WorldWideScience

Sample records for include finite temperature

  1. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  2. Inflation with finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, M.; Michoacan, Univ. Michoacana de S.Nicola de Hidalgo

    1998-01-01

    In this work the inflationary scenario of the Universe with finite temperature is studied. In this context, thermal equilibrium is closely maintained at the end of inflation. The example of the de Sitter expansion is developed

  3. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  4. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  5. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  6. QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Keiji

    1983-01-01

    The varidity of the perturbation method in the high temperature QCD is discussed. The skeleton expansion method takes account of plasmon effects and eliminates the electric infrared singularity but not the magnetic one. A possibility of eliminating the latter, which was recently proposed, is examined by a gauge invariant skeleton expansion. The magnetic singularity is unable to be eliminated by the perturbation method. This implies that some non-perturbative approaches must be incorporated in the high temperature QCD. (author)

  7. Lattice QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeTar, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the numerical simulation of QCD at finite temperature is reviewed. Eight topics are treated briefly: (1) T c scaling, (2) Equation of state, (3) Baryon susceptibility, (4) The QCD Phase Diagram, (5) J/Ψ Binding in the Plasma, (6) The Screening Spectrum of the Plasma, (7) Gauge Symmetry Breaking at High T, (8) Progress in Computing Power. (author)

  8. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Finite-temperature confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetitsky, B.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of lattice gauge theory at finite temperature is introduced. The framework of universality predictions for critical behavior is outlined, and recent analytic work in this direction is reviewed. New Monte Carlo information for the SU(4) theory are represented, and possible results of the inclusion of fermions in the SU(3) theory are listed

  10. Quantum Chromodynamic at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    A formal expression to the Gibbs free energy of topological defects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)by using the semiclassical approach in the context of field theory at finite temperature and in the high temperature limit is determined. This expression is used to calculate the free energy of magnetic monopoles. Applying the obtained results to a method in which the free energy of topological defects of a theory may indicate its different phases, its searched for informations about phases of QCD. (author) [pt

  11. Spinor pregeometry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Seiji.

    1985-10-01

    We derive the effective action for gravity at finite temperature in spinor pregeometry. The temperature-dependent effective potential for the vierbein which is parametrized as e sub(kμ) = b.diag(1, xi, xi, xi) has the minimum at b = 0 for fixed xi, and behaves as -xi 3 for fixed b. These results indicate that the system of fundamental matters in spinor pregeometry cannot be in equilibrium. (author)

  12. Strange matter at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.; Dang, B.V.

    1987-12-01

    The properties of strange quark matter at finite temperatures and in equilibrium with respect to weak interaction are explored on the basis of the MIT bag model picture of QCD. Furthermore, to determine the stability of strange quark matter analogous investigations are also performed for nuclear matter within Walecka's model field theory. It is found that strange quark matter can be stable at zero external pressure only for temperatures below 20 MeV. (orig.)

  13. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  14. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  15. Nuclear Deformation at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gilbreth, C. N.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  16. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  17. QCD and instantons at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.; Pisarski, R.D.; Yaffe, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    The current understanding of the behavior of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature is presented. Perturbative methods are used to explore the high-temperature dynamics. At sufficiently high temperatures the plasma of thermal excitations screens all color electric fields and quarks are unconfined. It is believed that the high-temperature theory develops a dynamical mass gap. However in perturbation theory the infrared behavior of magnetic fluctuations is so singular that beyond some order the perturbative expansion breaks down. The topological classification of finite-energy, periodic fields is presented and the classical solutions which minimize the action in each topological sector are examined. These include periodic instantons and magnetic monopoles. At sufficiently high temperature only fields with integral topological charge can contribute to the functional integral. Electric screening completely suppresses the contribution of fields with nonintegral topological charge. Consequently the theta dependence of the free energy at high temperature is dominated by the contribution of instantons. The complete temperature dependence of the instanton density is explicitly computed and large-scale instantons are found to be suppressed. Therefore the effects of instantons may be reliably calculated at sufficiently high temperature. The behavior of the theory in the vicinity of the transition from the high-temperature quark phase to the low-temperature hadronic phase cannot be accurately computed. However, at least in the absence of light quarks, semiclassical techniques and lattice methods may be combined to yield a simple picture of the dynamics valid for both high and low temperature, and to estimate the transition temperature

