3), and nonspecific adverse events ( n  = 7). Study drug was discontinued ( n  = 20), interrupted ( n  = 8), or unchanged ( n  = 7). Most neurologic irAEs resolved (26/35 patients; 75%). Overall, median time to onset was 45 days (range 1-170) and to resolution was 32 days (2-809+). Median time to onset of encephalitis was 55.5 days (range 18-297); four cases resolved and one was fatal. Both oncologists and neurologists need to be aware of signs and symptoms of serious but uncommon neurologic irAEs associated with checkpoint inhibitors. Prompt diagnosis and management using an established algorithm are critical to minimize serious complications from these neurologic irAEs. With increasing use of checkpoint inhibitors in cancer, practicing oncologists need to be aware of the potential risk of neurologic immune-related adverse events and be able to provide prompt treatment of this uncommon, but

  5. Advances in the Studies of Ginkgo Biloba Leaves Extract on Aging-Related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wei; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Li, Jiantao; Mei, Dan

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of degenerative disorders in public health has promoted in-depth investigations of the underlying pathogenesis and the development of new treatment drugs. Ginkgo biloba leaves extract (EGb) is obtained from Ginkgo biloba leaves and has been used for thousands of years. In recent decades, both basic and clinical studies have established the effects of EGb. It is widely used in various degenerative diseases such as cerebrovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, macroangiopathy and more. Here, we reviewed several pharmacological mechanisms of EGb, including its antioxidant properties, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunctions, and effect on apoptosis. We also described some clinical applications of EGb, such as its effect on neuro and cardiovascular protection, and anticancer properties. The above biological functions of EGb are mainly focused on aging-related disorders, but its effect on other diseases remains unclear. Thus, through this review, we aim to encourage further studies on EGb and discover more potential applications.

  6. Advances in the Studies of Ginkgo Biloba Leaves Extract on Aging-Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wei; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Li, Jiantao; Mei, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of degenerative disorders in public health has promoted in-depth investigations of the underlying pathogenesis and the development of new treatment drugs. Ginkgo biloba leaves extract (EGb) is obtained from Ginkgo biloba leaves and has been used for thousands of years. In recent decades, both basic and clinical studies have established the effects of EGb. It is widely used in various degenerative diseases such as cerebrovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, macroangiopathy and more. Here, we reviewed several pharmacological mechanisms of EGb, including its antioxidant properties, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunctions, and effect on apoptosis. We also described some clinical applications of EGb, such as its effect on neuro and cardiovascular protection, and anticancer properties. The above biological functions of EGb are mainly focused on aging-related disorders, but its effect on other diseases remains unclear. Thus, through this review, we aim to encourage further studies on EGb and discover more potential applications PMID:29344418

  7. Exploration of an Optimal Policy for Water Resources Management Including the Introduction of Advanced Sewage Treatment Technologies in Zaozhuang City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengyu He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Water shortage and water pollution are important factors restricting sustainable social and economic development. As a typical coal resource-exhausted city and a node city of the South-to-North Water Transfer East Route Project in China, Zaozhuang City’s water resources management faces multiple constraints such as transformation of economic development, restriction of groundwater exploitation, and improvement of water environment. In this paper, we develop a linear optimization model by input–output analysis to study water resources management with the introduction of three advanced sewage treatment technologies for pollutant treatment and reclaimed water production. The simulation results showed that from 2014 to 2020, Zaozhuang City will realize an annual GDP growth rate of 7.1% with an annual chemical oxygen demand (COD emissions reduction rate of 5.5%. The proportion of primary industry, secondary industry, and tertiary industry would be adjusted to 5.6%, 40.8%, and 53.6%, respectively. The amount of reclaimed water supply could be increased by 91% and groundwater supply could be decreased by 6%. Based on the simulation, this model proposes a scientific reference on water resources management policies, including water environment control, water supply plan, and financial subsidy, to realize the sustainable development of economy and water resources usage.

  8. Maternal educational status at birth, maternal educational advancement, and neurocognitive outcomes at age 10 years among children born extremely preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Robert M; O'Shea, Thomas M; Allred, Elizabeth N; Heeren, Tim; Kuban, Karl K

    2017-11-22

    BackgroundTo determine if a key marker of socioeconomic status, maternal education, is associated with later neurocognitive and academic outcomes among children born extremely preterm (EP).MethodEight hundred and seventy-three children born at 23 to 27 weeks of gestation were assessed for cognitive and academic ability at age 10 years. With adjustments for gestational age (GA) and potential confounders, outcomes of children whose mothers had fewer years of education at the time of delivery and children whose mother advanced in education between birth and 10 years were examined.ResultsChildren of mothers in the lowest education stratum at birth were significantly more likely to score ≥2 SDs below normative expectation on 17 of 18 tests administered. Children of mothers who advanced in education (n=199) were at reduced risk for scoring ≥2 SDs on 15 of 18 measures, but this reduction was statistically significant on only 2 of 18 measures.ConclusionAmong EP children, socioeconomic disadvantage at birth, indexed by maternal education, is associated with significantly poorer neurocognitive and academic outcomes at 10 years of age, independently of GA. Maternal educational advancement during the child's first 10 years of life is associated with modestly improved neurocognitive outcomes.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 22 November 2017; doi:10.1038/pr.2017.267.

  9. No psychological distress in sportsmen aged 45 years and older after cardiovascular screening, including cardiac CT : The Measuring Athlete's Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M. M.; Braber, T. L.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Doevendans, P. A. F. M.; Backx, F. J. G.; Grobbee, D. E.; Rienks, R.; Nathoe, H. M.; Bots, M. L.; Velthuis, B. K.; Mosterd, A.

    Background Psychological distress caused by cardiovascular pre-participation screening (PPS) may be a reason not to implement a PPS program. We assessed the psychological impact of PPS, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), in 318 asymptomatic sportsmen aged >= 45 years. Methods Coronary

  10. No psychological distress in sportsmen aged 45 years and older after cardiovascular screening, including cardiac CT : The Measuring Athlete’s Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M. M.; Braber, T. L.; Prakken, N. H J; Doevendans, P. A F M; Backx, F. J G; Grobbee, D. E.; Rienks, R.; Nathoe, H. M.; Bots, M. L.; Velthuis, B. K.; Mosterd, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychological distress caused by cardiovascular pre-participation screening (PPS) may be a reason not to implement a PPS program. We assessed the psychological impact of PPS, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), in 318 asymptomatic sportsmen aged ≥45 years. Methods Coronary artery

  11. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in children taking part in an oral health programme including fluoride tablet supplements from the age of 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersten, Charlotte; Pylvänen, Lena; Schröder, Ulla; Twetman, Svante; Wennhall, Inger; Matsson, Lars

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in children who had participated in an oral health programme between the ages 2-5 years, including fluoride tablets from the age of 2 years. The study group consisted of 135 10- to 11-year-old children who had participated in the programme, including parent education, tooth-brushing instruction and prescribed fluoride tablets (0.25 mg NaF) (2-3 years: 1 tablet/day; 3-5 years: 2 tablets/day). The prevalence of dental fluorosis in the study group was compared with that in a nonintervention reference group consisting of 129 children of the same ages. The analysis was based on photos of the permanent maxillary front teeth using the Thylstrup & Fejerskov (TF) Index. No statistically significant difference in prevalence of dental fluorosis was seen between the two groups. Forty-three percent of the children in the study group and 38% in the reference group had fluorosis, the majority of a mild nature (TF-score 1). None had a TF score above 2. The pattern was the same after correction for parent reported intake of tablets at 3 and 5 years of age. Introduction of fluoride tablets at the age of 2 years did not result in increased prevalence of dental fluorosis.

  12. Age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end-products-albumin, S100β, and the expressions of advanced glycation end product receptor differ in visceral and subcutaneous fat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Kuk Hui [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Myeongjoo [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Gachon University Graduate School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Functional Cellular Networks Laboratory, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyosang; Oh, Seyeon; Yum, Yoonji [Functional Cellular Networks Laboratory, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chang Hu [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kook Yang, E-mail: kkyypark@ghil.com [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Kyunghee, E-mail: khbyun1@gachon.ac.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Gachon University Graduate School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Functional Cellular Networks Laboratory, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-19

    Visceral fat induces more inflammation by activating macrophages than subcutaneous fat, and inflammation is an underlying feature of the pathogeneses of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), S100β, and their receptors, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), lead to macrophage activation. However, little information is available regarding the differential accumulations of AGE-albumin (serum albumin modified by AGEs), S100β, or expressions of RAGE in different adipocyte types in fat tissues. In this study, the authors investigated whether age-related AGE-albumin accumulations S100β level, and RAGE expressions differ in subcutaneous and visceral fat tissues. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were harvested from 3- and 28-week-old rats. Macrophage activation was confirmed by Iba1 staining, and AGE-albumin accumulations and RAGE expressions were assessed by confocal microscopy. S100β were analyzed by immunoblotting. It was found that activated macrophage infiltration, AGE-albumin accumulation, and S100β in visceral fat was significantly greater in 28-week-old rats than in 3-week-old rats, but similar in subcutaneous fat. The expression of RAGE in visceral fat was much greater in 28-week-old rats, but its expression in subcutaneous fat was similar in 3- and 28-week-old rats. Furthermore, inflammatory signal pathways (NFκB, TNF-α) and proliferation pathways (FAK) in visceral fat were more activated in 28-week-old rats. These results imply that age-related AGE-albumin accumulation, S100β, and RAGE expression are more prominent in visceral than in subcutaneous fat, suggesting that visceral fat is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced diseases in the elderly. - Highlights: • The age-related AGE-albumin accumulation and S100β were more prominent in visceral than subcutaneous fat. • The age-related RAGE expression were more prominent in visceral than subcutaneous fat.

  13. Age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end-products-albumin, S100β, and the expressions of advanced glycation end product receptor differ in visceral and subcutaneous fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Kuk Hui; Son, Myeongjoo; Ahn, Hyosang; Oh, Seyeon; Yum, Yoonji; Choi, Chang Hu; Park, Kook Yang; Byun, Kyunghee

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat induces more inflammation by activating macrophages than subcutaneous fat, and inflammation is an underlying feature of the pathogeneses of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), S100β, and their receptors, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), lead to macrophage activation. However, little information is available regarding the differential accumulations of AGE-albumin (serum albumin modified by AGEs), S100β, or expressions of RAGE in different adipocyte types in fat tissues. In this study, the authors investigated whether age-related AGE-albumin accumulations S100β level, and RAGE expressions differ in subcutaneous and visceral fat tissues. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were harvested from 3- and 28-week-old rats. Macrophage activation was confirmed by Iba1 staining, and AGE-albumin accumulations and RAGE expressions were assessed by confocal microscopy. S100β were analyzed by immunoblotting. It was found that activated macrophage infiltration, AGE-albumin accumulation, and S100β in visceral fat was significantly greater in 28-week-old rats than in 3-week-old rats, but similar in subcutaneous fat. The expression of RAGE in visceral fat was much greater in 28-week-old rats, but its expression in subcutaneous fat was similar in 3- and 28-week-old rats. Furthermore, inflammatory signal pathways (NFκB, TNF-α) and proliferation pathways (FAK) in visceral fat were more activated in 28-week-old rats. These results imply that age-related AGE-albumin accumulation, S100β, and RAGE expression are more prominent in visceral than in subcutaneous fat, suggesting that visceral fat is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced diseases in the elderly. - Highlights: • The age-related AGE-albumin accumulation and S100β were more prominent in visceral than subcutaneous fat. • The age-related RAGE expression were more prominent in visceral than subcutaneous fat.

  14. Advanced All-Gas Chemical Generation of Atomic Iodine for a COIL, and Testing the COIL Operation Including This Method of Atomic Iodine Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kodymova, Jarmila; Spalek, Otomar; Jirasek, Vit; Censky, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Academy of Sciences as follows: The Grantee will investigate advanced methods for chemical generation of atomic iodine for a Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL...

  15. Advancing maternal age predisposes to mitochondrial damage and loss during maturation of equine oocytes invitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rambags, B. P B; van Boxtel, D. C J; Tharasanit, T.; Lenstra, J. A.; Colenbrander, B.; Stout, T. A E

    2014-01-01

    In many mammalian species, reproductive success decreases with maternal age. One proposed contributor to this age-related decrease in fertility is a reduction in the quantity or functionality of mitochondria in oocytes. This study examined whether maternal age or (in vitro maturation). IVM affect

  16. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs accumulation in skin: relations with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Almeida França

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, main causes related with cardiovascular disease (CVD and bone mineral disorder (CKD-BMD. Uremic toxins, as advanced glycation end products (AGEs, are non-traditional cardiovascular risk factor and play a role on development of CKD-BMD in CKD. The measurement of skin autofluorescence (sAF is a noninvasive method to assess the level of AGEs in tissue, validated in CKD patients. Objective: The aim of this study is analyze AGEs measured by sAF levels (AGEs-sAF and its relations with CVD and BMD parameters in HD patients. Methods: Twenty prevalent HD patients (HD group and healthy subjects (Control group, n = 24, performed biochemical tests and measurements of anthropometric parameters and AGEs-sAF. In addition, HD group performed measurement of intact parathormone (iPTH, transthoracic echocardiogram and radiographies of pelvis and hands for vascular calcification score. Results: AGEs-sAF levels are elevated both in HD and control subjects ranged according to the age, although higher at HD than control group. Single high-flux HD session does not affect AGEs-sAF levels. AGEs-sAF levels were not related to ventricular mass, interventricular septum or vascular calcification in HD group. AGEs-sAF levels were negatively associated with serum iPTH levels. Conclusion: Our study detected a negative correlation of AGEs-sAF with serum iPTH, suggesting a role of AGEs on the pathophysiology of bone disease in HD prevalent patients. The nature of this relation and the clinical application of this non-invasive methodology for evaluation AGEs deposition must be confirmed and clarified in future studies.

  17. Interaction between FOXO1A-209 Genotype and Tea Drinking is Significantly Associated with Reduced Mortality at Advanced Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Ni, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Based on the genotypic/phenotypic data from Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) and Cox proportional hazard model, the present study demonstrates that interactions between carrying FOXO1A-209 genotypes and tea drinking are significantly associated with lower risk of mortality...... at advanced ages. Such significant association is replicated in two independent Han Chinese CLHLS cohorts (p =0.028-0.048 in the discovery and replication cohorts, and p =0.003-0.016 in the combined dataset). We found the associations between tea drinking and reduced mortality are much stronger among carriers...... of the FOXO1A-209 genotype compared to non-carriers, and drinking tea is associated with a reversal of the negative effects of carrying FOXO1A-209 minor alleles, that is, from a substantially increased mortality risk to substantially reduced mortality risk at advanced ages. The impacts are considerably...

  18. Advanced paternal age and risk of fetal death: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Kasper Daniel; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2004-01-01

    A possible detrimental paternal age effect on offspring health due to mutations of paternal origin should be reflected in an association between paternal age and fetal loss. The authors used data from a prospective study of 23,821 pregnant women recruited consecutively to the Danish National Birth...... analysis. Pregnancies fathered by a man aged 50 or more years (n = 124) had almost twice the risk of ending in a fetal loss compared with pregnancies with younger fathers (hazard ratio = 1.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.93, 3.82), after adjustment for maternal age, reproductive history, and maternal...... lifestyle during pregnancy. Various approaches to adjustment for potential residual confounding of the relation by maternal age did not affect the relative risk estimates. The paternal age-related risk of late fetal death was higher than the risk of early fetal death and started to increase from the age...

  19. Naphthopyrone glucosides from the seeds of Cassia tora with inhibitory activity on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ga Young; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Yun Mi; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Jin Sook

    2006-07-01

    Three naphthopyrone glucosides, cassiaside (1), rubrofusarin-6-O-beta-D-gentiobioside (2), and toralactone-9-O-beta-D-gentiobioside (3), were isolated from the BuOH-soluble extract of the seeds of Cassia tora as active constituents, using an in vitro bioassay based on the inhibition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to monitor chromatographic fractionation. The structures of 1-3 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation, particularly by extensive 1D and 2D NMR studies. All the isolates (1-3) were evaluated for the inhibitory activity on AGEs formation in vitro.

  20. Plasma advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and NF-κB activity are independent determinants of diastolic and pulse pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sourris, Karly C; Lyons, Jasmine G; Dougherty, Sonia L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: High levels of circulating advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can initiate chronic low-grade activation of the immune system (CLAIS) with each of these factors independently associated with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Therefore, our objective...... was to characterize the relationship between serum AGEs, CLAIS and other risk factors for CV disease in normotensive non-diabetic individuals. Methods: We measured body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, lipid and glucose profile in 44 non-diabetic volunteers (17 female, 27 males...

  1. Characterizing harmful advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and ribosylated aggregates of yellow mustard seed phytocystatin: Effects of different monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Azaj; Shamsi, Anas; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are at the core of variety of diseases ranging from diabetes to renal failure and hence gaining wide consideration. This study was aimed at characterizing the AGEs of phytocystatin isolated from mustard seeds (YMP) when incubated with different monosaccharides (glucose, ribose and mannose) using fluorescence, ultraviolet, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and microscopy. Ribose was found to be the most potent glycating agent as evident by AGEs specific fluorescence and absorbance. YMP exists as a molten globule like structure on day 24 as depicted by high ANS fluorescence and altered intrinsic fluorescence. Glycated YMP as AGEs and ribose induced aggregates were observed at day 28 and 32 respectively. In our study we have also examined the anti-aggregative potential of polyphenol, resveratrol. Our results suggested the anti-aggregative behavior of resveratrol as it prevented the in vitro aggregation of YMP, although further studies are required to decode the mechanism by which resveratrol prevents the aggregation.

  2. A Retrospective Study on Advanced Maternal Age and Assisted Reproductive Techniques, Medico-Legal Advice, "Food for Thought".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, Paola; Foldes-Papp, Zeno; Panici, Pierluigi B; Brunelli, Roberto; Zaami, Simona; Busardò, Francesco P; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy in advanced reproductive age is nowadays part of the social and welfare scenario. The effects and assessment of the risks and complications in women over the age of 43 must still be more specifically defined. The aim of this study is to compare the outcomes between spontaneous pregnancies with those induced by assisted reproductive technology (ART) in women ≥ 43 years. This retrospective observational study enrolled 114 women with an age of ≥ 43 divided as follows: 74 with spontaneous pregnancies and 40 with ART-induced pregnancy. For statistical analysis, a t-test was used to compare the parameters analyzed for quantitative variables and χ2 was used for qualitative variables. A p-value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Statistical Analysis was performed using the program SPSS 16.0 for Windows. The statistically significant differences between IVF and spontaneous pregnancy groups were respectively: gestational hypertension (30% vs 6.8%), preeclampsia (17.5% vs 2.7%), preterm delivery (47.5% vs 13.5%), IUGR (17.5% vs 4.1%), caesarian section (95% vs 70.3%), length of recovery (8.6±7.2 vs 5.9±3) and mean birth weight (2641± 695 g vs 3207±496 g). Women in advanced reproductive age (≥ 43 years) who undergo assisted fertilization procedures are at a higher risk of complications compared to women of the same age with spontaneous pregnancies.

  3. 198Au grain implantation for early tongue cancer in patients of advanced age or poor performance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Yoshiharu; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy using 198 Au grains is minimally invasive and the only curative treatment for early tongue cancer in patients of advanced age or poor performance status available in our institution. From March 1993 to February 2008, 198 Au grains were used to treat a group of 96 Stage I–II tongue cancer patients who could not undergo surgery or brachytherapy using 192 Ir pins because of an advanced age (≥75 years) or poor performance status (≥2). The patients were followed for 3.9 ± 3.3 years, and the cause-specific survival and local control rates were determined. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The results were compared with those for a group of 193 early tongue-cancer patients who underwent treatment using iridium pins. The 5-year cause-specific survival and local control rates of the 198 Au grains group were 71% and 68%, respectively, both of which were 16% lower than the corresponding rates for the 192 Ir pins group. Our study demonstrated that as the last curative treatment available, 198 Au grain implantation could be used to achieve moderate treatment results for early tongue cancer in patients of advanced age or poor performance status

  4. Growth-inhibiting effect of tumor necrosis factor on human umbilical vein endothelial cells is enhanced with advancing age in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Y.; Kaji, K.; Ito, H.; Noda, K.; Matsuo, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the effects of in vitro aging on the growth capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under the influence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) with or without interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The growth and colony-forming abilities of control cells were impaired with advancing age in vitro, especially at later stages (more than 70-80% of life span completed). It was found that treatment with TNF inhibited growth and colony-forming efficiency at any in vitro age. The effects of TNF were shown to increase with increasing in vitro age, as reflected by a more pronounced increase in doubling times, a decrease in saturation density, and a reduction in colony-forming efficiency. However, the characteristics of TNF receptors, including the dissociation constant, and the number of TNF-binding sites per cell-surface area remained rather constant. The effect of TNF was augmented by IFN-gamma at a dose that alone affected growth and colony formation only slightly. The augmentation by IFN-gamma was also found to depend on in vitro age; the synergy with TNF in the deterioration of colony-forming ability was observed only in aged cells. These results suggest that the intrinsic responsiveness of HUVECs to growth-inhibiting factors, as well as to growth-stimulating factors, changes during aging in vitro

  5. Spontaneous abortion rate and advanced maternal age: Consequences for prenatal diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.E. Cohen-Overbeek (Titia); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); M.E.M. Den Ouden; L. Pijpers (Leendert); M.G. Jahoda (M.); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Maternal age related and procedure-related fetal abortion rates were studied in 384 women aged 36 and over scheduled for transabdominal chorionic villus sampling (TA-CVS) at 12-14 weeks of gestation. The pre-TA-CVS abortion rate within 30 days of intake (at 6-10 weeks of

  6. Advanced paternal age and risk of fetal death: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Kasper Daniel; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2004-01-01

    A possible detrimental paternal age effect on offspring health due to mutations of paternal origin should be reflected in an association between paternal age and fetal loss. The authors used data from a prospective study of 23,821 pregnant women recruited consecutively to the Danish National Birt...

  7. A comparison of MR images and histological findings in menisci of persons in middle or advanced age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Furufu, Teruo; Suguro, Tohru

    2005-01-01

    Signal abnormalities in magnetic resonance (MR) images of the meniscus can result from various factors and may lead to a decrease in the diagnostic accuracy for meniscal tears. In particular, change in intrameniscal signal intensity has been frequently noted in persons in middle or advanced age, and is presumed to be related to the degeneration of meniscus. However, the types of histological change that might cause a change in signal intensity have not been determined. The present study compared MR images of menisci in persons of middle or advanced age with corresponding surgical and arthroscopic findings. The mean age of subjects was 62.1 years at the time of the study; 102 knees underwent arthroscopy or surgery after MRI. Regarding the validity of MR imaging, the sensitivity was as high as 83.5%, but specificity and accuracy were low (87.5% and 86.8%, respectively). There were many cases in which a change in intrameniscal signal intensity mimicked meniscal tears in persons in middle or advanced age. In order to demonstrate how a given change in intrameniscal signal intensity corresponded to a particular morbid condition, menisci were histologically examined and compared with the corresponding MR images. A total of 65 knees (21 knees from above-knee amputations and 44 removed during surgery) were studied from subjects with a mean age of 65.9 years; there were 87 medial and lateral menisci in total. The menisci were removed after MRI, and the specimens were prepared after macroscopic observation, after which they were investigated pathohistologically. The MR images were classified into 5 grades, from 0 to 4. In total, the normal signal intensity group (Grade 0) comprised 52% of specimens. Among anterior segments, Grade 0 was 73%, and the normal, low signal intensity group comprised the majority of specimens. Among posterior segments, a change in signal intensity (Grades 1 to 4) was noted in 75%. Analysis of MR grade and macroscopic findings revealed that almost no

  8. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-albumin from activated macrophage is critical in human mesenchymal stem cells survival and post-ischemic reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Kang, Woong Chol; Oh, Seyeon; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Ahn, Hyosang; Lee, Jaesuk; Park, Hyunjin; Lee, Sojung; Choi, Junwon; Lee, Hye Sun; Yang, Phillip C; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2017-09-14

    Post-ischemic reperfusion injury (PIRI) triggers an intense inflammatory response which is essential for repair but is also implicated in pathogenesis of post-ischemic remodeling in several organs in human. Stem cell therapy has recently emerged as a promising method for treatment of PIRI in human. However, satisfactory results have not been reported due to severe loss of injected stem cells in PIRI including critical limb ischemia (CLI). For investigating the advanced glycation end-product-albumin (AGE-albumin) from activated macrophages is critical in both muscle cell and stem cell death, we evaluated the recovery of PIRI-CLI by injection of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBD-MSCs) with or without soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE). Our results showed that activated M1 macrophages synthesize and secrete AGE-albumin, which induced the skeletal muscle cell death and injected hBD-MSCs in PIRI-CLI through RAGE increase. Combined injection of sRAGE and hBD-MSCs resulted in enhanced survival of hBD-MSCs and angiogenesis in PIRI-CLI mice. Taken together, AGE-albumin from activated macrophages is critical for both skeletal muscle cell and hBD-MSCs death in PIRI-CLI. Therefore, the inhibition of AGE-albumin from activated macrophages could be a successful therapeutic strategy for treatment of PIRI including CLI with or without stem cell therapy.

  9. Satisfaction with life during pregnancy and early motherhood in first-time mothers of advanced age: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasheim, Vigdis; Waldenström, Ulla; Rasmussen, Svein; Espehaug, Birgitte; Schytt, Erica

    2014-02-25

    The trend to delay motherhood to the age of 30 and beyond is established in most high-income countries but relatively little is known about potential effects on maternal emotional well-being. This study investigates satisfaction with life during pregnancy and the first three years of motherhood in women expecting their first baby at an advanced and very advanced age. The study was based on the National Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Data on 18 565 nulliparous women recruited in the second trimester 1999-2008 were used. Four questionnaires were completed: at around gestational weeks 17 and 30, and at six months and three years after the birth. Medical data were retrieved from the national Medical Birth Register. Advanced age was defined as 32-37 years, very advanced age as ≥38 years and the reference group as 25-31 years. The distribution of satisfaction with life from age 25 to ≥40 years was investigated, and the mean satisfaction with life at the four time points was estimated. Logistic regression analyses based on generalised estimation equations were used to investigate associations between advanced and very advanced age and satisfaction with life when controlling for socio-demographic factors. Satisfaction with life decreased from around age 28 to age 40 and beyond, when measured in gestational weeks 17 and 30, and at six months and three years after the birth. When comparing women of advanced and very advanced age with the reference group, satisfaction with life was slightly reduced in the two older age groups and most of all in women of very advanced age. Women of very advanced age had the lowest scores at all time points and this was most pronounced at three years after the birth. First-time mothers of advanced and very advanced age reported a slightly lower degree of satisfaction with life compared with the reference group of younger women, and the age-related effect was greatest

  10. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia may differ according to age and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunsung; Park, Jae Jun; Park, Yoo Mi; Baik, Su Jung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jung, Da Hyun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2018-03-29

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) remains controversial. This study aimed to clarify the association between H. pylori infection and ACN according to age groups. We retrospectively analyzed the association between H. pylori infection and ACN in patients aged Helicobacter pylori positivity was determined by the results of serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G or rapid urease test, if the anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G was in the borderline range. Among the 19 337 patients who were included, 56.2% and 3.4% were positive for H. pylori and ACN, respectively. Helicobacter pylori infection independently increased the risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and ACN was affected by smoking history. When stratified by age and smoking history, H. pylori infection conferred an increased risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and a history of smoking than in those without (69.3% vs 54.4%, respectively; P = .031). Helicobacter pylori infection confers an increased risk of ACN, but the association may differ according to age and smoking history. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Adverse perinatal outcomes for advanced maternal age: a cross‐sectional study of Brazilian births

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia Karla O. Almeida

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: As a rule, older mothers are at higher risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, which, however, may be mitigated or eliminated, depending on gestational age, parity, and, especially, on the education level of the pregnant woman.

  12. Impact of young age on treatment efficacy and safety in advanced colorectal cancer: a pooled analysis of patients from nine first-line phase III chemotherapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Charles D; Bot, Brian M; Thomas, David M; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M; Sargent, Daniel J

    2011-07-10

    Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC.

  13. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen.

  14. Fitness Consequences of Advanced Ancestral Age over Three Generations in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hayward

    Full Text Available A rapid rise in age at parenthood in contemporary societies has increased interest in reports of higher prevalence of de novo mutations and health problems in individuals with older fathers, but the fitness consequences of such age effects over several generations remain untested. Here, we use extensive pedigree data on seven pre-industrial Finnish populations to show how the ages of ancestors for up to three generations are associated with fitness traits. Individuals whose fathers, grandfathers and great-grandfathers fathered their lineage on average under age 30 were ~13% more likely to survive to adulthood than those whose ancestors fathered their lineage at over 40 years. In addition, females had a lower probability of marriage if their male ancestors were older. These findings are consistent with an increase of the number of accumulated de novo mutations with male age, suggesting that deleterious mutations acquired from recent ancestors may be a substantial burden to fitness in humans. However, possible non-mutational explanations for the observed associations are also discussed.

  15. Influence of Second-Trimester Ultrasound Markers for Down Syndrome in Pregnant Women of Advanced Maternal Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariza Rumi Kataguiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of second-trimester ultrasound markers on the incidence of Down syndrome among pregnant women of advanced maternal age. This was a retrospective cohort study on 889 singleton pregnancies between the 14th and 30th weeks, with maternal age ≥ 35 years, which would undergo genetic amniocentesis. The second-trimester ultrasound assessed the following markers: increased nuchal fold thickness, cardiac hyperechogenic focus, mild ventriculomegaly, choroid plexus cysts, uni- or bilateral renal pyelectasis, intestinal hyperechogenicity, single umbilical artery, short femur and humerus length, hand/foot alterations, structural fetal malformation, and congenital heart disease. To investigate differences between the groups with and without markers, nonparametric tests consisting of the chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test were used. Moreover, odds ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Out of the 889 pregnant women, 131 (17.3% presented markers and 758 (82.7% did not present markers on the second-trimester ultrasound. Increased nuchal fold (P<0.001 and structural malformation (P<0.001 were the markers most associated with Down syndrome. The presence of one marker increased the relative risk 10.5-fold, while the presence of two or more markers increased the risk 13.5-fold. The presence of markers on the second-trimester ultrasound, especially thickened nuchal fold and structural malformation, increased the risk of Down syndrome among pregnant women with advanced maternal age.

  16. Health at advanced age: social inequality and other factors potentially impacting longevity in nine high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, José A Tapia

    2013-02-01

    This article surveys the evolution of health at advanced age in nine high-income countries over the last three decades, and the variables that might explain that evolution. Life expectancy at age 65 for males and females is used as summary indicator to conceptualize "health at advanced age." A comparison of the nine countries - Canada, Denmark, France, Japan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States - reveals excellent health performance for Japan, which has the greatest proportion of elderly people in the population and also the best health indicators for both males and females; the United States and Denmark perform poorly. Of all nine countries, the United States has the youngest population, the highest income per capita, and the greatest expenditure on health care, but also the highest levels of income inequality and relative poverty, and lacked universal health care coverage during the study period. Experts have considered that these three factors have probably contributed to the poor progress in the health of the elderly in the United States in recent decades. Tobacco consumption appears to be a key influence on the health of the elderly and probably explains to a large extent - with a lag of several decades - the differential evolution of health in these countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The emerging role of IGF-1 deficiency in cardiovascular aging: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2012-06-01

    This review focuses on cardiovascular protective effects of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, provides a landscape of molecular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular alterations in patients and animal models with congenital and adult-onset IGF-1 deficiency, and explores the link between age-related IGF-1 deficiency and the molecular, cellular, and functional changes that occur in the cardiovascular system during aging. Microvascular protection conferred by endocrine and paracrine IGF-1 signaling, its implications for the pathophysiology of cardiac failure and vascular cognitive impairment, and the role of impaired cellular stress resistance in cardiovascular aging considered here are based on emerging knowledge of the effects of IGF-1 on Nrf2-driven antioxidant response.

