WorldWideScience

Sample records for include health insurance

  1. Health insurance in Singapore: who's not included and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, V D; Lim, J F Y

    2010-05-01

    Health insurance and the consequent risk pooling are believed to be essential components of a sustainable healthcare financing system. We sought to determine the profile of Singaporeans who had not procured health insurance over and above MediShield, the national government-spearheaded health insurance program and the factors associated with insurance procurement. A total of 1,783 respondents were interviewed via telephone and asked to rank their agreement with statements pertaining to healthcare cost, quality and financing on a fivepoint Likert scale. Respondents were representative of the general population in terms of ethnicity and housing type, but lower income households were over-represented. Respondents also had a higher education level compared to the general population. Data on 1,510 respondents, with full information on household (HH) income, education and insurance status, was analysed. HH income below S$1,500 per month (odds ratio [OR] is 5.66, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] is 3.9-8.3, p is less than 0.0001) and a secondary education and below (OR is 2.05, 95 percent CI is 1.5-2.8, p is less than 0.0001) were associated with not procuring insurance over and above MediShield coverage. Respondents with insurance were less likely to agree that healthcare was affordable and that the "3M" framework was sufficient to meet healthcare needs. Singaporeans with a lower HH income and a lower education level were less likely to possess health insurance. This may be related to a stronger belief that healthcare is affordable even without insurance. Educational efforts to encourage the more widespread use of health insurance should be targeted toward lower income groups with less formal education and should be complemented by other interventions to address other aspects of insurance procurement considerations.

  2. Including health insurance in poverty measurement: The impact of Massachusetts health reform on poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Sanders D; Remler, Dahlia K

    2016-12-01

    We develop and implement what we believe is the first conceptually valid health-inclusive poverty measure (HIPM) - a measure that includes health care or insurance in the poverty needs threshold and health insurance benefits in family resources - and we discuss its limitations. Building on the Census Bureau's Supplemental Poverty Measure, we construct a pilot HIPM for the under-65 population under ACA-like health reform in Massachusetts. This pilot demonstrates the practicality, face validity and value of a HIPM. Results suggest that public health insurance benefits and premium subsidies accounted for a substantial, one-third reduction in the health inclusive poverty rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health insurance helps protect you from high medical care costs. It is a contract between you and ... Many people in the United States get a health insurance policy through their employers. In most cases, ...

  4. Social Insurance and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ziebarth, Nicolas R.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter reviews the existing empirical evidence on how social insurance affects health. Social insurance encompasses programs primarily designed to insure against health risks, such as health insurance, sick leave insurance, accident insurance, long-term care insurance and disability insurance; and programs that insure against other risks, such as unemployment insurance, pension insurance and country-specific social insurance. These insurance systems exist in almost all developed countri...

  5. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Health Insurance Basics What's ... advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  6. The Impact of Including Immigrants without Permanent Residence Status in the Public Health Insurance System in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepperová Jana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Whether an individual can or cannot participate in the Czech public health insurance system depends on several characteristics, one of which is whether he/she has permanent residence status in the Czech Republic, and a second whether he/she is employed. This means that those without permanent residence status, including self-employed migrants from third countries, their dependent relatives, and the dependent relatives of third country employees in the Czech Republic, cannot participate in the public health insurance system. Some argue that such migrants should be included in the system, since commercial health insurance is disadvantageous and the contributions they would pay into the public health insurance system would increase the public health insurance agencies’ income. We estimate the value of the contributions to public health insurance that would be paid by third country self-employed and non-working immigrants, if they were insured based on data from 2011 to 2013, and compare this to the assumed costs of their medical care. To calculate the contributions for self-employed migrants we use data on the distribution of the tax base for self-employed persons from personal income tax returns. Our estimation results in an overall negative balance of 22 million CZK on the data for 2012 and 2013. In the current system this deficit would be covered by the state, which would pay contributions to the system for certain (state insured persons amounting to 97 million CZK; overall therefore the inclusion of these immigrants would result in a positive balance of 75 million CZK.

  7. HEALTH INSURANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The CERN-AUSTRIA Agreement, which implemented CERN's health insurance scheme, expired on 31 December 1999.In accordance with CERN's rules, a call for tenders for the management of the health insurance scheme was issued and the contract was once again awarded to AUSTRIA. In June 1999, the Finance Committee thus authorised the Management to conclude a new contract with AUSTRIA, which came into force on 1st January 2000.Continuity is thus assured on favourable conditions and the transition from one contract to the other will entail no substantial changes in the system for those insured at CERN except for a few minor and purely formal amendmentsWHAT REMAINS UNCHANGEDThe list of benefits, i.e. the 'cover' provided by the system, is not changed;Neither is the reimbursement procedure.AUSTRIA's office at CERN and its opening hours as well as its city headquarters remain the same. The envelopes containing requests for reimbursement have had to be sent (since the end of 1998) to :Rue des Eaux-Vives 94Case postale 64021...

  8. HEALTH INSURANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Division HR

    2000-01-01

    Change of name for AUSTRIA As of October 1, the AUSTRIA Assurances S.A. company will change its name to: UNIQA Assurances S.A. It inherits the same name as its parent Austrian company, which adopted it towards the end of 1999. This change has no effect on the contract which binds it to CERN for the administration of our Health Insurance Scheme. New insurance cards will be sent to you by UNIQA and the printed forms and envelopes will gradually be updated with the new name. Postal and phone addresses remain unaffected by the change. You should address your postal mail to: UNIQA Assurances rue des Eaux Vives 94 case postale 6402 1211 Genève 6 You may telephone your usual contact persons at the same numbers as before and send e-mails to the UNIQA office at CERN at: UNIQA.Assurances@cern.ch

  9. Understanding health insurance plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000879.htm Understanding health insurance plans To use the sharing features on this ... for you and your family. Types of Health Insurance Plans Depending on how you get your health ...

  10. Cost-Utility Analysis of Extending Public Health Insurance Coverage to Include Diabetic Retinopathy Screening by Optometrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Katwyk, Sasha; Jin, Ya-Ping; Trope, Graham E; Buys, Yvonne; Masucci, Lisa; Wedge, Richard; Flanagan, John; Brent, Michael H; El-Defrawy, Sherif; Tu, Hong Anh; Thavorn, Kednapa

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of vision loss and blindness in Canada. Eye examinations play an important role in early detection. However, DR screening by optometrists is not always universally covered by public or private health insurance plans. This study assessed whether expanding public health coverage to include diabetic eye examinations for retinopathy by optometrists is cost-effective from the perspective of the health care system. We conducted a cost-utility analysis of extended coverage for diabetic eye examinations in Prince Edward Island to include examinations by optometrists, not currently publicly covered. We used a Markov chain to simulate disease burden based on eye examination rates and DR progression over a 30-year time horizon. Results were presented as an incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. A series of one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Extending public health coverage to eye examinations by optometrists was associated with higher costs ($9,908,543.32) and improved QALYs (156,862.44), over 30 years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1668.43/QALY gained. Sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential determinants of the results were the cost of optometric screening and selected utility scores. At the commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY, the probability that the new policy was cost-effective was 99.99%. Extending public health coverage to eye examinations by optometrists is cost-effective based on a commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY. Findings from this study can inform the decision to expand public-insured optometric services for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Alternative health insurance schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Hansen, Bodil O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple model of health insurance with asymmetric information, where we compare two alternative ways of organizing the insurance market. Either as a competitive insurance market, where some risks remain uninsured, or as a compulsory scheme, where however, the level...... competitive insurance; this situation turns out to be at least as good as either of the alternatives...

  12. Social health insurance

    CERN Document Server

    International Labour Office. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    This manual provides an overview of social health insurance schemes and looks at the development of health care policies and feasibility issues. It also examines the design of health insurance schemes, health care benefits, financing and costs and considers the operational and strategic information requirements.

  13. Health insurance for "frontaliers"

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The French government has decided that, with effect from 1 June 2014, persons resident in France but working in Switzerland (hereinafter referred to as “frontaliers”) will no longer be entitled to opt for private French health insurance provision as their sole and principal health insurance.   The right of choice, which was granted by the Bilateral Agreement on the Free Movement of Persons between Switzerland and the European Union and which came into force on 1 June 2002, exempts “frontaliers” from the obligation to become a member of Switzerland’s compulsory health insurance scheme (LAMal) if they can prove that they have equivalent coverage in France, provided by either the French social security system (CMU) or a private French insurance provider. As the latter option of private health insurance as an alternative to membership of LAMal will be revoked under the new French legislation that will come into force on 1 June 2014, current “...

  14. Health insurance basic actuarial models

    CERN Document Server

    Pitacco, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    Health Insurance aims at filling a gap in actuarial literature, attempting to solve the frequent misunderstanding in regards to both the purpose and the contents of health insurance products (and ‘protection products’, more generally) on the one hand, and the relevant actuarial structures on the other. In order to cover the basic principles regarding health insurance techniques, the first few chapters in this book are mainly devoted to the need for health insurance and a description of insurance products in this area (sickness insurance, accident insurance, critical illness covers, income protection, long-term care insurance, health-related benefits as riders to life insurance policies). An introduction to general actuarial and risk-management issues follows. Basic actuarial models are presented for sickness insurance and income protection (i.e. disability annuities). Several numerical examples help the reader understand the main features of pricing and reserving in the health insurance area. A short int...

  15. Exploring health insurance services in Sudan from the perspectives of insurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Anas Mustafa Ahmed; Hamed, Fatima Hashim Mahmoud

    2018-01-01

    It has been 20 years since the introduction of health insurance in Sudan. This study was the first one that explored health insurance services in Sudan from the perspectives of the insurers. This was a qualitative, exploratory, interview study. The sampling frame was the list of Social Health Insurance and Private Health Insurance institutions in Sudan. Participants were selected from the four Social Health Insurance institutions and from five Private Health Insurance companies. The study was conducted in January and February 2017. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with a convenient sample of key executives from the different health insurers. Ideas and themes were identified and analysed using thematic analysis. The result showed that universal coverage was not achieved despite long time presence of Social Health Insurance and Private Health Insurance in Sudan. All participants described their services as comprehensive. All participants have good perception of the quality of the services they provide, although none of them investigated customer satisfaction. The main challenges facing Social Health Insurance are achieving universal coverage, ensuring sustainability and recruitment of the informal sector and self-employed population. Consumers' affordability of the premiums is the main obstacle for Private Health Insurance, while rising healthcare cost due to economic inflation is a challenge facing both Social Health Insurance and Private Health Insurance. In spite of the presence of Social Health Insurance and Private Health Insurance in Sudan, the country is still far from achieving universal coverage. Moreover, the sustainability of health insurance is questionable. The main reasons include low governmental financial resources and lack of affordability by beneficiaries especially for Private Health Insurance. This necessitates finding solutions to improve them or trying other types of health insurance. The quality of services provided by Social

  16. Risk segmentation in Chilean social health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Hector; Chipulu, Maxwell; Ojiako, Udechukwu

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify how risk and social variables are likely to be impacted by an increase in private sector participation in health insurance provision. The study focuses on the Chilean health insurance industry, traditionally dominated by the public sector. Predictive risk modelling is conducted using a database containing over 250,000 health insurance policy records provided by the Superintendence of Health of Chile. Although perceived with suspicion in some circles, risk segmentation serves as a rational approach to risk management from a resource perspective. The variables that have considerable impact on insurance claims include the number of dependents, gender, wages and the duration a claimant has been a customer. As shown in the case study, to ensure that social benefits are realised, increased private sector participation in health insurance must be augmented by regulatory oversight and vigilance. As it is clear that a "community-rated" health insurance provision philosophy impacts on insurance firm's ability to charge "market" prices for insurance provision, the authors explore whether risk segmentation is a feasible means of predicting insurance claim behaviour in Chile's private health insurance industry.

  17. Health Insurance without Single Crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, Jan; Schottmüller, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Standard insurance models predict that people with high risks have high insurance coverage. It is empirically documented that people with high income have lower health risks and are better insured. We show that income differences between risk types lead to a violation of single crossing...... in an insurance model where people choose treatment intensity. We analyse different market structures and show the following: If insurers have market power, the violation of single crossing caused by income differences and endogenous treatment choice can explain the empirically observed outcome. Our results do...

  18. [Abortion using health insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritschneder, O

    1984-09-01

    The author reports on current German court rulings on whether non-medically indicated abortions (although not prohibited by law and therefore not actionable) should be financed via the compulsory health insurance scheme or by the Federal Government. 1. The social welfare court at Dortmund ruled that current legislation governing the financing of welfare expenditure violates the Federal German constitution, and has, therefore, referred this matter to the Federal Constitutional Court. However, the Federal Constitutional Court turned down the referral and dismissed the case, since an application for declaring a Federal law null and void can be filed by the Federal Government or by a Federal Land Government or by at least one-third of the total number of members of the Federal German Parliament (Bundestag) only. This means that the current proceedings at the Dortmund social welfare court must continue. The plaintiff pleads to prohibit the compulsory health insurance scheme authorities from defraying the expenses for performing foeticide via legally permitted abortion without medical indication. 2. The Federal Land Government of Baden-Württemberg is the only Land Government of the Federal Republic of Germany that does not grant any financial aid towards performing non-medically indicated (albeit not legally actionable) abortions. Hence, the Baden-Württemberg Administrative Courts turned down the plea filed by a woman government servant towards paying such aid. The court decision was based on the judge's opinion that even the principle of equality before the law guaranteed by the Constitution would not compel the Land Government to emulate the example of the other Land Governments who are agreeable to bearing abortion costs.

  19. The economics of health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Saurabh; Baker, Tom

    2012-12-01

    Insurance plays an important role in the United States, most importantly in but not limited to medical care. The authors introduce basic economic concepts that make medical care and health insurance different from other goods and services traded in the market. They emphasize that competitive pricing in the marketplace for insurance leads, quite rationally, to risk classification, market segmentation, and market failure. The article serves as a springboard for understanding the basis of the reforms that regulate the health insurance market in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Health Insurance and Tax Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten Jeske; Sagiri Kitao

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. tax policy on health insurance favors only those offered group insurance through their employers, and is highly regressive since the subsidy takes the form of deductions from the progressive income tax system. The paper investigates alternatives to the current policy. We find that a complete removal of the subsidy results in a significant reduction in the insurance coverage and serious welfare deterioration. There is, however, room for improving welfare and raising the coverage, by e...

  1. Social insurance for health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, M I

    1997-06-01

    Implementation of social insurance for financing health services has yielded different patterns depending on a country's economic level and its government's political ideology. By the late 19th century, thousands of small sickness funds operated in Europe, and in 1883 Germany's Chancellor Bismarck led the enactment of a law mandating enrollment by low-income workers. Other countries followed, with France completing Western European coverage in 1928. The Russian Revolution in 1917 led to a National Health Service covering everyone from general revenues by 1937. New Zealand legislated universal population coverage in 1939. After World War II, Scandinavian countries extended coverage to everyone and Britain introduced its National Health Service covering everyone with comprehensive care and financed by general revenues in 1948. Outside of Europe Japan adopted health insurance in 1922, covering everyone in 1946. Chile was the first developing country to enact statutory health insurance in 1924 for industrial workers, with extension to all low-income people with its "Servicio Nacional de Salud" in 1952. India covered 3.5 percent of its large population with the Employees' State Insurance Corporation in 1948, and China after its 1949 revolution developed four types of health insurance for designated groups of workers and dependents. Sub-Saharan African countries took limited health insurance actions in the late 1960s and 1970s. By 1980, some 85 countries had enacted social security programs to finance or deliver health services or both.

  2. Health Insurance: Understanding Your Health Plan's Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Health Insurance: Understanding What It CoversUnderstanding Your Medical BillsResources for ...

  3. Research Highlights. Extending Health Care Insurance to Specific Populations: Profile of RAND Work

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    Since the failure of national health care reform, efforts to increase health insurance coverage for the American people have focused on extending insurance to certain vulnerable populations, including...

  4. Health Insurance Marketplace Public Use Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A set of seven (7) public use files containing information on health insurance issuers participating in the Health Insurance Marketplace and certified qualified...

  5. CERN Health Insurance Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Changes implemented on 1 January 2011 In addition to the information provided in the Official News section of the Bulletin concerning the CHIS, the following changes are in place since 1 January 2011. Benefits The list of benefits including the ceilings will remain initially unchanged while the CHIS Board prepares proposals to the Director-General, who has been authorized by the Council to take timely measures to limit the increase of the CHIS expenses, by encouraging the use of health care providers and treatments which provide the best quality-to-cost ratio. Termination of the agreement with “La Metairie” Attempts to find an agreement with the management of “La Metairie” on the conditions to continue to collaborate failed. The present agreement that CHIS, as well as the other international organisations (WHO, ILO/ITU, UNOG) had signed, therefore came to an end on 31 December 2010. As a result, the rules applicable to hospitals without an agreement will apply to &...

  6. Health insurance education strategies for increasing the insured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The older population in most developing countries are uninsured and lack access to health services. This study assessed the extent to which a multi-strategy health insurance education intervention would increase the number of insured among the older population in rural Kenya. Methods: The ...

  7. The Impact of Health Insurance Reform on Insurance Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, KM; Isabelle, AP; Hanchate, A; Kalish, RL; Kapoor, A; Bak, S; Mishuris, RG; Shroff, S; Battaglia, TA

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform on insurance coverage and stability among minority and underserved women. We examined 36 months of insurance claims among 1,946 women who had abnormal cancer screening at six Community Health Centers pre-(2004–2005) and post-(2007–2008) insurance reform. We examined frequency of switches in insurance coverage as measures of longitudinal insurance instability. On the date of their abnormal cancer screening test, 36% of subjects were publicly insured and 31% were uninsured. Post-reform, the percent ever uninsured declined from 39% to 29% (p.001) and those consistently uninsured declined from 23% to 16%. To assess if insurance instability changed between the pre- and post-reform periods, we conducted Poisson regression models, adjusted for patient demographics and length of time in care. These revealed no significant differences from the pre- to post-reform period in annual rates of insurance switches, incident rate ratio 0.98 (95%-CI 0.88–1.09). Our analysis is limited by changes in the populations in the pre and post reform period and inability to capture care outside of the health system network. Insurance reform increased stability as measured by decreasing uninsured rates without increasing insurance switches. PMID:24583490

  8. How consumers choose health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, G; Ettenson, R; Gaeth, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors used choice-based conjoint analysis to model consumers' decision processes when evaluating and selecting health insurance in a multiplan environment. Results indicate that consumer choice is affected by as many as 19 attributes, some of which have received little attention in previous studies. Moreover, the importance of the attributes varies across different demographic segments, giving marketers several targeting opportunities.

  9. Health Insurance and Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Few people would disagree that children with disabilities need adequate health insurance. But what kind of health insurance coverage would be optimal for these children? Peter Szilagyi surveys the current state of insurance coverage for children with special health care needs and examines critical aspects of coverage with an eye to helping policy…

  10. general practitioners and national health insurance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    establishment of some form of national health insurance ( !HI) or social health insurance (SHl) system has .... analysis was done using relative risk (prevalence ratios), with confidence intervals and chi-squared tests. ..... health insurance systems. Some of these are likely to change with the passage of the Medical Schemes.

  11. 76 FR 7767 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    .... As proposed, the agreement could be evidenced by the health insurance issuer issuing the master... wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services, including oral and vision care... accommodation in the formula for determining the MLR for those lines of business. This was done because mini-med...

  12. Private health insurance: implications for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Neelam; Savedoff, William

    2005-02-01

    Private health insurance is playing an increasing role in both high- and low-income countries, yet is poorly understood by researchers and policy-makers. This paper shows that the distinction between private and public health insurance is often exaggerated since well regulated private insurance markets share many features with public insurance systems. It notes that private health insurance preceded many modern social insurance systems in western Europe, allowing these countries to develop the mechanisms, institutions and capacities that subsequently made it possible to provide universal access to health care. We also review international experiences with private insurance, demonstrating that its role is not restricted to any particular region or level of national income. The seven countries that finance more than 20% of their health care via private health insurance are Brazil, Chile, Namibia, South Africa, the United States, Uruguay and Zimbabwe. In each case, private health insurance provides primary financial protection for workers and their families while public health-care funds are targeted to programmes covering poor and vulnerable populations. We make recommendations for policy in developing countries, arguing that private health insurance cannot be ignored. Instead, it can be harnessed to serve the public interest if governments implement effective regulations and focus public funds on programmes for those who are poor and vulnerable. It can also be used as a transitional form of health insurance to develop experience with insurance institutions while the public sector increases its own capacity to manage and finance health-care coverage.

  13. Health insurance for the "uninsurable".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, L H

    2000-01-01

    State-sponsored health insurance plans for people labeled "uninsurable" by commercial carriers provide financial lifelines for those who qualify. In 28 states, individuals suffering from cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, emotional disorders, cystic fibrosis, para- or quadriplegia and other chronic or recurrent health problems receive benefits--for reasonable premiums--from innovative programs that can literally make the difference between life and death, solvency or indigence. Medical practices and other health care facilities can play a pivotal role in informing patients of these coverage options--and by doing so, increase their revenue, as well.

  14. Productivity Measurement for a Health Insurer

    OpenAIRE

    Carol A. Sakosky; S. Travis Pritchett

    1987-01-01

    The nature of productivity measurement and problems specific to measuring insurance productivity are discussed. A specific measure--based on microeconomic principles, a multiproduct output concept, and readily available firm-level data--is developed. The measure should be applicable to the operations of any health insurer and is designed for use by health insurers interested in productivity measurement.

  15. Recent developments in health insurance, life insurance, and disability insurance case law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, Joseph J; Chittenden, William A; Doolin, Elizabeth G; Wall, Julie F

    2008-01-01

    This survey reviews significant state and federal court decisions from 2006 and 2007 involving health, life, and disability insurance. Also reviewed is a June 2008 Supreme Court decision in the disability insurance realm, affirming that a conflict of interest exists when an ERISA plan sponsor or insurer fulfills the dual role of determining plan benefits and paying those benefits but noting that the conflict is merely one factor in considering the legality of benefit denials. In addition, this years' survey includes compelling decisions in the life and health arena, including cases addressing statutory penalties and mandated benefits, as well as some ERISA decisions of note. This year, the Texas Supreme Court held that Texas's most recent version of the prompt payment statute abolished the common law interpleader exception and allowed the prevailing adverse claimant in an interpleader action filed beyond the sixty-day statutory period to recover statutory interest and attorney fees from the insurer. Meanwhile, the Court of Appeals of New York upheld the constitutionality of a statute mandating coverage for contraceptives in those employer-sponsored health plans that offer prescription drug coverage, including those plans sponsored by faith-based social service organizations. In the ERISA context, litigants continue to fight over the standard of review with varying results. In a unique assault on the arbitrary and capricious standard of review, the Fourth Circuit found that an ERISA plan abused its discretion when it failed to apply the doctrine of contra proferentem to construe ambiguous plan terms against itself. In more hopeful news for plan insurers, the Tenth Circuit held that claimants are not entitled to review and rebut medical opinions generated during the administrative appeal of a claim denial before a final decision is reached unless such reports contain new factual information.

  16. [Collaboration between occupational physicians and other specialists including insurance physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkenberg, A M; van Sprundel, M; Stassijns, G

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration between various stakeholders is essential for a well-operating vocational rehabilitation process. Researchers have mentioned, among other players, insurance physicians, the curative sector and employers. In 2011 the WHO organised the congress "Connecting Health and Labour: What role for occupational health in primary care". The congress was also attended by representatives of the WONCA (World Organisations of Family Medicine). In general, everyone agreed that occupational health aspects should continue to be seen as an integral part of primary health care. However, it is not easy to find literature on this subject. For this reason we conducted a review. We searched for literature relating to collaboration with occupational physicians in Dutch, English and German between 2001 and autumn 2011. Our attention focused on cooperation with specialists and insurance physicians. Therefore, we searched PUBMED using MeSH terms and made use of the database from the "Tijdschrift voor bedrijfs- en verzekeringsgeneeskunde (TBV) [Dutch Journal for Occupational - and Insurance Medicine]". We also checked the database from the "Deutsches Arzteblatt [German Medical Journal]" and made use of the online catalogue from THIEME - eJOURNALS. Last but not least, I used the online catalogue from the German paper "Arbeits -, Sozial -, Umweltmedizin [Occupational -, Social -, Milieu Medicine]". Additionally, we made use of the "snowball - method" to find relevant literature. We found many references to this subject. The Netherlands in particular has done a lot of research in this field. However, there is little research on the cooperation between occupational physicians and specialists; in particular insurance physicians. This is interesting, because several authors have mentioned its importance. However, cooperation with other specialists seems not to be the norm. Therefore, cooperation between curative physicians (specialists but also family doctors), insurance physicians and

  17. Health insurance coverage among women in Indonesia's major cities: A multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiani, Yodi; Byles, Julie E; Tavener, Meredith; Dugdale, Paul

    2017-03-01

    We examined women's access to health insurance in Indonesia. We analyzed IFLS-4 data of 1,400 adult women residing in four major cities. Among this population, the health insurance coverage was 24%. Women who were older, involved in paid work, and with higher education had greater access to health insurance (p health insurance across community levels (Median Odds Ratios = 3.40). Given the importance of health insurance for women's health, strategies should be developed to expand health insurance coverage among women in Indonesia, including the disparities across community levels. Such problems might also be encountered in other developing countries with low health insurance coverage.

  18. Does Retiree Health Insurance Encourage Early Retirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyce, Steven; Schieber, Sylvester J; Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj; Wise, David A

    2013-08-01

    The strong link between health insurance and employment in the United States may cause workers to delay retirement until they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. However, some employers extend health insurance benefits to their retirees, and individuals who are eligible for such retiree health benefits need not wait until age 65 to retire with group health coverage. We investigate the impact of retiree health insurance on early retirement using employee-level data from 54 diverse firms that are clients of Towers Watson, a leading benefits consulting firm. We find that retiree health coverage has its strongest effects at ages 62 through 64. Coverage that includes an employer contribution is associated with a 6.3 percentage point (36.2 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 62, a 7.7 percentage point (48.8 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 63, and a 5.5 percentage point (38.0 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 64. Conditional on working at age 57, such coverage reduces the expected retirement age by almost three months and reduces the total number of person-years worked between ages 58 and 64 by 5.6 percent.

  19. Consumer choice of social health insurance in managed competition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To promote managed competition in Dutch health insurance, the insured are now able to change health insurers. They can choose a health insurer with a low flat-rate premium, the best supplementary insurance and/or the best service. As we do not know why people prefer one health insurer to

  20. Consumer choice of social health insurance in managed competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To promote managed competition in Dutch health insurance, the insured are now able to change heaith insurers. They can choose a health insurer with a low flat-rate premium, the best supplementary insurance and/or the best service. As we do not know why people prefer one health insurer to

  1. 75 FR 52981 - Bluescope Buildings North America, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Reported Through Butler Manufacturing Company, Laurinburg, NC; Amended...Scope Buildings North America had their wages reported through a separate unemployment insurance (UI... America, including workers whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages are reported through Butler...

  2. The Impact of Health Insurance on Health Care Provision in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health insurance, in addition to being a technique for controlling and managing health risks, helps in placing the insured in a position for accessing health care delivery ahead of an illness. This instrument, which has been well utilized in developed economies, is what the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Nigeria ...

  3. MARKETING STRATEGY OF COMMERCIAL HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cut Zaraswati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research are to: 1 compare the effect of premium earnings products of health insurances after the launching of national social health insurance (JKN-BPJS (Badan Penyelenggara Jaminan Sosial for health; 2 analyze the internal and external factors of private/commercial health insurance companies; 3 formulate a marketing strategyy for health insurance product after the operation of JKN-BPJS for health.  It is a challenge for commercial health insurance to survive and thrive with the existence of JKN-BPJS for health which is compulsory to Indonesia’s citizens to be a member. The research begins by analyzing premium earnings of the commercial health insurance company one year before and after the implementation of JKN-BPJS for health, the intensive interviews and questionnaires to the chosen resource person (purposive samplings, the analysis on Internal Factor Evaluation (IFE, External Factor Evaluation (EFE, Matrix IE and SWOT are used in the research. Then it is continued by arranging a strategic priority using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP.  The result from the research is there is totally no decreasing premium earnings for the commercial health insurance company although the growth trend shows a slight drop.  The appropriate strategy for the health insurance company in the commercial sector is the differentiation where the implication is involving customer service quality improvement, product innovation, and technology and infrastructure development.      Keywords:  commercial health insurance company, Marketing Strategy, AHP Analysis, national social health insurance

  4. Main Determinants of Supplementary Health Insurance Demand: (Case of Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Soraya Nouraei; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Mahdavi, Ghadir; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the majority of developing countries, the volume of medical insurance services, provided by social insurance organizations is inadequate. Thus, supplementary medical insurance is proposed as a means to address inadequacy of medical insurance. Accordingly, in this article, we attempted to provide the context for expansion of this important branch of insurance through identification of essential factors affecting demand for supplementary medical insurance. Method: In this study, two methods were used to identify essential factors affecting choice of supplementary medical insurance including Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Bayesian logit. To this end, Excel® software was used to refine data and R® software for estimation. The present study was conducted during 2012, covering all provinces in Iran. Sample size included 18,541 urban households, selected by Statistical Center of Iran using 3-stage cluster sampling approach. In this study, all data required were collected from the Statistical Center of Iran. Results: In 2012, an overall 8.04% of the Iranian population benefited from supplementary medical insurance. Demand for supplementary insurance is a concave function of age of the household head, and peaks in middle-age when savings and income are highest. The present study results showed greater likelihood of demand for supplementary medical insurance in households with better economic status, higher educated heads, female heads, and smaller households with greater expected medical expenses, and household income is the most important factor affecting demand for supplementary medical insurance. Conclusion: Since demand for supplementary medical insurance is hugely influenced by households’ economic status, policy-makers in the health sector should devise measures to improve households’ economic or financial access to supplementary insurance services, by identifying households in the lower economic deciles, and increasing their

  5. Probability numeracy and health insurance purchase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillingh, Rik; Kooreman, Peter; Potters, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides new field evidence on the role of probability numeracy in health insurance purchase. Our regression results, based on rich survey panel data, indicate that the expenditure on two out of three measures of health insurance first rises with probability numeracy and then falls again.

  6. Conceptualising the lack of health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J B

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the lack of health insurance coverage in the US as a public policy issue. It first compares the problem of health insurance coverage to the problem of unemployment to show that in terms of the numbers of individuals affected lack of health insurance is a problem comparable in importance to the problem of unemployment. Secondly, the paper discusses the methodology involved in measuring health insurance coverage, and argues that the current method of estimation of the uninsured underestimates the extent that individuals go without health insurance. Third, the paper briefly introduces Amartya Sen's functioning and capabilities framework to suggest a way of representing the extent to which individuals are uninsured. Fourth, the paper sketches a means of operationalizing the Sen representation of the uninsured in terms of the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) measure.

  7. Health Insurance Rate Review Fact Sheet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act is bringing an unprecedented level of scrutiny and transparency to health insurance rate increases. The Act ensures that, in any State, any...

  8. Health insurance reform: labor versus health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Walid; Awar, May

    2012-01-01

    The Ministry of Labor (MOL) has submitted to the Council of Ministers a social security reform plan. The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) considers that health financing should be dealt with as part of a more comprehensive health reform plan that falls under its prerogatives. While a virulent political discussion is taking place, major stakeholders' inputs are very limited and civil society is totally put away from the whole policy making process. The role of the media is restricted to reproducing political disputes, without meaningful substantive debate. This paper discusses health insurance reform from labor market as well as public health perspectives, and aims at launching a serious public debate on this crucial issue that touches the life of every citizen.

  9. Factoring affecting the Demand for Health Insurance in a Micro Insurance Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Nishant; Bhat Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    Health insurance schemes are increasingly recognised as preferable mechanisms to finance health care provision. In this direction micro health insurance schemes and community based health insurance schemes are assuming significant importance in reaching large number of people. However, at the community level despite low premiums the penetration of health insurance is small. The objective of this paper is to analyse factors determining the demand for private health insurance in a micro insuran...

  10. Determinants of health insurance and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Yamada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper empirically examines how the decision to purchase private insurance and hospitalization are made based on household income, socio-demographic factors, and private health insurance factors in both Japan and the USA. Using these two data-sets, we found some similarities and dissimilarities between Japan and the United States. As income of households rises, households have a positive effect on purchasing health insurance as a normal good. Another similarity between the two countries is seen in the income effect on risk of hospitalization, which is negative for both Japanese and US cases. For dissimilarity, the insurance premium effect on risk of hospitalization is positive for the Japanese case, while negative for the US case. Since the Japanese insurance data had variables such as payments per day of hospitalization if household gets hospitalized, insurance payments upon death of an insured person, and annuity payments at maturity, we tested to see if these characteristics affect the risk of hospitalization for households; we do not eliminate a possibility of adverse selection. For the US pure health issuance characteristics, an increase in premium of health insurance policies cause individuals to substitute more health capital investment which causes lower risk of hospitalization.

  11. Health insurance premium tax credit. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This document contains final regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.These final regulations provide guidance to individuals related to employees who may enroll in eligible employer-sponsored coverage and who wish to enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges) and claim the premium tax credit.

  12. Knowledge and understanding of health insurance: challenges and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Andrew J; Hanoch, Yaniv

    2017-07-13

    As coverage is expanded in health systems that rely on consumers to choose health insurance plans that best meet their needs, interest in whether consumers possess sufficient understanding of health insurance to make good coverage decisions is growing. The recent IJHPR article by Green and colleagues-examining understanding of supplementary health insurance (SHI) among Israeli consumers-provides an important and timely answer to the above question. Indeed, their study addresses similar problems to the ones identified in the US health care market, with two notable findings. First, they show that overall-regardless of demographic variables-there are low levels of knowledge about SHI, which the literature has come to refer to more broadly as "health insurance literacy." Second, they find a significant disparity in health insurance literacy between different SES groups, where Jews were significantly more knowledgeable about SHI compared to their Arab counterparts.The authors' findings are consistent with a growing body of literature from the U.S. and elsewhere, including our own, presenting evidence that consumers struggle with understanding and using health insurance. Studies in the U.S. have also found that difficulties are generally more acute for populations considered the most vulnerable and consequently most in need of adequate and affordable health insurance coverage.The authors' findings call attention to the need to tailor communication strategies aimed at mitigating health insurance literacy and, ultimately, access and outcomes disparities among vulnerable populations in Israel and elsewhere. It also raises the importance of creating insurance choice environments in health systems relying on consumers to make coverage decisions that facilitate the decision process by using "choice architecture" to, among other things, simplify plan information and highlight meaningful differences between coverage options.

  13. Health insurance and hospital technology adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses the relationship between health insurance and hospitals' decisions to adopt medical technologies. I focus on both how the extent of insurance coverage can increase incentives to adopt new treatments, and how the parameters of the insurance contract can impact the types of treatments adopted. I provide a review of the previous theoretical and empirical literature and highlight evidence on this relationship from previous expansions of Medicaid eligibility to low-income pregnant women. While health insurance has important effects on individual-level choices of health care consumption, increases in the fraction of the population covered by insurance has also been found to have broader supply side effects as hospitals respond to changes in demand by changing the type of care offered. Furthermore, hospitals respond to the design of insurance contracts and adopt more or less cost-effective technologies depending on the incentive system. Understanding how insurance changes supply side incentives is important as we consider future changes in the insurance landscape. ORIGINALITY/VALUE OF PAPER: With these previous findings in mind, I conclude with a discussion of how the Affordable Care Act may alter hospital technology adoption incentives by both expanding coverage and changing payment schemes.

  14. Supplemental health insurance: did Croatia miss an opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbrunner, John C

    2002-08-01

    Croatia continues to face a health-funding crisis. A recent supplemental health insurance law increases revenues through first increasing co-payments, then raising the payroll tax to cover those co-payments. This public finance "slight-of-hand" will not solve the system's structural issues and may worsen system performance both in terms of efficiency and equity. Should Croatia have considered private supplemental insurance as an alternative? There is a new single private supplemental health insurance market now evolving over the EU countries and into Eastern Europe. Croatians could take advantage of lowered costs due to larger risk pooling and the lower administrative overhead of mature insurance organizations. Private supplemental insurance, when designed well, can address several objectives, including a) increased revenues into the health sector; b) removal of the public burden of coverage of selected services for certain population groups; and c) encourage new management and organizational innovations into the sector. Private and multiple company insurance markets are thought to be superior in terms of consumer responsiveness; choice of benefits; adoption of new, more expensive technology; and use of private sector providers. Private sector insurers may also encourage "spillover" effects encouraging reforms with public sector insurance performance. There is already an emerging private insurance market in Croatia, but can it be expanded and properly regulated? The private insurance companies might capture as much as 30-70% of the market for certain services, such as high cost procedures, preferred providers, and hotel amenities. But the Government will need to strengthen the regulatory framework for private insurance and assure that there is adequate regulatory capacity.

  15. Coverage matters: insurance and health care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Health Care Services Staff; Institute of Medicine Staff; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    2001-01-01

    ...: Insurance and Health Care , explores the myths and realities of who is uninsured, identifies social, economic, and policy factors that contribute to the situation, and describes the likelihood faced...

  16. ANNOTATION: Implementation of the National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of universal implementation will depend on several factors amongst which are continued political will, adequate funding, human resource development and public sensitization and mobilization to ensure widespread participation. KEYWORDS: National Health Insurance Scheme, Programmes, Political will. Sahel Med.

  17. Survey of social health insurance structure in selected countries; providing framework for basic health insurance in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Effat; Raissi, Ahmad Reza; Barooni, Mohsen; Ferdoosi, Massoud; Nuhi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    paying the insurance premiums within 6-10% of their income and employment status, are entitled to use the services. Providing services to the insured are performed by indirect forms. Payments to the service providers for the fee of inpatient and outpatient services are conservative and the related diagnostic groups system. Paying attention to the importance of modification of the fragmented health insurance system and financing the country's healthcare can reduce much of the failure of the health system, including the access of the public to health services. The countries according to the degree of development, governmental, and private insurance companies and existing rules must use the appropriate structure, comprehensive approach to the structure, and financing of the health social insurance on the investigated basis and careful attention to the intersections and differentiation. Studied structures, using them in the proposed approach and taking advantages of the perspectives of different beneficiaries about discussed topics can be important and efficient in order to achieve the goals of the health social insurance.

  18. Health Insurance: what is the current situation?

    CERN Document Server

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    One month ago, at our public meetings (see ECHO no. 38 - 24 September), we gave you certain information concerning our CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Since then, several discussions have taken place and, as promised, we come back to the subject to bring you the latest important news. Just to remind you: health insurance is the last point to be dealt with in the framework of the last five-yearly review.

  19. Seeing Health Insurance and HealthCare.gov Through the Eyes of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Charlene A; Asch, David A; Vinoya, Cjloe M; Ford, Carol A; Baker, Tom; Town, Robert; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-08-01

    We describe young adults' perspectives on health insurance and HealthCare.gov, including their attitudes toward health insurance, health insurance literacy, and benefit and plan preferences. We observed young adults aged 19-30 years in Philadelphia from January to March 2014 as they shopped for health insurance on HealthCare.gov. Participants were then interviewed to elicit their perceived advantages and disadvantages of insurance and factors considered important for plan selection. A 1-month follow-up interview assessed participants' plan enrollment decisions and intended use of health insurance. Data were analyzed using qualitative methodology, and salience scores were calculated for free-listing responses. We enrolled 33 highly educated young adults; 27 completed the follow-up interview. The most salient advantages of health insurance for young adults were access to preventive or primary care (salience score .28) and peace of mind (.27). The most salient disadvantage was the financial strain of paying for health insurance (.72). Participants revealed poor health insurance literacy with 48% incorrectly defining deductible and 78% incorrectly defining coinsurance. The most salient factors reported to influence plan selection were deductible (.48) and premium (.45) amounts as well as preventive care (.21) coverage. The most common intended health insurance use was primary care. Eight participants enrolled in HealthCare.gov plans: six selected silver plans, and three qualified for tax credits. Young adults' perspective on health insurance and enrollment via HealthCare.gov can inform strategies to design health insurance plans and communication about these plans in a way that engages and meets the needs of young adult populations. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  1. The impact of health insurance on maternal health care utilization: evidence from Ghana, Indonesia and Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjuan; Temsah, Gheda; Mallick, Lindsay

    2017-04-01

    While research has assessed the impact of health insurance on health care utilization, few studies have focused on the effects of health insurance on use of maternal health care. Analyzing nationally representative data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), this study estimates the impact of health insurance status on the use of maternal health services in three countries with relatively high levels of health insurance coverage-Ghana, Indonesia and Rwanda. The analysis uses propensity score matching to adjust for selection bias in health insurance uptake and to assess the effect of health insurance on four measurements of maternal health care utilization: making at least one antenatal care visit; making four or more antenatal care visits; initiating antenatal care within the first trimester and giving birth in a health facility. Although health insurance schemes in these three countries are mostly designed to focus on the poor, coverage has been highly skewed toward the rich, especially in Ghana and Rwanda. Indonesia shows less variation in coverage by wealth status. The analysis found significant positive effects of health insurance coverage on at least two of the four measures of maternal health care utilization in each of the three countries. Indonesia stands out for the most systematic effect of health insurance across all four measures. The positive impact of health insurance appears more consistent on use of facility-based delivery than use of antenatal care. The analysis suggests that broadening health insurance to include income-sensitive premiums or exemptions for the poor and low or no copayments can increase use of maternal health care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  2. Smart Choice Health Insurance©: A New, Interdisciplinary Program to Enhance Health Insurance Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Virginia; Russell, Mia; Ginter, Amanda; Braun, Bonnie; Little, Lynn; Pippidis, Maria; McCoy, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Smart Choice Health Insurance© is a consumer education program based on the definition and emerging measurement of health insurance literacy and a review of literature and appropriate theoretical frameworks. An interdisciplinary team of financial and health educators was formed to develop and pilot the program, with the goal of reducing confusion and increasing confidence in the consumer's ability to make a smart health insurance decision. Educators in seven states, certified to teach the program, conducted workshops for 994 consumers. Results show statistically significant evidence of increased health insurance literacy, confidence, and capacity to make a smart choice health insurance choice. Discussion centers on the impact the program had on specific groups, next steps to reach a larger audience, and implications for educators, consumers, and policymakers nationwide. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. 77 FR 16453 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... emergency services. Therefore, the final rule does not modify the proposed rule to grant student health... excluded coverage for contraceptive methods. Subsequent to the NPRM on student health insurance coverage... coverage provided in connection with those group health plans) from any requirement to cover contraceptives...

  4. Pricing behaviour of nonprofit insurers in a weakly competitive social health insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douven, Rudy C H M; Schut, Frederik T

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we examine the pricing behaviour of nonprofit health insurers in the Dutch social health insurance market. Since for-profit insurers were not allowed in this market, potential spillover effects from the presence of for-profit insurers on the behaviour of nonprofit insurers were absent. Using a panel data set for all health insurers operating in the Dutch social health insurance market over the period 1996-2004, we estimate a premium model to determine which factors explain the price setting behaviour of nonprofit health insurers. We find that financial stability rather than profit maximisation offers the best explanation for health plan pricing behaviour. In the presence of weak price competition, health insurers did not set premiums to maximize profits. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that regulations on financial reserves are needed to restrict premiums. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Liying; Yuan, Beibei; Huang, Fei; Lu, Ying; Garner, Paul; Meng, Qingyue

    2014-11-26

    Health insurance has the potential to improve access to health care and protect people from the financial risks of diseases. However, health insurance coverage is often low, particularly for people most in need of protection, including children and other vulnerable populations. To assess the effectiveness of strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), part of The Cochrane Library. www.thecochranelibrary.com (searched 2 November 2012), PubMed (searched 1 November 2012), EMBASE (searched 6 July 2012), Global Health (searched 6 July 2012), IBSS (searched 6 July 2012), WHO Library Database (WHOLIS) (searched 1 November 2012), IDEAS (searched 1 November 2012), ISI-Proceedings (searched 1 November 2012),OpenGrey (changed from OpenSIGLE) (searched 1 November 2012), African Index Medicus (searched 1 November 2012), BLDS (searched 1 November 2012), Econlit (searched 1 November 2012), ELDIS (searched 1 November 2012), ERIC (searched 1 November 2012), HERDIN NeON Database (searched 1 November 2012), IndMED (searched 1 November 2012), JSTOR (searched 1 November 2012), LILACS(searched 1 November 2012), NTIS (searched 1 November 2012), PAIS (searched 6 July 2012), Popline (searched 1 November 2012), ProQuest Dissertation &Theses Database (searched 1 November 2012), PsycINFO (searched 6 July 2012), SSRN (searched 1 November 2012), Thai Index Medicus (searched 1 November 2012), World Bank (searched 2 November 2012), WanFang (searched 3 November 2012), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CHKD-CNKI) (searched 2 November 2012).In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (NRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies and Interrupted time series (ITS) studies that

  6. The effect of Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme on health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study investigates the effect of Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) on health care utilisation. Methods: We provide a short history of health insurance in Ghana, and briefly discuss general patterns of enrolment in Ghana as well as in Accra in a first step. In a second step, we use data from the ...

  7. Health services utilization and costs of the insured and uninsured under the formal sector social health insurance scheme in Enugu metropolis South East Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujunwa, F A; Onwujekwe, O; Chinawa, J M

    2014-01-01

    Health insurance is a social security system that aims to facilitate fair financing of health costs through pooling and judicious utilization of financial resources, in order to provide financial risk protections and cost burden sharing for people against high cost of healthcare through various prepayment methods prior to falling ill. It is still unclear how the Federal Social Health insurance program for federal civil servants has affected the insured and uninsured civil servants in terms of health services cost and utilization in Enugu metropolis. The aim of the study was to compare the health services utilization and cost of insured with that of the non-insured federal civil servants with a view to generate information for policymaking on improving services of the National Health Insurance Scheme. A comparative, descriptive, cross-sectional survey of both the insured and uninsured federal civil servants was conducted in Enugu metropolis. Respondents were purposively enrolled and were grouped according to their insurance status after signing the informed consent form. Comparative analysis of health services utilization, satisfaction, and health services cost which include total cost, average cost, and catastrophic expenditures were done using SPSS version 17.0. There were 809 respondents; this comprised 451 insured and 358 uninsured respondents. There were 420 males (51.9%) and 389 females (48.1%). It was found that 657 respondents had at least easy access to health; this comprised 369 (56.7%) insured and 288 (43.3%) non-insured respondents while 70 (46%) of the non-insured and 82 (54%) of the insured civil servant had difficult access to health care ( P = 0.620). There are still federal civil servants yet to enroll into the formal sector social insurance program. The NHIS-insured civil servants have no appreciable advantage in terms of access to and cost of health services in Enugu metropolis.

  8. Health insurance coverage and health care access in Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Erica; Roberts, Bayard; Sava, Valeriu; Menon, Rekha; McKee, Martin

    2012-05-01

    In 2004, the Moldovan government introduced mandatory (social) health insurance (MHI) with the goals of sustainable health financing and improved access to services for poorer sections of the population. The government pays contributions for non-employed groups but the self-employed, which in Moldova include many agricultural workers, must purchase their own cover. This paper describes the extent to which the Moldovan MHI scheme has managed to achieve coverage of its population and the characteristics of those who remain without cover. The 2008 July-October enhanced health module of the Moldovan Household Budget Survey was used. The survey uses multi-stage random sampling, identifying individuals within households within 150 primary sampling units. Numbers and characteristics of those without insurance were tabulated and the determinants of lack of cover were assessed using multivariate regression. 3760 respondents were interviewed. Seventy-eight per cent were covered by MHI. Factors associated with being uninsured include being self-employed (particularly in agriculture), unemployed, younger age and low income. Respondents who were self-employed in agriculture were over 27 times more likely to be uninsured than those who were employed. Agricultural workers in Moldova are responsible for purchasing their own cover; most respondents cited cost as the main reason for not doing so. While being uninsured has an impact on utilization, financial barriers persist for those with insurance who seek care. The strengths and weaknesses of the MHI system in Moldova provide valuable lessons for policy makers in low- and middle-income countries addressing the challenges of achieving equitable coverage in health insurance schemes and the complex nature of financial barriers to access.

  9. HEALTH INSURANCE: FIXED CONTRIBUTION AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMA

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Affected by the salary adjustments on 1 January 2001 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maxima, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maxima and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2001. Reimbursement maxima The revised reimbursement maxima will appear on the leaflet summarizing the benefits for the year 2001, which will be sent out with the forthcoming issue of the CHIS Bull'. This leaflet will also be available from the divisional secretariats and from the UNIQA office at CERN. Fixed contributions The fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions) : voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with normal health insurance cover : 910.- (was 815.- in 2000) voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced heal...

  10. Health Insurance and Managed Care in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ferent models of health insurance have continued to evolve worldwide albeit .... or mental disorders. x. Emergencies in and out of the HMO ... tems for organising doctors, hospitals and other pro- viders into groups to enhance the quality of health care services. These groups also contain healthcare costs by discounting the ...

  11. National Health Insurance program and life satisfaction of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Sun, Lih-Chyun

    2012-01-01

    To ensure people's fundamental right to adequate medical care, universal health insurance is given a high priority in contemporary public policy. This article investigates the effects of the introduction of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) on life satisfaction within the elderly segment of the population. A longitudinal data set including 610 males and 430 females aged 65 or above was constructed from the Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan. A difference-in-differences-in-differences model was employed and estimated by the random-effect regression method. The effects of NHI on life satisfaction are different by gender. Compared to the change in life satisfaction between the previously uninsured and insured elderly men, the introduction of NHI had a larger effect of 4.330 points on reducing the disparity in life satisfaction between previously uninsured and insured elderly women. Education, living arrangements, lifestyle, social activities, geographic location, and urbanization level are also important determinants for life satisfaction among the elderly. Although NHI is designed to ensure equality for accessing health care, the implementation of NHI has also improved the subjective well-being of the elderly, with a larger improvement for the elderly women. The post-NHI disparity reductions in life satisfaction between the previously uninsured and insured are significantly greater among elderly women. Our analysis of Taiwan's experience should provide a valuable lesson to countries that are in the initial stages of proposing a universal health insurance program.