  18. Mean field canonical treatments at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossignoli, R.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed to make mean field and higher order canonical treatments at finite temperature. Definite improvements are made over the usual Hartree-Fock thermal (great canonical) treatment. (Author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  19. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  20. Bottomonium spectrum at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T.; Ryan, S. M.; Aarts, G.; Allton, C.; Kim, S.; Lombardo, M. P.; Skullerud, J. I.

    We investigate the modification of S and P wave states in the bottomonium spectrum above and below the deconfinement crossover temperature through their spectral functions obtained from the maximum entropy method. Anisotropic ensembles with $N_f=2+1$ Wilson clover fermions with tadpole-improvement are used while the bottom quark is treated with an improved non-relativistic action. We observe significant modifications of the P wave $\\chi_{b1}$ ground state directly above the crossover temperature, $T_c$, while the S wave $\\Upsilon$ ground state remains relatively unchanged up to temperatures of almost $2T_c$. This evidence supports earlier conclusions from our FASTSUM collaboration of the immediate dissociation of the P wave states above $T_c$ and the survival of the S wave ground states up to $2T_c$.

  1. Selfconsistent calculations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, M.; Quentin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations have been done for the spherical nuclei 40 Ca, 208 Pb and the hypothetical superheavy nucleus with Z=114, A=298, as well as for the deformed nucleus 168 Yb. The temperature T was varied from zero up to 5 MeV. For T>3 MeV, some numerical problems arise in connection with the optimization of the basis when calculating deformed nuclei. However, at these high temperatures the occupation numbers in the continuum are sufficiently large so that the nucleus starts evaporating particles and no equilibrium state can be described. Results are obtained for excitation energies and entropies. (Auth.)

  2. Flux tubes at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cea, Paolo [INFN, Sezione di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cosmai, Leonardo [INFN, Sezione di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cuteri, Francesca; Papa, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria & INFN-Cosenza,Ponte Bucci, cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Cosenza) (Italy)

    2016-06-07

    The chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair, with its peculiar tube-like shape, can be nicely described, at zero temperature, within the dual superconductor scenario for the QCD confining vacuum. In this work we investigate, by lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the SU(3) pure gauge theory, the fate of chromoelectric flux tubes across the deconfinement transition. We find that, if the distance between the static sources is kept fixed at about 0.76 fm ≃1.6/√σ and the temperature is increased towards and above the deconfinement temperature T{sub c}, the amplitude of the field inside the flux tube gets smaller, while the shape of the flux tube does not vary appreciably across deconfinement. This scenario with flux-tube “evaporation” above T{sub c} has no correspondence in ordinary (type-II) superconductivity, where instead the transition to the phase with normal conductivity is characterized by a divergent fattening of flux tubes as the transition temperature is approached from below. We present also some evidence about the existence of flux-tube structures in the magnetic sector of the theory in the deconfined phase.

  3. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature

  4. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  5. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S

    2002-03-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature.

  6. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  7. Topics on field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a first order phase transition through the study of the decay rate of the false vacuum in the high temperature limit are analysed. An alternative approach to obtain the phase diagram of a field theory which is based on the study of the free energy of topological defects, is developed the behavior of coupling constants with the help of the Dyson-Schwinger equations at finite temperature, is evaluated. (author) [pt

  8. Gribov gap equation at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Pais, Pablo [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Valdivia (Chile); Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile); Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Insitutes, Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper the Gribov gap equation at finite temperature is analyzed. The solutions of the gap equation (which depend explicitly on the temperature) determine the structure of the gluon propagator within the semi-classical Gribov approach. The present analysis is consistent with the standard confinement scenario for low temperatures, while for high enough temperatures, deconfinement takes place and a free gluon propagator is obtained. An intermediate regime in between the confined and free phases can be read off from the resulting gluon propagator, which appears to be closely related to partial deconfinement. (orig.)