  18. Diastolic dysfunction of aging is independent of myocardial structure but associated with plasma advanced glycation end-product levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan J Campbell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure is associated with abnormalities of myocardial structure, and plasma levels of the advanced glycation end-product (AGE N(ε-(carboxymethyllysine (CML correlate with the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Aging is associated with diastolic dysfunction and increased risk of heart failure, and we investigated the hypothesis that diastolic dysfunction of aging humans is associated with altered myocardial structure and plasma AGE levels. METHODS: We performed histological analysis of non-ischemic left ventricular myocardial biopsies and measured plasma levels of the AGEs CML and low molecular weight fluorophores (LMWFs in 26 men undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery who had transthoracic echocardiography before surgery. None had previous cardiac surgery, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure. RESULTS: The patients were aged 43-78 years and increasing age was associated with echocardiographic indices of diastolic dysfunction, with higher mitral Doppler flow velocity A wave (r = 0.50, P = 0.02, lower mitral E/A wave ratio (r = 0.64, P = 0.001, longer mitral valve deceleration time (r = 0.42, P = 0.03 and lower early diastolic peak velocity of the mitral septal annulus, e' (r = 0.55, P = 0.008. However, neither mitral E/A ratio nor mitral septal e' was correlated with myocardial total, interstitial or perivascular fibrosis (picrosirius red, immunostaining for collagens I and III, CML, and receptor for AGEs (RAGE, cardiomyocyte width, capillary length density, diffusion radius or arteriolar dimensions. Plasma AGE levels were not associated with age. However, plasma CML levels were associated with E/A ratio (r = 0.44, P = 0.04 and e' (r = 0.51, P = 0.02 and LMWF levels were associated with E/A ratio (r = 0.49, P = 0.02. Moreover, the mitral E/A ratio remained correlated with plasma LMWF levels in all patients (P = 0.04 and the

  19. Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Risks Age Explore this page: Age Do anesthesia risks increase ... can you reduce anesthesia risks in older patients? Age Age may bring wisdom but it also brings ...

  20. Long-term smoking causes more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naya, Masanao; Goto, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Manabe, Osamu; Hirata, Kenji; Tamaki, Nagara; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Katoh, Chietsugu

    2011-01-01

    Smoking cessation has been shown to normalize the coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers. However, its effect has not been explored in middle-aged smokers with a longer history of smoking. Therefore, we compared the effects of smoking cessation on coronary vasomotor response between both young and middle-aged smokers and identified the predictor for its improvement. This study investigated 14 young healthy smokers (age 25.2 ± 2.3 years), 13 middle-aged smokers (age 42.0 ± 6.5 years) and 10 non-smokers. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured by using 15 O-water positron emission tomography (PET). At baseline, the ratio of MBF during the cold pressor test (CPT) to that at rest (MBF CPT/rest ), the index of coronary endothelial function, was significantly decreased in both young and middle-aged smokers compared to non-smokers (1.24 ± 0.20 and 1.10 ± 0.39 vs 1.53 ± 0.18, p CPT/rest at 1 month after smoking cessation significantly increased in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers. By multivariate analysis, baseline serum malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) was an independent predictor for the changes in MBF CPT/rest after smoking cessation (β = -0.45, p < 0.05). Coronary endothelial dysfunction was reversible by short-term smoking cessation in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers, which was associated with serum MDA-LDL levels. Long-term smoking exposure could lead to more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis possibly via oxidative stress. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of urinary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) using a fluorescence assay for metabolic syndrome-related screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Akira; Uchida, Kagehiro; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The simple screening test of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) has not been established yet. We aimed to clarify the usefulness of simple measurement of AGEs for screening tests. The subjects were healthy participants and patients with metabolic syndrome. Urine samples were diluted from 1:10 to 1:200 using phosphate-buffered saline, and the fluorescence intensity was measured at 440nm after excitation at 370nm in a 96-well microplate spectrophotometer. The obtained intensities were adjusted according to the urinary creatinine levels. In patients with metabolic syndrome, urinary AGE levels were significantly higher than in healthy individuals (median [range], 168.25 [82.51-1276.15] AU/g creatinine [n=37] versus 134.67 [37.86-776.31] AU/g creatinine [n=350], respectively; p=0.0066). We found significant positive correlations between urinary AGEs and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (Spearman's correlation r=0.119 [p=0.019] and r=0.128 [p=0.012], respectively). There was no significant correlation between estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary AGEs (r=0.018 [p=0.744]), confirming that renal dysfunction did not influence results of urinary AGE measurements. When all of the participants in the study were classified into four groups according to the numbers of components of metabolic syndrome, we found a significant tendency (p=0.0127) for urinary AGE levels to be higher with the increasing number of metabolic syndrome components. These results suggested that measurement of urinary AGE levels may be useful for evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of Talented Dancers and Age Group Differences: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Imogen J.; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.; Redding, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the characteristics of talented dancers in relation to age. Physical (handgrip muscular strength, leg muscular power, hamstring flexibility and external hip rotation), psychological (passion, self-esteem and anxiety) and social (the motivational climate) characteristics were assessed in 334 students enrolled…

  3. Advancing telemedicine services for the aging population: The challenge of interoperability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Solana, Javier; Oude Nijeweme-d'Hollosy, Wendeline; Garate-Barreiro, Francisco; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Sik-Lányi, Cecilia; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Miesenberger, Klaus; Cudd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We reflect on our experiences in two projects in which we developed interoperable telemedicine applications for the aging population. While technically data exchange could be implemented technically, uptake was impeded by a lack of working procedures. We argue that development of interoperable

  4. Sex differences in elite swimming with advanced age are less than marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senefeld, J; Joyner, M J; Stevens, A; Hunter, S K

    2016-01-01

    The sex difference in marathon performance increases with finishing place and age of the runner but whether this occurs among swimmers is unknown. The purpose was to compare sex differences in swimming velocity across world record place (1st-10th), age group (25-89 years), and event distance. We also compared sex differences between freestyle swimming and marathon running. The world's top 10 swimming times of both sexes for World Championship freestyle stroke, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly events and the world's top 10 marathon times in 5-year age groups were obtained. Men were faster than women for freestyle (12.4 ± 4.2%), backstroke (12.8 ± 3.0%), and breaststroke (14.5 ± 3.2%), with the greatest sex differences for butterfly (16.7 ± 5.5%). The sex difference in swimming velocity increased across world record place for freestyle (P < 0.001), breaststroke, and butterfly for all age groups and distances (P < 0.001) because of a greater relative drop-off between first and 10th place for women. The sex difference in marathon running increased with the world record place and the sex difference for marathon running was greater than for swimming (P < 0.001). The sex difference in swimming increased with world record place and age, but was less than for marathon running. Collectively, these results suggest more depth in women's swimming than marathon running. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. PERSONAL COMPETENCIES, SOCIAL RESOURCES, AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF PRIMIPAROUS WOMEN OF ADVANCED MATERNAL AGE AND THEIR PARTNERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Maryse; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to (a) characterize the personal competencies, the social resources, and the psychosocial adjustment (psychological distress, quality of life, and parenting self-perceptions) during the early postpartum period of primiparous women of advanced age (≥35 years at the time of delivery) and their partners (older parents) compared with that of younger first-time mothers (20-34 years) and their partners (younger parents); and (b) explore the role of personal competencies and social resources in couples' psychosocial adjustment, depending on the age group. Older (n = 74) and younger parents (n = 71) completed self-report measures to assess personal competencies and social resources (third trimester of pregnancy), psychological distress, and quality of life (third trimester of pregnancy and 1-month' postpartum) and parenting self-perceptions (1-month' postpartum). Older parents were more similar than different from younger parents regarding personal competencies, social resources, and psychosocial adjustment during the first postnatal month. Regardless of the age group, higher personal competencies and social resources predicted lower anxiety and more positive parenting self-perceptions in women. Beyond higher personal competencies, older maternal age also predicted higher quality of life. In men, higher personal competencies were protective against anxiety, but only at older maternal age. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  6. Sarcopenia, dynapenia and the impact of advancing age on human skeletal muscle size and strength; a quantitative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kyle Mitchell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Changing demographics make it ever more important to understand the modifiable risk factors for disability and loss of independence with advancing age. For more than two decades there has been increasing interest in the role of sarcopenia, the age related loss of muscle or lean mass, in curtailing active and healthy aging. There is now evidence to suggest that lack of strength, or dynapenia, is a more constant factor in compromised wellbeing in old age and it is apparent that the decline in muscle mass and the decline in strength can take quite different trajectories. This demands recognition of the concept of muscle quality; that is the force generating per capacity per unit cross-sectional area (CSA. An understanding of the impact of aging on skeletal muscle will require attention to both the changes in muscle size and the changes in muscle quality.The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of the decline in human muscle mass and strength with advancing age and the associated risk to health and survival and to review the underlying changes in muscle characteristics and the aetiology of sarcopenia. Cross-sectional studies comparing young (18-45yrs and old (>65yrs samples show dramatic variation based on the technique used and population studied. The median of values of rate of loss reported across studies is 0.47% per year in men and 0.37% per year in women. Longitudinal studies show that in people aged 75yrs, muscle mass is lost at a rate of 0.64-0.70% per year in women and 0.80-0.98% per year in men. Strength is lost more rapidly. Longitudinal studies show that at age 75yrs, strength is lost at a rate of 3-4% per year in men and 2.5-3% per year in women. Studies that assessed changes in mass and strength in the same sample report a loss of strength 2 – 5 times faster than loss of mass. Loss of strength is a more consistent risk for disability and death than is loss of muscle mass.

  7. Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand -Te Puāwaitanga o Nga Tapuwae Kia Ora Tonu, LiLACS NZ: Study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The number of people of advanced age (85 years and older) is increasing and health systems may be challenged by increasing health-related needs. Recent overseas evidence suggests relatively high levels of wellbeing in this group, however little is known about people of advanced age, particularly the indigenous Māori, in Aotearoa, New Zealand. This paper outlines the methods of the study Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand. The study aimed to establish predictors of successful advanced ageing and understand the relative importance of health, frailty, cultural, social & economic factors to successful ageing for Māori and non-Māori in New Zealand. Methods/design A total population cohort study of those of advanced age. Two cohorts of equal size, Māori aged 80–90 and non-Māori aged 85, oversampling to enable sufficient power, were enrolled. A defined geographic region, living in the Bay of Plenty and Lakes District Health Board areas of New Zealand, defined the sampling frame. Rūnanga (Māori tribal organisations) and Primary Health Organisations were subcontracted to recruit on behalf of the University. Measures - a comprehensive interview schedule was piloted and administered by a trained interviewer using standardised techniques. Socio-demographic and personal history included tribal affiliation for Māori and participation in cultural practices; physical and psychological health status used standardised validated research tools; health behaviours included smoking, alcohol use and nutrition risk; and environmental data included local amenities, type of housing and neighbourhood. Social network structures and social support exchanges are recorded. Measures of physical function; gait speed, leg strength and balance, were completed. Everyday interests and activities, views on ageing and financial interests complete the interview. A physical assessment by a trained nurse included electrocardiograph, blood pressure, hearing

  8. Life and living in advanced age: a cohort study in New Zealand--e Puāwaitanga o Nga Tapuwae Kia Ora Tonu, LiLACS NZ: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Karen J; Kerse, Ngaire; Dyall, Lorna; Kepa, Mere; Teh, Ruth; Wham, Carol; Clair, Valerie Wright-St; Wiles, Janine; Keeling, Sally; Connolly, Martin J; Wilkinson, Tim J; Moyes, Simon; Broad, Joanna B; Jatrana, Santosh

    2012-06-29

    The number of people of advanced age (85 years and older) is increasing and health systems may be challenged by increasing health-related needs. Recent overseas evidence suggests relatively high levels of wellbeing in this group, however little is known about people of advanced age, particularly the indigenous Māori, in Aotearoa, New Zealand. This paper outlines the methods of the study Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand. The study aimed to establish predictors of successful advanced ageing and understand the relative importance of health, frailty, cultural, social & economic factors to successful ageing for Māori and non-Māori in New Zealand. A total population cohort study of those of advanced age. Two cohorts of equal size, Māori aged 80-90 and non-Māori aged 85, oversampling to enable sufficient power, were enrolled. A defined geographic region, living in the Bay of Plenty and Lakes District Health Board areas of New Zealand, defined the sampling frame. Rūnanga (Māori tribal organisations) and Primary Health Organisations were subcontracted to recruit on behalf of the University. Measures--a comprehensive interview schedule was piloted and administered by a trained interviewer using standardised techniques. Socio-demographic and personal history included tribal affiliation for Māori and participation in cultural practices; physical and psychological health status used standardised validated research tools; health behaviours included smoking, alcohol use and nutrition risk; and environmental data included local amenities, type of housing and neighbourhood. Social network structures and social support exchanges are recorded. Measures of physical function; gait speed, leg strength and balance, were completed. Everyday interests and activities, views on ageing and financial interests complete the interview. A physical assessment by a trained nurse included electrocardiograph, blood pressure, hearing and vision, anthropometric

  9. Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand -Te Puāwaitanga o Nga Tapuwae Kia Ora Tonu, LiLACS NZ: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayman Karen J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of people of advanced age (85 years and older is increasing and health systems may be challenged by increasing health-related needs. Recent overseas evidence suggests relatively high levels of wellbeing in this group, however little is known about people of advanced age, particularly the indigenous Māori, in Aotearoa, New Zealand. This paper outlines the methods of the study Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand. The study aimed to establish predictors of successful advanced ageing and understand the relative importance of health, frailty, cultural, social & economic factors to successful ageing for Māori and non-Māori in New Zealand. Methods/design A total population cohort study of those of advanced age. Two cohorts of equal size, Māori aged 80–90 and non-Māori aged 85, oversampling to enable sufficient power, were enrolled. A defined geographic region, living in the Bay of Plenty and Lakes District Health Board areas of New Zealand, defined the sampling frame. Rūnanga (Māori tribal organisations and Primary Health Organisations were subcontracted to recruit on behalf of the University. Measures - a comprehensive interview schedule was piloted and administered by a trained interviewer using standardised techniques. Socio-demographic and personal history included tribal affiliation for Māori and participation in cultural practices; physical and psychological health status used standardised validated research tools; health behaviours included smoking, alcohol use and nutrition risk; and environmental data included local amenities, type of housing and neighbourhood. Social network structures and social support exchanges are recorded. Measures of physical function; gait speed, leg strength and balance, were completed. Everyday interests and activities, views on ageing and financial interests complete the interview. A physical assessment by a trained nurse included

  10. Suspected ontogeny of a recently described hypo-androgenic PCOS-like phenotype with advancing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, Norbert; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Darmon, Sarah K; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lin; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H

    2018-03-01

    A recent report described a new PCOS-like phenotype in lean older infertile women, and was characterized by high age-specific anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) but hypo- rather than the expected hyper-androgenism. The hypo-androgenism was, furthermore, characterized of, likely, adrenal origin and autoimmune etiology. We extracted data on 708 consecutive infertility patients, and separated them into three age-strata, 42 years. In each stratum, we investigated how levels of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and testosterone (T) interrelate between high-AMH (AMH ≥ 75th quantile) and normal AMH (25th-75th quantile) and low-T (total testosterone ≤19.0 ng/dL), normal-T (19.0-29.0 ng/dL) and high-T (>29.0 ng/dL). High-AMH cycles were presumed to reflect PCOS-like patients. Routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle outcomes and clinical phenotypes of patients were then compared between groups with AMH and T as statistical variables. This hypo-androgenic PCOS-like phenotype already exists in age stratum PCOS phenotype that develops in comparison to controls (likely autoimmune-induced) insufficiency of the adrenal zona reticularis (low-T and low-DHEAS) and zona fasciculata (low-C), and is characterized by frequent evidence of autoimmunity. A degree of adrenal insufficiency, thus, concomitantly appears to affect adrenal androgen and, to lesser degrees, glucocorticoid production (mineralocorticoids were not investigated). Here investigated new PCOS-like phenotype demonstrates features compatible with what under Rotterdam criteria has been referred to as PCOS phenotype-D. If confirmed, the observation that the ontogeny of this phenotype already at young ages is, likely, driven by adrenal autoimmunity, supports the position of the androgen excess and PCOS society that the etiology of phenotype-D differs from that of classical hyper-androgenic PCOS of mostly ovarian etiology.

  11. Adverse perinatal outcomes for advanced maternal age: a cross-sectional study of Brazilian births

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia Karla O. Almeida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To investigate the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in women aged ≥41 years relatively to those aged 21-34. METHODS: Approximately 8.5 million records of singleton births in Brazilian hospitals in the period 2004-2009 were investigated. Odds ratios were estimated for preterm and post-term births, for low Apgar scores at 1 min and at 5 min, for asphyxia, for low birth weight, and for macrosomia. RESULTS: For pregnant women ≥41, increased risks were identified for preterm births, for post-term births (except for primiparous women with schooling ≥12 years, and for low birth weight. When comparing older vs. younger women, higher educational levels ensure similar risks of low Apgar score at 1 min (for primiparous mothers and term births, of low Apgar score at 5 min (for term births, of macrosomia (for non-primiparous women, and of asphyxia. CONCLUSION: As a rule, older mothers are at higher risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, which, however, may be mitigated or eliminated, depending on gestational age, parity, and, especially, on the education level of the pregnant woman.

  12. Advanced age is a risk factor for proximal adenoma recurrence following colonoscopy and polypectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, H C; Burcharth, J; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    a randomized clinical trial that showed no effect of aspirin-calcitriol-calcium treatment on colorectal adenoma recurrence. Patients at high risk of colorectal cancer who had one or more sporadic colorectal adenomas removed during colonoscopy were followed up for 3 years. Independent risk factors associated...... with recurrence and characteristics of recurrent adenomas were investigated in a generalized linear model. Results After 3 years, the recurrence rate was 25·8 per cent in 427 patients. For younger subjects (aged 50 years or less), the recurrence rate was 19 per cent; 18 of 20 recurrent adenomas were located...... in the distal part of the colon. For older subjects (aged over 70 years), the recurrence rate was 35 per cent, and 16 of 25 recurrent adenomas were in the proximal colon. Age (odds ratio (OR) 1·04, 95 per cent c.i. 1·01 to 1·07) and number of adenomas (OR 1·27, 1·11 to 1·46) at the time of inclusion...

  13. Practical and Ethical Aspects of Advance Research Directives for Research on Healthy Aging: German and Israeli Professionals’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Werner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHealthy aging is the development and maintenance of optimal cognitive, social and physical well-being, and function in older adults. Preventing or minimizing disease is one of the main ways of achieving healthy aging. Dementia is one of the most prevalent and life-changing diseases of old age. Thus, dementia prevention research is defined as one of the main priorities worldwide. However, conducting research with persons who lack the capacity to give consent is a major ethical issue.ObjectiveOur study attempts to explore if and how advance research directives (ARDs may be used as a future tool to deal with the ethical and practical issues in dementia research.MethodWe conducted focus groups and in-depth interviews with German and Israeli professional stakeholders from the fields of gerontology, ethics, medical law, psychiatry, neurology and policy advice (n = 16, and analyzed the main topics discussed regarding cross-national similarities and controversies within the groups, as well as across the two national contexts.ResultsWhile both countries are in the midst of a developmental process and have recognized the importance and need for ARD as a tool for expanding healthy aging, Germany is in a more advanced stage than Israel because of the EU regulation process, which indicates the influence of international harmonization on these research-related ethical issues. Consensual themes within the qualitative material were identified: the need for a broader debate on ARD, the ethical importance of autonomy and risk–benefit assessment for ARD implementation, the role of the proxy and the need for the differentiation of types of dementia research. Controversies and dilemmas aroused around themes such as the current role of IRBs in each country, the need for limits, and how to guaranty safeguarding and control.DiscussionImplementing a new tool is a step-by-step procedure requiring a thorough understanding of the current state of knowledge

  14. Radiochemotherapy including cisplatin alone versus cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribius, Silke; Kilic, Yasemin; Kronemann, Stefanie; Schroeder, Ursula; Hakim, Samer; Schild, Steven E.; Rades, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: the optimal radiochemotherapy regimen for advanced head-and-neck cancer is still debated. This nonrandomized study compares two cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 128 patients with locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: concurrent chemotherapy consisted of either two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 /d1-5 + 29-33; n = 54) or two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 /d1-5 + 29-33) + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 600 mg/m 2 /d1-5 + 29-33; n = 74). Results: at least one grade 3 toxicity occurred in 25 of 54 patients (46%) receiving cisplatin alone and in 52 of 74 patients (70%) receiving cisplatin + 5-FU. The latter regimen was particularly associated with increased rates of mucositis (p = 0.027) and acute skin toxicity (p = 0.001). Seven of 54 (13%) and 20 of 74 patients (27%) received only one chemotherapy course due to treatment-related acute toxicity. Late toxicity in terms of xerostomia, neck fibrosis, skin toxicity, and lymphedema was not significantly different. The 2-year locoregional control rates were 67% after cisplatin alone and 52% after cisplatin + 5-FU (p = 0.35). The metastases-free survival rates were 79% and 69%, respectively (p = 0.65), and the overall survival rates 70% and 51%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, outcome was significantly associated with performance status, T-category, N-category, hemoglobin level prior to radiotherapy, and radiotherapy break > 1 week. Conclusion: two courses of fractionated cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 /day) alone appear preferable, as this regimen resulted in similar outcome and late toxicity as two courses of cisplatin + 5-FU, but in significantly less acute toxicity. (orig.)

  15. Leg strength declines with advancing age despite habitual endurance exercise in active older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcell, Taylor J; Hawkins, Steven A; Wiswell, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    Age-associated loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and strength (dynapenia) is associated with a loss of independence that contributes to falls, fractures, and nursing home admissions, whereas regular physical activity has been suggested to offset these losses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of habitual endurance exercise on muscle mass and strength in active older adults. A longitudinal analysis of muscle strength (≈4.8 years apart) was performed on 59 men (age at start of study: 58.6 ± 7.3 years) and 35 women (56.9 ± 8.2 years) who used endurance running as their primary mode of exercise. There were no changes in fat-free mass although body fat increased minimally (1.0-1.5%). Training volume (km·wk, d·wk) decreased in both the men and women. There was a significant loss of both isometric knee extension (≈5% per year) and knee flexion (≈3.6% per year) strength in both the men and women. However, there was no significant change in either isokinetic concentric or eccentric torque of the knee extensors. Our data demonstrated a significant decline in isometric knee extensor and knee flexor strength although there were no changes in body mass in this group of very active older men and women. Our data support newer exercise guidelines for older Americans suggesting resistance training be an integral component of a fitness program and that running alone was not sufficient to prevent the loss in muscle strength (dynapenia) with aging.

  16. Can innate and autoimmune reactivity forecast early and advance stages of age-related macular degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna

    2017-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of central vision loss in persons over 55years of age in developed countries. AMD is a complex disease in which genetic, environmental and inflammatory factors influence its onset and progression. Elevation in serum anti-retinal autoantibodies, plasma and local activation of complement proteins of the alternative pathway, and increase in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines have been seen over the course of disease. Genetic studies of AMD patients confirmed that genetic variants affecting the alternative complement pathway have a major influence on AMD risk. Because the heterogeneity of this disease, there is no sufficient strategy to identify the disease onset and progression sole based eye examination, thus identification of reliable serological biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment by sampling patient's blood is necessary. This review provides an outline of the current knowledge on possible serological (autoantibodies, complement factors, cytokines, chemokines) and related genetic biomarkers relevant to the pathology of AMD, and discusses their application for prediction of disease activity and prognosis in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of surgical outcome in advanced age patients with developmental hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçekli, Özgür; Doğan, Metin

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed at determining the efficacy of the surgical treatment conducted on children with delayed presentation developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The objective was to provide a good comparison of functional and radiographic outcomes and to determine various surgical treatment options. In this study, we evaluated the results of 38 hips of 27 patients aged 4 years onset which had been operated due to DDH. Radiographic outcomes were evaluated by using acetabular index, CE angle, Tonnis and the Severin classification system. Clinical evaluation was made by using IOWA hip scores. Degenerative changes were evaluated according to Boyer and avascular necrosis according to Kalamchi-MacEwen criteria. The mean age of the patients at the operation time was 10 years 3 months (range: 4 years 3 months-30 years). While the mean acetabular index was 37.97 preoperatively, in the last follow-up it was 19.92. Thirty-six hips (94%) had an excellent and good outcomes, and two hips (%6) had a fair outcome with respect to the Severin criteria. The mean hip score with respect to IOWA was 93.736 (range: 75-98) and the rate of excellent and good outcomes was 98%. For the treatment of patients with DDH of late onset, a one-staged operative procedure is recommended. This method is applied successfully and enables us to achieve good clinical and radiographic results. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient-specific age: the other side of the coin in advanced mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Maria Schimke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are present as a rare subpopulation within any type of stroma in the body of higher animals. Prominently, MSC have been recognized to reside in perivascular locations, supposedly maintaining blood vessel integrity. During tissue damage and injury, MSC/pericytes become activated, evade from their perivascular niche and are thus assumed to support wound healing and tissue regeneration.In vitro MSC exhibit demonstrated capabilities to differentiate into a wide variety of tissue cell types. Hence, many MSC-based therapeutic approaches have been performed to address bone, cartilage or heart regeneration. Furthermore, prominent studies showed efficacy of ex vivo expanded MSC to countervail graft-versus-host-disease. Therefore, additional fields of application are presently conceived, in which MSC-based therapies potentially unfold beneficial effects, such as amelioration of non-healing conditions after tendon or spinal cord injury, as well as neuropathies. Working along these lines, MSC-based scientific research has been forged ahead to prominently occupy the clinical stage.Aging is to a great deal stochastic by nature bringing forth changes in an individual fashion. Yet, is aging of stem cells or/and their corresponding niche considered a determining factor for outcome and success of clinical therapies?

  19. Justifiability of amniocentesis on the basis of positive findings of triple test, ultrasound scan and advanced maternal age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoslav Bukvic

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effectiveness of antenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities based on maternal age (≥35 years, positive ultrasound findings or a positive triple test. Materials and methods. Retrospective six-year study. The pregnant women routinely underwent established clinical and laboratory practice at the Department of Medical Genetics between 1997 and 2003. The women’s case notes were examined to identify indications for karyotyping, gestation period and the outcome of karyotyping and pregnancy. Results. Invasive antenatal tests were performed on 1440 cases, 1168 (81.11% age 35(a, 72 (5.00% positive triple test (b, 24 (1.67% positive ultrasound scanning (c and 176 (12.2% other (psychological, personal reasons, etc (d. The overall positive predictive value was 1.67% (1.6%(a, 1.4% (b, 12.5% (c, 0.0% (d. The constructed model of logistic regression gave an odds-ratio of 8.647 for the “positive ultrasound result vs. maternal age ≥35” indication, while the odds-ratio for the triple test vs. maternal age ≥35 was 0.854. Conclusions. Amniocentesis and cytogenetic analysis of foetal karyotype should be presented as a diagnostic possibility to all women over 35 years. The application of biochemical markers was far from the expected results. If we compare results for indication positive ultrasound scanning vs. maternal age, an oddsratio of ~9 was obtained. These results demonstrate that the likelihood of obtaining positive results (i.e. the presence of chromosome alterations from an amniocentesis having this indication is almost 9 times higher than from having an amniocentesis performed solely for advanced maternal age.

  20. Advanced first-principles theory of superconductivity including both lattice vibrations and spin fluctuations: The case of FeB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, J.; Aperis, A.; Partoens, B.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Milošević, M. V.

    2018-01-01

    We present an advanced method to study spin fluctuations in superconductors quantitatively and entirely from first principles. This method can be generally applied to materials where electron-phonon coupling and spin fluctuations coexist. We employ it here to examine the recently synthesized superconductor iron tetraboride (FeB4) with experimental Tc˜2.4 K [H. Gou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157002]. We prove that FeB4 is particularly prone to ferromagnetic spin fluctuations due to the presence of iron, resulting in a large Stoner interaction strength, I =1.5 eV, as calculated from first principles. The other important factor is its Fermi surface that consists of three separate sheets, among which two are nested ellipsoids. The resulting susceptibility has a ferromagnetic peak around q =0 , from which we calculated the repulsive interaction between Cooper pair electrons using the random phase approximation. Subsequently, we combined the electron-phonon interaction calculated from first principles with the spin fluctuation interaction in fully anisotropic Eliashberg theory calculations. We show that the resulting superconducting gap spectrum is conventional, yet very strongly depleted due to coupling to the spin fluctuations. The critical temperature decreases from Tc=41 K, if they are not taken into account, to Tc=1.7 K, in good agreement with the experimental value.

  1. Tensile behavior of humid aged advanced composites for helicopter external fuel tank development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condruz Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of humid aging on tensile properties of two polymeric composites was studied. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the materials for a naval helicopter external fuel tank. Due to the application, the humid environment was kerosene and saline solution to evaluate the sea water effect on the composite tensile strength. The composite samples were immersed in kerosene for 168 hours, respective 1752 hours and in saline solution for 168 hours. Tensile tests were performed after the immersion. The composite sample tensile tests showed that kerosene and saline solution had no influence on the elastic modulus of the materials, but it was observed a slight improvement of the tensile strength of the two polymeric composites.

  2. Long-term smoking causes more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naya, Masanao; Goto, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Morita, Koichi; Manabe, Osamu; Hirata, Kenji; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Chietsugu [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Health Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Smoking cessation has been shown to normalize the coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers. However, its effect has not been explored in middle-aged smokers with a longer history of smoking. Therefore, we compared the effects of smoking cessation on coronary vasomotor response between both young and middle-aged smokers and identified the predictor for its improvement. This study investigated 14 young healthy smokers (age 25.2 {+-} 2.3 years), 13 middle-aged smokers (age 42.0 {+-} 6.5 years) and 10 non-smokers. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured by using {sup 15}O-water positron emission tomography (PET). At baseline, the ratio of MBF during the cold pressor test (CPT) to that at rest (MBF{sub CPT/rest}), the index of coronary endothelial function, was significantly decreased in both young and middle-aged smokers compared to non-smokers (1.24 {+-} 0.20 and 1.10 {+-} 0.39 vs 1.53 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). The ratio of MBF during adenosine triphosphate infusion to that at rest was significantly decreased in middle-aged smokers compared to young smokers and non-smokers (3.34 {+-} 1.52 vs 4.43 {+-} 0.92 and 4.69 {+-} 1.25, p < 0.05, respectively). MBF{sub CPT/rest} at 1 month after smoking cessation significantly increased in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers. By multivariate analysis, baseline serum malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) was an independent predictor for the changes in MBF{sub CPT/rest} after smoking cessation ({beta} = -0.45, p < 0.05). Coronary endothelial dysfunction was reversible by short-term smoking cessation in young smokers, but not in middle-aged smokers, which was associated with serum MDA-LDL levels. Long-term smoking exposure could lead to more advanced coronary endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis possibly via oxidative stress. (orig.)