  12. The Effects of Health Shocks on Employment and Health Insurance: The Role of Employer-Provided Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J.; Neumark, David; Motika, Meryl

    2012-01-01

    Background Employment-contingent health insurance (ECHI) has been criticized for tying insurance to continued employment. Our research sheds light on two central issues regarding employment-contingent health insurance: whether such insurance “locks” people who experience a health shock into remaining at work; and whether it puts people at risk for insurance loss upon the onset of illness, because health shocks pose challenges to continued employment. Objective To determine how men’s dependence on their own employer for health insurance affects labor supply responses and health insurance coverage following a health shock. Data Sources We use the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) surveys from 1996 through 2008 to observe employment and health insurance status at interviews two years apart, and whether a health shock occurred in the intervening period between the interviews. Study Selection All employed married men with health insurance either through their own employer or their spouse’s employer, interviewed in at least two consecutive HRS waves with non-missing data on employment, insurance, health, demographic, and other variables, and under age 64 at the second interview. We limited the sample to men who were initially healthy. Data Extraction Our analytical sample consisted of 1,582 men of whom 1,379 had ECHI at the first interview, while 203 were covered by their spouse’s employer. Hospitalization affected 209 men with ECHI and 36 men with spouse insurance. A new disease diagnosis was reported by 103 men with ECHI and 22 men with other insurance. There were 171 men with ECHI and 25 men with spouse employer insurance who had a self-reported health decline. Data Synthesis Labor supply response differences associated with ECHI – with men with health shocks and ECHI more likely to continue working – appear to be driven by specific types of health shocks associated with future higher health care costs but not with immediate increases in morbidity that

  13. Does Uninsurance Affect the Health Outcomes of the Insured?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daysal, N. Meltem

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the health of the insured, focusing on one health outcome -- the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999-2006). My...... results indicate that uninsured patients have an economically significant effect that increases the mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I show that these results are not driven by alternative explanations, including reverse causality, patient composition effects, sample selection...... of care to insured heart attack patients in response to reduced revenues, the evidence I have suggests a modest increase in the quantity of cardiac services without a corresponding increase in hospital staff....

  14. Awareness and utilisation of national health insurance scheme by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the awareness, utilization and perception of healthcare workers towards National Health Insurance Scheme in a tertiary hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study among healthcare workers in a tertiary health institution in Ile-Ife Nigeria. The study population included all the staff in the ...

  15. Health Insurance Marketplace Quality Initiatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act requires the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to develop quality data collection and reporting tools such as a Quality...

  16. Policy Options to Reduce Fragmentation in the Pooling of Health Insurance Funds in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Kane, Sumit; Vaez Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza; Akbari Sari, Ali; Doshmangir, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are fragmentations in Iran’s health insurance system. Multiple health insurance funds exist, without adequate provisions for transfer or redistribution of cross subsidy among them. Multiple risk pools, including several private secondary insurance schemes, have resulted in a tiered health insurance system with inequitable benefit packages for different segments of the population. Also fragmentation might have contributed to inefficiency in the health insurance systems, a low financial protection against healthcare expenditures for the insured persons, high coinsurance rates, a notable rate of insurance coverage duplication, low contribution of well-funded institutes with generous benefit package to the public health insurance schemes, underfunding and severe financial shortages for the public funds, and a lack of transparency and reliable data and statistics for policy-making. We have conducted a policy analysis study, including qualitative interviews of key informants and document analysis. As a result we introduce three policy options: keeping the existing structural fragmentations of social health insurance (SHI)schemes but implementing a comprehensive "policy integration" strategy; consolidation of existing health insurance funds and creating a single national health insurance scheme; and reducing fragmentation by merging minor well-resourced funds together and creating two or three large insurance funds under the umbrella of the existing organizations. These policy options with their advantages and disadvantages are explained in the paper. PMID:27239868

  17. Policy Options to Reduce Fragmentation in the Pooling of Health Insurance Funds in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Kane, Sumit; Vaez Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza; Akbari Sari, Ali; Doshmangir, Leila

    2016-02-11

    There are fragmentations in Iran's health insurance system. Multiple health insurance funds exist, without adequate provisions for transfer or redistribution of cross subsidy among them. Multiple risk pools, including several private secondary insurance schemes, have resulted in a tiered health insurance system with inequitable benefit packages for different segments of the population. Also fragmentation might have contributed to inefficiency in the health insurance systems, a low financial protection against healthcare expenditures for the insured persons, high coinsurance rates, a notable rate of insurance coverage duplication, low contribution of well-funded institutes with generous benefit package to the public health insurance schemes, underfunding and severe financial shortages for the public funds, and a lack of transparency and reliable data and statistics for policy-making. We have conducted a policy analysis study, including qualitative interviews of key informants and document analysis. As a result we introduce three policy options: keeping the existing structural fragmentations of social health insurance (SHI)schemes but implementing a comprehensive "policy integration" strategy; consolidation of existing health insurance funds and creating a single national health insurance scheme; and reducing fragmentation by merging minor well-resourced funds together and creating two or three large insurance funds under the umbrella of the existing organizations. These policy options with their advantages and disadvantages are explained in the paper. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  18. Patient satisfaction with primary health care - a comparison between the insured and non-insured under the National Health Insurance Policy in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenny, Ama Pokuaa; Enemark, Ulrika; Asante, Felix A; Hansen, Kristian S

    2014-04-01

    Ghana has initiated various health sector reforms over the past decades aimed at strengthening institutions, improving the overall health system and increasing access to healthcare services by all groups of people. The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) instituted in 2005, is an innovative system aimed at making health care more accessible to people who need it. Currently, there is a growing amount of concern about the capacity of the NHIS to make quality health care accessible to its clients. A number of studies have concentrated on the effect of health insurance status on demand for health services, but have been quiet on supply side issues. The main aim of this study is to examine the overall satisfaction with health care among the insured and uninsured under the NHIS. The second aim is to explore the relations between overall satisfaction and socio-demographic characteristics, health insurance and the various dimensions of quality of care. This study employs logistic regression using household survey data in three districts in Ghana covering the 3 ecological zones (coastal, forest and savannah). It identifies the service quality factors that are important to patients' satisfaction and examines their links to their health insurance status. The results indicate that a higher proportion of insured patients are satisfied with the overall quality of care compared to the uninsured. The key predictors of overall satisfaction are waiting time, friendliness of staff and satisfaction of the consultation process. These results highlight the importance of interpersonal care in health care facilities. Feedback from patients' perception of health services and satisfaction surveys improve the quality of care provided and therefore effort must be made to include these findings in future health policies.

  19. Strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Liying; Yuan, Beibei; Huang, Fei; Lu, Ying; Garner, Paul; Meng, Qingyue

    2014-01-01

    Background Health insurance has the potential to improve access to health care and protect people from the financial risks of diseases. However, health insurance coverage is often low, particularly for people most in need of protection, including children and other vulnerable populations. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), part of The Cochrane Library. www.thecochranelibrary.com (searched 2 November 2012), PubMed (searched 1 November 2012), EMBASE (searched 6 July 2012), Global Health (searched 6 July 2012), IBSS (searched 6 July 2012), WHO Library Database (WHOLIS) (searched 1 November 2012), IDEAS (searched 1 November 2012), ISI-Proceedings (searched 1 November 2012),OpenGrey (changed from OpenSIGLE) (searched 1 November 2012), African Index Medicus (searched 1 November 2012), BLDS (searched 1 November 2012), Econlit (searched 1 November 2012), ELDIS (searched 1 November 2012), ERIC (searched 1 November 2012), HERDIN NeON Database (searched 1 November 2012), IndMED (searched 1 November 2012), JSTOR (searched 1 November 2012), LILACS(searched 1 November 2012), NTIS (searched 1 November 2012), PAIS (searched 6 July 2012), Popline (searched 1 November 2012), ProQuest Dissertation &Theses Database (searched 1 November 2012), PsycINFO (searched 6 July 2012), SSRN (searched 1 November 2012), Thai Index Medicus (searched 1 November 2012), World Bank (searched 2 November 2012), WanFang (searched 3 November 2012), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CHKD-CNKI) (searched 2 November 2012). In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (NRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA

  20. How to Shop for Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for an insurance plan through the health care marketplace can be done online through healthcare.gov or a state site, over ... from the Internet. Before you fill out an online application, you'll need to create ... or your state's marketplace. You'll need to know a few things ...

  1. Knowledge and Attitude Towards National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The instrument for data collection was self-developed and structured questionnaire of Knowledge towards National Health Insurance Scheme Questionnaire (KNHISQ) designed in four-point Likert-scale format. Descriptive statistics of frequency count and percentages were used to describe the demographic data, while ...

  2. Consolidation of the health insurance scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    In the last issue of Echo, we highlighted CERN’s obligation to guarantee a social security scheme for all employees, pensioners and their families. In that issue we talked about the first component: pensions. This time we shall discuss the other component: the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS).

  3. Premium indexing in lifelong health insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercruysse, W.; Dhaene, J.; Denuit, M.; Pitacco, E.; Antonio, K.

    2013-01-01

    For lifelong health insurance covers, medical inflation not incorporated in the level premiums determined at policy issue requires an appropriate increase of these premiums and/or the corresponding reserves during the term of the contract. In this paper, we investigate appropriate premium indexing

  4. Optimal cost reimbursement of health insurers to reduce risk selection

    OpenAIRE

    Kifmann, Mathias; Lorenz, Normann

    2005-01-01

    In the absence of a perfect risk adjustment scheme, reimbursing health insurers' costs can reduce risk selection in community-rated health insurance markets. In this paper, we develop a model in which insurers determine the cost efficiency of health care and have incentives for risk selection. We derive the optimal cost reimbursement function which balances the incentives for cost efficiency and risk selection. For health cost data from a Swiss health insurer, we find that an optimal cost rei...

  5. Slovenian national health insurance card: the next step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, T; Kandus, G; Trcek, D; Zupan, B

    1999-01-01

    The Slovenian national health insurance company started a full-scale deployment of the insurance smart card that is at the present used for insurance data and identification purpose only. There is ample capacity on the cards that were selected, to contain much more data than needed for the purely administrative and charging purposes. There are plans to include some basic medical information, donor information, etc. On the other hand, there are no firm plans to use the security infrastructure and the extensive network, connecting the insurance company with the more than 200 self service terminals positioned at the medical facilities through the country to build an integrated medical information system that would be very beneficial to the patients and the medical community. This paper is proposing some possible future developments and further discusses on the security issues involved with such countrywide medical information system.

  6. Health Care for the Wongs: Health Insurance, Choosing a Doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thypin, Marilyn; Glasner, Lynne

    A short fictional work for limited English speakers presents a young family's experience in learning about the value of health insurance and the importance of having a physician when medical care is needed. Information is related regarding insurance acquired through one's place of employment and the availability of medical assistance, through…

  7. Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Web site discusses and provides downloadable data on state and program type, number of children ever enrolled, and the percentage of growth compared to the...

  8. Disparities in Private Health Insurance Coverage of Skilled Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. Tovino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article compares and contrasts public and private health insurance coverage of skilled medical rehabilitation, including cognitive rehabilitation, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and skilled nursing services (collectively, skilled care. As background, prior scholars writing in this area have focused on Medicare coverage of skilled care and have challenged coverage determinations limiting Medicare coverage to beneficiaries who are able to demonstrate improvement in their conditions within a specific period of time (the Improvement Standard. By and large, these scholars have applauded the settlement agreement approved on 24 January 2013, by the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont in Jimmo v. Sebelius (Jimmo, as well as related motions, rulings, orders, government fact sheets, and Medicare program manual statements clarifying that Medicare covers skilled care that is necessary to prevent or slow a beneficiary’s deterioration or to maintain a beneficiary at his or her maximum practicable level of function even though no further improvement in the beneficiary’s condition is expected. Scholars who have focused on beneficiaries who have suffered severe brain injuries, in particular, have framed public insurance coverage of skilled brain rehabilitation as an important civil, disability, and educational right. Given that approximately two-thirds of Americans with health insurance are covered by private health insurance and that many private health plans continue to require their insureds to demonstrate improvement within a short period of time to obtain coverage of skilled care, scholarship assessing private health insurance coverage of skilled care is important but noticeably absent from the literature. This article responds to this gap by highlighting state benchmark plans’ and other private health plans’ continued use of the Improvement Standard in skilled care coverage decisions and

  9. Policy processes underpinning universal health insurance in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui T. T. Ha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost 30 years since economic reforms or ‘renovation’ (Doimoi were launched, Vietnam has achieved remarkably good health results, in many cases matching those in much higher income countries. This study explores the contribution made by Universal Health Insurance (UHI policies, focusing on the past 15 years. We conducted a mixed method study to describe and assess the policy process relating to health insurance, from agenda setting through implementation and evaluation. Design: The qualitative research methods implemented in this study were 30 in-depth interviews, 4 focus group discussions, expert consultancy, and 420 secondary data review. The data were analyzed by NVivo 7.0. Results: Health insurance in Vietnam was introduced in 1992 and has been elaborated over a 20-year time frame. These processes relate to moving from a contingent to a gradually expanded target population, expanding the scope of the benefit package, and reducing the financial contribution from the insured. The target groups expanded to include 66.8% of the population by 2012. We characterized the policy process relating to UHI as incremental with a learning-by-doing approach, with an emphasis on increasing coverage rather than ensuring a basic service package and financial protection. There was limited involvement of civil society organizations and users in all policy processes. Intertwined political economy factors influenced the policy processes. Conclusions: Incremental policy processes, characterized by a learning-by-doing approach, is appropriate for countries attempting to introduce new health institutions, such as health insurance in Vietnam. Vietnam should continue to mobilize resources in sustainable and viable ways to support the target groups. The country should also adopt a multi-pronged approach to achieving universal access to health services, beyond health insurance.

  10. Policy processes underpinning universal health insurance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Bui T T; Frizen, Scott; Thi, Le M; Duong, Doan T T; Duc, Duong M

    2014-01-01

    In almost 30 years since economic reforms or 'renovation' (Doimoi) were launched, Vietnam has achieved remarkably good health results, in many cases matching those in much higher income countries. This study explores the contribution made by Universal Health Insurance (UHI) policies, focusing on the past 15 years. We conducted a mixed method study to describe and assess the policy process relating to health insurance, from agenda setting through implementation and evaluation. The qualitative research methods implemented in this study were 30 in-depth interviews, 4 focus group discussions, expert consultancy, and 420 secondary data review. The data were analyzed by NVivo 7.0. Health insurance in Vietnam was introduced in 1992 and has been elaborated over a 20-year time frame. These processes relate to moving from a contingent to a gradually expanded target population, expanding the scope of the benefit package, and reducing the financial contribution from the insured. The target groups expanded to include 66.8% of the population by 2012. We characterized the policy process relating to UHI as incremental with a learning-by-doing approach, with an emphasis on increasing coverage rather than ensuring a basic service package and financial protection. There was limited involvement of civil society organizations and users in all policy processes. Intertwined political economy factors influenced the policy processes. Incremental policy processes, characterized by a learning-by-doing approach, is appropriate for countries attempting to introduce new health institutions, such as health insurance in Vietnam. Vietnam should continue to mobilize resources in sustainable and viable ways to support the target groups. The country should also adopt a multi-pronged approach to achieving universal access to health services, beyond health insurance.

  11. Message from the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHISB)

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    At the end of 2006, the Management of Clinique La Colline canceled its 2005 tariff agreement with the health insurance schemes of international organizations (CERN, ILO-ITU, WHO, UNOG). The proposed 2007 tariffs were unacceptable to these schemes as they included an average increase of 12%. No agreement was found and therefore this clinic is no longer approved by the CHIS, according to the definition given in the Rules of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme. Our Administrator, UNIQA, will no longer act as paying third party for any hospitalisation which has not already been planned and agreed. More information will appear in the next issue of the CHISBull'. Tel.74484

  12. Genetic screening, health care and the insurance industry. Should genetic information be made available to insurers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Diego F; Towse, Adrian

    2004-06-01

    The potential use of genetic tests in insurance has raised concerns about discrimination and individuals losing access to health care either because of refusals to test for treatable diseases, or because test-positives cannot afford premiums. Governments have so far largely sought to restrict the use of genetic information by insurance companies. To date the number of tests available with significant actuarial value is limited. However, this is likely to change, raising more clearly the question as to whether the social costs of adverse selection outweigh the social costs of individuals not accessing health care for fear of the consequences of test information being used in insurance markets. In this contribution we set out the policy context and model the potential trade-offs between the losses faced by insurers from adverse selection by insurees (which will increase premiums reducing consumer welfare) and the detrimental health effects that may result from persons refusing to undergo tests that could identify treatable health conditions. It argues that the optimal public policy on genetic testing should reflect overall societal benefit, taking account of these trade-offs. Based on our model, the factors that influence the outcome include: the size of and value attached to the health gains from treatment; deterrent effects of a disclosure requirement on testing for health reasons; incidence of the disease; propensity of test-positives to adverse select; policy value adverse selectors buy in a non-disclosure environment; and price elasticity of demand for insurance. Our illustrative model can be used as a benchmark for developing other scenarios or incorporating real data in order to address the impact of different policies on disclosure and requirement to test.

  13. Financial Health of a Commercial Insurance Company and its Coherences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svatopluk Nečas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: The main purpose of the article is to define the term “financial health of a commercial insurance company” and identify the factors that influence management and its economic results of a commercial insurance company. The above mentioned term will be faced with other similar terms such as financial stability, financial strength, solvency, liquidity or profitability (always with emphasis on the insurance sector. Related to this purpose, this hypothesis is formulated: “Financial health of a commercial insurance company can be identified in the long perspective with the term financial stability and as its synonym the concept of solvency can be stated.” Methodology/methods: The methods of description, analysis, deduction and induction will be used in the article. The research part is based on a qualitative basis. It combines three methods of qualitative research: interviews with experts, a structured interview with open questions, a questionnaire with open questions. Its subject is a managed conversation with leading experts in the field of insurance and related branches, who answered questions related to the topic. Evaluation of interviews was done by method of interview analysis, respectively thematic analysis and subsequent synthesis based on respondents’ answers. The synthesis is used as a method to gain new knowledge. The conclusions are the basis for discussion for the theory completion in the case of the term mentioned above and for statements to other contexts that are defined in the objectives of the article. Synthetic approach is applied in the formulation of conclusions of the research. Significant findings for the theory are obtained by abstraction, as derived from observations of the issues, i.e. financial health of a commercial insurance company. The evaluation also includes a summary of significant matters and it reflects the opinion of the author devised throughout literature and based on interviews

  14. Dynamics of health insurance ownership in Vietnam, 2004 – 06

    OpenAIRE

    Trong-Ha Nguyen; Suiwah Leung

    2010-01-01

    Vietnam is undertaking health financing reform in an attempt to achieve universal health insurance coverage by 2014. Changes in health insurance policies have doubled the overall coverage between 2004 and 2006. However, close examination of Vietnam Living Standard Surveys during this period reveals that about one fifth of the insured in 2004 dropped out of the health insurance system by 2006. This paper uses longitudinal data from VHLSS 2004 and 2006 to investigate the characteristics of thos...

  15. Experiences and Lessons from Urban Health Insurance Reform in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Haichang

    2016-08-01

    Health care systems often face competing goals and priorities, which make reforms challenging. This study analyzed factors influencing the success of a health care system based on urban health insurance reform evolution in China, and offers recommendations for improvement. Findings based on health insurance reform strategies and mechanisms that did or did not work can effectively inform improvement of health insurance system design and practice, and overall health care system performance, including equity, efficiency, effectiveness, cost, finance, access, and coverage, both in China and other countries. This study is the first to use historical comparison to examine the success and failure of China's health care system over time before and after the economic reform in the 1980s. This study is also among the first to analyze the determinants of Chinese health system effectiveness by relating its performance to both technical reasons within the health system and underlying nontechnical characteristics outside the health system, including socioeconomics, politics, culture, values, and beliefs. In conclusion, a health insurance system is successful when it fits its social environment, economic framework, and cultural context, which translates to congruent health care policies, strategies, organization, and delivery. No health system can survive without its deeply rooted socioeconomic environment and cultural context. That is why one society should be cautious not to radically switch from a successful model to an entirely different one over time. There is no perfect health system model suitable for every population-only appropriate ones for specific nations and specific populations at the right place and right time. (Population Health Management 2016;19:291-297).

  16. Impact of discontinuity in health insurance on resource utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ritesh; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Shah, Nilay D

    2010-07-06

    This study sought to describe the incidence of transitions into and out of Medicaid, characterize the populations that transition and determine if health insurance instability is associated with changes in healthcare utilization. 2000-2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) was used to identify adults enrolled in Medicaid at any time during the survey period (n = 6,247). We estimate both static and dynamic panel data models to examine the effect of health insurance instability on health care resource utilization. We find that, after controlling for observed factors like employment and health status, and after specifying a dynamic model that attempts to capture time-dependent unobserved effects, individuals who have multiple transitions into and out of Medicaid have higher emergency room utilization, more office visits, more hospitalizations, and refill their prescriptions less often. Individuals with more than one transition in health insurance status over the study period were likely to have higher health care utilization than individuals with one or fewer transitions. If these effects are causal, in addition to individual benefits, there are potentially large benefits for Medicaid programs from reducing avoidable insurance instability. These results suggest the importance of including provisions to facilitate continuous enrollment in public programs as the United States pursues health reform.

  17. Universal Health Insurance in India: Ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prinja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian health system is characterized by a vast public health infrastructure which lies underutilized, and a largely unregulated private market which caters to greater need for curative treatment. High out-of-pocket (OOP health expenditures poses barrier to access for healthcare. Among those who get hospitalized, nearly 25% are pushed below poverty line by catastrophic impact of OOP healthcare expenditure. Moreover, healthcare costs are spiraling due to epidemiologic, demographic, and social transition. Hence, the need for risk pooling is imperative. The present article applies economic theories to various possibilities for providing risk pooling mechanism with the objective of ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality care. Asymmetry of information leads to failure of actuarially administered private health insurance (PHI. Large proportion of informal sector labor in India′s workforce prevents major upscaling of social health insurance (SHI. Community health insurance schemes are difficult to replicate on a large scale. We strongly recommend institutionalization of tax-funded Universal Health Insurance Scheme (UHIS, with complementary role of PHI. The contextual factors for development of UHIS are favorable. SHI schemes should be merged with UHIS. Benefit package of this scheme should include preventive and in-patient curative care to begin with, and gradually include out-patient care. State-specific priorities should be incorporated in benefit package. Application of such an insurance system besides being essential to the goals of an effective health system provides opportunity to regulate private market, negotiate costs, and plan health services efficiently. Purchaser-provider split provides an opportunity to strengthen public sector by allowing providers to compete.

  18. Universal health insurance in India: ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Indian health system is characterized by a vast public health infrastructure which lies underutilized, and a largely unregulated private market which caters to greater need for curative treatment. High out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures poses barrier to access for healthcare. Among those who get hospitalized, nearly 25% are pushed below poverty line by catastrophic impact of OOP healthcare expenditure. Moreover, healthcare costs are spiraling due to epidemiologic, demographic, and social transition. Hence, the need for risk pooling is imperative. The present article applies economic theories to various possibilities for providing risk pooling mechanism with the objective of ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality care. Asymmetry of information leads to failure of actuarially administered private health insurance (PHI). Large proportion of informal sector labor in India's workforce prevents major upscaling of social health insurance (SHI). Community health insurance schemes are difficult to replicate on a large scale. We strongly recommend institutionalization of tax-funded Universal Health Insurance Scheme (UHIS), with complementary role of PHI. The contextual factors for development of UHIS are favorable. SHI schemes should be merged with UHIS. Benefit package of this scheme should include preventive and in-patient curative care to begin with, and gradually include out-patient care. State-specific priorities should be incorporated in benefit package. Application of such an insurance system besides being essential to the goals of an effective health system provides opportunity to regulate private market, negotiate costs, and plan health services efficiently. Purchaser-provider split provides an opportunity to strengthen public sector by allowing providers to compete.

  19. Community Based Health Insurance Schemes and Protection of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are two folds: firstly to explore the magnitude of catastrophic expenditure, and secondly to determine its contributing factor,s including the protective impact of the voluntary community based health insurance schemes in Tanzania. The study covered 274 respondents. Study findings have shown ...

  20. Social Health Insurance in Nigeria: Policy Implications in A Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social health insurance was introduced in Nigeria in 1999 and had since been restricted to workers in the formal public sector. There are plans for scaling up to include rural populations in a foreseeable future. Information on willingness to participate and pay a premium in the programme by rural populations is dearth.

  1. Breaking Health Insurance Knowledge Barriers Through Games: Pilot Test of Health Care America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlin, Sara; James, Juli

    2017-11-16

    Having health insurance is associated with a number of beneficial health outcomes. However, previous research suggests that patients tend to avoid health insurance information and often misunderstand or lack knowledge about many health insurance terms. Health insurance knowledge is particularly low among young adults. The purpose of this study was to design and test an interactive newsgame (newsgames are games that apply journalistic principles in their creation, for example, gathering stories to immerse the player in narratives) about health insurance. This game included entry-level information through scenarios and was designed through the collation of national news stories, local personal accounts, and health insurance company information. A total of 72 (N=72) participants completed in-person, individual gaming sessions. Participants completed a survey before and after game play. Participants indicated a greater self-reported understanding of how to use health insurance from pre- (mean=3.38, SD=0.98) to postgame play (mean=3.76, SD=0.76); t 71 =-3.56, P=.001. For all health insurance terms, participants self-reported a greater understanding following game play. Finally, participants provided a greater number of correct definitions for terms after playing the game, (mean=3.91, SD=2.15) than they did before game play (mean=2.59, SD=1.68); t 31 =-3.61, P=.001. Significant differences from pre- to postgame play differed by health insurance term. A game is a practical solution to a difficult health issue-the game can be played anywhere, including on a mobile device, is interactive and will thus engage an apathetic audience, and is cost-efficient in its execution. ©Sara Champlin, Juli James. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 16.11.2017.

  2. The future of health insurance for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newacheck, Paul W; Houtrow, Amy J; Romm, Diane L; Kuhlthau, Karen A; Bloom, Sheila R; Van Cleave, Jeanne M; Perrin, James M

    2009-05-01

    Because of their elevated need for services, health insurance is particularly important for children with special health care needs. In this article we assess how well the current system is meeting the insurance needs of children with special health care needs and how emerging trends in health insurance may affect their well-being. We begin with a review of the evidence on the impact of health insurance on the health care experiences of children with special health care needs based on the peer-reviewed literature. We then assess how well the current system meets the needs of these children by using data from 2 editions of the National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Finally, we present an analysis of recent developments and emerging trends in the health insurance marketplace that may affect this population. Although a high proportion of children with special health care needs have insurance at any point in time, nearly 40% are either uninsured at least part of the year or have coverage that is inadequate. Recent expansions in public coverage, although offset in part by a contraction in employer-based coverage, have led to modest but significant reductions in the number of uninsured children with special health care needs. Emerging insurance products, including consumer-directed health plans, may expose children with special health care needs and their families to greater financial risks. Health insurance coverage has the potential to secure access to needed care and improve the quality of life for these children while protecting their families from financially burdensome health care expenses. Continued vigilance and advocacy for children and youth with special health care needs are needed to ensure that these children have access to adequate coverage and that they fare well under health care reform.

  3. Inequalities in health: the role of health insurance in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Chukwudozie

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Health financing is a core necessity for sustainable healthcare delivery. Access inequalities due to financial restrictions in low-middle income countries, and in Africa especially, significantly affect disease rates and health statistics in these regions. This paper focuses on the role of a national health insurance cover as a funding medium in Nigeria, highlighting the theoretical premise of health insurance, its driving forces, key benefits and key limitations particular to the country under scrutiny. Emphasis is laid on its overall effect on the pressing public health issue of health inequality.

  4. Knowledge of Health Insurance Among Primary Health-Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) was formally launched in Nigeria in 2005 as an option to help bridge the evident gaps in health care financing, with the expectation of it leading to significant improvement in the country's dismal health status indices. Primary Health Care (PHC) is the nation's ...

  5. HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR PENNSYLVANIA DAIRY FARM MANAGERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gripp, Sharon I.; Ford, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of more than 1200 Pennsylvania dairy farm managers showed that almost 20% of those managers do not have health insurance. Of those farm managers with health insurance, 67% had insurance acquired through the farm business. Farm characteristics and demographic information were used to determine indicators of health insurance coverage. Age, education, net farm income, off-farm income, milk marketing cooperative membership, and intensity of hired labor use all had significant effects on ...

  6. Health insurance without provider influence: the limits of cost containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, L G; Greenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    In our previous paper, we showed that market forces can play a significant role in controlling health care costs and that a considerable amount of cost containment effort was pursued by third-party insurers in Oregon in the 1930s and 1940s. Although physicians were able to thwart this cost-control effort, a 1986 Supreme Court decision, FTC v. Indiana Federation of Dentists, found that a boycott of insurers by dentists violated Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act. Further investigation of recent developments, including the recent Wickline v. California decision, indicates that the primary barriers to cost containment today are not obstructive tactics by providers or provider-controlled health insurance plans. Rather, the primary barriers are increases in the development and diffusion of new technology and society's apparent preference for paying for new tests and procedures regardless of economic efficiency.

  7. Demand for Health Insurance by Military Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    determinant. For forecasting and policy analyses, one should take both premiums and OOP expenses into account . v Contents 1.  Introduction...insurance allows beneficiaries to rely on civilian providers. Virtually all costs above the TRICARE Standard/Extra deductible are payable by OHI (first payer... account plan access and quality. Marginal health benefits under OHI are greater than under TRICARE, but so are OOP expenses and premiums. For some

  8. Health insurance affects the use of disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann; Salter, Amber R.; Fox, Robert; Cofield, Stacey S.; Tyry, Tuula; Cutter, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between health insurance coverage and disease-modifying therapy (DMT) use for multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In 2014, we surveyed participants in the North American Research Committee on MS registry regarding health insurance coverage. We investigated associations between negative insurance change and (1) the type of insurance, (2) DMT use, (3) use of free/discounted drug programs, and (4) insurance challenges using multivariable logistic regressions. Results: Of 6,662 respondents included in the analysis, 6,562 (98.5%) had health insurance, but 1,472 (22.1%) reported negative insurance change compared with 12 months earlier. Respondents with private insurance were more likely to report negative insurance change than any other insurance. Among respondents not taking DMTs, 6.1% cited insurance/financial concerns as the sole reason. Of respondents taking DMTs, 24.7% partially or completely relied on support from free/discounted drug programs. Of respondents obtaining DMTs through insurance, 3.3% experienced initial insurance denial of DMT use, 2.3% encountered insurance denial of DMT switches, and 1.6% skipped or split doses because of increased copay. For respondents with relapsing-remitting MS, negative insurance change increased their odds of not taking DMTs (odds ratio [OR] 1.50; 1.16–1.93), using free/discounted drug programs for DMTs (OR 1.89; 1.40–2.57), and encountering insurance challenges (OR 2.48; 1.64–3.76). Conclusions: Insurance coverage affects DMT use for persons with MS, and use of free/discounted drug programs is substantial and makes economic analysis that ignores these supplements potentially inaccurate. The rising costs of drugs and changing insurance coverage adversely affect access to treatment for persons with MS. PMID:27358338

  9. INFORMATION FROM THE CERN HEALTH INSURANCE SCHEME

    CERN Multimedia

    Tel : 7-3635

    2002-01-01

    Please note that, from 1 July 2002, the tariff agreement between CERN and the Hôpital de la Tour will no longer be in force. As a result the members of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme will no longer obtain a 5% discount for quick payment of bills. More information on the termination of the agreement and the implications for our Health Insurance Scheme will be provided in the next issue of the CHIS Bull', due for publication in the first half of July. It will be sent to your home address, so, if you have moved recently, please check that your divisional secretariat has your current address. Tel.: 73635 The Organization's Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) has launched its own Web pages, located on the Website of the Social & Statutory Conditions Group of HR Division (HR-SOC). The address is short and easy-to-remember www.cern.ch/chis The pages currently available concentrate on providing basic information. Over the coming months it is planned to fill out the details and introduce new topics. Please give us ...

  10. The cost conundrum: financing the business of health care insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    Health care spending in both the governmental and private sectors skyrocketed over the last century. This article examines the rapid growth of health care expenditures by analyzing the extent of this financial boom as well some of the reasons why health care financing has become so expensive. It also explores how the market concentration of insurance companies has led to growing insurer profits, fewer insurance providers, and less market competition. Based on economic data primarily from the Government Accountability Office, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the American Medical Associa tion, it has become clear that this country needs more competitive rates for the business of health insurance. Because of the unique dynamics of health insurance payments and financing, America needs to promote affordability and innovation in the health insurance market and lower the market's high concentration levels. In the face of booming insurance profits, soaring premiums, many believe that in our consolidated health insurance market, the "business of insurance" should not be exempt from antitrust laws. All in all, it is in our nation's best interest that Congress restore the application of antitrust laws to health sector insurers by passing the Health Insurance Industry Antitrust Enforcement Act as an amendment to the McCarran-Ferguson Act's "business of insurance" provision.

  11. Exploring fraud and abuse in National Health Insurance Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    2014-05-23

    May 23, 2014 ... The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) is a form of Health Insurance system established by the Government of ... the NHIS. One of the major challenges of the insurance industry is fraud and abuse which causes substantial losses. ...... Switzerland: Springer International. Publishing Company.

  12. 76 FR 50931 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of... relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care... plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and claim the premium tax credit, and to Exchanges that...

  13. How does retiree health insurance influence public sector employee saving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert L; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2014-12-01

    Economic theory predicts that employer-provided retiree health insurance (RHI) benefits have a crowd-out effect on household wealth accumulation, not dissimilar to the effects reported elsewhere for employer pensions, Social Security, and Medicare. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any similar research on the impacts of retiree health insurance per se. Accordingly, the present paper utilizes a unique data file on respondents to the Health and Retirement Study, to explore how employer-provided retiree health insurance may influence net household wealth among public sector employees, where retiree healthcare benefits are still quite prevalent. Key findings include the following: Most full-time public sector employees anticipate having employer-provided health insurance coverage in retirement, unlike most private sector workers.Public sector employees covered by RHI had substantially less wealth than similar private sector employees without RHI. In our data, Federal workers had about $82,000 (18%) less net wealth than private sector employees lacking RHI; state/local workers with RHI accumulated about $69,000 (or 15%) less net wealth than their uninsured private sector counterparts.After controlling on socioeconomic status and differences in pension coverage, net household wealth for Federal employees was $116,000 less than workers without RHI and the result is statistically significant; the state/local difference was not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. National health insurance policy in Nepal: challenges for implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj Mishra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The health system in Nepal is characterized by a wide network of health facilities and community workers and volunteers. Nepal's Interim Constitution of 2007 addresses health as a fundamental right, stating that every citizen has the right to basic health services free of cost. But the reality is a far cry. Only 61.8% of the Nepalese households have access to health facilities within 30 min, with significant urban (85.9% and rural (59% discrepancy. Addressing barriers to health services needs urgent interventions at the population level. Recently (February 2015, the Government of Nepal formed a Social Health Security Development Committee as a legal framework to start implementing a social health security scheme (SHS after the National Health Insurance Policy came out in 2013. The program has aimed to increase the access of health services to the poor and the marginalized, and people in hard to reach areas of the country, though challenges remain with financing. Several aspects should be considered in design, learning from earlier community-based health insurance schemes that suffered from low enrollment and retention of members as well as from a pro-rich bias. Mechanisms should be built for monitoring unfair pricing and unaffordable copayments, and an overall benefit package be crafted to include coverage of major health services including non-communicable diseases. Regulations should include such issues as accreditation mechanisms for private providers. Health system strengthening should move along with the roll-out of SHS. Improving the efficiency of hospital, motivating the health workers, and using appropriate technology can improve the quality of health services. Also, as currently a constitution drafting is being finalized, careful planning and deliberation is necessary about what insurance structure may suit the proposed future federal structure in Nepal.

  15. Are the poor too poor to demand health insurance?

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeev Ahuja; Johannes Jutting

    2004-01-01

    Community based micro insurance has aroused much interest and hope in meeting health care challenges facing the poor. In this paper we explore how institutional rigidities such as credit constraints impinge on demand for health insurance and how insurance could potentially prevent poor households from falling into poverty trap. In this setting, we argue that the appropriate public intervention in generating demand for insurance is not to subsidise premium but to remove these rigidities (easin...

  16. DIVORCE AND WOMEN'S RISK OF HEALTH INSURANCE LOSS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health insurance changes after divorce. Our estimates suggest that roughly 115,000 American women lose private health insurance annually in the months following divorce and that roughly 65,000 of these women become uninsured. The loss of insurance coverage we observe is not just a short-term disruption. Women's rates of insurance coverage remain depressed for more than two years after divorce. Insurance loss may compound the economic losses women experience after divorce, and contribute to as well as compound previously documented health declines following divorce. PMID:23147653

  17. Divorce and women's risk of health insurance loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health insurance changes after divorce. Our estimates suggest that roughly 115,000 American women lose private health insurance annually in the months following divorce and that roughly 65,000 of these women become uninsured. The loss of insurance coverage we observe is not just a short-term disruption. Women's rates of insurance coverage remain depressed for more than two years after divorce. Insurance loss may compound the economic losses women experience after divorce and contribute to as well as compound previously documented health declines following divorce.

  18. The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) and Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... providing support for the implementation of the NHIS objectives was also analysed. Te study concludes by focusing on aspects of information management on health services especially within the construct of Health Insurance Scheme. Key Words: Health Information Management, Health Insurance, Social Health System

  19. Health Insurance Coverage and Its Impact on Medical Cost: Observations from the Floating Population in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinjun; Kang, Bowei; Liu, Yawen; Li, Yichong; Shi, Guoqing; Shen, Tao; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Mei; Zhou, Maigeng; Wang, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Background China has the world's largest floating (migrant) population, which has characteristics largely different from the rest of the population. Our goal is to study health insurance coverage and its impact on medical cost for this population. Methods A telephone survey was conducted in 2012. 644 subjects were surveyed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were conducted on insurance coverage and medical cost. Results 82.2% of the surveyed subjects were covered by basic insurance at hometowns with hukou or at residences. Subjects' characteristics including age, education, occupation, and presence of chronic diseases were associated with insurance coverage. After controlling for confounders, insurance coverage was not significantly associated with gross or out-of-pocket medical cost. Conclusion For the floating population, health insurance coverage needs to be improved. Policy interventions are needed so that health insurance can have a more effective protective effect on cost. PMID:25386914

  20. Health insurance coverage and its impact on medical cost: observations from the floating population in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinjun Zhao

    Full Text Available China has the world's largest floating (migrant population, which has characteristics largely different from the rest of the population. Our goal is to study health insurance coverage and its impact on medical cost for this population.A telephone survey was conducted in 2012. 644 subjects were surveyed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were conducted on insurance coverage and medical cost.82.2% of the surveyed subjects were covered by basic insurance at hometowns with hukou or at residences. Subjects' characteristics including age, education, occupation, and presence of chronic diseases were associated with insurance coverage. After controlling for confounders, insurance coverage was not significantly associated with gross or out-of-pocket medical cost.For the floating population, health insurance coverage needs to be improved. Policy interventions are needed so that health insurance can have a more effective protective effect on cost.

  1. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Contributions – Changes for 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2012, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.41%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity increase accordingly : Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1094 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (547 CHF) is applied to apprentices as well as to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 438 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and tempo...

  2. The Relationship of Health Insurance and Mortality: Is Lack of Insurance Deadly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U

    2017-09-19

    About 28 million Americans are currently uninsured, and millions more could lose coverage under policy reforms proposed in Congress. At the same time, a growing number of policy leaders have called for going beyond the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to a single-payer national health insurance system that would cover every American. These policy debates lend particular salience to studies evaluating the health effects of insurance coverage. In 2002, an Institute of Medicine review concluded that lack of insurance increases mortality, but several relevant studies have appeared since that time. This article summarizes current evidence concerning the relationship of insurance and mortality. The evidence strengthens confidence in the Institute of Medicine's conclusion that health insurance saves lives: The odds of dying among the insured relative to the uninsured is 0.71 to 0.97.

  3. 77 FR 33490 - Long Elevator & Machine Company, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-80,525] Long Elevator & Machine... former workers of Long Elevator & Machine Company, Inc., including workers whose unemployment insurance...

  4. 78 FR 7264 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains final regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit... Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges) and claim the premium tax credit. DATES: Effective date: These...

  5. Basic Versus Supplementary Health Insurance : Moral Hazard and Adverse Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a tractable model of health insurance with both moral hazard and adverse selection. We show that government sponsored universal basic insurance should cover treatments with the biggest adverse selection problems. Treatments not covered by basic insurance can be covered on the

  6. Basic versus supplementary health insurance : Moral hazard and adverse selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    This paper introduces a tractable model of health insurance with both moral hazard and adverse selection. We show that government sponsored universal basic insurance should cover treatments with the biggest adverse selection problems. Treatments not covered by basic insurance can be covered on the

  7. Immigrants’ Access to Health Insurance: No Equality without Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Dzúrová

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants’ access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants’ access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system.

  8. Immigrants’ Access to Health Insurance: No Equality without Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzúrová, Dagmar; Winkler, Petr; Drbohlav, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants’ access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants’ access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system. PMID:25026082

  9. Health insurance and health care in India: a supply-demand perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Perianayagam, Arokiasamy; Goli, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    India’s health care and health financing provision is characterized by too little Government spending on health, meager health insurance coverage, declining public health care use contrasted by highest levels of private out-of-pocket health spending in the world. To understand the interconnectedness of these disturbing outcomes, this paper envisions a theoretical framework of health insurance and health care revisits the existing health insurance schemes and assesses the health insurance cove...

  10. Will private health insurance schemes subscriptions continue after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Uganda is currently designing a National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme, with the aim of raising additional resources for the health sector. Very little was known about the health insurance market in Uganda before this study, so one of our main objectives was to investigate the nature of the private health ...

  11. Influence of biomedical sciences on National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health insurance becomes a viable alternative for financing health care amidst the high cost of health care. This study, conducted in 1997, uses a valuation method to assess the willingness of individuals from the working sector in Accra, Ghana, to join and pay premium for a proposed National Health Insurance Scheme ...

  12. Perceptions and uptake of health insurance for maternal care in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In Kenya, maternal and child health accounts for a large proportion of the expenditures made towards healthcare. It is estimated that one in every five Kenyans has some form of health insurance. Availability of health insurance may protect families from catastrophic spending on health. The study intended to ...

  13. Does co-payment rate influence the relationship between monthly salary and health care service demand among the insured of health insurance societies in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagva, Dulamsuren; Gao, Yan; Babazono, Akira

    2013-02-01

    The co-payment rate for health care services for insured people increased from 10% to 20% in 1997, and then to 30% in 2003 under the Employed Health Insurance System in Japan. The purpose of this study is to quantify the relationship between average monthly salary and health care service demand by different co-payment rates among the insured of health insurance societies in Japan. Data from the National Federation of Health Insurance Societies from 1996, 2002, and 2007 were analyzed. Indicators of health care service demand included case rates and number of service days per case for inpatient, outpatient, and dental services. The authors evaluated the relationship of average monthly salary with these indicators using multiple regression analyses for each of the 3 years. In the study, the average monthly salary showed a high positive correlation with outpatient and dental case rates for all 3 years. The magnitude of the relationship of average monthly salary to health care service demand was intensified as patient co-payment increased from 10% to 20%. However, it did not change when the co-payment increased from 20% to 30%. The increase in patient co-payment rate from 20% to 30% did not intensify the relationship between average monthly salary and health care service demand among the insured of health insurance societies in Japan.

  14. Health insurance tax credits, the earned income tax credit, and health insurance coverage of single mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebi, Merve; Woodbury, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 enacted a refundable tax credit for low-income working families who purchased health insurance coverage for their children. This health insurance tax credit (HITC) existed during tax years 1991, 1992, and 1993, and was then rescinded. A difference-in-differences estimator applied to Current Population Survey data suggests that adoption of the HITC, along with accompanying increases in the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), was associated with a relative increase of about 4.7 percentage points in the private health insurance coverage of working single mothers with high school or less education. Also, a difference-in-difference-in-differences estimator, which attempts to net out the possible influence of the EITC increases but which requires strong assumptions, suggests that the HITC was responsible for about three-quarters (3.6 percentage points) of the total increase. The latter estimate implies a price elasticity of health insurance take-up of -0.42. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Perceived Relationships among Components of Insurance Service for Users of Complementary Health Insurance Service

    OpenAIRE

    Urban Sebjan

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between the components of the services provided by complementary voluntary health insurance (CVHI), to which users ascribe different levels of importance. Research model that consists of four constructs (importance of quality service, additional coverage, price discounts of CVHI and insurance company reputation) and an indicator of the importance of insurance premium of CVHI was tested with structural equation modelling (SEM) on the sample of 300 Sloveni...

  16. Switching health insurance plans: results from a health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lako, Christiaan J; Rosenau, Pauline; Daw, Chris

    2011-12-01

    The study is designed to provide an informal summary of what is known about consumer switching of health insurance plans and to contribute to knowledge about what motivates consumers who choose to switch health plans. Do consumers switch plans largely on the basis of critical reflection and assessment of information about the quality, and price? The literature suggests that switching is complicated, not always possible, and often overwhelming to consumers. Price does not always determine choice. Quality is very hard for consumers to understand. Results from a random sample survey (n = 2791) of the Alkmaar region of the Netherlands are reported here. They suggest that rather than embracing the opportunity to be active critical consumers, individuals are more likely to avoid this role by handing this activity off to a group purchasing organization. There is little evidence that consumers switch plans on the basis of critical reflection and assessment of information about quality and price. The new data reported here confirm the importance of a group purchasing organizations. In a free-market-health insurance system confidence in purchasing groups may be more important for health insurance choice than health informatics. This is not what policy makers expected and might result a less efficient health insurance market system.

  17. Health insurance and the demand for medical care: Instrumental variable estimates using health insurer claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Abe

    2016-07-01

    This paper takes a different approach to estimating demand for medical care that uses the negotiated prices between insurers and providers as an instrument. The instrument is viewed as a textbook "cost shifting" instrument that impacts plan offerings, but is unobserved by consumers. The paper finds a price elasticity of demand of around -0.20, matching the elasticity found in the RAND Health Insurance Experiment. The paper also studies within-market variation in demand for prescription drugs and other medical care services and obtains comparable price elasticity estimates. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Health Insurance – Affiliation to LAMal insurance for families of CERN personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On May 16, the HR department published in the CERN Bulletin an article concerning cross-border workers (“frontaliers”) and the exercise of the right of choice in health insurance: « In view of the Agreement concluded on 7 July 2016 between Switzerland and France regarding the choice of health insurance system* for persons resident in France and working in Switzerland ("frontaliers"), the Swiss authorities have indicated that those persons who have not “formally exercised their right to choose a health insurance system before 30 September 2017 risk automatically becoming members of the Swiss LAMal system” and having to “pay penalties to their insurers that may amount to several years’ worth of contributions”. Among others, this applies to spouses of members of the CERN personnel who live in France and work in Switzerland. » But the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), provides insuranc...

  19. General practitioners and national health insurance results of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the attitudes of South African general practitioners (GPs) to national health insurance (NHI), social health insurance (SHI) and other related health system reforms. Design. A national survey using postal questionnaires and telephonic follow-up of non-responders. Setting. GPs throughout South Africa.

  20. Divorce and Women's Risk of Health Insurance Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health…

  1. Health insurance and care-seeking behaviours of female migrants in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattof, Samantha R

    2018-05-01

    People working in Ghana's informal sector have low rates of enrolment in the publicly funded National Health Insurance Scheme. Informal sector workers, including migrant girls and women from northern Ghana working as head porters (kayayei), report challenges obtaining insurance and seeking formal health care. This article analyses how health insurance status affects kayayei migrants' care-seeking behaviours. This mixed-methods study involved surveying 625 migrants using respondent-driven sampling and conducting in-depth interviews with a sub-sample of 48 migrants. Analyses explore health status and health seeking behaviours for recent illness/injury. Binary logistic regression modelled the effects of selected independent variables on whether or not a recently ill/injured participant (n = 239) sought health care. Although recently ill/injured participants (38.4%) desired health care, less than half (43.5%) sought care. Financial barriers overwhelmingly limit kayayei migrants from seeking health care, preventing them from registering with the National Health Insurance Scheme, renewing their expired health insurance policies, or taking time away from work. Both insured and uninsured migrants did not seek formal health services due to the unpredictable nature of out-of-pocket expenses. Catastrophic and impoverishing medical expenses also drove participants' migration in search of work to repay loans and hospital bills. Health insurance can help minimize these expenditures, but only 17.4% of currently insured participants (58.2%) reported holding a valid health insurance card in Accra. The others lost their cards or forgot them when migrating. Access to formal health care in Accra remains largely inaccessible to kayayei migrants who suffer from greater illness/injury than the general female population in Accra and who are hindered in their ability to receive insurance exemptions. With internal migration on the rise in many settings, health systems must recognize the

  2. Efficiency and competition in the Dutch non-life insurance industry: Effects of the 2006 health care reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, Jaap; Popescu, Adelina

    This paper investigates the cost efficiency and competitive behaviour of the non-life – or property and casualty – insurance market in the Netherlands over the period 1995-2012. We focus on the 2006 health care reform, where public health care insurance has been included in the non-life insurance

  3. Development of the Health Insurance Literacy Measure (HILM): Conceptualizing and Measuring Consumer Ability to Choose and Use Private Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Kathryn A.; Mallery, Coretta J.; Noel, HarmoniJoie; Pugliese, Christopher; McSorley, Veronica E.; Lucado, Jennifer L.; Ganachari, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Understanding health insurance is central to affording and accessing health care in the United States. Efforts to support consumers in making wise purchasing decisions and using health insurance to their advantage would benefit from the development of a valid and reliable measure to assess health insurance literacy. This article reports on the development of the Health Insurance Literacy Measure (HILM), a self-assessment measure of consumers' ability to select and use private health insurance. The authors developed a conceptual model of health insurance literacy based on formative research and stakeholder guidance. Survey items were drafted using the conceptual model as a guide then tested in two rounds of cognitive interviews. After a field test with 828 respondents, exploratory factor analysis revealed two HILM scales, choosing health insurance and using health insurance, each of which is divided into a confidence subscale and likelihood of behavior subscale. Correlations between the HILM scales and an objective measure of health insurance knowledge and skills were positive and statistically significant which supports the validity of the measure. PMID:25315595

  4. 41 CFR 60-300.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... law. (b) The contractor may establish, sponsor, observe or administer the terms of a bona fide benefit... administer the terms of a bona fide benefit plan that is not subject to state laws that regulate insurance... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life...