  9. Quantum chromodynamics on networks and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, A.

    1990-01-01

    Lectures on quantum chromodynamics theory in the continuum and the associated non-disturbing phenomena are given. The discretization of the theory giving equations similar to those found in four dimensional statistical systems is studied. The physics of the expected non-disturbing phenomena is discussed. The lectures are also dedicated to finite temperature (chiral transitions and confinement) and addressed to non-experts [fr

  10. Supersymmetric field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicus, D.A.; Tata, X.R.

    1983-01-01

    We show by explicit calculations to second and third order in perturbation theory, that finite temperature effects do not break the supersymmetry Ward-Takahashi identities of the Wess-Zumino model. Moreover, it is argued that this result is true to all orders in perturbation theory, and further, true for a wide class of supersymmetric theories. We point out, however, that these identities can be broken in the course of a phase transition that restores an originally broken internal symmetry

  11. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc/sup 2//k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10/sup 11/ /sup 0/K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light.

  12. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc 2 /k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10 11 0 K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light

  13. Realistic finite temperature simulations of magnetic systems using quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders

    2018-01-01

    We have performed realistic atomistic simulations at finite temperatures using Monte Carlo and atomistic spin dynamics simulations incorporating quantum (Bose-Einstein) statistics. The description is much improved at low temperatures compared to classical (Boltzmann) statistics normally used in these kind of simulations, while at higher temperatures the classical statistics are recovered. This corrected low-temperature description is reflected in both magnetization and the magnetic specific heat, the latter allowing for improved modeling of the magnetic contribution to free energies. A central property in the method is the magnon density of states at finite temperatures, and we have compared several different implementations for obtaining it. The method has no restrictions regarding chemical and magnetic order of the considered materials. This is demonstrated by applying the method to elemental ferromagnetic systems, including Fe and Ni, as well as Fe-Co random alloys and the ferrimagnetic system GdFe3.

  14. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Wen-Cong, E-mail: ganwencong@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Shu, Fu-Wen, E-mail: shufuwen@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wu, Meng-He, E-mail: menghewu.physik@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-09-10

    We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  15. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cong Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  16. Level-density parameter of nuclei at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Stout, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of particle-particle (hole-hole) and of particle-hole ring diagrams to the nuclear level-density parameter at finite temperature is calculated. We first derive the correlated grand potential with the above ring diagrams included to all orders by way of a finite temperature RPA equation. An expression for the correlated level-density parameter is then obtained by differentiating the grand potential. Results obtained for the 40 Ca nucleus with realistic matrix elements derived from the Paris potential are presented. The contribution of the RPA correlations is found to be important, being significantly larger than typical Hartree-Fock results. The temperature dependence of the level-density parameter derived in the present work is generally similar to that obtained in a schematic model. Comparison with available experimental data is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Finite-temperature correlation functions of Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izergin, A.G.; Korepin, V.E.; Slavnov, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The finite-temperature correlation functions in the one-dimensional Heisenberg XXZ magnet are investigated in the framework of the quantum inverse scattering method. On the transition to nonzero temperatures, it is necessary in this case to solve a number of basically new problems. The main one of these is related to the fact that the ground state of the Hamiltonian (physical vacuum) at nonzero temperature (more precisely, the state of thermodynamic equilibrium) includes many species of particles - not only elementary particles but also bound states of them. We give an appropriate generalization of the method

  18. Selfconsistent Solution of Galitskii-Feynman Equations at Finite Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We solve the in-medium T-matrix equation at finite temperature including the off-shell propagation of nucleons. In this way a self-consistent spectral function for the nucleons is obtained. The results are compared to a calculation using the quasiparticle approximation in the T-matrix equation. Also the effective in-medium cross sections for the two cases are compared. (author)