  3. Advanced Age, High β-CTX Levels, and Impaired Renal Function are Independent Risk Factors for All-Cause One-Year Mortality in Hip Fracture Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Tonko; Kruljac, Ivan; Kirigin, Lora; Merc, Marcela; Pavić, Marina; Trcin, Mirna Tominac; Bokulić, Adrijana; Megla, Željka Bukovec; Kaštelan, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for increased mortality in hip fracture patients include older age, male sex, fracture type, bone mineral density, and pre-existing co-morbidities. The role of biochemical and other anthropometric parameters on hip fracture mortality remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for one-year mortality in patients with hip fractures. A total of 236 consecutive patients (59 males) with hip fractures were followed over a one-year period. Patient age, gender, type of fracture, type of treatment, time from admission to surgery, type of anesthesia, body mass index, and electrocardiograms were recorded. Complete blood counts, serum electrolytes, urea, creatinine, d-dimers, calcium, phosphate, osteocalcin, and beta-isomerised C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (β-CTX) were measured at admission and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to analyze the association of these parameters with survival. One-year mortality rate was 28.4%. Age was independently associated with mortality (HR 1.117, 95% CI 1.062-1.174, P 0.276 g/L (3.5 vs. 25.7%, HR 9.5, 95% CI 2.11-42.76). Advanced age, high β-CTX levels, and impaired renal function are independent risk factors of mortality in patients with hip fractures.

  4. Using nursing intervention classification in an advance practice registered nurse-led preventive model for adults aging with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan Earle

    2014-09-01

    To describe the most frequently reported and the most central nursing interventions in an advance practice registered nurse (APRN)-led in-home preventive intervention model for adults aging with developmental disabilities using the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) system. A descriptive data analysis and a market basket analysis were conducted on de-identified nominal nursing intervention data from two home visits conducted by nurse practitioners (NPs) from October 2010 to June 2012 for 80 community-dwelling adults with developmental disabilities, ages 29 to 68 years. The mean number of NIC interventions was 4.7 in the first visit and 6.0 in the second visit and last visit. NPs reported 45 different intervention types as classified using a standardized language, with 376 in Visit One and 470 in Visit Two. Approximately 85% of the sample received the Health education intervention. The market basket analysis revealed common pairs, triples, and quadruple sets of interventions in this preventive model. The NIC nursing interventions that occurred together repeatedly were: Health education, Weight management, Nutrition management, Health screening, and Behavior management. Five NIC interventions form the basis of an APRN-led preventive intervention model for individuals aging with lifelong disability, with health education as the most common intervention, combined with interventions to manage weight and nutrition, promote healthy behaviors, and encourage routine health screening. Less frequently reported NIC interventions suggest the need to tailor prevention to individual needs, whether acute or chronic. APRNs employing prevention among adults aging with developmental disabilities must anticipate the need to focus on health education strategies for health promotion and prevention as well as tailor and target a patient-centered approach to support self-management of health to promote healthy aging in place. These NIC interventions serve not only as a guide for

  5. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks

  6. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States); Moreau, Régis [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Hagen, Tory, E-mail: Tory.Hagen@oregonstate.edu [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  7. High serum level of pentosidine, an advanced glycation end product (AGE), is a risk factor of patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yo; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Arimoto, Takanori; Niizeki, Takeshi; Shishido, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nozaki, Naoki; Hirono, Osamu; Tsunoda, Yuichi; Nitobe, Joji; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2007-04-01

    Pentosidine, one of the advanced glycation end products (AGE), is generated by nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins. The receptor of AGE (RAGE) is expressed in a variety of tissue, and interaction of AGE with RAGE induces oxidative stress and activation of intracellular signaling, causing production of cytokines and mediators of inflammation. We investigated whether serum pentosidine is a risk factor for heart failure. Serum pentosidine concentration was measured in 141 patients with heart failure and 18 control subjects by a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were prospectively followed during a median follow-up period of 479 days with end points of cardiac death or rehospitalization. Serum concentration of pentosidine was significantly higher in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III/IV patients than in NYHA class I/II patients (P volume, and left ventricular mass were significant risk factors to predict cardiac events. In the multivariate Cox analysis, serum pentosidine concentration was an independent risk factor for cardiac events (hazard ratio 1.88, 95% confidence interval 1.23-2.69, P = .002). The highest 4th quartile of pentosidine was associated with the highest risk of cardiac events (4.52-fold). Serum pentosidine concentration is an independent prognostic factor for heart failure, and this new marker may be useful for risk stratification of patients with heart failure. Patients were divided into 4 groups based on the serum pentosidine levels.

  8. Long-lasting complete response status of advanced stage IV gall bladder cancer and colon cancer after combined treatment including autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Yuki; Kuranishi, Fumito; Miyazaki, Tsubasa; Yasuda, Hiroko; Ohno, Tadao

    2017-09-11

    The prognosis of advanced (stage IV) cancer of the digestive organs is very poor. We have previously reported a case of advanced breast cancer with bone metastasis that was successfully treated with combined treatments including autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV). Herein, we report the success of this approach in advanced stage IV (heavily metastasized) cases of gall bladder cancer and colon cancer. Case 1: A 61-year-old woman with stage IV gall bladder cancer (liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis) underwent surgery in May 2011, including partial resection of the liver. She was treated with AFTV as the first-line adjuvant therapy, followed by conventional chemotherapy. This patient is still alive without any recurrence, as confirmed with computed tomography, for more than 5 years. Case 2: A 64-year-old man with stage IV colon cancer (multiple para-aortic lymph node metastases and direct abdominal wall invasion) underwent non-curative surgery in May 2006. Following conventional chemotherapy, two courses of AFTV and radiation therapy were administered sequentially. This patient has had no recurrence for more than 5 years. We report the success of combination therapy including AFTV in cases of liver-metastasized gall bladder cancer and abdominal wall-metastasized colon cancer. Both patients experienced long-lasting, complete remission. Therefore, combination therapies including AFTV should be considered in patients with advanced cancer of the digestive organs.

  9. Cultural and social factors and quality of life of Maori in advanced age. Te puawaitanga o nga tapuwae kia ora tonu - Life and living in advanced age: a cohort study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna; Kepa, Mere; Teh, Ruth; Mules, Rangimarie; Moyes, Simon A; Wham, Carol; Hayman, Karen; Connolly, Martin; Wilkinson, Tim; Keeling, Sally; Loughlin, Hine; Jatrana, Santosh; Kerse, Ngaire

    2014-05-02

    To establish 1) the socioeconomic and cultural profile and 2) correlates of quality of life (QOL) of Maori in advanced age. A cross sectional survey of a population based cohort of Maori aged 80-90 years, participants in LiLACS NZ, in the Rotorua and Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand. Socioeconomic and cultural engagement characteristics were established by personal interview and QOL was assessed by the SF-12. In total 421 (56%) participated and 267 (63%) completed the comprehensive interview. Maori lived with high deprivation areas and had received a poor education in the public system. Home ownership was high (81%), 64% had more than 3 children still living and social support was present for practical tasks and emotional support in 82%. A need for more practical help was reported by 21%. Fifty-two percent of the participants used te reo Maori me nga tikanga (Maori language and culture) daily. One in five had experienced discrimination and one in five reported colonisation affecting their life today. Greater frequency of visits to marae/sacred gathering places was associated with higher physical health-related QOL. Unmet need for practical help was associated with lower physical health-related QOL. Lower mental health-related QOL was associated with having experienced discrimination. Greater language and cultural engagement is associated with higher QOL for older Maori and unmet social needs and discrimination are associated with lower QOL.

  10. The effect of advanced paternal age on the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques among patients with azoospermia using cryopreserved testicular spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ru Tsai

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate an unfavorable effect of advanced paternal age on the fertility outcome for TESE-ICSI. The thawed testicular spermatozoa from males aged ≤40 years did not have an adverse impact on ICSI outcomes.

  11. Leukocyte telomere length is associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hong; Kan, Mengyuan; Ye, Junyi; Liu, Fatao; Wang, Ting; Deng, Jiaying; Tan, Yanfang; He, Lin; Liu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Telomeres located at the ends of chromosomes are involved in genomic stability and play a key role in various cancers and age-related diseases. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a late-onset, age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disease, which includes the geographic atrophy (GA) subtype and the choroidal neovascularization (CNV) subtype. To better understand how leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is related to AMD, we conducted an association study in 197 AMD patients and 259 healthy controls using the established quantitative PCR technique. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association of LTL and AMD with the age-adjusted ratio of the telomere length to the copy number of a single-copy gene (T/S). Notably, we found a significant association between AMD and LTL (OR=2.24; 95% CI=1.68-3.07; P=0.0001) after adjusting for age and sex. Furthermore, the results showed a strongly significant association between the GA subtype and the LTL (OR=4.81; 95% CI=3.15-7.82; P=0.0001) after adjusting for age and sex. Our findings provide evidence of the role that LTL plays in the pathological mechanisms of AMD, mainly in the GA subgroup but not the CNV subgroup. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Macronutrient intake in advanced age: Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Tapuwae Kia ora Tonu, Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, Carol; Teh, Ruth; Moyes, Simon A; Rolleston, Anna; Muru-Lanning, Marama; Hayman, Karen; Adamson, Ashley; Kerse, Ngaire

    2016-09-01

    As part of the 12-month follow-up of the longitudinal cohort study, Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand, dietary intake was assessed in 216 Māori and 362 non-Māori octogenarians using repeat 24-h multiple pass recalls. Energy and macronutrient intakes were calculated, and food items reported were allocated to food groups used in the New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey (NZANS). Intakes were compared with the nutrient reference values (NRV) for Australia and New Zealand. The median BMI was higher for Māori (28·3 kg/m2) than for non-Māori (26·2 kg/m2) P=0·007. For Māori, median energy intake was 7·44 MJ/d for men and 6·06 MJ/d for women with 16·3 % energy derived from protein, 43·3 % from carbohydrate and 38·5 % from fat. Median energy intake was 7·91 and 6·26 MJ/d for non-Māori men and women, respectively, with 15·4 % of energy derived from protein, 45 % from carbohydrate and 36·7 % from fat. For both ethnic groups, bread was the top contributor to energy and carbohydrate intakes. Protein came from beef and veal, fish and seafood, bread, milk and poultry with the order differing by ethnic groups and sex. Fat came mainly from butter and margarine. Energy-adjusted protein was higher for Māori than non-Māori (P=0·049). For both ethnic groups, the median energy levels were similar, percent carbohydrate tended to be lower and percent fat higher compared with adults aged >70 years in NZANS. These unique cross-sectional data address an important gap in our understanding of dietary intake in this growing section of our population and highlight lack of age-appropriate NRV.

  13. Advanced glycation end products and their receptor in age-related, non-communicable chronic inflammatory diseases; Overview of clinical evidence and potential contributions to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaert, Niki L; Gopal, Poornima; Rutten, Erica P A; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2016-12-01

    Age-related, non-communicable chronic inflammatory diseases represent the major 21st century health problem. Especially in Western countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis are exponentially rising as the population ages. These diseases are determined by common risk factors and share an age-related onset. The affected organs display evidence of accelerated ageing, and are hallmarked by chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases and plays a central role in amplifying inflammatory responses. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation and accumulation is accelerated under these conditions. Advanced glycation end products are not only linked to RAGE signaling and inflammation, but to various hallmarks of the ageing process. In addition to these biological functions, circulating levels of the soluble form of RAGE and of advanced glycation end products are candidate biomarkers for many age-related inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the mechanistic connections between RAGE and advanced glycation end products and the processes of inflammation and ageing. Furthermore, through the presented overview of AGE-RAGE alterations that have been described in clinical studies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis, and insight obtained from mechanistic in vitro and animal studies, it can be concluded that these AGE-RAGE disturbances are a common contributing factor to the inflammatory state and pathogenesis of these various conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A distinct subtype of ``metatropic dysplasia variant`` characterised by advanced carpal skeletal age and subluxation of the radial heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, G. [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi-ken 321-02 (Japan); Satoh, Masato [Department of Orthopedics, Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Aihara, Toshinori [Department of Radiology, Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Aida, Noriko [Department of Radiology, Kanagawa Children`s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Yamamoto, Takehisa [Department of Pediatrics, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ozono, Keiichi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Osaka Medical Center and Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Background. ``Metatropic dysplasia variants`` are a group of bone dysplasias whose skeletal abnormalities are similar to, but milder than, those of classical metatropic dysplasia. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity has not been thoroughly elucidated. Objective. The objective was to designate a distinct subtype of these metatropic dysplasia variants. Materials and methods. The subjects were four Japanese patients, two sporadic cases and two siblings, who all had identical skeletal changes. The radiological features in these patients were compared with those of previously reported metatropic dysplasia variants. Results. Moderate platyspondyly with pear-shaped and/or anterior-tongued vertebral bodies, halberd pelvis, and dumbbell deformity of the tubular bones were regarded as hallmarks of metatropic dysplasia variants. The peculiar skeletal change in our patients was advanced carpal skeletal age in childhood, unlike most patients reported as metatropic dysplasia variants who manifest delayed carpal ossification. Another hallmark was congenital dislocation of the radial heads. A description of a patient with similar skeletal changes was found in the literature. Conclusion. These patients are considered to represent a distinct subgroup of metatropic dysplasia variants. It remains unknown whether the present siblings represent an autosomal recessive trait or an autosomal dominant trait with germinal mosaicism related to increased paternal age. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  15. Morphometric Evaluation of the Blood Pressure Related Organs in Nili-Ravi Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis With Advancing Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hussain

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Forty clinically healthy buffaloes of either sex were divided into two age-groups of equal size i.e., young (12-42 months and adult (48-96 months. Histological sections were prepared by routine method and stained by H&E. AutoCAD® image analysis software and ocular micrometer were used for the morphometric evaluations. Studies revealed that the adrenal cortex of buffalo was divided into four zones, zona glomerulosa, zona intermedia, zona fasciculate and zona reticularis. The zona fasciculata was recorded as the widest and zona reticularis narrowest zone of the adrenal cortex. The volume of cardiomyocytic nuclei (μm3, volume of renal corpuscles (μm3×103, volume of nuclei of cells of zona glomerulosa (μm3, thickness of the zona glomerulosa, zona intermedia and zona fasciculata of adrenal cortex in adult buffaloes were significantly (P<0.01 higher as compared to their younger counterparts. It is conceivable that the development of blood related parameters showed an increase parallel to the advancing age in order to adjust with the increasing blood pressure due to physiological development process in buffalo.

  16. Dietary protein intake may reduce hospitalisation due to infection in Māori of advanced age: LiLACS NZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, Carol; Baggett, Fiona; Teh, Ruth; Moyes, Simon; Kēpa, Mere; Connolly, Martin; Jatrana, Santosh; Kerse, Ngaire

    2015-08-01

    To investigate factors related to hospital admission for infection, specifically examining nutrient intakes of Māori in advanced age (80+ years). Face-to-face interviews with 200 Māori (85 men) to obtain demographic, social and health information. Diagnoses were validated against medical records. Detailed nutritional assessment using the 24-hour multiple-pass recall method was collected on two separate days. FOODfiles was used to analyse nutrient intake. National Health Index (NHI) numbers were matched to hospitalisations over a two-year period (12 months prior and 12 months following dietary assessment). Selected International Classification of Disease (ICD) codes were used to identify admissions related to infection. A total of 18% of participants were hospitalised due to infection, most commonly lower respiratory tract infection. Controlling for age, gender, NZ deprivation index, diabetes, CVD and chronic lung disease, a lower energy-adjusted protein intake was independently associated with hospitalisation due to infection: OR (95%CI) 1.14 (1.00-1.29), p=0.046. Protein intake may have a protective effect on the nutrition-related morbidity of older Māori. Improving dietary protein intake is a simple strategy for dietary modification aiming to decrease the risk of infections that lead to hospitalisation and other morbidities. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  17. The effects of infographics and several quantitative versus qualitative formats for cardiovascular disease risk, including heart age, on people's risk understanding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Olga C; Vonk, Suzanne I; Van den Haak, Maaike J; van Hooijdonk, Charlotte M J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2018-01-01

    To study how comprehension of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is influenced by: (1) infographics about qualitative risk information, with/without risk numbers; (2) which qualitative risk dimension is emphasized; (3) heart age vs. traditional risk format.

  18. The range of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer and optic disc parameters in children aged up to but not including 18 years of age, as measured by optical coherence tomography: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creavin, Alexandra L; Williams, Cathy; Tilling, Kate; Timpson, Nicholas; Higgins, Julian P T

    2016-04-30

    The parameters of the optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) in children may vary with disease processes that contribute to visual impairment and blindness and so could be useful as an objective measure in at-risk children. There is no standardised reference for the normal parameters of the optic disc and pRNFL in children; however, there are a large number of small individual studies that have been undertaken to look at these measures. A systematic review of current literature on the range of pRNFL and optic disc parameters in children aged less than 18 years will be performed. Studies will be considered for review if they report numerical data on optic disc and pRNFL parameters, measured using optical coherence tomography. Outcome measures will include mean pRNFL thickness and cup-disc ratio. The bibliographic databases Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Science will be systematically searched from 1991. Screening of search results will be conducted by two authors working independently, as will extraction of primary and secondary outcome data. Ten per cent of all other data extraction will be checked by a second author. Results will be compiled and presented in evidence tables. Where possible and appropriate, study-specific estimates will be combined to obtain an overall summary estimate of pRNFL thickness and cup-disc ratio across studies and results will be presented by age of population. Subgroup analyses will be undertaken for children of different ethnicities. This review aims to provide an overview of the parameters of the optic disc and pRNFL in children of different ages in order to identify gaps in knowledge and to improve understanding of what might be considered within/outside the range of normality. The findings will be presented in peer-reviewed journals and will be presented at conferences. PROSPERO CRD42016033068.

  19. Prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning provision for Australian community aged care clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Karen Margaret; Carter, Rachel Zoe; Sellars, Marcus William; Lewis, Virginia; Sutton, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-12-01

    Conduct a prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning (ACP) provision in community aged care: ACP conducted by the client's case manager (CM) ('Facilitator') and ACP conducted by an external ACP service ('Referral') over a 6-month period. This Australian study involved CMs and their clients. Eligible CM were English speaking, ≥18 years, had expected availability for the trial and worked ≥3 days per week. CMs were recruited via their organisations, sequentially allocated to a group and received education based on the group allocation. They were expected to initiate ACP with all clients and to facilitate ACP or refer for ACP. Outcomes were quantity of new ACP conversations and quantity and quality of new advance care directives (ACDs). 30 CMs (16 Facilitator, 14 Referral) completed the study; all 784 client's files (427 Facilitator, 357 Referral) were audited. ACP was initiated with 508 (65%) clients (293 Facilitator, 215 Referral; p<0.05); 89 (18%) of these (53 Facilitator, 36 Referral) and 41 (46%) (13 Facilitator, 28 Referral; p<0.005) completed ACDs. Most ACDs (71%) were of poor quality/not valid. A further 167 clients (facilitator 124; referral 43; p<0.005) reported ACP was in progress at study completion. While there were some differences, overall, models achieved similar outcomes. ACP was initiated with 65% of clients. However, fewer clients completed ACP, there was low numbers of ACDs and document quality was generally poor. The findings raise questions for future implementation and research into community ACP provision. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and associations with cardio-metabolic, lifestyle, and dietary factors in a general population : The NQplus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botros, Nadia; Sluik, Diewertje; van Waateringe, Robert P.; de Vries, Jeanne H. M.; Geelen, Anouk; Feskens, Edith J. M.

    Background: Advanced glycation end-products are a heterogeneous group of molecules that are formed during reactions between reducing sugars and proteins. Advanced glycation end-products are thought to play a role in several diseases, including diabetes mellitus and can be measured non-invasively

  1. Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma ... about advance directives. Two well-known ones are: Aging With Dignity Aging with Dignity is a national ...

  2. Advances in Solid-State Transformations of Coordination Bonds: From the Ball Mill to the Aging Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mottillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the formation of coordination bonds is pivotal to the development of a plethora of functional metal-organic materials, ranging from coordination polymers, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs to metallodrugs. The interest in and commercialization of such materials has created a need for more efficient, environmentally-friendly routes for making coordination bonds. Solid-state coordination chemistry is a versatile greener alternative to conventional synthesis, offering quantitative yields, enhanced stoichiometric and topological selectivity, access to a wider range of precursors, as well as to molecules and materials not readily accessible in solution or solvothermally. With a focus on mechanochemical, thermochemical and “accelerated aging” approaches to coordination polymers, including pharmaceutically-relevant materials and microporous MOFs, this review highlights the recent advances in solid-state coordination chemistry and techniques for understanding the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  3. Micronutrient intake in advanced age: Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Tapuwae Kia ora Tonu, Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, Carol; Teh, Ruth; Moyes, Simon A; Rolleston, Anna; Muru-Lanning, Marama; Hayman, Karen; Kerse, Ngaire; Adamson, Ashley

    2016-11-09

    A high prevalence of undernutrition has previously been reported in indigenous Māori (49 %) and non-Māori (38 %) octogenarians and may be associated with risk of micronutrient deficiencies. We examined vitamin and mineral intakes and the contributing food sources among 216 Māori and 362 non-Māori participating in Life and Living to Advanced age a Cohort Study in New Zealand, using a repeat 24-h multiple-pass recall. More than half of the Māori and non-Māori participants had intakes below the estimated average requirement from food alone for Ca, Mg and Se. Vitamin B6 (Māori women only), folate (women only), vitamin E (Māori women; all men) and Zn (men only) were low in these ethnic and sex subgroups. Women had intakes of higher nutrient density in folate, vitamin C, Ca, Mg, K, vitamin A (non-Māori) and β-carotene (Māori) compared with men (P<0·05). When controlling for age and physical function, β-carotene, folate, vitamin C, Ca and Mg were no longer significantly different, but vitamins B2, B12, E and D, Fe, Na, Se and Zn became significantly different for Māori between men and women. When controlling for age and physical function, vitamins A and C and Ca were no longer significantly different, but vitamin B2, Fe, Na and Zn became significantly different for non-Māori between men and women. For those who took nutritional supplements, Māori were less likely to be deficient in food alone intake of vitamin A, folate and Mg, whereas non-Maori were less likely to be deficient in intakes of Mg, K and Zn, but more likely to be deficient in vitamin B12 intake. A lack of harmonisation in nutrient recommendations hinders the interpretation of nutrient adequacy; nonetheless, Ca, Mg and Se are key micronutrients of concern. Milk and cheese were important contributions to Ca intake, whereas bread was a key source of Mg and Se. Examination of dietary intake related to biochemical status and health outcomes will establish the utility of these observations.

  4. Caesarean section in nulliparous women of advanced maternal age has been reduced in Sweden and Norway since the 1970s: a register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenström, U; Gottvall, K; Rasmussen, S

    2012-12-01

    To investigate rates of caesarean delivery in Sweden and Norway from 1973 to 2008 in relation to advanced and very advanced maternal age. Register study. Sweden and Norway. All nulliparous women aged over 30 years with a singleton pregnancy, with the fetus in a cephalic presentation, and delivering at term between 1973 and 2008 were evaluated. The study population comprised 329 824 women in Sweden and 127 810 women in Norway. Data from the national Medical Birth Registers were used to describe caesarean section rates in three age groups: 30-34 years (reference group); 35-39 years (advanced age group); and ≥ 40 years (very advanced age group). Logistic regression analyses estimated the risk in each age group over four decades, in each of the two national samples. Caesarean delivery decreased from 1973-1979 to 2000-2008 in the two oldest age groups in Sweden (35-39 years, OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.50-0.58; ≥ 40 years, OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.30-0.43) and Norway (35-39 years, OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.54-0.68; ≥ 40 years, OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.34-0.58), but increased in women aged 30-34 years. The caesarean delivery rate in the two oldest groups peaked in the second half of the 1970s. Regardless of time point, the caesarean delivery rate was always highest in women aged ≥ 40 years, followed by women aged 35-39 years and lowest in women aged 30-34 years. Caesarean delivery in nulliparous women of advanced and very advanced age peaked by end of the 1970s in Sweden and Norway. The subsequent reduction was contemporaneous with the introduction of electronic fetal monitoring and a more consistent use of the partogram, suggesting that more effective surveillance of labour increased the chance of a vaginal birth in these high-risk women. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  5. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yamada, Michiko

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to ionizing radiation accelerates the aging process has been actively investigated at ABCC-RERF since 1958, when longitudinal cohort studies of the Adult Health Study (AHS) and the Life Span Study (LSS) were initiated. In their 1975 overall review of aging studies related to the atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, Finch and Beebe concluded that while most studies had shown no correlation between aging and radiation exposure, they had not involved the large numbers of subjects required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Extending LSS mortality data up to 1978 did not alter the earlier conclusion that any observed life-shortening was associated primarily with cancer induction rather than with any nonspecific cause. The results of aging studies conducted during the intervening 15 years using data from the same populations are reviewed in the present paper. Using clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory techniques, a broad spectrum of aging parameters have been studied, such as postmortem morphological changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, laboratory tests, tissue changes, and morbidity. With respect to the aging process, the overall results have not been consistent and are generally thought to show no relation to radiation exposure. Although some preliminary results suggest a possible radiation-induced increase in atherosclerotic diseases and acceleration of aging in the T-cell-related immune system, further study is necessary to confirm these findings. In the future, applying the latest gerontological study techniques to data collected from subjects exposed 45 years ago to A-bomb radiation at relatively young ages will present a new body of data relevant to the study of late radiation effects. (author) 103 refs

  6. The effects of infographics and several quantitative versus qualitative formats for cardiovascular disease risk, including heart age, on people's risk understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; Vonk, Suzanne I; van den Haak, Maaike J; van Hooijdonk, Charlotte M J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2018-03-11

    To study how comprehension of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is influenced by: (1) infographics about qualitative risk information, with/without risk numbers; (2) which qualitative risk dimension is emphasized; (3) heart age vs. traditional risk format. For aim 1, a 2 (infographics versus text) x 2 (risk number versus no risk number) between-subjects design was used. For aim 2, three pieces of information were tested within-subjects. Aim 3 used a simple comparison group. Participants (45-65 yrs old) were recruited through an online access panel; low educated people were oversampled. They received hypothetical risk information (20%/61yrs). Primary outcomes: recall, risk appraisals, subjective/objective risk comprehension. behavioral intentions, information evaluations. Infographics of qualitative risk dimensions negatively affected recall, subjective risk comprehension and information evaluations. No effect of type of risk dimension was found on risk perception. Heart age influenced recall, comprehension, evaluations and affective risk appraisals. Infographics of hypothetical CVD risk information had detrimental effects on measures related to risk perception/comprehension, but effects were mainly seen in undereducated participants. Heart age influenced perceptions/comprehension of hypothetical risk in a way that seemed to support understanding. Heart age seems a fruitful risk communication approach in disease risk calculators. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic predisposition to advanced biological ageing increases risk for childhood-onset recurrent major depressive disorder in a large UK sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Julia E; Kepa, Agnieszka; Vincent, John; Frissa, Souci; Goodwin, Laura; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L; Breen, Gerome; Powell, Timothy R

    2017-04-15

    Previous studies have revealed increased biological ageing amongst major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, as assayed by shorter leukocyte telomere lengths (TL). Stressors such as childhood maltreatment are more common amongst MDD patients, and it has been suggested that this might contribute to shorter TL present amongst patients. However, to our knowledge, no study has yet tested for reverse causality, i.e. whether a genetic predisposition to shorter TL might predispose to MDD or an earlier onset of MDD. This study used a Mendelian randomisation design to investigate if shortened TL might increase risk for recurrent MDD in a relatively large UK sample (1628 MDD cases, 1140 controls). To achieve this, we used a subset of our sample, for which TL data was available, to identify a suitable instrumental variable. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping on rs10936599, a SNP upstream of telomerase RNA component (TERC), and rs2736100, a SNP within telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and attempted to replicate findings which identified these SNPs as predictors of TL. After which, we performed regressions to test if genetic risk for shortened TL increased risk for MDD, childhood-onset MDD or childhood/adolescent-onset MDD. T-carriers of rs10936599 demonstrated shorter TL compared to CC-carriers (p≤0.05; 3% of variance explained) and was subsequently used as our instrumental variable. We found that the T-allele of rs10936599 predicted increased risk for childhood-onset MDD relative to controls (p≤0.05), and increased risk for childhood-onset MDD relative to adult-onset MDD cases (p≤0.001), but rs10936599 did not predict adult-onset MDD risk. Limitations include a relatively small sample of early-onset cases, and the fact that age-of-onset was ascertained by retrospective recall. Genetic predisposition to advanced biological ageing, as assayed using rs10936599, predicted a small, but significant, increased risk for childhood

  8. Dental Age Estimation (DAE): Data management for tooth development stages including the third molar. Appropriate censoring of Stage H, the final stage of tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Graham J; McDonald, Fraser; Andiappan, Manoharan; Lucas, Victoria S

    2015-11-01

    The final stage of dental development of third molars is usually helpful to indicate whether or not a subject is aged over 18 years. A complexity is that the final stage of development is unlimited in its upper border. Investigators usually select an inappropriate upper age limit or censor point for this tooth development stage. The literature was searched for appropriate data sets for dental age estimation and those that provided the count (n), the mean (x¯), and the standard deviation (sd) for each of the tooth development stages. The Demirjian G and Demirjian H were used for this study. Upper and lower limits of the Stage G and Stage H data were calculated limiting the data to plus or minus three standard deviations from the mean. The upper border of Stage H was limited by appropriate censoring at the maximum value for Stage G. The maximum age at attainment from published data, for Stage H, ranged from 22.60 years to 34.50 years. These data were explored to demonstrate how censoring provides an estimate for the correct maximum age for the final stage of Stage H as 21.64 years for UK Caucasians. This study shows that confining the data array of individual tooth developments stages to ± 3sd provides a reliable and logical way of censoring the data for tooth development stages with a Normal distribution of data. For Stage H this is inappropriate as it is unbounded in its upper limit. The use of a censored data array for Stage H using Percentile values is appropriate. This increases the reliability of using third molar Stage H alone to determine whether or not an individual is over 18 years old. For Stage H, individual ancestral groups should be censored using the same technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. The contribution of uniparental disomy to congenital development defects in children born to mothers at advanced childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, C; Fokstuen, S; Schinzel, A