  5. 41 CFR 60-250.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... law. (b) The contractor may establish, sponsor, observe or administer the terms of a bona fide benefit... administer the terms of a bona fide benefit plan that is not subject to state laws that regulate insurance... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life...

  6. 41 CFR 60-741.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., sponsor, observe, or administer the terms of a bona fide benefit plan that is not subject to State laws... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. 60-741.25 Section 60-741.25 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  7. The Effects of Health Insurance and Self-Insurance on Retirement Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    John Bailey Jones; Eric French

    2010-01-01

    Using an estimable dynamic programming model of retirement behavior, this paper assesses the relative importance of Medicare and Social Security in determining job exit rates at age 65. Of central importance is whether individuals value health insurance benefits not just for the reduction in average medical expenses, but also for the reduction in the volatility of medical expenses. To address this problem the model accounts explicitly for the effects of health cost volatility and health insur...

  8. Health insurance and the development of diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Nina E; Mulla, Zuber D; Bonilla-Navarrete, Aracely; Chedebeau, Fernando; Lopez, Oscar; Tovar, Yara; Meza, Armando

    2009-08-01

    Lack of health insurance can adversely affect access to medical care which leads to poor disease outcome. Few studies examine the effects of no insurance on the development of diabetes complications. The objective of this study was to determine if there is an association between health insurance status and the outcome of complications among a group of diabetic patients admitted to a teaching hospital on the Texas-Mexico border. A retrospective case-control study was conducted over a one-year period. Multiple imputations were used to address missing values. We examined 82 diabetics who had one or more complications and 83 diabetic controls without complications. A complication was defined as a current skin or soft-tissue infection or a limb amputation. The main exposure was health insurance status, a three-level variable: no health insurance, Medicaid, and other insurance (referent). Logistic regression was used to calculate health insurance odds ratios (OR) adjusted for age, sex, and a history of recent trauma. Patients with no health insurance were twice as likely to have a diabetic complication as patients in the referent category: adjusted OR = 2.22, P = 0.03. An association between Medicaid status and complications was not detected (adjusted OR = 1.16, P = 0.78). Not having health insurance was a risk factor for developing diabetic complications in a group of predominantly Hispanic patients.

  9. Insurer market structure and variation in commercial health care spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Michael R; Naimer, Sivia; Landrum, Mary B; Gibson, Teresa B; Chandra, Amitabh; Chernew, Michael

    2014-06-01

    To examine the relationship between insurance market structure and health care prices, utilization, and spending. Claims for 37.6 million privately insured employees and their dependents from the Truven Health Market Scan Database in 2009. Measures of insurer market structure derived from Health Leaders Inter study data. Regression models are used to estimate the association between insurance market concentration and health care spending, utilization, and price, adjusting for differences in patient characteristics and other market-level traits. Insurance market concentration is inversely related to prices and spending, but positively related to utilization. Our results imply that, after adjusting for input price differences, a market with two equal size insurers is associated with 3.9 percent lower medical care spending per capita (p = .002) and 5.0 percent lower prices for health care services relative to one with three equal size insurers (p market might lead to higher prices and higher spending for care, suggesting some of the gains from insurer competition may be absorbed by higher prices for health care. Greater attention to prices and utilization in the provider market may need to accompany procompetitive insurance market strategies. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Enhancing employee capacity to prioritize health insurance benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Marion; Goold, Susan Dorr; Parise, Carol; Ginsburg, Marjorie

    2007-09-01

    To demonstrate that employees can gain understanding of the financial constraints involved in designing health insurance benefits. While employees who receive their health insurance through the workplace have much at stake as the cost of health insurance rises, they are not necessarily prepared to constructively participate in prioritizing their health insurance benefits in order to limit cost. Structured group exercises. Employees of 41 public and private organizations in Northern California. Administration of the CHAT (Choosing Healthplans All Together) exercise in which participants engage in deliberation to design health insurance benefits under financial constraints. Change in priorities and attitudes about the need to exercise insurance cost constraints. Participants (N = 744) became significantly more cognizant of the need to limit insurance benefits for the sake of affordability and capable of prioritizing benefit options. Those agreeing that it is reasonable to limit health insurance coverage given the cost increased from 47% to 72%. It is both possible and valuable to involve employees in priority setting regarding health insurance benefits through the use of structured decision tools.

  11. New CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) forms

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    New versions of the following forms for claims and requests to the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) have been released:   form for claiming reimbursement of medical expenses,   form for requesting advance reimbursement, and   dental estimate form (for treatments foreseen to exceed 800 CHF).   The new forms are available in French and English. They can either be completed electronically before being printed and signed, or completed in paper form. New detailed instructions can be found at the back of the claim form; CHIS members are invited to read them carefully. The electronic versions (PDF) of all the forms are available on the CHIS website and on the UNIQA Member Portal. CHIS Members are requested to use these new forms forthwith and to discard any previous version. Questions regarding the above should be addressed directly to UNIQA (72730 or 022.718 63 00 or uniqa.assurances@cern.ch).

  12. Exclusion from the Health Insurance Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A CERN pensioner, member of the Organization's Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), recently provided fake documents in support of claims for medical expenses, in order to receive unjustified reimbursement from the CHIS. The Administrator of the CHIS, UNIQA, suspected a case of fraud: Accordingly, an investigation and interview of the person concerned was carried out and brought the Organization to the conclusion that fraud had actually taken place. Consequently and in accordance with Article VIII 3.12 of the CHIS Rules, it was decided to exclude this member permanently from the CHIS. The Organization takes the opportunity to remind Scheme members that any fraud or attempt to fraud established within the framework of the CHIS exposes them to: - disciplinary action, according to the Staff Rules and Regulations, for CERN members of the personnel; - definitive exclusion from the CHIS for members affiliated on a voluntary basis. Human Resources Division Tel. 73635

  13. Putting Health Back Into Health Insurance Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Pavel; Baker, Tom

    2014-08-01

    What are the barriers to voluntary take-up of high-deductible plans? We address this question using a large-scale employer survey conducted after an open-enrollment period in which a new high-deductible plan was first introduced. Only 3% of the employees chose this plan, despite the respondents' recognition of its financial advantages. Employees who believed that the high-deductible plan provided access to top physicians in the area were three times more likely to choose it than employees who did not share this belief. A framed field experiment using a similar choice menu showed that displaying additional financial information did not increase high-deductible plan take-up. However, when plans were presented as identical except for the deductible, respondents were highly likely to choose the high-deductible plan, especially in a two-way choice. These results suggest that informing plan choosers about high-deductible plans' health access provisions may affect choice more strongly than focusing on their financial advantages. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. The impact of the macroeconomy on health insurance coverage: evidence from the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Moriya, Asako S; Simon, Kosali

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the macroeconomy on the health insurance coverage of Americans using panel data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation for 2004-2010, a period that includes the Great Recession of 2007-2009. We find that a one percentage point increase in the state unemployment rate is associated with a 1.67 percentage point (2.12%) reduction in the probability that men have health insurance; this effect is strongest among college-educated, white, and older (50-64 years old) men. For women and children, health insurance coverage is not significantly correlated with the unemployment rate, which may be the result of public health insurance acting as a social safety net. Compared with the previous recession, the health insurance coverage of men is more sensitive to the unemployment rate, which may be due to the nature of the Great Recession. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Health and life insurance as an alternative to malpractice tort law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Walton

    2010-06-02

    Tort law has legitimate social purposes of deterrence, punishment and compensation, but medical tort law does none of these well. Tort law could be counterproductive in medicine, encouraging costly defensive practices that harm some patients, restricting access to care in some settings and discouraging innovation. Patients might be better served by purchasing combined health and life insurance policies and waiving their right to pursue malpractice claims. The combined policy should encourage the insurer to profit by inexpensively delaying policyholders' deaths. A health and life insurer would attempt to minimize mortal risks to policyholders from any cause, including medical mistakes and could therefore pursue systematic quality improvement efforts. If policyholders trust the insurer to seek, develop and reward genuinely effective care; identify, deter and remediate poor care; and compensate survivors through the no-fault process of paying life insurance benefits, then tort law is largely redundant and the right to sue may be waived. If expensive defensive medicine can be avoided, that savings alone could pay for fairly large life insurance policies. Insurers are maligned largely because of their logical response to incentives that are misaligned with the interests of patients and physicians in the United States. Patient, provider and insurer incentives could be realigned by combining health and life insurance, allowing the insurer to use its considerable information access and analytic power to improve patient care. This arrangement would address the social goals of malpractice torts, so that policyholders could rationally waive their right to sue.

  16. Health characteristics associated with gaining and losing private and public health insurance: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerant, Anthony; Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Millions of Americans lack or lose health insurance annually, yet how health characteristics predict insurance acquisition and loss remains unclear. To examine associations of health characteristics with acquisition and loss of private and public health insurance. Prospective observational analysis of 2000 to 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data for persons aged 18 to 63 on entry, enrolled for 2 years. We modeled year 2 private and public insurance gain and loss. year 2 insurance status [none (reference), any private insurance, or public insurance] among those uninsured in year 1 (N=13,022), and retaining or losing coverage in year 2 among those privately or publicly insured in year 1 (N=47,239). age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, region, urbanity, health status, health conditions, year 1 health expenditures, year 1 and 2 employment status, and (in secondary analyses) skepticism toward medical care and insurance. In adjusted analyses, lower income and education were associated with not gaining and with losing private insurance. Poorer health status was associated with public insurance gain. Smoking and being overweight were associated with not gaining private insurance, and smoking with losing private coverage. Secondary analyses adjusting for medical skepticism yielded similar findings. Social disadvantage and poorer health status are associated with gaining public insurance, whereas social advantage, not smoking, and not being overweight are associated with gaining private insurance, even when adjusting for attitudes toward medical care. Private insurers seem to benefit from relatively low health risk selection.

  17. Health insurance and the demand for medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meza, D

    1983-03-01

    With rare exceptions the provision of actuarially fair health insurance tends to substantially increase the demand for medical care by redistributing income from the healthy to the sick. This suggests that previous studies which attribute all the extra demand for medical care to moral hazard effects may overestimate the efficiency costs of health insurance.

  18. Enrolment on Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana: Evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrolment on Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana: Evidence from Mfantseman Municipality. S Sekyi, Peter B Aglobitse, Johnson Addai-Asante. Abstract. The study aimed at analysing the determinants of enrolment in the Ghana's national health insurance scheme. This survey was carried out to collect cross-sectional ...

  19. Community Based Health Insurance Knowledge and Willingness to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: A Community-Based Health Insurance Scheme (CBHI) is any program managed and operated by a community-based organization that provides resource pooling and risk-sharing to cover the costs of health care services. CBHI reduces out of pocket expenditure and is the most appropriate insurance model for ...

  20. HEALTH INSURANCE: our money in a capitalized fund now

    CERN Document Server

    Association du personnel

    In ECHO no. 41 on 5 November “Health insurance: what is the current situation?” we explained to you the situation of our Health Insurance Scheme and the ideas currently being discussed to ensure its future balance. If you missed this episode, you should catch up on it now so that you understand what follows.

  1. Health insurance for Users and other Associated Members of the Personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    A new health insurance option for Associated Members of the Personnel (including users): Allianz Worldwide Care Healthcare Plan for CERN MPAs.   Based on a survey conducted by the Users’ Office and a request by the Advisory Committee of CERN Users (ACCU), CERN has looked into health insurance products on the market and has identified a health insurance for MPAs and their accompanying family members which covers the financial consequences of illness and accidents and which is deemed adequate in CERN’s Host States. This insurance may be a useful option for MPAs who may not have adequate coverage in place from their home institution or who choose not to or cannot enrol in the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). For the time being the insurance company can only offer limited duration policies to MPAs. We hope that this restriction can be removed in the future. The health insurance is offered by the insurance company Allianz WorldWide Care for a monthly fee of 139 euros per insure...

  2. Health Insurance Coverage among Young Adult Survivors of Pediatric Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Li, Susan S; Nandi, Deipanjan; Gajarski, Robert J; McKee, Christopher; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2017-09-01

    To describe the change in health insurance after heart transplantation among adolescents, and characterize the implications of this change for long-term transplant outcomes. Patients age 15-18 years receiving first-time heart transplantation between 1999 and 2011 were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing registry and included in the analysis if they survived at least 5 years. The primary exposure was change or continuity of health insurance coverage between the time of transplant and the 5-year follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the association between insurance status change and long-term (>5 years) patient and graft survival. The analysis included 366 patients (age 16 ± 1 years at transplant), of whom 205 (56%) had continuous private insurance; 96 (26%) had continuous public insurance; and 65 (18%) had a change in insurance status. In stepwise multivariable Cox regression, change in insurance status was associated with greater mortality hazard, compared with continuous private insurance (hazard ratio = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.2; P = .016), whereas long-term patient and graft survival did not differ between patients with continuous public and continuous private insurance. Continuity of insurance coverage is associated with improved long-term clinical outcomes among adolescent heart transplant recipients who survive into adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A logistic regression model for Ghana National Health Insurance claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Antwi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In August 2003, the Ghanaian Government made history by implementing the first National Health Insurance System (NHIS in Sub-Saharan Africa. Within three years, over half of the country’s population had voluntarily enrolled into the National Health Insurance Scheme. This study had three objectives: 1 To estimate the risk factors that influences the Ghana national health insurance claims. 2 To estimate the magnitude of each of the risk factors in relation to the Ghana national health insurance claims. In this work, data was collected from the policyholders of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme with the help of the National Health Insurance database and the patients’ attendance register of the Koforidua Regional Hospital, from 1st January to 31st December 2011. Quantitative analysis was done using the generalized linear regression (GLR models. The results indicate that risk factors such as sex, age, marital status, distance and length of stay at the hospital were important predictors of health insurance claims. However, it was found that the risk factors; health status, billed charges and income level are not good predictors of national health insurance claim. The outcome of the study shows that sex, age, marital status, distance and length of stay at the hospital are statistically significant in the determination of the Ghana National health insurance premiums since they considerably influence claims. We recommended, among other things that, the National Health Insurance Authority should facilitate the institutionalization of the collection of appropriate data on a continuous basis to help in the determination of future premiums.

  4. The Role of Public Health Insurance in Reducing Child Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Laura R; Kenney, Genevieve M; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, there have been major expansions in public health insurance for low-income children in the United States through Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and other state-based efforts. In addition, many low-income parents have gained Medicaid coverage since 2014 under the Affordable Care Act. Most of the research to date on health insurance coverage among low-income populations has focused on its effect on health care utilization and health outcomes, with much less attention to the financial protection it offers families. We review a growing body of evidence that public health insurance provides important financial benefits to low-income families. Expansions in public health insurance for low-income children and adults are associated with reduced out of pocket medical spending, increased financial stability, and improved material well-being for families. We also review the potential poverty-reducing effects of public health insurance coverage. When out of pocket medical expenses are taken into account in defining the poverty rate, Medicaid plays a significant role in decreasing poverty for many children and families. In addition, public health insurance programs connect families to other social supports such as food assistance programs that also help reduce poverty. We conclude by reviewing emerging evidence that access to public health insurance in childhood has long-term effects for health and economic outcomes in adulthood. Exposure to Medicaid and CHIP during childhood has been linked to decreased mortality and fewer chronic health conditions, better educational attainment, and less reliance on government support later in life. In sum, the nation's public health insurance programs have many important short- and long-term poverty-reducing benefits for low-income families with children. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceived Relationships among Components of Insurance Service for Users of Complementary Health Insurance Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Sebjan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the components of the services provided by complementary voluntary health insurance (CVHI, to which users ascribe different levels of importance. Research model that consists of four constructs (importance of quality service, additional coverage, price discounts of CVHI and insurance company reputation and an indicator of the importance of insurance premium of CVHI was tested with structural equation modelling (SEM on the sample of 300 Slovenian users of CVHI. Our findings show that - according to the users - the importance of the component of CVHI service (insurance premium is reflected in the perceived importance of other components of CVHI (additional coverage, quality, price discounts and insurance company reputation.

  6. Reassembling and Cutting the Social with Health Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossandón, José

    2014-01-01

    By rescuing an obscure and almost forgotten parliamentary controversy in Chile, this article shows how private property and solidarity cohabit in health insurance. To do so, it follows both pragmatist sociology, where controversies are seen as situations in which social formations are questioned...... and reconfigured, and recent economic sociology, studying how marketisation might help in assembling and not only destroying social bonds. Simultaneously, this work departs from these influences in three directions. It deals with two ways of assembling the social, solidarity and property, which have remained....... And, by analysing a parliamentary controversy regarding insurance, it complements recent work that is starting to study how finance commodities are enacted not only in traditional market encounters but also in a varied array of collateral sites, including courts, social policy and regulation...

  7. Public perceptions on national health insurance : moving towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Public perceptions on national health insurance : moving towards universal health coverage in South Africa. Olive Shisana, Thomas Rehle, Julia Louw, Nompumelelo Zungu-Dirwayi, Pelisa Dana, Laetitia Rispel ...

  8. Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors of Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Information in 2012, recently published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  9. PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE AS A SOURCE OF FINANCING THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Rodzinka

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The medical services market in Poland is financed mainly with funds from national health insurance, yet year by year, an increasing importance of private resources in financing health services can be noticed. Apart from common (national health insurance, medical care is primarily financed directly by the patient and possibly by his employer (occupational medicine, additional private medical care. The purpose of this paper is to present the basic legal and market aspects of private health insurance in Poland, including a presentation of the structure of private healthcare expenses in Poland.

  10. Survey of social health insurance structure in selected countries; providing framework for basic health insurance in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Effat; Raissi, Ahmad Reza; Barooni, Mohsen; Ferdoosi, Massoud; Nuhi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Health system reforms are the most strategic issue that has been seriously considered in healthcare systems in order to reduce costs and increase efficiency and effectiveness. The costs of health system finance in our country, lack of universal coverage in health insurance, and related issues necessitate reforms in our health system financing. The aim of this research was to prepare a structure of framework for social health insurance in Iran and conducting a comp...

  11. Impact of community-based health insurance in rural India on self-medication & financial protection of the insured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Dror

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The evidence-base of the impact of community-based health insurance (CBHI on access to healthcare and financial protection in India is weak. We investigated the impact of CBHI in rural Uttar Pradesh and Bihar s0 tates of India on insured households′ self-medication and financial position. Methods: Data originated from (i household surveys, and (ii the Management Information System of each CBHI. Study design was "staggered implementation" cluster randomized controlled trial with enrollment of one-third of the treatment group in each of the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. Around 40-50 per cent of the households that were offered to enroll joined. The benefits-packages covered outpatient care in all three locations and in-patient care in two locations. To overcome self-selection enrollment bias, we constructed comparable control and treatment groups using Kernel Propensity Score Matching (K-PSM. To quantify impact, both difference-in-difference (DiD, and conditional-DiD (combined K-PSM with DiD were used to assess robustness of results. Results: Post-intervention (2013, self-medication was less practiced by insured HHs. Fewer insured households than uninsured households reported borrowing to finance care for non-hospitalization events. Being insured for two years also improved the HH′s location along the income distribution, namely insured HHs were more likely to experience income quintile-upgrade in one location, and less likely to experience a quintile-downgrade in two locations. Interpretation & conclusions: The realized benefits of insurance included better access to healthcare, reduced financial risks and improved economic mobility, suggesting that in our context health insurance creates welfare gains. These findings have implications for theoretical, ethical, policy and practice considerations.

  12. Impact of community-based health insurance in rural India on self-medication & financial protection of the insured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, David M; Chakraborty, Arpita; Majumdar, Atanu; Panda, Pradeep; Koren, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    The evidence-base of the impact of community-based health insurance (CBHI) on access to healthcare and financial protection in India is weak. We investigated the impact of CBHI in rural Uttar Pradesh and Bihar s0 tates of India on insured households' self-medication and financial position. Data originated from (i) household surveys, and (ii) the Management Information System of each CBHI. Study design was "staggered implementation" cluster randomized controlled trial with enrollment of one-third of the treatment group in each of the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. Around 40-50 per cent of the households that were offered to enroll joined. The benefits-packages covered outpatient care in all three locations and in-patient care in two locations. To overcome self-selection enrollment bias, we constructed comparable control and treatment groups using Kernel Propensity Score Matching (K-PSM). To quantify impact, both difference-in-difference (DiD), and conditional-DiD (combined K-PSM with DiD) were used to assess robustness of results. Post-intervention (2013), self-medication was less practiced by insured HHs. Fewer insured households than uninsured households reported borrowing to finance care for non-hospitalization events. Being insured for two years also improved the HH's location along the income distribution, namely insured HHs were more likely to experience income quintile-upgrade in one location, and less likely to experience a quintile-downgrade in two locations. The realized benefits of insurance included better access to healthcare, reduced financial risks and improved economic mobility, suggesting that in our context health insurance creates welfare gains. These findings have implications for theoretical, ethical, policy and practice considerations.

  13. Development of costs for complementary medicine after provisional inclusion into the Swiss basic health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Hans-Peter; Busato, André

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, 5 complementary procedures were included into the Swiss basic health insurance on a provisional basis. In consequence, many people expected a substantial increase of costs of up to CHF 110 million or even higher. Data on consultation costs at the expense of basic health insurance for the period of 1997-2003 were analyzed for 206 certified complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) physicians with 1 or multiple certificates for complementary medicine. The data was provided by the Swiss health insurers' data pool (santésuisse). The 2 major Swiss health insurers provided additional cost data of expenditures reimbursed by private health insurance for complementary medicine. This allowed a longitudinal analysis of consultation costs at the expense of basic health insurance and the costs of private health insurance of certified CAM physicians. Furthermore, those costs were compared to the respective costs of 119 non-certified CAM physicians and 145 physicians in conventional practices. The development of consultation costs of certified CAM physicians at the expense of basic health insurance showed a net annual increase of CHF 54,200 per physician between 1998 and 2002 and of CHF 35.9 million for all 663 certified CAM physicians. On the other hand, costs at the expense of private health insurance for complementary medicine decreased in the same period by CHF 34,300 per certified CAM physician and by CHF 22.8 million for all 663 certified CAM physicians. The inclusion of 5 complementary disciplines into the Swiss basic health insurance led to an increase of costs, which was, however, much lower than predicted. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Self-rated dental health and dental insurance: modification by household income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, Dana N; Anikeeva, Olga; Brennan, David S

    2014-05-09

    Previous studies have reported that socioeconomically disadvantaged Australians have poorer self-rated dental health (SRDH), are less likely to be insured for dental services and are less likely to have regular dental visits than their more advantaged counterparts. However, less is known about the associations between dental insurance and SRDH. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between SRDH and dental insurance status and to test if the relationship was modified by household income. A random sample of 3,000 adults aged 30-61 years was drawn from the Australian Electoral Roll and mailed a self-complete questionnaire. Analysis included dentate participants. Bivariate associations were assessed between SRDH and insurance stratified by household income group. A multiple variable model adjusting for covariates estimated prevalence ratios (PR) of having good to excellent SRDH and included an interaction term for insurance and household income group. The response rate was 39.1% (n = 1,093). More than half (53.9%) of the participants were insured and 72.5% had good to excellent SRDH. SRDH was associated with age group, brushing frequency, insurance status and income group. Amongst participants in the $40,000- insured had a higher proportion reporting good to excellent SRDH (80.8%) than the uninsured (66.5%); however, there was little difference in SRDH by insurance status for those in the $120,000+ income group. After adjusting for covariates, there was a significant interaction (p insurance and income; there was an association between insurance and SRDH for adults in the $40,000- insured was associated with better SRDH, but there was no association for those in the highest income group. Insurance coverage may have the potential to improve dental health for low income groups.

  15. Universal health insurance and health care access for homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Stephen W; Ueng, Joanna J M; Chiu, Shirley; Kiss, Alex; Tolomiczenko, George; Cowan, Laura; Levinson, Wendy; Redelmeier, Donald A

    2010-08-01

    We examined the extent of unmet needs and barriers to accessing health care among homeless people within a universal health insurance system. We randomly selected a representative sample of 1169 homeless individuals at shelters and meal programs in Toronto, Ontario. We determined the prevalence of self-reported unmet needs for health care in the past 12 months and used regression analyses to identify factors associated with unmet needs. Unmet health care needs were reported by 17% of participants. Compared with Toronto's general population, unmet needs were significantly more common among homeless individuals, particularly among homeless women with dependent children. Factors independently associated with a greater likelihood of unmet needs were younger age, having been a victim of physical assault in the past 12 months, and lower mental and physical health scores on the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Within a system of universal health insurance, homeless people still encounter barriers to obtaining health care. Strategies to reduce nonfinancial barriers faced by homeless women with children, younger adults, and recent victims of physical assault should be explored.

  16. [Does public health insurance improve health care? The case of prenatal care for adolescents in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Avendaño, Biani; Darney, Blair G; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Serván-Mori, Edson

    2016-01-01

    To test the association between public health insurance and adequate prenatal care among female adolescents in Mexico. Cross-sectional study, using the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2000, 2006, and 2012.We included 3 978 (N=4 522 296) adolescent (12-19) women who reported a live birth.We used logistic regression models to test the association of insurance and adequate (timeliness, frequency and content) prenatal care. The multivariable predicted probability of timely and frequent prenatal care improved over time, from 0.60 (IC95%:0.56;0.64) in 2000 to 0.71 (IC95%:0.66;0.76) in 2012. In 2012, the probability of adequate prenatal care was 0.54 (IC95%:0.49;0.58); women with Social Security had higher probability than women with Seguro Popular and without health insurance. Having Social Security is associated with receipt of adequate prenatal care among adolescents in Mexico.

  17. Health Insurance and Risk of Divorce: Does Having Your Own Insurance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Heeju

    2015-08-01

    Most American adults under 65 obtain health insurance through their employers or their spouses' employers. The absence of a universal healthcare system in the United States puts Americans at considerable risk for losing their coverage when transitioning out of jobs or marriages. Scholars have found evidence of reduced job mobility among individuals who are dependent on their employers for healthcare coverage. This paper finds similar relationships between insurance and divorce. I apply the hazard model to married individuals in the longitudinal Survey of Income Program Participation (N=17,388) and find lower divorce rates among people who are insured through their partners' plans without alternative sources of their own. Furthermore, I find gender differences in the relationship between healthcare coverage and divorce rates: insurance dependent women have lower rates of divorce than men in similar situations. These findings draw attention to the importance of considering family processes when debating and evaluating health policies.

  18. Health Insurance and Risk of Divorce: Does Having Your Own Insurance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Heeju

    2016-01-01

    Most American adults under 65 obtain health insurance through their employers or their spouses’ employers. The absence of a universal healthcare system in the United States puts Americans at considerable risk for losing their coverage when transitioning out of jobs or marriages. Scholars have found evidence of reduced job mobility among individuals who are dependent on their employers for healthcare coverage. This paper finds similar relationships between insurance and divorce. I apply the hazard model to married individuals in the longitudinal Survey of Income Program Participation (N=17,388) and find lower divorce rates among people who are insured through their partners’ plans without alternative sources of their own. Furthermore, I find gender differences in the relationship between healthcare coverage and divorce rates: insurance dependent women have lower rates of divorce than men in similar situations. These findings draw attention to the importance of considering family processes when debating and evaluating health policies. PMID:26949269

  19. Would national health insurance itnprove equity and efficiency of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In some cases, however, urban primary care has been promoted through polyclinics and health maintenance organisations. Inequalities.in funding, access and utilisation exist between the insured and uninsured, between strata of the insured, and between urban and rural areas. These inequalities have at times been ...

  20. 77 FR 41048 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and... Reconciling the premium tax credit with advance credit payments. * * * * * (b) * * * (6) * * * Example 5...

  1. Trends in Health Insurance Subscription at Cape Coast, Ghana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even though a major objective of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme at its promulgation in 2003 was a universal subscription by 2008, the scheme covered 38.3 per cent of the Ghanaian ... A record review approach was adopted in extracting records of insurance subscription within the period under review.

  2. Preferences and choices for care and health insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, B. van den; Dommelen, P. van; Stam, P.; Laske-Aldershof, T.; Buchmueller, T.; Schut, F.T.

    2008-01-01

    Legislation that came into effect in 2006 has dramatically altered the health insurance system in the Netherlands, placing greater emphasis on consumer choice and competition among insurers. The potential for such competition depends largely on consumer preferences for price and quality of service

  3. Does Migration Limit the Effect of Health Insurance on Hypertension Management in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hai; Jin, Yinzi; Zhao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Huyang; A Rizzo, John; Zhang, Donglan; Hou, Zhiyuan

    2017-10-20

    Background: In China, rapid urbanization has caused migration from rural to urban areas, and raised the prevalence of hypertension. However, public health insurance is not portable from one place to another, and migration may limit the effectiveness of this non-portable health insurance on healthcare. Our study aims to investigate whether migration limits the effectiveness of health insurance on hypertension management in China. Methods: Data were obtained from the national baseline survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study in 2011, including 4926 hypertensive respondents with public health insurance. Outcome measures included use of primary care, hypertension awareness, medication use, blood pressure monitoring, physician advice, and blood pressure control. Multivariate logistic regressions were estimated to examine whether the effects of rural health insurance on hypertension management differed between those who migrated to urban areas and those who did not migrate and lived in rural areas. Results: Among hypertensive respondents, 60.7% were aware of their hypertensive status. Compared to rural residents, the non-portable feature of rural health insurance significantly reduced rural-to-urban migrants' probabilities of using primary care by 7.8 percentage points, hypertension awareness by 8.8 percentage points, and receiving physician advice by 18.3 percentage points. Conclusions: In China, migration to urban areas limited the effectiveness of rural health insurance on hypertension management due to its non-portable nature. It is critical to improve the portability of rural health insurance, and to extend urban health insurance and primary care coverage to rural-to-urban migrants to achieve better chronic disease management.

  4. Does Migration Limit the Effect of Health Insurance on Hypertension Management in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Fang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In China, rapid urbanization has caused migration from rural to urban areas, and raised the prevalence of hypertension. However, public health insurance is not portable from one place to another, and migration may limit the effectiveness of this non-portable health insurance on healthcare. Our study aims to investigate whether migration limits the effectiveness of health insurance on hypertension management in China. Methods: Data were obtained from the national baseline survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study in 2011, including 4926 hypertensive respondents with public health insurance. Outcome measures included use of primary care, hypertension awareness, medication use, blood pressure monitoring, physician advice, and blood pressure control. Multivariate logistic regressions were estimated to examine whether the effects of rural health insurance on hypertension management differed between those who migrated to urban areas and those who did not migrate and lived in rural areas. Results: Among hypertensive respondents, 60.7% were aware of their hypertensive status. Compared to rural residents, the non-portable feature of rural health insurance significantly reduced rural-to-urban migrants’ probabilities of using primary care by 7.8 percentage points, hypertension awareness by 8.8 percentage points, and receiving physician advice by 18.3 percentage points. Conclusions: In China, migration to urban areas limited the effectiveness of rural health insurance on hypertension management due to its non-portable nature. It is critical to improve the portability of rural health insurance, and to extend urban health insurance and primary care coverage to rural-to-urban migrants to achieve better chronic disease management.

  5. Pharmaceutical policies used by private health insurance companies in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, Saleh A; Alkudsi, Mohammed A; Al Humaidan, Abdullah S; Al Jaser, Maher A; Sasich, Larry D

    2013-07-01

    Currently, the Council of Cooperative Health Insurance (CCHI) is the body responsible for regulating health insurance in the KSA. While the cooperative health insurance schedule (i.e., model policy for health insurance) is available on the CCHI web site, policies related to pharmaceuticals are ambiguous. The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of health insurance policies provided by health insurance companies in KSA on access to medication and its use. This study was descriptive in design and used a survey, which was conducted through face-to-face interviews with the medical managers of health insurance companies. The survey took place between March and June, 2011. All 25 insurance companies accredited by CCHI were eligible to be included in the study. Out of these 25 companies, three were excluded from this survey as no response was received. All the 16 companies responded "Yes" that they had a prior authorization policy; however, their reasons varied. Eight (50%) of the companies were concerned about the duration of treatment. While 10 (62.5%) did not offer additional coverage over the CCHI model policy, the other 6 (37.5%) reported that they could reconcile certain conditions. The survey also demonstrated that 10 insurance companies allowed refilling of medication but with certain limitations. Six out of the 10 permitted refilling within a maximum time of three months, whereas the other four companies did not have any time-based limits for refilling. The other six companies did not allow refilling without prescription. Although this paper was primarily descriptive, the findings revealed a substantial scope for improvement in terms of pharmaceutical policy standards and regulation in the health insurance companies in KSA. Additionally, the study highlighted such areas to augment the overall quality use of medication, over-prescribing and irrational use of medication. Further research, thus, is definitely needed.

  6. Examining levels, distribution and correlates of health insurance coverage in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazungu, Jacob S; Barasa, Edwine W

    2017-09-01

    To examine the levels, inequalities and factors associated with health insurance coverage in Kenya. We analysed secondary data from the Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) conducted in 2009 and 2014. We examined the level of health insurance coverage overall, and by type, using an asset index to categorise households into five socio-economic quintiles with quintile 5 (Q5) being the richest and quintile 1 (Q1) being the poorest. The high-low ratio (Q5/Q1 ratio), concentration curve and concentration index (CIX) were employed to assess inequalities in health insurance coverage, and logistic regression to examine correlates of health insurance coverage. Overall health insurance coverage increased from 8.17% to 19.59% between 2009 and 2014. There was high inequality in overall health insurance coverage, even though this inequality decreased between 2009 (Q5/Q1 ratio of 31.21, CIX = 0.61, 95% CI 0.52-0.0.71) and 2014 (Q5/Q1 ratio 12.34, CIX = 0.49, 95% CI 0.45-0.52). Individuals that were older, employed in the formal sector; married, exposed to media; and male, belonged to a small household, had a chronic disease and belonged to rich households, had increased odds of health insurance coverage. Health insurance coverage in Kenya remains low and is characterised by significant inequality. In a context where over 80% of the population is in the informal sector, and close to 50% live below the national poverty line, achieving high and equitable coverage levels with contributory and voluntary health insurance mechanism is problematic. Kenya should consider a universal, tax-funded mechanism that ensures revenues are equitably and efficiently collected, and everyone (including the poor and those in the informal sector) is covered. © 2017 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Geographic variation in health insurance benefits in Qianjiang District, China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ye, Ting; Wang, Yongfei

    2018-02-05

    Health insurance contributes to reducing the economic burden of disease and improving access to healthcare. In 2016, the Chinese government announced the integration of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) and Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) to reduce system segmentation. Nevertheless, it was unclear whether there would be any geographic variation in health insurance benefits if the two types of insurance were integrated. The aim of this study was to identify the potential geographic variation in health insurance benefits and the related contributing factors. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Qianjiang District, where the NCMS and URBMI were integrated into Urban and Rural Resident Basic Medical Insurance Scheme (URRBMI) in 2010. All beneficiaries under the URRBMI were hospitalized at least once in 2013, totaling 445,254 persons and 65,877 person-times, were included in this study. Town-level data on health insurance benefits, healthcare utilization, and socioeconomic and geographical characteristics were collected through health insurance system, self-report questionnaires, and the 2014 Statistical Yearbook of Qianjiang District. A simplified Theil index at town level was calculated to measure geographic variation in health insurance benefits. Colored maps were created to visualize the variation in geographic distribution of benefits. The effects of healthcare utilization and socioeconomic and geographical characteristics on geographic variation in health insurance benefits were estimated with a multiple linear regression analysis. Different Theil index values were calculated for different towns, and the Theil index values for compensation by person-times and amount were 2.5028 and 1.8394 in primary healthcare institutions and 1.1466 and 0.9204 in secondary healthcare institutions. Healthcare-seeking behavior and economic factors were positively associated with health insurance benefits in compensation by person-times significantly

  8. Integration of economic appraisal and health care policy in a health insurance system; The Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.F.H. Rutten (Frans); J.-W. van der Linden (J.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThis article discusses the role of economic appraisal in insurance based health care systems, taking the case of the Netherlands as an example. The public health insurance system in this country is governed by the Health Insurance Executive Board, which policies are firmly based on the

  9. Health Insurance: Understanding What It Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I do? Your doctor will try to be familiar with your insurance coverage so he or she ... higher risk for chronic disease Domestic and interpersonal violence screening and counseling All ages Dyslipidemia screening Those ...

  10. Response to health insurance by previously uninsured rural children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, J M; Robbins, J M; Shema, S J; Farmer, F L

    1999-08-01

    To examine the healthcare utilization and costs of previously uninsured rural children. Four years of claims data from a school-based health insurance program located in the Mississippi Delta. All children who were not Medicaid-eligible or were uninsured, were eligible for limited benefits under the program. The 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES) was used to compare utilization of services. The study represents a natural experiment in the provision of insurance benefits to a previously uninsured population. Premiums for the claims cost were set with little or no information on expected use of services. Claims from the insurer were used to form a panel data set. Mixed model logistic and linear regressions were estimated to determine the response to insurance for several categories of health services. The use of services increased over time and approached the level of utilization in the NMES. Conditional medical expenditures also increased over time. Actuarial estimates of claims cost greatly exceeded actual claims cost. The provision of a limited medical, dental, and optical benefit package cost approximately $20-$24 per member per month in claims paid. An important uncertainty in providing health insurance to previously uninsured populations is whether a pent-up demand exists for health services. Evidence of a pent-up demand for medical services was not supported in this study of rural school-age children. States considering partnerships with private insurers to implement the State Children's Health Insurance Program could lower premium costs by assembling basic data on previously uninsured children.

  11. SCHIP Directors' Perception of Schools Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H.; Rickard, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Health insurance coverage increases access to health care. There has been an erosion of employer-based health insurance and a concomitant rise in children covered by public health insurance programs, yet more than 8 million children are still without health insurance coverage. Methods: This study was a national survey to assess the…

  12. Korean medicine coverage in the National Health Insurance in Korea: present situation and critical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byungmook Lim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available National Health Insurance (NHI in Korea has covered Korean medicine (KM services including acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, and herbal preparations since 1987, which represents the first time that an entire traditional medicine system was insured by an NHI scheme anywhere in the world. This nationwide insurance coverage led to a rapid increase in the use of KM, and the KM community became one of the main interest groups in the Korean healthcare system. However, due to the public's safety concern of and the stagnancy in demand for KM services, KM has been facing new challenges. This paper presents a brief history and the current structure of KM health insurance, and describes the critical issues related to KM insurance for in-depth understanding of the present situation.

  13. Exploring the barriers to implementing National Health Insurance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the challenges of implementing the proposed National Health Insurance for South Africa (SA), based on the six building blocks of the World Health Organization Health System Framework. In the context of the current SA health system, leadership, finance, workforce, technologies, information and service ...

  14. Community-Based Health Insurance Schemes : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Mebratie (Anagaw); R.A. Sparrow (Robert); G. Alemu (Getnet ); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to the limited ability of publicly financed health systems in developing countries to provide adequate access to health care, community-based health financing has been proposed as a viable option. This has led to the implementation of a number of Community- Based Health Insurance

  15. The Health Insurance Marketplace: What Women Need To Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-04-02

    In this podcast women will learn how the Health Insurance Marketplace meets the needs of women. The Marketplace allows women to find quality health coverage and gives women more choice and control over their health coverage.  Created: 4/2/2014 by Office of Women's Health.   Date Released: 4/2/2014.

  16. Editorial National Health insurance (NHi): time for reflections!

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health industry acting as insurance brokers and broker organisations and these make private health care cost expensive and has made it unaffordable unless innovative policies are instituted to curtail this trend. With South Africa's estimated population of fifty-two million, the private health sector provides health care to ...

  17. Spillover effects of supplementary on basic health insurance: Evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A-F. Roos (Anne-Fleur); F.T. Schut (Erik)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLike many other countries, the Netherlands has a health insurance system that combines mandatory basic insurance with voluntary supplementary insurance. Both types of insurance are founded on different principles. Since basic and supplementary insurance are sold by the same health

  18. VOLUNTARY HEALTH INSURANCE AS A METHOD OF HEALTH CARE FINANCING IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Borda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In times of systematically rising health expenditure and insufficient cover provided by publicly-financed health systems additional methods of private health care funding become more and more considerable. The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of voluntary health insurance (VHI purchased in European countries and to analyze its contribution to health care financing systems. In the paper voluntary health insurance as a part of health expenditure incurred by the European countries is considered. Next, the results of analysis concerning the main characteristics of health insurance markets in Europe are presented. The conducted analysis was mainly focused on: the value of gross written premiums, the amount of benefits paid, the number of health insurers operating in the markets and the percentage of populations covered by voluntary health insurance. The current trends and challenges for the health insurance sector in Europe are also discussed.

  19. Health-based risk neutralization in private disability insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnvoord, Elisabeth C; Buitenhuis, Jan; Brouwer, Sandra; van der Klink, Jac J L; de Boer, Michiel R

    2016-12-01

    Exclusions are used by insurers to neutralize higher than average risks of sickness absence (SA). However, differentiating risk groups according to one's medical situation can be seen as discrimination against people with health problems in violation of a 2006 United Nations convention. The objective of this study is to investigate whether the risk of SA of insured persons with exclusions added to their insurance contract differs from the risk of persons without exclusions. A dynamic cohort of 15 632 applicants for private disability insurance at a company insuring only college and university educated self-employed in the Netherlands. Mean follow-up was 8.94 years. Duration and number of SA periods were derived from insurance data to calculate the hazard of SA periods and of recurrence of SA periods. Self-employed with an exclusion added to their insurance policy experienced a higher hazard of one or more periods of SA and on average more SA days than self-employed without an exclusion. Persons with an exclusion had a higher risk of SA than persons without an exclusion. The question to what extent an individual should benefit from being less vulnerable to disease and SA must be addressed in a larger societal context, taking other aspects of health inequality and solidarity into account as well. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  20. How the Affordable Care Act Has Helped Women Gain Insurance and Improved Their Ability to Get Health Care: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunja, Munira Z; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Beautel, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    ISSUE: Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), one-third of women who tried to buy a health plan on their own were either turned down, charged a higher premium because of their health, or had specific health problems excluded from their plans. Beginning in 2010, ACA consumer protections, particularly coverage for preventive care screenings with no cost-sharing and a ban on plan benefit limits, improved the quality of health insurance for women. In 2014, the law’s major insurance reforms helped millions of women who did not have employer insurance to gain coverage through the ACA’s marketplaces or through Medicaid. GOALS: To examine the effects of ACA health reforms on women’s coverage and access to care. METHOD: Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Surveys, 2001–2016. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Women ages 19 to 64 who shopped for new coverage on their own found it significantly easier to find affordable plans in 2016 compared to 2010. The percentage of women who reported delaying or skipping needed care because of costs fell to an all-time low. Insured women were more likely than uninsured women to receive preventive screenings, including Pap tests and mammograms.

  1. Universal health coverage in 'One ASEAN': are migrants included?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinto, Ramon Lorenzo Luis R; Curran, Ufara Zuwasti; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Pocock, Nicola S

    2015-01-01

    As the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) gears toward full regional integration by 2015, the cross-border mobility of workers and citizens at large is expected to further intensify in the coming years. While ASEAN member countries have already signed the Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, the health rights of migrants still need to be addressed, especially with ongoing universal health coverage (UHC) reforms in most ASEAN countries. This paper seeks to examine the inclusion of migrants in the UHC systems of five ASEAN countries which exhibit diverse migration profiles and are currently undergoing varying stages of UHC development. A scoping review of current migration trends and policies as well as ongoing UHC developments and migrant inclusion in UHC in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand was conducted. In general, all five countries, whether receiving or sending, have schemes that cover migrants to varying extents. Thailand even allows undocumented migrants to opt into its Compulsory Migrant Health Insurance scheme, while Malaysia and Singapore are still yet to consider including migrants in their government-run UHC systems. In terms of predominantly sending countries, the Philippines's social health insurance provides outbound migrants with portable insurance yet with limited benefits, while Indonesia still needs to strengthen the implementation of its compulsory migrant insurance which has a health insurance component. Overall, the five ASEAN countries continue to face implementation challenges, and will need to improve on their UHC design in order to ensure genuine inclusion of migrants, including undocumented migrants. However, such reforms will require strong political decisions from agencies outside the health sector that govern migration and labor policies. Furthermore, countries must engage in multilateral and bilateral dialogue as they redefine UHC beyond the basis of

  2. Coverage matters: insurance and health care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Health Care Services Staff; Institute of Medicine Staff; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    2001-01-01

    ...? How does the system of insurance coverage in the U.S. operate, and where does it fail? The first of six Institute of Medicine reports that will examine in detail the consequences of having a large uninsured population, Coverage Matters...

  3. The Dutch health insurance reform: switching between insurers. A comparison between the general population and the chronically ill and disabled.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J.D. de; Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On 1 January 2006 a number of far-reaching changes in the Dutch health insurance system came into effect. In the new system of managed competition consumer mobility plays an important role. Consumers are free to change their insurer and insurance plan every year. The idea is that

  4. School Superintendents' Perceptions of Schools Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Price, James H.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.; Fink, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Superintendents' perceptions regarding the effect of health insurance status on academics, the role schools should play in the process of obtaining health insurance, and the benefits/barriers to assisting students in enrolling in health insurance were surveyed. Superintendents' basic knowledge of health insurance, the link between…

  5. Can Decision Biases Improve Insurance Outcomes? An Experiment on Status Quo Bias in Health Insurance Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  6. Can Decision Biases Improve Insurance Outcomes? An Experiment on Status Quo Bias in Health Insurance Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Felder

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure.

  7. The association between insured male expatriates' knowledge of health insurance benefits and lack of access to health care in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamis, Abdulwahab A

    2018-03-15

    Insufficient knowledge of health insurance benefits could be associated with lack of access to health care, particularly for minority populations. This study aims to assess the association between expatriates' knowledge of health insurance benefits and lack of access to health care. A cross-sectional study design was conducted from March 2015 to February 2016 among 3398 insured male expatriates in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The dependent variable was binary and expresses access or lack of access to health care. Independent variables included perceived and validated knowledge of health insurance benefits and other variables. Data were summarized by computing frequencies and percentage of all quantities of variables. To evaluate variations in knowledge, personal and job characteristics with lack of access to health care, the Chi square test was used. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were recorded for each independent variable. Multiple logistic regression and stepwise logistic regression were performed and adjusted ORs were extracted. Descriptive analysis showed that 15% of participants lacked access to health care. The majority of these were unskilled laborers, usually with no education (17.5%), who had been working for less than 3 years (28.1%) in Saudi Arabia. A total of 23.3% worked for companies with less than 50 employees and 16.5% earned less than 4500 Saudi Riyals monthly ($1200). Many (20.3%) were young (lacked previous knowledge of health insurance (18%). For perceived knowledge of health insurance, 55.2% scored 1 or 0 from total of 3. For validated knowledge, 16.9% scored 1 or 0 from total score of 4. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only perceived knowledge of health insurance had significant associations with lack of access to health care ((OR) = 0.393, (CI) = 0.335-0.461), but the result was insignificant for validated knowledge. Stepwise logistic regression gave similar findings. Our results confirmed that low

  8. Health-based risk neutralization in private disability insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitenhuis, Jan; Brouwer, Sandra; van der Klink, Jac J.L.; de Boer, Michiel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exclusions are used by insurers to neutralize higher than average risks of sickness absence (SA). However, differentiating risk groups according to one’s medical situation can be seen as discrimination against people with health problems in violation of a 2006 United Nations convention. The objective of this study is to investigate whether the risk of SA of insured persons with exclusions added to their insurance contract differs from the risk of persons without exclusions. Methods: A dynamic cohort of 15 632 applicants for private disability insurance at a company insuring only college and university educated self-employed in the Netherlands. Mean follow-up was 8.94 years. Duration and number of SA periods were derived from insurance data to calculate the hazard of SA periods and of recurrence of SA periods. Results: Self-employed with an exclusion added to their insurance policy experienced a higher hazard of one or more periods of SA and on average more SA days than self-employed without an exclusion. Conclusion: Persons with an exclusion had a higher risk of SA than persons without an exclusion. The question to what extent an individual should benefit from being less vulnerable to disease and SA must be addressed in a larger societal context, taking other aspects of health inequality and solidarity into account as well. PMID:27371668

  9. 75 FR 24470 - Health Care Reform Insurance Web Portal Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Health Care Reform Insurance Web Portal Requirements AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION... not defined in the Affordable Care Act or the PHSA. These terms are ``State health benefits high risk...(b)(1) of the PHSA, as incorporated by reference into the Affordable Care Act, defines ``health...

  10. A Study on the Feasibility of Health Insurance Schemes for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    households are willing to pay a certain amount of money to the proposed health insurance scheme. ... On the supply side, the delivery of health care services in the country is restrained by limited ..... Where µis the exogenous survival probability, y is income and z is the health state of the respondent and e is a random ...

  11. Treatment-seeking behaviour and social health insurance in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenny, Ama P; Asante, Felix A; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Health insurance is attracting more and more attention as a means for improving health care utilization and protecting households against impoverishment from out-of-pocket expenditures. Currently about 52 percent of the resources for financing health care services come from out of pocket sources...

  12. Prerequisites for National Health Insurance in South Africa: Results ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. National Health Insurance (NHI) is currently high on the health policy agenda. The intention of this financing system is to promote efficiency and the equitable distribution of financial and human resources, improving health outcomes for the majority. However, there are some key prerequisites that need to be in ...