  19. Compton scattering at finite temperature: thermal field dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juraev, F.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Compton scattering is a classical problem of quantum electrodynamics and has been studied in its early beginnings. Perturbation theory and Feynman diagram technique enables comprehensive analysis of this problem on the basis of which famous Klein-Nishina formula is obtained [1, 2]. In this work this problem is extended to the case of finite temperature. Finite-temperature effects in Compton scattering is of practical importance for various processes in relativistic thermal plasmas in astrophysics. Recently Compton effect have been explored using closed-time path formalism with temperature corrections estimated [3]. It was found that the thermal cross section can be larger than that for zero-temperature by several orders of magnitude for the high temperature realistic in astrophysics [3]. In our work we use a main tool to account finite-temperature effects, a real-time finite-temperature quantum field theory, so-called thermofield dynamics [4, 5]. Thermofield dynamics is a canonical formalism to explore field-theoretical processes at finite temperature. It consists of two steps, doubling of Fock space and Bogolyubov transformations. Doubling leads to appearing additional degrees of freedom, called tilded operators which together with usual field operators create so-called thermal doublet. Bogolyubov transformations make field operators temperature-dependent. Using this formalism we treat Compton scattering at finite temperature via replacing in transition amplitude zero-temperature propagators by finite-temperature ones. As a result finite-temperature extension of the Klein-Nishina formula is obtained in which differential cross section is represented as a sum of zero-temperature cross section and finite-temperature correction. The obtained result could be useful in quantum electrodynamics of lasers and for relativistic thermal plasma processes in astrophysics where correct account of finite-temperature effects is important. (author)

  20. Lorentz violation, gravitoelectromagnetism and Bhabha scattering at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2018-04-01

    Gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM) is an approach for the gravitation field that is described using the formulation and terminology similar to that of electromagnetism. The Lorentz violation is considered in the formulation of GEM that is covariant in its form. In practice, such a small violation of the Lorentz symmetry may be expected in a unified theory at very high energy. In this paper, a non-minimal coupling term, which exhibits Lorentz violation, is added as a new term in the covariant form. The differential cross-section for Bhabha scattering in the GEM framework at finite temperature is calculated that includes Lorentz violation. The Thermo Field Dynamics (TFD) formalism is used to calculate the total differential cross-section at finite temperature. The contribution due to Lorentz violation is isolated from the total cross-section. It is found to be small in magnitude.

  1. Liouville Cosmology at Zero and Finite Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Westmuckett, M

    2006-01-01

    We discuss cosmology in the context of Liouville strings, characterized by a central-charge deficit Q^2, in which target time is identified with (the world-sheet zero mode of the) Liouville field: Q-Cosmology. We use a specific example of colliding brane worlds to illustrate the phase diagram of this cosmological framework. The collision provides the necessary initial cosmological instability, expressed as a departure from conformal invariance in the underlying string model. The brane motion provides a way of breaking target-space supersymmetry, and leads to various phases of the brane and bulk Universes. Specifically, we find a hot metastable phase for the bulk string Universe soon after the brane collision in which supersymmetry is broken, which we describe by means of a subcritical world-sheet sigma model dressed by a space-like Liouville field, representing finite temperature (Euclidean time). This phase is followed by an inflationary phase for the brane Universe, in which the bulk string excitations are ...

  2. Excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusch, M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental observations of collective excitations of Bose condensed atomic vapours have stimulated interest in the microscopic description of the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an external potential. We present a finite temperature field theory for collective excitations of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates and use a finite-temperature linear response formalism, which goes beyond the simple mean-field approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The effect of the non-condensed thermal atoms we include using perturbation theory in a quasiparticle basis. This presents a simple scheme to understand the interaction between condensate and non-condensed atoms and enables us to include the effect the condensate has on collision dynamics. At first we limit our treatment to the case of a spatially homogeneous Bose gas. We include the effect of pair and triplet anomalous averages and thus obtain a gapless theory for the excitations of a weakly interacting system, which we can link to well known results for Landau and Beliaev damping rates. A gapless theory for trapped systems with a static thermal component follows straightforwardly. We then investigate finite temperature excitations of a condensate in a spherically symmetric harmonic trap. We avoid approximations to the density of states and thus emphasise finite size aspects of the problem. We show that excitations couple strongly to a restricted number of modes, giving rise to resonance structure in their frequency spectra. Where possible we derive energy shifts and lifetimes of excitations. For one particular mode, the breathing mode, the effects of the discreteness of the system are sufficiently pronounced that the simple picture of an energy shift and width fails. Experiments in spherical traps have recently become feasible and should be able to test our detailed quantitative predictions. (author)