    2000-12-18

    Most instances of maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) start as trisomies and, similar to the latter, show a significant increase of mean maternal age at delivery. To investigate the incidence of UPD in offspring of older mothers, we investigated two groups of patients: 1) 50 patients with unclassified developmental defects born to mothers 35 years or older at delivery were tested for UPD for all autosomes by means of microsatellite marker analysis; 2) The incidence of UPD versus other etiologies in correlation, with maternal age below versus 35 years and above at delivery was studied in patients investigated in our laboratory for maternal UPD 15 (Prader-Willi syndrome, PWS), paternal UPD 15 (Angelman syndrome, AS), and maternal UPD 7 (Silver-Russell syndrome, SRS). In group 1, four patients of 50 showed UPD for an autosome that clarified the etiology of their developmental problems: a 27-year-old woman with growth retardation and early puberty disclosed maternal heterodisomy 14; a 15-year-old girl revealed paternal isodisomy 15; a 6-year-old boy with suspected Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome was shown to have maternal heterodisomy 16 with additional mosaic partial trisomy 16(pter-p13); a 16-month-old girl with intrauterine growth retardation and a dysmorphic pattern revealed maternal heterodisomy 7. In group 2 the offspring of older mothers showed a clear increase of UPD compared with the mothers below 35 years at delivery. The binomial distribution gave P-values of 1.9 x 10(-10), 2.6 x 10(-4), and 0.01 for PWS, AS, and SRS, respectively. The correlation between increase of paternal UPD 15 with advanced maternal age might be explained by maternal non-disjunction leading to hypohaploid gamete (nullisomy) for chromosome 15 with subsequent or concomitant duplication of the paternal homologue (paternal isodisomy). The three UPD 15 AS cases with mothers older than 35 years at delivery revealed isodisomy, whereas the three cases from younger mothers showed heterodisomy. This

  10. Testosterone in advance age: a New Zealand longitudinal cohort study: Life and Living in Advanced Age (Te Puāwaitanga o Ngā Tapuwae Kia Ora Tonu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Martin J; Kerse, Ngaire; Wilkinson, Tim; Menzies, Oliver; Rolleston, Anna; Chong, Yih Harng; Broad, Joanna B; Moyes, Simon A; Jatrana, Santosh; Teh, Ruth

    2017-11-12

    Serum testosterone (T) levels in men decline with age. Low T levels are associated with sarcopenia and frailty in men aged > 80 years. T levels have not previously been directly associated with disability in older men. We explored associations between T levels, frailty and disability in a cohort of octogenarian men. Data from all men from Life and Living in Advanced Age Cohort Study in New Zealand, a longitudinal cohort study in community-dwelling older adults. Community-dwelling ( > 80 years) adult men excluding those receiving T treatment or with prostatic carcinoma. Associations between baseline total testosterone (TT) and calculated free testosterone (fT), frailty (Fried scale) and disability (Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale (NEADL)) (baseline and 24 months) were examined using multivariate regression and Wald's χ 2 techniques. Subjects with the lowest quartile of baseline TT and fT values were compared with those in the upper three quartiles. Participants: 243 men, mean (SD) age 83.7 (2.0) years. Mean (SD) TT=17.6 (6.8) nmol/L and fT=225.3 (85.4) pmol/L. On multivariate analyses, lower TT levels were associated with frailty: β=0.41, p=0.017, coefficient of determination (R 2 )=0.10 and disability (NEADL) (β=-1.27, p=0.017, R 2 =0.11), low haemoglobin (β=-7.38, p=0.0016, R 2 =0.05), high fasting glucose (β=0.38, p=0.038, R 2 =0.04) and high C reactive protein (CRP) (β=3.57, p=0.01, R 2 =0.06). Low fT levels were associated with frailty (β=0.39, p=0.024, R 2 =0.09) but not baseline NEADL (β=-1.29, p=0.09, R 2 =0.09). Low fT was associated with low haemoglobin (β=-7.83, p=0.0008, R 2 =0.05) and high CRP (β=2.86, p=0.04, R 2 =0.05). Relationships between baseline TT and fT, and 24-month outcomes of disability and frailty were not significant. In men over 80 years, we confirm an association between T levels and baseline frailty scores. The new finding of association between T levels and disability is potentially relevant to

  11. Advancing stroke genomic research in the age of Trans-Omics big data science: Emerging priorities and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa; Peprah, Emmanuel; Xu, Huichun; Akinyemi, Rufus; Tiwari, Hemant K; Irvin, Marguerite R; Wahab, Kolawole Wasiu; Arnett, Donna K; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-11-15

    We systematically reviewed the genetic variants associated with stroke in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and examined the emerging priorities and opportunities for rapidly advancing stroke research in the era of Trans-Omics science. Using the PRISMA guideline, we searched PubMed and NHGRI- EBI GWAS catalog for stroke studies from 2007 till May 2017. We included 31 studies. The major challenge is that the few validated variants could not account for the full genetic risk of stroke and have not been translated for clinical use. None of the studies included continental Africans. Genomic study of stroke among Africans presents a unique opportunity for the discovery, validation, functional annotation, Trans-Omics study and translation of genomic determinants of stroke with implications for global populations. This is because all humans originated from Africa, a continent with a unique genomic architecture and a distinctive epidemiology of stroke; as well as substantially higher heritability and resolution of fine mapping of stroke genes. Understanding the genomic determinants of stroke and the corresponding molecular mechanisms will revolutionize the development of a new set of precise biomarkers for stroke prediction, diagnosis and prognostic estimates as well as personalized interventions for reducing the global burden of stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Age dependent accumulation patterns of advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE) ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in the liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Chung, Wook-Jin; Oh, Seyeon; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Chang Hu; Hong, Suntaek; Park, Kook Yang; Son, Kuk Hui; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-01-01

    Much evidence indicates receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) related inflammation play essential roles during aging. However, the majority of studies have focused on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and not on other RAGE ligands. In the present study, the authors evaluated whether the accumulation of RAGE ligands and binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands differ in kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle during aging. In C57BL/6 N mice aged 12 weeks, 12 months, and 22 months, ligands accumulation, binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands, activated macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 macrophage expression, glyoxalase-1expression, and signal pathways related to inflammation were evaluated. The RAGE ligands age-associated accumulation patterns were found to be organ dependent. Binding intensities between RAGE and its ligands in kidney and liver increased with age, but those in skeletal muscle were unchanged. Infiltration of activated macrophages in kidney and liver increased with age, but infiltration in the skeletal muscle was unchanged. M1 expression increased and M2 and glyoxalase-1 expression decreased with age in kidney and liver, but their expressions in skeletal muscle were not changed. These findings indicate patterns of RAGE ligands accumulation, RAGE/ligands binding intensities, or inflammation markers changes during aging are organs dependent.

  13. Identifying advanced glycation end products as a major source of oxidants in aging: implications for the management and/or prevention of reduced renal function in elderly persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassara, Helen; Uribarri, Jaime; Ferrucci, Luigi; Cai, Weijing; Torreggiani, Massimo; Post, James B; Zheng, Feng; Striker, Gary E

    2009-11-01

    Aging is characterized by increasing inflammation and oxidant stress (OS). Reduced renal function was present in more than 20% of normal-aged individuals sampled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cross-sectional study of the US population. Longitudinal studies in the United States and Italy showed that renal function does not decline in some individuals, suggesting that a search for causes of the loss of renal function in some persons might be indicated and interventions to reduce this outcome should be sought. Because advanced glycation end products (AGEs) induce both inflammation and OS, accumulate with age, and primarily are excreted by the kidney, one outcome of reduced renal function in aging could be decreased AGE disposal. The build-up of AGEs with reduced renal function could contribute to inflammation, increased oxidant stress, and accumulation of AGEs in aging. In fact, results from a longitudinal study of normal aging adults in Italy showed that the most significant correlation with mortality was the level of renal function. A clear link between inflammation, OS, AGEs, and chronic disease was shown in studies of mice that showed that reduction of AGE levels by drugs or decreased intake of AGEs reduces chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease of aging. The data support a role for AGEs in the development of renal lesions in aging mice and reveal that AGEs in the diet are very important contributors to renal and cardiovascular lesions. AGEs signal through two receptors, one of which is anti-inflammatory (AGER1) and the other is proinflammatory (RAGE). Overexpression of AGER1 protects against OS and acute vascular injury. The reduction of AGEs in the diet is as efficient in preventing aging-related cardiovascular and renal lesions in mice as that seen with calorie restriction. Studies in normal adults of all ages and those with CKD suggest that the findings in mice may be directly applicable to both aging and CKD

  14. Combined advanced parental age has an additive negative effect on live birth rates-data from 4057 first IVF/ICSI cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Nicole O; Zander-Fox, Deirdre; Vincent, Andrew D; Lane, Michelle

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if there is an additive effect of combined advanced maternal and paternal age on pregnancy and live birth rates. Retrospective data analysis of 4057 first cycles at a fertility centre between 2009 and 2013 was compiled. Donor, preimplantation genetic screening and double embryo transfer cycles were excluded. Main outcomes measured were clinical pregnancy, viable pregnancy, live birth and term birth. Logistic regression indicated strong negative associations for maternal ages exceeding 27 years with clinical pregnancies (p < 0.001), viable pregnancies (p < 0.001), live births (p < 0.001) and term births (p < 0.001). There was evidence of negative associations between paternal age and both viable pregnancies (p = 0.06) and live births (p = 0.04), such that the probability of pregnancy was 10% further reduced for women who were 35 years with a partner over 40 years vs. women aged 35 years with a partner under 30 years. There was evidence of an interaction between maternal age and the paternal age on term births (p = 0.02) such that advanced paternal age's effect on the probability of a term birth was only evident in couples where the maternal age ranged between ~27 and 35 years. There is an additive effect to pregnancy and live birth rates when both partners are of an advanced age, thus highlighting the need for pre-conception public health messaging and a combined approach to ART counselling assessing both parental ages in combination.

  15. DNA Advanced Glycation End Products (DNA-AGEs) Are Elevated in Urine and Tissue in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Richard; Shuck, Sarah C; Chan, Yin S; Liu, Xueli; Bates, Steven E; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Lacoste, Sandrine; O'Connor, Timothy R; Termini, John

    2017-02-20

    More precise identification and treatment monitoring of prediabetic/diabetic individuals will require additional biomarkers to complement existing diagnostic tests. Candidates include hyperglycemia-induced adducts such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of proteins, lipids, and DNA. The potential for DNA-AGEs as diabetic biomarkers was examined in a longitudinal study using the Lepr db/db animal model of metabolic syndrome. The DNA-AGE, N 2 -(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) was quantified by mass spectrometry using isotope dilution from the urine and tissue of hyperglycemic and normoglycemic mice. Hyperglycemic mice (fasting plasma glucose, FPG, ≥ 200 mg/dL) displayed a higher median urinary CEdG value (238.4 ± 112.8 pmol/24 h) than normoglycemic mice (16.1 ± 11.8 pmol/24 h). Logistic regression analysis revealed urinary CEdG to be an independent predictor of hyperglycemia. Urinary CEdG was positively correlated with FPG in hyperglycemic animals and with HbA1c for all mice. Average tissue-derived CEdG was also higher in hyperglycemic mice (18.4 CEdG/10 6 dG) than normoglycemic mice (4.4 CEdG/10 6 dG). Urinary CEdG was significantly elevated in Lepr db/db mice relative to Lepr wt/wt , and tissue CEdG values increased in the order Lepr wt/wt < Lepr wt/db < Lepr db/db . These data suggest that urinary CEdG measurement may provide a noninvasive quantitative index of glycemic status and augment existing biomarkers for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes.

  16. Height loss with advancing age in a hospitalized population of Polish men and women: magnitude, pattern and associations with mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The connection between the rate of height loss in older people and their general health status has been well documented in the medical literature. Our study was aimed at furthering the characterization of this interrelationship in the context of health indices and mortality in a hospitalized population of Polish adults. Data were collated from a literature review and from a longitudinal study of aging carried out in the Polish population which followed 142 physically healthy inmates, including 68 men and 74 women, for at least 25 years from the age of 45 onwards. Moreover, cross-sectional data were available from 225 inmates, including 113 men and 112 women. These subjects were confined at the same hospital. ANOVA, t-test, and regression analysis were employed. The results indicate that the onset of height loss emerges in the fourth and five decade of life and there is a gradual acceleration of reduction of height at later stages of ontogeny in both sexes. Postmenopausal women experience a more rapid loss of height compared with men. The individuals who had higher rate of loss of height (≥3 cm/decade tend to be at greater risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a systematic assessment of the rate of loss of height can be useful for clinicians caring for elderly people because of its prognostic value in terms of morbidity and mortality.

  17. Falls in advanced old age: recalled falls and prospective follow-up of over-90-year-olds in the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Fiona E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "oldest old" are now the fastest growing section of most western populations, yet there are scarcely any data concerning even the common problem of falls amongst the very old. Prospective data collection is encouraged as the most reliable method for researching older people's falls, though in clinical practice guidelines advise taking a history of any recalled falls. This study set out to inform service planning by describing the epidemiology of falls in advanced old age using both retrospectively and prospectively collected falls data. Methods Design: Re-survey of over-90-year-olds in a longitudinal cohort study – cross-sectional interview and intensive 12-month follow-up. Participants and setting: 90 women and 20 men participating in a population-based cohort (aged 91–105 years, in care-homes and community-dwelling recruited from representative general practices in Cambridge, UK Measurements: Prospective falls data were collected using fall calendars and telephone follow-up for one year after cross-sectional survey including fall history. Results 58% were reported to have fallen at least once in the previous year and 60% in the 1-year follow-up. The proportion reported to have fallen more than once was lower using retrospective recall of the past year than prospective reports gathered the following year (34% versus 45%, as were fall rates (1.6 and 2.8 falls/person-year respectively. Repeated falls in the past year were more highly predictive of falls during the following year – IRR 4.7, 95% CI 2.6–8.7 – than just one – IRR 3.6, 95% CI 2.0–6.3, using negative binomial regression. Only 1/5 reportedly did not fall during either the year before or after interview. Conclusion Fall rates in this representative sample of over-90-year-olds are even higher than previous reports from octogenarians. Recalled falls last year, particularly repeated falls, strongly predicted falls during follow-up. Similar proportions

  18. Effects of growth hormone plus gonadotropins on controlled ovarian stimulation in infertile women of advanced age, poor responders, and previous in vitro fertilization failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Kai Ho

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: No significant differences were observed in infertile women of advanced age, which may be due to the low GH dose. The GH adjuvant therapy for patients with one or more previous IVF treatment failures and for poor responders significantly improved the oocyte and embryo numbers as well as implantation and pregnancy rates.

  19. Attitudes of women of advanced maternal age undergoing invasive prenatal diagnosis and the impact of genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Lea; Pompilii, Eva; D'Anna, Federica; Morselli-Labate, Antonio M; Nardi, Elena; Seri, Marco; Rizzo, Nicola; Pilu, Gianluigi; Turchetti, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Despite the increasing availability and effectiveness of non-invasive screening for foetal aneuploidies, most women of advanced maternal age (AMA) still opt for invasive tests. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was performed on women of AMA undergoing prenatal invasive procedures, in order to explore their motivations and the outcome of preliminary genetic counselling according to the approach (individual or group) adopted. Of 687 eligible women, 221 (32.2%) participated: 117 had received individual counselling, while 104 had attended group sessions. The two groups did not differ by socio-demographic features. The commonest reported reason to undergo invasive tests was AMA itself (67.4%), while only 10.4% of women mentioned the opportunity of making informed choices. The majority perceived as clear and helpful the information received at counselling, and only 12.7% had doubts left that, however, often concerned non-pertinent issues. The impact of counselling on risk perception and decisions was limited: a minority stated their perceived risk of foetal abnormalities had either increased (6.8%) or reduced (3.6%), and only one eventually declined invasive test. The 52.6% of women expressed a preference toward individual counselling, which also had a stronger impact on perceived risk reduction (P=0.003). Nevertheless, group counselling had a more favourable impact on both clarity of understanding and helpfulness (P=0.0497 and P=0.035, respectively). The idea that AMA represents an absolute indication for invasive tests appears deeply rooted; promotion of non-invasive techniques may require extensive educational efforts targeted to both the general population and health professionals.

  20. Advanced glycation end product ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products: Biochemical characterization and formation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valencia, J.V.; Weldon, S.C.; Quinn, D.; Kiers, G.H.; Groot, J. de; TeKoppele, J.M.; Hughes, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate with age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. AGEs bind cell-surface receptors including the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The dependence of RAGE binding on specific biochemical characteristics of AGEs is currently unknown.

  1. Effect of PKC-β Signaling Pathway on Expression of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in Different Cell Models in Response to Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisienny C. T. Rempel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are compounds classified as uremic toxins in patients with chronic kidney disease that have several pro-inflammatory effects and are implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases. To explore the mechanisms of AGEs–endothelium interactions through the receptor for AGEs (RAGE in the PKC-β pathway, we evaluated the production of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in human endothelial cells (HUVECs, monocytes, and a coculture of both. AGEs were prepared by albumin glycation and characterized by absorbance and electrophoresis. The effect of AGEs on cell viability was assessed with an MTT assay. The cells were also treated with AGEs with and without a PKC-β inhibitor. MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in the cell supernatants were estimated by ELISA, and RAGE was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. AGEs exposure did not affect cell viability, but AGEs induced RAGE, MCP-1, and VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs. When HUVECs or monocytes were incubated with AGEs and a PKC-β inhibitor, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 expression significantly decreased. However, in the coculture, exposure to AGEs and a PKC-β inhibitor produced no significant effect. This study demonstrates, in vitro, the regulatory mechanisms involved in MCP-1 production in three cellular models and VCAM-1 production in HUVECs, and thus mimics the endothelial dysfunction caused by AGEs in early atherosclerosis. Such mechanisms could serve as therapeutic targets to reduce the harmful effects of AGEs in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  2. Engagement and recruitment of Māori and non-Māori people of advanced age to LiLACS NZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna; Kepa, Mere; Hayman, Karen; Teh, Ruth; Moyes, Simon; Broad, Joanna B; Kerse, Ngaire

    2013-04-01

    Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ) aims to determine the predictors of successful advanced ageing and understand the trajectories of wellbeing in advanced age. This paper reports recruitment strategies used to enrol 600 Māori aged 80-90 years and 600 non-Māori aged 85 years living within a defined geographic boundary. Electoral roll and primary health lists of older people were used as a base for identification and recruitment, supplemented by word of mouth, community awareness raising and publicity. A Kaupapa Māori method was used to recruit Māori with: dual Māori and non-Māori research leadership; the formation of a support group; local tribal organisations and health providers recruiting participants; and use of the Māori language in interviews. Non-Māori were recruited through local health and community networks. Six organisations used differing strategies to invite older people to participate in several ways: complete full or partial interviews; complete physical assessments; provide a blood sample and provide access to medical records. During 14 months in 2010-2011, 421 of 766 (56%) eligible Māori and 516 of 870 (59%) eligible non-Māori were enrolled. Participation and contribution of information varied across the recruitment sites. Attention to appropriate recruitment techniques resulted in an acceptable engagement and recruitment for both Māori and non-Māori of advanced age in a longitudinal cohort study. There is high potential for meaningful results useful for participants, their whānau and families, health agencies, planners and policy. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. Revie ⊕: the influence of a life review intervention including a positive, patient-centered approach towards enhancing the personal dignity of patients with advanced cancer-a study protocol for a feasibility study using a mixed method investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha Rodrigues, Maria Goreti; Pautex, Sophie; Shaha, Maya

    2016-01-01

    It is generally recognized that existential concerns must be addressed to promote the dignity of patients with advanced cancer. A number of interventions have been developed in this regard, such as dignity therapy and other life review interventions (LRI). However, so far, none have focused on a positive approach or evaluated its effects on dignity and personal growth. This study aims to explore the feasibility of Revie ⊕, a life review intervention comprising a positive, patient-centered approach, and to determine potential changes of patients' sense of dignity, posttraumatic growth, and satisfaction with life. A mixed method study will be performed, which includes specialized nurses and 40 patients with advanced cancer in an ambulatory and in-patient setting of a Swiss university hospital. Quantitative methods involve a single group, pre- and post-intervention, and outcome measurements include the Patient Dignity Inventory, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Feasibility data relating to process, resource, and scientific elements of the trial will also be collected. A semi-directed interview will be used to collect qualitative data about the process and the participants' experiences of the intervention. In this way, enhanced quantitative-qualitative evidence can be drawn from outcome measures as well as individual, contextualized personal views, to help inform researchers about the plausibility of this complex intervention before testing its effectiveness in a subsequent full trial. Patient dignity is a goal of quality end-of-life care. To our knowledge, this is the first trial to evaluate the role of a life review intervention that is focused on personal growth and on changes relating to the experience of having cancer. This study will evaluate the feasibility of a novel intervention, Revie ⊕, which we hope will contribute to promote the dignity, personal growth, and overall life satisfaction of patients with advanced

  4. An Exploratory Analysis of Child Feeding Beliefs and Behaviors Included in Food Blogs Written by Mothers of Preschool-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doub, Allison E; Small, Meg; Birch, Leann

    2016-02-01

    This study analyzed child feeding beliefs and behaviors, types of recipes, and their associations in blogs focused on child feeding. The authors selected 13 blogs using purposive snowball sampling, from which 158 blog posts were sampled and coded using directed qualitative content analysis. Child feeding beliefs and behaviors and types of recipes were coded using schemes developed from existing literature. Code frequencies were calculated. Chi-square tests for independence examined associations between child feeding and recipe codes. Bonferroni corrections were applied: P feeding beliefs and behaviors were coded in 78% and 49% of posts, respectively. Beliefs about children's food preferences (48% of posts) and involving children in food preparation (27% of posts) were the most frequent codes. Recipes were included in 66% of posts. Most recipes were for mixed dishes (32% of recipes), followed by sweets and desserts (19% of recipes). Vegetable recipes were more likely in posts that included behavior encouraging balance and variety (χ2 [1, n = 104] = 18.54; P feeding practices. Future research should explore how mothers use blogs to learn about child feeding. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intravitreous injection of AAV2-sFLT01 in patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a phase 1, open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Jeffrey S; Kherani, Saleema; Desai, Shilpa; Dugel, Pravin; Kaushal, Shalesh; Cheng, Seng H; Delacono, Cheryl; Purvis, Annie; Richards, Susan; Le-Halpere, Annaig; Connelly, John; Wadsworth, Samuel C; Varona, Rafael; Buggage, Ronald; Scaria, Abraham; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Long-term intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralising proteins can preserve central vision in many patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. We tested the safety and tolerability of a single intravitreous injection of an AAV2 vector expressing the VEGF-neutralising protein sFLT01 in patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This was a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalating study done at four outpatient retina clinics in the USA. Patients were assigned to each cohort in order of enrolment, with the first three patients being assigned to and completing the first cohort before filling positions in the following treatment groups. Patients aged 50 years or older with neovascular age-related macular degeneration and a baseline best-corrected visual acuity score of 20/100 or less in the study eye were enrolled in four dose-ranging cohorts (cohort 1, 2 × 10 8 vector genomes (vg); cohort 2, 2 × 10 9 vg; cohort 3, 6 × 10 9 vg; and cohort 4, 2 × 10 10 vg, n=3 per cohort) and one maximum tolerated dose cohort (cohort 5, 2 × 10 10 vg, n=7) and followed up for 52 weeks. The primary objective of the study was to assess the safety and tolerability of a single intravitreous injection of AAV2-sFLT01, through the measurement of eye-related adverse events. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01024998. 19 patients with advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration were enrolled in the study between May 18, 2010, and July 14, 2014. All patients completed the 52-week trial period. Two patients in cohort 4 (2 × 10 10 vg) experienced adverse events that were possibly study-drug related: pyrexia and intraocular inflammation that resolved with a topical steroid. Five of ten patients who received 2 × 10 10 vg had aqueous humour concentrations of sFLT01 that peaked at 32·7-112·0 ng/mL (mean 73·7 ng/mL, SD 30·5) by week 26 with a slight decrease to

  6. Dietary folate, B vitamins, genetic susceptibility and progression to advanced nonexudative age-related macular degeneration with geographic atrophy: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Bénédicte M J; Silver, Rachel E; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence of the importance of nutrition in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but few studies have explored associations with folate and B vitamins. No effective therapeutic strategy for geographic atrophy (GA) is available, and prevention could be of great value. We investigated associations between dietary folate, B vitamins, and progression to GA and whether these associations might be modified by genetic susceptibility. Among 2525 subjects (4663 eyes) in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, 405 subjects (528 eyes) progressed to GA over 13 y. Folate and B vitamins were log transformed and calorie adjusted separately for men and women. Ten loci in 7 AMD genes [complement factor H, age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2/high-temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1, complement component 2, complement component 3, complement factor B, collagen type VIII α 1, and RAD51 paralog B] were examined. Survival analysis was used to assess associations between incident GA and dietary intake of folate and B vitamins. Interaction effects between these nutrients and genetic variation on AMD risk were also evaluated. Subjects with at least one eye free of advanced AMD at baseline were included in these analyses. There was a reduced risk of progression to GA with increasing intake of thiamin, riboflavin, and folate after adjusting for age, sex, and total energy intake (P-trend = 0.01, 0.03, and 0.001, respectively). After adjustment for demographic, behavioral, ocular, and genetic covariates, trends remained statistically significant for folate (P-trend = 0.007) and were borderline for thiamin (P-trend = 0.05). Riboflavin did not retain statistical significance (P-trend = 0.20). Folate was significantly associated with lower risk of incident GA among subjects homozygous for the complement component 3 (C3) R102G rs2230199 nonrisk genotype (CC) (HR = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.70; P = 0.0005) but not subjects carrying the risk allele (G) (P = 0.76). Neither

  7. Fractal scale-invariant and nonlinear properties of cardiac dynamics remain stable with advanced age: a new mechanistic picture of cardiac control in healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Daniel T; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2007-11-01

    Heart beat fluctuations exhibit temporal structure with robust long-range correlations, fractal and nonlinear features, which have been found to break down with pathologic conditions, reflecting changes in the mechanism of neuroautonomic control. It has been hypothesized that these features change and even break down also with advanced age, suggesting fundamental alterations in cardiac control with aging. Here we test this hypothesis. We analyze heart beat interval recordings from the following two independent databases: 1) 19 healthy young (average age 25.7 yr) and 16 healthy elderly subjects (average age 73.8 yr) during 2 h under resting conditions from the Fantasia database; and 2) 29 healthy elderly subjects (average age 75.9 yr) during approximately 8 h of sleep from the sleep heart health study (SHHS) database, and the same subjects recorded 5 yr later. We quantify: 1) the average heart rate (); 2) the SD sigma(R-R) and sigma(DeltaR-R) of the heart beat intervals R-R and their increments DeltaR-R; 3) the long-range correlations in R-R as measured by the scaling exponent alpha(R-R) using the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis; 4) fractal linear and nonlinear properties as represented by the scaling exponents alpha(sgn) and alpha(mag) for the time series of the sign and magnitude of DeltaR-R; and 5) the nonlinear fractal dimension D(k) of R-R using the fractal dimension analysis. We find: 1) No significant difference in (P > 0.05); 2) a significant difference in sigma(R-R) and sigma(DeltaR-R) for the Fantasia groups (P 0.5); and 3) no significant change in the fractal measures alpha(R-R) (P > 0.15), alpha(sgn) (P > 0.2), alpha(mag) (P > 0.3), and D(k) with age. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that fractal linear and nonlinear characteristics of heart beat dynamics break down with advanced age in healthy subjects. Although our results indeed show a reduced SD of heart beat fluctuations with advanced age, the inherent temporal fractal and nonlinear

  8. Self-rated health, health-related behaviours and medical conditions of Maori and non-Maori in advanced age: LiLACS NZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Ruth; Kerse, Ngaire; Kepa, Mere; Doughty, Rob N; Moyes, Simon; Wiles, Janine; Wham, Carol; Hayman, Karen; Wilkinson, Tim; Connolly, Martin; Mace, Casey; Dyall, Lorna

    2014-07-04

    To establish self-rated health, health-related behaviours and health conditions of Maori and non-Maori in advanced age. LiLACS NZ is a longitudinal study. A total of 421 Maori aged 80-90 years and 516 non-Maori aged 85 years living in the Bay of Plenty and Rotorua district were recruited at baseline (2010). Socioeconomic-demographic characteristics and health-related behaviours were established using interviewer administered questionnaire. Self-rated health was obtained from the SF-12. Medical conditions were established from a combination of self-report, review of general practitioner and hospital discharge records, and analyses of fasting blood samples. 61% Maori and 59% non-Maori rated their health from good to excellent. Eleven percent of Maori and 5% of non-Maori smoked; 23% Maori and 47% non-Maori had alcohol on at least 2 occasions per week. Physical activity was higher in Maori than non-Maori (p=0.035) and the relationship was attenuated when adjusted for age. More Maori (49%) than non-Maori (38%) were at high nutrition risk (p=0.005); and more non-Maori (73%) than Maori (59%) were driving (p<0.01). The three most common health conditions were hypertension (83%), eye diseases (58%) and coronary artery disease (44%). The health profile differed by gender and ethnicity. Overall, participants had a median of five health conditions. Self-rated health is high in this sample considering the number of comorbidities. There are differences in health behaviours and health conditions between genders and by ethnicity in advanced age. The significance of health conditions in men and women, Maori and non-Maori in advanced age will be examined longitudinally.

  9. Second-generation non-invasive high-throughput DNA sequencing technology in the screening of Down's syndrome in advanced maternal age women

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, JIAO; ZHANG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of using non-invasive DNA testing technology in screening Down's syndrome among women of advanced maternal age (AMA) and to provide evidence for prenatal screening of Down's syndrome. With a double-blind design, 8 ml of peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 87 women aged ≥35 years after 12 weeks of pregnancy. All cases were recorded with unique identification cards with clinical details and followed up until delivery. All...

  10. The use of recombinant luteinizing hormone in patients undergoing assisted reproductive techniques with advanced reproductive age: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Micah J; Levens, Eric D; Levy, Gary; Ryan, Mary E; Csokmay, John M; DeCherney, Alan H; Whitcomb, Brian W

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of recombinant LH in assisted reproduction technology (ART) cycles in patients of advanced reproductive age. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Published randomized controlled clinical trials comparing recombinant LH plus recombinant FSH versus recombinant FSH only in patients of advanced reproductive age. Patients 35 years and older undergoing assisted reproduction. Recombinant LH plus recombinant FSH controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) versus recombinant FSH stimulation only in assisted reproduction cycles. Implantation and clinical pregnancy. Seven trials were identified that met inclusion criteria and comprised 902 assisted reproduction technology cycles. No differences in serum E(2) on the day of hCG administration were reported in any trials. Two trials reported lower oocyte yield and one trial reported lower metaphase II oocyte yield in the recombinant LH-supplemented group. One trial reported higher fertilization rates in the recombinant LH-supplemented group. In a fixed effect model, implantation was higher in the recombinant LH-supplemented group (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.78). Similarly, clinical pregnancy was increased in the recombinant LH-supplemented group (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.83). The addition of recombinant LH to ART cycles may improve implantation and clinical pregnancy in patients of advanced reproductive age. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of dietary modification of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the hormonal and metabolic profile of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantalaki, Evangelia; Piperi, Christina; Livadas, Sarantis; Kollias, Anastasios; Adamopoulos, Christos; Koulouri, Aikaterini; Christakou, Charikleia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of dietary intervention on Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) intake on the hormonal and metabolic profile in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). After baseline evaluation, 23 women with PCOS [mean ± SD, age: 23.4 ± 5.7 years; body mass index (BMI): 26 ± 5.7 kg/m2] underwent the following consecutive 2-month dietary regimens: a hypocaloric diet with ad-libitum AGEs content (Hypo), an isocaloric diet with high AGEs (HA) and an isocaloric diet with low AGEs (LA). Metabolic, hormonal and oxidative stress status was assessed and AGEs levels were determined in all subjects after the completion of each dietary intervention. Serum levels of AGEs, testosterone, oxidative stress, insulin and HOMA-IR index were significantly increased on the HA compared to the Hypo diet and subsequently decreased on the LA diet (compared to HA) (pPCOS. These novel findings support recommendations for a low AGEs dietary content along with lifestyle changes in women with PCOS.