  13. The problem of choice: From the voluntary way to Affordable Care Act health insurance exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jessica

    2017-05-01

    This article takes a genealogical and ethnographic approach to the problem of choice, arguing that what choice means has been reworked several times since health insurance first figured prominently in national debates about health reform. Whereas voluntary choice of doctor and hospital used to be framed as an American right, contemporary choice rhetoric includes consumer choice of insurance plan. Understanding who has deployed choice rhetoric and to what ends helps explain how offering choices has become the common sense justification for defending and preserving the exclusionary health care system in the United States. Four case studies derived from 180 enrollment observations at the Rhode Island health insurance exchange conducted from March 2014-January 2017 and interviews with enrollees show how choice is experienced in this latest iteration of health reform. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 created new pathways to insurance coverage in the United States. Insurance exchanges were supposed to unleash the power of consumer decision-making through marketplaces where health plans compete on quality, coverage, and price. Consumers, however, contended with confusing insurance terminology and difficult to navigate websites. The ethnography shows that consumers experienced choice as confusing and overwhelming and did not feel "in charge" of their decisions. Instead, unstable employment, changes in income, existing health needs, and bureaucratic barriers shaped their "choices." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 51846 - BlueScope Buildings North America Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Buildings North America Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Reported Through... wages reported through a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name Buttler... as follows: All workers of BlueScope Buildings North America, including workers whose unemployment...

  15. Public views of health insurance in Japan during the era of attaining universal health coverage: a secondary analysis of an opinion poll on health insurance in 1967

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuma Nozaki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While Japan’s success in achieving universal health insurance over a short period with controlled healthcare costs has been studied from various perspectives, that of beneficiaries have been overlooked. We conducted a secondary analysis of an opinion poll on health insurance in 1967, immediately after reaching universal coverage. We found that people continued to face a slight barrier to healthcare access (26.8% felt medical expenses were a heavy burden and had high expectations for health insurance (60.5% were satisfied with insured medical services and 82.4% were willing to pay a premium. In our study, younger age, having children before school age, lower living standards, and the health insurance scheme were factors that were associated with a willingness to pay premiums. Involving high-income groups in public insurance is considered to be the key to ensuring universal coverage of social insurance.

  16. Patient satisfaction with primary health care - a comparison between the insured and non-insured under the National Health Insurance Policy in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenny, Ama Pokuaa; Enemark, Ulrika; Asante, Felix A

    2014-01-01

    system aimed at making health care more accessible to people who need it. Currently, there is a growing amount of concern about the capacity of the NHIS to make quality health care accessible to its clients. A number of studies have concentrated on the effect of health insurance status on demand......, health insurance and the various dimensions of quality of care. This study employs logistic regression using household survey data in three districts in Ghana covering the 3 ecological zones (coastal, forest and savannah). It identifies the service quality factors that are important to patients......Ghana has initiated various health sector reforms over the past decades aimed at strengthening institutions, improving the overall health system and increasing access to healthcare services by all groups of people. The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) instituted in 2005, is an innovative...

  17. ROMANIA’S PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE MATEI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The significant gap between the quality of life and the level of health expenditure has led to the need to reconsider the modalities and the sources of collecting and redirecting the funds of the sanitary sector in such a way that sustainable medical results are generated for the entire population of the globe. Under these circumstances, the role of private health insurance is constantly increasing, even though its importance is still being influenced by the types of social policy and the dimension of the public health sector at national level. Due to the impact of these factors, the actual dimension of private health insurance market varies significantly across countries. In order to be able to realistically assess the level of development of the private health insurance market in Romania, the analysis has to be taken further than the simplistic measurement of indicators such as income and expenditure.

  18. What is affordable health insurance? The reasonable tradeoff account of affordability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Carla

    2009-12-01

    The reform of the health care system will include a mandate: Individuals are required to purchase health insurance provided that affordable options are available. But what is affordable health insurance? Three accounts of affordability of health coverage have been advanced. The first two accounts are empirical. The third account is needs-based. All three accounts are inadequate. I propose a fourth, the reasonable tradeoff account, according to which individuals should only be required to make reasonable tradeoffs in order to pay for their health coverage. That is, health insurance is affordable if in order to pay for it one does not to have to sacrifice other benefit(s) that are comparable in importance to the benefits of health coverage.

  19. Assessing barriers to health insurance and threats to equity in comparative perspective: The Health Insurance Access Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesnel-Vallée Amélie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typologies traditionally used for international comparisons of health systems often conflate many system characteristics. To capture policy changes over time and by service in health systems regulation of public and private insurance, we propose a database containing explicit, standardized indicators of policy instruments. Methods The Health Insurance Access Database (HIAD will collect policy information for ten OECD countries, over a range of eight health services, from 1990–2010. Policy indicators were selected through a comprehensive literature review which identified policy instruments most likely to constitute barriers to health insurance, thus potentially posing a threat to equity. As data collection is still underway, we present here the theoretical bases and methodology adopted, with a focus on the rationale underpinning the study instruments. Results These harmonized data will allow the capture of policy changes in health systems regulation of public and private insurance over time and by service. The standardization process will permit international comparisons of systems’ performance with regards to health insurance access and equity. Conclusion This research will inform and feed the current debate on the future of health care in developed countries and on the role of the private sector in these changes.

  20. Premium inflation in the Irish private health insurance market: drivers and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, B

    2013-12-01

    Nearly half of the Irish population is covered by private health insurance. In recent years, premium inflation has been significantly ahead of overall inflation and has been accelerating. This has contributing to a drop in the numbers insured since the peak in 2008. The fall in the numbers with private health insurance also has implications for the public health system. Factors behind this premium inflation include rising charges for beds in public hospitals, increasing volume of treatments and increasing quality of service and cover. While some progress has been made by insurers on reducing fees paid to consultants and private hospitals, unless the quantity or quality of care are addressed then premium inflation is unlikely to abate.

  1. Health insurance coverage and healthcare utilization among homeless young adults in Venice, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winetrobe, H; Rice, E; Rhoades, H; Milburn, N

    2016-03-01

    Homeless young adults are a vulnerable population with great healthcare needs. Under the Affordable Care Act, homeless young adults are eligible for Medicaid, in some states, including California. This study assesses homeless young adults' health insurance coverage and healthcare utilization prior to Medicaid expansion. All homeless young adults accessing services at a drop-in center in Venice, CA, were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire; 70% of eligible clients participated (n = 125). Within this majority White, heterosexual, male sample, 70% of homeless young adults did not have health insurance in the prior year, and 39% reported their last healthcare visit was at an emergency room. Past year unmet healthcare needs were reported by 31%, and financial cost was the main reported barrier to receiving care. Multivariable logistic regression found that homeless young adults with health insurance were almost 11 times more likely to report past year healthcare utilization. Health insurance coverage is the sole variable significantly associated with healthcare utilization among homeless young adults, underlining the importance of insurance coverage within this vulnerable population. Service providers can play an important role by assisting homeless young adults with insurance applications and facilitating connections with regular sources of health care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Determinants of Health Insurance Coverage among People Aged 45 and over in China: Who Buys Public, Private and Multiple Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinzi; Hou, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Donglan

    2016-01-01

    Background China is reforming and restructuring its health insurance system to achieve the goal of universal coverage. This study aims to understand the determinants of public, private and multiple insurance coverage among people of retirement-age in China. Methods We used data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey 2011 and 2013, a nationally representative survey of Chinese people aged 45 and over. Multinomial logit regression was performed to identify the determinants of public, private and multiple health insurance coverage. We also conducted logit regression to examine the association between public insurance coverage and demand for private insurance. Results In 2013, 94.5% of this population had at least one type of public insurance, and 12.2% purchased private insurance. In general, we found that rural residents were less likely to be uninsured (Relative Risk Ratio (RRR) = 0.40, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.34–0.47) and were less likely to buy private insurance (RRR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.16–0.31). But rural-to-urban migrants were more likely to be uninsured (RRR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.24–1.57). Public health insurance coverage may crowd out private insurance market (Odds Ratio = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.48–0.63), particularly among enrollees of Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance. There exists a huge socioeconomic disparity in both public and private insurance coverage. Conclusion The migrants, the poor and the vulnerable remained in the edge of the system. The growing private insurance market did not provide sufficient financial protection and did not cover the people with the greatest need. To achieve universal coverage and reduce socioeconomic disparity, China should integrate the urban and rural public insurance schemes across regions and remove the barriers for the middle-income and low-income to access private insurance. PMID:27564320

  3. 77 FR 66069 - Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No-Health Period Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO24 Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No-Health Period Extension... Life Insurance (VGLI) to extend to 240 days the current 120-day ``no-health'' period during which... insurability is needed, known as the Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) ``no- health'' period, from 120 days...

  4. The importance of health insurance and the safety net in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Thomas G; Moore, Kellan S

    2015-01-01

    Access to health insurance and health care are critical for people living in rural communities, where the safety net is fragile. However, rural communities face challenges as they enroll uninsured people in the health insurance marketplace, educate newly insured individuals on how to use insurance, and coordinate care for those who remain uninsured.

  5. [Development of pharmaceutical expenses in German private health insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcking, W; Tidelski, O; Skuras, B; Kitzmann, F; Zuehlke, L

    2012-06-01

    Health Insurance costs in Germany have grown by 3 % p. a. over the last ten years and amount to approx. 280 bn EUR in 2009. While costs for stationary treatment as the largest cost category have been intensely analyzed over the past years, pharmaceutical expenses have been analyzed in less detail, mostly focusing on the Statutory Health Insurance side, even though pharmaceutical expenses have grown almost twice as much as costs for ambulant treatments. This research article therefore focuses on the question how pharmaceutical expenses in a large German private health insurance company are allocated with respect to age and indication groups, and how those have developed during the past four years. Therefore, the data of a private health insurance company with more than 600.000 customers was split into price and volume effects per age group to understand if price or volume drives the cost development. Additionally, the two largest indication groups are analyzed in detail. As a result, both price and volume effects drive an overall cost increase of 7,3 %. These effects are even stronger in older age groups. This strong cost increase is not sustainable for the German health insurance system over a longer period of time and will even further increase due to the ageing of the German population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Reinsurance of health insurance for the informal sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, D M

    2001-01-01

    Deficient financing of health services in low-income countries and the absence of universal insurance coverage leaves most of the informal sector in medical indigence, because people cannot assume the financial consequences of illness. The role of communities in solving this problem has been recognized, and many initiatives are under way. However, community financing is rarely structured as health insurance. Communities that pool risks (or offer insurance) have been described as micro-insurance units. The sources of their financial instability and the options for stabilization are explained. Field data from Uganda and the Philippines, as well as simulated situations, are used to examine the arguments. The article focuses on risk transfer from micro-insurance units to reinsurance. The main insight of the study is that when the financial results of micro-insurance units can be estimated, they can enter reinsurance treaties and be stabilized from the first year. The second insight is that the reinsurance pool may require several years of operation before reaching cost neutrality.

  7. CERN Health Insurance Scheme - changes on 1 January 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Changes decided by the Council on 16 December 2010 Following the five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council has taken certain decisions which affect both active and retired staff. In order to restore the financial equilibrium of the CHIS, the level of contributions will increase progressively over the next five years. In 2011, the contributions of both active and retired members increase from 4.02% to 4.27%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntary insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with an income from a professional activity increase accordingly. The amounts of the daily allowance for Long-Term Care have been increased by 20% as of 1 January 2011. The CHIS Rules have been amended according to the above decisions. They entered into force on 1 January 2011 and are available on the CHIS site. Tel. 74125 Members of the personnel shall be deemed to ...

  8. Public awareness and knowledge of the National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Individuals residing in Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape provinces who had access to public health services were surveyed to determine public knowledge and awareness of the new National Health Insurance (NHI). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted and a total of 748 ...

  9. The Obstetrician/Gynaecologist and The National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Decree establishing the National Health Insurance Scheme was promulgated in 1999; however, actual implementation commenced in 2002 and has remained at a rudimentary stage. This is despite the very laudable reasons for establishing the NHIS, to provide a financial lifeline to health care delivery in Nigeria.

  10. Health services utilization and costs of the insured and uninsured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Health insurance is a social security system that aims to facilitate fair financing of health costs through pooling and judicious utilization of financial resources, in order to provide financial risk protections and cost burden sharing for people against high cost of healthcare through various prepayment methods ...

  11. Health Insurance: principles, models and the Nigerian National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Nigerian National Health Insurance scheme (NHIS) is planned to attract more resources to the health care sector and improve the level of access and utilization of healthcare services. It is also intended to protect people from the catastrophic financial implications of illnesses. However, whether it will work in ...

  12. Acceptability to general practitioners of national health insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient. These are important considerations in South Africa where 52 - 59% of doctorsB. " . and 61 % of total health care expenditure20 are in the private sector, but only 22,8% of the population are covered by some form of medical scheme, medical insurance policy or employer-provided health . service.'o. This study ...

  13. Participation in the National Health Insurance Scheme Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme was established under Act 35 of 1999 by the Federal Government of Nigeria and is aimed at providing easy access to health care for all Nigerians at an affordable cost through various prepayment systems. It is totally committed to achieving universal coverage and ...

  14. Economic Cost of Malaria Treatment under the Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care by examining costs incurred by health insurance card holders in the Savelugu-Nanton. District. Treatment for malaria, a disease that causes morbidity and mortality in Sub-Sahara. Africa, based on the Cost of Illness Approach (CIA) was used to compute the cost of health care. An analysis of the survey data showed that ...

  15. Urban health insurance reform and coverage in China using data from National Health Services Surveys in 1998 and 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Charles D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1997 there was a major reform of the government run urban health insurance system in China. The principal aims of the reform were to widen coverage of health insurance for the urban employed and contain medical costs. Following this reform there has been a transition from the dual system of the Government Insurance Scheme (GIS and Labour Insurance Scheme (LIS to the new Urban Employee Basic Health Insurance Scheme (BHIS. Methods This paper uses data from the National Health Services Surveys of 1998 and 2003 to examine the impact of the reform on population coverage. Particular attention is paid to coverage in terms of gender, age, employment status, and income levels. Following a description of the data between the two years, the paper will discuss the relationship between the insurance reform and the growing inequities in population coverage. Results An examination of the data reveals a number of key points: a The overall coverage of the newly established scheme has decreased from 1998 to 2003. b The proportion of the urban population without any type of health insurance arrangement remained almost the same between 1998 and 2003 in spite of the aim of the 1997 reform to increase the population coverage. c Higher levels of participation in mainstream insurance schemes (i.e. GIS-LIS and BHIS were identified among older age groups, males and high income groups. In some cases, the inequities in the system are increasing. d There has been an increase in coverage of the urban population by non-mainstream health insurance schemes, including non-commercial and commercial ones. The paper discusses three important issues in relation to urban insurance coverage: institutional diversity in the forms of insurance, labour force policy and the non-mainstream forms of commercial and non-commercial forms of insurance. Conclusion The paper concludes that the huge economic development and expansion has not resulted in a reduced disparity in

  16. The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron-Dine, Aviva; Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy

    2013-01-01

    We re-present and re-examine the analysis from the famous RAND Health Insurance Experiment from the 1970s on the impact of consumer cost sharing in health insurance on medical spending. We begin by summarizing the experiment and its core findings in a manner that would be standard in the current age. We then examine potential threats to the validity of a causal interpretation of the experimental treatment effects stemming from different study participation and differential reporting of outcomes across treatment arms. Finally, we re-consider the famous RAND estimate that the elasticity of medical spending with respect to its out-of-pocket price is −0.2, emphasizing the challenges associated with summarizing the experimental treatment effects from non-linear health insurance contracts using a single price elasticity. PMID:24610973

  17. Employer-provided health insurance and hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of employer-provided health insurance on hospital competition and hospital mergers. Under employer-provided health insurance, employer executives act as agents for their employees in selecting health insurance options for their firm. The paper investigates whether a merger of hospitals favored by executives will result in a larger price increase than a merger of competing hospitals elsewhere. This is found to be the case even when the executive has the same opportunity cost of travel as her employees and even when the executive is the sole owner of the firm, retaining all profits. This is consistent with the Federal Trade Commission's findings in its challenge of Evanston Northwestern Healthcare's acquisition of Highland Park Hospital. Implications of the model are further tested with executive location data and hospital data from Florida and Texas.

  18. Application of preventive medicine resources in the health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Karla Regina Dias de; Liberal, Márcia Mello Costa de; Zucchi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To identify the financial resources and investments provided for preventive medicine programs by health insurance companies of all kinds. Data were collected from 30 large health insurance companies, with over 100 thousand individuals recorded, and registered at the Agência Nacional de Saúde Suplementar. It was possible to identify the percentage of participants of the programs in relation to the total number of beneficiaries of the health insurance companies, the prevention and promotion actions held in preventive medicine programs, the inclusion criteria for the programs, as well as the evaluation of human resources and organizational structure of the preventive medicine programs. Most of the respondents (46.7%) invested more than US$ 50,000.00 in preventive medicine program, while 26.7% invested more than US$ 500,000.00. The remaining, about 20%, invested less than US$ 50,000.00, and 3.3% did not report the value applied.

  19. Gender differences in public perceptions on National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Meredith; Shisana, Olive

    2012-10-12

    Implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI) commenced recently. With the promise of addressing drastic inequalities in the health sector, NHI has the potential to positively transform the health system . In particular, NHI could have a significant positive impact on females, who are disadvantaged under the current system, with higher rates of poor health and lower rates of medical scheme membership compared with males. Despite NHI's transformative potential, however, the public discourse on NHI as portrayed in the media suggests that it is an unpopular policy. The evidence presented in this paper is to the contrary. To assess the general public's opinion on NHI and to explore gender differences in perceptions. This paper reports on findings from a 2010 cross-sectional nationally representative survey of the South African population that assessed social attitudes, including perceptions on NHI. Sex-disaggregated data were analysed in SPSS version 20. There is broad public acceptance of NHI, indicating that an overwhelming majority of South Africans would prefer an NHI system to the current two-tiered system. Support for NHI has increased since similar studies in 2005 and 2008, with the simultaneous growth of public discourse on the policy. More females than males support NHI, reflecting the potential of the NHI system to have a positive impact on gender equality and the health of women and girls.

  20. A Two-Account Life Insurance Model for Scenario-Based Valuation Including Event Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ninna Reitzel; Schomacker, Kristian Juul

    2015-01-01

    Using a two-account model with event risk, we model life insurance contracts taking into account both guaranteed and non-guaranteed payments in participating life insurance as well as in unit-linked insurance. Here, event risk is used as a generic term for life insurance events, such as death......, disability, etc. In our treatment of participating life insurance, we have special focus on the bonus schemes “consolidation” and “additional benefits”, and one goal is to formalize how these work and interact. Another goal is to describe similarities and differences between participating life insurance...... and unit-linked insurance. By use of a two-account model, we are able to illustrate general concepts without making the model too abstract. To allow for complicated financial markets without dramatically increasing the mathematical complexity, we focus on economic scenarios. We illustrate the use of our...

  1. Expanding insurance coverage through tax credits, consumer choice, and market enhancements: the American Medical Association proposal for health insurance reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Donald J; Emmons, David W; Wozniak, Gregory D

    2004-05-12

    Recent reports showing an increase in the number of uninsured individuals in the United States have given heightened attention to increasing health insurance coverage. The American Medical Association (AMA) has proposed a system of tax credits for the purchase of individually owned health insurance and enhancements to individual and group health insurance markets as a means of expanding coverage. Individually owned insurance would enable people to maintain coverage without disruption to existing patient-physician relationships, regardless of changes in employers or in work status. The AMA's plan would empower individuals to choose their health plan and give patients and their physicians more control over health care choices. Employers could continue to offer employment-based coverage, but employees would not be limited to the health plans offered by their employer. With a tax credit large enough to make coverage affordable and the ability to choose their own coverage, consumers would dramatically transform the individual and group health insurance markets. Health insurers would respond to the demands of individual consumers and be more cautious about increasing premiums. Insurers would also tailor benefit packages and develop new forms of coverage to better match the preferences of individuals and families. The AMA supports the development of new health insurance markets through legislative and regulatory changes to foster a wider array of high-quality, affordable plans.

  2. The transfer of a health insurance/managed care business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, John N; Goodman, George; Goroff, David B

    2007-01-01

    The owners of a health insurance/managed care business may want to sell that business for a variety of reasons. Health care provider systems may want to exit that business due to operating losses, difficulty in complying with regulations, the inherent conflict in operating that business as part of a provider system, or the desire to focus on being a health care provider. Health insurers/HMOs may want to sell all or a portion of their business due to operating losses, difficulty in servicing a particular market, or a desire to focus on other markets. No matter what reason prompts a seller to undertake a sale, a sale of health insurance/managed care business can be a complicated transaction involving a multitude of issues. This article will focus first on the ways in which such a sale may be structured. The article will then discuss some transactional issues that may arise in the negotiations for the sale of a health insurance/managed care business. The article will then focus on some particular legal issues that arise in each sale-e.g., antitrust, HIPAA, regulatory approvals, and charitable issues. Finally, this article will provide an overview of tax structuring considerations.

  3. Anonymous HIV workplace surveys as an advocacy tool for affordable private health insurance in Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Ingrid; Coutinho, Hannah M.; van Wyk, Peter J.; Gaeb, Esegiel; de Wit, Tobias Rinke; van Vugt, Michèle

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: With an estimated adult HIV prevalence of 15%, Namibia is in need of innovative health financing strategies that can alleviate the burden on the public sector. Affordable and private health insurances were recently developed in Namibia, and they include coverage for HIV/AIDS.

  4. Community Rating in Health Insurance : Trade-Off Between Coverage and Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.; Boone, Jan; Zwart, G.T.J.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the role of community rating in the optimal design of a risk adjustment scheme in competitive health insurance markets when insurers have better information on their customers’ risk profiles than the sponsor of health insurance. The sponsor offers insurers a menu of risk adjustment

  5. Household perceptions and their implications for enrollment in the National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehu-Appiah, C.; Aryeetey, G.C.; Agyepong, I.; Spaan, E.J.; Baltussen, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This paper identifies, ranks and compares perceptions of insured and uninsured households in Ghana on health care providers (quality of care, service delivery adequacy, staff attitudes), health insurance schemes (price, benefits and convenience) and community attributes (health 'beliefs

  6. 75 FR 58203 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    .... Ambulatory surgical centers, end-stage renal disease facilities, Federally qualified health centers... Parts 405, 424, 438, et al. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional...-AQ20 Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements...

  7. Cost-effectiveness of national health insurance programs in high-income countries: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Nghiem

    Full Text Available National health insurance is now common in most developed countries. This study reviews the evidence and synthesizes the cost-effectiveness information for national health insurance or disability insurance programs across high-income countries.A literature search using health, economics and systematic review electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Medline, Econlit, RepEc, Cochrane library and Campbell library, was conducted from April to October 2015.Two reviewers independently selected relevant studies by applying screening criteria to the title and keywords fields, followed by a detailed examination of abstracts.Studies were selected for data extraction using a quality assessment form consisting of five questions. Only studies with positive answers to all five screening questions were selected for data extraction. Data were entered into a data extraction form by one reviewer and verified by another.Data on costs and quality of life in control and treatment groups were used to draw distributions for synthesis. We chose the log-normal distribution for both cost and quality-of-life data to reflect non-negative value and high skew. The results were synthesized using a Monte Carlo simulation, with 10,000 repetitions, to estimate the overall cost-effectiveness of national health insurance programs.Four studies from the United States that examined the cost-effectiveness of national health insurance were included in the review. One study examined the effects of medical expenditure, and the remaining studies examined the cost-effectiveness of health insurance reforms. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER ranged from US$23,000 to US$64,000 per QALY. The combined results showed that national health insurance is associated with an average incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$51,300 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY. Based on the standard threshold for cost-effectiveness, national insurance programs are cost-effective interventions

  8. Switching insurer in the Irish voluntary health insurance market: determinants, incentives, and risk equalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Conor; Teljeur, Conor; Turner, Brian; Thomas, Steve

    2016-09-01

    The determinants of consumer mobility in voluntary health insurance markets providing duplicate cover are not well understood. Consumer mobility can have important implications for competition. Consumers should be price-responsive and be willing to switch insurer in search of the best-value products. Moreover, although theory suggests low-risk consumers are more likely to switch insurer, this process should not be driven by insurers looking to attract low risks. This study utilizes data on 320,830 VHI healthcare policies due for renewal between August 2013 and June 2014. At the time of renewal, policyholders were categorized as either 'switchers' or 'stayers', and policy information was collected for the prior 12 months. Differences between these groups were assessed by means of logistic regression. The ability of Ireland's risk equalization scheme to account for the relative attractiveness of switchers was also examined. Policyholders were price sensitive (OR 1.052, p sensitivity declined with age. Age (OR 0.971; p Consumers appear price-responsive, which is important for competition provided it is based on correct incentives. Risk equalization payments largely eliminated the profitable status of switchers, although further refinements may be required.

  9. Employer-sponsored health insurance and the gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Schwab, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    During prime working years, women have higher expected healthcare expenses than men. However, employees' insurance rates are not gender-rated in the employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) market. Thus, women may experience lower wages in equilibrium from employers who offer health insurance to their employees. We show that female employees suffer a larger wage gap relative to men when they hold ESI: our results suggest this accounts for roughly 10% of the overall gender wage gap. For a full-time worker, this pay gap due to ESI is on the order of the expected difference in healthcare expenses between women and men. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Early retiree and near-elderly health insurance in recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elise; Hertel-Fernandez, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    This paper examines recent trends in health insurance cost and coverage for the near-elderly population (aged 55 to 64), with particular attention directed toward the implications of the 2007 recession. We examine coverage by demographic and socioeconomic characteristics from the Current Population Survey and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We also estimate the effects of projected increases in the unemployment rate for employer-sponsored insurance coverage of the near elderly in 2009 and 2010. Erosion in coverage is likely to be exacerbated in the short run by the 2007 recession, given rapidly rising unemployment among this age cohort, and in the long-run, given the inability of the labor market to support increased labor market participation of older Americans in jobs that would have traditionally provided health insurance coverage.

  11. Can rural health insurance improve equity in health care utilization? a comparison between China and Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaoyun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Health care financing reforms in both China and Vietnam have resulted in greater financial difficulties in accessing health care, especially for the rural poor. Both countries have been developing rural health insurance for decades. This study aims to evaluate and compare equity in access to health care in rural health insurance system in the two countries. Methods Household survey and qualitative study were conducted in 6 counties in China and 4 districts in Vietnam. Health insurance policy and its impact on utilization of outpatient and inpatient service were analyzed and compared to measure equity in access to health care. Results In China, Health insurance membership had no significant impact on outpatient service utilization, while was associated with higher utilization of inpatient services, especially for the higher income group. Health insurance members in Vietnam had higher utilization rates of both outpatient and inpatient services than the non-members, with higher use among the lower than higher income groups. Qualitative results show that bureaucratic obstacles, low reimbursement rates, and poor service quality were the main barriers for members to use health insurance. Conclusions China has achieved high population coverage rate over a short time period, starting with a limited benefit package. However, poor people have less benefit from NCMS in terms of health service utilization. Compared to China, Vietnam health insurance system is doing better in equity in health service utilization within the health insurance members. However with low population coverage, a large proportion of population cannot enjoy the health insurance benefit. Mutual learning would help China and Vietnam address these challenges, and improve their policy design to promote equitable and sustainable health insurance.

  12. Can rural health insurance improve equity in health care utilization? a comparison between China and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Health care financing reforms in both China and Vietnam have resulted in greater financial difficulties in accessing health care, especially for the rural poor. Both countries have been developing rural health insurance for decades. This study aims to evaluate and compare equity in access to health care in rural health insurance system in the two countries. Methods Household survey and qualitative study were conducted in 6 counties in China and 4 districts in Vietnam. Health insurance policy and its impact on utilization of outpatient and inpatient service were analyzed and compared to measure equity in access to health care. Results In China, Health insurance membership had no significant impact on outpatient service utilization, while was associated with higher utilization of inpatient services, especially for the higher income group. Health insurance members in Vietnam had higher utilization rates of both outpatient and inpatient services than the non-members, with higher use among the lower than higher income groups. Qualitative results show that bureaucratic obstacles, low reimbursement rates, and poor service quality were the main barriers for members to use health insurance. Conclusions China has achieved high population coverage rate over a short time period, starting with a limited benefit package. However, poor people have less benefit from NCMS in terms of health service utilization. Compared to China, Vietnam health insurance system is doing better in equity in health service utilization within the health insurance members. However with low population coverage, a large proportion of population cannot enjoy the health insurance benefit. Mutual learning would help China and Vietnam address these challenges, and improve their policy design to promote equitable and sustainable health insurance. PMID:22376290

  13. [The change of the health insurance policy and social welfare discourse in 1970s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byoung-joo

    2011-12-31

    medical facilities. Therefore, they began to see health insurance as a means of developing potential demand for medical service. In addition, the business world, which already expanded their own corporate welfare for employees from the early 1970s, sharing the idea that it was impossible to keep the issue of public health insurance unsolved, showed an enthusiastic attitude. These factors finally enabled Park regime to adopt the public health insurance system. Likewise, it is critical to understand the establishment of the public health insurance system in Korea through pursuing the process to it. What matters is the discoursive changes as well as the changes in social condition around the establishment, not merely the policy changes per se. Then most people, including decision makers in Park regime, thought of social welfare as a privilege developed countries. Thus, in the 1970s when unbalanced industrialization brought about widening gap between social classes, the employment of a social welfare policy could be recognized as a symbol of an escape from backwardness. In fact, with the introduction of the national health insurance in the 1970s, Park regime could fortify the material fundamental of a social welfare discourse which would be mobilized to strengthen the dichotomous discourse of developedness and backwardness and to dump the social crisis caused by Park regime's industrialization drive on the next generation.

  14. Insuring America's health: principles and recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance; Board on Health Care Services; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    .... Being uninsured is associated with a range of adverse health, social, and economic consequences for individuals and their families, for the health care systems in their communities, and for the nation as a whole...

  15. People's willingness to pay for health insurance in rural Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelin Anders

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inequity caused by health financing in Vietnam, which mainly relies on out-of-pocket payments, has put pre-payment reform high on the political agenda. This paper reports on a study of the willingness to pay for health insurance among a rural population in northern Vietnam, exploring whether the Vietnamese are willing to pay enough to sufficiently finance a health insurance system. Methods Using the Epidemiological Field Laboratory for Health Systems Research in the Bavi district (FilaBavi, 2070 households were randomly selected for the study. Existing FilaBavi interviewers were trained especially for this study. The interview questionnaire was developed through a pilot study followed by focus group discussions among interviewers. Determinants of households' willingness to pay were studied through interval regression by which problems such as zero answers, skewness, outliers and the heaping effect may be solved. Results Households' average willingness to pay (WTP is higher than their costs for public health care and self-treatment. For 70–80% of the respondents, average WTP is also sufficient to pay the lower range of premiums in existing health insurance programmes. However, the average WTP would only be sufficient to finance about half of total household public, as well as private, health care costs. Variables that reflect income, health care need, age and educational level were significant determinants of households' willingness to pay. Contrary to expectations, age was negatively related to willingness to pay. Conclusion Since WTP is sufficient to cover household costs for public health care, it depends to what extent households would substitute private for public care and increase utilization as to whether WTP would also be sufficient enough to finance health insurance. This study highlights potential for public information schemes that may change the negative attitude towards health insurance, which this study has

  16. Is employer-based health insurance a barrier to entrepreneurship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, Robert W; Kapur, Kanika; Gates, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The focus on employer-provided health insurance in the United States may restrict business creation. We address the limited research on the topic of "entrepreneurship lock" by using recent panel data from matched Current Population Surveys. We use difference-in-difference models to estimate the interaction between having a spouse with employer-based health insurance and potential demand for health care. We find evidence of a larger negative effect of health insurance demand on business creation for those without spousal coverage than for those with spousal coverage. We also take a new approach in the literature to examine the question of whether employer-based health insurance discourages business creation by exploiting the discontinuity created at age 65 through the qualification for Medicare. Using a novel procedure of identifying age in months from matched monthly CPS data, we compare the probability of business ownership among male workers in the months just before turning age 65 and in the months just after turning age 65. We find that business ownership rates increase from just under age 65 to just over age 65, whereas we find no change in business ownership rates from just before to just after for other ages 55-75. We also do not find evidence from the previous literature and additional estimates that other confounding factors such as retirement, partial retirement, social security and pension eligibility are responsible for the increase in business ownership in the month individuals turn 65. Our estimates provide some evidence that "entrepreneurship lock" exists, which raises concerns that the bundling of health insurance and employment may create an inefficient level of business creation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determinants of health insurance ownership among South African women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwabu Germano M

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies conducted in developed countries using economic models show that individual- and household- level variables are important determinants of health insurance ownership. There is however a dearth of such studies in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between health insurance ownership and the demographic, economic and educational characteristics of South African women. Methods The analysis was based on data from a cross-sectional national household sample derived from the South African Health Inequalities Survey (SANHIS. The study subjects consisted of 3,489 women, aged between 16 and 64 years. It was a non-interventional, qualitative response econometric study. The outcome measure was the probability of a respondent's ownership of a health insurance policy. Results The χ2 test for goodness of fit indicated satisfactory prediction of the estimated logit model. The coefficients of the covariates for area of residence, income, education, environment rating, age, smoking and marital status were positive, and all statistically significant at p ≤ 0.05. Women who had standard 10 education and above (secondary, high incomes and lived in affluent provinces and permanent accommodations, had a higher likelihood of being insured. Conclusion Poverty reduction programmes aimed at increasing women's incomes in poor provinces; improving living environment (e.g. potable water supplies, sanitation, electricity and housing for women in urban informal settlements; enhancing women's access to education; reducing unemployment among women; and increasing effective coverage of family planning services, will empower South African women to reach a higher standard of living and in doing so increase their economic access to health insurance policies and the associated health services.

  18. 77 FR 41270 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 [TD 9590] RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit Correction In rule document 2012-12421 appearing on pages 30377-30400 in the issue of Wednesday, May 23, 2012, make the following corrections: 0 1. On page 30385, in the...

  19. Would national health insurance itnprove equity and efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a payroll tax. Individuals unable to afford compulsory insurance may be excluded from benefits, but could instead be subsidised by the premiums of wealthier work- ers and/or government ... public health care bener than can general taxation, because people are ..... the direct method is still dominant in India and. Turkey.

  20. Workable Social Health Insurance Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the major barriers to access to healthcare in most sub-Saharan African countries is financial constraints. The need therefore arises for African states to put in place workable social health insurance schemes, as is the practice in most developed countries. This article assesses the peculiar characteristics of ...

  1. Willingness to pay for voluntary health insurance in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective(s): To assess how willing people would be to join a voluntary health insurance scheme and to see how they respond to changes in the benefit package. We also examined willingness to cross-subsidise the poor. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Two thousand two hundread and twenty four households ...

  2. National Health Insurance in South Africa: Relevance of a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Health Insurance in South Africa: Relevance of a national priority-setting agency. Karen J Hofman, Shelley McGee, Kalipso Chalkidou, Sripen Tantivess, Anthony J Culyer. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  3. Exploring fraud and abuse in National Health Insurance Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explored patterns of fraud and abuse that exist in the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) claims in the Awutu-Effutu-Senya District using data mining techniques, with a specific focus on malaria-related claims. The study employed quantitative research approach with survey design as a strategy of enquiry.

  4. Evaluation of Rajiv Aarogyasri Health Insurance Scheme in Andrha ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In 2007, out-of-pocket expenditures accounted for 90% of total private expenditure on healthcare in India. The cost of coping with serious disease can be ruinous for families living below the poverty line. The Rajiv Aarogyasri Health Insurance Scheme was established in Andrha Pradesh to mitigate catastrophic healthcare ...

  5. Utilization and perception of Community Health Insurance Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shell in collaboration with four communities in Obio-Akpor LGA, Port Harcourt, started a Community Health Insurance Scheme in February 2010. An evaluation of enrollees' utilization and perception of the services provided was done. Methodology: Quantitative data were collected by the use of structured interviewer ...

  6. Would national health insurance improve equity and efficiency of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arguments for and against national health insurance (NHI) for South Africa are illuminated by the experiences of other middle-income developing countries. In many Latin American and Asian countries the majority of their populations are covered by NHI, coverage having steadily increased over the last decade. Patterns of ...

  7. Health-based risk neutralization in private disability insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnvoord, Elisabeth C.; Buitenhuis, Jan; Brouwer, Sandra; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; de Boer, Michiel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exclusions are used by insurers to neutralize higher than average risks of sickness absence (SA). However, differentiating risk groups according to one's medical situation can be seen as discrimination against people with health problems in violation of a 2006 United Nations convention.

  8. Health-based risk neutralization in private disability insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnvoord, Elisabeth C; Buitenhuis, Jan; Brouwer, Sandra; van der Klink, Jac J L; de Boer, Michiel R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exclusions are used by insurers to neutralize higher than average risks of sickness absence (SA). However, differentiating risk groups according to one's medical situation can be seen as discrimination against people with health problems in violation of a 2006 United Nations convention.

  9. PROMISING FINANCING SCHEME OF HEALTH INSURANCE IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Slavitych

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The promising financing scheme of health insurance in Ukraine should be found at the present stage of its development. The health care system in Ukraine is cumbersome and outdated. It is based on the Semashko model with rigid management and financing procedures. The disadvantages accumulated in the national health care system due to lack of modernization, disregard of the population needs, non-use of modern global trends, the inefficient operation of the system and the high level of corruption cause the underlying situation. The decision of new government policy in the sector is introduction of new financial mechanisms, in order to ensure human rights in the health sector. Methodology. The study is based on a comparison of systems of financing of medicine in Ukraine and in other countries, provided advantages and disadvantages of each model. Results showed that the availability of medical services is the key problem in any society. The availability of health care services is primarily determined by the proportion of services guaranteed by the government (government guarantees. In some countries such as the United States, practically the whole medicine is funded by voluntary health insurance (VHI. In Europe the mandatory health insurance (MHI and government funding are the most significant source of funds. Practical importance. The improvement of the demographic situation, the preservation and improvement of public health, improvement of social equity and citizens' rights in respect of medical insurance. Value/originality. Premiums for health insurance are the source of funding. Based on the new model requirements it is necessary to create an appropriate regulation, which would determine its organizational and regulatory framework. This process is primarily determined by identification and setting rules governing the relationship between patients, health care providers and insurers, creation of the conditions and the implementation of quality

  10. Health insurance theory: the case of the missing welfare gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, John A

    2008-11-01

    An important source of value is missing from the conventional welfare analysis of moral hazard, namely, the effect of income transfers (from those who purchase insurance and remain healthy to those who become ill) on purchases of medical care. Income transfers are contained within the price reduction that is associated with standard health insurance. However, in contrast to the income effects contained within an exogenous price decrease, these income transfers act to shift out the demand for medical care. As a result, the consumer's willingness to pay for medical care increases and the resulting additional consumption is welfare increasing.

  11. The 2007-09 recession and health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, John

    2011-01-01

    Loss of employment and declining incomes meant that five million Americans lost employment-based health insurance during the recent economic recession (2007-09). All groups of Americans were affected, but the growth in the number of uninsured people was particularly noticeable for whites, native-born citizens, and residents of the Midwest and South. Adults did not benefit nearly as much as children from public programs designed to offset the decline in employer-sponsored insurance and thus bore all of the burden of rising uninsurance. Throughout the past decade, even in good economic times, the number of Americans with employer-sponsored insurance has fallen, and the number of uninsured Americans has increased. This finding underscores the importance of planned coverage expansions under the Affordable Care Act.

  12. Does Full Insurance Increase the Demand for Health Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Stefan; Gerfin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We estimate the causal impact of having full health insurance on healthcare expenditures. We take advantage of a unique quasi-experimental setup in which deductibles and co-payments were zero in a managed care plan and nonzero in regular insurance, until a policy change forced all individuals with an active plan to cover a minimum amount of their expenses. Using panel data and a nonlinear difference-in-differences strategy, we find a demand elasticity of about -0.14 comparing full insurance with the cost-sharing model and a significant upward shift in the likelihood to generate costs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Life and health insurance behaviour of individuals having undergone a predictive genetic testing programme for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan-Collan, Katja; Haukkala, Ari; Kaariainen, Helena

    2001-01-01

    We describe the insurance behaviour of subjects (n=271) who had previously taken a predictive genetic test for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC); 31% of them were mutation positive, indicating a high risk of cancer. One year after testing, subjects were sent a questionnaire including questions about their present life and health insurance before participation in the study, and their actual and planned purchase of the insurance policies during the testing programme which compromised a pre-test counseling session, a period for reflection, the testing, and a test disclosure session. Thirty percent reported that they already had a life insurance and 14% a health insurance before participating in the study. The mutation-positive subjects possessed a health insurance significantly more often than the mutation-negative individuals (21 vs. 11%, p=0.02) and similar trend was observed for life insurance (36 vs. 28%, p=0.12). Life and health insurance policies purchased just before testing was reported by 3 and 2% of the subjects, respectively. Life and health insurance policies purchased after testing were reported by 3 and life or health insurance behaviour during or after the programme. According to self-reported data, the mutation-positive subjects did not differ from the others in the purchase of life or health insurance policies. However, the mutation-positive individuals reported that they possessed health insurance policies before entering the study more often than their counterparts.

  14. Health insurance and stage at diagnosis of laryngeal cancer: does insurance type predict stage at diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Amy Y; Schrag, Nicole M; Halpern, Michael; Stewart, Andrew; Ward, Elizabeth M

    2007-08-01

    To examine whether patients with no insurance or Medicaid are more likely to present with advanced-stage laryngeal cancer. Retrospective cohort study from the National Cancer Database, 1996-2003. Hospital-based practice. Patients with known insurance status diagnosed as having invasive laryngeal cancer at Commission on Cancer facilities (N = 61 131) were included. Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression models analyzed the likelihood of presenting at a more advanced stage. Overall stage of laryngeal cancer (early vs advanced) and tumor size (T stage) at diagnosis. Patients with advanced-stage laryngeal cancer at diagnosis were more likely to be uninsured (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-2.15) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 2.21-2.61) compared with those with private insurance. Similarly, patients were most likely to present with the largest tumors (T4 disease) if they were uninsured (OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 2.60-3.28) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 3.97; 95% CI, 3.56-4.34). Patients who were black, between ages 18 and 56 years, and who resided in zip codes with low proportions of high school graduates or low median household incomes were also more likely to be diagnosed as having advanced disease and/or larger tumors. Individuals lacking insurance or having Medicaid are at greatest risk for presenting with advanced laryngeal cancer. Results for the Medicaid group may be influenced by the postdiagnosis enrollment of uninsured patients. It is important to consider the impact of insurance coverage on stage at diagnosis and associated morbidity, mortality, quality of life, and costs.

  15. Outcome-based health equity across different social health insurance schemes for the elderly in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoting; Wong, Hung; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-14

    Against the achievement of nearly universal coverage for social health insurance for the elderly in China, a problem of inequity among different insurance schemes on health outcomes is still a big challenge for the health care system. Whether various health insurance schemes have divergent effects on health outcome is still a puzzle. Empirical evidence will be investigated in this study. This study employs a nationally representative survey database, the National Survey of the Aged Population in Urban/Rural China, to compare the changes of health outcomes among the elderly before and after the reform. A one-way ANOVA is utilized to detect disparities in health care expenditures and health status among different health insurance schemes. Multiple Linear Regression is applied later to examine the further effects of different insurance plans on health outcomes while controlling for other social determinants. The one-way ANOVA result illustrates that although the gaps in insurance reimbursements between the Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) and the other schemes, the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) and Urban Residents Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) decreased, out-of-pocket spending accounts for a larger proportion of total health care expenditures, and the disparities among different insurances enlarged. Results of the Multiple Linear Regression suggest that UEBMI participants have better self-reported health status, physical functions and psychological wellbeing than URBMI and NCMS participants, and those uninsured. URBMI participants report better self-reported health than NCMS ones and uninsured people, while having worse psychological wellbeing compared with their NCMS counterparts. This research contributes to a transformation in health insurance studies from an emphasis on the opportunity-oriented health equity measured by coverage and healthcare accessibility to concern with outcome-based equity composed of health expenditure and health

  16. Health, Disability Insurance and Retirement in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Jørgensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    gradients in outcomes and behavior by health and schooling partially reflects the less educated having poorer health on average, but also that the less educated have worse job prospects and higher replacement rates due to a progressive formula for DI and other pension benefits....... schooling are more likely to receive DI. The gradient of DI participation across health quintiles is almost twice as steep as for schooling - moving from having no high school diploma to college completion. Using an option value model that accounts for different pathways to retirement, applied to a period...

  17. The role of health system governance in strengthening the rural health insurance system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; Jian, Weiyan; He, Li; Wang, Bingyu; Balabanova, Dina

    2017-05-23

    Systems of governance play a key role in the operation and performance of health systems. In the past six decades, China has made great advances in strengthening its health system, most notably in establishing a health insurance system that enables residents of rural areas to achieve access to essential services. Although there have been several studies of rural health insurance schemes, these have focused on coverage and service utilization, while much less attention has been given to the role of governance in designing and implementing these schemes. Information from publications and policy documents relevant to the development of two rural health insurance policies in China was obtained, analysed, and synthesise. 92 documents on CMS (Cooperative Medical Scheme) or NCMS (New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme) from four databases searched were included. Data extraction and synthesis of the information were guided by a framework that drew on that developed by the WHO to describe health system governance and leadership. We identified a series of governance practices that were supportive of progress, including the prioritisation by the central government of health system development and certain health policies within overall national development; strong government commitment combined with a hierarchal administrative system; clear policy goals coupled with the ability for local government to adopt policy measures that take account of local conditions; and the accumulation and use of the evidence generated from local practices. However these good practices were not seen in all governance domains. For example, poor collaboration between different government departments was shown to be a considerable challenge that undermined the operation of the insurance schemes. China's success in achieving scale up of CMS and NCMS has attracted considerable interest in many low and middle income countries (LMICs), especially with regard to the schemes' designs, coverage, and funding

  18. China's Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme: a type of health insurance or a type of health cooperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Liang, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    The Cooperative Medical Scheme (CMS) was popular in rural China in the 1960s and 1970s, having garnered praise from the World Bank and World Health Organization as an unprecedented example of a successful health care model in a low-income developing country. However, the CMS almost collapsed in the 1980s. Based on its historical origins and main activities, we think the CMS functioned as a health cooperative rather than a health insurance scheme. Perhaps, however, the importance to the CMS of cooperation between institutions has been overestimated. Overlooked, yet equally important, has been the cooperation between health workers and farmers to target health-related risk factors associated with agricultural work and ways of life. The 'cooperative' character of the CMS includes two aspects: cooperative institutions and cooperative behaviour. Although the CMS collapsed in China, similar schemes are flourishing elsewhere in the world. In the future, in-depth analysis of these schemes is required.

  19. 77 FR 49007 - Changes in Certain Multifamily Housing and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Premiums for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... Housing Administration (FHA) Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage Insurance... economic model, but rather reflects the administration's concern for mitigating potential unforeseen risks...)), specifically for certain FHA Multifamily Housing, Health Care Facilities, and Hospital Mortgage Insurance...

  20. Health insurance in practice: international variations in financing, benefits, and problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, William G

    1991-01-01

    In "Health Insurance in practice", the author pinpoints the strengths and weaknesses of health insurance programs in developing countries and uses a lessons-from-abroad approach to offer suggestions...

  1. Impact of community-based health insurance in rural India on self-medication & financial protection of the insured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Dror (David); A. Chakraborty (Arpita); M. Majumdar (Manabi); P. Panda (Pradeep); R. Koren (Ruth)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & objectives: The evidence-base of the impact of community-based health insurance (CBHI) on access to healthcare and financial protection in India is weak. We investigated the impact of CBHI in rural Uttar Pradesh and Bihar States of India on insured households’

  2. The Dutch health insurance reform : switching between insurers, a comparison between the general population and the chronically ill and disabled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Judith D. de; Brink-Muinen, Atie van den; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: On 1 January 2006 a number of far-reaching changes in the Dutch health insurancesystem came into effect. In the new system of managed competition consumer mobility plays animportant role. Consumers are free to change their insurer and insurance plan every year. The ideais that consumers

  3. Examining the types and payments of the disabilities of the insurants in the National Farmers' Health Insurance program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiun-Hao; Chang, Hung-Hao

    2010-10-26

    In contrast to the considerable body of literature concerning the disabilities of the general population, little information exists pertaining to the disabilities of the farm population. Focusing on the disability issue to the insurants in the Farmers' Health Insurance (FHI) program in Taiwan, this paper examines the associations among socio-demographic characteristics, insured factors, and the introduction of the national health insurance program, as well as the types and payments of disabilities among the insurants. A unique dataset containing 1,594,439 insurants in 2008 was used in this research. A logistic regression model was estimated for the likelihood of received disability payments. By focusing on the recipients, a disability payment and a disability type equation were estimated using the ordinary least squares method and a multinomial logistic model, respectively, to investigate the effects of the exogenous factors on their received payments and the likelihood of having different types of disabilities. Age and different job categories are significantly associated with the likelihood of receiving disability payments. Compared to those under age 45, the likelihood is higher among recipients aged 85 and above (the odds ratio is 8.04). Compared to hired workers, the odds ratios for self-employed and spouses of farm operators who were not members of farmers' associations are 0.97 and 0.85, respectively. In addition, older insurants are more likely to have eye problems; few differences in disability types are related to insured job categories. Results indicate that older farmers are more likely to receive disability payments, but the likelihood is not much different among insurants of various job categories. Among all of the selected types of disability, a highest likelihood is found for eye disability. In addition, the introduction of the national health insurance program decreases the likelihood of receiving disability payments. The experience in Taiwan can

  4. Examining the types and payments of the disabilities of the insurants in the national farmers' health insurance program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung-Hao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to the considerable body of literature concerning the disabilities of the general population, little information exists pertaining to the disabilities of the farm population. Focusing on the disability issue to the insurants in the Farmers' Health Insurance (FHI program in Taiwan, this paper examines the associations among socio-demographic characteristics, insured factors, and the introduction of the national health insurance program, as well as the types and payments of disabilities among the insurants. Methods A unique dataset containing 1,594,439 insurants in 2008 was used in this research. A logistic regression model was estimated for the likelihood of received disability payments. By focusing on the recipients, a disability payment and a disability type equation were estimated using the ordinary least squares method and a multinomial logistic model, respectively, to investigate the effects of the exogenous factors on their received payments and the likelihood of having different types of disabilities. Results Age and different job categories are significantly associated with the likelihood of receiving disability payments. Compared to those under age 45, the likelihood is higher among recipients aged 85 and above (the odds ratio is 8.04. Compared to hired workers, the odds ratios for self-employed and spouses of farm operators who were not members of farmers' associations are 0.97 and 0.85, respectively. In addition, older insurants are more likely to have eye problems; few differences in disability types are related to insured job categories. Conclusions Results indicate that older farmers are more likely to receive disability payments, but the likelihood is not much different among insurants of various job categories. Among all of the selected types of disability, a highest likelihood is found for eye disability. In addition, the introduction of the national health insurance program decreases the

  5. A dental phobia treatment within the Swedish National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglin, Catharina; Boman, Ulla Wide

    2012-01-01

    Severe dental fear/phobia (DF) is a problem for both dental care providers and for patients who often suffer from impaired oral health and from social and emotional distress.The aim of this paper was to present the Swedish model for DF treatment within the National Health Insurance System, and to describe the dental phobia treatment and its outcome at The Dental Fear Research and Treatment Clinic (DFRTC) in Gothenburg. A literature review was made of relevant policy documents on dental phobia treatment from the National Health Insurance System and for Västra Götaland region on published outcome studies from DFRTC. The treatment manual of DFRTC was also used. In Sweden, adult patients with severe DF are able to undergo behavioral treatment within the National Health Insurance System if the patient and caregivers fulfil defined criteria that must be approved for each individual case. At DFRTC dental phobia behavioral treatment is given by psychologists and dentists in an integrated model. The goal is to refer patients for general dental care outside the DFRTC after completing treatment. The DF treatment at DFRTC has shown positive effects on dental fear, attendance and acceptance of dental treatment for 80% of patients. Follow-up after 2 and 10 years confirmed these results and showed improved oral health. In addition, positive psychosomatic and psychosocial side-effects were reported, and benefits also for society were evident in terms of reduced sick-leave. In conlusion, in Sweden a model has been developed within the National Health Insurance System helping individuals with DF. Behavioral treatment conducted at DFRTC has proven successful in helping patients cope with dental care, leading to regular attendance and better oral health.