  3. On the fate of the Standard Model at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Luigi Delle; Marzo, Carlo [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi' ,Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Lecce,via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Urbano, Alfredo [SISSA - International School for Advanced Studies,via Bonomea 256, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-05-10

    In this paper we revisit and update the computation of thermal corrections to the stability of the electroweak vacuum in the Standard Model. At zero temperature, we make use of the full two-loop effective potential, improved by three-loop beta functions with two-loop matching conditions. At finite temperature, we include one-loop thermal corrections together with resummation of daisy diagrams. We solve numerically — both at zero and finite temperature — the bounce equation, thus providing an accurate description of the thermal tunneling. Assuming a maximum temperature in the early Universe of the order of 10{sup 18} GeV, we find that the instability bound excludes values of the top mass M{sub t}≳173.6 GeV, with M{sub h}≃125 GeV and including uncertainties on the strong coupling. We discuss the validity and temperature-dependence of this bound in the early Universe, with a special focus on the reheating phase after inflation.

  4. Optimization of finite-size errors in finite-temperature calculations of unordered phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Deepak; Srednicki, Mark; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    It is common knowledge that the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensembles are equivalent in thermodynamically large systems. Here, we study finite-size effects in the latter two ensembles. We show that contrary to naive expectations, finite-size errors are exponentially small in grand canonical ensemble calculations of translationally invariant systems in unordered phases at finite temperature. Open boundary conditions and canonical ensemble calculations suffer from finite-size errors that are only polynomially small in the system size. We further show that finite-size effects are generally smallest in numerical linked cluster expansions. Our conclusions are supported by analytical and numerical analyses of classical and quantum systems.

  5. Chiral anomalies in QED and QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    Chiral anomalies (a) for QED and QCD at finite temperature are analyzed in imaginary- and real-time formalisms. Both triangle diagrams and functional methods are used. It is found that the expressions for a in terms of finite-temperature fields are formally similar to that for the zero-temperature anomaly as a function of zero-temperature fields, thereby generalizing previous work by other authors. (author). 20 refs.; 1 fig

  6. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to

  7. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to iteratively construct

  8. Relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, which has been proposed recently in an astrophysical context. Assuming a constant distribution of protons inside the nucleus of finite size avoids severe divergence of the electron density with respect to a point-like nucleus. A formula for the nuclear radius is chosen to treat any element. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model matches the two asymptotic regimes, i.e., the non-relativistic and the ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models. The equation of state is considered in detail. For each version of the finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, the pressure, the kinetic energy, and the entropy are calculated. The internal energy and free energy are also considered. The thermodynamic consistency of the three models is considered by working from the free energy. The virial question is also studied in the three cases as well as the relationship with the density functional theory. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model is far more involved than the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models that are very close to each other from a mathematical point of view.

  9. Simulation of temperature distribution by finite element analysis on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on exposure to the synchrotron beam has been simulated by finite element analysis. Design of the cooling mechanism for each of these components has been carried out and estimation of the temperature rise has also been done incorporating the cooling mechanism. Keywords. Synchrotron; EXAFS; finite element analysis.