  12. Crosslinking by advanced glycation end products increases the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular cartilage: A possible mechanism through which age is a risk factor for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Zaken, C.B.; Braun-Benjamin, O.; Maroudas, A.; Bank, R.A.; Mizrahi, J.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Age is an important risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). During aging, nonenzymatic glycation results in the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in cartilage collagen. We studied the effect of AGE crosslinking on the stiffness of the collagen network in human articular

  13. Synchrotron infrared imaging of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in cardiac tissue from mice fed high glycemic diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Elizabeth A.; Fu, Shang; Weikel, Karen; Hu, Ping; Blankenberg, Francis G.; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Taylor, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Recent research findings correlate an increased risk for dieases such as diabetes, macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease (CVD) with diets that rapidly raise the blood sugar levels; these diets are known as high glycemic index (GI) diets which include white breads, sodas and sweet deserts. Lower glycemia diets are usually rich in fruits, non-starchy vegetables and whole grain products. The goal of our study was to compare and contrast the effects of a low vs. high glycemic diet using the biochemical composition and microstructure of the heart. The improved spatial resolution and signal-to-noise for SR-FTIR obtained through the coupling of the bright synchrotron infrared photon source to an infrared spectral microscope enabled the molecular-level observation of diet-related changes within unfixed fresh frozen histologic sections of mouse cardiac tissue. High and low glycemic index (GI) diets were started at the age of five-months and continued for one year, with the diets only differing in their starch distribution (high GI diet = 100% amylopectin versus low GI diet = 30% amylopectin/70% amylose). Serial cryosections of cardiac tissue for SR-FTIR imaging alternated with adjacent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections allowed not only fine-scale chemical analyses of glycogen and glycolipid accumulation along a vein as well as protein glycation hotspots co-localizing with collagen cold spots but also the tracking of morphological differences occurring in tandem with these chemical changes. As a result of the bright synchrotron infrared photon source coupling, we were able to provide significant molecular evidence for a positive correlation between protein glycation and collagen degradation in our mouse model. Our results bring a new insight not only to the effects of long-term GI dietary practices of the public but also to the molecular and chemical foundation behind the cardiovascular disease pathogenesis commonly seen in diabetic patients. PMID

  14. Elective single-embryo transfer improves cumulative pregnancy outcome in young patients but not in women of advanced reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Akihisa; Morishima, Kaoru; Harada, Miyuki; Hirata, Tetsuya; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to assess the significance of elective single-embryo transfer (eSET) in older women. The outcomes of assisted reproductive technology between 2001 and 2013 at single institution were retrospectively evaluated. Cumulative live birth rates (CLBRs) in one oocyte retrieval cycle were compared between those who underwent eSET and multiple embryo transfer (MET) in fresh cycles. The outcomes of 429 eSET cycles and 965 MET cycles were compared. CLBRs in eSET were higher than those of MET in women under 37 and were comparable in women aged 37 and over. The analysis of the outcomes separately in three age subgroups showed a significantly higher CLBR in young eSET (aged under 37) than that in young MET and similar CLBR between older (aged 37-40 and over 40) eSET and MET. Multiple birth rates were lower in eSET in all age groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that, in women aged under 37, number of frozen embryos, presence of good-quality embryos, and eSET were significantly related to cumulative live birth. In women aged between 37 and 40, age and number of frozen embryos were significantly related, while eSET was not. eSET in women under 37 resulted in increased CLBR compared with MET. In women aged between 37 and 40, CLBR in eSET group was similar with that in MET group. In both age groups, eSET reduced multiple birth rates. The significance of eSET in older women is limited presently, and further research on the strategy to improve cumulative outcomes is necessary.

  15. New assessment for advanced age: Italian study protocol on the assessment of surgical risk in the over-75-year age-group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilleri, Annarita; Scorcu, Giampaolo

    2017-07-18

    The role of age in the risk stratification of patients candidate for non-cardiac surgery is still today an unresolved issue. European guidelines, in contrast to American guidelines, do not attribute to age an independent role in increasing the risk, and the indices for assessment of perioperative cardiovascular risk are based on studies that were carried out on middle-aged subgroups of the population without specific attention to the elderly patient. While the indices of geriatric assessment have still not yet gained a standardized role in the risk stratification of patients candidate to non-cardiac surgery, their need is becoming increasingly urgent considering the epidemiological impact of elderly patients with multi-comorbidities who more and more in the future will undergo such interventions. The European guidelines themselves identify an "evidence gap" concerning frailty which requires a deeper evaluation. The aim of the multicenter observational study VALUTA-75 is to verify if the indices of risk stratification routinely used by the cardiologist integrated with those of physical and cognitive performance of specific geriatric pertinence can improve the ability to predict perioperative cardiovascular and non cardiovascular events, with the scope of improving the therapeutic process.

  16. The Donald W. Reynolds Consortium for Faculty Development to Advance Geriatrics Education (FD~AGE): a model for dissemination of subspecialty educational expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Mitchell T; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Fernandez, Helen; Christmas, Colleen; Osterweil, Dan; Sauvigné, Karen; Warshaw, Gregg; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Leipzig, Rosanne; Reuben, David B; Durso, Samuel C

    2012-05-01

    Most U.S. medical schools and training programs lack sufficient faculty expertise in geriatrics to train future physicians to care for the growing population of older adults. Thus, to reach clinician-educators at institutions and programs that have limited resources for enhancing geriatrics curricula, the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation launched the Faculty Development to Advance Geriatrics Education (FD~AGE) program. This consortium of four medical schools disseminates expertise in geriatrics education through support and training of clinician-educators. The authors conducted this study to measure the effects of FD~AGE. Program leaders developed a three-pronged strategy to meet program goals: FD~AGE offers (1) advanced fellowships in clinical education for geriatricians who have completed clinical training, (2) mini-fellowships and intensive courses for faculty in geriatrics, teaching skills, and curriculum development, and (3) on-site consultations to assist institutions with reviewing and redesigning geriatrics education programs. FD~AGE evaluators tracked the number and type of participants and conducted interviews and follow-up surveys to gauge effects on learners and institutions. Over six years (2004-2010), FD~AGE trained 82 fellows as clinician-educators, hosted 899 faculty scholars in mini-fellowships and intensive courses, and conducted 65 site visits. Participants taught thousands of students, developed innovative curricula, and assumed leadership roles. Participants cited as especially important to program success expanded knowledge, improved teaching skills, mentoring, and advocacy. The FD~AGE program represents a unique model for extending concentrated expertise in geriatrics education to a broad group of faculty and institutions to accelerate progress in training future physicians.

  17. Elevated Serum Carboxymethyl-Lysine, an Advanced Glycation End Product, Predicts Severe Walking Disability in Older Women: The Women's Health and Aging Study I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. Our aim was to characterize the relationship between serum carboxymethyl-lysine (CML, a major circulating AGE, and incident severe walking disability (inability to walk or walking speed <0.4 m/sec over 30 months of followup in 394 moderately to severely disabled women, ≥65 years, living in the community in Baltimore, Maryland (the Women’s Health and Aging Study I. During followup, 154 (26.4% women developed severe walking disability, and 23 women died. Women in the highest quartile of serum CML had increased risk of developing of severe walking disability in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for age and other potential confounders. Women with elevated serum CML are at an increased risk of developing severe walking disability. AGEs are a potentially modifiable risk factor. Further work is needed to establish a causal relationship between AGEs and walking disability.

  18. N-butanol extracts of Morinda citrifolia suppress advanced glycation end products (AGE)-induced inflammatory reactions in endothelial cells through its anti-oxidative properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Isami, Fumiyuki; Abe, Yumi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2017-03-04

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), senescent macroprotein derivatives formed during a normal aging process and acceleratedly under diabetic conditions, play a role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. AGEs cause endothelial cell (EC) damage, an initial trigger for atherosclerosis through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE). We have previously shown that n-butanol extracts of Morinda citrifolia (noni), a plant belonging to the family Rubiaceae, block the binding of AGEs to RAGE in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of n-butanol extracts of noni on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammatory reactions on AGE-exposed human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). HUVECs were treated with 100 μg/ml AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) or non-glycated BSA in the presence or absence of 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni for 4 h. Then ROS generation and inflammatory and gene expression in HUVECs were evaluated by dihydroethidium staining and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was measured after 2-day incubation of AGE-BSA or BSA in the presence or absence of 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni. N-butanol extracts of noni at 670 ng/ml significantly inhibited the AGE-induced ROS generation and RAGE, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene expressions in HUVECs. AGEs significantly increased monocytic THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs, which was also prevented by 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni. The present study demonstrated for the first time that N-butanol extracts of noni could suppress the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in HUVECs through its anti-oxidative properties via blocking of the interaction of AGEs with RAGE. Inhibition of the AGE-RAGE axis by n-butanol extracts of noni may be a novel nutraceutical strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  19. Comparison of endocranial morphology according to age in one-piece fronto-orbital advancement using a distraction in craniosynostotic plagiocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Shik; Altun, Ersin; Choi, Jong Woo; Rah, Young Shin

    2017-09-01

    The capacity for cranial remodelling is known to be better at younger ages. The timing of cranioplasty could affect the axis of the skull base. We investigated whether age at the time of distraction is related to the outcome of endocranial morphology correction. In this retrospective study, we investigated the surgical outcome of 14 patients with unilateral craniosynostotic plagiocephaly who underwent one-piece fronto-orbital advancement without bandeau by using a distraction technique between April 2005 and December 2015. Satisfactory results were achieved in all 14 patients with unilateral coronal suture craniosynostosis. An average distraction of 27.3 mm was obtained without detachment from the dura mater. The endocranial angulation of the anteroposterior axis was reduced from 165.4° to 173.5° on average, and the average total change was 8.1°. Between patients aged 1 year, there was a statistically significant difference in the postoperative endocranial angulation of the anteroposterior axis after 3 months (p = 0.003). The distraction techniques resulted in better correction of endocranial morphology. This indicates that the changes in the skull base axis after one-piece fronto-orbital advancement without bandeau are related to the remodelling capacity of the skull base in growing children based on the dura mater. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Takanori [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume 830-0011 (Japan); Yamagishi, Sho-ichi, E-mail: shoichi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume 830-0011 (Japan); Takeuchi, Masayoshi [Department of Pathophysiological Science, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya [Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2009-07-24

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-{gamma}, it increased the PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-{gamma} activation.

  1. O Impacto da Idade Materna Avançada sobre os Resultados da Gravidez Impact of Advanced Maternal Age on the Outcome of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Cecatti

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: identificar o efeito da idade sobre os resultados maternos e perinatais das gestações ocorridas em mulheres com 40 anos ou mais. Métodos: comparamos 494 gestantes com mais de 40 anos, com 988 gestantes com idade entre 20 e 29 anos, pareando-as por paridade. Após controlar possíveis variáveis confundidoras pela análise multivariada, a idade materna avançada manteve associação com a maior prevalência de hipertensão arterial, apresentação anômala, parto por cesária, hemorragia puerperal, índice de Apgar baixo, morte perinatal, natimortalidade e sofrimento fetal intraparto. Resultados: a idade materna avançada esteve isoladamente associada à hipertensão arterial, apresentação anômala, diagnóstico de sofrimento fetal intraparto, parto por cesária e hemorragia puerperal. Com relação aos resultados neonatais, a idade materna avançada estava associada independentemente apenas ao baixo índice de Apgar, morte perinatal e óbito fetal. Conclusões: esses achados mostram a necessidade de assistência obstétrica adequada com atenção especial a esses fatores para procurar melhorar os resultados maternos e perinatais das gestantes com idade avançada.Most authors agree on the negative impact of pregnancy in women with advanced maternal age on maternal and perinatal outcome. However, it is not usual to evaluate if some considered risk factors are only confounders because they are present in women over forty years. In order to identify the isolated effect of age on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancies in women over forty, 494 pregnancies from this age group were compared to 988 pregnancies among women aged 20 to 29 years, matched by parity. After controlling possible confounding variables through multivariate analysis, advanced maternal age maintained its association with a higher prevalence of hypertension, malpresentation, cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, low Apgar score, perinatal death, late fetal

  2. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. → GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression via PPARγ activation.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 21 protects mouse brain against D-galactose induced aging via suppression of oxidative stress response and advanced glycation end products formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinhang; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Liu, Yaonan; Yuan, Qingyan; Qu, Susu; Zhang, Tong; Tian, Guiyou; Li, Siming; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone secreted predominantly in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. Recently, it has been reported that FGF21-Transgenic mice can extend their lifespan compared with wild type counterparts. Thus, we hypothesize that FGF21 may play some roles in aging of organisms. In this study d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging mice were used to study the mechanism that FGF21 protects mice from aging. The three-month-old Kunming mice were subcutaneously injected with d-gal (180mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 8weeks and administered simultaneously with FGF21 (1, 2 or 5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Our results showed that administration of FGF21 significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in water maze task and step-down test, reduced brain cell damage in the hippocampus, and attenuated the d-gal-induced production of MDA, ROS and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). At the same time, FGF21 also markedly renewed the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and total anti-oxidation capability (T-AOC), and decreased the enhanced total cholinesterase (TChE) activity in the brain of d-gal-treated mice. The expression of aldose reductase (AR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and member-anchored receptor for AGEs (RAGE) declined significantly after FGF21 treatment. Furthermore, FGF21 suppressed inflamm-aging by inhibiting IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, decreased significantly. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF21 protects the aging mice brain from d-gal-induced injury by attenuating oxidative stress damage and decreasing AGE formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Takanori [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Yamagishi, Sho-ichi, E-mail: shoichi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Takeuchi, Masayoshi [Department of Pathophysiological Science, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya [Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  5. GxE Interactions Between FOXO Genotypes and Tea Drinking Significantly Affect Cognitive Disability at Advanced Ages in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Ni, Ting

    2014-01-01

    age 60, and at present time. Based on prior findings from animal and human cell models, we postulate that intake of tea compounds may activate FOXO gene expression, which in turn may positively affect cognitive function in the oldest old population. Our empirical findings imply that the health...

  6. Recent advances in measuring cerebral blood flow and metabolism in human aging, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, sleep and the epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.S.; Baylor Univ., Houston, TX

    1986-01-01

    The 133 Xe inhalation method, positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, X-ray transmission tomography by inhalation of 37.5% stable xenon gas during CT scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques contributions to knowledge of normal aging, cerebrovascular disorders, the dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, normal and abnormal sleep, migraine and cluster headache are summarized. 62 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Urban sustainability in an age of enduring inequalities: Advancing theory and ecometrics for the 21st-century city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Robert J

    2017-08-22

    The environmental fragility of cities under advanced urbanization has motivated extensive efforts to promote the sustainability of urban ecosystems and physical infrastructures. Less attention has been devoted to neighborhood inequalities and fissures in the civic infrastructure that potentially challenge social sustainability and the capacity of cities to collectively address environmental challenges. This article draws on a program of research in three American cities-Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles-to develop hypotheses and methodological strategies for assessing how the multidimensional and multilevel inequalities that characterize contemporary cities bear on sustainability. In addition to standard concerns with relative inequality in income, the article reviews evidence on compounded deprivation, racial cleavages, civic engagement, institutional cynicism, and segregated patterns of urban mobility and organizational ties that differentially connect neighborhood resources. Harnessing "ecometric" measurement tools and emerging sources of urban data with a theoretically guided framework on neighborhood inequality can enhance the pursuit of sustainable cities, both in the United States and globally.

  8. Interactions between Social/ behavioral factors and ADRB2 genotypes may be associated with health at advanced ages in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Y.; Cheng, L. G.; Zhao, L.

    2013-01-01

    ages. This study intends to fill in this research gap. Method: We conducted an exploratory analysis, using longitudinal survey phenotype/genotype data from 877 oldest-old aged 90+. To estimate association of GxE interactions with health outcome, adjusted for the potential correlation between genotypes...... and positively associated with good cognitive function; interaction between regular exercise and carrying rs1042718 or rs1042719 minor allele is significantly and positively associated with self-reported good health; and interaction between social-leisure activities and carrying rs1042719 minor allele...... exercise and social-leisure activities with cognitive function and self-reported health, and negative association of negative emotion with cognitive function, were much stronger among carriers of rs1042718 or rs1042719 alleles, compared to the non-carriers. Conclusions: The results indicate significant...

  9. The influence of patients age, type of tumor growth, hematocrit, and radiation-induced tumor regression on the prognosis of advanced uterine cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boljesikova, E.; Gyarfasova, M.

    1988-01-01

    The age of patients, type of tumor growth, pretreatment hematocrit, and radiation-induced tumor regression were evaluated as possible prognostic factors in 222 patients with advanced cervical cancer treated at the Institute of Clinical Oncology in Bratislava in the period from 1960 through 1980. The five-year disease-free survival rate for Stage IIb patients was 50%, for Stage III patients 23.1%, and for Stage IV patients 13%. Radiatoin-induced tumor regression and type of tumor growth were noted to be a significant prognostic factor with regard to the control of disease in the pelvis. Age of the patients and pretreatment hematocrit were found to be a weak prognostic factor. (author). 4 figs., 6 tabs., 25 refs

  10. "Electro-clinical syndromes" with onset in paediatric age: the highlights of the clinical-EEG, genetic and therapeutic advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisi Pasquale

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic causes underlying epilepsy remain largely unknown, and the impact of available genetic data on the nosology of epilepsy is still limited. Thus, at present, classification of epileptic disorders should be mainly based on electroclinical features. Electro-clinical syndrome is a term used to identify a group of clinical entities showing a cluster of electro-clinical characteristics, with signs and symptoms that together define a distinctive, recognizable, clinical disorder. These often become the focus of treatment trials as well as of genetic, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging investigations. They are distinctive disorders identifiable on the basis of a typical age onset, specific EEG characteristics, seizure types, and often other features which, when taken together, permit a specific diagnosis which, in turn, often has implications for treatment, management, and prognosis. Each electro-clinical syndrome can be classified according to age at onset, cognitive and developmental antecedents and consequences, motor and sensory examinations, EEG features, provoking or triggering factors, and patterns of seizure occurrence with respect to sleep. Therefore, according to the age at onset, here we review the more frequently observed paediatric electro-clinical syndrome from their clinical-EEG, genetic and therapeutic point of views.

  11. Attenuation of Glucose-Induced Myoglobin Glycation and the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs by (R-α-Lipoic Acid In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Ghelani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available High-carbohydrate containing diets have become a precursor to glucose-mediated protein glycation which has been linked to an increase in diabetic and cardiovascular complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of (R-α-lipoic acid (ALA against glucose-induced myoglobin glycation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs in vitro. Methods: The effect of ALA on myoglobin glycation was determined via the formation of AGEs fluorescence intensity, iron released from the heme moiety of myoglobin and the level of fructosamine. The extent of glycation-induced myoglobin oxidation was measured via the levels of protein carbonyl and thiol. Results: The results showed that the co-incubation of ALA (1, 2 and 4 mM with myoglobin (1 mg/mL and glucose (1 M significantly decreased the levels of fructosamine, which is directly associated with the decrease in the formation of AGEs. Furthermore, ALA significantly reduced the release of free iron from myoglobin which is attributed to the protection of myoglobin from glucose-induced glycation. The results also demonstrated a significant protective effect of ALA on myoglobin from oxidative damage, as seen from the decreased protein carbonyls and increased protein thiols. Conclusion: The anti-glycation properties of ALA suggest that ALA supplementation may be beneficial in the prevention of AGEs-mediated diabetic and cardiovascular complications.

  12. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs.

  13. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled pilot trial of a combined extract of sage, rosemary and melissa, traditional herbal medicines, on the enhancement of memory in normal healthy subjects, including influence of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, N S L; Menzies, R; Hodgson, F; Wedgewood, P; Howes, M-J R; Brooker, H J; Wesnes, K A; Perry, E K

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate for the first time the effects of a combination of sage, rosemary and melissa (Salvia officinalis L., Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Melissa officinalis L.; SRM), traditional European medicines, on verbal recall in normal healthy subjects. To devise a suitable study design for assessing the clinical efficacy of traditional herbal medicines for memory and brain function. Forty-four normal healthy subjects (mean age 61 ± 9.26y SD; m/f 6/38) participated in this study. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study was performed with subjects randomised into an active and placebo group. The study consisted of a single 2-week term ethanol extract of SRM that was chemically-characterised using high resolution LC-UV-MS/MS analysis. Immediate and delayed word recall were used to assess memory after taking SRM or placebo (ethanol extract of Myrrhis odorata (L.) Scop.). In addition analysis was performed with subjects divided into younger and older subgroups (≤ 62 years mean age n = 26: SRM n = 10, Placebo n = 16; ≥ 63 years n = 19: SRM n = 13, Placebo n = 6). Overall there were no significant differences between treatment and placebo change from baseline for immediate or delayed word recall. However subgroup analysis showed significant improvements to delayed word recall in the under 63 year age group (p memory in healthy subjects under 63 years of age. Short- and long- term supplementation with SRM extract merits more robust investigation as an adjunctive treatment for patients with Alzheimer's disease and in the general ageing population. The study design proved a simple cost effective trial protocol to test the efficacy of herbal medicines on verbal episodic memory, with future studies including broader cognitive assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) inhibits proximal tubular cell injury in early diabetic nephropathy by suppressing advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-receptor (RAGE) axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Sayaka; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yoshida, Yumiko; Yamakawa, Ryoji; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2011-03-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein with anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, and it could block the development and progression of experimental diabetic retinopathy. However, a role for PEDF in early experimental diabetic nephropathy is not fully understood. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis stimulates oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions in renal tubular cells, thereby playing a role in diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, this study investigated whether PEDF could prevent AGE-elicited tubular cell injury in early diabetic nephropathy. Human proximal tubular cells were incubated with or without AGE-bovine serum albumin in the presence or absence of PEDF. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with or without intravenous injection of PEDF for 4 weeks. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured with dihydroethidium staining. PEDF or antibodies raised against RAGE inhibited the AGE-induced RAGE gene expression and subsequently reduced ROS generation, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), fibronectin and type IV collagen mRNA levels in proximal tubular cells. RAGE gene expression, ROS generation and MCP-1 and TGF-β mRNA levels were significantly increased in diabetic kidney, which were suppressed by administration of PEDF. Our present data suggest that PEDF could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetic nephropathy by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulation of RAGE expression. Administration of PEDF may offer a promising strategy for halting the development of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk assessment of medically assisted reproduction and advanced maternal ages in the development of Prader-Willi syndrome due to UPD(15)mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, K; Murakami, N; Fukami, M; Kagami, M; Nagai, T; Ogata, T

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have suggested that disomic oocyte-mediated uniparental disomy 15 (UPD(15)mat) is increased in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). However, it remains unknown whether the increase is primarily due to MAR procedure itself or advanced maternal childbearing ages as a predisposing factor for the disomic oocyte production. To examine this matter, we studied 122 naturally conceived PWS patients (PWS-NC group) and 13 MAR-conceived patients (PWS-MAR group). The relative frequency of disomic oocyte-mediated UPD(15)mat was significantly higher in PWS-MAR group than in PWS-NC group (7/13 vs 20/122, p = 0.0045), and the maternal childbearing ages were significantly higher in PWS-MAR group than in PWS-NC group [median (range), 38 (26-45) vs 30 (19-42), p = 0.0015]. However, the logistic regression analysis revealed no significant association between the occurrence of disomic oocyte-mediated UPD(15)mat and MAR, after adjusting for childbearing age (p = 0.25). Consistent with this, while the frequency of assisted reproductive technology (ART)-conceived livebirths was higher in the PWS patients than in the Japanese general population (6.4% vs 1.1%, p = 0.00018), the distribution of childbearing ages was significantly skewed to the increased ages in the PWS patients (p < 2.2 × 10(-16) ). These results argue against a positive association of MAR procedure itself with the development of UPD(15)mat. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. An ER activity profile including ER, PR, Bcl-2 and IGF-IR may have potential as selection criterion for letrozole or tamoxifen treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Katrine L; Rasmussen, Birgitte B; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2009-01-01

    microarrays from formalin fixed paraffin embedded primary tumor material from a subgroup of patients (9.4%), who have participated in the international, randomized, phase III clinical trial PO25 comparing letrozole with tamoxifen in 907 patients with advanced breast cancer. The expression levels of ER...

  17. The assessment of combined first trimester screening in women of advanced maternal age in an Asian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sarah Weiling; Barrett, Angela Natalie; Gole, Leena; Tan, Wei Ching; Biswas, Arijit; Tan, Hak Koon; Choolani, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    First trimester screening (FTS) is a validated screening tool that has been shown to achieve detection rates of 84%-90% for trisomies 21, 18 and 13. However, its effectiveness for different maternal ages has not been assessed. The present study aimed to assess the performance of FTS in an Asian population, and to compare its effectiveness in older (≥ 35 years) and younger (NIPT) as a contingent screening test is also examined. Data on cases of FTS performed on singleton pregnancies over a six-year period was collated from two Singapore maternal centres, National University Hospital and Singapore General Hospital. Cases that had a 1:250 risk of trisomy were considered to be screen-positive. Pregnancy outcomes were obtained from birth records or karyotype test results. From 10,289 FTS cases, we obtained a sensitivity of 87.8%, a specificity of 97.6%, a false positive rate of 2.4% and a false negative rate of 0.06% for the detection of aneuploidy. The overall detection rate for trisomy 21 was 86.5%-85.7% for older women and 87.5% for younger women. The mean number of invasive tests required per case of trisomy 21 was 9.3 in younger women, 8.6 in older women and 13.5 in women with intermediate risk (1:250-1,000). While the performance of FTS was similar in younger and older women, more invasive procedures were required to diagnose trisomy 21 in women with intermediate risk. It may be advantageous to offer contingent NIPT to this group of women to reduce the risk of iatrogenic fetal loss.

  18. Tree-ring dates on two pre-Little Ice Age advances in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Gregory C.; Lawson, Daniel E.; Lyon, Eva; Wiesenberg, Nicholas; D'Arrigo, R. D.

    2011-09-01

    Two interstadial tree ring-width chronologies from Geikie Inlet, Glacier Bay Southeast, Alaska were built from 40 logs. One of these chronologies has been calendar dated to AD 224-999 (775 yr) crossdating with a living ring-width chronology from Prince William Sound, Alaska. Trees in this chronology were likely killed through inundation by sediments and meltwater from the advancing Geikie Glacier and its tributaries ca. AD 850. The earlier tree-ring chronology spans 545 yr and is a floating ring-width series tied to radiocarbon ages of about 3000 cal yr BP. This tree-ring work indicates two intervals of glacial expansion by the Geikie Glacier system toward the main trunk glacier in Glacier Bay between 3400 and 3000 cal yr BP and again about AD 850. The timing of both expansions is consistent with patterns of ice advance at tidewater glaciers in other parts of Alaska and British Columbia about the same time, and with a relative sea-level history from just outside Glacier Bay in Icy Strait. This emerging tree-ring dated history builds on previous radiocarbon-based glacial histories and is the first study to use tree-ring dating to assign calendar dates to glacial activity for Glacier Bay.

  19. The New Age of Bullying and Violence in Health Care: Part 2: Advancing Professional Education, Practice Culture, and Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Samnick, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This article will discuss new regulations and professional guidance addressing bullying and workplace violence including addressing recent organizational initiatives to support the health care workforce; reviewing how professional education has historically contributed to a culture of bullying across health care; and exploring how academia is shifting the culture of professional practice through innovative education programming. Applicable to all health care sectors where case management is practiced. This article is the second of two on this topic. Part 2 focuses on how traditional professional education has been cited as a contributing factor to bullying within and across disciplines. Changes to educational programming will impact the practice culture by enhancing collaboration and meaningful interactions across the workforce. Attention is also given to the latest regulations, professional guidelines, and organizational initiatives. Workplace bullying and violence have contributed to health care become the most dangerous workplace sector. This is a concerning issue that warrants serious attention by all industry stakeholders.Traditional professional education models have created a practice culture that promotes more than hinders workplace bullying and violence in the industry. Changes to both academic coursework and curricula have shifted these antiquated practice paradigms across disciplines. New care delivery modes and models have fostered innovative care and treatment perspectives. Case management is poised to facilitate the implementation of these perspectives and further efforts to promote a safe health care workplace for patients and practitioners alike.

  20. Impact of Age on the Risk of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia in a Young Population: An Analysis Using the Predicted Probability Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Mi Yeon; Park, Dong Il

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is decreasing in adults aged ≥50 years and increasing in those aged probability models for ACRN in a population aged 30-49 years. Of 96,235 participants, 57,635 and 38,600 were included in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. The predicted probability model considered age, sex, body mass index, family history of colorectal cancer, and smoking habits, as follows: Y ACRN  = -8.755 + 0.080·X age  - 0.055·X male  + 0.041·X BMI  + 0.200·X family_history_of_CRC  + 0.218·X former_smoker  + 0.644·X current_smoker . The optimal cutoff value for the predicted probability of ACRN by Youden index was 1.14%. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values of our model for ACRN were higher than those of the previously established Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS), Korean Colorectal Screening (KCS), and Kaminski's scoring models [AUROC (95% confidence interval): model in the current study, 0.673 (0.648-0.697); vs. APCS, 0.588 (0.564-0.611), P probability model can assess the risk of ACRN more accurately than existing models, including the APCS, KCS, and Kaminski's scoring models.

  1. Second-generation non-invasive high-throughput DNA sequencing technology in the screening of Down's syndrome in advanced maternal age women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, JIAO; ZHANG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of using non-invasive DNA testing technology in screening Down's syndrome among women of advanced maternal age (AMA) and to provide evidence for prenatal screening of Down's syndrome. With a double-blind design, 8 ml of peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 87 women aged ≥35 years after 12 weeks of pregnancy. All cases were recorded with unique identification cards with clinical details and followed up until delivery. All the non-invasive prenatal testing results were confirmed by amniotic fluid fetal karyotyping (the gold standard of aneuploidy test), follow-up examination by neonatologists or neonatal blood karyotyping. The sensitivity, specificity and other indicators of non-invasive DNA testing technology were calculated based on the data of 87 women of AMA. Among the 87 women of AMA, 5 were cases with abnormal numbers of chromosomes (3 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 18 and 1 case of 47, XXX). The sensitivity and specificity reached 100% for trisomy 21, trisomy 18 and 47, XXX. The present study supports that non-invasive DNA testing is a useful method of AMA screening of Down's syndrome with 100% accuracy. Therefore, it can be used as an important alternative screening method for Down's syndrome in women of AMA. PMID:27313855

  2. Second-generation non-invasive high-throughput DNA sequencing technology in the screening of Down's syndrome in advanced maternal age women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of using non-invasive DNA testing technology in screening Down's syndrome among women of advanced maternal age (AMA) and to provide evidence for prenatal screening of Down's syndrome. With a double-blind design, 8 ml of peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 87 women aged ≥35 years after 12 weeks of pregnancy. All cases were recorded with unique identification cards with clinical details and followed up until delivery. All the non-invasive prenatal testing results were confirmed by amniotic fluid fetal karyotyping (the gold standard of aneuploidy test), follow-up examination by neonatologists or neonatal blood karyotyping. The sensitivity, specificity and other indicators of non-invasive DNA testing technology were calculated based on the data of 87 women of AMA. Among the 87 women of AMA, 5 were cases with abnormal numbers of chromosomes (3 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 18 and 1 case of 47, XXX). The sensitivity and specificity reached 100% for trisomy 21, trisomy 18 and 47, XXX. The present study supports that non-invasive DNA testing is a useful method of AMA screening of Down's syndrome with 100% accuracy. Therefore, it can be used as an important alternative screening method for Down's syndrome in women of AMA.