  6. PROVIDER CHOICE FOR OUTPATIENT HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN INDONESIA: THE ROLE OF HEALTH INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Hidayat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesian's health care system is characterized by underutilized of the health-care infrastructure. One of the ways to improve the demand for formal health care is through health insurance. Responding to this potentially effective policy leads the Government of Indonesia to expand health insurance coverage by enacting the National Social Security Act in 2004. In this particular issue, understanding provider choice is therefore a key to address the broader policy question as to how the current low uptake of health care services could be turned in to an optimal utilization. Objective:To estimate a model of provider choice for outpatient care in Indonesia with specific attention being paid to the role of health insurance. Methods: A total of 16485 individuals were obtained from the second wave of the Indonesian Family Life survey. A multinomial logit regression model was applied to a estimate provider choice for outpatient care in three provider alternative (public, private and self-treatment. A policy simulation is reported as to how expanding insurance benefits could change the patterns of provider choice for outpatient health care services. Results: Individuals who are covered by civil servant insurance (Askes are more likely to use public providers, while the beneficiaries of private employees insurance (Jamsostek are more likely to use private ones compared with the uninsured population. The results also reveal that less healthy, unmarried, wealthier and better educated individuals are more likely to choose private providers than public providers. Conclusions: Any efforts to improve access to health care through health insurance will fail if policy-makers do not accommodate peoples' preferences for choosing health care providers. The likely changes in demand from public providers to private ones need to be considered in the current social health insurance reform process, especially in devising premium policies and benefit packages

  7. Age, Sex, Health Insurance, and Race Associated With Increased Rate of Emergent Pediatric Gastrointestinal Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Ashley; Franklin, Linda; Rush, Natasha; Witts, Robin; Blanco, David; Pall, Harpreet

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have examined the role health disparities play in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI) procedures. We hypothesized that health disparity factors affect whether patients undergo an emergent versus nonemergent GI procedure. The aims were to characterize the existing pediatric population undergoing GI procedures at our institution and assess specific risk factors associated with emergent versus nonemergent care. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2110 patients undergoing GI procedures from January 2012 to December 2014. Emergent procedures were performed on an urgent inpatient basis. All other procedures were considered nonemergent. Health disparity factors analyzed included age, sex, insurance type, race, and language. Logistic regression analysis identified the odds of undergoing emergent procedures for each factor. Most study patients were boys (58.2%), primarily insured by Medicaid (63.8%), white (44.0%), and spoke English (91.7%). Ten percent of all patients had an emergent procedure. Logistic regression analysis showed significant odds ratios (P value) for ages 18 years older (2.16, 0.003), females (0.62, 0.001), commercial insurance users (0.49, race (1.72, 0.039). Health disparities in age, sex, insurance, and race appear to exist in this pediatric population undergoing GI procedures. Patients older than 18 years, African Americans, and other races were significantly more likely to have an emergent procedure. Girls and commercial insurance users were significantly less likely to have an emergent procedure. More research is necessary to understand why these relations exist and how to establish appropriate interventions.

  8. 78 FR 14034 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... reports submitted to the Secretary by the covered entity and through the use of any other source of... health maintenance organizations. See Joint Committee on Taxation, General Explanation of Tax Legislation... and vision benefits). In accordance with the explanation provided by the Joint Committee on Taxation...

  9. Assessing responsiveness of health care services within a health insurance scheme in Nigeria: users' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Shafiu; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Souares, Aurélia; Sauerborn, Rainer; Dong, Hengjin

    2013-12-01

    Responsiveness of health care services in low and middle income countries has been given little attention. Despite being introduced over a decade ago in many developing countries, national health insurance schemes have yet to be evaluated in terms of responsiveness of health care services. Although this responsiveness has been evaluated in many developed countries, it has rarely been done in developing countries. The concept of responsiveness is multi-dimensional and can be measured across various domains including prompt attention, dignity, communication, autonomy, choice of provider, quality of facilities, confidentiality and access to family support. This study examines the insured users' perspectives of their health care services' responsiveness. This retrospective, cross-sectional survey took place between October 2010 and March 2011. The study used a modified out-patient questionnaire from a responsiveness survey designed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Seven hundred and ninety six (796) enrolees, insured for more than one year in Kaduna State-Nigeria, were interviewed. Generalized ordered logistic regression was used to identify factors that influenced the users' perspectives on responsiveness to health services and quantify their effects. Communication (55.4%), dignity (54.1%), and quality of facilities (52.0%) were rated as "extremely important" responsiveness domains. Users were particularly contented with quality of facilities (42.8%), dignity (42.3%), and choice of provider (40.7%). Enrolees indicated lower contentment on all other domains. Type of facility, gender, referral, duration of enrolment, educational status, income level, and type of marital status were most related with responsiveness domains. Assessing the responsiveness of health care services within the NHIS is valuable in investigating the scheme's implementation. The domains of autonomy, communication and prompt attention were identified as priority areas for action to improve

  10. Rural-Urban Differences in Access to Preventive Health Care Among Publicly Insured Minnesotans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, John; Allen, Elizabeth M; Call, Kathleen Thiede; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2018-02-01

    Reduced access to care and barriers have been shown in rural populations and in publicly insured populations. Barriers limiting health care access in publicly insured populations living in rural areas are not understood. This study investigates rural-urban differences in system-, provider-, and individual-level barriers and access to preventive care among adults and children enrolled in a public insurance program in Minnesota. This was a secondary analysis of a 2008 statewide, cross-sectional survey of publicly insured adults and children (n = 4,388) investigating barriers associated with low utilization of preventive care. Sampling was stratified with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities. Rural enrollees were more likely to report no past year preventive care compared to urban enrollees. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant after controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors (OR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.00-1.88). Provider- and system-level barriers associated with low use of preventive care among rural enrollees included discrimination based on public insurance status (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.34-2.38), cost of care concerns (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.03-2.89) and uncertainty about care being covered by insurance (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.01-2.85). These and additional provider-level barriers were also identified among urban enrollees. Discrimination, cost of care, and uncertainty about insurance coverage inhibit access in both the rural and urban samples. These barriers are worthy targets of interventions for publicly insured populations regardless of residence. Future studies should investigate additional factors associated with access disparities based on rural-urban residence. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  11. Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities.

  12. Perceptions of healthcare quality in Ghana: Does health insurance status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Stephen Kwasi Opoku; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Janssens, Wendy; Pradhan, Menno

    2018-01-01

    This study's objective is to provide an alternative explanation for the low enrolment in health insurance in Ghana by analysing differences in perceptions between the insured and uninsured of the non-technical quality of healthcare. It further explores the association between insurance status and perception of healthcare quality to ascertain whether insurance status matters in the perception of healthcare quality. Data from a survey of 1,903 households living in the catchment area of 64 health centres were used for the analysis. Two sample independent t-tests were employed to compare the average perceptions of the insured and uninsured on seven indicators of non-technical quality of healthcare. A generalised ordered logit regression, controlling for socio-economic characteristics and clustering at the health facility level, tested the association between insurance status and perceived quality of healthcare. The perceptions of the insured were found to be significantly more negative than the uninsured and those of the previously insured were significantly more negative than the never insured. Being insured was associated with a significantly lower perception of healthcare quality. Thus, once people are insured, they tend to perceive the quality of healthcare they receive as poor compared to those without insurance. This study demonstrated that health insurance status matters in the perceptions of healthcare quality. The findings also imply that perceptions of healthcare quality may be shaped by individual experiences at the health facilities, where the insured and uninsured may be treated differently. Health insurance then becomes less attractive due to the poor perception of the healthcare quality provided to individuals with insurance, resulting in low demand for health insurance in Ghana. Policy makers in Ghana should consider redesigning, reorganizing, and reengineering the National Healthcare Insurance Scheme to ensure the provision of better quality healthcare

  13. Perceptions of healthcare quality in Ghana: Does health insurance status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Stephen Kwasi Opoku

    2018-01-01

    This study’s objective is to provide an alternative explanation for the low enrolment in health insurance in Ghana by analysing differences in perceptions between the insured and uninsured of the non-technical quality of healthcare. It further explores the association between insurance status and perception of healthcare quality to ascertain whether insurance status matters in the perception of healthcare quality. Data from a survey of 1,903 households living in the catchment area of 64 health centres were used for the analysis. Two sample independent t-tests were employed to compare the average perceptions of the insured and uninsured on seven indicators of non-technical quality of healthcare. A generalised ordered logit regression, controlling for socio-economic characteristics and clustering at the health facility level, tested the association between insurance status and perceived quality of healthcare. The perceptions of the insured were found to be significantly more negative than the uninsured and those of the previously insured were significantly more negative than the never insured. Being insured was associated with a significantly lower perception of healthcare quality. Thus, once people are insured, they tend to perceive the quality of healthcare they receive as poor compared to those without insurance. This study demonstrated that health insurance status matters in the perceptions of healthcare quality. The findings also imply that perceptions of healthcare quality may be shaped by individual experiences at the health facilities, where the insured and uninsured may be treated differently. Health insurance then becomes less attractive due to the poor perception of the healthcare quality provided to individuals with insurance, resulting in low demand for health insurance in Ghana. Policy makers in Ghana should consider redesigning, reorganizing, and reengineering the National Healthcare Insurance Scheme to ensure the provision of better quality

  14. Effect of Health Insurance on Demand for Outpatient Medical Care in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ahavugimana

    effects on learning, and that these impacts can later influence economic outcomes in life (Bhargava et al., 2001). ..... Where Z is defined as in equation (1) and I is household characteristics including insurance; S is the ... study assumes that demand for health services has only one endogenous variable. In this study, demand ...

  15. Is universal coverage via social health insurance financially feasible in Swaziland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathauer, Inke; Musango, Laurent; Sibandze, Sibusiso; Mthethwa, Khosi; Carrin, Guy

    2011-03-01

    The Government of Swaziland decided to explore the feasibility of social health insurance (SHI) in order to enhance universal access to health services. We assess the financial feasibility of a possible SHI scheme in Swaziland. The SHI scenario presented is one that mobilises resources additional to the maintained Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) budget. It is designed to increase prepayment, enhance overall health financing equity, finance quality improvements in health care, and eventually cover the entire population. The financial feasibility assessment consists of calculating and projecting revenues and expenditures of the SHI scheme from 2008 to 2018. SimIns, a health insurance simulation software, was used. Quantitative data from government and other sources and qualitative data from discussions with health financing stakeholders were gathered. Policy assumptions were jointly developed with and agreed upon by a MOHSW team. SHI would take up an increasing proportion of total health expenditure over the simulation period and become the dominant health financing mechanism. In principle, and on the basis of the assumed policy variables, universal coverage could be reached within 6 years through the implementation of an SHI scheme based on a mix of contributory and tax financing. Contribution rates for formal sector employees would amount to 7% of salaries and the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare budget would need to be maintained. Government health expenditure including social health insurance would increase from 6% in 2008 to 11% in 2018.

  16. Limited provider panels: their promise and problems in an individual health insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsenberger, William H

    2008-07-01

    The cost of healthcare, and consequently of health insurance, continues to increase dramatically. A growing chorus calls for replacing the fundamental method by which people purchase insurance today--through their employers--with a system of individually acquired insurance. This article argues that changing how Americans purchase health insurance could change the dynamics between insurers and healthcare providers in a way that could favorably impact costs, primarily through reliance on highly limited provider networks. It examines the bases of legal obstacles to limited provider networks embedded in both statutory and case law and urges re-examination of those bases in light of changes in the distribution system of health insurance.

  17. THE MEXICAN POPULAR HEALTH INSURANCE: MYTHS AND REALITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurell, Asa Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Universal health coverage (UHC) is today a dominant issue in the global health policy debate. The hegemonic proposal is UHC that recommends universal health insurance with an explicit service package and a payer-provider split with public and private managers. The Mexican Popular Health Insurance (PHI) is widely presented as a UHC success case to be followed. This article reviews critically its achievements after a decade of implementation. It shows that universal coverage has not been reached and about 30 million Mexicans are uninsured. Access to needed services is quite limited for PHI affiliates given the restrictions of the service package, which excludes common high-cost diseases, and the lack of health facilities. Public health expenditure has increased 0.36 percent of Gross National Product, favoring the PHI at the expense of public social security. These funds are, however, lower than legal specifications and the service package under-priced. Private health expenditure as a percentage of total expenditure has not varied much and PHI affiliates' out-of-pocket payment is larger than the whole PHI budget. There is no evidence of health impact. The Mexican health reform corresponds to neoclassic-neoliberal reorganization of society on the market principle. Although some of the PHI problems are particular to Mexico, it illustrates some of the overall flaws of the UHC model.

  18. China in transition: the new health insurance scheme for the urban employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, D

    2000-01-01

    China has been very successful in achieving good health at a low cost, mostly through national programs for health promotion and illness prevention. However, increased prosperity in recent years has led to higher expectations for therapeutic care, and the change to a socialist market economy has created new risks and opportunities for both financing and care provision. After several years of experimentation, China committed itself in 1996 to a major reform program which includes implementation of a new method of financing of care for the urban employed population. It comprises a mix of government-operated compulsory basic insurance, individual health savings accounts, and optional private health insurance. This paper outlines the new Scheme, and notes some tactical and strategic issues. I conclude that the Chinese government is correctly choosing to balance new and old ideas, but that there are many challenges to be faced including integration of the new Scheme with the rest of the health care system.

  19. The Association of Health Insurance with institutional delivery and access to skilled birth attendants: evidence from the Kenya Demographic and health survey 2008-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Were, Lawrence P O; Were, Edwin; Wamai, Richard; Hogan, Joseph; Galarraga, Omar

    2017-07-03

    Healthcare financing through health insurance is gaining traction as developing countries strive to achieve universal health coverage and address the limited access to critical health services for specific populations including pregnant women and their children. However, these reforms are taking place despite limited evaluation of impact of health insurance on maternal health in developing countries including Kenya. In this study we evaluate the association of health insurance with access and utilization of obstetric delivery health services for pregnant women in Kenya. Nationally representative data from the Kenya Demographic and Health Survey 2008-09 was used in this study. 4082 pregnant women with outcomes of interest - Institutional delivery (Yes/No - delivery at hospital, dispensary, maternity home, and clinic) and access to skilled birth attendants (help by a nurse, doctor, or trained midwife at delivery) were selected from 8444 women ages 15-49 years. Linear and logistic regression, and propensity score adjustment are used to estimate the causal association of enrollment in insurance on obstetric health outcomes. Mothers with insurance are 23 percentage points (p delivery and access to skilled birth attendants, the average difference of the association of insurance enrollment compared to not enrolling for those of low SES is 23 percentage points (p delivery health services for pregnant women. Notably, those of lower socio-economic status seem to benefit the most from enrollment in insurance.

  20. 78 FR 71476 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Committee on Taxation General Explanation also indicates that a MEWA is intended to be a covered entity... revenues include all revenues of the covered entity without taking into account their source, the final... fee liability for 2014 based on the 2013 data year will be significantly larger than the total amount...

  1. Acceptance of selective contracting: the role of trust in the health insurer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In a demand oriented health care system based on managed competition, health insurers have incentives to become prudent buyers of care on behalf of their enrolees. They are allowed to selectively contract care providers. This is supposed to stimulate competition between care providers and both increase the quality of care and contain costs in the health care system. However, health insurers are reluctant to implement selective contracting; they believe their enrolees will not accept this. One reason, insurers believe, is that enrolees do not trust their health insurer. However, this has never been studied. This paper aims to study the role played by enrolees’ trust in the health insurer on their acceptance of selective contracting. Methods An online survey was conducted among 4,422 people insured through a large Dutch health insurance company. Trust in the health insurer, trust in the purchasing strategy of the health insurer and acceptance of selective contracting were measured using multiple item scales. A regression model was constructed to analyse the results. Results Trust in the health insurer turned out to be an important prerequisite for the acceptance of selective contracting among their enrolees. The association of trust in the purchasing strategy of the health insurer with acceptance of selective contracting is stronger for older people than younger people. Furthermore, it was found that men and healthier people accepted selective contracting by their health insurer more readily. This was also true for younger people with a low level of trust in their health insurer. Conclusion This study provides insight into factors that influence people’s acceptance of selective contracting by their health insurer. This may help health insurers to implement selective contracting in a way their enrolees will accept and, thus, help systems of managed competition to develop. PMID:24083663

  2. Acceptance of selective contracting: the role of trust in the health insurer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Romy E; Wendel, Sonja; Curfs, Emile C; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Jong, Judith D

    2013-10-02

    In a demand oriented health care system based on managed competition, health insurers have incentives to become prudent buyers of care on behalf of their enrolees. They are allowed to selectively contract care providers. This is supposed to stimulate competition between care providers and both increase the quality of care and contain costs in the health care system. However, health insurers are reluctant to implement selective contracting; they believe their enrolees will not accept this. One reason, insurers believe, is that enrolees do not trust their health insurer. However, this has never been studied. This paper aims to study the role played by enrolees' trust in the health insurer on their acceptance of selective contracting. An online survey was conducted among 4,422 people insured through a large Dutch health insurance company. Trust in the health insurer, trust in the purchasing strategy of the health insurer and acceptance of selective contracting were measured using multiple item scales. A regression model was constructed to analyse the results. Trust in the health insurer turned out to be an important prerequisite for the acceptance of selective contracting among their enrolees. The association of trust in the purchasing strategy of the health insurer with acceptance of selective contracting is stronger for older people than younger people. Furthermore, it was found that men and healthier people accepted selective contracting by their health insurer more readily. This was also true for younger people with a low level of trust in their health insurer. This study provides insight into factors that influence people's acceptance of selective contracting by their health insurer. This may help health insurers to implement selective contracting in a way their enrolees will accept and, thus, help systems of managed competition to develop.

  3. Health worker preferences for community-based health insurance payment mechanisms: a discrete choice experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2004, a community-based health insurance scheme (CBI) was introduced in Nouna health district, Burkina Faso. Since its inception, coverage has remained low and dropout rates high. One important reason for low coverage and high dropout is that health workers do not support the CBI scheme because they are dissatisfied with the provider payment mechanism of the CBI. Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to examine CBI provider payment attributes that influence health workers’ stated preferences for payment mechanisms. The DCE was conducted among 176 health workers employed at one of the 34 primary care facilities or the district hospital in Nouna health district. Conditional logit models with main effects and interactions terms were used for analysis. Results Reimbursement of service fees (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.49, p health workers chose a given provider payment mechanism. The odds of selecting a payment mechanism decreased significantly if the mechanism included (i) results-based financing (RBF) payments made through the local health management team (instead of directly to the health workers (aOR 0.86, p health worker’s facility relative to the coverage achieved at other facilities (instead of payments based on the numbers of individuals or households enrolled at the health worker’s facility (aOR 0.86, p health district in January 2011, taking into consideration health worker preferences on how they are paid. PMID:22697498

  4. Utilization of Comprehensive Health Insurance Scheme, Kerala: A Comparative Study of Insured and Uninsured Below-Poverty-Line Households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Neena Elezebeth; Kannan, Srinivasan; Sarma, Sankara P

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the sociodemographics, health care utilization pattern, and out-of-pocket (OOP) expenses of 149 insured and 147 uninsured below-poverty-line households insured under the Comprehensive Health Insurance Scheme, Kerala, through a comparative cross-sectional study. Family size more than 4 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.13-4.82), family member with chronic disease (OR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.18-3.57), high socioeconomic status (OR = 2.95; 95% CI = 1.74-5.03), and an employed household head (OR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.44-5.02) were significantly associated with insured households. Insured households had higher inpatient service utilization (OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.05-2.34). Only 40% of inpatient service utilization among the insured was covered by insurance. The mean OOP expenses for inpatient services among insured (INR 448.95) was higher than among uninsured households (INR 159.93); P = .003. These findings show that urgent attention of the government is required to redesign and closely monitor the scheme. © 2015 APJPH.

  5. Risks associated with genetic testing: health insurance discrimination or simply business as usual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, K K

    2000-01-01

    Doctors can test patients for mutations that put them at high risk for hereditary forms of such diseases as breast and ovarian cancer. Even though the opportunities for disease prevention using genetic testing will increase with time, the risks of testing, which include insurance loss and employment discrimination, currently make testing problematic. Some have proposed making use of genetic information in health insurance underwriting illegal. But in the current system of risk-based underwriting, it is hard to imagine that insurance companies will willingly forego access to a growing body of information on risk. If the American public chooses to limit the use of genetic information, a reassessment of current laws or methods of paying for health care will be needed.

  6. Mental Health Concerns and Insurance Denials Among Transgender Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Leena; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Caltabellotta, Nicole M; Tishelman, Amy C

    2017-06-01

    Transgender youth are at high risk for mental health morbidities. Based on treatment guidelines, puberty blockers and gender-affirming hormone therapy should be considered to alleviate distress due to discordance between an individual's assigned sex and gender identity. The goals of this study were to examine the: (1) prevalence of mental health diagnoses, self-injurious behaviors, and school victimization and (2) rates of insurance coverage for hormone therapy, among a cohort of transgender adolescents at a large pediatric gender program, to understand access to recommended therapy. An IRB-approved retrospective medical record review (2014-2016) was conducted of patients with ICD 9/10 codes for gender dysphoria referred to pediatric endocrinology within a large multidisciplinary gender program. Researchers extracted the following details: demographics, age, assigned sex, identified gender, insurance provider/coverage, mental health diagnoses, self-injurious behavior, and school victimization. Seventy-nine records (51 transgender males, 28 transgender females) met inclusion criteria (median age: 15 years, range: 9-18). Seventy-three subjects (92.4%) were diagnosed with one or more of the following conditions: depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, autism spectrum disorder, and bipolar disorder. Fifty-nine (74.7%) reported suicidal ideation, 44 (55.7%) exhibited self-harm, and 24 (30.4%) had one or more suicide attempts. Forty-six (58.2%) subjects reported school victimization. Of the 27 patients prescribed gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues, only 8 (29.6%) received insurance coverage. Transgender youth face significant barriers in accessing appropriate hormone therapy. Given the high rates of mental health concerns, self-injurious behavior, and school victimization among this vulnerable population, healthcare professionals must work alongside policy makers toward insurance coverage reform.

  7. Health seeking behavior in Karnataka: Does micro-health insurance matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Savitha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health seeking behaviour in the event of illness is influenced by the availability of good health care facilities and health care financing mechanisms. Micro health insurance not only promotes formal health care utilization at private providers but also reduces the cost of care by providing the insurance coverage. Objectives: This paper explores the impact of Sampoorna Suraksha Programme, a micro health insurance scheme on the health seeking behaviour of households during illness in Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in three randomly selected districts in Karnataka, India in the first half of the year 2011. The hypothesis was tested using binary logistic regression analysis on the data collected from randomly selected 1146 households consisting of 4961 individuals. Results: Insured individuals were seeking care at private hospitals than public hospitals due to the reduction in financial barrier. Moreover, equity in health seeking behaviour among insured individuals was observed. Conclusion : Our finding does represent a desirable result for health policy makers and micro finance institutions to advocate for the inclusion of health insurance in their portfolio, at least from the HSB perspective.

  8. Health seeking behavior in karnataka: does micro-health insurance matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha, S; Kiran, Kb

    2013-10-01

    Health seeking behaviour in the event of illness is influenced by the availability of good health care facilities and health care financing mechanisms. Micro health insurance not only promotes formal health care utilization at private providers but also reduces the cost of care by providing the insurance coverage. This paper explores the impact of Sampoorna Suraksha Programme, a micro health insurance scheme on the health seeking behaviour of households during illness in Karnataka, India. The study was conducted in three randomly selected districts in Karnataka, India in the first half of the year 2011. The hypothesis was tested using binary logistic regression analysis on the data collected from randomly selected 1146 households consisting of 4961 individuals. Insured individuals were seeking care at private hospitals than public hospitals due to the reduction in financial barrier. Moreover, equity in health seeking behaviour among insured individuals was observed. Our finding does represent a desirable result for health policy makers and micro finance institutions to advocate for the inclusion of health insurance in their portfolio, at least from the HSB perspective.

  9. Change in Health Insurance Coverage After Liver Transplantation Can Be Associated with Worse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akateh, Clifford; Tumin, Dmitry; Beal, Eliza W; Mumtaz, Khalid; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don; Black, Sylvester M

    2018-03-24

    Health insurance coverage changes for many patients after liver transplantation, but the implications of this change on long-term outcomes are unclear. To assess post-transplant patient and graft survival according to change in insurance coverage within 1 year of transplantation. We queried the United Network for Organ Sharing for patients between ages 18-64 years undergoing liver transplantation in 2002-2016. Patients surviving > 1 year were categorized by insurance coverage at transplantation and the 1-year transplant anniversary. Multivariable Cox regression characterized the association between coverage pattern and long-term patient or graft survival. Among 34,487 patients in the analysis, insurance coverage patterns included continuous private coverage (58%), continuous public coverage (29%), private to public transition (8%) and public to private transition (4%). In multivariable analysis of patient survival, continuous public insurance (HR 1.29, CI 1.22, 1.37, p < 0.001), private to public transition (HR 1.17, CI 1.07, 1.28, p < 0.001), and public to private transition (HR 1.14, CI 1.00, 1.29, p = 0.044), were associated with greater mortality hazard, compared to continuous private coverage. After disaggregating public coverage by source, mortality hazard was highest for patients transitioning from private insurance to Medicaid (HR vs. continuous private coverage = 1.32; 95% CI 1.14, 1.52; p < 0.001). Similar differences by insurance category were found for death-censored graft failure. Post-transplant transition to public insurance coverage is associated with higher risk of adverse outcomes when compared to retaining private coverage.

  10. Has public health insurance for older children reduced disparities in access to care and health outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Decker, Sandra; Lin, Wanchuan

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the effects of expanding public health insurance eligibility for older children. Using data from the National Health Interview Surveys from 1986 to 2005, we first show that although income continues to be an important predictor of children's health status, the importance of income for predicting health has fallen for children 9-17 in recent years. We then investigate the extent to which the dramatic expansions in public health insurance coverage for these children in the past decade are responsible for the decline in the importance of income. We find that while eligibility for public health insurance unambiguously improves current utilization of preventive care, it has little effect on current health status. However, we find some evidence that Medicaid eligibility in early childhood has positive effects on future health. This may indicate that adequate medical care early on puts children on a better health trajectory, resulting in better health as they grow.

  11. Health Insurance, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes: A Model of Elderly Health Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Gilleskie, Donna B.; Norton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Prescription drug coverage creates a change in medical care consumption, beyond standard moral hazard, arising both from the differential cost-sharing and the relative effectiveness of different types of care. We model the dynamic supplemental health insurance decisions of Medicare beneficiaries, their medical care demand, and subsequent health…

  12. 5 CFR 352.309 - Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... life insurance. 352.309 Section 352.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Organizations § 352.309 Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance. (a) Agency action. An employee... entitled to retain coverage for retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance purposes if he or she...

  13. The Importance of Family-Based Insurance Expansions: New Research Findings about State Health Reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Leighton; Broaddus, Matthew

    Although a national consensus has emerged regarding the importance of extending publicly-funded health insurance coverage to low-income children under the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and Medicaid, substantial numbers of eligible children remain uninsured. This study examined whether extending insurance coverage to low-income…

  14. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Monthly Contributions – Changes for 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2015, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.86%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including the CERN pension) increase accordingly : 1. Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1208 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (604 CHF) is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 483 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insur...

  15. Can health insurance protect against out-of-pocket and catastrophic expenditures and also support poverty reduction? Evidence from Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryeetey, Genevieve Cecilia; Westeneng, Judith; Spaan, Ernst; Jehu-Appiah, Caroline; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Baltussen, Rob

    2016-07-22

    Ghana since 2004, begun implementation of a National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to minimize financial barriers to health care at point of use of service. Usually health insurance is expected to offer financial protection to households. This study aims to analyze the effect health insurance on household out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE), catastrophic expenditure (CE) and poverty. We conducted two repeated household surveys in two regions of Ghana in 2009 and 2011. We first analyzed the effect of OOPE on poverty by estimating poverty headcount before and after OOPE were incurred. We also employed probit models and use of instrumental variables to analyze the effect of health insurance on OOPE, CE and poverty. Our findings showed that between 7-18 % of insured households incurred CE as a result of OOPE whereas this was between 29-36 % for uninsured households. In addition, between 3-5 % of both insured and uninsured households fell into poverty due to OOPE. Our regression analyses revealed that health insurance enrolment reduced OOPE by 86 % and protected households against CE and poverty by 3.0 % and 7.5 % respectively. This study provides evidence that high OOPE leads to CE and poverty in Ghana but enrolment into the NHIS reduces OOPE, provides financial protection against CE and reduces poverty. These findings support the pro-poor policy objective of Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme and holds relevance to other low and middle income countries implementing or aiming to implement insurance schemes.

  16. Health insurance benefit design and healthcare utilization in northern rural China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poverty due to illness has become a substantial social problem in rural China since the collapse of the rural Cooperative Medical System in the early 1980s. Although the Chinese government introduced the New Rural Cooperative Medical Schemes (NRCMS in 2003, the associations between different health insurance benefit package designs and healthcare utilization remain largely unknown. Accordingly, we sought to examine the impact of health insurance benefit design on health care utilization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from a household survey of 15,698 members of 4,209 randomly-selected households in 7 provinces, which were representative of the provinces along the north side of the Yellow River. Interviews were conducted face-to-face and in Mandarin. Our analytic sample included 9,762 respondents from 2,642 households. In each household, respondents indicated the type of health insurance benefit that the household had (coverage for inpatient care only or coverage for both inpatient and outpatient care and the number of outpatient visits in the 30 days preceding the interview and the number of hospitalizations in the 365 days preceding the household interview. People who had both outpatient and inpatient coverage compared with inpatient coverage only had significantly more village-level outpatient visits, township-level outpatient visits, and total outpatient visits. Furthermore, the increased utilization of township and village-level outpatient care was experienced disproportionately by people who were poorer, whereas the increased inpatient utilization overall and at the county level was experienced disproportionately by people who were richer. CONCLUSION: The evidence from this study indicates that the design of health insurance benefits is an important policy tool that can affect the health services utilization and socioeconomic equity in service use at different levels. Without careful

  17. A 10-year experience with universal health insurance in Taiwan: measuring changes in health and health disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chi Pang; Tsai, Shan Pou; Chung, Wen-Shen Isabella

    2008-02-19

    Universal national health insurance, financed jointly by payroll taxes, subsidies, and individual premiums, commenced in Taiwan in 1995. Coverage expanded from 57% of the population (before the introduction of national health insurance) to 98%. To assess the role of national health insurance in improving life expectancy and reducing health disparities in Taiwan. A before-and-after comparison of the decade before the introduction of national health insurance (1982-1984 to 1992-1994) with the decade after (1992-1994 to 2002-2004). Taiwan. All townships (n = 358) in Taiwan were ranked according to overall mortality rates before the introduction of national health insurance and then ranked into 10 health class groups in descending order of health (groups 1 [healthiest] to 10 [least healthy]). Health improvement (change in life expectancy after the introduction of national health insurance) and health disparity (reduction in the difference in life expectancy between the highest- and lowest-ranked health class groups). After the introduction of national health insurance, life expectancy increased more in health class groups that had higher mortality rates before the introduction of national health insurance and health disparity narrowed, reversing an earlier trend toward widening disparity. The major contributors to the reduction in disparity were relatively larger reductions in death from cardiovascular diseases, ill-defined conditions, infectious diseases, and accidents in the lower-ranked health class groups. However, death from cancer increased more in the lower-ranked health class groups. Utilization of medical services increased, whereas cost remained at 5% to 6% of the gross domestic product. The per capita average annual number of visits to the physician's office was 14. The interpretation of comparisons before and after the introduction of national health insurance assumes that the changes were entirely due to the effect of national health insurance rather than

  18. Supplementary contribution payable to the Health Insurance Scheme for spouses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Staff members, fellows and pensioners are reminded that any change in their marital status, as well as any change in their spouse or registered partner’s income or health insurance cover, must be reported to CERN in writing within 30 calendar days, in accordance with Articles III 6.01 to 6.03 of the Rules of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Such changes may affect the conditions of the spouse or registered partner’s membership of the CHIS or the payment of the supplementary contribution to it for the spouse or registered partner’s insurance cover. For more information see: http://cern.ch/chis/contribsupp.asp From 1.1.2008, the indexed amounts of the supplementary monthly contribution for the different monthly income brackets are as follows, expressed in Swiss francs: more than 2500 CHF and up to 4250 CHF: 134.- more than 4250 CHF and up to 7500 CHF: 234.- more than 7500 CHF and up to 10,000 CHF: 369.- more than 10,000 CHF: 470.- It is in the member of the ...

  19. The problems of private health insurance in Chile: Looking for a solution to a history of inefficiency and inequity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Cid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of health insurance is of vital importance for health policy. Beneficiaries are able to share the risk arising from health expenses, and are ensured access to health care provisions whenever necessary. The need to share an individual’s risk to become ill is the direct consequence of the uncertainty that surrounds the health sector. Chilean health insurance companies are able to reach financial balance (the state-owned insurer or profits (privately-owned insurers by setting a premium rate. Information flow tends to be asymmetric and one of the shortcomings of this system is that the private health insurance companies have better information, which leads to risk selection. A form of regulation would be to set a premium rate proportional to income thus incentivizing contributions in accordance with income (independent of risk and pool efficiency if the whole population is included. A natural solution that would be functional to the current system is the creation of a single pool together with a broad community premium rate to finance the fund. The article analyses the feasibility of a single fund, its requisites, and the health plan that the Chilean government is proposing in its bill to reform the private health insurance sector.

  20. Modifications to the Rules of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    On the proposal of the CHIS Board, and following examination by the Standing Concertation Committee on 29 April 2010, the Director-General has approved the new Rules of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme, which will come into effect on 1 June 2010. The Rules will shortly be available on the CHIS web site. As the Rules had not been revised since 2003, it had become necessary to make certain changes in order to bring them into line with other texts (such as the Staff Rules and Regulations and Administrative Circulars) and to clarify some practices. The new Rules do not introduce any new benefits or remove any existing ones. The following changes will affect all insured members:   Description of change Articles in the new Rules Time limit for claiming reimbursement The time period is measured from the invoice date (instead of the date of treatment). ...

  1. Is the medical loss ratio a good target measure for regulation in the individual market for health insurance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Abraham, Jean M; Simon, Kosali

    2015-01-01

    Effective January 1, 2011, individual market health insurers must meet a minimum medical loss ratio (MLR) of 80%. This law aims to encourage 'productive' forms of competition by increasing the proportion of premium dollars spent on clinical benefits. To date, very little is known about the performance of firms in the individual health insurance market, including how MLRs are related to insurer and market characteristics. The MLR comprises one component of the price-cost margin, a traditional gauge of market power; the other component is percent of premiums spent on administrative expenses. We use data from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (2001-2009) to evaluate whether the MLR is a good target measure for regulation by comparing the two components of the price-cost margin between markets that are more competitive versus those that are not, accounting for firm and market characteristics. We find that insurers with monopoly power have lower MLRs. Moreover, we find no evidence suggesting that insurers' administrative expenses are lower in more concentrated insurance markets. Thus, our results are largely consistent with the interpretation that the MLR could serve as a target measure of market power in regulating the individual market for health insurance but with notable limited ability to capture product and firm heterogeneity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Role of Agents and Brokers in the Market for Health Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Pinar Karaca-Mandic; Roger Feldman; Peter Graven

    2013-01-01

    Health insurance markets in the United States are characterized by imperfect information, complex products, and substantial search frictions. Insurance agents and brokers play a significant role in helping employers navigate these problems. However, little is known about the relation between the structure of the agent/broker market and access and affordability of insurance. This paper aims to fill this gap by investigating the influence of agents/brokers on health insurance decisions of small...

  3. Health Benefits Mandates and Their Potential Impacts on Racial/Ethnic Group Disparities in Insurance Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Shana Alex; Ponce, Ninez; Ritley, Dominique; Guendelman, Sylvia; Kempster, Jennifer; Lewis, John; Melnikow, Joy

    2017-08-01

    Addressing racial/ethnic group disparities in health insurance benefits through legislative mandates requires attention to the different proportions of racial/ethnic groups among insurance markets. This necessary baseline data, however, has proven difficult to measure. We applied racial/ethnic data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey to the 2012 California Health Benefits Review Program Cost and Coverage Model to determine the racial/ethnic composition of ten health insurance market segments. We found disproportional representation of racial/ethnic groups by segment, thus affecting the health insurance impacts of benefit mandates. California's Medicaid program is disproportionately Latino (60 % in Medi-Cal, compared to 39 % for the entire population), and the individual insurance market is disproportionately non-Latino white. Gender differences also exist. Mandates could unintentionally increase insurance coverage racial/ethnic disparities. Policymakers should consider the distribution of existing racial/ethnic disparities as criteria for legislative action on benefit mandates across health insurance markets.

  4. About Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieslak, Raymond F.

    The student manual for high school level special needs students was prepared to acquaint deaf students with the various types of insurance protection that will be available to them in their future life. Seven units covering the topics of what insurance is, automobile insurance, life insurance, health insurance, social security, homeowner's…

  5. [Health insurance expenses for children in the first five years of life - a cohort-based analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Jörg; Schemken, Maryan; Manthei, René; Steinbronn, Rolf; Bucher, Ulrike; Albrecht, Michael; Rüdiger, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The development of paediatrics is characterised by several changes in the past few years, concerning, in particular holistic treatments or preventive check-ups, but also the transfer of treatment from the inpatient to the outpatient sector. There are no reference values for assessing emerging health insurance expenses. The aim of this study was to obtain a frame of reference for the costs of the treatment for neonates, infants, and young children using the example of the expenditures of one health insurance fund. The individual health insurance expenditures were analysed for the first five years of life of children insured with the AOK PLUS in Saxony, Germany, in 2005. Costs of hospital treatment, ambulatory care, remedies, tools, medicines and care were included. The costs per insured child and year amounted to approximately 1,277 Euro (N = 11,147), with the highest costs arising in the first two years. 858 Euro were spent annually for an "average" child; 5,691 Euro per year incurred for a child with special medical needs. The present cost analysis describes both the height and structure of a health insurance's spendings on children within the first five years of their life in consideration of regional medical care offers. The question of whether this analysis provides valid reference values for other health insurances or other service areas will have to be answered by other analyses. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. The Effect of Child Health Insurance Access on Schooling: Evidence from Public Insurance Expansions. NBER Working Paper No. 20178

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohodes, Sarah; Kleiner, Samuel; Lovenheim, Michael F.; Grossman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Public health insurance programs comprise a large share of federal and state government expenditure, and these programs are due to be expanded as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act. Despite a large literature on the effects of these programs on health care utilization and health outcomes, little prior work has examined the long-term effects of…

  7. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Monthly Contributions – Changes for 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2013-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2013, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.55%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity will increase accordingly: 1. Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1116 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (558 CHF) is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 446 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and temporarily basis. More ...

  8. Differences in price elasticities of demand for health insurance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendzialek, Jonas B; Simic, Dusan; Stock, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Many health insurance systems apply managed competition principles to control costs and quality of health care. Besides other factors, managed competition relies on a sufficient price-elastic demand. This paper presents a systematic review of empirical studies on price elasticity of demand for health insurance. The objective was to identify the differing international ranges of price elasticity and to find socio-economic as well as setting-oriented factors that influence price elasticity. Relevant literature for the topic was identified through a two-step identification process including a systematic search in appropriate databases and further searches within the references of the results. A total of 45 studies from countries such as the USA, Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland were found. Clear differences in price elasticity by countries were identified. While empirical studies showed a range between -0.2 and -1.0 for optional primary health insurance in the US, higher price elasticities between -0.6 and -4.2 for Germany and around -2 for Switzerland were calculated for mandatory primary health insurance. Dutch studies found price elasticities below -0.5. In consideration of all relevant studies, age and poorer health status were identified to decrease price elasticity. Other socio-economic factors had an unclear impact or too limited evidence. Premium level, range of premiums, homogeneity of benefits/coverage and degree of forced decision were found to have a major influence on price elasticity in their settings. Further influence was found from supplementary insurance and premium-dependent employer contribution.

  9. Measuring customer preferences in the German statutory health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendzialek, Jonas B; Simic, Dusan; Stock, Stephanie

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates consumer preferences in the German statutory health insurance market. It further aims to test whether preferences differ by age and health status. Evidence is provided by a discrete choice experiment conducted in 2014 using the six most important attributes in sickness fund competition and ten random generated choice sets per participant. Price is found to be the most important attribute followed by additional benefits, managed care programmes, and distance to nearest branch. Other positive attributes of sickness funds are found to balance out a higher price, which would allow a sickness fund to position itself as high quality. However, significant differences in preferences were found between age and health status group. In particular, compromised health is associated with higher preference for illness-related additional benefits and less distance to the lowest branch, but lower preference for a lower price. Based on these differences, a distinct sickness fund offer could be constructed that would allow passive risk selection.

  10. France tries to save its ailing national health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorum, Paul Clay

    2005-07-01

    France has provided universal health care through employment-based health insurance funds. As its governments have increasingly used tax revenues to supplement payroll levies, they have assumed a larger role. Faced with widening deficits in the funds' accounts, the National Assembly adopted in August 2004 legislation designed to decrease health expenses, increase revenues to the funds, and improve quality of care. The apparent impacts of the so-called Douste-Blazy law are to reaffirm social solidarity and equality of access; to reinforce central control rather than relying more on decentralized and market forces; to give the now-unified funds a stronger director, shielded not only from labor and business but also, possibly, from the central government; to allow French private physicians to retain their unrivaled freedom of prescription; and to continue France's reliance on taxes as well as payroll levies to finance its health care.

  11. HEALTH INSURANCE INFORMATION-SEEKING BEHAVIORS AMONG INTERNET USERS: AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS TO INFORM POLICIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlyana, Erlyana; Acosta-Deprez, Veronica; O'Lawrence, Henry; Sinay, Tony; Ramirez, Jeremy; Jacot, Emmanuel C; Shim, Kyuyoung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore characteristics of Internet users who seek health insurance information online, as well as factors affecting their behaviors in seeking health insurance information. Secondary data analysis was conducted using data from the 2012 Pew Internet Health Tracking Survey. Of 2,305 Internet user adults, only 29% were seeking health insurance information online. Bivariate analyses were conducted to test differences in characteristics of those who seek health insurance information online and those who do not. A logistic regression model was used to determine significant predictors of health insurance information-seeking behavior online. Findings suggested that factors such as being a single parent, having a high school education or less, and being uninsured were significant and those individuals were less likely to seek health insurance information online. Being a family caregiver of an adult and those who bought private health insurance or were entitled to Medicare were more likely to seek health insurance information online than non-caregivers and the uninsured. The findings suggested the need to provide quality health insurance information online is critical for both the insured and uninsured population.

  12. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS): Monthly Contributions for 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    For 2016, the contribution rate for active and retired CHIS members will be 4.86%. The amounts of the fixed contributions for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and other associates), as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including a CERN pension), are thus as follows:   1. Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is 1218 CHF per month. This fixed contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and other associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount, 609 CHF, is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and other associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 487 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and temporary basis. 2. Supplementary contributions The supplementary contribution for the spouse or registered partner of a staff member, fellow or pensioner is now as follows, according to the spouse’s month...

  13. Registry and health insurance claims data in vascular research and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Heidemann, Franziska; Rieß, Henrik Christian; Stoberock, Konstanze; Debus, Sebastian Eike

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of procedures in multidisciplinary vascular medicine has sparked a controversy regarding measures of quality improvement. In addition to primary registries, the use of health insurance claims data is becoming of increasing importance. However, due to the fact that health insurance claims data are not collected for scientific evaluation but rather for reimbursement purposes, meticulous validation is necessary before and during usage in research and quality improvement matters. This review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of such data sources. A recent comprehensive expert opinion panel examined the use of health insurance claims data and other administrative data sources in medicine. Results from several studies concerning the validity of administrative data varied significantly. Validity of these data sources depends on the clinical relevance of the diagnoses considered. The rate of implausible information was 0.04 %, while the validity of the considered diagnoses varied between 80 and 97 % across multiple validation studies. A matching study between health insurance claims data of the third-largest German health insurance provider, DAK-Gesundheit, and a prospective primary registry of the German Society for Vascular Surgery demonstrated a good level of validity regarding the mortality of endovascular and open surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in German hospitals. In addition, a large-scale international comparison of administrative data for the same disorder presented important results in treatment reality, which differed from those from earlier randomized controlled trials. The importance of administrative data for research and quality improvement will continue to increase in the future. When discussing the internal and external validity of this data source, one has to distinguish not only between its intended usage (research vs. quality improvement), but also between the included diseases and/or treatment procedures

  14. Message from the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHISB)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Following a long series of discussions with the Administration of the La Tour Hospital, a tariff agreement has been concluded between the Hospital and the CERN Health Insurance Scheme. In the case of hospitalisations, this new agreement will apply to admissions on or after 1st September 2004 and will result, in particular, in the reintroduction of the third-party payer system. In the case of out-patient treatment, billing will be according to the Swiss medical tariff system TARMED and Uniqa will act as third-party guarantor. Further details will be published in the next issue of the CHISBull'. Tel.74484

  15. Universal health insurance coverage for 1.3 billion people: What accounts for China's success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao

    2015-09-01

    China successfully achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011, representing the largest expansion of insurance coverage in human history. While the achievement is widely recognized, it is still largely unexplored why China was able to attain it within a short period. This study aims to fill the gap. Through a systematic political and socio-economic analysis, it identifies seven major drivers for China's success, including (1) the SARS outbreak as a wake-up call, (2) strong public support for government intervention in health care, (3) renewed political commitment from top leaders, (4) heavy government subsidies, (5) fiscal capacity backed by China's economic power, (6) financial and political responsibilities delegated to local governments and (7) programmatic implementation strategy. Three of the factors seem to be unique to China (i.e., the SARS outbreak, the delegation, and the programmatic strategy.) while the other factors are commonly found in other countries' insurance expansion experiences. This study also discusses challenges and recommendations for China's health financing, such as reducing financial risk as an immediate task, equalizing benefit across insurance programs as a long-term goal, improving quality by tying provider payment to performance, and controlling costs through coordinated reform initiatives. Finally, it draws lessons for other developing countries. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Coverage of health insurance among the near-poor in rural Vietnam and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Duc; Wilson, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    The Vietnamese government is committed to universal health care largely through social health insurance. The near-poor population is entitled to subsidized but not free insurance under this scheme, but remains under-represented compared to other groups. The aims of this research were to estimate the health insurance coverage of the near-poor in rural Vietnam and identify the individual and household factors associated with health insurance status. Rates of health insurance coverage were estimated from district-level administrative data. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a representative sample of 2000 near-poor in Cao Lanh district, Dong Thap province, Vietnam. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with a standardized questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression was applied to identify the factors associated with insurance status. The insurance coverage of the near-poor in the selected communities was 20.3%. Enrollment in the health insurance scheme was significantly associated with poor health status (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 2.4-9.8), good knowledge of health insurance (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 3.4-6.2), interest in health insurance (OR = 30.1, 95% CI = 11.6-78.0), and the perceived cost of the insurance premium (OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.7-3.6). The cost of insurance premiums is a barrier to enrollment. Information, education and communication campaigns together with modified insurance scheme for the near-poor are necessary to enhance insurance coverage in Vietnam.

  17. 77 FR 37839 - Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No-Health Period Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO24 Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No-Health Period Extension... Affairs (VA) proposes to amend its regulations governing eligibility for Veterans' Group Life Insurance... indicate that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AO24--Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No...

  18. A perverse 'net' effect? Health insurance and ex-ante moral hazard in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debebe, Z.Y.; Kempen, L.A.C.M. van; Hoop, T.J. de

    2012-01-01

    Incentive problems in insurance markets are well-established in economic theory. One of these incentive problems is related to reduced prevention efforts following insurance coverage (ex-ante moral hazard). This prediction is yet to be tested empirically with regard to health insurance, as the

  19. 42 CFR 431.636 - Coordination of Medicaid with the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coordination of Medicaid with the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). 431.636 Section 431.636 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). (a) Statutory basis. This section implements— (1) Section 2102(b...