  10. Rigorous theory of graded thermoelectric converters including finite heat transfer coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenmaier, York Christian; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Maximization of thermoelectric (TE) converter performance with an inhomogeneous material and electric current distribution has been investigated in previous literature neglecting thermal contact resistances to the heat reservoirs. The heat transfer coefficients (HTCs), defined as inverse thermal contact resistances per unit area, are thus infinite, whereas in reality, always parasitic thermal resistances, i.e., finite HTCs, are present. Maximization of the generated electric power and of cooling power in the refrigerator mode with respect to Seebeck coefficients and heat conductivity for a given profile of the material's TE figure of merit Z are mathematically ill-posed problems in the presence of infinite HTCs. As will be shown in this work, a fully self consistent solution is possible for finite HTCs, and in many respects, the results are fundamentally different. A previous theory for 3D devices will be extended to include finite HTCs and is applied to 1D devices. For the heat conductivity profile, an infinite number of solutions exist leading to the same device performance. Cooling power maximization for finite HTCs in 1D will lead to a strongly enhanced corresponding efficiency (coefficient of performance), whereas results with infinite HTCs lead to a non-monotonous temperature profile and coefficient of performance tending to zero for the prescribed heat conductivities. For maximized generated electric power, the corresponding generator efficiency is nearly a constant independent from the finite HTC values. The maximized efficiencies in the generator and cooling mode are equal to the efficiencies for the infinite HTC, provided that the corresponding powers approach zero. These and more findings are condensed in 4 theorems in the conclusions.

  11. Finite-temperature behavior of glueballs in lattice gauge theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselle, M; Pellegrini, R

    2013-09-27

    We propose a new method to compute glueball masses in finite temperature lattice gauge theory which at low temperature is fully compatible with the known zero temperature results and as the temperature increases leads to a glueball spectrum which vanishes at the deconfinement transition. We show that this definition is consistent with the Isgur-Paton model and with the expected contribution of the glueball spectrum to various thermodynamic quantities at finite temperature. We test our proposal with a set of high precision numerical simulations in the 3D gauge Ising model and find a good agreement with our predictions.

  12. Wall deffects in field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeia Filho, D.

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the effect of restauration of simmetry in field theories at finite temperature and its relation with wall deffects which appear as consequence of the instability of the constant field configuration. (M.W.O.) [pt

  13. Dimensional regularization and analytical continuation at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangjun; Liu Lianshou

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between dimensional regularization and analytical continuation of infrared divergent integrals at finite temperature is discussed and a method of regularization of infrared divergent integrals and infrared divergent sums is given

  14. Pole prescription in axial gauge at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Maximilian; Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1991-11-01

    We establish Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in axial gauge. We encounter the breakdown of the Hata-Kugo expression for the partition function in the special choice of temporal axial gauge. For n ≠ 0 the finite temperature propagator is calculated in both the imaginary time formalism and the real time formalism. In the latter we recover the Leibbrandt-Mandelstam prescription in the lijit T→0. As a check we calculate the mean energy to lowest order.

  15. Pole prescription in axial gauge at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M.; Nachbagauer, H. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-11-14

    We establish Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in axial gauge. We encounter the breakdown of the Hata-Kugo expression for the partition function in the special choice of temporal axial gauge. For n {ne} 0 the finite temperature propagator is calculated in both the imaginary time formalism and the real time formalism. In the latter we recover the Leibbrandt-Mandelstam prescription in the limit T {yields} 0. As a check we calculate the mean energy to lowest order. (orig.).

  16. Finite Temperature Qcd With Domain Wall Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, G T

    2001-01-01

    Domain wall fermions are a new lattice fermion formulation which preserves the full chiral symmetry of the continuum at finite lattice spacing, up to terms exponentially small in an extra parameter. We discuss the main features of the formulation and its application to study of QCD with two light fermions of equal mass. We also present numerical studies of the two flavor QCD thermodynamics with aT = 1/4.

  17. Fibonacci-Hubbard chain at zero and finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sanjay [Theoretical Condensed Matter (TCMP) Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)]. E-mail: sanjay@cmp.saha.ernet.in; Sil, Shreekantha [Department of Physics, Vishwabharati, Shantiniketan, Birbhum (India); Bhattacharyya, Bibhas [Department of Physics, Scottish Church College, 1 and 3, Urquhart Square, Kolkata 700006 (India)

    2005-01-31

    We have studied finite-sized single band Hubbard chains with Fibonacci modulation for half-filling within a mean field approximation. The ground state properties, together with the DC conductivity both at zero and non-zero temperatures, are calculated for such quasiperiodic Hubbard chains. While a reduction in the conductivity is found due to strong electronic interaction or strong Fibonacci modulation, a competition between these two is observed to enhance the conductivity. The results at finite temperatures also illustrate some interesting features of such finite-sized systems.