  3. Beneficial effects of banana (Musa sp. var. elakki bale) flower and pseudostem on hyperglycemia and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Jamuna J; Shobha, Mysore S; Sambaiah, Kari; Salimath, Paramahans V

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes is a chronic health problem and major cause of death in most of the countries. Diet management plays an important role in controlling diabetes and its complications along with insulin and drugs. We have examined the effect of banana (Musa sp. var. elakki bale) flower and pseudostem on hyperglycemia and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Our results indicated that banana flower and pseudostem have low glycemic index and have a high content of dietary fiber and antioxidants. Diabetic symptoms like hyperglycemia, polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia, urine sugar, and body weight were ameliorated in banana flower- and pseudostem-treated rats. Increased glomerular filtration rate in the diabetic group (5.1 ± 0.22 ml/min) was decreased in banana flower-fed (2.5 ± 0.37 ml/min) and pseudostem-fed (3.0 ± 0.45 ml/min) groups and were significant at P banana flower- and pseudostem-fed groups, it was reduced to 9.21 ± 0.32 and 9.29 ± 0.24 μg/mg protein, respectively, and were significant at P banana flower and pseudostem have anti-diabetic and anti-AGEs properties and are beneficial as food supplements for diabetics.

  4. Is expanding HPV vaccination programs to include school-aged boys likely to be value-for-money: a cost-utility analysis in a country with an existing school-girl program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Similar to many developed countries, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is provided only to girls in New Zealand and coverage is relatively low (47% in school-aged girls for dose 3). Some jurisdictions have already extended HPV vaccination to school-aged boys. Thus, exploration of the cost-utility of adding boys’ vaccination is relevant. We modeled the incremental health gain and costs for extending the current girls-only program to boys, intensifying the current girls-only program to achieve 73% coverage, and extension of the intensive program to boys. Methods A Markov macro-simulation model, which accounted for herd immunity, was developed for an annual cohort of 12-year-olds in 2011 and included the future health states of: cervical cancer, pre-cancer (CIN I to III), genital warts, and three other HPV-related cancers. In each state, health sector costs, including additional health costs from extra life, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were accumulated. The model included New Zealand data on cancer incidence and survival, and other cause mortality (all by sex, age, ethnicity and deprivation). Results At an assumed local willingness-to-pay threshold of US$29,600, vaccination of 12-year-old boys to achieve the current coverage for girls would not be cost-effective, at US$61,400/QALY gained (95% UI $29,700 to $112,000; OECD purchasing power parities) compared to the current girls-only program, with an assumed vaccine cost of US$59 (NZ$113). This was dominated though by the intensified girls-only program; US$17,400/QALY gained (95% UI: dominant to $46,100). Adding boys to this intensified program was also not cost-effective; US$128,000/QALY gained, 95% UI: $61,900 to $247,000). Vaccination of boys was not found to be cost-effective, even for additional scenarios with very low vaccine or program administration costs – only when combined vaccine and administration costs were NZ$125 or lower per dose was vaccination of boys cost

  5. Is expanding HPV vaccination programs to include school-aged boys likely to be value-for-money: a cost-utility analysis in a country with an existing school-girl program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Wilson, Nick; Smith, Megan; Canfell, Karen; Blakely, Tony

    2014-06-26

    Similar to many developed countries, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is provided only to girls in New Zealand and coverage is relatively low (47% in school-aged girls for dose 3). Some jurisdictions have already extended HPV vaccination to school-aged boys. Thus, exploration of the cost-utility of adding boys' vaccination is relevant. We modeled the incremental health gain and costs for extending the current girls-only program to boys, intensifying the current girls-only program to achieve 73% coverage, and extension of the intensive program to boys. A Markov macro-simulation model, which accounted for herd immunity, was developed for an annual cohort of 12-year-olds in 2011 and included the future health states of: cervical cancer, pre-cancer (CIN I to III), genital warts, and three other HPV-related cancers. In each state, health sector costs, including additional health costs from extra life, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were accumulated. The model included New Zealand data on cancer incidence and survival, and other cause mortality (all by sex, age, ethnicity and deprivation). At an assumed local willingness-to-pay threshold of US$29,600, vaccination of 12-year-old boys to achieve the current coverage for girls would not be cost-effective, at US$61,400/QALY gained (95% UI $29,700 to $112,000; OECD purchasing power parities) compared to the current girls-only program, with an assumed vaccine cost of US$59 (NZ$113). This was dominated though by the intensified girls-only program; US$17,400/QALY gained (95% UI: dominant to $46,100). Adding boys to this intensified program was also not cost-effective; US$128,000/QALY gained, 95% UI: $61,900 to $247,000).Vaccination of boys was not found to be cost-effective, even for additional scenarios with very low vaccine or program administration costs - only when combined vaccine and administration costs were NZ$125 or lower per dose was vaccination of boys cost-effective. These results suggest that

  6. Premature aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassaki, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis that radiation may accelerate aging phenomenon has been studied extensively, using the population of A-bomb survivors. In this paper, non-specific radiation-induced premature aging is discussed with a review of the literature. Cardiac lipofuscin, papillary fibrosis, aortic extensibility, hexamine/collagen ratio in the skin and aorta, testicular changes, giant hepatic cell nucleus, and neurofibril changes have so far been studied pathologically in the context of A-bomb radiation. Only testicular sclerosis has been found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter. Suggestive correlation was found to exist between the hexamine/collagen ratio in the skin and aorta and A-bomb radiation. Grip strength and hearing ability were decreased in the group of 100 rad and the group of 50-99 rad, respectively. The other physiological data did not definitely correlate with A-bomb radiation. Laboratory data, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, α and β globulin levels, phytohemagglutinin reaction, T cell counts, erythrocyte glycophorin-A, the incidence of cerebral stroke, ischemic heart disease, and cataract were age-dependent and correlated with A-bomb radiation. These findings indicated that the occurrence of arteriosclerosis-related diseases, changes in immunological competence, and some pathological and physiological findings altered with advancing age, suggesting the correlation with A-bomb radiation. In general, it cannot be concluded that there is a positive correlation between A-bomb radiation and the premature aging. (N.K.) 51 refs

  7. A combination of gefitinib and FOLFOX-4 as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer patients. A GISCAD multicentre phase II study including a biological analysis of EGFR overexpression, amplification and NF-kB activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascinu, S; Berardi, R; Salvagni, S; Beretta, G D; Catalano, V; Pucci, F; Sobrero, A; Tagliaferri, P; Labianca, R; Scartozzi, M; Crocicchio, F; Mari, E; Ardizzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    Interesting activity has been reported by combining chemotherapy with cetuximab. An alternative approach for blocking EGFR function has been the development of small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinase domain such as gefitinib. We designed a multicentre phase II study in advanced colorectal cancer combining gefitinib+FOLFOX in order to determine the activity and to relate EGFR expression and gene amplification and NF-kB activation to therapeutic results. Patients received FOLFOX-4 regimen plus gefitinib as first-line treatment. Tumour samples were analysed for EGFR protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis and for EGFR gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) and NF-kB activation. Forty-three patients were enrolled into this study; 15 patients experienced a partial response (response rate=34.9%), whereas other 12 (27.9%) had a stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7.8 months and median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. We did not find any relationship with EGFR overexpression, gene amplification, while NF-kB activation was associated with a resistance to therapy. Gefitinib does not seem to increase the activity of FOLFOX in advanced colorectal cancer even in patients overexpressing EGFR or with EGFR amplification. Furthermore, while NF-kB activation seems to predict resistance to chemotherapy as demonstrated ‘in vitro' models, gefitinib does not overcome this mechanism of resistance, as reported for cetuximab. PMID:18059397

  8. The Hallmarks of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Otín, Carlos; Blasco, Maria A.; Partridge, Linda; Serrano, Manuel; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of physiological integrity, leading to impaired function and increased vulnerability to death. This deterioration is the primary risk factor for major human pathologies including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Aging research has experienced an unprecedented advance over recent years, particularly with the discovery that the rate of aging is controlled, at least to some extent, by genetic pathways and biochemical processes conserved in evolution. This review enumerates nine tentative hallmarks that represent common denominators of aging in different organisms, with special emphasis on mammalian aging. These hallmarks are: genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient-sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. A major challenge is to dissect the interconnectedness between the candidate hallmarks and their relative contribution to aging, with the final goal of identifying pharmaceutical targets to improve human health during aging with minimal side-effects. PMID:23746838

  9. Development of a modified prognostic index for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma aged 70 years or younger: possible risk-adapted management strategies including allogeneic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Utsunomiya, Atae; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Owatari, Satsuki; Miyagi, Takashi; Taguchi, Jun; Choi, Ilseung; Otsuka, Eiichi; Nakachi, Sawako; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Saiko; Tobinai, Kensei; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma is a distinct type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation after chemotherapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, there is no consensus about indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation because there is no established risk stratification system for transplant eligible patients. We conducted a nationwide survey of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in order to construct a new, large database that includes 1,792 patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 and received intensive first-line chemotherapy. We randomly divided patients into two groups (training and validation sets). Acute type, poor performance status, high soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels (> 5,000 U/mL), high adjusted calcium levels (≥ 12 mg/dL), and high C-reactive protein levels (≥ 2.5 mg/dL) were independent adverse prognostic factors used in the training set. We used these five variables to divide patients into three risk groups. In the validation set, median overall survival for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 626 days, 322 days, and 197 days, respectively. In the intermediate- and high-risk groups, transplanted recipients had significantly better overall survival than non-transplanted patients. We developed a promising new risk stratification system to identify patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who may benefit from upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm the benefit of this treatment strategy. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Advanced Age Attenuates Left Ventricular Filling Efficiency Quantified Using Vortex Formation Time: A Study of Octogenarians With Normal Left Ventricular Systolic Function Undergoing Coronary Artery Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Paul S; Dye, Lonnie; Boettcher, Brent T; Freed, Julie K

    2018-03-07

    Blood flow across the mitral valve during early left ventricular (LV) filling produces a 3-dimensional rotational fluid body, known as a vortex ring, that enhances LV filling efficiency. Diastolic dysfunction is common in elderly patients, but the influence of advanced age on vortex formation is unknown. The authors tested the hypothesis that advanced age is associated with a reduction in LV filling efficiency quantified using vortex formation time (VFT) in octogenarians undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Observational study. Veterans Affairs medical center. After institutional review board approval, octogenarians (n = 7; 82 ± 2 year [mean ± standard deviation]; ejection fraction 56% ± 7%) without valve disease or atrial arrhythmias undergoing CABG were compared with a younger cohort (n = 7; 55 ± 6 year; ejection fraction 57% ± 7%) who were undergoing coronary revascularization. None. All patients were monitored using radial and pulmonary arterial catheters and transesophageal echocardiography. Peak early LV filling (E) and atrial systole (A) blood flow velocities and their corresponding velocity-time integrals were obtained using pulse-wave Doppler echocardiography to determine E/A, atrial filling fraction (β), and E wave deceleration time. Pulse-wave Doppler also was used to measure pulmonary venous blood flow during systole and diastole. Mitral valve diameter (D) was calculated as the average of major and minor axis lengths obtained in the midesophageal LV bicommissural and long-axis transesophageal echocardiography imaging planes, respectively. VFT was calculated as 4 × (1 - β) × SV/(πD 3 ), where SV is the stroke volume measured using thermodilution. Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamics, LV diastolic function, and VFT were determined during steady-state conditions 30 minutes before cardiopulmonary bypass. A delayed relaxation pattern of LV filling (E/A 0.81 ± 0.16 v 1.29 ± 0.19, p = 0.00015; β 0.44 ± 0.05 v 0.35 ± 0.03, p = 0

  11. β-Hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and glucose concentrations in the blood of dairy calves as influenced by age, vaccination stress, weaning, and starter intake including evaluation of BHB and glucose markers of starter intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Hu, W; Dennis, T S; Hill, T M; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this research was to determine how blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and glucose are affected by age, time of day, stress, weaning, forced intake restriction, and voluntary starter intake in calves between 1 and 9 wk of age, and to evaluate if either is an acceptable proxy for starter intake. Holstein calves were fed a 27% crude protein, 17% fat milk replacer at 660 g of dry matter daily along with free-choice starter and water. Calves were weaned on d 42. Jugular blood was sampled at 0800, 1200, and 1600 h, and within 5 min of sampling BHB, and glucose concentrations were estimated using test strips (Nova Max Plus meter, Nova Biomedical Corporation, Waltham, MA). Age effects and time of day were estimated by sampling blood weekly (d 6, 13, 20, 27, 34, 41, and 48). To determine vaccination stress, a Pasteurella vaccine was administered after blood sampling at 0800 h on d 36. Effect of voluntary starter intake was tested by selecting calves for low and high intakes (d 35 to 39) and sampling on d 40, 41, 43, and 44. Starter intake restriction was tested by restricting intake in half of the calves and sampling on d 60 and 61. Data were analyzed with repeated measurements in a mixed model procedure with either within-calf effect (day or week) or within-calf effects (hour, and day or week) included in the model. Time of day did not affect blood BHB and glucose in the first 6 wk. Blood BHB was greater in wk 7 versus wk 1 to 6. Blood glucose was greater in the first 5 wk compared with wk 6 and 7. Blood BHB increased and glucose decreased with increasing starter intake. Blood BHB declined due to vaccination, but glucose was unaffected. Starter intake restriction reduced BHB for 3 d and glucose for 2 d after restriction. Both were affected by time of day. Around weaning (d 40 to 44), BHB and glucose increased with increasing starter intake. In this research, neither blood BHB nor glucose was a good proxy for starter intake. Blood BHB was positively and glucose

  12. Effects of an advanced practice nurse in-home health consultation program for community-dwelling persons aged 80 and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Lorenz; Naef, Rahel; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Schwarz, Jürg; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of an advanced practice nurse (APN) in-home health consultation program (HCP) on quality of life, health indicators (falls, acute events), and healthcare utilization. Randomized clinical trial. One urban area in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Four hundred sixty-one community-dwelling individuals aged 80 and older (mean age 85, 72.7% female, all Caucasian) participated in the intervention (n = 231) and control (n = 230) groups. After a comprehensive geriatric assessment, participants were randomly assigned to the 9-month HCP with four in-home visits and three phone calls from APNs or to a control group with standard care with no intervention. The primary outcome was quality of life at 3, 6, and 9 months. Secondary outcomes were incidence of falls, acute events due to health problems, and healthcare utilization measured for 3-month periods at 3, 6, and 9 months. The intervention and control groups did not differ significantly on any dimension of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire but differed significantly over 9 months in self-reported acute events (116 vs 168, relative risk (RR) = 0.70, P = .001), falls (74 vs 101, RR = 0.71, P = .003), consequences of falls (63.1% vs 78.7%, chi-square = 7.39, P = .007), and hospitalizations (47 vs 68, RR = .70, P = .03). The in-home HCP provided by APNs and guided by the principles of health promotion, empowerment, partnership, and family-centeredness, can be effective in reducing adverse health outcomes such as falls, acute events, and hospitalizations. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Health and Social Factors Associated with Nutrition Risk: Results from Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, C A; Teh, R; Moyes, S; Dyall, L; Kepa, M; Hayman, K; Kerse, N

    2015-06-01

    To establish the prevalence of high nutrition risk and associated health and social risk factors for New Zealand Māori and non-Māori in advanced age. A cross sectional analysis of inception cohorts to LiLACS NZ. Bay of Plenty and Lakes region of the North Island, New Zealand. 255 Māori and 400 non- Māori octogenarians. Nutrition risk was assessed using a validated questionnaire Seniors in the Community: Risk Evaluation for Eating and Nutrition (SCREEN II). Demographic, social, physical and health characteristics were established using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Health related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed with the SF-12, depressive symptoms using the GDS-15. Half (49%) of Māori and 38% of non-Māori participants were at high nutrition risk (SCREEN II score <49). Independent risk factors were for Māori younger age (p=0.04), lower education (p=0.03), living alone (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p=0.01). For non- Māori high nutrition risk was associated with female gender (p=0.005), living alone (p=0.002), a lower physical health related quality of life (p=0.02) and depressive symptoms (p=0.002). Traditional risk factors apply to both Māori and non-Māori whilst education as indicative of low socioeconomic status is an additional risk factor for Māori. High nutrition risk impacts health related quality of life for non-Māori. Interventions which socially facilitate eating are especially important for women and for Māori to maintain cultural practices and could be initiated by routine screening.

  14. Socioeconomic correlates of quality of life for non-Māori in advanced age: Te Puāwaitanga o Nga Tapuwae Kia ora Tonu. Life and Living in Advanced Age: a Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerse, Ngaire; Teh, Ruth; Moyes, Simon A; Dyall, Lorna; Wiles, Janine L; Kēpa, Mere; Wham, Carol; Hayman, Karen; Connolly, Martin; Wilkinson, Tim; Wright St Clair, Valerie; Keeling, Sally; Broad, Joanna; Jatrana, Santosh; Lumley, Thomas

    2016-09-09

    To establish socioeconomic and cultural profiles and correlates of quality of life (QoL) in non-Māori of advanced age. A cross sectional analysis of the baseline data of a cohort study of 516 non-Māori aged 85 years living in the Bay of Plenty and Rotorua areas of New Zealand. Socioeconomic and cultural characteristics were established by face-to-face interviews in 2010. Health-related QoL (HRQoL) was assessed with the SF-12. Of the 516 non-Māori participants enrolled in the study, 89% identified as New Zealand European, 10% other European, 1% were of Pacific, Asian or Middle Eastern ethnicity; 20% were born overseas and half of these identified as 'New Zealand European.' More men were married (59%) and more women lived alone (63%). While 89% owned their own home, 30% received only the New Zealand Superannuation as income and 22% reported that they had 'just enough to get along on'. More than 85% reported that they had sufficient practical and emotional support; 11% and 6% reported unmet need for practical and emotional support respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that those with unmet needs for practical and emotional support had lower mental HR QoL (p<0.005). Reporting that family were important to wellbeing was associated with higher mental HR QoL (p=0.038). Those that did not need practical help (p=0.047) and those that reported feeling comfortable with their money situation (0.0191) had higher physical HRQoL. High functional status was strongly associated with both high mental and high physical HR QoL (p<0.001). Among our sample of non-Māori people of advanced age, those with unmet support needs reported low HRQoL. Functional status was most strongly associated with mental and physical HRQoL.

  15. Mechanisms of lung aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenberger, Christina; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Lung aging is associated with structural remodeling, a decline of respiratory function and a higher susceptibility to acute and chronic lung diseases. Individual factors that modulate pulmonary aging include basic genetic configuration, environmental exposure, life-style and biography of systemic diseases. However, the actual aging of the lung takes place in pulmonary resident cells and is closely linked to aging of the immune system (immunosenescence). Therefore, this article reviews the current knowledge about the impact of aging on pulmonary cells and the immune system, without analyzing those factors that may accelerate the aging process in depth. Hallmarks of aging include alterations at molecular, cellular and cell-cell interaction levels. Because of the great variety of cell types in the lung, the consequences of aging display a broad spectrum of phenotypes. For example, aging is associated with more collagen and less elastin production by fibroblasts, thus increasing pulmonary stiffness and lowering compliance. Decreased sympathetic airway innervation may increase the constriction status of airway smooth muscle cells. Aging of resident and systemic immune cells leads to a pro-inflammatory milieu and reduced capacity of fighting infectious diseases. The current review provides an overview of cellular changes occurring with advancing age in general and in several cell types of the lung as well as of the immune system. Thereby, this survey not only aims at providing a better understanding of the mechanisms of pulmonary aging but also to identify gaps in knowledge that warrant further investigations.

  16. Context-specific outdoor time and physical activity among school-children across gender and age: Using accelerometers and GPS to advance methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Demant Klinker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field.Aims: To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children (outdoor time and outdoor MVPA and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA.Methods: A total of 170 children had at least one weekday of nine hours combined accelerometer and GPS data and were included in the analyses. The data were processed using the Personal Activity and Location Measurement System and a purpose-built PostgreSQL database resulting in context-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA and overall daily MVPA. In addition, four domains (leisure, school, transport and home and 11 subdomains (e.g. urban green space, sports facilities were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association between outdoor time and MVPA.Results: Girls compared to boys had fewer outdoors minutes (pConclusion:A new methodology to assess context-specific outdoor time and physical activity patterns has been developed and can be expanded to other populations. Different context-specific patterns were found for gender and age, suggesting different strategies may be needed to promote physical activity

  17. Positive predictive values for detection of trisomies 21, 18 and 13 and termination of pregnancy rates after referral for advanced maternal age, first trimester combined test or ultrasound abnormalities in a national screening programme (2007-2009)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siljee, Jacqueline E.; Knegt, Alida C.; Knapen, Maarten F. C. M.; Bekker, Mireille N.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Schielen, Peter C. J. I.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyse the positive predictive value (PPV) of trisomies 21, 18 and 13 after referral for advanced maternal age (AMA), first trimester combined test or ultrasound findings to suggest improvements for clinical practice. Data (48 457 combined tests, 134 000 fetal

  18. Advanced maternal age as an indication for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)--the need for more judicious application in clinically assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin

    2006-11-01

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is often recommended for routine screening of chromosomal aneuploidy in older women undergoing clinical assisted reproduction, even though its prognostic value on this group of patients is rather ambiguous. What is needed is a clear set of ethical guidelines in the marketing of this technically complex and expensive procedure to patients who are neither suffers nor carriers of serious genetic diseases. Professional counseling would be required to enable an informed decision from the patient. Differences in the prognostic value of PGD for different medical indications must be clearly presented to the patient and they must also be told that PGD is not a completely 'fool-proof' means of preventing birth defects. What may be detected are some genetic syndromes and conditions associated with cytogenetic abnormalities. The patient must be made aware that the results of previous studies have demonstrated that the overwhelming majority of chromosomally abnormal oocytes and embryos either fail to fertilize or implant, and therefore have a relatively low chance of resulting in a live birth with chromosomal defects. Statistical data, particularly the concept of relative risk must clearly be presented to the patient without exaggerating the risk of birth defects. The patient must also be rightfully informed that PGD carries a small risk of damaging the embryo, which could compromise chances of conception. PGD should be judiciously indicated for advanced maternal age in clinically assisted reproduction. Other diagnostic options that may be cheaper, and which also possess a high level of accuracy should be presented first to the patient i.e. amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy and ultrasonargraphy.

  19. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...

  20. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  1. Context-Specific Outdoor Time and Physical Activity among School-Children Across Gender and Age: Using Accelerometers and GPS to Advance Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field. To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children [outdoor time and outdoor moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA. A total of 170 children had at least one weekday of 9 h combined accelerometer and global positioning system data and were included in the analyses. The data were processed using the personal activity and location measurement system (PALMS) and a purpose-built PostgreSQL database resulting in context-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA, and overall daily MVPA. In addition, 4 domains (leisure, school, transport, and home) and 11 subdomains (e.g., urban green space and sports facilities) were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association between outdoor time and MVPA. Girls compared to boys had fewer outdoor minutes (p < 0.05), spent a smaller proportion of their overall daily time outdoors (p < 0.05), had fewer outdoor MVPA minutes during the day (p < 0.001) and in 11 contexts. Children compared to adolescents had more outdoor minutes (p < 0.05). During school and within recess, children compared to adolescents had more outdoor MVPA (p < 0.001) and outdoor time (p < 0.001). A 1-h increase in outdoor time was associated with 9.9 more minutes of MVPA (p < 0.001). A new methodology to assess the context-specific outdoor time and physical activity patterns has been developed and can be expanded to other populations. Different context-specific patterns were found for gender and age, suggesting

  2. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  3. Malignant lymphomas (including myeloproliferative disorders)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, I.D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter deals with the radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy of the malignant lymphomas. Included within this group are Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, mycosis fungoides, and chronic lymphatic leukaemia. A further section deals with the myeloproliferative disorders, including granulocytic leukaemia, polycythaemia vera, and primary thrombocythaemia. Excluded are myeloma and reticulum cell sarcoma of bone and acute leukaemia. With regard to Hodgkin's disease, the past 25 years have seen general recognition of the curative potential of radiotherapy, at least in the local stages, and, more recently, awareness of the ability to achieve long-term survival after combination chemotherapy in generalised or in recurrent disease. At the same time the importance of staging has become appreciated and the introduction of procedures such as lymphography, staging laparotomy, and computer tomography (CT) has enormously increased its reliability. Advances have not been so dramatic in the complex group of non-Hodgkins's lymphomas, but are still very real

  4. The aging raptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristan, Tim

    2010-01-01

    There is little information available in the literature regarding geriatric raptor medicine. Estimating the life span of birds of prey and evaluating factors that influence longevity are continuing to be explored. Identifying disease conditions that arise with advancing age may involve various body systems including the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and others. Falconry, exhibit, and wildlife raptors are reviewed with regard to factors that affect their mortality, life expectancy, and age evaluation. In addition, medical conditions that are frequently seen in geriatric raptors are covered in this article. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk Factors for Obesity at Age 3 in Alaskan Children, Including the Role of Beverage Consumption: Results from Alaska PRAMS 2005-2006 and Its Three-Year Follow-Up Survey, CUBS, 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M.; Young, Margaret B.; Perham-Hester, Katherine A.; de Schweinitz, Peter; Gessner, Bradford D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal and early life risk factors are associated with childhood obesity. Alaska Native children have one of the highest prevalences of childhood obesity of all US racial/ethnic groups. Methods Using the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and the follow-up survey at 3 years of age (CUBS), we evaluated health, behavioral, lifestyle and nutritional variables in relation to obesity (95th percentile for body mass index (BMI)) at 3 years of age. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was conducted using Stata 12.0 to evaluate independent risk factors for obesity in non-Native and Alaska Native children. Results We found an obesity prevalence of 24.9% in all Alaskan and 42.2% in Alaska Native 3 year olds. Among Alaska Native children, obesity prevalence was highest in the Northern/Southwest part of the state (51.6%, 95%CI (42.6-60.5)). Independent predictive factors for obesity at age 3 years in Alaska non-Native children were low income (obesity (OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.01-4.01) and longer duration of breastfeeding was protective (OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.995). Among Alaska Native children, predictive factors were witnessing domestic violence/abuse as a 3 year-old (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.17-7.60). Among obese Alaska Native children, there was an increased daily consumption of energy dense beverages in the Northern/Southwest region of the state, which may explain higher rates of obesity in this part of the state. Conclusions The high prevalence of obesity in Alaska Native children may be explained by differences in lifestyle patterns and food consumption in certain parts of the state, specifically the Northern/Southwest region, which have higher consumption of energy dense beverages. PMID:25793411

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age

    OpenAIRE

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnos...

  7. ACR-700 advanced technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Turner, C.W.; Yu, S.K.W.; Olmstead, R.; Speranzini, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A successful advanced reactor plant will have optimized economics including reduced operating and maintenance costs, improved performance, and enhanced safety. Incorporating improvements based on advanced technologies ensures cost, safety and operational competitiveness of the ACR-700. These advanced technologies include modern configuration management; construction technologies; operational technology for the control centre and information systems for plant monitoring and analysis. This paper summarizes the advanced technologies used to achieve construction and operational improvements to enhance plant economic competitiveness, advances in the operational technology used for reactor control, and presents the development of the Smart CANDU suite of tools and its application to existing operating reactors and to the ACR-700. (author)

  8. [Recent advances in anti-aging study of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside--a main component of Polygonum multiflorum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Han; Wang, Yue-Fei; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable process of life caused by a combination of organs and tissues events which manifests as loss of structure and function. It is accompanied with organ hypofunction, decline in defense against stress and energy metabolism, and lots of age-related diseases. Therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanism of aging, as well as to discover new drugs to slow aging. Polygonum multiflorum has long been recognized in traditional Chinese medicine as anti-aging medicine. Interestingly, its extract has been shown to prolong lifespan in drosophila and elegans. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG), the main ingredient of P. multiflorum, shares a strong structural similarity with resveratrol, a well-known anti-aging natural product. This review summarized up-to-date literature reports and our laboratory findings on the mechanism of TSG anti-aging efficiency and function against age-related disease. It could provide reference for searching for anti-aging tradition Chinese medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. Risk factors for obesity at age 3 in Alaskan children, including the role of beverage consumption: results from Alaska PRAMS 2005-2006 and its three-year follow-up survey, CUBS, 2008-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Wojcicki

    Full Text Available Prenatal and early life risk factors are associated with childhood obesity. Alaska Native children have one of the highest prevalences of childhood obesity of all US racial/ethnic groups.Using the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS and the follow-up survey at 3 years of age (CUBS, we evaluated health, behavioral, lifestyle and nutritional variables in relation to obesity (95th percentile for body mass index (BMI at 3 years of age. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was conducted using Stata 12.0 to evaluate independent risk factors for obesity in non-Native and Alaska Native children.We found an obesity prevalence of 24.9% in all Alaskan and 42.2% in Alaska Native 3 year olds. Among Alaska Native children, obesity prevalence was highest in the Northern/Southwest part of the state (51.6%, 95%CI (42.6-60.5. Independent predictive factors for obesity at age 3 years in Alaska non-Native children were low income (<$10,000 in the year before the child was born (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.22--17.03 and maternal pre-pregnancy obesity (OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.01-4.01 and longer duration of breastfeeding was protective (OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.995. Among Alaska Native children, predictive factors were witnessing domestic violence/abuse as a 3 year-old (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.17-7.60. Among obese Alaska Native children, there was an increased daily consumption of energy dense beverages in the Northern/Southwest region of the state, which may explain higher rates of obesity in this part of the state.The high prevalence of obesity in Alaska Native children may be explained by differences in lifestyle patterns and food consumption in certain parts of the state, specifically the Northern/Southwest region, which have higher consumption of energy dense beverages.