  20. Tobacco use and health insurance literacy among vulnerable populations: implications for health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Robert T; Hanoch, Yaniv; Barnes, Andrew J

    2017-11-15

    Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), millions of Americans have been enrolling in the health insurance marketplaces. Nearly 20% of them are tobacco users. As part of the ACA, tobacco users may face up to 50% higher premiums that are not eligible for tax credits. Tobacco users, along with the uninsured and racial/ethnic minorities targeted by ACA coverage expansions, are among those most likely to suffer from low health literacy - a key ingredient in the ability to understand, compare, choose, and use coverage, referred to as health insurance literacy. Whether tobacco users choose enough coverage in the marketplaces given their expected health care needs and are able to access health care services effectively is fundamentally related to understanding health insurance. However, no studies to date have examined this important relationship. Data were collected from 631 lower-income, minority, rural residents of Virginia. Health insurance literacy was assessed by asking four factual questions about the coverage options presented to them. Adjusted associations between tobacco use and health insurance literacy were tested using multivariate linear regression, controlling for numeracy, risk-taking, discount rates, health status, experiences with the health care system, and demographics. Nearly one third (31%) of participants were current tobacco users, 80% were African American and 27% were uninsured. Average health insurance literacy across all participants was 2.0 (SD 1.1) out of a total possible score of 4. Current tobacco users had significantly lower HIL compared to non-users (-0.22, p financial burdens on them and potentially limiting access to tobacco cessation and treatment programs and other needed health services.

  1. Health care seeking behaviour and utilisation in a multiple health insurance system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares G M; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    to the differential revenue raising capacities and benefit packages offered by the various funds resulting in inequity and inefficiency within the health system. This paper examines how the existence of multiple health insurance funds affects health care seeking behaviour and utilisation among members...

  2. Financing health care for all insurance the first step? is national h-ealth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-04

    Aug 4, 1990 ... supplemented by a national health insurance scheme, rather than through simply expanding the contribution to health care that comes out of general tax revenue. Given that private ownership of health ..... Commonly excluded under such schemes are specialist dental services, cosmetic surgery, and even ...

  3. The 1991 Pennsylvania Senate race and national health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blendon, R J; Szalay, U S; Altman, D E; Chervinsky, G

    1992-01-01

    Voter interest in reform of the American health care system played a central role in the November 5 come-from-behind reelection victory of Democratic Senator Harris Wofford of Pennsylvania over Republican candidate Richard Thornburgh. In a post-election poll of 1,000 Pennsylvania voters, over 50 percent identified "national health insurance" as one of two issues that mattered most in deciding how to vote. And 21 percent of voters said the issue was the "single most important factor" in their voting decision. The results of the Pennsylvania Senate race suggest that universal health care has arrived as a mainstream political issue and that political candidates who fail to address the issue do so at their peril.

  4. INNOVATIVE APPROACH IN THE COMPULSORY HEALTH INSURANCE TARIFF SETTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Zasypkin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of a single channel financing in the health system of the Russian Federation based on the standards of the compulsory health insurance (CHI requires a single channel financing of the health system through the CHI as one of the main direction using payment of the medical services in the form of so-called «full» tariff [1-12].It is not a secret that for many years the medical services tariff in the CHI system contained from only five items of expenditures (salary, charges on payroll, soft goods and clothing, medicines, bandages, other medical expenses, and food. On one hand, such defective tariff was based on the parallel government financing of the medical institutions (MIs, on the other hand, because of this tariff, the manager was hoppled in the control of the financial flows.

  5. Extended applications with smart cards for integration of health care and health insurance services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucholotiuc, M; Stefan, L; Dobre, I; Teseleanu, M

    2000-01-01

    In 1999 in Romania has initiated the reformation of the national health care system based on health insurance. In 1998 we analyzed this system from the point of view of its IT support and we studied methods of optimisation with relational, distributed databases and new technologies such as Our objectives were to make a model of the information and services flow in a modern health insurance system, to study the smart card technology and to demonstrate how smart card can improve health care services. The paper presents only the smart cards implementations.

  6. Demographic and Socio-economic determinants of maternal health insurance coverage in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nilesh Mulenga

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The importance of health insurance to individual and society at large cannot be overemphasized. It plays a critical role through enabling access to health care services and cushions the individual from catastrophic treatment costs. This study assessed the demographic and socioeconomic determinants of maternal health insurance coverage in Zambia. Methods: The study analysed the data from the 2013-14 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS using univariate, bivariate, binary logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between demographic and socioeconomic and maternal health insurance coverage in Zambia. Results: The findings indicate that a very low proportion of the women(3% have health insurance coverage in Zambia. The study also found that  being married, access to media, higher age category, higher education level, being employed have a positive influence on  health insurance coverage while province of residence and type of place of residence are negatively associated with health insurance coverage among women in Zambia.  Conclusions:The study concludes that health insurance among women in Zambia is associated with marital status, access to media, age, education level, employed status, province of residence and type of place of residence. Given these findings, the study recommends that health insurance providers should tailor their health insurance packages not only to the needs of the employed but the unemployed, the younger age groups, the informal sector and those in the rural areas

  7. Health insurance reform and the development of health insurance plans: the case of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Samer; Shaban, Sami; Mahate, Ashraf A; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2014-01-01

    The Emirate of Abu Dhabi has taken concrete steps to reform health insurance by improving the access to health providers as well as freedom of choice. The growing cost of health care and the impact of the global financial crisis have meant that countries are no longer able to solely bear the cost. As a result many countries have sought to overhaul their health care system so as to share the burden of provision with the private sector whether it is health care plan providers or employers. This article explores and discusses how the policy issues inherent in private health care schemes have been dealt with by the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Data was collected in early 2013 on health care plans in Abu Dhabi from government sources. The Abu Dhabi model has private sector involvement but the government sets prices and benefits. The Abu Dhabi model adequately deals with the problem of adverse selection through making insurance coverage a mandatory requirement. There are issues with moral hazards, which are a combination of individual and medical practitioner behavior that might affect the efficiency of the system. Over time there is a general increase in the usage of medical services, which may be reflective of greater awareness of the policy and its benefits as well as lifestyle change. Although the current health care system level of usage is adequate for the current population, as the level of usage increases, the government may face a financial burden. Therefore, the government needs to place safeguards in order to limit its exposure. The market for medical treatment needs to be made more competitive to reduce monopolistic behavior. The government needs to make individuals aware of a healthier lifestyle and encourage precautionary actions.

  8. Using insurance standards and policy levers to build a high performance health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Michael; Koller, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    This issue brief examines an unprecedented use of state health insurance regulatory authority to promote health system reform. In 2004, the Rhode Island legislature created the Office of the Health Insurance Commissioner (OHIC) with authority not granted to state health insurance regulatory agencies in other states. Specifically, the legislation instructed OHIC to direct insurers toward policies that promote improved accessibility, quality, and affordability for the Rhode Island health system. In 2009, OHIC used this authority to implement a set of standards to promote increased affordability through a series of requirements aimed at strengthening and expanding the state's primary care infrastructure. Insurers are required to increase their investments in primary care on a cost-neutral basis, expand use of the chronic care model medical home, and support implementation of electronic medical records. Rhode Island is testing whether state insurance regulation can foster a profound transformation in health care delivery.

  9. When Health Care Insurance Does Not Make A Difference – The Case of Health Care ‘Made in China’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dalen (Hendrik)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDoes medical insurance affect health care demand and in the end contribute to improvements in the health status? Evidence for China for the year 2004, by means of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), shows that health insurance does not affect health care demand in a significant

  10. The Dutch health insurance reform: switching between insurers, a comparison between the general population and the chronically ill and disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On 1 January 2006 a number of far-reaching changes in the Dutch health insurance system came into effect. In the new system of managed competition consumer mobility plays an important role. Consumers are free to change their insurer and insurance plan every year. The idea is that consumers who are not satisfied with the premium or quality of care provided will opt for a different insurer. This would force insurers to strive for good prices and quality of care. Internationally, the Dutch changes are under the attention of both policy makers and researchers. Questions answered in this article relate to switching behaviour, reasons for switching, and differences between population categories. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent to 1516 members of the Dutch Health Care Consumer Panel and to 3757 members of the National Panel of the Chronically ill and Disabled (NPCD in April 2006. The questionnaire was returned by 1198 members of the Consumer Panel (response 79% and by 3211 members of the NPCD (response 86%. Among other things, questions were asked about choices for a health insurer and insurance plan and the reasons for this choice. Results Young and healthy people switch insurer more often than elderly or people in bad health. The chronically ill and disabled do not switch less often than the general population when both populations are comparable on age, sex and education. For the general population, premium is more important than content, while the chronically ill and disabled value content of the insurance package as well. However, quality of care is not important for either group as a reason for switching. Conclusion There is increased mobility in the new system for both the general population and the chronically ill and disabled. This however is not based on quality of care. If reasons for switching are unrelated to the quality of care, it is hard to believe that switching influences the quality of care. As yet there

  11. Effects of Medical Insurance on the Health Status and Life Satisfaction of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liubao; Feng, Huihui; Jin, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Population aging has become increasingly serious in China. The demand for medical insurance of the elderly is increasing, and their health status and life satisfaction are becoming significant issues. This study investigates the effects of medical insurance on the health status and life satisfaction of the elderly. The national baseline survey data of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey in 2013 were adopted. The Ordered Probit Model was established. The effects of the medical insurance for urban employees, medical insurance for urban residents, and new rural cooperative medical insurance on the health status and life satisfaction of the elderly were investigated. Medical insurance could facilitate the improvement of the health status and life satisfaction of the elderly. Accordingly, the health status and life satisfaction of the elderly who have medical insurance for urban residents improved significantly. The regression coefficients were 0.348 and 0.307. The corresponding regression coefficients of the medical insurance for urban employees were 0.189 and 0.236. The regression coefficients of the new rural cooperative medical insurance were 0.170 and 0.188. Medical insurance can significantly improve the health status and life satisfaction of the elderly. This development is of immense significance for the formulation of equal medical security.

  12. How Has the Affordable Care Act Affected Health Insurers' Financial Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A; McCue, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act transformed the market for individual health insurance by changing how insurance is sold and by subsidizing coverage for millions of new purchasers. Insurers, who had no previous experience under these market conditions, competed actively but faced uncertainty in how to price their products. This issue brief uses newly available data to understand how health insurers fared financially during the ACA's first year of full reforms. Overall, health insurers' financial performance began to show some strain in 2014, but the ACA's reinsurance program substantially buffered the negative effects for most insurers. Although a quarter of insurers did substantially worse than others, experience under the new market rules could improve the accuracy of pricing decisions in subsequent years.

  13. Strategies for Health Insurance Mechanisms to Address Health ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Over the past two decades, African governments have promoted the growth of private health care as a key element of health sector reform. This trend has contributed to health system inequities and exacerbated the plight of the poor. For example, the movement of health professionals to the private sector has limited the ...

  14. Individual and small-group market health insurance rate review and disclosure: state and federal roles after PPACA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Kathryn

    2011-09-28

    Oversight of private insurance, including health insurance, is primarily a state responsibility. Each state establishes its own laws and regulations regarding insurer activities, including premium increases for the insurance products within its purview. The authority that state regulators have to review and deny requests for premium changes varies from state to state, as do the amount of resources available to state insurance departments for reviewing premium changes. In some markets where insurers have proposed or implemented steep increases, such changes have received considerable attention from the press, state regulators, and policymakers. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) requires annual review of premium increases and disclosure of those increases determined unreasonable beginning in September 2011. Under PPACA, each state will conduct these reviews for individual and small-group health insurance unless the federal government concludes they do not have an effective review program and assumes review responsibility. As they did prior to PPACA, state laws govern whether rates go into effect and establish the parameters of regulators' authority. This issue brief outlines specific state and federal roles in the rate review process and changes to rate review processes since PPACA was enacted.

  15. The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa A. Thomasson

    2000-01-01

    In 1954, the Internal Revenue Service stipulated that employer contributions to the health insurance plans of their employees were to be excluded from employee taxable income. Today, the tax subsidy is major feature of the U.S. health care market. This paper examines the initial effects of the tax subsidy on the demand for health insurance using previously unexamined data from 1953 and 1958. Results suggest that the tax subsidy increased the growth of group insurance, particularly among union...

  16. Readiness of Health Centers and Primary Hospitals for the Implementation of Proposed Health Insurance Schemes in Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazinab, Sabit; Woldie, Mirkuzie; Alaro, Tesfamichael

    2016-09-01

    In response to the 2005 World Health Assembly, many low income countries developed different healthcare financing mechanisms with risk pooling stategy to ensure universal coverage of health services. Accordingly, service availability and readiness of the health system to bear the responsibility of providing service have critical importance. The objective of this study was to assess service availability and readiness of health centers and primary hospitals to bear the responsibility of providing service for the members of health insurance schemes. A facility based cross sectional study design with quantitative data collection methods was employed. Of the total 18 districts in Jimma Zone, 6(33.3%) districts were selected randomly. In the selected districts, there were 21 functional public health facilities (health centers and primary hospitals) which were included in the study. Data were collected by interviewer administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated by using SPSS version 20.0. Prior to data collection, ethical clearance was obtained. Among the total 21 public health facilities surveyed, only 38.1% had all the categories of health professionals as compared to the national standards. The majority, 85.2%, of the facilities fulfilled the criteria for basic equipment, but 47.7% of the facilities did not fulfill the criteria for infection prevention supplies. Moreover, only two facilities fulfilled the criteria for laboratory services, and 95.2% of the facilities had no units/departmenst to coordinate the health insurance schemes. More than nine out of ten facilities did not fulfill the criteria for providing healthcare services for insurance beneficiaries and are not ready to provide general services according to the standard. Hence, policy makers and implementers should devise strategies to fill the identified gaps for successful and sustainable implementation of the proposed insurance scheme.

  17. Trends in risk factors chronic diseases, according of health insurance, Brazil, 2008-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Carvalho Malta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to compare the trends for risk and protective factors for NCD in the population with and without health insurance. Analysis of temporal trends of the Vigitel phone survey, collected annually in adult population. Were used analyzed the temporal series of variables referent to risk and protective factors for NCD, from 2008 to 2013. Variables were compared according to the possession or not of health insurance using simple linear regression model. There was a reduction in the prevalence of smoking in the population with and without health insurance, in 0.72% and 0,69% per year respectively. The consumption of fruits and vegetables grew 0,8% and 0.72% per year respectively among the population with and without health insurance. Physical activity in leisure time increased 1.17% and 1.01% per year among population with and without health insurance. Excess weight increased in 1.03% and obesity in 0.74% p.y in the population with health insurance and 1.53% and 0.95% p.y without health insurance. Mammography increased 2.4% in the population without health insurance. Vigitel monitoring showed improvement in the indicators in the population with and without health insurance.

  18. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina O. Odusola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective: We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11 and health insurance managers (n=4. Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results: Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions: By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA.

  19. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odusola, Aina O.; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; van Weert, Henk; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11) and health insurance managers (n=4). Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA. PMID:26880152

  20. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odusola, Aina O; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; van Weert, Henk; Haafkens, Joke A

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11) and health insurance managers (n=4). Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider-insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA.

  1. The role of public health insurance in protecting against the costs of ill health: Evidence from Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Sáenz de Miera Juárez, Belén

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of health insurance, households have to self-insure against the risk of ill health, which may involve the use of mechanisms that have long-term consequences. This study analyses whether Mexican households are able to smooth consumption after severe health shocks, as well as the contribution of public health insurance in the form of social security and, more recently, the Seguro Popular programme. Using data from the Mexican Family Life Survey, a nationally representative longit...

  2. Self-Insurance: A Solution for Faculty and Staff Health Promotion? Pilot Study Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebert, Megan C. H.; Wilson, Kelly L.; Ward, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty and staff health promotion is a cost-saving component of coordinated school health, but little is known about the comprehensiveness of these programs. Self-insured school districts require employees to contribute directly to the district's health insurance pool. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify the prevalence of…

  3. 75 FR 62684 - Health Insurance Reform; Announcement of Maintenance Changes to Electronic Data Transaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 162 [CMS-0009-N] RIN 0938-AM50 Health Insurance Reform; Announcement of Maintenance Changes to Electronic Data Transaction Standards Adopted Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 AGENCY: Office of...

  4. Switching health insurers: the role of price, quality and consumer information search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H.H.M. Boonen (Lieke); T. Laske-Aldershof (Trea); F.T. Schut (Erik)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We examine the impact of price, service quality and information search on people’s propensity to switch health insurers in the competitive Dutch health insurance market. Using panel data from annual household surveys and data on health insurers’ premiums

  5. Burden of Clostridium difficile Infections in French Hospitals in 2014 From the National Health Insurance Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Soline; Blein, Cécile; Andremont, Antoine; Bandinelli, Pierre-Alain; Galvain, Thibaut

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the hospital stays of patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and to measure the hospitalization costs of CDI (as primary and secondary diagnoses) from the French national health insurance perspective DESIGN Burden of illness study SETTING All acute-care hospitals in France METHODS Data were extracted from the French national hospitalization database (PMSI) for patients covered by the national health insurance scheme in 2014. Hospitalizations were selected using the International Classification of Diseases, 10 th revision (ICD-10) code for CDI. Hospital stays with CDI as the primary diagnosis or the secondary diagnosis (comorbidity) were studied for the following parameters: patient sociodemographic characteristics, mortality, length of stay (LOS), and related costs. A retrospective case-control analysis was performed on stays with CDI as the secondary diagnosis to assess the impact of CDI on the LOS and costs. RESULTS Overall, 5,834 hospital stays with CDI as the primary diagnosis were included in this study. The total national insurance costs were €30.7 million (US $33,677,439), and the mean cost per hospital stay was €5,267±€3,645 (US $5,777±$3,998). In total, 10,265 stays were reported with CDI as the secondary diagnosis. The total national insurance additional costs attributable to CDI were estimated to be €85 million (US $93,243,725), and the mean additional cost attributable to CDI per hospital stay was €8,295±€17,163, median, €4,797 (US $9,099±$8,827; median, $5,262). CONCLUSION CDI has a high clinical and economic burden in the hospital, and it represents a major cost for national health insurance. When detected as a comorbidity, CDI was significantly associated with increased LOS and economic burden. Preventive approaches should be implemented to avoid CDIs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:906-911.

  6. State and Insurance : The Long-Term Trends in Danish Health Policy from 1672 to 1973

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Løkke, Anne

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss the path dependency of the Danish tax financed, egalitarian health policy. It is argued, that the Danish health policy of today can not be understood separately from its history. The principles of universalism and decommodification have roots that go back to experiences from nearly 200 years of absolutist, patriarchal biopolitics, including poor laws, educated, authorised and publicly-paid midwives, publicly-paid district surgeons et cetera. The route from absolutist biopolitics to modern welfare state went through enormous, voluntary civic engagement by non-profit health insurance societies (sygekasser, formed in the mid-nineteenth century and controlled and subsidised by the state from 1892.

  7. Health insurance system and provider payment reform in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doncho M. Donev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an insight to the current health insurance system in the Republic of Macedonia. Special emphasis is given to the specificities and practice of both obligatory and voluntary health insurance, to the scope of the insured persons and their benefits and obligations, the way of calculating and payment of the contributions and the other sources of revenues for health insurance, user participation in health care expenses, payment to the health care providers and some other aspects of realization of health insurance in practice. According to the Health Insurance Law, which was adopted in March 2000, a person can become an insured to the Health Insurance Fund on various modalities. More than 90% of the citizens are eligible to the obligatory health insurance, which provides a broad scope of basic health care benefits. Till end of 2008 payroll contributions were equal to 9.2%, and from January 1st, 2009 are equal to 7.5% of gross earned wages and almost 60% of health sector revenues are derived from them. Within the autonomy and scope of activities of the Health Insurance Fund the structures of the revenues and expenditures are presented. Health financing and reform of the payment to health care providers are of high importance within the ongoing health care reform in Macedonia. It is expected that the newly introduced methods of payments at the primary health care level (capitation and at the hospital sector (global budgeting, DRGs will lead to increased equity, efficiency and quality of health care in hospitals and overall system

  8. 75 FR 27141 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Providing Dependent Coverage of Children to Age...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Providing Dependent Coverage of Children to Age 26 Under... dependent children to age 26. The IRS is issuing the temporary regulations at the same time that the... substantially similar interim final regulations with respect to group health plans and health insurance coverage...

  9. The effects of Ghana's national health insurance scheme on maternal and infant health care utilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.E.J. Bonfrer (Igna); Breebaart, L. (Lyn); De Poel, E.V. (Ellen Van)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIncreasing equitable access to health care is a main challenge African policy makers are facing. The Ghanaian government implemented the National Health Insurance Scheme in 2004 and the aim of this study is to evaluate its early effects on maternal and infant healthcare use. We exploit

  10. Financing health care for all - is national health insurance the first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If a substantial proportion of the funds continue to come from private sources, then inequity in access to and the distribution of health care is inevitable. ... It is suggested that it will be more feasible to generate sufficient funds under central control through taxation supplemented by a national health insurance scheme, rather ...

  11. Financial Performance of Health Insurers: State-Run Versus Federal-Run Exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A; McCue, Michael J; Palazzolo, Jennifer R

    2017-03-01

    Many insurers incurred financial losses in individual markets for health insurance during 2014, the first year of Affordable Care Act mandated changes. This analysis looks at key financial ratios of insurers to compare profitability in 2014 and 2013, identify factors driving financial performance, and contrast the financial performance of health insurers operating in state-run exchanges versus the federal exchange. Overall, the median loss of sampled insurers was -3.9%, no greater than their loss in 2013. Reduced administrative costs offset increases in medical losses. Insurers performed better in states with state-run exchanges than insurers in states using the federal exchange in 2014. Medical loss ratios are the underlying driver more than administrative costs in the difference in performance between states with federal versus state-run exchanges. Policy makers looking to improve the financial performance of the individual market should focus on features that differentiate the markets associated with state-run versus federal exchanges.

  12. Consumer-directed health care for persons under 65 years of age with private health insurance: United States, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robin A; Martinez, Michael E

    2009-03-01

    Data from the National Health Interview Survey. In 2007, 17.3% of persons under 65 years of age with private health insurance were enrolled in a high deductible health plan (HDHP), 4.5% were enrolled in a consumer-directed health plan (CDHP), and 14.8% were in a family with a flexible spending account for medical expenses (FSA); Persons with directly purchased private health insurance were more likely to be enrolled in a high deductible plan than those who obtained their private health insurance through an employer or union; Higher incomes and higher educational attainment were associated with greater uptake and enrollment in HDHPs, CDHPs, and FSAs. National attention to consumer-directed health care has increased following the enactment of the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-173), which established tax-advantaged health savings accounts (1). Consumer-directed health care enables individuals to have more control over when and how they access care, what types of care they use, and how much they spend on health care services. This report includes estimates of three measures of consumer-directed private health care. Estimates for 2007 are provided for enrollment in high deductible health plans (HDHPs), plans with high deductibles coupled with health savings accounts also known as consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs), and the percentage of individuals with private coverage whose family has a flexible spending account (FSA) for medical expenses, by selected sociodemographic characteristics. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  13. Real Decision Support for Health Insurance Policy Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Roger M

    2016-03-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop data-driven tools to help individuals make better choices about health insurance and to better understand the range of costs to which they are exposed under different health plans. We describe a simulation tool that we developed to evaluate the likely usage and costs for an individual and family under a wide range of health service usage outcomes, but that can be tailored to specific physicians and the needs of the user and to reflect the demographics and other special attributes of the family. The simulator can accommodate, for example, specific known physician visits or planned procedures, while also generating statistically reasonable "unexpected" events like ER visits or catastrophic diagnoses. On the other hand, if a user provides only a small amount of information (e.g., just information about the family members), the simulator makes a number of generic assumptions regarding physician usage, etc., based on the age, gender, and other features of the family. Data to parameterize all of these events is informed by a combination of the information provided by the user and a series of specialized databases that we have compiled based on publicly available government data and commercial data as well as our own analysis of this initially very coarse and rigid data. To demonstrate both the subtlety of choosing a healthcare plan and the degree to which the simulator can aid in such evaluations, we present sample results using real insurance plans and two example policy shoppers with different demographics and healthcare needs.

  14. Willingness to Pay for Social Health Insurance in Central Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lan Hoang; Hoang, Anh Thuan Duc

    2017-01-01

    A social health insurance (SHI) program was implemented in Vietnam in 1992. Participation is compulsory for some groups, such as formal-sector workers and voluntary for other groups. In 2013, 68% of the total population was covered by SHI, with most enrollees from compulsory groups. Enrollment has remained low among persons whose enrollment is voluntary. As a result, households face financial risk due to high out-of-pocket payments for health care. The goal of this study is to identify willingness to pay (WTP) for the SHI scheme among persons whose enrollment is voluntary and to examine factors that influence their choice. Three hundred thirty-one uninsured persons from three districts and one city of Thua Thien Hue province were interviewed face to face using a structured questionnaire. Contingent valuation technique was used to assess the WTP among the study participants. Each individual was asked to choose the maximum premium they were willing to pay for a health insurance card per year with three copayment levels of 0, 10, and 20%. Seven premium levels were offered ranging from 0 to 900,000 Vietnamese Dong (VND) (42.12 USD). The mean WTP of respondents for each scenario was estimated. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing WTP for SHI. The survey found that 73.1, 72.2, and 71.6%, respectively, for each copayment level, of the respondents would agree to participate in the SHI scheme and are willing to pay an annual premium of 578,926 VND (27.1 USD); 473,222 VND (22.1 USD); and 401,266 VND (18.8 USD) at the copayment levels of 0, 10, and 20%, respectively. The WTP for SHI is influenced by knowledge of SHI at all copayment levels ( p value Vietnam.

  15. Health insurance and diabetes among multiracial men: the mediation effects of usual source of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Julia F; Hawkins, Jaclynn

    2010-09-01

    Health insurance and having a usual source of care is important in diabetes management for multiethnic men. Few studies focus on determining whether usual source of care mediates the association between health insurance and diabetes among men. Using data from the 2005 California Health Interview Survey, responses from 17,472 men were analyzed to examine the extent to which a usual source of health care mediates the relationship between health insurance and diabetes. Sobel-Goodman tests for mediation indicated the largest effects between Latino and White men. For African American and Asian men, usual source of care did not serve as a significant mediation factor between health insurance and diabetes. Findings highlight a need for more research on the importance of having a usual source of care along with consistent health insurance type for multiracial men.

  16. THE ROLE OF HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANIES IN THE FINANCIAL PROVISION OF FREE MEDICAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Valentinovna Tokun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the features of the mandatory health insurance, the financial resources of health care and the characteristics of the Russian health care system. The article defines the need to apply the SWOT-analysis to the activities of medical organizations, it analyses the interconnection between the criteria of quality, availability and payment for services and their accordance to the sector of economics, which produces or pays for the service. Goal / Objectives: The goal of this article is to study the compulsory health insurance system, its pros and cons in the health system. The objectives of this paper is to identify the sources of financing of compulsory health insurance, the definition of the stages of formation of financial flows, the designation of the role of insurance companies in the compulsory health insurance system, the study of the processes of formation of funds of health insurance companies, the definition of the role of the compulsory health insurance in the risk protection and study of the positive and negative aspects of the modern health care system. Methodology: Methods of comparison, analysis and synthesis are used in this article. Results: as a result of the conducted research authors have made conclusions about the need for the major changes in the financing of public health care. The scope of work of health insurance companies requires increase in number of staff , premises, additional hardware and software. Health insurance companies should be motivated to maintain the health of the population and its improvement. Conclusions: The results of this research can be used to build a system of motivation in the health insurance organizations.

  17. Trends in Disparities in Low-Income Children's Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care by Family Immigration Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlenski, Marian; Baller, Julia; Borrero, Sonya; Bennett, Wendy L

    2016-03-01

    To examine time trends in disparities in low-income children's health insurance coverage and access to care by family immigration status. We used data from the National Survey of Children's Health in 2003 to 2011-2012, including 83,612 children aged 0 to 17 years with family incomes poverty level. We examined 3 immigration status categories: citizen children with nonimmigrant parents; citizen children with immigrant parents; and immigrant children. We used multivariable regression analyses to obtain adjusted trends in health insurance coverage and access to care. All low-income children experienced gains in health insurance coverage and access to care from 2003 to 2011-2012, regardless of family immigration status. Relative to citizen children with nonimmigrant parents, citizen children with immigrant parents had a 5 percentage point greater increase in health insurance coverage (P = .06), a 9 percentage point greater increase in having a personal doctor or nurse (P still exist. Policy efforts are needed to ensure that children of immigrant parents and immigrant children are able to access health insurance and health care. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Equitable access to health insurance for socially excluded children? The case of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gemma A; Parmar, Divya; Dkhimi, Fahdi; Asante, Felix; Arhinful, Daniel; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2017-08-01

    To help reduce child mortality and reach universal health coverage, Ghana extended free membership of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to children (under-18s) in 2008. However, despite the introduction of premium waivers, a substantial proportion of children remain uninsured. Thus far, few studies have explored why enrolment of children in NHIS may remain low, despite the absence of significant financial barriers to membership. In this paper we therefore look beyond economic explanations of access to health insurance to explore additional wider determinants of enrolment in the NHIS. In particular, we investigate whether social exclusion, as measured through a sociocultural, political and economic lens, can explain poor enrolment rates of children. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 4050 representative households conducted in Ghana in 2012. Household indices were created to measure sociocultural, political and economic exclusion, and logistic regressions were conducted to study determinants of enrolment at the individual and household levels. Our results indicate that socioculturally, economically and politically excluded children are less likely to enrol in the NHIS. Furthermore, households excluded in all dimensions were more likely to be non-enrolled or partially-enrolled (i.e. not all children enrolled within the household) than fully-enrolled. These results suggest that equity in access for socially excluded children has not yet been achieved. Efforts should be taken to improve coverage by removing the remaining small, annually renewable registration fee, implementing and publicising the new clause that de-links premium waivers from parental membership, establishing additional scheme administrative offices in remote areas, holding regular registration sessions in schools and conducting outreach sessions and providing registration support to female guardians of children. Ensuring equitable access to NHIS will contribute substantially

  19. The Influence of Israel Health Insurance Law on the Negev Bedouin Population — A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Morad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extension of universal health service insurance to national populations is a relatively new phenomenon. Since 1995, the Israeli National Health Insurance Law (NHIL has provided universal health services to every resident, but the effect of this law on health and health services among minorities has not been examined sufficiently. The goals of this study were to track some of the first changes engendered by the NHIL among the Negev Bedouin Arabs to examine the effects of universal health care services. Methods included analysis of historical and health policy documents, three field appraisals of health care services (1994, 1995, 1999, a region-wide interview survey of Negev Bedouins (1997, and key informant interviews. For the interview survey, a sample of 515 households was chosen from different Bedouin localities representing major sedentarization stages. Results showed that prior to the NHIL, a substantial proportion of the Negev Bedouins were uninsured with limited, locally available health service. Since 1995, health services, particularly primary care clinics and health manpower, have dramatically expanded. The initial expansion appears to have been a marketing ploy, but real improvements have occurred. There was a high level of health service utilization among the Bedouins in the Negev, especially private medical services, hospitals, and night ambulatory medical services. The NHIL brought change to the structure of health services in Israel, namely the institution of a national health system based on proportional allocation of resources (based on size and age and open competition in the provision of quality health care. The expansion of the pool of potential members engendered by the new universal coverage had profound effects on the Health Funds' attitudes towards Negev Bedouins. In addition, real consumer choice was introduced for the first time. Although all the health care needs of this rapidly growing population have yet to be met

  20. Holistic approach to fraud management in health insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Furlan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fraud present an immense problem for health insurance companies and the only way to fight fraud is by using specialized fraud management systems. The current research community focussed great efforts on different fraud detection techniques while neglecting other also important activities of fraud management. We propose a holistic approach that focuses on all 6 activities of fraud management, namely, (1 deterrence, (2 prevention, (3 detection, (4 investigation, (5 sanction and redress, and (6 monitoring. The main contribution of the paper are 15 key characteristics of a fraud management system, which enable construction of a fraud management system that provides effective and efficient support to all fraud management activities. We base our research on literature review, interviews with experts from different fields, and a case study. The case study provides additional confirmation to expert opinions, as it puts our holistic framework into practice.

  1. HEALTH INSURANCE SCHEME - announcement from the CHIS Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    A number of members of our Health Insurance Scheme are currently experiencing difficulties getting reimbursement for consulting an acupuncture practitioner. The CHIS Board wishes to remind you that in order to be reimbursed, you must receive your acupuncture treatment from doctors recognised by the competent authorities of the country in which they have their medical practice. In Switzerland, these are people possessing the title of doctor of medicine recognised by the Swiss Medical Association (FMH). Treatment provided by medical auxiliaries must be prescribed beforehand by a recognised doctor. As the practitioner in question is currently not recognised as a doctor in Switzerland, his services are not reimbursed. In order to avoid any inconvenience, we advise you to contact uniqa before undergoing such treatment. You will find all details concerning reimbursement of complementary medicine (acupuncture, chiropractic, osteopathy and ethiopathy) in CHISbull' No. 18 dated November 2004, which can also be co...

  2. HEALTH INSURANCE SCHEME -- announcement from the CHIS Board

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    A number of members of our Health Insurance Scheme are currently experiencing difficulties getting reimbursement for consulting an acupuncture practitioner. The CHIS Board wishes to remind you that in order to be reimbursed, you must receive your acupuncture treatment from doctors recognised by the competent authorities of the country in which they have their medical practice. In Switzerland, these are people possessing the title of doctor of medicine recognised by the Swiss Medical Association (FMH). Treatment provided by medical auxiliaries must be prescribed beforehand by a recognised doctor. As the practitioner in question is currently not recognised as a doctor in Switzerland, his services are not reimbursed. In order to avoid any inconvenience, we advise you to contact uniqa before undergoing such treatment. You will find all details concerning reimbursement of complementary medicine (acupuncture, chiropractic, osteopathy and ethiopathy) in CHISbull’ No. 18 dated November 2004, which can ...

  3. Equity of access under Korean universal health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju Moon

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the extent to which equity in the use of physician services has been achieved in the Republic of Korea. Descriptive and logistic regression analysis was performed examining the relationship between the dependent variable and the independent variables and the relative importance of factors. The results indicate that a universal health insurance system has not yielded a fully equitable distribution of services. Access differences arise from coverage limitation, as well as urban/rural variations in the distributions of providers. The policy options for expansion of coverage should be encouraged to ease the financial burden of out-of-pocket payments on patients and to limit the range of noninsured services. Urban/rural variations in the distributions of providers are caused by the government's "laissez-faire" policy for the private medical sector. To solve this geographic misdistribution, the attention of policy makers is required, with changing of the government's "laissez-faire" policy. © 2012 APJPH.

  4. The Role of Wealth and Health in Insurance Choice: Bivariate Probit Analysis in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiding Yue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper captures the correlation between the choices of health insurance and pension insurance using the bivariate probit model and then studies the effect of wealth and health on insurance choice. Our empirical evidence shows that people who participate in a health care program are more likely to participate in a pension plan at the same time, while wealth and health have different effects on the choices of the health care program and the pension program. Generally, the higher an individual’s wealth level is, the more likelihood he will participate in a health care program; but wealth has no effect on the participation of pension. Health status has opposite effects on choices of health care programs and pension plans; the poorer an individual’s health is, the more likely he is to participate in health care programs, while the better health he enjoys, the more likely he is to participate in pension plans. When the investigation scope narrows down to commercial insurance, there is only a significant effect of health status on commercial health insurance. The commercial insurance choice and the insurance choice of the agricultural population are more complicated.

  5. National income inequality and ineffective health insurance in 35 low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Francisco N; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

    2017-05-01

    Global health policy efforts to improve health and reduce financial burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has fuelled interest in expanding access to health insurance coverage to all, a movement known as Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Ineffective insurance is a measure of failure to achieve the intended outcomes of health insurance among those who nominally have insurance. This study aimed to evaluate the relation between national-level income inequality and the prevalence of ineffective insurance. We used Standardized World Income Inequality Database (SWIID) Gini coefficients for 35 LMICs and World Health Survey (WHS) data about insurance from 2002 to 2004 to fit multivariable regression models of the prevalence of ineffective insurance on national Gini coefficients, adjusting for GDP per capita. Greater inequality predicted higher prevalence of ineffective insurance. When stratifying by individual-level covariates, higher inequality was associated with greater ineffective insurance among sub-groups traditionally considered more privileged: youth, men, higher education, urban residence and the wealthiest quintile. Stratifying by World Bank country income classification, higher inequality was associated with ineffective insurance among upper-middle income countries but not low- or lower-middle income countries. We hypothesize that these associations may be due to the imprint of underlying social inequalities as countries approach decreasing marginal returns on improved health insurance by income. Our findings suggest that beyond national income, income inequality may predict differences in the quality of insurance, with implications for efforts to achieve UHC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Fair health financing and catastrophic health expenditures: potential impact of the coverage extension of the popular health insurance in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Méndez, Oscar; Martínez, Alejandra

    2005-01-01

    To assess the impact on fair health financing and household catastrophic health expenditures of the implementation of the Popular Health Insurance (Seguro Popular de Salud). Data analyzed in this study come from the National Income and Expenditure Household Survey (Encuesta Nacional de Ingresos y Gastos de los Hogares, ENIGH), 2000, and the National Health Insurance and Expenditure Survey, (Encuesta Nacional de Aseguramiento y Gasto en Salud, ENAGS), 2001. Estimations are based on projections of extension of the Popular Health Insurance under different conditions of coverage and out-of-pocket expenditure reductions in the uninsured population. The mathematic simulation model assumes applying the new Popular Health Insurance financial structure to the 2000 expenditure values reported by ENIGH, given the probability of affiliation by households. The model of determinants of affiliation to the Popular Health Insurance yielded three significant variables: being in income quintiles I and II, being a female head of household, and that a household member had a medical visit in the past year. Simulation results show that important impacts on the performance of the Mexican Health System will occur in terms of fair financing and catastrophic expenditures, even before achieving the universal coverage goal in 2010. A reduction of 40% in out-of-pocket expenditures and a Popular Health Insurance coverage of 100% will decrease catastrophic health expenditures from 3.4% to 1.6%. Our results show that the reduction of out-of-pocket expenditures generated by the new financing and health provision Popular Health Insurance model, will improve the financial fairness index and the financial contribution to the health system, and will decrease the percentage of households with catastrophic expenditures, even before reaching universal coverage. A greater impact may be expected due to coverage extension initiating in the poorest communities that have a very restricted and progressive

  7. Impact of Publicly Financed Health Insurance Schemes on Healthcare Utilization and Financial Risk Protection in India: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Chauhan, Akashdeep Singh; Karan, Anup; Kaur, Gunjeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Several publicly financed health insurance schemes have been launched in India with the aim of providing universalizing health coverage (UHC). In this paper, we report the impact of publicly financed health insurance schemes on health service utilization, out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure, financial risk protection and health status. Empirical research studies focussing on the impact or evaluation of publicly financed health insurance schemes in India were searched on PubMed, Google scholar, Ovid, Scopus, Embase and relevant websites. The studies were selected based on two stage screening PRISMA guidelines in which two researchers independently assessed the suitability and quality of the studies. The studies included in the review were divided into two groups i.e., with and without a comparison group. To assess the impact on utilization, OOP expenditure and health indicators, only the studies with a comparison group were reviewed. Out of 1265 articles screened after initial search, 43 studies were found eligible and reviewed in full text, finally yielding 14 studies which had a comparator group in their evaluation design. All the studies (n-7) focussing on utilization showed a positive effect in terms of increase in the consumption of health services with introduction of health insurance. About 70% studies (n-5) studies with a strong design and assessing financial risk protection showed no impact in reduction of OOP expenditures, while remaining 30% of evaluations (n-2), which particularly evaluated state sponsored health insurance schemes, reported a decline in OOP expenditure among the enrolled households. One study which evaluated impact on health outcome showed reduction in mortality among enrolled as compared to non-enrolled households, from conditions covered by the insurance scheme. While utilization of healthcare did improve among those enrolled in the scheme, there is no clear evidence yet to suggest that these have resulted in reduced OOP expenditures or

  8. Impact of Publicly Financed Health Insurance Schemes on Healthcare Utilization and Financial Risk Protection in India: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prinja

    Full Text Available Several publicly financed health insurance schemes have been launched in India with the aim of providing universalizing health coverage (UHC. In this paper, we report the impact of publicly financed health insurance schemes on health service utilization, out-of-pocket (OOP expenditure, financial risk protection and health status. Empirical research studies focussing on the impact or evaluation of publicly financed health insurance schemes in India were searched on PubMed, Google scholar, Ovid, Scopus, Embase and relevant websites. The studies were selected based on two stage screening PRISMA guidelines in which two researchers independently assessed the suitability and quality of the studies. The studies included in the review were divided into two groups i.e., with and without a comparison group. To assess the impact on utilization, OOP expenditure and health indicators, only the studies with a comparison group were reviewed. Out of 1265 articles screened after initial search, 43 studies were found eligible and reviewed in full text, finally yielding 14 studies which had a comparator group in their evaluation design. All the studies (n-7 focussing on utilization showed a positive effect in terms of increase in the consumption of health services with introduction of health insurance. About 70% studies (n-5 studies with a strong design and assessing financial risk protection showed no impact in reduction of OOP expenditures, while remaining 30% of evaluations (n-2, which particularly evaluated state sponsored health insurance schemes, reported a decline in OOP expenditure among the enrolled households. One study which evaluated impact on health outcome showed reduction in mortality among enrolled as compared to non-enrolled households, from conditions covered by the insurance scheme. While utilization of healthcare did improve among those enrolled in the scheme, there is no clear evidence yet to suggest that these have resulted in reduced OOP

  9. Reform towards National Health Insurance in Malaysia: the equity implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chai Ping; Whynes, David K; Sach, Tracey H

    2011-05-01

    This paper assesses the potential equity impact of Malaysia's projected reform of its current tax financed system towards National Health Insurance (NHI). The Kakwani's progressivity index was used to assess the equity consequences of the new NHI system (with flat rate NHI scheme) compared to the current tax financed system. It was also used to model a proposed system (with a progressive NHI scheme) that can generate the same amount of funding more equitably. The new NHI system would be less equitable than the current tax financed system, as evident from the reduction of Kakwani's index to 0.168 from 0.217. The new flat rate NHI scheme, if implemented, would reduce the progressivity of the health finance system because it is a less progressive finance source than that of general government revenue. We proposed a system with a progressive NHI scheme that generates the same amount of funding whilst preserving the equity at the Kakwani's progressivity index of 0.213. A NHI system with a progressive NHI scheme is proposed to be implemented to raise health funding whilst preserving the equity in health care financing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Health insurance as a vehicle for health care financing | Irukwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Medicine and Health Development. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (1997) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Monthly Contributions – Changes for 2014

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2014, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.7%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including the CERN pension) will increase accordingly: Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1161 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (580 CHF) is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 464 CHF is applied to children maintaining their ins...

  12. Government health insurance for people below poverty line in India: quasi-experimental evaluation of insurance and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Neeraj; Bendavid, Eran; Mukherji, Arnab; Wagner, Zachary; Nagpal, Somil; Mullen, Patrick

    2014-09-11

    To evaluate the effects of a government insurance program covering tertiary care for people below the poverty line in Karnataka, India, on out-of-pocket expenditures, hospital use, and mortality. Geographic regression discontinuity study. 572 villages in Karnataka, India. 31,476 households (22,796 below poverty line and 8680 above poverty line) in 300 villages where the scheme was implemented and 28,633 households (21,767 below poverty line and 6866 above poverty line) in 272 neighboring matched villages ineligible for the scheme. A government insurance program (Vajpayee Arogyashree scheme) that provided free tertiary care to households below the poverty line in about half of villages in Karnataka from February 2010 to August 2012. Out-of-pocket expenditures, hospital use, and mortality. Among households below the poverty line, the mortality rate from conditions potentially responsive to services covered by the scheme (mostly cardiac conditions and cancer) was 0.32% in households eligible for the scheme compared with 0.90% among ineligible households just south of the eligibility border (difference of 0.58 percentage points, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.75; Ppoverty line (households above the poverty line were not eligible for the scheme), with a mortality rate from conditions covered by the scheme of 0.56% in eligible villages compared with 0.55% in ineligible villages (difference of 0.01 percentage points, -0.03 to 0.03; P=0.95). Eligible households had significantly reduced out-of-pocket health expenditures for admissions to hospitals with tertiary care facilities likely to be covered by the scheme (64% reduction, 35% to 97%; P<0.001). There was no significant increase in use of covered services, although the point estimate of a 44.2% increase approached significance (-5.1% to 90.5%; P=0.059). Both reductions in out-of-pocket expenditures and potential increases in use might have contributed to the observed reductions in mortality. Insuring poor households

  13. Health Insurance Exchanges: Health Insurance Navigators and In-Person Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    Some states could require non-navigators to target different demographic groups or perform different functions than navigators.33 Certified... demographic characteristics of their service area, including the languages spoken. Navigators and non-navigators must also provide appropriate materials... Redhead . 67 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchange Functions: Standards for Navigators and Non

  14. Quality of Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care for Children in Low-Income Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Amanda R; French, Benjamin; Aysola, Jaya; Saloner, Brendan; Noonan, Kathleen G; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    An increasing diversity of children's health coverage options under the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, together with uncertainty regarding reauthorization of the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) beyond 2017, merits renewed attention on the quality of these options for children. To compare health care access, quality, and cost outcomes by insurance type (Medicaid, CHIP, private, and uninsured) for children in households with low to moderate incomes. A repeated cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the 2003, 2007, and 2011-2012 US National Surveys of Children's Health, comprising 80,655 children 17 years or younger, weighted to 67 million children nationally, with household incomes between 100% and 300% of the federal poverty level. Multivariable logistic regression models compared caregiver-reported outcomes across insurance types. Analysis was conducted between July 14, 2014, and May 6, 2015. Insurance type was ascertained using a caregiver-reported measure of insurance status and each household's poverty status (percentage of the federal poverty level). Caregiver-reported outcomes related to access to primary and specialty care, unmet needs, out-of-pocket costs, care coordination, and satisfaction with care. Among the 80,655 children, 51,123 (57.3%) had private insurance, 11,853 (13.6%) had Medicaid, 9554 (18.4%) had CHIP, and 8125 (10.8%) were uninsured. In a multivariable logistic regression model (with results reported as adjusted probabilities [95% CIs]), children insured by Medicaid and CHIP were significantly more likely to receive a preventive medical (Medicaid, 88% [86%-89%]; P insured children (medical, 83% [82%-84%]; dental, 73% [72%-74%]). Children with all insurance types experienced challenges in access to specialty care, with caregivers of children insured by CHIP reporting the highest rates of difficulty accessing specialty care (28% [24%-32%]), problems obtaining a referral (23% [18%-29%]), and

  15. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  16. Does Uninsurance Affect the Health Outcomes of the Insured? Evidence from Heart Attack Patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the health of the insured, focusing on one health outcome - the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California

  17. Consumer mobility in social health insurance markets: A five-country comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Laske-Aldershof (Trea); F.T. Schut (Erik); K. Beck (Konstantin); S. Greaß (Stefan); A. Shmueli (Amir); C. van de Voorde (Carine)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDuring the 1990s, the social health insurance schemes of Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium and Israel were significantly reformed by the introduction of freedom of choice (open enrolment) of health insurer. This was introduced alongside a system of risk adjustment to

  18. 10 CFR 5.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health and insurance benefits and services. 5.440 Section 5.440 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to...

  19. Trends in Health Insurance Coverage of Title X Family Planning Program Clients, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Emily J; Ahrens, Katherine A; Fowler, Christina I; Carter, Marion; Gavin, Loretta; Moskosky, Susan

    2017-12-13

    The federal Title X Family Planning Program supports the delivery of family planning services and related preventive care to 4 million individuals annually in the United States. The implementation of the 2010 Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) Medicaid expansion and provisions expanding access to health insurance, which took effect in January 2014, resulted in higher rates of health insurance coverage in the U.S. population; the ACA's impact on individuals served by the Title X program has not yet been evaluated. Using administrative data we examined changes in health insurance coverage among Title X clinic patients during 2005-2015. We found that the percentage of clients without health insurance decreased from 60% in 2005 to 48% in 2015, with the greatest annual decrease occurring between 2013 and 2014 (63% to 54%). Meanwhile, between 2005 and 2015, the percentage of clients with Medicaid or other public health insurance increased from 20% to 35% and the percentage of clients with private health insurance increased from 8% to 15%. Although clients attending Title X clinics remained uninsured at substantially higher rates compared with the national average, the increase in clients with health insurance coverage aligns with the implementation of ACA-related provisions to expand access to affordable health insurance.

  20. AIDS and Health Insurance: An OTA Survey. AIDS-Related Issues Staff Paper 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Jill

    The United States Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) conducted a study designed to provide a view of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in the context of other routine tests required by health insurers. The study was undertaken to collect basic information on underwriting practices and the use of medical screening by health insurers and…

  1. The challenges of strategic purchasing of healthcare services in Iran Health Insurance Organization: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Hasan Abolghasem; Shojaei, Ali; Keshavarzi, Anahita; Zare, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Background Strategic purchasing in healthcare services is a key component in improving health system performance, and it has been one of the most important issues in health system reform around the world, especially Europe in the last decade. Iran health system and insurance, although sometimes considered the issue of strategic purchasing goals, has not been made possible to achieve or even to implement, due to the associated problems. Objective To determine the associated problems of strategic purchasing in the Iran Health Insurance Organization (IHIO). Methods This study is a qualitative study, and framework analysis which was conducted in Iran in 2014–15. The participants in this study were 34 individuals from decision-makers and executives in the IHIO purchasing process, and university experts who have been chosen purposefully. This study conducted frame analysis, by using MAXQDA 10. Results The findings included associated problems of IHIO strategic purchasing in 12 themes and 65 subthemes. The themes included: Laws and regulations for purchasing, Organization of purchasing, Qualified and authorized providers, Right type of services, Right type of contracts, Target groups for purchasing, Resources allocation, financing and pricing system, Purchasing as improving performance and quality, Purchasing as shaping the market and competition, Purchasing as health progress state of people and society, Guided purchasing and stewardship of government, Structure of decision-making process in the health and welfare ministries. Conclusion The findings of this study showed associated problems in IHIO strategic purchasing. To achieve strategic purchasing goals in Iran, identification of all issues and factors of the total insurers and health system sets which affect strategic purchasing is essential.