  10. Dietary echium oil increases long-chain n-3 PUFAs, including docosapentaenoic acid, in blood fractions and alters biochemical markers for cardiovascular disease independently of age, sex, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Fuhrmann, Claudia; Köhler, Melanie; Kiehntopf, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO) containing stearidonic acid (SDA) is a plant-based strategy to improve long-chain (LC) n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status in humans. We investigated the effect of EO on LC n-3 PUFA accumulation in blood and biochemical markers with respect to age, sex, and metabolic syndrome. This double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized controlled study started with a 2-wk run-in period, during which participants (n = 80) were administered 17 g/d run-in oil. Normal-weight individuals from 2 age groups (20-35 and 49-69 y) were allotted to EO or fish oil (FO; control) groups. During the 8-wk intervention, participants were administered either 17 g/d EO (2 g SDA; n = 59) or FO [1.9 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); n = 19]. Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome (n = 19) were recruited for EO treatment only. During the 10-wk study, the participants followed a dietary n-3 PUFA restriction, e.g., no fish. After the 8-wk EO treatment, increases in the LC n-3 metabolites EPA (168% and 79%) and docosapentaenoic acid [DPA (68% and 39%)] were observed, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreased (-5% and -23%) in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Compared with FO, the efficacy of EO to increase EPA and DPA in blood was significantly lower (∼25% and ∼50%, respectively). A higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with lower relative and net increases in EPA and DPA. Compared with baseline, EO significantly reduced serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, and triglyceride (TG), but also HDL cholesterol, regardless of age and BMI. In the FO group, only TG decreased. Overall, daily intake of 15-20 g EO increased EPA and DPA in blood but had no influence on DHA. EO lowered cardiovascular risk markers, e.g., serum TG, which is particularly relevant for individuals with metabolic syndrome. Natural EO could be a noteworthy source of n-3 PUFA in human nutrition.

  11. Communication & Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William E.

    This extensive bibliography contains more than 1,800 entries about communication and aging. The citations include journal articles, unpublished papers, speeches, dissertations, research studies, and books that relate aging and the aged to a variety of topics, including the following: physiological deterioration, socialization, political…

  12. Myricetin inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-induced migration of retinal pericytes through phosphorylation of ERK1/2, FAK-1, and paxillin in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Ki Mo; Jung, Dong Ho; Choi, Sojin; Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-02-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) have been implicated in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Characterization of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy is retinal pericytes loss, which is the result of pericytes migration. In this study, we investigated the pathological mechanisms of AGE on the migration of retinal pericytes and confirmed the inhibitory effect of myricetin on migration in vitro and in vivo. Migration assays of bovine retinal pericytes (BRP) were induced using AGE-BSA and phosphorylation of Src, ERK1/2, focal adhesion kinase (FAK-1) and paxillin were determined using immunoblot analysis. Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks old) were injected intravitreally with AGE-BSA and morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of p-FAK-1 and p-paxillin were performed in the rat retina. Immunoblot analysis and siRNA transfection were used to study the molecular mechanism of myricetin on BRP migration. AGE-BSA increased BRP migration in a dose-dependent manner via receptor for AGEs (RAGE)-dependent activation of the Src kinase-ERK1/2 pathway. AGE-BSA-induced migration was inhibited by an ERK1/2 specific inhibitor (PD98059), but not by p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitors. AGE-BSA increased FAK-1 and paxillin phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These increases were attenuated by PD98059 and ERK1/2 siRNA. Phosphorylation of FAK-1 and paxillin was increased in response to AGE-BSA-induced migration of rat retinal pericytes. Myricetin strongly inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and significantly suppressed pericytes migration in AGE-BSA-injected rats. Our results demonstrate that AGE-BSA participated in the pathophysiology of retinal pericytes migration likely through the RAGE-Src-ERK1/2-FAK-1-paxillin signaling pathway. Furthermore, myricetin suppressed phosphorylation of ERK 1/2-FAK-1-paxillin and inhibited pericytes migration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of advanced glycation end products in cellular signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Ott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in health care and lifestyle have led to an elevated lifespan and increased focus on age-associated diseases, such as neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, frailty and arteriosclerosis. In all these chronic diseases protein, lipid or nucleic acid modifications are involved, including cross-linked and non-degradable aggregates, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs. Formation of endogenous or uptake of dietary AGEs can lead to further protein modifications and activation of several inflammatory signaling pathways. This review will give an overview of the most prominent AGE-mediated signaling cascades, AGE receptor interactions, prevention of AGE formation and the impact of AGEs during pathophysiological processes.

  14. Evolutionary perspectives on ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Martin

    2017-10-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, ageing is a decrease in fitness with chronological age - expressed by an increase in mortality risk and/or decline in reproductive success and mediated by deterioration of functional performance. While this makes ageing intuitively paradoxical - detrimental to individual fitness - evolutionary theory offers answers as to why ageing has evolved. In this review, I first briefly examine the classic evolutionary theories of ageing and their empirical tests, and highlight recent findings that have advanced our understanding of the evolution of ageing (condition-dependent survival, positive pleiotropy). I then provide an overview of recent theoretical extensions and modifications that accommodate those new discoveries. I discuss the role of indeterminate (asymptotic) growth for lifetime increases in fecundity and ageing trajectories. I outline alternative views that challenge a universal existence of senescence - namely the lack of a germ-soma distinction and the ability of tissue replacement and retrogression to younger developmental stages in modular organisms. I argue that rejuvenation at the organismal level is plausible, but includes a return to a simple developmental stage. This may exempt a particular genotype from somatic defects but, correspondingly, removes any information acquired during development. A resolution of the question of whether a rejuvenated individual is the same entity is central to the recognition of whether current evolutionary theories of ageing, with their extensions and modifications, can explain the patterns of ageing across the Tree of Life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A dwarf mouse model with decreased GH/IGF-1 activity that does not experience life-span extension: potential impact of increased adiposity, leptin, and insulin with advancing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Darlene E; Lubbers, Ellen R; Magon, Vishakha; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J

    2014-02-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) action is associated with extended longevity in many vertebrate species. GH receptor (GHR) null (GHR(-)(/-)) mice, which have a disruption in the GHR gene, are a well-studied example of mice that are insulin sensitive and long lived yet obese. However, unlike other mouse lines with reduced GH action, GH receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mice have reduced GH action yet exhibit a normal, not extended, life span. Understanding why GHA mice do not have extended life span though they share many physiological attributes with GHR(-)(/-) mice will help provide clues about how GH influences aging. For this study, we examined age- and sex-related changes in body composition, glucose homeostasis, circulating adipokines, and tissue weights in GHA mice and littermate controls. Compared with previous studies with GHR(-)(/-) mice, GHA mice had more significant increases in fat mass with advancing age. The increased obesity resulted in significant adipokine changes. Euglycemia was maintained in GHA mice; however, hyperinsulinemia developed in older male GHA mice. Overall, GHA mice experience a more substantial, generalized obesity accompanied by altered adipokine levels and glucose homeostasis than GHR(-)(/-) mice, which becomes more exaggerated with advancing age and which likely contributes to the lack of life-span extension in these mice.

  16. Expression of advanced glycation end-products on sun-exposed and non-exposed cutaneous sites during the ageing process in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Crisan

    Full Text Available The glycation process is involved in both the intrinsic (individual, genetic and extrinsic (ultraviolet light, polution and lifestyle aging processes, and can be quantified at the epidermal or dermal level by histological, immunohistochemical (IHC, or imagistic methods. Our study is focused on a histological and immunohistological comparison of sun-protected regions versus sun-exposed regions from different age groups of skin phototype III subjects, related to the aging process. Skin samples collected from non-protected and UV protected regions of four experimental groups with different ages, were studied using histology and IHC methods for AGE-CML [N(epsilon-(carboxymethyllysine]. A semi-quantitative assessment of the CML expression in the microvascular endothelium and dermal fibroblasts was performed. The Pearson one-way ANOVA was used to compare data between the groups. In the dermis of sun-exposed skin, the number and the intensity of CML positive cells in both fibroblasts and endothelial cells (p<0.05 was higher compared to sun-protected skin, and was significantly increased in older patients. The sun-exposed areas had a more than 10% higher AGE-CML score than the protected areas. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the histological score and the IHC expression of CML. We concluded that in healthy integument, the accumulation of final glycation products increases with age and is amplified by ultraviolet exposure. The study provides new knowledge on differences of AGE-CML between age groups and protected and unprotected areas and emphasizes that endothelium and perivascular area are most affected, justifying combined topical and systemic therapies.

  17. Expression of advanced glycation end-products on sun-exposed and non-exposed cutaneous sites during the ageing process in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Maria; Taulescu, Marian; Crisan, Diana; Cosgarea, Rodica; Parvu, Alina; Cãtoi, Cornel; Drugan, Tudor

    2013-01-01

    The glycation process is involved in both the intrinsic (individual, genetic) and extrinsic (ultraviolet light, polution and lifestyle) aging processes, and can be quantified at the epidermal or dermal level by histological, immunohistochemical (IHC), or imagistic methods. Our study is focused on a histological and immunohistological comparison of sun-protected regions versus sun-exposed regions from different age groups of skin phototype III subjects, related to the aging process. Skin samples collected from non-protected and UV protected regions of four experimental groups with different ages, were studied using histology and IHC methods for AGE-CML [N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine]. A semi-quantitative assessment of the CML expression in the microvascular endothelium and dermal fibroblasts was performed. The Pearson one-way ANOVA was used to compare data between the groups. In the dermis of sun-exposed skin, the number and the intensity of CML positive cells in both fibroblasts and endothelial cells (p<0.05) was higher compared to sun-protected skin, and was significantly increased in older patients. The sun-exposed areas had a more than 10% higher AGE-CML score than the protected areas. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the histological score and the IHC expression of CML. We concluded that in healthy integument, the accumulation of final glycation products increases with age and is amplified by ultraviolet exposure. The study provides new knowledge on differences of AGE-CML between age groups and protected and unprotected areas and emphasizes that endothelium and perivascular area are most affected, justifying combined topical and systemic therapies.

  18. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2007-01-01

    This rigorous two-part treatment advances from functions of one variable to those of several variables. Intended for students who have already completed a one-year course in elementary calculus, it defers the introduction of functions of several variables for as long as possible, and adds clarity and simplicity by avoiding a mixture of heuristic and rigorous arguments.The first part explores functions of one variable, including numbers and sequences, continuous functions, differentiable functions, integration, and sequences and series of functions. The second part examines functions of several

  19. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Abdali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p=0.001 and p=0.01. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis.

  20. Dietary advanced glycation endproducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe

    High heat cooking induces flavor, aroma, and color of food, but leads to formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) by the Maillard reaction. In addition to the formation in food, AGEs are also formed in vivo, and increased endogenous formation of AGEs has been linked to diabetic complica......High heat cooking induces flavor, aroma, and color of food, but leads to formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) by the Maillard reaction. In addition to the formation in food, AGEs are also formed in vivo, and increased endogenous formation of AGEs has been linked to diabetic...... complications. A potential pathophysiological role of dietary AGEs in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease has been discussed, as the contribution of dietary AGEs has been estimated to be larger than the amount of endogenously formed AGEs. Furthermore, the increased mortality associated with type 2...... for biological effects of high heat-treated diets in humans. Studies with well-defined AGEs should be undertaken in order to advance our understanding of biological effects of specific AGEs....

  1. Skin collagen advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and the long-term progression of sub-clinical cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Vincent M; Sun, Wanjie; Gao, Xiaoyu; Sell, David R; Cleary, Patricia A; Lachin, John M; Genuth, Saul

    2015-09-05

    We recently reported strong associations between eight skin collagen AGEs and two solubility markers from skin biopsies obtained at DCCT study closeout and the long-term progression of microvascular disease in EDIC, despite adjustment for mean glycemia. Herein we investigated the hypothesis that some of these AGEs (fluorescence to be reported elsewhere) correlate with long-term subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) measurements, i.e. coronary artery calcium score (CAC) at EDIC year 7-9 (n = 187), change of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) from EDIC year 1 to year 6 and 12 (n = 127), and cardiac MRI outcomes at EDIC year 15-16 (n = 142). Skin collagen AGE measurements obtained from stored specimens were related to clinical data from the DCCT/EDIC using Spearman correlations and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Spearman correlations showed furosine (early glycation) was associated with future mean CAC (p 0 (p = 0.039), [corrected] but not with CAC score 100. Glucosepane and pentosidine crosslinks, methylglyoxal hydroimidazolones (MG-H1) and pepsin solubility (inversely) correlated with IMT change from year 1 to 6(all P multivariate analysis only furosine (p = 0.01) was associated with CAC. In contrast IMT was inversely associated with lower collagen pepsin solubility and positively with glucosepane, In type 1 diabetes, multiple AGEs are associated with IMT progression in spite of adjustment for A1c implying a likely participatory role of glycation and AGE mediated crosslinking on matrix accumulation in coronary arteries. This may also apply to functional cardiac MRI outcomes, especially left ventricular mass. In contrast, early glycation measured by furosine, but not AGEs, was associated with CAC score, implying hyperglycemia as a risk factor in calcium deposition perhaps via processes independent of glycation. Registered at Clinical trial reg. nos. NCT00360815 and NCT00360893, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  2. Context-specific outdoor time and physical activity among school-children across gender and age: using accelerometers and GPS to advance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    : To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children [outdoor time and outdoor moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA. Methods......-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA, and overall daily MVPA. In addition, 4 domains (leisure, school, transport, and home) and 11 subdomains (e.g., urban green space and sports facilities) were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association...... minutes (p new methodology to assess the context...

  3. Comparison of single-agent chemotherapy and targeted therapy to first-line treatment in patients aged 80 years and older with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang QQ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Qianqian Zhang,1 Zhehai Wang,2 Jun Guo,2 Liyan Liu,2 Xiao Han,2 Minmin Li,1 Shu Fang,1 Xiang Bi,1 Ning Tang,1 Yang Liu1 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare single-agent chemotherapy with targeted therapy in initial treatment and to explore a better choice of treatment for patients aged 80 years and older with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC.Patients and methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for 136 patients aged 80 years and older who were cytopathologically diagnosed and staged as advanced (stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. The patient population was divided into two treatment groups: 78 patients were allocated to the chemotherapy group (group A, pemetrexed or gemcitabine or docetaxel as a single agent, and 60 patients were allocated to another group and received epidermal growth factor-receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (group B, erlotinib or gefitinib as a single agent. The primary end points were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS, and the secondary end points were response rate, disease-control rate, safety, and quality of life.Results: In group A and group B, respectively, the median PFS was 2 versus 4 months (P=0.013, and the median OS was 8 versus 16 months (P=0.025. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the two groups were 23.7% (group A, 18 of 76 versus 76.7% (group B, 46 of 60 and 13.2% (group A, ten of 76 versus 10% (group B, six of 60, respectively. The response rate and disease-control rate were 28.9% versus 36.7% (P=0.39 and 57.9% versus 76.7% (P=0.022 in group A and group B, respectively.Conclusion: Elders aged 80 years and over with advanced NSCLC in group B had longer PFS and OS compared with group A. It was well tolerated in group B because of the mild adverse effects. Targeted therapy can be

  4. [Home end-of-life care for advanced dementia vs advanced cancer elderly patients: dying elderly at home project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Masuda, Yuichiro; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Iguchi, Akihisa; Asahi, Takiko; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of symptoms and end-of-life care received in advanced dementia and advanced cancer elderly patients dying at home during the last two days of their lives and to evaluate the differences observed between the two groups. We used data from the Dying Elderly at Home (DEATH) project, which was a prospective study of home elderly patients dying with end-stage illness. Consecutive deceased subjects aged 65 or older who were seen at 16 study clinics belonging to the Japanese Society of Hospice and Home-care with diagnoses of all illnesses including advanced dementia and advanced cancer and died at home from October 2002 to September 2004 were included in the study. We evaluated 36 deceased subjects with advanced dementia and 116 with advanced cancer. We collected the following information: sociodemographics, ADLs, cognitive impairment, observed symptoms and end-of-life care provided during the last 48 hours of life. Deceased subjects with advanced dementia were less likely to show symptoms of pain, acute confusion, or nausea/vomiting and more likely to display fever or cough than advanced cancer patients. Also, those with advanced dementia were more likely to receive intravenous drip injection or narcotic analgesia and more likely to be given sputum suction, or antibiotics. We observed that the dying process and end-of-life care for advanced dementia elderly patients was different from that for advanced cancer elderly patients.

  5. Diabetic foot ulcer carries high amputation and mortality rates, particularly in the presence of advanced age, peripheral artery disease and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael Henrique Rodrigues; Cardoso, Natália Anício; Procópio, Ricardo Jayme; Navarro, Túlio Pinho; Dardik, Alan; de Loiola Cisneros, Ligia

    2017-12-01

    Foot ulcer is also a clinical marker for limb amputation and for death in diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine amputation and mortality rates and its associated factors in patients with diabetic foot ulcerations in a tertiary hospital in Brazil. Retrospective medical records from 654 diabetic foot patients were reviewed. The risk factors were determined using the conditional logistic regression model analysis. The mean patient age was 63.1 years (SD 12.20). Peripheral arterial disease was present in 160 patients (24.5%). Major amputations were performed in 135 (21%). The in-hospital mortality rate was 12% and the mortality rate of the amputees was 22.2%. The lowest hemoglobin level, the median value was 9.50g/dL, (4.0-17.0). Anemia was detected in 89.6% of patients submitted to amputation and in 82,1% of those who died. Hemoglobin foot ulcer is associated with high amputation and mortality rates. Old age, peripheral arterial disease and low hemoglobin level are risk factor for major amputation. Old age, major amputation and low hemoglobin level are risk factors for death. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p -53 ) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease

  9. Advancing neurotrophic factors as treatments for age-related neurodegenerative diseases: developing and demonstrating "clinical proof-of-concept" for AAV-neurturin (CERE-120) in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartus, Raymond T; Baumann, Tiffany L; Brown, Lamar; Kruegel, Brian R; Ostrove, Jeffrey M; Herzog, Christopher D

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors have long shown promise as potential therapies for age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, 20 years of largely disappointing clinical results have underscored the difficulties involved with safely and effectively delivering these proteins to targeted sites within the central nervous system. Recent progress establishes that gene transfer can now likely overcome the delivery issues plaguing the translation of neurotrophic factors. This may be best exemplified by adeno-associated virus serotype-2-neurturin (CERE-120), a viral-vector construct designed to deliver the neurotrophic factor, neurturin to degenerating nigrostriatal neurons in Parkinson's disease. Eighty Parkinson's subjects have been dosed with CERE-120 (some 7+ years ago), with long-term, targeted neurturin expression confirmed and no serious safety issues identified. A double-blind, controlled Phase 2a trial established clinical "proof-of-concept" via 19 of the 24 prescribed efficacy end points favoring CERE-120 at the 12-month protocol-prescribed time point and all but one favoring CERE-120 at the 18-month secondary time point (p = 0.007 and 0.001, respectively). Moreover, clinically meaningful benefit was seen with CERE-120 on several specific protocol-prescribed, pairwise, blinded, motor, and quality-of-life end points at 12 months, and an even greater number of end points at 18 months. Because the trial failed to meet the primary end point (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor-off, measured at 12 months), a revised multicenter Phase 1/2b protocol was designed to enhance the neurotrophic effects of CERE-120, using insight gained from the Phase 2a trial. This review summarizes the development of CERE-120 from its inception through establishing "clinical proof-of-concept" and beyond. The translational obstacles and issues confronted, and the strategies applied, are reviewed. This information should be informative to investigators interested in translational

  10. [Management of unstable angina: advanced age is still an independent predictive factor of more conservative management after prognostic stratification with stress test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; García, E; Cantalapiedra, J L; Ortega, A; López de Sá, E; López-Sendón, J L; Delcán, J L

    2000-07-01

    In the management of ischemic heart disease, elderly patients constitute a subgroup that, despite having a worse prognosis, are usually managed more conservatively. The objective of this study was to evaluate if, in the management of unstable angina, a more conservative attitude in elderly patients is maintained after stratification by exercise test. The study population is constitude by 859 patients admitted to hospital due to suspected unstable angina that were referred to exercise test after medical stabilization. The management (invasive versus conservative, according to submission to cardiac catheterization or not) of patients was retrospectively studied, comparing patients 70 years-of age. Out of the 859 patients, 156 (18%) were > 70 years old, and the exercise test was positive in 281 (33%). Cardiac catheterization was performed in 494 (57%): 62% in older and 38% in younger patients (p management were: a negative exercise test, > 85% of the maximum heart rate, duration of exercise test more than 6 minutes, female gender, smoking and absence of episodes of rest angina. In the multivariate analysis, the statistically significant characteristics associated with an invasive management were the result of the exercise test (OR for positive result: 4.50; IC 95% = 2.73-7.63; p or = 6 minutes: 0.51; IC 95% = 0.29-0.88; p = 0.0177), the percentage of the maximum heart rate (OR for > or = 85%: 0.65; IC 95% = 0.42-0.98; p = 0.0391) and age (OR for > 70 years 0.36; IC 95% = 0.20-0.62; p = 0.0004). In the management of unstable angina, elderly patients constitute a more conservatively managed subgroup even after risk stratification with exercise test.

  11. Successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, G E; Mukamal, K

    2001-06-01

    Until now, prospective studies of aging have begun with 50-60-year-olds, not adolescents. Premature death, childhood variables, and alcohol abuse have been often ignored, as has successful aging. The authors reviewed the existing literature on health in late life in order to highlight that, increasingly, successful aging is not an oxymoron. The present study followed two cohorts of adolescent boys (237 college students and 332 core-city youth) for 60 years or until death. Complete physical examinations were obtained every 5 years and psychosocial data every 2 years. Predictor variables assessed before age 50 included six variables reflecting uncontrollable factors: parental social class, family cohesion, major depression, ancestral longevity, childhood temperament, and physical health at age 50 and seven variables reflecting (at least some) personal control: alcohol abuse, smoking, marital stability, exercise, body mass index, coping mechanisms, and education. The six outcome variables chosen to assess successful aging at age 70-80 included four objectively assessed variables (physical health, death and disability before age 80, social supports, and mental health) and two self-rated variables (instrumental activities of daily living and life enjoyment). Multivariate analysis suggested that "good" and "bad" aging from age 70-80 could be predicted by variables assessed before age 50. More hopeful still, if the seven variables under some personal control were controlled, depression was the only uncontrollable predictor variable that affected the quality of subjective and objective aging. One may have greater personal control over one's biopsychosocial health after retirement than previously recognized.

  12. Information Literacy: Advancing Opportunities for Learning in the Digital Age. A Report of The Aspen Institute Forum on Communications and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Richard P.; Breivik, Patricia Senn

    This report is an informed observer's interpretation of the discussions that took place at the 1998 annual meeting of the Aspen Institute's Forum on Communications and Society (FOCAS). It summarizes the inquiry made by FOCAS members into the many issues surrounding information literacy, including what information literacy is, why we need an…

  13. Age and Fertility: A Study on Patient Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Deatsman, Sara; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Rhoton-Vlasak, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fertility declines as women age. Advancing maternal age increases pregnancy risks such as diabetes or hypertension. Studies suggest women are not aware of the risks of aging on fertility and pregnancy. The study objective was to assess women's knowledge of fertility and reproductive outcomes affected by aging. Methods Prospective IRB approved survey of women (n=94) attending an obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) clinic. Data collected included demographics, pregnancy history, and kn...

  14. Conceptualizing age-friendly communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menec, Verena H; Means, Robin; Keating, Norah; Parkhurst, Graham; Eales, Jacquie

    2011-09-01

    On the political and policy front, interest has increased in making communities more "age-friendly", an ongoing trend since the World Health Organization launched its global Age-Friendly Cities project. We conceptualize age-friendly communities by building on the WHO framework and applying an ecological perspective. We thereby aim to make explicit key assumptions of the interplay between the person and the environment to advance research or policy decisions in this area. Ecological premises (e.g., there must be a fit between the older adult and environmental conditions) suggest the need for a holistic and interdisciplinary research approach. Such an approach is needed because age-friendly domains (the physical environment, housing, the social environment, opportunities for participation, informal and formal community supports and health services, transportation, communication, and information) cannot be treated in isolation from intrapersonal factors, such as age, gender, income, and functional status, and other levels of influence, including the policy environment.

  15. Life review in advanced age: qualitative research on the 'start in life' of 90-year-olds in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsley, Hilary; Pattie, Alison; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2016-04-01

    This research report presents findings on 'start in life' from a qualitative study of 90-year-olds from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921. The study aimed to contextualise the LBC1921 cohort in time and place, describe cohort members' experiences of family and schooling and stimulate further inquiry into the relationships between 'start in life' and risk and resilience factors relating to longevity and healthy ageing. Scottish education and family life in the early 1930s are briefly described. Life review questionnaire: A qualitative Life Review Questionnaire was developed, requiring free-text handwritten responses. Its 'Start in Life' section focused on schooling and family support. Wave 4 of the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 involved testing 129 members near to their 90(th) birthday. They reside largely in Edinburgh and its environs. The Life Review Questionnaire was administered to 126 participants, 54 % women. Qualitative analysis: Thematic analysis was the qualitative technique used to categorise, code and extract meaning from questionnaire text. Narratives were extracted from the data to present illustrative stories. Narratives of start in life gave contextual description. Thematic analysis showed LBC1921 members enjoying their schooling, highlighting teachers, academic achievement, school activities and school friendships. Personal qualities, family circumstances and aspects of schooling sometimes hindered educational performance. Family life was recalled mostly with warmth and parents were often portrayed as valuing education and supporting learning and development. Family adversity from poverty, parental illness and parental death was often mitigated by support from parents (or the remaining parent). Overall, most cohort members believed that they had got off to a good 'start in life'. This qualitative investigation of 'start in life' adds context and richness to quantitative investigations of the sizeable LBC1921 cohort, stimulating fresh insights and hypotheses

  16. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials Part IV: Case study of oxo-biodegradable polyethylene commercial bag - Aging in biotic and abiotic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musioł, Marta; Rydz, Joanna; Janeczek, Henryk; Radecka, Iza; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2017-06-01

    The public awareness of the quality of environment stimulates the endeavor to safe polymeric materials and their degradation products. The aim of the forensic engineering case study presented in this paper is to evaluate the aging process of commercial oxo-degradable polyethylene bag under real industrial composting conditions and in distilled water at 70°C, for comparison. Partial degradation of the investigated material was monitored by changes in molecular weight, thermal properties and Keto Carbonyl Bond Index and Vinyl Bond Index, which were calculated from the FTIR spectra. The results indicate that such an oxo-degradable product offered in markets degrades slowly under industrial composting conditions. Even fragmentation is slow, and it is dubious that biological mineralization of this material would occur within a year under industrial composting conditions. The slow degradation and fragmentation is most likely due to partially crosslinking after long time of degradation, which results in the limitation of low molecular weight residues for assimilation. The work suggests that these materials should not be labeled as biodegradable, and should be further analyzed in order to avoid the spread of persistent artificial materials in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  18. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  19. Assessment of Biochemical Liver Function Tests in Relation to Age ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Background and Objective: Multiorgan failure including liver dysfunction is a common finding in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients, the cause of which is multifactorial with advancing age said to be a major determinant. There is a paucity of data on liver function among SCA patients in relation to age in ...

  20. Assessment of biochemical liver function tests in relation to age ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Multiorgan failure including liver dysfunction is a common finding in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients, the cause of which is multifactorial with advancing age said to be a major determinant. There is a paucity of data on liver function among SCA patients in relation to age in northern Nigerian ...

  1. Advanced glycation end product ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products: biochemical characterization and formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Jessica V; Weldon, Stephen C; Quinn, Douglas; Kiers, Geesje H; DeGroot, Jeroen; TeKoppele, Johan M; Hughes, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate with age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. AGEs bind cell-surface receptors including the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The dependence of RAGE binding on specific biochemical characteristics of AGEs is currently unknown. Using standardized procedures and a variety of AGE measures, the present study aimed to characterize the AGEs that bind to RAGE and their formation kinetics in vitro. To produce AGEs with varying RAGE binding affinity, bovine serum albumin (BSA) AGEs were prepared with 0.5M glucose, fructose, or ribose at times of incubation from 0 to 12 weeks or for up to 3 days with glycolaldehyde or glyoxylic acid. The AGE-BSAs were characterized for RAGE binding affinity, fluorescence, absorbance, carbonyl content, reactive free amine content, molecular weight, pentosidine content, and N-epsilon-carboxymethyl lysine content. Ribose-AGEs bound RAGE with high affinity within 1 week of incubation in contrast to glucose- and fructose-AGE, which required 12 and 6 weeks, respectively, to generate equivalent RAGE ligands (IC50=0.66, 0.93, and 1.7 microM, respectively). Over time, all of the measured AGE characteristics increased. However, only free amine content robustly correlated with RAGE binding affinity. In addition, detailed protocols for the generation of AGEs that reproducibly bind RAGE with high affinity were developed, which will allow for further study of the RAGE-AGE interaction.

  2. Transportation and Aging: An Updated Research Agenda to Advance Safe Mobility among Older Adults Transitioning From Driving to Non-driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Anne E; Molnar, Lisa J; Bédard, Michel; Eby, David W; Berg-Weger, Marla; Choi, Moon; Grigg, Jenai; Horowitz, Amy; Meuser, Thomas; Myers, Anita; O'Connor, Melissa; Silverstein, Nina M

    2017-07-29

    Engagement in civic, social, and community life plays an important role in health, well-being, and quality of life, and requires individuals to be mobile in their environment. In this article, we review what is currently known about 2 areas relevant to safe mobility for older drivers and identify future research in these areas. Using a framework for transportation and safe mobility, 2 key areas were selected for review: the process of transitioning to non-driving and the maintenance of mobility after driving has ceased. This article serves as a companion to another article that used the same approach to explore safe mobility issues for older adults who are still driving. We found that although there has been progress in supporting transitioning process to non-driving and improving mobility options for older adults following driving cessation, many knowledge gaps still exist. We identified several research topics that would benefit from continued scientific inquiry. In addition, several themes emerged from the review, including the need for: multidisciplinary, community-wide solutions; large-scale, longitudinal studies; improved education and training for older adults and the variety of stakeholders involved in older adult transportation; and the need for programs and interventions that are flexible and responsive to individual needs and situational differences. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Maternal age and child morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Malene Meisner; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Mørch, Lina Steinrud

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age at delivery has increased over the latest half of a century. Women of advanced maternal age have increased obstetrical risks and increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities and some other specified diagnoses in the offspring. The aim of this study was to assess the asso......INTRODUCTION: The mean age at delivery has increased over the latest half of a century. Women of advanced maternal age have increased obstetrical risks and increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities and some other specified diagnoses in the offspring. The aim of this study was to assess...... the association between maternal age and overall child morbidity according to main diagnosis groups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a national cohort study including 352 027 live firstborn singleton children. The children were born between Jan 1994 and Dec 2009 and followed to Dec 2012. Children were divided...... into groups according to maternal age: 15-24, 25-29, 30-34, and 35+ years. Poisson regression analyses calculated adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of child morbidities according to main diagnoses groups A-Q of the International Classification of Disease 10 with adjustment for year of birth, body mass...

  4. Dietary advanced glycation endproducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe

    on postprandial subjective appetite sensations, appetite hormones, and markers of inflammation of two cooking methods that respectively induce or limit AGE formation were investigated in healthy overweight individuals. It was concluded that the meals affected subjective appetite sensations similarly, but the high...... sensitivity of cooking methods that induce or limit AGE formation were investigated in healthy overweight women. It was concluded that insulin sensitivity was improved with use of low heat cooking methods, compared with high heat cooking methods. In a rat study, effects on expression of AGE receptors, insulin......High heat cooking induces flavor, aroma, and color of food, but leads to formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) by the Maillard reaction. In addition to the formation in food, AGEs are also formed in vivo, and increased endogenous formation of AGEs has been linked to diabetic...

  5. Advanced glycation endproducts in food and their effects on health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Andersen, Jeanette Marker

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) form by Maillard-reactions after initial binding of aldehydes with amines or amides in heated foods or in living organisms. The mechanisms of formation may include ionic as well as oxidative and radical pathways. The reactions may proceed within proteins...

  6. [Joint destruction and infection in advanced age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettin, D; Dethloff, M; Karbowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Because of degenerative joint diseases and the reduced resistance in older patients the correct diagnoses of joint-empyema is difficult. In 29 pat (> 60 y) the mean delay of diagnoses was 5.1 months. First location of the infection have been: urinary tract 12, pneumonia 6, skin infection 10, and decubitus 3. Risk factors have been diabetes 4, polyarthritis 3, gout 3 and tuberculosis 3. The species were: s. aureus 12, s. albus 2, streptococcus 2, diphtheroid 2, e.coli 2, pseudomonas 2, proteus 4, enterobacter 3 and salmonella 1. 8 patients demonstrated mixed infections. The high mortality (3 pat.) and the frequent general sepsis (5 pat.) underline the importance of a missed joint-empyema in the elderly.

  7. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  8. bFGF and TGFβ1 growth factors, inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, CRP and advanced glycation end-products (AGE, RAGE in patients with ischemic heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Vladimirovna Ivannikova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate plasma levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, markers for nonspecific inflammatory process (interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP and their putative correlation with advanced glycation end-products relative to diabetes compensation in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Materials and Methods. 87 patients with IHD were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent standard clinical examination, including laboratory assessment of glycemic parameters, lipid panel and renal function, with echocardiography, supplemented with coronary angiography. Analyses for study parameters were performed on samples obtained from aorta and, separately, from cubital vein during coronary angiography.Results. Diabetes mellitus in patients with IHD is firmly associated with TGFβ1, IL-6 and CRP elevation in both arterial and venous plasma. TGFβ1 positively correlates with lipid profile parameters. Plasma concentration of inflammatory markers and advanced glycation end-products positively correlates with the extent of coronary lesions in relation to the presence of diabetes mellitus.Conclusion. Our data suggests the interplay between connective tissue growth factors and lipid metabolism in the atherosclerotic process.

  9. Advancing LGBT Elder Policy and Support Services: The Massachusetts Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, Lisa; Cahill, Sean R

    2017-12-01

    The Massachusetts-based LGBT Aging Project has trained elder service providers in affirming and culturally competent care for LGBT older adults, supported development of LGBT-friendly meal programs, and advanced LGBT equality under aging policy. Working across sectors, this innovative model launched the country's first statewide Legislative Commission on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Aging. Advocates are working with policymakers to implement key recommendations, including cultural competency training and data collection in statewide networks of elder services. The LGBT Aging Project's success provides a template for improving services and policy for LGBT older adults throughout the country.

  10. AdvancED Flex 4

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Shashank; Schulze, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    AdvancED Flex 4 makes advanced Flex 4 concepts and techniques easy. Ajax, RIA, Web 2.0, mashups, mobile applications, the most sophisticated web tools, and the coolest interactive web applications are all covered with practical, visually oriented recipes. * Completely updated for the new tools in Flex 4* Demonstrates how to use Flex 4 to create robust and scalable enterprise-grade Rich Internet Applications.* Teaches you to build high-performance web applications with interactivity that really engages your users.* What you'll learn Practiced beginners and intermediate users of Flex, especially

  11. Alcohol, aging, and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boule, Lisbeth A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2017-07-01

    The global population is aging: in 2010, 8% of the population was older than 65 y, and that is expected to double to 16% by 2050. With advanced age comes a heightened prevalence of chronic diseases. Moreover, elderly humans fair worse after acute diseases, namely infection, leading to higher rates of infection-mediated mortality. Advanced age alters many aspects of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, leading to impaired responses to primary infection and poor development of immunologic memory. An often overlooked, yet increasingly common, behavior in older individuals is alcohol consumption. In fact, it has been estimated that >40% of older adults consume alcohol, and evidence reveals that >10% of this group is drinking more than the recommended limit by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol consumption, at any level, alters host immune responses, including changes in the number, phenotype, and function of innate and adaptive immune cells. Thus, understanding the effect of alcohol ingestion on the immune system of older individuals, who are already less capable of combating infection, merits further study. However, there is currently almost nothing known about how drinking alters innate immunity in older subjects, despite innate immune cells being critical for host defense, resolution of inflammation, and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we review the effects of aging and alcohol consumption on innate immune cells independently and highlight the few studies that have examined the effects of alcohol ingestion in aged individuals. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Biological Age Predictors

    OpenAIRE

    Jylh?v?, Juulia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; H?gg, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The search for reliable indicators of biological age, rather than chronological age, has been ongoing for over three decades, and until recently, largely without success. Advances in the fields of molecular biology have increased the variety of potential candidate biomarkers that may be considered as biological age predictors. In this review, we summarize current state-of-the-art findings considering six potential types of biological age predictors: epigenetic clocks, telomere length, transcr...

  13. Successful Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiqurrahman Nasihun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The emerging concept of successful aging is based on evidence that in healthy individual when they get aged, there are  considerable variations in physiological functions alteration. Some people exhibiting greater, but others very few or no age related alteration. The first is called poor aging and the later is called successful pattern of aging (Lambert SW, 2008. Thus, in the simple words the successful aging concept is define as an opportunity of old people to stay  active and productive condition despite they get aged chronologically. Aging itself might be defined as the progressive accumulation of changes with time associated with or responsible for the ever-increasing susceptibility to disease and death which accompanies advancing age (Harman D, 1981. The time needed to accumulate changes is attributable to aging process. The marked emerging questions are how does aging happen and where does aging start? To answer these questions and because of the complexity of aging process, there are more than 300 aging theories have been proposed to explain how and where aging occured and started respectively. There are too many to enumerate theories and classification of aging process. In summary, all of these aging theories can be grouped into three clusters: 1. Genetics program theory, this theory suggests that aging is resulted from program directed by the genes; 2. Epigenetic theory, in these theory aging is resulted from environmental random events not determined by the genes; 3. Evolutionary theory, which propose that aging is a medium for disposal mortal soma in order to avoid competition between organism and their progeny for food and space, did not try to explain how aging occur, but possibly answer why aging occur (De la Fuente. 2009. Among the three groups of aging theories, the epigenetic theory is useful to explain and try to solve the enigma of aging which is prominently caused by internal and external environmental influences

  14. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J [and others

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  15. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Nickerson, HK; Steenrod, NE

    2011-01-01

    ""This book is a radical departure from all previous concepts of advanced calculus,"" declared the Bulletin of the American Mathematics Society, ""and the nature of this departure merits serious study of the book by everyone interested in undergraduate education in mathematics."" Classroom-tested in a Princeton University honors course, it offers students a unified introduction to advanced calculus. Starting with an abstract treatment of vector spaces and linear transforms, the authors introduce a single basic derivative in an invariant form. All other derivatives - gradient, divergent, curl,

  16. Paternal age and intelligence: implications for age-related genomic changes in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Dolores; Reichenberg, Avi; Weiser, Mark; Fennig, Shmuel; Davidson, Michael; Harlap, Susan; Wolitzky, Rachel; Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Susser, Ezra; Knobler, Haim Y

    2005-06-01

    A robust association between advancing paternal age and schizophrenia risk is reported, and genetic changes in the germ cells of older men are presumed to underlie the effect. If that is so, then the pathway may include effects on cognition, as those with premorbid schizophrenia are reported to have lower intelligence. There are also substantial genetic influences on intelligence, so de novo genetic events in male germ cells, which accompany advancing paternal age, may plausibly influence offspring intelligence. An association of paternal age with IQ in healthy adolescents may illuminate the mechanisms that link it to schizophrenia. We examined the association of paternal age and IQ scores using the Israeli Army Board data on 44 175 individuals from a richly described birth cohort, along with maternal age and other potential modifiers. A significant inverted U-shaped relationship was observed between paternal age and IQ scores, which was independent from a similar association of IQ scores with maternal age. These relationships were not significantly attenuated by controlling for multiple possible confounding factors, including the other parent's age, parental education, social class, sex and birth order, birth weight and birth complications. Overall, parental age accounted for approximately 2% of the total variance in IQ scores, with later paternal age lowering non-verbal IQ scores more than verbal IQ scores. We found independent effects of maternal and paternal age on offspring IQ scores. The paternal age effect may be explained by de novo mutations or abnormal methylation of paternally imprinted genes, whereas maternal age may affect fetal neurodevelopment through age-related alterations in the in-utero environment. The influence of late paternal age to modify non-verbal IQ may be related to the pathways that increase the risk for schizophrenia in the offspring of older fathers.

  17. Advanced predictive methods for wine age prediction: Part I - A comparison study of single-block regression approaches based on variable selection, penalized regression, latent variables and tree-based ensemble methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Ricardo; Pereira, Ana Cristina; Reis, Marco S

    2017-08-15

    In this paper we test and compare advanced predictive approaches for estimating wine age in the context of the production of a high quality fortified wine - Madeira Wine. We consider four different data sets, namely, volatile, polyphenols, organic acids and the UV-vis spectra. Each one of these data sets contain chemical information of a different nature and present diverse data structures, namely a different dimensionality, level of collinearity and degree of sparsity. These different aspects may imply the use of different modelling approaches in order to better explore the data set's information content, namely their predictive potential for wine age. This happens to be so, because different regression methods have different prior assumptions regarding the predictors, response variable(s) and the data generating mechanism, which may or may not find good adherence to the case study under analysis. In order to cover a wide range of modelling domains, we have incorporated in this work methods belonging to four very distinct classes of approaches that cover most applications found in practice: linear regression with variable selection, penalized regression, latent variables regression and tree-based ensemble methods. We have also developed a rigorous comparison framework based on a double Monte Carlo cross-validation scheme, in order to perform the relative assessment of the performance of the various methods. Upon comparison, models built using the polyphenols and volatile composition data sets led to better wine age predictions, showing lower errors under testing conditions. Furthermore, the results obtained for the polyphenols data set suggest a more sparse structure that can be further explored in order to reduce the number of measured variables. In terms of regression methods, tree-based methods, and boosted regression trees in particular, presented the best results for the polyphenols, volatile and the organic acid data sets, suggesting a possible presence of a

  18. Advancing Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Penny L. Tenuto

    2014-01-01

    Preparing students to become active citizens and contributors to a democratic society is premised on teaching democratic principles and modeling standards of democratic practice at all levels of education. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to establish a conceptual framework grounded in literature and a model for cultivating democratic professional practice in education (DPPE) to advance leadership f...

  19. Technological Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  20. Leading in a Technological Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadgir, Sheri A.

    2011-01-01

    Technology is advancing more rapidly than at any time in history since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. In fact, experts say that the world is leaving the Industrial Age of the 20th century and entering an Information Age that will lead into the future. These advances mean that important changes are being made in all areas of life--and…

  1. Recycling management including transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricaud, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear industry, at least in advanced countries such as Japan, France and other European countries, has developed for years a global strategy of fuel utilization which implies an extensive recycling and reuse of spent fuel. Such recycling strategies are now increasingly required from the industry in general by the various Governments and international organizations. Nuclear fuel recycling and waste management are the two faces of the same policy: the closed fuel cycle, whereby reprocessing of spent fuel makes available for recycling the energetic contents : uranium and plutonium, while segregating the real waste in categories for their specific treatment, conditioning, storage, transportation and final disposal. Plutonium recycling is performed through the fabrication of the so-called mixed oxide fuel (MOX), where fissile plutonium replaces the U 235 isotope used in UO 2 fuel. The international trade of nuclear materials and services, under close control of IAEA and other national and international organization, has let to the circulation of materials between the producers of uranium and enrichment fuel, fabrication, reprocessing and recycling services, and the customers worldwide. The industrial transport experience now accumulated shows an excellent record in terms of safety and quality. This communication will describe the current situation and future trends of the recycling route mainly through COGEMA industrial experience. 1 fig

  2. Advanced Virgo

    CERN Multimedia

    Virgo, a first-generation interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detector, located in the European Gravitational Observatory, EGO, Cascina (Pisa-Italy) and constructed by the collaboration of French and Italian institutes (CNRS and INFN) has successfully completed its long-duration data taking runs. It is now undergoing a fundamental upgrade that exploits available cutting edges technology to open an exciting new window on the universe, with the first detection of a gravitational wave signal. Advanced Virgo (AdV) is the project to upgrade the Virgo detector to a second-generation instrument. AdV will be able to scan a volume of the Universe 1000 times larger than initial Virgo. AdV will be hosted in the same infrastructures as Virgo. The Advanced VIRGO project is funded and at present carried on by a larger collaboration of institutes belonging to CNRS- France , RMKI - Hungary, INFN- Italy, Nikhef - The Netherlands Polish Academy of Science - Poland.

  3. All Students Need Advanced Mathematics. Math Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achieve, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet explains that to thrive in today's world, all students will need to graduate with very strong math skills. That can only mean one thing: advanced math courses are now essential math courses. Highlights of this paper include: (1) Advanced math equals college success; (2) Advanced math equals career opportunity; and (3) Advanced math…

  4. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  5. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, J Mari Beth; Schiska, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam) or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  6. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  7. Advanced Telemetry System Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progress in advanced telemetry system development is described. Discussions are included of studies leading to the specification for design...Progress indicates that further sophistication of existing designs in telemetry will be less advantageous than the development of new systems of

  8. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  9. Nutrition and AGE-ing: Focusing on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Giulia; Marziano, Mariagrazia; Rungratanawanich, Wiramon; Memo, Maurizio; Uberti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the role of food and nutrition in preventing or delaying chronic disability in the elderly population has received great attention. Thanks to their ability to influence biochemical and biological processes, bioactive nutrients are considered modifiable factors capable of preserving a healthy brain status. A diet rich in vitamins and polyphenols and poor in saturated fatty acids has been recommended. In the prospective of a healthy diet, cooking methods should be also considered. In fact, cooking procedures can modify the original dietary content, contributing not only to the loss of healthy nutrients, but also to the formation of toxins, including advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These harmful compounds are adsorbed at intestinal levels and can contribute to the ageing process. The accumulation of AGEs in ageing ("AGE-ing") is further involved in the exacerbation of neurodegenerative and many other chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss food's dual role as both source of bioactive nutrients and reservoir for potential toxic compounds-paying particular attention to the importance of proper nutrition in preventing/delaying Alzheimer's disease. In addition, we focus on the importance of a good education in processing food in order to benefit from the nutritional properties of an optimal diet.

  10. Advanced Surface Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Nielsen, Lars Pleht

    This new significant book on advanced modern surface technology in all its variations, is aimed at both teaching at engineering schools and practical application in industry. The work covers all the significant aspects of modern surface technology and also describes how new advanced techniques make...... of the components. It covers everything from biocompatible surfaces of IR absorbent or reflective surfaces to surfaces with specific properties within low friction, hardness, corrosion, colors, etc. The book includes more than 400 pages detailing virtually all analysis methods for examining at surfaces....

  11. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  12. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations

  13. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick M

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Calculus is intended as a text for courses that furnish the backbone of the student's undergraduate education in mathematical analysis. The goal is to rigorously present the fundamental concepts within the context of illuminating examples and stimulating exercises. This book is self-contained and starts with the creation of basic tools using the completeness axiom. The continuity, differentiability, integrability, and power series representation properties of functions of a single variable are established. The next few chapters describe the topological and metric properties of Euclide

  14. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Widder, David V

    2012-01-01

    This classic text by a distinguished mathematician and former Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University, leads students familiar with elementary calculus into confronting and solving more theoretical problems of advanced calculus. In his preface to the first edition, Professor Widder also recommends various ways the book may be used as a text in both applied mathematics and engineering.Believing that clarity of exposition depends largely on precision of statement, the author has taken pains to state exactly what is to be proved in every case. Each section consists of definitions, theorem

  15. Stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J; Weissmann, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2010-08-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by a number of clinically significant conditions arising in the hematopoietic system that include: diminution and decreased competence of the adaptive immune system, elevated incidence of certain autoimmune diseases, increased hematological malignancies, and elevated incidence of age-associated anemia. As with most tissues, the aged hematopoietic system also exhibits a reduced capacity to regenerate and return to normal homeostasis after injury or stress. Evidence suggests age-dependent functional alterations within the hematopoietic stem cell compartment significantly contribute to many of these pathophysiologies. Recent developments have shed light on how aging of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment contributes to hematopoietic decline through diverse mechanisms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Methodological advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebreton, J.-D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of population dynamics has long depended on methodological progress. Among many striking examples, continuous time models for populations structured in age (Sharpe & Lotka, 1911 were made possible by progress in the mathematics of integral equations. Therefore the relationship between population ecology and mathematical and statistical modelling in the broad sense raises a challenge in interdisciplinary research. After the impetus given in particular by Seber (1982, the regular biennial EURING conferences became a major vehicle to achieve this goal. It is thus not surprising that EURING 2003 included a session entitled “Methodological advances”. Even if at risk of heterogeneity in the topics covered and of overlap with other sessions, such a session was a logical way of ensuring that recent and exciting new developments were made available for discussion, further development by biometricians and use by population biologists. The topics covered included several to which full sessions were devoted at EURING 2000 (Anderson, 2001 such as: individual covariates, Bayesian methods, and multi–state models. Some other topics (heterogeneity models, exploited populations and integrated modelling had been addressed by contributed talks or posters. Their presence among “methodological advances”, as well as in other sessions of EURING 2003, was intended as a response to their rapid development and potential relevance to biological questions. We briefly review all talks here, including those not published in the proceedings. In the plenary talk, Pradel et al. (in prep. developed GOF tests for multi–state models. Until recently, the only goodness–of–fit procedures for multistate models were ad hoc, and non optimal, involving use of standard tests for single state models (Lebreton & Pradel, 2002. Pradel et al. (2003 proposed a general approach based in particular on mixtures of multinomial distributions. Pradel et al. (in prep. showed

  17. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...... strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful ageing’....... and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention...

  18. Elderly people's interaction with advanced technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Kokol, Peter; Saranto, Kaija; Rissanen, Sari

    2014-01-01

    Aging of population is an inevitable process by which the number of elderly people is increasing. Rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) is changing basic needs of elderly people; therefore society should ensure opportunities for elderly to learn and use ICT in a way to manage their daily life activities and in this way enable them participation in the information and knowledge society. The purpose of the study was to find out whether elderly are acquainted with the advanced technology and to what extent they use it or they desire to use it. Within the single point study we interviewed 100 randomly selected elderly people from different geographical regions in Slovenia. Results showed the differences in the use of advanced technology by Slovenian regions; therefore in the future activities should be focused on organizing promotional and demonstrational activities including ICT courses to increase elderly's motivation for ICT interaction.

  19. Advancement & Promotion Review: 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and promotion decisions were made at the end of June, following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 13/2003. These decisions were included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2003. The award of the periodic step was communicated to staff by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification. The names of staff receiving exceptional advancements or promotions are now published on the HR Division website and are accessible for consultation only at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/personnel/advlist_2003.asp It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2003. Final decisions will be applied retroactively to 1 July 2003. Human Resources Division Tel:...

  20. ADVANCEMENT & PROMOTION REVIEW: 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and promotion decisions were made at the beginning of July, under the new career structure scheme and following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 11/2002. These decisions were included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2002. The award of the periodic step was communicated to staff by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification. The names of staff receiving exceptional advancements or promotions will be published this year on the HR Division website and are accessible for consultation only at the following address : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/personnel/advlist.asp It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2002. Final decisions will be applied retroactivel...

  1. SAPHO: Treatment options including bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaenepoel, Tom; Vlam, Kurt de

    2016-10-01

    Both the diagnosis and treatment of the syndrome of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) remain difficult. We describe a case series of 21 patients with SAPHO and their response to several pharmacological treatments. Clinical and biochemical data, along with medical imaging, were collected from the medical records of 21 patients, diagnosed as SAPHO during follow-up between 2005 and 2013. Symptoms and inflammatory markers were recorded twice, once at first patient presentation, and once at the end of follow-up. Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis were labeled as defining features. All treatment options were categorized according to their respective responses (full remission, partial remission, and no disease control). There was a female predominance and a median age of 32 years (range: 12-54 years). Median follow-up duration was 45 months (range: 0-188 months). Total prevalence of defining features in this cohort increased for each defining feature during follow-up, except for acne. All patients reached full or partial remission at the end of follow-up. A total of 14 patients were treated with bisphosphonates. Of which 8 of them went into full or partial remission. In our case series, none of the patients had the full presentation of SAPHO at the first consultation. Some presented with symptoms suggestive for psoriatic arthritis. This explains why diagnosis of SAPHO can be challenging. Full remission was induced in the majority of individuals. Bisphosphonates seem to be a noteworthy treatment option. We suggest a prospective placebo-controlled clinical trial with bisphosphonates to confirm this observation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  3. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  4. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" trainings have been recently changed to include, respectively, an introduction and an expert training on the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to develop expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepare...

  5. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepares participants to develop test and measurement, da...

  6. Biological Age Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juulia Jylhävä

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The search for reliable indicators of biological age, rather than chronological age, has been ongoing for over three decades, and until recently, largely without success. Advances in the fields of molecular biology have increased the variety of potential candidate biomarkers that may be considered as biological age predictors. In this review, we summarize current state-of-the-art findings considering six potential types of biological age predictors: epigenetic clocks, telomere length, transcriptomic predictors, proteomic predictors, metabolomics-based predictors, and composite biomarker predictors. Promising developments consider multiple combinations of these various types of predictors, which may shed light on the aging process and provide further understanding of what contributes to healthy aging. Thus far, the most promising, new biological age predictor is the epigenetic clock; however its true value as a biomarker of aging requires longitudinal confirmation.

  7. Biomarkers of Aging: From Function to Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Wagner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a major risk factor for most chronic diseases and functional impairments. Within a homogeneous age sample there is a considerable variation in the extent of disease and functional impairment risk, revealing a need for valid biomarkers to aid in characterizing the complex aging processes. The identification of biomarkers is further complicated by the diversity of biological living situations, lifestyle activities and medical treatments. Thus, there has been no identification of a single biomarker or gold standard tool that can monitor successful or healthy aging. Within this short review the current knowledge of putative biomarkers is presented, focusing on their application to the major physiological mechanisms affected by the aging process including physical capability, nutritional status, body composition, endocrine and immune function. This review emphasizes molecular and DNA-based biomarkers, as well as recent advances in other biomarkers such as microRNAs, bilirubin or advanced glycation end products.

  8. Numerical Correlation of Levator Advancement in Preoperative Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, Valeria; Collawn, Sherry S; Pierce, Evelina N; Mousa, Mina S; Yang, Jennifer H; Davison, Peter N; Jospitre, Elodie C

    2017-06-01

    Several procedures have been proposed for the treatment of eyelid ptosis, and both levator advancement and levator plication are widely used to shorten the levator palpebrae superioris. The purpose of this study was to quantify perioperative lid measurements in patients undergoing bilateral levator aponeurosis advancements to aid in preoperative planning. Between July 2014 and June 2016, the authors performed a retrospective analysis of all bilateral upper eyelid levator advancement procedures for ptosis performed by the senior surgeon. There are a total of 21 patients (6 men and 15 women) with a mean age of 63 years (range, 48-79 years). The average time at follow-up was 5.3 months, with a range of 1 to 26 months. In this retrospective study, we collected data on presurgical measurements including marginal reflex distance 1 (MRD1), surgical technique used (symmetrical/asymmetrical levator advancement) with millimeters of advancement used, and postsurgical measurements. We found that on average, an advancement of 4 mm led to an improvement in MRD1 of 2.26 mm (n = 14), and advancement of 5 mm led to an improvement in MRD1 of 2.74 mm (n = 15). Patients also reported improvements in their quality of life. Our results may be used to guide clinicians in preoperative planning.

  9. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of cantilever arms (12) contacting the surface of the test sample when performing the movement....... arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area...

  10. Retooling for an aging America: building the healthcare workforce. A white paper regarding implementation of recommendation 4.2 of this Institute of Medicine Report of April 14, 2008, that "All licensure, certification and maintenance of certification for healthcare professionals should include demonstration of competence in care of older adults as a criterion.".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    In Chicago, Illinois, on May 7, 2009, a group of 53 medical educators representing many U.S. certification boards, residency review committees, and medical societies met to review and approve a white paper intended to promote Recommendation 4.2 of the Institute of Medicine report of April 14, 2008, "Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Healthcare Workforce." This recommendation is one of 14 and states: "All licensure, certification and maintenance of certification for healthcare professionals should include demonstration of competence in care of older adults as a criterion." Background information given included the growing numbers of older adults, review of a 15-year initiative by a section of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) to include geriatric education in all surgical and some related medical specialties, a recent announcement of 26 elder care competencies to be expected of graduating medical students from association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) affiliated schools, and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) approach to 'Reinforcing Geriatric Competencies through Licensure and Certification Examinations." Nine points involved in the implementation of this recommendation received discussion, and approaches to realization were presented. In conclusion, this white paper, which those listed as being in attendance approved, proposes hat all ABMS member boards whose diplomates participate in the care of older adults select the floor competencies enumerated by the AAMC that apply to their specialty and add or subtract those completed during their trainees' initial (intern) year and then define those needed in subsequent years of residency and ultimate practice. This would fulfill the requirements of Recommendation 4.2 above.

  11. Gestational age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to ...

  12. Advanced Pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  13. Circadian and age-related modulation of thermoception and temperature regulation: mechanisms and functional implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, E.J.W.; Raymann, RJEM; Scherder, E.J.A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Swaab, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    At older ages, the circadian rhythm of body temperature shows a decreased amplitude, an advanced phase, and decreased stability. The present review evaluates to what extent these changes may result from age-related deficiencies at several levels of the thermoregulatory system, including

  14. Circadian and age-related modulation of thermoreception and temperature regulation: mechanisms and functional implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, Eus J. W.; Raymann, Roy J. E. M.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Daanen, Hein A. M.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    At older ages, the circadian rhythm of body temperature shows a decreased amplitude, an advanced phase, and decreased stability. The present review evaluates to what extent these changes may result from age-related deficiencies at several levels of the thermoregulatory system, including

  15. An Update on Inflamm-Aging: Mechanisms, Prevention, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijin Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflamm-aging is a challenging and promising new branch of aging-related research fields that includes areas such as immunosenescence. Increasing evidence indicates that inflamm-aging is intensively associated with many aging diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, heart disease, type II diabetes, and cancer. Mounting studies have focused on the role of inflamm-aging in disease progression and many advances have been made in the last decade. However, the underlying mechanisms by which inflamm-aging affects pathological changes and disease development are still unclear. Here, we review studies of inflamm-aging that explore the concept, pathological features, mechanisms, intervention, and the therapeutic strategies of inflamm-aging in disease progression.

  16. Advance Directives in Hospice Healthcare Providers: A Clinical Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, George R; Eggenberger, Terry; Newman, David; Cortizo, Jacqueline; Blankenship, Derek C; Hennekens, Charles H

    2017-11-01

    On a daily basis, healthcare providers, especially those dealing with terminally ill patients, such as hospice workers, witness how advance directives help ensure the wishes of patients. They also witness the deleterious consequences when patients fail to document the care they desire at their end of life. To the best of our knowledge there are no data concerning the prevalence of advance directives among hospice healthcare providers. We therefore explored the prevalence and factors influencing completion rates in a survey of hospice healthcare providers. Surveys that included 32 items to explore completion rates, as well as barriers, knowledge, and demographics, were e-mailed to 2097 healthcare providers, including employees and volunteers, at a nonprofit hospice. Of 890 respondents, 44% reported having completed an advance directive. Ethnicity, age, relationship status, and perceived knowledge were all significant factors influencing the completion rates, whereas years of experience or working directly with patients had no effect. Procrastination, fear of the subject, and costs were common reasons reported as barriers. Upon completion of the survey, 43% said they will now complete an advance directive, and 45% will talk to patients and families about their wishes. The majority of hospice healthcare providers have not completed an advance directive. These results are very similar to those for other healthcare providers treating patients with terminal diseases, specifically oncologists. Because, at completion, 43% said that they would now complete an advance directive, such a survey of healthcare providers may help increase completion rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aging Brain, Aging Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the aging process related to physical changes of the human neural structure involved in learning, memory, and reasoning. Presents evidence that indicates such alterations do not necessarily signal the decline in cognitive function. Vignettes provide images of brain structures involved in learning, memory, and reasoning; hippocampal…

  18. Avoiding Aging? Social Psychology's Treatment of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E.; Redmond, Rebecca; von Rohr, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Population aging, in conjunction with social and cultural transformations of the life course, has profound implications for social systems--from large-scale structures to micro-level processes. However, much of sociology remains fairly quiet on issues of age and aging, including the subfield of social psychology that could illuminate the impact of…

  19. Structural imaging measures of brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Samuel N; DeCarli, Charles

    2014-09-01

    During the course of normal aging, biological changes occur in the brain that are associated with changes in cognitive ability. This review presents data from neuroimaging studies of primarily "normal" or healthy brain aging. As such, we focus on research in unimpaired or nondemented older adults, but also include findings from lifespan studies that include younger and middle aged individuals as well as from populations with prodromal or clinically symptomatic disease such as cerebrovascular or Alzheimer's disease. This review predominantly addresses structural MRI biomarkers, such as volumetric or thickness measures from anatomical images, and measures of white matter injury and integrity respectively from FLAIR or DTI, and includes complementary data from PET and cognitive or clinical testing as appropriate. The findings reveal highly consistent age-related differences in brain structure, particularly frontal lobe and medial temporal regions that are also accompanied by age-related differences in frontal and medial temporal lobe mediated cognitive abilities. Newer findings also suggest that degeneration of specific white matter tracts such as those passing through the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum may also be related to age-related differences in cognitive performance. Interpretation of these findings, however, must be tempered by the fact that comorbid diseases such as cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's disease also increase in prevalence with advancing age. As such, this review discusses challenges related to interpretation of current theories of cognitive aging in light of the common occurrence of these later-life diseases. Understanding the differences between "Normal" and "Healthy" brain aging and identifying potential modifiable risk factors for brain aging is critical to inform potential treatments to stall or reverse the effects of brain aging and possibly extend cognitive health for our aging society.

  20. Advanced Melanoma Facebook Live Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    In case you missed it, watch this recent Facebook Live event about the current state of research and treatment for advanced stage melanoma. To learn more, see our evidence-based information about skin cancer, including melanoma.

  1. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2017-01-01

    This second edition continues to be the most comprehensive review on the developments in advanced electronic packaging technologies, with a focus on materials and processing. Recognized experts in the field contribute to 22 updated and new chapters that provide comprehensive coverage on various 3D package architectures, novel bonding and joining techniques, wire bonding, wafer thinning techniques, organic substrates, and novel approaches to make electrical interconnects between integrated circuit and substrates. Various chapters also address advances in several key packaging materials, including: Lead-free solders Flip chip underfills Epoxy molding compounds Conductive adhesives Die attach adhesives/films Thermal interface materials (TIMS) Materials for fabricating embedded passives including capacitors, inductors, and resistors Materials and processing aspects on wafer-level chip scale package (CSP) and MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) Contributors also review new and emerging technologies such as Light ...