  2. The challenges of strategic purchasing of healthcare services in Iran Health Insurance Organization: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Hasan Abolghasem; Mousavi, Sayyed Masoud Shajari Pour; Shojaei, Ali; Keshavarzi, Anahita; Zare, Hossein

    2018-02-01

    Strategic purchasing in healthcare services is a key component in improving health system performance, and it has been one of the most important issues in health system reform around the world, especially Europe in the last decade. Iran health system and insurance, although sometimes considered the issue of strategic purchasing goals, has not been made possible to achieve or even to implement, due to the associated problems. To determine the associated problems of strategic purchasing in the Iran Health Insurance Organization (IHIO). This study is a qualitative study, and framework analysis which was conducted in Iran in 2014-15. The participants in this study were 34 individuals from decision-makers and executives in the IHIO purchasing process, and university experts who have been chosen purposefully. This study conducted frame analysis, by using MAXQDA 10. The findings included associated problems of IHIO strategic purchasing in 12 themes and 65 subthemes. The themes included: Laws and regulations for purchasing, Organization of purchasing, Qualified and authorized providers, Right type of services, Right type of contracts, Target groups for purchasing, Resources allocation, financing and pricing system, Purchasing as improving performance and quality, Purchasing as shaping the market and competition, Purchasing as health progress state of people and society, Guided purchasing and stewardship of government, Structure of decision-making process in the health and welfare ministries. The findings of this study showed associated problems in IHIO strategic purchasing. To achieve strategic purchasing goals in Iran, identification of all issues and factors of the total insurers and health system sets which affect strategic purchasing is essential.

  3. Health insurers' financial performance and quality improvement expenditures in the Affordable Care Act's second year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J; Hall, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act requires health insurers to rebate any amounts less than 80%-85% of their premiums that they fail to spend on medical claims or quality improvement. This study uses the new comprehensive reporting under this law to examine changes in insurers' financial performance and differences in their quality improvement expenditures. In the ACA's second year (2012), insurers' median medical loss ratios continued to increase and their median administrative cost ratios dropped, producing moderate operating margins in the group markets but a small operating loss in the individual market, at the median. For-profit insurers showed larger changes, in general, than did nonprofits. For quality improvement, insurers reported spending a significantly greater amount per member in their government plans than they did on their self-insured members, with spending on commercial insurance being in between these two extremes. The magnitude and source of these differences varied by corporate ownership. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. The welfare gain from replacing the health insurance tax exclusion with lump-sum tax credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqun; Rettenmaier, Andrew J; Saving, Thomas R

    2011-06-01

    This paper analyzes the welfare gain from replacing the tax exclusion of employer-provided health insurance with a lump-sum tax credit. It differs from earlier studies in that we look at the welfare cost of health insurance tax exclusion as coming directly from excessive health insurance rather than from overconsumption of medical care and that we account for the labor market effect of the tax exclusion on welfare. Both differences work to produce a smaller tax reform welfare gain. For a set of mid-range parameter values, the welfare gain is about 21% of current health insurance tax expenditures. In addition, government tax expenditures would fall by 38%, and health insurance spending would fall by 77% after the reform.

  5. Do more health insurance options lead to higher wages? Evidence from states extending dependent coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillender, Marcus

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about how health insurance affects labor market decisions for young adults. This is despite the fact that expanding coverage for people in their early 20s is an important component of the Affordable Care Act. This paper studies how having an outside source of health insurance affects wages by using variation in health insurance access that comes from states extending dependent coverage to young adults. Using American Community Survey and Census data, I find evidence that extending health insurance to young adults raises their wages. The increases in wages can be explained by increases in human capital and the increased flexibility in the labor market that comes from people no longer having to rely on their own employers for health insurance. The estimates from this paper suggest the Affordable Care Act will lead to wage increases for young adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetes technology, innovation, and the U.S. health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Bruce

    2013-09-01

    The flow of funds in the U.S. health care system is crucial both for the provision of services to patients and to encourage innovation that enables long-term improvement of health services. Rising concern about health care costs often includes concerns about inappropriate adoption of costly or unnecessary technology. Many innovations in diabetes technology may involve personal technology, which does not qualify under existing health insurance categories such as "durable medical equipment" or under a currently defined telehealth technology. In such cases, the diabetes technology industry may be developing types of technology that are so innovative they do not have clearly established payment mechanisms in the existing U.S. fee for service health care reimbursement system. This article describes key features of the U.S. health care payment system relevant to developers of new diabetes technologies. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. An urban school based comparative study of experiences and perceptions differentiating public health insurance eligible immigrant families with and without coverage for their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yoona; Belmonte, Frank; Weiner, Saul J

    2009-06-01

    We explore why some low income immigrant families enroll in government financed health insurance plans for their children, while others also eligible do not enroll. Our team conducted and analyzed audiotaped semi-structured interviews with families of 8 insured and 10 uninsured children focused on knowledge of and experience with seeking health insurance coverage. Common among families not enrolled in government sponsored plans were misperceptions about the insurance system, including a suspicion of the government monitoring them and/or lack of familiarity with the concept of insurance itself. Among families that did enroll, the predominant theme was the essential role of their sponsor, other kin or community in educating and assisting them with the application process. Prior research has identified external obstacles to enrollment. Our findings indicate the additional importance of facilitating social support, particularly from sponsors in mentoring new arrivals through the process of seeking insurance coverage.

  8. [Use of routine data from statutory health insurances for federal health monitoring purposes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmeier, C; Frick, J; Prütz, F; Lampert, T; Ziese, T; Mikolajczyk, R; Garbe, E

    2014-04-01

    Federal health monitoring deals with the state of health and the health-related behavior of populations and is used to inform politics. To date, the routine data from statutory health insurances (SHI) have rarely been used for federal health monitoring purposes. SHI routine data enable analyses of disease frequency, risk factors, the course of the disease, the utilization of medical services, and mortality rates. The advantages offered by SHI routine data regarding federal health monitoring are the intersectoral perspective and the nearly complete absence of recall and selection bias in the respective population. Further, the large sample sizes and the continuous collection of the data allow reliable descriptions of the state of health of the insurants, even in cases of multiple stratification. These advantages have to be weighed against disadvantages linked to the claims nature of the data and the high administrative hurdles when requesting the use of SHI routine data. Particularly in view of the improved availability of data from all SHI insurants for research institutions in the context of the "health-care structure law", SHI routine data are an interesting data source for federal health monitoring purposes.

  9. Coverage for Gender-Affirming Care: Making Health Insurance Work for Transgender Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Baker, Kellan

    2017-08-01

    Many transgender Americans continue to remain uninsured or are underinsured because of payers' refusal to cover medically necessary, gender-affirming healthcare services-such as hormone therapy, mental health counseling, and reconstructive surgeries. Coverage refusal results in higher costs and poor health outcomes among transgender people who cannot access gender-affirming care. Research into the value of health insurance coverage for gender-affirming care for transgender individuals shows that the health benefits far outweigh the costs of insuring transition procedures. Although the Affordable Care Act explicitly protects health insurance for transgender individuals, these laws are being threatened; therefore, this article reviews their importance to transgender-inclusive healthcare coverage.

  10. Attracting Health Insurance Buyers through Selective Contracting: Results of a Discrete-Choice Experiment among Users of Hospital Services in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Bergrath

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Netherlands commenced market based reforms in its health care system. The reforms included selective contracting of health care providers by health insurers. This paper focuses on how health insurers may increase their market share on the health insurance market through selective contracting of health care providers. Selective contracting is studied by eliciting the preferences of health care consumers for attributes of health care services that an insurer could negotiate on behalf of its clients with health care providers. Selective contracting may provide incentives for health care providers to deliver the quality that consumers need and demand. Selective contracting also enables health insurers to steer individual patients towards selected health care providers. We used a stated preference technique known as a discrete choice experiment to collect and analyze the data. Results indicate that consumers care about both costs and quality of care, with healthy consumers placing greater emphasis on costs and consumers with poorer health placing greater emphasis on quality of care. It is possible for an insurer to satisfy both of these criteria by selective contracting health care providers who consequently purchase health care that is both efficient and of good quality.

  11. Boosting health insurance coverage in developing countries: do conditional cash transfer programmes matter in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosca, Olga; Brown, Heather

    2015-03-01

    Achieving universal health insurance coverage is a goal for many developing countries. Even when universal health insurance programmes are in place, there are significant barriers to reaching the lowest socio-economic groups such as a lack of awareness of the programmes or knowledge of the benefits to participating in the insurance market. Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes can encourage participation through mandatory health education classes, increased contact with the health care system and cash payments to reduce costs of participating in the insurance market. To explore if participation in a CCT programme in Mexico, Oportunidades, is significantly associated with self-reported enrolment in a public health insurance programme. Cross-sectional data from 2007 collected on 29 595 Mexican households where the household head is aged between ages 15 and 60 were analysed. A logit model was used to estimate the association between Oportunidades participation and awareness of enrolment in a public health insurance programme. Participation in the Oportunidades programme is associated with a 25% higher likelihood of being actively aware of enrolment in Seguro Popular, a public health insurance scheme for the lowest socio-economic groups. Participation in the Oportunidades CCT programme is positively associated with awareness of enrolment in public health insurance. CCT programmes may be used to promote participation of the lowest socio-economic groups in universal public health insurance systems. This is crucial to achieving universal health insurance coverage in developing countries. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  12. Potential determinants of deductible uptake in health insurance: How to increase uptake in The Netherlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winssen, K P M; van Kleef, R C; van de Ven, W P M M

    2016-12-01

    In health insurance, voluntary deductibles are offered to the insured in return for a premium rebate. Previous research has shown that 11 % of the Dutch insured opted for a voluntary deductible (VD) in health insurance in 2014, while the highest VD level was financially profitable for almost 50 % of the population in retrospect. To explain this discrepancy, this paper identifies and discusses six potential determinants of the decision to opt for a VD from the behavioral economic literature: loss aversion, risk attitude, ambiguity aversion, debt aversion, omission bias, and liquidity constraints. Based on these determinants, five potential strategies are proposed to increase the number of insured opting for a VD. Presenting the VD as the default option and providing transparent information regarding the VD are the two most promising strategies. If, as a result of these strategies, more insured would opt for a VD, moral hazard would be reduced.

  13. Should Governments engage health insurance intermediaries? A comparison of benefits with and without insurance intermediary in a large tax funded community health insurance scheme in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagulapalli, Srikant; Rokkam, Sudarsana Rao

    2015-09-10

    A peculiar phenomenon of engaging insurance intermediaries for government funded health insurance schemes for the poor, not usually found globally, is gaining ground in India. Rajiv Aarogyasri Scheme launched in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, is first largest tax funded community health insurance scheme in the country covering more than 20 million poor families. Aarogyasri Health Care Trust (trust), the scheme administrator, transfers funds to hospitals through two routes one, directly and the other through an insurance intermediary. The objective of this paper is to find out if engaging an insurance intermediary has any effect on cost efficiency of the insurance scheme. We used payment data of RAS for the period 2007-12, to find out the influence of insurance intermediary on the two variables, benefit cost ratio defined as benefit payment divided by premium payment, and claim denial ratio defined as benefit payment divided by treatment cost. Relationship between scheme expenditure and number of beds empanelled under the scheme is examined. OLS regression is used to perform all analyses. We found that adding an additional layer of insurance intermediary between the trust and hospitals reduced the benefit cost ratio under the scheme by 12.2% (p-value = 0.06). Every addition of 100 beds under the scheme increases the scheme payments by US$ 0.75 million (p-value < 0.001). The gap in claim denial ratio between insurance and trust modes narrowed down from 2.84% in government hospitals to 0.41% in private hospitals (p-value < 0.001). The scheme is a classic case of Roemer's principle in operation. Introduction of insurance intermediary has the twin effects of reduction in benefit payments to beneficiaries, and chocking fund flow to government hospitals. The idea of engaging insurance intermediary should be abandoned.

  14. Demand for Health Insurance: A Study on the Feasibility of Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzes households' willingness to pay (WTP) for a new health insurance scheme. The data was collected from a random sample of 210 households from three community-based organizations, locally known as iddirs. These iddirs were purposively selected from areas that are believed to constitute largely of the ...

  15. 78 FR 42159 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act. This final rule finalizes new... Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility notices and delegation of appeals; modernizes and streamlines existing...

  16. Healthcare quality in Ghana : Improving healthcare quality and health worker motivation to promote sustainable health insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alhassan, R.K.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is about promoting a sustainable National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana through improved client-centred quality care and effective community engagement in quality care assessment. The thesis comprises of two main parts. Part one reports on findings from baseline surveys

  17. Willingness to Pay for Social Health Insurance in Central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Hoang Nguyen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA social health insurance (SHI program was implemented in Vietnam in 1992. Participation is compulsory for some groups, such as formal-sector workers and voluntary for other groups. In 2013, 68% of the total population was covered by SHI, with most enrollees from compulsory groups. Enrollment has remained low among persons whose enrollment is voluntary. As a result, households face financial risk due to high out-of-pocket payments for health care. The goal of this study is to identify willingness to pay (WTP for the SHI scheme among persons whose enrollment is voluntary and to examine factors that influence their choice.MethodThree hundred thirty-one uninsured persons from three districts and one city of Thua Thien Hue province were interviewed face to face using a structured questionnaire. Contingent valuation technique was used to assess the WTP among the study participants. Each individual was asked to choose the maximum premium they were willing to pay for a health insurance card per year with three copayment levels of 0, 10, and 20%. Seven premium levels were offered ranging from 0 to 900,000 Vietnamese Dong (VND (42.12 USD. The mean WTP of respondents for each scenario was estimated. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing WTP for SHI.ResultsThe survey found that 73.1, 72.2, and 71.6%, respectively, for each copayment level, of the respondents would agree to participate in the SHI scheme and are willing to pay an annual premium of 578,926 VND (27.1 USD; 473,222 VND (22.1 USD; and 401,266 VND (18.8 USD at the copayment levels of 0, 10, and 20%, respectively. The WTP for SHI is influenced by knowledge of SHI at all copayment levels (p value < 0.05. The more knowledge about SHI individuals have, the higher the WTP amount. Chronic disease was related to WTP only at a copayment level of 20% (p = 0.049.ConclusionEnhanced awareness of the benefits of SHI among the population should contribute

  18. The impact of race, income, drug abuse and dependence on health insurance coverage among US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nianyang; Xie, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the impact of drug abuse/dependence on health insurance coverage, especially by race groups and income levels. In this study, we examine the disparities in health insurance predictors and investigate the impact of drug use (alcohol abuse/dependence, nicotine dependence, and illicit drug abuse/dependence) on lack of insurance across different race and income groups. To perform the analysis, we used insurance data (8057 uninsured and 28,590 insured individual adults) from the National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH 2011). To analyze the likelihood of being uninsured we performed weighted binomial logistic regression analyses. The results show that the overall prevalence of lacking insurance was 19.6 %. However, race differences in lack of insurance exist, especially for Hispanics who observe the highest probability of being uninsured (38.5 %). Furthermore, we observe that the lowest income level bracket (annual income <$20,000) is associated with the highest likelihood of being uninsured (37.3 %). As the result of this investigation, we observed the following relationship between drug use and lack of insurance: alcohol abuse/dependence and nicotine dependence tend to increase the risk of lack of insurance for African Americans and whites, respectively; illicit drug use increases such risk for whites; alcohol abuse/dependence increases the likelihood of lack of insurance for the group with incomes $20,000-$49,999, whereas nicotine dependence is associated with higher probability of lack of insurance for most income groups. These findings provide some useful insights for policy makers in making decisions regarding unmet health insurance coverage.

  19. Social Health Insurance Difference in Inpatient Expenditure and Service Category in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Shen, Jay; Rice, Jennifer; Frakes, Kaitlyn

    2018-01-01

    China successfully achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. Previous work on the effects of social health insurance in China has overlooked the association between health insurance and inpatient service category as well as the mechanisms of institutional characteristics. This study seeks to estimate the social health insurance difference in inpatient expenditure and service category. The role of institutional characteristics was also studied. The logistic model was applied to estimate the association of social health insurance and service category. In addition, Heckman Selected Model and generalized linear model were used to examine the association of health insurance and inpatient expenditure. Estimations were done for 4076 individuals older than 45 years using pooled cross-sectional survey data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study conducted in 2011 and 2013. Patients with health insurance were more likely to spend more and receive more types of inpatient service. This relationship was partially explained by the institutional characteristics. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of enforcing the regulation of referral mechanisms, the tiered copayment requirement to guide people's care-seeking behavior, and reforming the allocation of limited health resources between different levels of facilities and also between private and public hospitals.

  20. Health Insurance Costs and Employee Compensation: Evidence from the National Compensation Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Priyanka

    2017-12-01

    This paper examines the relationship between rising health insurance costs and employee compensation. I estimate the extent to which total compensation decreases with a rise in health insurance costs and decompose these changes in compensation into adjustments in wages, non-health fringe benefits, and employee contributions to health insurance premiums. I examine this relationship using the National Compensation Survey, a panel dataset on compensation and health insurance for a sample of establishments across the USA. I find that total hourly compensation reduces by $0.52 for each dollar increase in health insurance costs. This reduction in total compensation is primarily in the form of higher employee premium contributions, and there is no evidence of a change in wages and non-health fringe benefits. These findings show that workers are absorbing at least part of the increase in health insurance costs through lower compensation and highlight the importance of examining total compensation, and not just wages, when examining the relationship between health insurance costs and employee compensation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Determinants of workplace health promotion in the insurance sector: results of a complete survey of German insurance companies in 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, T; Janssen, C; Plath, S-C; Steinhausen, S; Pfaff, H

    2009-11-01

    The present study is aimed to assess the current level of workplace health promotion (WHP) within the German insurance sector and to examine whether and to what extent internal and external factors play a role in implementing non-statutory health promotion measures. Firstly, a telephone survey was conducted of German insurance companies fulfilling the inclusion criteria for the survey (n=258). It was enquired whether these companies wish to participate in a written survey on workplace health promotion. A written questionnaire was then sent to those companies meeting the criteria (n=140). The questionnaire contained questions on the company, number and type of workplace health promotion measures as well as the internal and external framework for workplace health promotion measures. In total, 68 questionnaires were filled in and returned. Linear regression analysis was applied to investigate how external and internal variables influence workplace health promotion. The response rate was 48.57%. Workplace health promotion measures undertaken by those insurance companies taking part in the written survey were largely dominated by behavioural and relational prevention measures. Also on offer were measures from areas such as further education and prevention that seek to improve communication and team work. By contrast, diagnostic activities were only of minor importance. Incorporation into workplace health management (beta=0.469; pmanagement measures with regard to personnel development, organisational development and quality control (beta=0.243; pcompanies should increasingly incorporate such measures into specific health management programmes as well as general management measures with regard to personnel development, organisational development and quality control. Moreover, workplace health promotion measures should always be evaluated in terms of health and economic indicators. It should also be noted that small and medium-sized companies have the largest potential

  2. Health insurance: this time we want something concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few months, we have communicated to you a huge amount of information to defend our Pension Fund. Concerning this subject, we can inform you that the mass mobilization on 18 March is bearing fruit, CERN Council now seems to be willing to act. We will have to wait and see, but we are keeping a close eye on things. Today there is concern for the other mainstay of our social security system, the CHIS. Same scenario, same result. They play for time, they wait for the deficit, and then they take “emergency” measures. Drastic measures, we suppose, in line with the financial imbalance observed. These are the measures CERN Council, the Management, and your humble servants will discuss over the coming months in the framework of the current five-yearly review. These are crucial months for the future of our health scheme. In December the die will be cast. The CHIS (CERN Health Insurance Scheme) is divided into two parts, LTC (Long-Term Care) and the HIS (illness and accident cover). L...

  3. Determinants of Voluntary National Health Insurance Drop-Out in Eastern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Chantal; Fakihammed, Wael Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Low enrolment and high drop-out rates are common problems in voluntary health insurance schemes. Yet, most studies in this research area focus on community-based health insurance and enrolment, rather than drop-out. This study examines what causes informal sector families not to renew their voluntary National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) health insurance membership in Eastern Sudan. Primary data from about 600 informal sector households that dropped out or remained insured, collected through a household survey conducted in March 2014, were used. Logistic regressions were employed to examine what determines drop-out of the voluntary NHIF scheme. The logistic regression results are consistent with the existing literature and confirm the importance of household head, household and community characteristics. Notably, worse family health status and higher health care utilization decrease the probability of drop-out, which requires further analysis as it may indicate the problem of adverse selection and insufficient risk management. Most importantly, the results consistently show that household heads who are satisfied with health services and those who understand the main features of the voluntary NHIF scheme are less likely to drop out. Also, 30 % of drop-out households hold a social support card and reported that the social support scheme is the main reason for not renewing their voluntary NHIF health insurance membership as they qualify for sponsored NHIF health insurance membership. This study shows that satisfaction with health services and knowledge of the health insurance scheme are important factors explaining drop-out of a national health insurance programme. The results suggest that education and information campaigns should be developed further to raise understanding of the NHIF voluntary scheme. In addition, information systems and coordination between the main agencies should be strengthened to reduce administrative costs and ensure policy coherence.

  4. [Complaints by private health insurance policy-holders to the Consumer Protection Bureau in Argentina, 2000-2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzuriaga, María José; Spinelli, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    This paper analyzes problems experienced by policy-holders of voluntary private health insurance plans in Argentina when insurance companies fail to comply with the Consumer Protection Code. The sample consisted of consumer complaints filed with the Consumer Protection Bureau and rulings by the Bureau from 2000 to 2008. One striking issue was recurrent non-compliance with services included in the Mandatory Medical Program and the companies' attempts to blame policy-holders. According to the study, the lack of an information system hinders scientific studies to adequately address the problem. Thus, a comparison with studies on health insurance in other Latin American countries highlighted the importance of such research, the relationship to health systems, constraints on use and denial of citizens' rights to healthcare, and the increasing judicialization of healthcare provision.

  5. Health insurance coverage and impact: a survey in three cities in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuangnan Fang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: China has one of the world's largest health insurance systems, composed of government-run basic health insurance and commercial health insurance. The basic health insurance has undergone system-wide reform in recent years. Meanwhile, there is also significant development in the commercial health insurance sector. A phone call survey was conducted in three major cities in China in July and August, 2011. The goal was to provide an updated description of the effect of health insurance on the population covered. Of special interest were insurance coverage, gross and out-of-pocket medical cost and coping strategies. RESULTS: Records on 5,097 households were collected. Analysis showed that smaller households, higher income, lower expense, presence of at least one inpatient treatment and living in rural areas were significantly associated with a lower overall coverage rate. In the separate analysis of basic and commercial health insurance, similar factors were found to have significant associations. Higher income, presence of chronic disease, presence of inpatient treatment, higher coverage rates and living in urban areas were significantly associated with higher gross medical cost. A similar set of factors were significantly associated with higher out-of-pocket cost. Households with lower income, inpatient treatment, higher commercial insurance coverage, and living in rural areas were significantly more likely to pursue coping strategies other than salary. CONCLUSIONS: The surveyed cities and surrounding rural areas had socioeconomic status far above China's average. However, there was still a need to further improve coverage. Even for households with coverage, there was considerable out-of-pocket medical cost, particularly for households with inpatient treatments and/or chronic diseases. A small percentage of households were unable to self-finance out-of-pocket medical cost. Such observations suggest possible targets for further improving

  6. Acceptability of, and willingness to pay for, community health insurance in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankit; Swetha, Selva; Johar, Zeena; Raghavan, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    To understand the acceptability of, and willingness to pay for, community health insurance coverage among residents of rural India. We conducted a mixed methods study of 33 respondents located in 8 villages in southern India. Interview domains focused on health-seeking behaviors of the family for primary healthcare, household expenditures on primary healthcare, interest in pre-paid health insurance, and willingness to pay for such a product. Most respondents reported that they would seek care only when symptoms were manifest; only 6 respondents recognized the importance of preventative services. None reported impoverishment due to health expenditures. Few viewed health insurance as necessary either because they did not wish to be early adopters, because they had alternate sources of financial support, or because of concerns with the design of insurance coverage or the provider. Those who were interested reported being willing to pay Rs. 1500 ($27) as the modal annual insurance premium. Penetration of community health insurance programs in rural India will require education of the consumer base, careful attention to premium rate setting, and deeper understanding of social networks that may act as financial substitutes for health insurance. Copyright © 2013 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. "Aging Out" of Dependent Coverage and the Effects on US Labor Market and Health Insurance Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Heather M

    2015-11-01

    I examined how labor market and health insurance outcomes were affected by the loss of dependent coverage eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). I used National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data and regression discontinuity models to measure the percentage-point change in labor market and health insurance outcomes at age 26 years. My sample was restricted to unmarried individuals aged 24 to 28 years and to a period of time before the ACA's individual mandate (2011-2013). I ran models separately for men and women to determine if there were differences based on gender. Aging out of this provision increased employment among men, employer-sponsored health insurance offers for women, and reports that health insurance coverage was worse than it was 1 year previously (overall and for young women). Uninsured rates did not increase at age 26 years, but there was an increase in the purchase of non-group health coverage, indicating interest in remaining insured after age 26 years. Many young adults will turn to state and federal health insurance marketplaces for information about health coverage. Because young adults (aged 18-29 years) regularly use social media sites, these sites could be used to advertise insurance to individuals reaching their 26th birthdays.

  8. Beyond Antitrust: Health Care And Health Insurance Market Trends And The Future Of Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glied, Sherry A; Altman, Stuart H

    2017-09-01

    The United States relies on competition to balance costs and quality in the health care system. But concentration is increasing throughout the hospital, physician, and insurer markets. Midsize community hospitals face declining demand and growing competition from both larger hospitals and smaller freestanding diagnostic and surgical centers, leaving the midsize hospitals vulnerable to closure or merger with other facilities. Competition among insurers has been limited by the development of hospital systems that extend the bargaining power of "must-have" hospitals (those perceived to provide the best care for complex and less common conditions) across local health care markets. Government antitrust enforcement could play an important role in maintaining competition in both the hospital and insurer markets, but in many markets, the impact of that enforcement has been limited to date. Policy makers should consider supplementing antitrust activities with strategies that combine competition and regulation-for example, by regulating selected prices and structuring competition to cover entire insurance markets. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  9. A Longitudinal Investigation of Willingness to Pay for Health Insurance in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens-Oliver; Hajek, André; Brenner, Hermann; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Matschinger, Herbert; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schöttker, Ben; Quinzler, Renate; Heider, Dirk; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-06-01

    To investigate factors affecting willingness to pay (WTP) for health insurance of older adults in a longitudinal setting in Germany. Survey data from a cohort study in Saarland, Germany, from 2008-2010 and 2011-2014 (n 1  = 3,124; n 2  = 2,761) were used. Panel data were taken at two points from an observational, prospective cohort study. WTP estimates were derived using a contingent valuation method with a payment card. Participants provided data on sociodemographics, lifestyle factors, morbidity, and health care utilization. Fixed effects regression models showed higher individual health care costs to increase WTP, which in particular could be found for members of private health insurance. Changes in income and morbidity did not affect WTP among members of social health insurance, whereas these predictors affected WTP among members of private health insurance. The fact that individual health care costs affected WTP positively might indicate that demanding (expensive) health care services raises the awareness of the benefits of health insurance. Thus, measures to increase WTP in old age should target at improving transparency of the value of health insurances at the moment when individual health care utilization and corresponding costs are still relatively low. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. The role of the National Health insurance scheme in shaping equity of access to healthcare in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassan, Yussif Nagumse

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent emphasis on achieving Universal Health Coverage through social health insurance in low income countries, this thesis examined how the National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana impacts on equity of access to healthcare in Tamale District of northern Ghana. Using mainly a qualitative approach, the thesis specifically examined whether the NHIS promotes equity in health insurance coverage and whether insured members are able to access healthcare equitably. Against this backgrou...

  11. 78 FR 32661 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal of the Advisory Panel on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... communities Health communications Disease-related advocacy Disability policy and access Health economics research Health insurers and plans Health information technology (IT) Direct patient care Matters of labor... Populations, African-American Health/Disparities, Health/Disability/Quality and State Programs/ Medicaid/Rural...

  12. A national and state profile of leading health problems and health care quality for US children: key insurance disparities and across-state variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethell, Christina D; Kogan, Michael D; Strickland, Bonnie B; Schor, Edward L; Robertson, Julie; Newacheck, Paul W

    2011-01-01

    Parent/consumer-reported data is valuable and necessary for population-based assessment of many key child health and health care quality measures relevant to both the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) of 2009 and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA). The aim of this study was to evaluate national and state prevalence of health problems and special health care needs in US children; to estimate health care quality related to adequacy and consistency of insurance coverage, access to specialist, mental health and preventive medical and dental care, developmental screening, and whether children meet criteria for having a medical home, including care coordination and family centeredness; and to assess differences in health and health care quality for children by insurance type, special health care needs status, race/ethnicity, and/or state of residence. National and state level estimates were derived from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (N = 91,642; children aged 0-17 years). Variations between children with public versus private sector health insurance, special health care needs, specific conditions, race/ethnicity, and across states were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression and/or standardized statistical tests. An estimated 43% of US children (32 million) currently have at least 1 of 20 chronic health conditions assessed, increasing to 54.1% when overweight, obesity, or being at risk for developmental delays are included; 19.2% (14.2 million) have conditions resulting in a special health care need, a 1.6 point increase since 2003. Compared with privately insured children, the prevalence, complexity, and severity of health problems were systematically greater for the 29.1% of all children who are publicly insured children after adjusting for variations in demographic and socioeconomic factors. Forty-five percent of all children in the United States scored positively on a minimal quality

  13. Something old or something new? Social health insurance in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie; Garshong, Bertha

    2009-08-28

    There is considerable interest at present in exploring the potential of social health insurance to increase access to and affordability of health care in Africa. A number of countries are currently experimenting with different approaches. Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) was passed into law in 2003 but fully implemented from late 2005. It has already reached impressive coverage levels. This article aims to provide a preliminary assessment of the NHIS to date. This can inform the development of the NHIS itself but also other innovations in the region. This article is based on analysis of routine data, on secondary literature and on key informant interviews conducted by the authors with stakeholders at national, regional and district levels over the period of 2005 to 2009. In relation to its financing sources, the NHIS is heavily reliant on tax funding for 70-75% of its revenue. This has permitted quick expansion of coverage, partly through the inclusion of large exempted population groups. Card holders increased from 7% of the population in 2005 to 45% in 2008. However, only around a third of these are contributing to the scheme financially. This presents a sustainability problem, in that revenue is de-coupled from the growing membership. In addition, the NHIS offers a broad benefits package, with no co-payments and limited gate-keeping, and also faces cost escalation related to its new payment system and the growing utilisation of members. These features contributed to a growth in distressed schemes and failure to pay outstanding facility claims in 2008.The NHIS has had a considerable impact on the health system as a whole, taking on a growing role in funding curative care. In 2009, it is expected to contribute 41% of the overall resource envelope. However there is evidence that this funding is not additional but has been switched from other funding channels. There are some equity concerns about this, as the new funding source (a VAT-based tax) may

  14. Something old or something new? Social health insurance in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garshong Bertha

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest at present in exploring the potential of social health insurance to increase access to and affordability of health care in Africa. A number of countries are currently experimenting with different approaches. Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS was passed into law in 2003 but fully implemented from late 2005. It has already reached impressive coverage levels. This article aims to provide a preliminary assessment of the NHIS to date. This can inform the development of the NHIS itself but also other innovations in the region. Methods This article is based on analysis of routine data, on secondary literature and on key informant interviews conducted by the authors with stakeholders at national, regional and district levels over the period of 2005 to 2009. Results In relation to its financing sources, the NHIS is heavily reliant on tax funding for 70–75% of its revenue. This has permitted quick expansion of coverage, partly through the inclusion of large exempted population groups. Card holders increased from 7% of the population in 2005 to 45% in 2008. However, only around a third of these are contributing to the scheme financially. This presents a sustainability problem, in that revenue is de-coupled from the growing membership. In addition, the NHIS offers a broad benefits package, with no co-payments and limited gate-keeping, and also faces cost escalation related to its new payment system and the growing utilisation of members. These features contributed to a growth in distressed schemes and failure to pay outstanding facility claims in 2008. The NHIS has had a considerable impact on the health system as a whole, taking on a growing role in funding curative care. In 2009, it is expected to contribute 41% of the overall resource envelope. However there is evidence that this funding is not additional but has been switched from other funding channels. There are some equity concerns

  15. Asymmetric Information in Iranian’s Health Insurance Market: Testing of Adverse Selection and Moral Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Farhad; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Mahdavi, Ghadir; Hadian, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asymmetric information is one of the most important issues in insurance market which occurred due to inherent characteristics of one of the agents involved in insurance contracts; hence its management requires designing appropriate policies. This phenomenon can lead to the failure of insurance market via its two consequences, namely, adverse selection and moral hazard. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the status of asymmetric information in Iran’s health insurance market with respect to the demand for outpatient services. Materials/sPatients and Methods: This research is a cross sectional study conducted on households living in Iran. The data of the research was extracted from the information on household’s budget survey collected by the Statistical Center of Iran in 2012. In this study, the Generalized Method of Moment model was used and the status of adverse selection and moral hazard was evaluated through calculating the latent health status of individuals in each insurance category. To analyze the data, Excel, Eviews and stata11 software were used. Results: The estimation of parameters of the utility function of the demand for outpatient services (visit, medicine, and Para-clinical services) showed that households were more risk averse in the use of outpatient care than other goods and services. After estimating the health status of households based on their health insurance categories, the results showed that rural-insured people had the best health status and people with supplementary insurance had the worst health status. In addition, the comparison of the conditional distribution of latent health status approved the phenomenon of adverse selection in all insurance groups, with the exception of rural insurance. Moreover, calculation of the elasticity of medical expenses to reimbursement rate confirmed the existence of moral hazard phenomenon. Conclusions: Due to the existence of the phenomena of adverse selection and moral hazard

  16. Asymmetric Information in Iranian's Health Insurance Market: Testing of Adverse Selection and Moral Hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Farhad; Abolghasem Gorji, Hassan; Mahdavi, Ghadir; Hadian, Mohammad

    2015-04-19

    Asymmetric information is one of the most important issues in insurance market which occurred due to inherent characteristics of one of the agents involved in insurance contracts; hence its management requires designing appropriate policies. This phenomenon can lead to the failure of insurance market via its two consequences, namely, adverse selection and moral hazard. This study was aimed to evaluate the status of asymmetric information in Iran's health insurance market with respect to the demand for outpatient services. This research is a cross sectional study conducted on households living in Iran. The data of the research was extracted from the information on household's budget survey collected by the Statistical Center of Iran in 2012. In this study, the Generalized Method of Moment model was used and the status of adverse selection and moral hazard was evaluated through calculating the latent health status of individuals in each insurance category. To analyze the data, Excel, Eviews and stata11 software were used. The estimation of parameters of the utility function of the demand for outpatient services (visit, medicine, and Para-clinical services) showed that households were more risk averse in the use of outpatient care than other goods and services. After estimating the health status of households based on their health insurance categories, the results showed that rural-insured people had the best health status and people with supplementary insurance had the worst health status. In addition, the comparison of the conditional distribution of latent health status approved the phenomenon of adverse selection in all insurance groups, with the exception of rural insurance. Moreover, calculation of the elasticity of medical expenses to reimbursement rate confirmed the existence of moral hazard phenomenon. Due to the existence of the phenomena of adverse selection and moral hazard in most of health insurances categories, policymakers need to adjust contracts so

  17. The Politico-Economic Challenges of Ghana’s National Health Insurance Scheme Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Fusheini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background National/social health insurance schemes have increasingly been seen in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs as a vehicle to universal health coverage (UHC and a viable alternative funding mechanism for the health sector. Several countries, including Ghana, have thus introduced and implemented mandatory national health insurance schemes (NHIS as part of reform efforts towards increasing access to health services. Ghana passed mandatory national health insurance (NHI legislation (ACT 650 in 2003 and commenced nationwide implementation in 2004. Several peer review studies and other research reports have since assessed the performance of the scheme with positive rating while challenges also noted. This paper contributes to the literature on economic and political implementation challenges based on empirical evidence from the perspectives of the different category of actors and institutions involved in the process. Methods Qualitative in-depth interviews were held with 33 different category of participants in four selected district mutual health insurance schemes in Southern (two and Northern (two Ghana. This was to ascertain their views regarding the main challenges in the implementation process. The participants were selected through purposeful sampling, stakeholder mapping, and snowballing. Data was analysed using thematic grouping procedure. Results Participants identified political issues of over politicisation and political interference as main challenges. The main economic issues participants identified included low premiums or contributions; broad exemptions, poor gatekeeper enforcement system; and culture of curative and hospital-centric care. Conclusion The study establishes that political and economic factors have influenced the implementation process and the degree to which the policy has been implemented as intended. Thus, we conclude that there is a synergy between implementation and politics; and achieving UHC under

  18. The Politico-Economic Challenges of Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusheini, Adam

    2016-04-27

    National/social health insurance schemes have increasingly been seen in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as a vehicle to universal health coverage (UHC) and a viable alternative funding mechanism for the health sector. Several countries, including Ghana, have thus introduced and implemented mandatory national health insurance schemes (NHIS) as part of reform efforts towards increasing access to health services. Ghana passed mandatory national health insurance (NHI) legislation (ACT 650) in 2003 and commenced nationwide implementation in 2004. Several peer review studies and other research reports have since assessed the performance of the scheme with positive rating while challenges also noted. This paper contributes to the literature on economic and political implementation challenges based on empirical evidence from the perspectives of the different category of actors and institutions involved in the process. Qualitative in-depth interviews were held with 33 different category of participants in four selected district mutual health insurance schemes in Southern (two) and Northern (two) Ghana. This was to ascertain their views regarding the main challenges in the implementation process. The participants were selected through purposeful sampling, stakeholder mapping, and snowballing. Data was analysed using thematic grouping procedure. Participants identified political issues of over politicisation and political interference as main challenges. The main economic issues participants identified included low premiums or contributions; broad exemptions, poor gatekeeper enforcement system; and culture of curative and hospital-centric care. The study establishes that political and economic factors have influenced the implementation process and the degree to which the policy has been implemented as intended. Thus, we conclude that there is a synergy between implementation and politics; and achieving UHC under the NHIS requires political stewardship. Political

  19. Criteria for the future division of labor between private and social health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, P

    2000-01-01

    This article's point of departure is that the individual has to manage three stochastic assets, namely health, wealth, and wisdom (skills), which tend to be positively correlated. It shows that the unexpected components of insurance payments should be negatively correlated for minimizing total asset volatility. The empirical finding is that in the United States, Japan, and Germany, the lines of social insurance contribute less to diversification than do those of private insurance. The article concludes with suggestions for new, umbrella-type insurance contracts that in the future should help individuals in the efficient management of their assets.

  20. Unemployment insurance and deteriorating self-rated health in 23 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, Tommy; Nelson, Kenneth; Sjöberg, Ola

    2014-07-01

    The global financial crisis of 2008 is likely to have repercussions on public health in Europe, not least through escalating mass unemployment, fiscal austerity measures and inadequate social protection systems. The purpose of this study is to analyse the role of unemployment insurance for deteriorating self-rated health in the working age population at the onset of the fiscal crisis in Europe. Multilevel logistic conditional change models linking institutional-level data on coverage and income replacement in unemployment insurance to individual-level panel data on self-rated health in 23 European countries at two repeated occasions, 2006 and 2009. Unemployment insurance significantly reduces transitions into self-rated ill-health and, particularly, programme coverage is important in this respect. Unemployment insurance is also of relevance for the socioeconomic gradients of health at individual level, where programme coverage significantly reduces health risks attached to educational attainment. Unemployment insurance mitigated adverse health effects both at individual and country-level during the financial crisis. Due to the centrality of programme coverage, reforms to unemployment insurance should focus on extending the number of insured people in the labour force. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Social health insurance contributes to universal coverage in South Africa, but generates inequities: survey among members of a government employee insurance scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Goudge, Jane; Alaba, Olufunke A.; Govender, Veloshnee; Harris, Bronwyn; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Chersich, Matthew F.

    2018-01-01

    Background Many low- and middle-income countries are reforming their health financing mechanisms as part of broader strategies to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). Voluntary social health insurance, despite evidence of resulting inequities, is attractive to policy makers as it generates additional funds for health, and provides access to a greater range of benefits for the formally employed. The South African government introduced a voluntary health insurance scheme (GEMS) for governme...

  2. How Have Health Insurers Performed Financially Under the ACA' Market Rules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J; Hall, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) transformed the market for individual health insurance, so it is not surprising that insurers' transition was not entirely smooth. Insurers, with no previous experience under these market conditions, were uncertain how to price their products. As a result, they incurred significant losses. Based on this experience, some insurers have decided to leave the ACA’s subsidized market, although others appear to be thriving. Examine the financial performance of health insurers selling through the ACA's marketplace exchanges in 2015--the market’s most difficult year to date. Analysis of financial data for 2015 reported by insurers from 48 states and D.C. to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Although health insurers were profitable across all lines of business, they suffered a 10 percent loss in 2015 on their health plans sold through the ACA's exchanges. The top quarter of the ACA exchange market was comfortably profitable, while the bottom quarter did much worse than the ACA market average. This indicates that some insurers were able to adapt to the ACA's new market rules much better than others, suggesting the ACA's new market structure is sustainable, if supported properly by administrative policy.

  3. Lifetime Consequences of Early-Life and Midlife Access to Health Insurance: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Étienne; Pauley, Gwyn C; Zissimopoulos, Julie M

    2017-11-01

    Over the past decade, the number of studies examining the effects of health insurance has grown rapidly, along with the breadth of outcomes considered. In light of growing research in this area and the intense policy focus on coverage expansions in the United States, there is need for an up-to-date and comprehensive literature review and synthesis of lessons learned. We reviewed 112 experimental or quasi-experimental studies on the effects of health insurance prior to people becoming eligible for Medicare on a broad set of outcomes. Over the past decade, evidence related to the effect of increased access to health insurance has strengthened, illuminating that children and vulnerable adults are most likely to see health and economic benefits. We identified promising areas for future study in this active and burgeoning research area, noting benefit design of health insurance and outcomes such as government program participation and self-reported health status as targets.

  4. Health Insurance Type and Control of Hypertension Among US Women Living With and Without HIV Infection in the Women's Interagency HIV Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludema, Christina; Cole, Stephen R; Eron, Joseph J; Holmes, G Mark; Anastos, Kathryn; Cocohoba, Jennifer; Cohen, Marge H; Cooper, Hannah L F; Golub, Elizabeth T; Kassaye, Seble; Konkle-Parker, Deborah; Metsch, Lisa; Milam, Joel; Wilson, Tracey E; Adimora, Adaora A

    2017-06-01

    Health care access is an important determinant of health. We assessed the effect of health insurance status and type on blood pressure control among US women living with (WLWH) and without HIV. We used longitudinal cohort data from the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS participants were included at their first study visit since 2001 with incident uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) (i.e., BP ≥140/90 and at which BP at the prior visit was controlled (i.e., insured via Medicaid, were African-American, and had a yearly income ≤$12,000. Among participants living with HIV, comparing the uninsured to those with Medicaid yielded an 18-month BP control risk difference of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.23). This translates into a number-needed-to-treat (or insure) of 6; to reduce the caseload of WLWH with uncontrolled BP by one case, five individuals without insurance would need to be insured via Medicaid. Blood pressure control was similar among WLWH with private insurance and Medicaid. There were no differences observed by health insurance status on 18-month risk of BP control among the HIV-uninfected participants. These results underscore the importance of health insurance for hypertension control-especially for people living with HIV. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Health Care Communication Laws in the United States, 2013: Implications for Access to Sensitive Services for Insured Dependents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoff, Iris; Cramer, Ryan; Leichliter, Jami S

    Young adults may not seek sensitive health services when confidentiality cannot be ensured. To better understand the policy environment for insured dependent confidentiality, we systematically assessed legal requirements for health insurance plan communications using WestlawNext to create a jurisdiction-level data set of health insurance plan communication regulations as of March 2013. Two jurisdictions require plan communications be sent to a policyholder, 22 require plan communications to be sent to an insured, and 36 give insurers discretion to send plan communications to the policyholder or insured. Six jurisdictions prohibit disclosure, and 3 allow a patient to request nondisclosure of certain patient information. Our findings suggest that in many states, health insurers are given considerable discretion in determining to whom plan communications containing sensitive health information are sent. Future research could use this framework to analyze the association between state laws concerning insured dependent confidentiality and public health outcomes and related sensitive services.

  6. [Evidence-based medicine and public health law: statutory health insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Wolfgang

    2004-09-01

    Beyond all differences in terminology and legal principles between the laws governing private health insurance, the governmental financial support for civil, servants and statutory health insurance the fundamental issues to be solved by the courts in case of litigation are quite similar. But only a part of these refer to the quality of medical services, which is the main concern of Evidence-based Medicine (EbM); EbM, though, is not able to contribute towards answering the equally important question of how to distinguish between "treatment" and "(health-relevant) lifestyle". The respective definitions that have been developed in the particular fields of law are only seemingly divergent from each other and basically unsuitable to aid the physician in his clinical decision-making because the common blanket clauses of public health law are regularly interpreted as rules for the exclusion of certain claims and not as a confirmatory paraphrase of what is clinically necessary. If on the other hand medical quality is what lies at the core of litigation, reference to EbM may become necessary. In fact, it is already common practice in the statutory health insurance system that decision-making processes in the Federal Committee being responsible for quality assurance (Bundesausschuss) are based on EbM principles and that in exceptional cases only the courts have to medically review the Federal Committee's decisions.

  7. [Challenges of an integrative and personalised health care for health economics and the insurance system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Goentje-Gesine; Würdemann, E

    2014-11-01

    "Stratifying medicine" is a topic of increasing importance in the public health system. There are several questions related to "stratifying medicine". This paper reconsiders definitions, opportunities and risks related to "stratifying medicine" as well as the main challenges of "stratifying medicine" from the perspective of a public health insurance. The application of the term and the definition are important points to discuss. Terms such as "stratified medicine", "personalised medicine" or "individualised medicine" are used. The Techniker Krankenkasse prefers "stratifying medicine", because it usually means a medicine that tailors therapy to specific groups of patients by biomarkers. OPPORTUNITIES AND RISKS: "Stratifying medicine" is associated with various hopes, e. g., the avoidance of ineffective therapies and early detection of diseases. But "stratifying medicine" also carries risks, such as an increase in the number of cases by treatment of disease risks, a duty for health and the weakening of the criteria of evidence-based medicine. The complexity of "stratifying medicine" is a big challenge for all involved parties in the health system. A lot of interrelations are still not completely understood. So the statutory health insurance faces the challenge of making innovative therapy concepts accessible in a timely manner to all insured on the one hand but on the other hand also to protect the community from harmful therapies. Information and advice to patients related to "stratifying medicine" is of particular importance. The equitable distribution of fees for diagnosis and counselling presents a particular challenge. The solidarity principle of public health insurance may be challenged by social and ethical issues of "stratifying medicine". "Stratifying medicine" offers great potential to improve medical care. However, false hopes must be avoided. Providers and payers should measure chances and risks of "stratifying medicine" together for the welfare of the

  8. Advancing human rights in patient care of Roma: access to health insurance in Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salioska, Nesime; Lee, Theodore T; Quinn, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Roma in Macedonia suffer from dire health consequences due to economic factors, such as high rates of unemployment and poverty, and social factors, including discrimination by medical providers. Although Macedonia administers a public health care system for its citizens, Roma frequently lack access to this system in contravention of the rights to health and equality enshrined in Macedonia's Constitution and international law. Applying a human rights in patient care (HRPC) framework to this problem, we discuss a facially neutral law that predicated access to health insurance for low-income citizens on the submission of a statement of income. This requirement created additional barriers to care, which we describe in this article. Even after the Constitutional Court declared the requirement invalid, the government failed to implement appropriate changes to the law in a timely manner. We argue this failure threatened the rule of law in the country and further marginalized and discriminated against Roma in violation of their human rights.

  9. [Health promotion in the framework of the health reform legislation--current perspectives for health insurance and municipalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, M

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes the perspectives of health promotion within the framework of the basic laws promulgated as of January 1989 in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial situation, the intentions of the legislator, the performance criteria and the types of organised health promotion on a regional or county (community) basis are described. The new legislation on health promotion opens up new perspectives for compulsory health insurance bodies and regional (community) bodies. The advantages offered thereby must be made use of. The health insurance bodies can revive the principles of self-administration by taking full advantage of all possibilities of creating health promotion facilities. Community bodies must not only bear costs, they are also centrally responsible for health promotion policies to be enforced in their respective regions by organising cooperation between the individual persons and institutions who can regionally act as health policy promoters, and they are expected to bring about a general consensus on health promotion procedures.

  10. Health Insurance Trends in United States Living Kidney Donors (2004 to 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, J R; Fleishman, A

    2016-12-01

    Some transplant programs consider the lack of health insurance as a contraindication to living kidney donation. Still, prior studies have shown that many adults are uninsured at time of donation. We extend the study of donor health insurance status over a longer time period and examine associations between insurance status and relevant sociodemographic and health characteristics. We queried the United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network registry for all living kidney donors (LKDs) between July 2004 and July 2015. Of the 53 724 LKDs with known health insurance status, 8306 (16%) were uninsured at the time of donation. Younger (18 to 34 years old), male, minority, unemployed, less educated, unmarried LKDs and those who were smokers and normotensive were more likely to not have health insurance at the time of donation. Compared to those with no health risk factors (i.e. obesity, smoking, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate health risk factors at the time of donation were more likely to be uninsured (p health risk factors, blacks (28%) and Hispanics (27%) had higher likelihood of being uninsured compared to whites (19%; p importance of providing health insurance benefits to all previous and future LKDs. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. [Work place health promotion programmes of the statutory German Pension Insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffert, C; Mittag, O; Jäckel, W H

    2013-12-01

    In 2009, the amendment of § 31 Abs. 1 Nr. 2 SGB VI gave the German Pension Insurance the opportunity to provide outpatient medical treatments for insured people who have an occupation with particularly high risk of health. Ever since, the German Pension Insurance has developed various work place prevention programmes, which have been implemented as pilot projects. This article aims at systematically recording and comparatively analyzing these programmes in a synopsis which meets the current state of knowledge. We developed an 8 page questionnaire focusing on work place prevention programmes by the German Pension Insurance. This questionnaire was sent to people in charge of all programmes known to us. All programmes have been drafted -across indications. They are aiming at insured people who already suffer from first health disorders but who are not in imminent need of rehabilitation. However, the concrete target groups at which the specific programmes are aimed differ (shift workers, nurses, elderly employees). Another difference between the various programmes is the setting (in- or outpatients) as well as the duration. All programmes are using existing structures offered by the German Pension Insurance. They provide measures in pension insurance owned rehabilitation centers. It would be desirable to link these performances with internal work place health promotion and offers of other social insurances. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Private finance of services covered by the National Health Insurance package of benefits in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelchin-Nissan, Esti; Shmueli, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Private health expenditure in systems of national health insurance has raised concern in many countries. The concern is mainly about the accessibility of care to the poor and the sick, and inequality in use and in health. The concern thus refers specifically to the care financed privately rather than to private health expenditure as defined in the national health accounts. To estimate the share of private finance in total use of services covered by the national package of benefits. and to relate the private finance of use to the income and health of the users. The Central Bureau of Statistics linked the 2009 Health Survey and the 2010 Incomes Survey. Twenty-four thousand five hundred ninety-five individuals in 7175 households were included in the data. Lacking data on the share of private finance in total cost of care delivered, we calculated instead the share of uses having any private finance-beyond copayments-in total uses, in primary, secondary, paramedical and total care. The probability of any private finance in each type of care is then related, using random effect logistic regression, to income and health state. Fifteen percent of all uses of care covered by the national package of benefits had any private finance. This rate ranges from 10 % in primary care, 16 % in secondary care and 31 % in paramedical care. Twelve percent of all uses of physicians' services had any private finance, ranging from 10 % in family physicians to 20 % in pulmonologists, psychiatrists, neurologists and urologists. Controlling for health state, richer individuals are more likely to have any private finance in all types of care. Controlling for income, sick individuals (1+ chronic conditions) are 30 % in total care and 60 % in primary care more likely to have any private finance compared to healthy individuals (with no chronic conditions). The national accounts' "private health spending" (39 % of total spending in 2010) is not of much use regarding equity of and

  13. Social health insurance: can we ever make a case for Pakistan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrejo, Farina Gul; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2008-05-01

    Social Health Insurance has been used as an approach to increase efficiency of healthcare system and consumer satisfaction in provision of healthcare services. Many developed countries have successfully planned and implemented insurance models which provide almost universal coverage and addresses issues of equity. The phenomenon is established however, developing countries especially Eastern Mediterranean region is still struggling to present one successful model of social health insurance which can be compared with European or Scandinavian countries. Pakistan likewise faces huge challenges in public sector healthcare provision and considerable proportion of population prefers to go to private sector. Quality of care, access and rising costs make healthcare, somehow, a luxury. Rising national economy, political will to carry out health sector reforms and the creation of district health system after devolution presents an opportunity to launch at least some pilot initiatives of social health insurance. This will give us some food for thought to further up scale and replicate the model all over the country.

  14. How will changes in health insurance tax policy and employer health plan contributions affect access to health care and health care costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, M S; Buchanan, J L

    To understand how changes in federal taxation of and employer contributions to health insurance benefits affect the decisions of firms to offer insurance, the willingness of households to purchase different health plans, and the resultant health expenditures. Economic policy simulation. Secondary data analysis. A total of 18,343 sampled families (representing 77 million total families throughout the United States) with a working household head from the 1988 Current Population Survey who were not covered by either Medicare, Medicaid, or CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services) insurance. One intervention limits the amounts of tax-free employer contributions to health insurance premiums to 80% of our estimate of the base plan in the market and assumes that employer contributions will also be limited to this maximum. A second intervention eliminates the favorable tax treatment of employer-paid premiums altogether and assumes that employees will pay the full price of insurance. Change in the number of working families offered employment-based insurance, change in insurance plan choice, and change in medical spending. Capping the favorable tax treatment and employer contributions decreases the number of families offered employment-based insurance by approximately 91,000, increases the number of families selecting the least generous insurance plan from 20% under the current situation to 33%, and reduces overall health spending by less than 2%. By eliminating the tax exemption altogether, the number of families offered employment-based insurance decreases by approximately half a million families, the number of families selecting the least generous plan goes from 20% to 40%, and overall spending falls by about $16 billion. Eliminating the tax subsidy and limiting employer-paid contributions to the low-cost plan substantially increases the number of low-income uninsured under a voluntary insurance system, decreases overall spending only

  15. [Health insurance in the contributive and subsidized regimes and its impact on the service providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Luis M

    2004-01-01

    The performance of 18 private Health-promoting (EPS) and Family Compensation (CCF) entities, as well as their general balances for 1997, 1998 and 1999, were studied to determine the profit margins achieved by EPS's in their work of administering health insurance. The average behavior of each EPS balance sheet was analyzed to reduce the effect produced by extreme cases; each EPS's value was thus weighted by the number of its affiliated people. The expected behavior of the costs and expenses of companies whose main business is providing health insurance could thus become determined. The main source of operational income for a private EPS is the contributive regime's per capita unit of payment (UPC). Subsidized regime participation and that of other sources of income has decreased year by year. By contrast, public EPS's have shown decreasing participation in income obtained from UPC (contributive and subsidized) and growing dependence on other sources of income; this can be interpreted as being a symptom of weak commercial management. According to the balance sheets provided by the SNS, the EPS (public, private and Family Compensation entities), including the Social Security Institute (ISS), together obtained a total of 4.18 billion pesos operational income in 1999, an increase of 21.7% as compared to 1998. Income received from the ISS amounted to 1.93 billion dollars in 1999 (46% of the total). At 2000 prices, the total amount of operational income was 4.54 billion pesos in 1999 (15.6% real increase). Taking the behavior of 4 EPS's as our reference point (Sanitas, Humana Vivir, Coomeva and Famisanar), it can be concluded that an EPS whose main business is health insurance needs a 17.2% gross margin to cover its operational and non-operational costs and a 1.1% margin before tax.

  16. Determinants of health insurance ownership among women in Kenya: evidence from the 2008–09 Kenya demographic and health survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Government of Kenya is making plans to implement a social health insurance program by transforming the National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF) into a universal health coverage program. The objective of this study was to examine the determinants associated with health insurance ownership among women in Kenya. Methods Data came from the 2008–09 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, a nationally representative survey. The sample comprised 8,435 women aged 15–49 years. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to describe the characteristics of the sample and to identify factors associated with health insurance ownership. Results Being employed in the formal sector, being married, exposure to the mass media, having secondary education or higher, residing in households in the middle or rich wealth index categories and residing in a female-headed household were associated with having health insurance. However, region of residence was associated with a lower likelihood of having insurance coverage. Women residing in Central (OR = 0.4; p insured compared to their counterparts in Nairobi province. Conclusions As the Kenyan government transforms the NHIF into a universal health program, it is important to implement a program that will increase equity and access to health care services among the poor and vulnerable groups. PMID:24678655

  17. Stakeholders Perspectives on the Success Drivers in Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme - Identifying Policy Translation Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusheini, Adam; Marnoch, Gordon; Gray, Ann Marie

    2016-10-01

    Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), established by an Act of Parliament (Act 650), in 2003 and since replaced by Act 852 of 2012 remains, in African terms, unprecedented in terms of growth and coverage. As a result, the scheme has received praise for its associated legal reforms, clinical audit mechanisms and for serving as a hub for knowledge sharing and learning within the context of South-South cooperation. The scheme continues to shape national health insurance thinking in Africa. While the success, especially in coverage and financial access has been highlighted by many authors, insufficient attention has been paid to critical and context-specific factors. This paper seeks to fill that gap. Based on an empirical qualitative case study of stakeholders' views on challenges and success factors in four mutual schemes (district offices) located in two regions of Ghana, the study uses the concept of policy translation to assess whether the Ghana scheme could provide useful lessons to other African and developing countries in their quest to implement social/NHISs. In the study, interviewees referred to both 'hard and soft' elements as driving the "success" of the Ghana scheme. The main 'hard elements' include bureaucratic and legal enforcement capacities; IT; financing; governance, administration and management; regulating membership of the scheme; and service provision and coverage capabilities. The 'soft' elements identified relate to: the background/context of the health insurance scheme; innovative ways of funding the NHIS, the hybrid nature of the Ghana scheme; political will, commitment by government, stakeholders and public cooperation; social structure of Ghana (solidarity); and ownership and participation. Other developing countries can expect to translate rather than re-assemble a national health insurance programme in an incomplete and highly modified form over a period of years, amounting to a process best conceived as germination as opposed

  18. Yearly Data for Asian & Pacific Islander Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides annual volumes for API language preferences at the national level of individuals filing claims for Disability insurance benefits for federal...

  19. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Raman

    2013-07-16

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health.

  20. A framework for including family health spillovers in economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Al-Janabi (Hareth); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); J. Coast (Joanna)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHealth care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these health spillovers? should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health

  1. Supplementary Health Insurance from the consumer point of view: Are Israelis consumers doing an informed rational choice when purchasing Supplementary Health Insurance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Giora; Shahar, Yael; Tal, Orna

    2017-06-01

    The National Health Insurance Law in Israel ensures basic health basket eligibility for all its citizens. A supplemental health insurance plan (SHIP) is offered for an additional fee. Over the years, the percentage of supplemental insurance's holders has risen considerably, ranking among the highest in OECD countries. The assumption that consumers implement an informed rational choice based on relevant information is doubtful. Are consumers sufficiently well informed to make market processes work well? To examine perspectives, preferences and knowledge of Israelis in relation to SHIP. A telephone survey was conducted with a representative sample of the Israeli adult population. 703 interviews were completed. The response rate was 50.3%. 85% of the sample reported possessing SHIP. This survey found that most of the Israeli public parched additional insurance coverage however did not show a significant knowledge about the benefits provided by the supplementary insurance, at least in the three measurements used in this study. The scope of SHIP acquisition is very broad and cannot be explained in economic terms alone. Acquiring SHIP became a default option rather than an active decision. It is time to review the goals, achievements and side effects of SHIP and to create new policy for the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Illness Mapping: A time and cost effective method to estimate healthcare data needed to establish community-based health insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Binnendijk (Erica); M. Gautham (Meenakshi); R. Koren (Ruth); D.M. Dror (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Most healthcare spending in developing countries is private out-of-pocket. One explanation for low penetration of health insurance is that poorer individuals doubt their ability to enforce insurance contracts. Community-based health insurance schemes (CBHI) are a solution,

  3. The emergence of a health insurance system in a developing country: the case of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S

    1989-12-01

    In an attempt to understand the social forces and the economic and political conditions under which new social policies emerge in developing countries, this study outlines factors affecting the introduction of the health insurance system in South Korea. The emergence of the South Korean health insurance system was influenced by changing labor needs of the industrial sector, increasing social expectations, external and international pressures, increasing medical costs, and class conflict. These pressures compelled the South Korean government to respond to demands for the introduction of new social welfare policies in the 1970s. In the case of South Korea, the new health insurance system resulted from the government's attempts to cope with political, economic, and social pressures rather than from an ideological commitment to the well-being of the population. The resulting insurance system was a way to maintain the social order and legitimacy of the regime, and a means to promote the health of groups important to defense or production.

  4. Moving toward universal coverage of health insurance in Vietnam: barriers, facilitating factors, and lessons from Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ngan; Oh, Juhwan; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2014-07-01

    Vietnam has pursued universal health insurance coverage for two decades but has yet to fully achieve this goal. This paper investigates the barriers to achieve universal coverage and examines the validity of facilitating factors to shorten the transitional period in Vietnam. A comparative study of facilitating factors toward universal coverage of Vietnam and Korea reveals significant internal forces for Vietnam to further develop the National Health Insurance Program. Korea in 1977 and Vietnam in 2009 have common characteristics to be favorable of achieving universal coverage with similarities of level of income, highly qualified administrative ability, tradition of solidarity, and strong political leadership although there are differences in distribution of population and structure of the economy. From a comparative perspective, Vietnam can consider the experience of Korea in implementing the mandatory enrollment approach, household unit of eligibility, design of contribution and benefit scheme, and resource allocation to health insurance for sustainable government subsidy to achieve and sustain the universal coverage of health insurance.

  5. Private Health Insurance Exchanges: Early Evidence and Implications for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttorff, Christine; Nowak, Sarah; Syme, James; Eibner, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Private health insurance exchanges offer employer health insurance, combining online shopping, increased plan choice, benefit administration, and cost-containment strategies. This article examines how private exchanges function, how they may affect employers and employees, and the possible implications for the Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) Marketplaces. The authors found that private exchanges could encourage employees to select less-generous plans. This could expose employees to higher out-of-pocket costs, but premium contributions would drop substantially, so net spending would decrease. On the other hand, employee spending may increase if, in moving to private exchanges, employers decrease their health insurance contributions. Most employers can avoid the ACA's "Cadillac tax" by reducing the generosity of the plans they offer, regardless of whether they move to a private exchange. There is not yet enough evidence to determine whether the private exchanges will become prominent in the insurance market and how they will affect employers and their employees.

  6. Marketing in the health insurance market of Ukraine: nature and peculiarities

    OpenAIRE

    Bas, Maryana

    2014-01-01

    The main theoretical basics and peculiarities of marketing in the health insurance market are described in this paper. The characteristics of the market that allow you to determine the essence and particularities of marketing activities on it are investigated.

  7. Rents From the Essential Health Benefits Mandate of Health Insurance Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2015-01-01

    The essential health benefits mandate constitutes one of the most controversial health care reforms introduced under the U.S. Affordable Care Act of 2010. It bears important theoretical and practical implications for health care risk and insurance management. These essential health benefits are examined in this study from a rent-seeking perspective, particularly in terms of three interrelated questions: Is there an economic rationale for standardized, minimum health care coverage? How is the scope of essential health services and treatments determined? What are the attendant and incidental costs and benefits of such determination/s? Rents offer ample incentives to business interests to expend considerable resources for health care marketing, particularly when policy processes are open to contestation. Welfare losses inevitably arise from these incentives. We rely on five case studies to illustrate why and how rents are created, assigned, extracted, and dissipated in equilibrium. We also demonstrate why rents depend on persuasive marketing and the bargained decisions of regulators and rentiers, as conditioned by the Tullock paradox. Insights on the intertwining issues of consumer choice, health care marketing, and insurance reform are offered by way of conclusion.

  8. Sociodemographic disparities in survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer differ by health insurance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRouen, Mindy C; Parsons, Helen M; Kent, Erin E; Pollock, Brad H; Keegan, Theresa H M

    2017-08-01

    To investigate associations of sociodemographic factors-race/ethnicity, neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES), and health insurance-with survival for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with invasive cancer. Data on 80,855 AYAs with invasive cancer diagnosed in California 2001-2011 were obtained from the California Cancer Registry. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate overall survival. Associations of public or no insurance with greater risk of death were observed for 11 of 12 AYA cancers examined. Compared to Whites, Blacks experienced greater risk of death, regardless of age or insurance, while greater risk of death among Hispanics and Asians was more apparent for younger AYAs and for those with private/military insurance. More pronounced neighborhood SES disparities in survival were observed among AYAs with private/military insurance, especially among younger AYAs. Lacking or having public insurance was consistently associated with shorter survival, while disparities according to race/ethnicity and neighborhood SES were greater among AYAs with private/military insurance. While health insurance coverage associates with survival, remaining racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities among AYAs with cancer suggest additional social factors also need consideration in intervention and policy development.

  9. Reports of Insurance-Based Discrimination in Health Care and Its Association With Access to Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Kathleen Thiede; Pintor, Jessie Kemmick; Alarcon-Espinoza, Giovann; Simon, Alisha Baines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined reports of insurance-based discrimination and its association with insurance type and access to care in the early years of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Methods. We used data from the 2013 Minnesota Health Access Survey to identify 4123 Minnesota adults aged 18 to 64 years who reported about their experiences of insurance-based discrimination. We modeled the association between discrimination and insurance type and predicted odds of having reduced access to care among those reporting discrimination, controlling for sociodemographic factors. Data were weighted to represent the state’s population. Results. Reports of insurance-based discrimination were higher among uninsured (25%) and publicly insured (21%) adults than among privately insured adults (3%), which held in the regression analysis. Those reporting discrimination had higher odds of lacking a usual source of care, lacking confidence in getting care, forgoing care because of cost, and experiencing provider-level barriers than those who did not. Conclusions. Further research and policy interventions are needed to address insurance-based discrimination in health care settings. PMID:25905821

  10. Lack of Health Insurance Among Adults Aged 18 to 64 Years: Findings From the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Catherine A; Zhao, Guixiang; Dhingra, Satvinder S; Xu, Fang

    2015-12-31

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lack of health insurance among adults aged 18 to 64 years for each state and the United States and to describe populations without insurance. We used 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to categorize states into 3 groups on the basis of the prevalence of lack of health insurance in each state compared with the national average (21.5%; 95% confidence interval, 21.1%-21.8%): high-insured states (states with an estimated prevalence of lack of health insurance below the national average), average-insured states (states with an estimated prevalence of lack of health insurance equivalent to the national average), and low-insured states (states with an estimated prevalence of lack of health insurance higher than the national average). We used bivariate analyses to compare the sociodemographic characteristics of these 3 groups after age adjustment to the 2000 US standard population. We examined the distribution of Medicaid expansion among the 3 groups. Compared with the national age-adjusted prevalence of lack of health insurance, 24 states had lower rates of uninsured residents, 12 states had equivalent rates of uninsured, and 15 states had higher rates of uninsured. Compared with adults in the high-insured and average-insured state groups, adults in the low-insured state group were more likely to be non-Hispanic black or Hispanic, to have less than a high school education, to be previously married (divorced, widowed, or separated), and to have an annual household income at or below $35,000. Seventy-one percent of high-insured states were expanding Medicaid eligibility compared with 67% of average-insured states and 40% of low-insured states. Large variations exist among states in the estimated prevalence of health insurance. Many uninsured Americans reside in states that have opted out of Medicaid expansion.

  11. Universal health coverage in ‘One ASEAN’: are migrants included?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinto, Ramon Lorenzo Luis R.; Curran, Ufara Zuwasti; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Pocock, Nicola S.

    2015-01-01

    Background As the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) gears toward full regional integration by 2015, the cross-border mobility of workers and citizens at large is expected to further intensify in the coming years. While ASEAN member countries have already signed the Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, the health rights of migrants still need to be addressed, especially with ongoing universal health coverage (UHC) reforms in most ASEAN countries. This paper seeks to examine the inclusion of migrants in the UHC systems of five ASEAN countries which exhibit diverse migration profiles and are currently undergoing varying stages of UHC development. Design A scoping review of current migration trends and policies as well as ongoing UHC developments and migrant inclusion in UHC in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand was conducted. Results In general, all five countries, whether receiving or sending, have schemes that cover migrants to varying extents. Thailand even allows undocumented migrants to opt into its Compulsory Migrant Health Insurance scheme, while Malaysia and Singapore are still yet to consider including migrants in their government-run UHC systems. In terms of predominantly sending countries, the Philippines's social health insurance provides outbound migrants with portable insurance yet with limited benefits, while Indonesia still needs to strengthen the implementation of its compulsory migrant insurance which has a health insurance component. Overall, the five ASEAN countries continue to face implementation challenges, and will need to improve on their UHC design in order to ensure genuine inclusion of migrants, including undocumented migrants. However, such reforms will require strong political decisions from agencies outside the health sector that govern migration and labor policies. Furthermore, countries must engage in multilateral and bilateral dialogue as they redefine UHC

  12. Universal health coverage in ‘One ASEAN’: are migrants included?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Lorenzo Luis R. Guinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN gears toward full regional integration by 2015, the cross-border mobility of workers and citizens at large is expected to further intensify in the coming years. While ASEAN member countries have already signed the Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, the health rights of migrants still need to be addressed, especially with ongoing universal health coverage (UHC reforms in most ASEAN countries. This paper seeks to examine the inclusion of migrants in the UHC systems of five ASEAN countries which exhibit diverse migration profiles and are currently undergoing varying stages of UHC development. Design: A scoping review of current migration trends and policies as well as ongoing UHC developments and migrant inclusion in UHC in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand was conducted. Results: In general, all five countries, whether receiving or sending, have schemes that cover migrants to varying extents. Thailand even allows undocumented migrants to opt into its Compulsory Migrant Health Insurance scheme, while Malaysia and Singapore are still yet to consider including migrants in their government-run UHC systems. In terms of predominantly sending countries, the Philippines's social health insurance provides outbound migrants with portable insurance yet with limited benefits, while Indonesia still needs to strengthen the implementation of its compulsory migrant insurance which has a health insurance component. Overall, the five ASEAN countries continue to face implementation challenges, and will need to improve on their UHC design in order to ensure genuine inclusion of migrants, including undocumented migrants. However, such reforms will require strong political decisions from agencies outside the health sector that govern migration and labor policies. Furthermore, countries must engage in multilateral and bilateral dialogue as

  13. Advocacy for women's health should include lesbian health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlan, Katherine A; Dibble, Suzanne L; Hagan, H Jennifer J; Davids, Rachel

    2004-03-01

    Although research confirms that homosexuality is a normal expression of human sexuality, established scientific studies are often not reflected in laws and judicial opinions for lesbians with regard to employment, taxation, pensions, disability, healthcare, immigration, military service, marriage, custody, and adoption. The expression of homosexual attraction or behavior is sometimes met by disdain or violence. Psychological and epidemiological research confirms that the public discriminatory attitudes and second-class legal status cause physical, emotional, and financial harm to lesbians, their families, and their children. Some lesbians experience discrimination in healthcare and avoid routine primary healthcare. To decrease the harm, and improve the health of lesbians, medical institutions can include sexual orientation and gender identity in their nondiscrimination policies and offer domestic partner coverage in employment benefits. Our specialty societies should review current laws and judicial opinions and advocate for change. Further, specialty societies can effect change by issuing policy statements about issues of orientation and by writing orientation/identity curricula for public schools, colleges, and postcollegiate education to improve their accuracy, reduce sexually transmitted diseases, delay sexual activity, and reduce morbidity from homophobic violence.

  14. The Colombian health insurance system and its effect on access to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Luz Stella; Salmon, J Warren; Swartzman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In 1993, the Colombian government sought to reform its health care system under the guidance of international financial institutions (the World Bank and International Monetary Fund). These institutions maintain that individual private health insurance systems are more appropriate than previously established national public health structures for overcoming inequities in health care in developing countries. The reforms carried out following international financial institution guidelines are known as "neoliberal reforms." This qualitative study explores consumer health choices and associated factors, based on interviews with citizens living in Medellin, Colombia, in 2005-2006. The results show that most study participants belonging to low-income and middle-income strata, even with medical expense subsidies, faced significant barriers to accessing health care. Only upper-income participants reported a selection of different options without barriers, such as complementary and alternative medicines, along with private Western biomedicine. This study is unique in that the informal health system is linked to overall neo-liberal policy change.

  15. The suggested system for health insurance Application based on Smart Cards

    OpenAIRE

    Esam Mohamed El Gohary; Mohamed El-Sayed Waheed

    2013-01-01

    This paper concentrates on designing a system for Health insurance using smart card technology .The system is called HISS (Health insurance system using smart card).As we will see the system is web based application based on central database ,uses smart card for two reasons first, as a data carrier for patient and professionals. Second reason is for authentication purposes. There are some figures that describe system architecture and processes then each component well be explained.

  16. Latin American immigrants have limited access to health insurance in Japan: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguimoto S Pilar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japan provides universal health insurance to all legal residents. Prior research has suggested that immigrants to Japan disproportionately lack health insurance coverage, but no prior study has used rigorous methodology to examine this issue among Latin American immigrants in Japan. The aim of our study, therefore, was to assess the pattern of health insurance coverage and predictors of uninsurance among documented Latin American immigrants in Japan. Methods We used a cross sectional, mixed method approach using a probability proportional to estimated size sampling procedure. Of 1052 eligible Latin American residents mapped through extensive fieldwork in selected clusters, 400 immigrant residents living in Nagahama City, Japan were randomly selected for our study. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire developed from qualitative interviews. Results Our response rate was 70.5% (n = 282. Respondents were mainly from Brazil (69.9%, under 40 years of age (64.5% and had lived in Japan for 9.45 years (SE 0.44; median, 8.00. We found a high prevalence of uninsurance (19.8% among our sample compared with the estimated national average of 1.3% in the general population. Among the insured full time workers (n = 209, 55.5% were not covered by the Employee's Health Insurance. Many immigrants cited financial trade-offs as the main reasons for uninsurance. Lacking of knowledge that health insurance is mandatory in Japan, not having a chronic disease, and having one or no children were strong predictors of uninsurance. Conclusions Lack of health insurance for immigrants in Japan is a serious concern for this population as well as for the Japanese health care system. Appropriate measures should be taken to facilitate access to health insurance for this vulnerable population.

  17. Public insurance program impact on catastrophic health expenditure on acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, M; Vargas-Barrón, J; Bañuelos-Téllez, F; González-Pacheco, H; Fresno, C; Hernández-Lemus, E; Martínez-Ríos, M A; Vallejo, M

    2018-03-13

    ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has an important economic burden that poised the urgent need to evaluate its catastrophic medical expense. This study evaluates the first 5 years of the national health initiative called Popular Insurance (PI) at the National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico. Retrospective data analysis. STEMI patients with (n=317) and without (n=260) PI were selected. Analysed variables included socio-economical context, management care, cost evaluation and three outcomes (mortality, hospital readmission and therapeutic adherence). Descriptive statistical analyses, Kaplan-Meier survival and Support Vector Machine models were used accordingly. Treatment costs were higher for PI-covered individuals (P=0.022) and only 1.89% of them remained in debt, in contrast to 16.15% of those without PI. Statistically significant differences were found in relation to days in hospital wards (Pcatastrophic health challenging events. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Taiwan National Health Insurance Program and Full Infant Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Shyan; Liu, Tsai-Ching

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We compared hospital-born infants and well-baby care use associated with complete immunizations in Taiwan before and after institution of National Health Insurance (NHI). Methods. We used logistic regression to analyze data from 1989 and 1996 National Maternal and Infant Health Surveys of 1398 and 3185 1-year-old infants, respectively. Results. Infants born in hospitals were found to receive fewer immunizations than those born elsewhere before NHI but significantly more after NHI. Use of well-baby care correlates strongly and positively with the probability that a child will receive a full course of immunization after NHI. Conclusions. The NHI policy of including hospitals as immunization providers facilitates access to immunization services for children born in those facilities. Through NHI provision of free well-baby care, health planners have stimulated the demand for immunization. PMID:15671469

  19. 78 FR 13405 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Health Insurance Market Rules; Rate Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... health status or gender. In addition, health insurance issuers will no longer be able to segment... intend to issue future guidance on counting employees for determining market size of a group health plan... actuarially justified differences in health care costs and utilization patterns, particularly in states with...

  20. 45 CFR 148.122 - Guaranteed renewability of individual health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... market. (3) Acts uniformly without regard to any health status-related factor of covered individuals or... REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET... health status-related factor of covered individuals. (5) Association membership ceases. For coverage made...

  1. Expansion of health insurance in Moldova and associated improvements in access and reductions in direct payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, Thomas; Habicht, Jarno; Domente, Silviu; Atun, Rifat

    2016-12-01

    Moldova is the poorest country in Europe. Economic constraints mean that Moldova faces challenges in protecting individuals from excessive costs, improving population health and securing health system sustainability. The Moldovan government has introduced a state benefit package and expanded health insurance coverage to reduce the burden of health care costs for citizens. This study examines the effects of expanded health insurance by examining factors associated with health insurance coverage, likelihood of incurring out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for medicines or services, and the likelihood of forgoing health care when unwell. Using publically available databases and the annual Moldova Household Budgetary Survey, we examine trends in health system financing, health care utilization, health insurance coverage, and costs incurred by individuals for the years 2006-2012. We perform logistic regression to assess the likelihood of having health insurance, incurring a cost for health care, and forgoing health care when ill, controlling for socio-economic and demographic covariates. Private expenditure accounted for 55.5% of total health expenditures in 2012. 83.2% of private health expenditures is OOP payments-especially for medicines. Healthcare utilization is in line with EU averages of 6.93 outpatient visits per person. Being uninsured is associated with groups of those aged 25-49 years, the self-employed, unpaid family workers, and the unemployed, although we find lower likelihood of being uninsured for some of these groups over time. Over time, the likelihood of OOP for medicines increased (odds ratio OR = 1.422 in 2012 compared to 2006), but fell for health care services (OR = 0.873 in 2012 compared to 2006). No insurance and being older and male, was associated with increased likelihood of forgoing health care when sick, but we found the likelihood of forgoing health care to be increasing over time (OR = 1.295 in 2012 compared to 2009). Moldova has

  2. The impact of universal National Health Insurance on population health: the experience of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Ken N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taiwan established a system of universal National Health Insurance (NHI in March, 1995. Today, the NHI covers more than 98% of Taiwan's population and enrollees enjoy almost free access to healthcare with small co-payment by most clinics and hospitals. Yet while this expansion of coverage will almost inevitably have improved access to health care, however, it cannot be assumed that it will necessarily have improved the health of the population. The aim of this study was to determine whether the introduction of National Health Insurance (NHI in Taiwan in 1995 was associated with a change in deaths from causes amenable to health care. Methods Identification of discontinuities in trends in mortality considered amenable to health care and all other conditions (non-amenable mortality using joinpoint regression analysis from 1981 to 2005. Results Deaths from amenable causes declined between 1981 and 1993 but slowed between 1993 and 1996. Once NHI was implemented, the decline accelerated significantly, falling at 5.83% per year between 1996 and 1999. In contrast, there was little change in non-amenable causes (0.64% per year between 1981 and 1999. The effect of NHI was highest among the young and old, and lowest among those of working age, consistent with changes in the pattern of coverage. NHI was associated with substantial reductions in deaths from circulatory disorders and, for men, infections, whilst an earlier upward trend in female cancer deaths was reversed. Conclusions NHI was associated in a reduction in deaths considered amenable to health care; particularly among those age groups least likely to have been insured previously.

  3. Hancocked: manulife and the limits of private health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert G

    2011-08-01

    Long-term care (LTC) insurance is a salesman's dream. Millions of well-heeled boomers, anxious to protect their estates from the random expropriation of institutional dependency - what a market! But for Manulife, bleeding $1.5 million a day in LTC claims through subsidiary John Hancock, LTC is a nightmare. Company spokesmen blame unexpected increases in life expectancy. But management's fundamental error was insuring correlated risks. Risk pooling works only when individual risks are uncorrelated. Increases in life expectancy affect all contracts together. Manulife made the same mistake selling equity-linked annuities with guaranteed floors - essentially insuring against stock market declines. Results for shareholders have been catastrophic. Top management, meanwhile, have been honoured and richly rewarded.

  4. Does community-based health insurance protect household assets? Evidence from rural Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Divya; Reinhold, Steffen; Souares, Aurélia; Savadogo, Germain; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate whether community-based health insurance (CBHI) protects household assets in rural Burkina Faso, Africa. Data were used from a household panel survey that collected primary data from randomly selected households, covering 41 villages and one town, during 2004-2007(n = 890). The study area was divided into 33 clusters and CBHI was randomly offered to these clusters during 2004-2006. We applied different strategies to control for selection bias-ordinary least squares with covariates, two-stage least squares with instrumental variable, and fixed-effects models. Household members were interviewed in their local language every year, and information was collected on demographic and socio-economic indicators including ownership of assets, and on self-reported morbidity. Fixed-effects and ordinary least squares models showed that CBHI protected household assets during 2004-2007. The two-stage least squares with instrumental variable model showed that CBHI increased household assets during 2004-2005. In this study, we found that CBHI has the potential to not only protect household assets but also increase household assets. However, similar studies from developing countries that evaluate the impact of health insurance on household economic indicators are needed to benchmark these results with other settings. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  5. The use of data mining by private health insurance companies and customers' privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saggaf, Yeslam

    2015-07-01

    This article examines privacy threats arising from the use of data mining by private Australian health insurance companies. Qualitative interviews were conducted with key experts, and Australian governmental and nongovernmental websites relevant to private health insurance were searched. Using Rationale, a critical thinking tool, the themes and considerations elicited through this empirical approach were developed into an argument about the use of data mining by private health insurance companies. The argument is followed by an ethical analysis guided by classical philosophical theories-utilitarianism, Mill's harm principle, Kant's deontological theory, and Helen Nissenbaum's contextual integrity framework. Both the argument and the ethical analysis find the use of data mining by private health insurance companies in Australia to be unethical. Although private health insurance companies in Australia cannot use data mining for risk rating to cherry-pick customers and cannot use customers' personal information for unintended purposes, this article nonetheless concludes that the secondary use of customers' personal information and the absence of customers' consent still suggest that the use of data mining by private health insurance companies is wrong.

  6. Spousal labor market effects from government health insurance: Evidence from a veterans affairs expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Melissa A; Lahey, Joanna N

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the total impact of health insurance receipt on household labor supply is important in an era of increased access to publicly provided and subsidized insurance. Although government expansion of health insurance to older workers leads to direct labor supply reductions for recipients, there may be spillover effects on the labor supply of uncovered spouses. While the most basic model predicts a decrease in overall household work hours, financial incentives such as credit constraints, target income levels, and the need for own health insurance suggest that spousal labor supply might increase. In contrast, complementarities of spousal leisure would predict a decrease in labor supply for both spouses. Utilizing a mid-1990s expansion of health insurance for U.S. veterans, we provide evidence on the effects of public insurance availability on the labor supply of spouses. Using data from the Current Population Survey and Health and Retirement Study, we employ a difference-in-differences strategy to compare the labor market behavior of the wives of older male veterans and non-veterans before and after the VA health benefits expansion. Although husbands' labor supply decreases, wives' labor supply increases, suggesting that financial incentives dominate complementarities of spousal leisure. This effect is strongest for wives with lower education levels and lower levels of household wealth and those who were not previously employed full-time. These findings have implications for government programs such as Medicare and Social Security and the Affordable Care Act. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental insurance, service use and health outcomes in Australia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanamanickam, E S; Teusner, D N; Arrow, P G; Brennan, D S

    2018-03-01

    Private health insurance plays a key role in financing dental care in Australia. Having private dental insurance has been associated with higher levels of access to dental care, visiting for a check-up and receiving a favourable pattern of services. Associations with better oral health have also been reported. In the absence of any existing review, this paper aims to systematically review the relationship between dental insurance and dental service use and/or oral health outcomes in Australia. A systematic search of online databases and subsequent sifting resulted in 36 publications, 33 of which were cross sectional and three cohort analyses. Dental service outcomes were more commonly reported than oral health outcomes. There was considerable heterogeneity in the outcome measures reported, for both service use and health outcomes. Overall, the majority of the evidence was from cross sectional studies and few studies reported analyses adjusted for confounding factors. The consolidated evidence points towards a positive association between dental insurance and dental visiting. Dentally insured adults are likely to have more regular access to dental care and have a more favourable pattern of service use than the uninsured. However, evidence of associations between dental insurance and oral health are mixed. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Disparities in quality of cancer care: The role of health insurance and population demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh-Patel, Arti; Morris, Cyllene R; Kizer, Kenneth W

    2017-12-01

    Escalating costs and concerns about quality of cancer care have increased calls for quality measurement and performance accountability for providers and health plans. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to assess variability in the quality of cancer care by health insurance type in California.Persons with breast, ovary, endometrium, cervix, colon, lung, or gastric cancer during the period 2004 to 2014 were identified in the California Cancer Registry. Individuals were stratified into 5 health insurance categories: private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, dual Medicare and Medicaid eligible, and uninsured. Quality of care was evaluated using Commission on Cancer quality measures. Logistic regression models were generated to assess the independent effect of health insurance type on stage at diagnosis, quality of care and survival after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES).A total of 763,884 cancer cases were evaluated. Individuals with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual-eligible coverage and the uninsured had significantly lower odds of receiving recommended radiation and/or chemotherapy after diagnosis or surgery for breast, endometrial, and colon cancer, relative to those with private insurance. Dual eligible patients with gastric cancer had 21% lower odds of having the recommended number of lymph nodes removed and examined compared to privately insured patients.After adjusting for known demographic confounders, substantial and consistent disparities in quality of cancer care exist according to type of health insurance in California. Further study is needed to identify particular factors and mechanisms underlying the identified treatment disparities across sources of health insurance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Social Life of Health Insurance in Low- to Middle-income Countries: An Anthropological Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Amy; Nichter, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The following article identifies new areas for engaged medical anthropological research on health insurance in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Based on a review of the literature and pilot research, we identify gaps in how insurance is understood, administered, used, and abused. We provide a historical overview of insurance as an emerging global health panacea and then offer brief assessments of three high-profile attempts to provide universal health coverage. Considerable research on health insurance in LMICs has been quantitative and focused on a limited set of outcomes. To advance the field, we identify eight productive areas for future ethnographic research that will add depth to our understanding of the social life and impact of health insurance in LMICs. Anthropologists can provide unique insights into shifting health and financial practices that accompany insurance coverage, while documenting insurance programs as they evolve and respond to contingencies. © 2015 by the American Anthropological Association.

  10. Key Aspects of a Sustainable Health Insurance System in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelster, Matthias; Hagemann, Vera; Laporte Uribe, Franziska

    2016-06-01

    The main goals of health-care systems are to improve the health of the population they serve, respond to people's legitimate expectations, and offer fair financing. As a result, the health system in Germany is subject to continuous adaption as well as public and political discussions about its design. This paper analyzes the key challenges for the German health-care system and the underlying factors driving these challenges. We aim to identify possible solutions to put the German health-care system in a better position to face these challenges. We utilize a broad array of methods to answer these questions, including a review of the published and grey literature on health-care planning in Germany, semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in the system, and an online questionnaire. We find that the most urgent (and manageable) aspects that merit attention are holistic hospital planning, initiatives to increase (administrative) innovation in the health-care system, incentives to increase prevention, and approaches to increase analytical quality assurance. We found that hospital planning, innovation, quality control, and prevention, are considered to be the topics most in need of attention in the German health system.

  11. Impact of medical loss regulation on the financial performance of health insurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael; Hall, Mark; Liu, Xinliang

    2013-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act's regulation of medical loss ratios requires health insurers to use at least 80-85 percent of the premiums they collect for direct medical expenses (care delivery) or for efforts to improve the quality of care. To gauge this rule's effect on insurers' financial performance, we measured changes between 2010 and 2011 in key financial ratios reflecting insurers' operating profits, administrative costs, and medical claims. We found that the largest changes occurred in the individual market, where for-profit insurers reduced their median administrative cost ratio and operating margin by more than two percentage points each, resulting in a seven-percentage-point increase in their median medical loss ratio. Financial ratios changed much less for insurers in the small- and large-group markets.

  12. Protocol: realist synthesis of the impact of unemployment insurance policies on poverty and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Agnes; O'Campo, Patricia; Ng, Edwin; Mitchell, Christiane; Muntaner, Carles; Renahy, Emilie; St John, Alexander; Shankardass, Ketan

    2015-02-01

    Unemployment insurance is an important social protection policy that buffers unemployed workers against poverty and poor health. Most unemployment insurance studies focus on whether increases in unemployment insurance generosity are predictive of poverty and health outcomes. Less work has used theory-driven approaches to understand and explain how and why unemployment insurance works, for whom, and under what circumstances. Given this, we present a realist synthesis protocol that seeks to unpack how contextual influences trigger relevant mechanisms to generate poverty and health outcomes. In this protocol, we conceptualize unemployment insurance as a key social protection policy; provide a supporting rationale on the need for a realist synthesis; and describe our process on identifying context-mechanism-outcome pattern configurations. Six methodological steps are described: initial theory development, search strategy; selection and appraisal of documents; data extraction; analysis and synthesis process; and presentation and dissemination of revised theory. Our forthcoming realist synthesis will be the first to build and test theory on the intended and unintended outcomes of unemployment insurance policies. Anticipated findings will allow policymakers to move beyond 'black box' approaches to consider 'mechanism-based' explanations that explicate the logic on how and why unemployment insurance matters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Coverage by health insurance or discount cards: a household survey in the coverage area of the Family Health Strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Leonardo Ferreira; Camargo, Maria Beatriz Junqueira de; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Gonçalves, Helen; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Barros, Aluísio J D

    2017-10-26

    This study was designed to assess the reasons for health insurance coverage in a population covered by the Family Health Strategy in Brazil. We describe overall health insurance coverage and according to types, and analyze its association with health-related and socio-demographic characteristics. Among the 31.3% of persons (95%CI: 23.8-39.9) who reported "health insurance" coverage, 57.0% (95%CI: 45.2-68.0) were covered only by discount cards, which do not offer any kind of coverage for medical care, but only discounts in pharmacies, clinics, and hospitals. Both for health insurance and discount cards, the most frequently cited reasons for such coverage were "to be on the safe side" and "to receive better care". Both types of coverage were associated statistically with age (+65 vs. 15-24 years: adjusted odds ratios, aOR = 2.98, 95%CI: 1.28-6.90; and aOR = 3.67; 95%CI: 2.22-6.07, respectively) and socioeconomic status (additional standard deviation: aOR = 2.25, 95%CI: 1.62-3.14; and aOR = 1.96, 95%CI: 1.34-2.97). In addition, health insurance coverage was associated with schooling (aOR = 7.59, 95%CI: 4.44-13.00) for complete University Education and aOR = 3.74 (95%CI: 1.61-8.68) for complete Secondary Education, compared to less than complete Primary Education. Meanwhile, neither health insurance nor discount card was associated with health status or number of diagnosed diseases. In conclusion, studies that aim to assess private health insurance should be planned to distinguish between discount cards and formal health insurance.

  14. The health and healthcare impact of providing insurance coverage to uninsured children: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Glenn; Lin, Hua; Walker, Candice; Lee, Michael; Currie, Janet M; Allgeyer, Rick; Portillo, Alberto; Henry, Monica; Fierro, Marco; Massey, Kenneth

    2017-05-23

    Of the 4.8 million uninsured children in America, 62-72% are eligible for but not enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP. Not enough is known, however, about the impact of health insurance on outcomes and costs for previously uninsured children, which has never been examined prospectively. This prospective observational study of uninsured Medicaid/CHIP-eligible minority children compared children obtaining coverage vs. those remaining uninsured. Subjects were recruited at 97 community sites, and 11 outcomes monitored monthly for 1 year. In this sample of 237 children, those obtaining coverage were significantly (P insurance for >6 months at baseline were associated with remaining uninsured for the entire year. In multivariable analysis, children who had been uninsured for >6 months at baseline (odds ratio [OR], 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-10.3) and African-American children (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3) had significantly higher odds of remaining uninsured for the entire year. Insurance saved $2886/insured child/year, with mean healthcare costs = $5155/uninsured vs. $2269/insured child (P = .04). Providing health insurance to Medicaid/CHIP-eligible uninsured children improves health, healthcare access and quality, and parental satisfaction; reduces unmet needs and out-of-pocket costs; and saves $2886/insured child/year. African-American children and those who have been uninsured for >6 months are at greatest risk for remaining uninsured. Extrapolation of the savings realized by insuring uninsured, Medicaid/CHIP-eligible children suggests that America potentially could save $8.7-$10.1 billion annually by providing health insurance to all Medicaid/CHIP-eligible uninsured children.

  15. Medicines coverage and community-based health insurance in low-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Anita K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The 2004 International Conference on Improving Use of Medicines recommended that emerging and expanding health insurances in low-income countries focus on improving access to and use of medicines. In recent years, Community-based Health Insurance (CHI schemes have multiplied, with mounting evidence of their positive effects on financial protection and resource mobilization for healthcare in poor settings. Using literature review and qualitative interviews, this paper investigates whether and how CHI expands access to medicines in low-income countries. Methods We used three complementary data collection approaches: (1 analysis of WHO National Health Accounts (NHA and available results from the World Health Survey (WHS; (2 review of peer-reviewed articles published since 2002 and documents posted online by national insurance programs and international organizations; (3 structured interviews of CHI managers about key issues related to medicines benefit packages in Lao PDR and Rwanda. Results In low-income countries, only two percent of WHS respondents with voluntary insurance belong to the lowest income quintile, suggesting very low CHI penetration among the poor. Yet according to the WHS, medicines are the largest reported component of out-of-pocket payments for healthcare in these countries (median 41.7% and this proportion is inversely associated with income quintile. Publications have mentioned over a thousand CHI schemes in 19 low-income countries, usually without in-depth description of the type, extent, or adequacy of medicines coverage. Evidence from the literature is scarce about how coverage affects medicines utilization or how schemes use cost-containment tools like co-payments and formularies. On the other hand, interviews found that medicines may represent up to 80% of CHI expenditures. Conclusion This paper highlights the paucity of evidence about medicines coverage in CHI. Given the policy commitment to expand CHI

  16. [Introduction of the DRG system from the point of view of private health insurers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Jürgen; Miebach, Jürgen; Hüdig, Wolfgang

    2002-08-01

    For the first time, there has been a worldwide attempt to fund all hospital services almost completely by a DRG system supplemented by additional charges, rebates, and procedural rates. In the interest of the efficiency and transparency of hospital services the introduction of a German DRG system settling the current implausible price differences would be welcome. The system selected by the medical self-governing bodies in Germany is based upon the Australian AR-DRG classification. In contrast to other systems, the latter provides the best medical plausibility, the highest transparency of the assignment algorithm and the highest potential for flexibility and adaptations to changing morbidity patterns and medical progress. The adaptation to the conditions of the German health care system requires considerable efforts on the part of hospitals as well as sickness funds and health insurers. Hospitals need to establish a cost unit accounting system satisfying the rules of Applied Economics to allow, among other things, the calculation of relative cost weights. The self-governing bodies will have to consent on a complex regulation system. The German Hospital Federation declared the break down of negotiations concerning a provisional DRG system to be optionally available to hospitals in 2003. The Federal Ministry of Health will now have to decide whether to implement the system through executive fiat. The comprehensive DRG system will introduce new risks. The economic risks of the individual hospital, though not the individual insurer's risks, will be partially compensated for in the introductory phase by revenue balance mechanisms, for example. In particular, both the privately insured and civil servants will face a rise in costs as they will no longer benefit from a shorter length of hospital stay. To end this discrimination against private health insurers, the double counting of the costs associated with medical treatment (included in the DRG price and additionally

  17. Research Needs Assessment in the Health Insurance Organization: Level of Health Care Provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Setting research priorities in the research management cycle is a key. It is important to set the research priorities to make optimal use of scarce resources. The aim of this research was to determine the research needs of Health Insurance Organization based on its health care centers research needs.Methods: This is a qualitative, descriptive and cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2011. A purposeful sample of 60 participants from 14 hospitals, seven dispensaries, five dental clinics, two rehabilitation centers, four radiology centers, six medical diagnostic laboratories, 12 pharmacies, and 20 medical offices that were contracted with the Health Insurance Organization in Iran was interviewed. The framework analysis method (a qualitative research method was used for analysis of interviews. Atlas-Ti software was used to analyze quantitative data, respectively. The topics were prioritized using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method through Expert Choice software.Results: Based on the problems extracted in our qualitative study, 12 research topics were proposed by the experts. Among these “Design of standard treatment protocols,” “Designing model of ranking the health care centers under contract,” and “Pathology of payment system” took the priority ranks of 1 to 3, earning the scores of 0.44, 0.42, and 0.37, respectively.Conclusion: Considering limited resources and unlimited needs and to prevent research resource wasting, conducting research related to health care providers in the Health Insurance Organization can help it achieve its goals.

  18. Health insurance coverage among women of reproductive age before and after implementation of the affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel K; Sonfield, Adam

    2016-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act's expansions to Medicaid and private coverage are of particular importance for women of childbearing age, who have numerous preventive care and reproductive health care needs. We conducted two national surveys, one in 2012 and one in 2015, collecting information about health insurance coverage and access to care from 8000 women aged 18-39. We examine type of insurance and continuity of coverage between time periods, including poverty status and whether or not women live in a state that expanded Medicaid coverage. The proportion of women who were uninsured declined by almost 40% (from 19% to 12%), though several groups, including US-born and foreign-born Latinas, experienced no significant declines. Among low-income women in states that expanded Medicaid, the proportion uninsured declined from 38% to 15%, largely due to an increase in Medicaid coverage (from 40% to 62%). Declines in uninsurance in nonexpansion states were only marginally significant. Despite substantial improvements in health insurance coverage, significant gaps remain, particularly in states that have not expanded Medicaid and for Latinas. This analysis examines changes in insurance coverage that occurred after the Affordable Care Act was implemented. While coverage has improved for many populations, sizeable gaps in coverage remain for Latinas and women in states that did not expand Medicaid. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pricing of drugs with heterogeneous health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Ida; Missios, Paul

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of insurance coverage in explaining the generic competition paradox in a two-stage game involving a single producer of brand-name drugs and n quantity-competing producers of generic drugs. Independently of brand loyalty, which some studies rely upon to explain the paradox, we show that heterogeneity in insurance coverage may result in higher prices of brand-name drugs following generic entry. With market segmentation based on insurance coverage present in both the pre- and post-entry stages, the paradox can arise when the two types of drugs are highly substitutable and the market is quite profitable but does not have to arise when the two types of drugs are highly differentiated. However, with market segmentation occurring only after generic entry, the paradox can arise when the two types of drugs are weakly substitutable, provided, however, that the industry is not very profitable. In both cases, that is, when market segmentation is present in the pre-entry stage and when it is not, the paradox becomes more likely to arise as the market expands and/or insurance companies decrease deductibles applied on the purchase of generic drugs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk distribution across multiple health insurance funds in rural Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares Gamba; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multiple insurance funds serving different population groups may compromise equity due to differential revenue raising capacity and an unequal distribution of high risk members among the funds. This occurs when the funds exist without mechanisms in place to promote income and risk c...