  18. Finite temperature QCD sum rule and the ρ-meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jueping; Jin Yaping

    1995-01-01

    The contributions from the three-gluon condensates to the finite temperature QCD sum rule for the ρ-meson are calculated, and then the dependence of the properties of the ρ-meson upon temperature is investigated in a string model of condensates. The results show that the parameters characterizing the properties of the ρ-meson change noticeably when the temperature closes to the critical temperature of the condensates, and if the critical temperatures of condensates are the same

  19. Complex saddle points in QCD at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Pangeni, Kamal

    2014-08-01

    The sign problem in QCD at finite temperature and density leads naturally to the consideration of complex saddle points of the action or effective action. The global symmetry CK of the finite-density action, where C is charge conjugation and K is complex conjugation, constrains the eigenvalues of the Polyakov loop operator P at a saddle point in such a way that the action is real at a saddle point, and net color charge is zero. The values of TrFP and TrFP† at the saddle point are real but not identical, indicating the different free energy cost associated with inserting a heavy quark versus an antiquark into the system. At such complex saddle points, the mass matrix associated with Polyakov loops may have complex eigenvalues, reflecting oscillatory behavior in color-charge densities. We illustrate these properties with a simple model which includes the one-loop contribution of gluons and two flavors of massless quarks moving in a constant Polyakov loop background. Confinement-deconfinement effects are modeled phenomenologically via an added potential term depending on the Polyakov loop eigenvalues. For sufficiently large temperature T and quark chemical potential μ, the results obtained reduce to those of perturbation theory at the complex saddle point. These results may be experimentally relevant for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at FAIR.

  20. Finitely limited group contribution correlations for boiling temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, Fateme Sadat; Vahid, Amir [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States); Richard Elliott, J. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States)], E-mail: elliotl@uakron.edu

    2009-04-15

    Group contribution correlations are presented for the boiling temperatures at (101.33 and 1.33) kPa and for critical temperature applicable to a broad range of organic compounds. The group contributions are based on UNIFAC groups to facilitate simultaneous group identification for estimation of activity coefficients. These correlations recognize a finite limit in boiling temperature and critical temperature as infinite molar mass is approached. The existence of this limit is suggested by: extrapolation of the experimentally measured boiling temperatures, by critical behavior polymer solutions, by engineering equations of state, and by molecular simulation results. The availability of two vapor pressures enables straightforward application of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to estimate boiling temperatures at other points. In the presented approach, there are three parameters for the boiling temperature correlations and one parameter for the critical temperature plus 72 functional groups. The parameters are regressed through a database consisting of 336 hydrocarbons and 642 non-hydrocarbons. The database consists of various chemical families including aliphatics, olefinics, naphthenics, aromatics, alcohols, amines, nitriles, thiols, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, halocarbons, silicones, and acids. The average absolute percent deviations (AAD%) between the correlated and experimental temperatures are calculated in comparison with the Joback-Reid and Gani approaches. For the enthalpy of vaporization at T = 298 K, the Joback model makes calculations possible at 1.33 kPa by assuming that Hvap is constant over this range. Also, Kolska and Gani have reported a correlation for heat of vaporization at the normal boiling point which is used in this study. We obtain (3.5, 4.7, and 4.1) AAD% in temperature for the present work using the Joback-Reid and Gani methods, respectively. Additionally, the accuracy of the present work is evaluated by calculating the

  1. Finitely limited group contribution correlations for boiling temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Fateme Sadat; Vahid, Amir; Richard Elliott, J.

    2009-01-01

    Group contribution correlations are presented for the boiling temperatures at (101.33 and 1.33) kPa and for critical temperature applicable to a broad range of organic compounds. The group contributions are based on UNIFAC groups to facilitate simultaneous group identification for estimation of activity coefficients. These correlations recognize a finite limit in boiling temperature and critical temperature as infinite molar mass is approached. The existence of this limit is suggested by: extrapolation of the experimentally measured boiling temperatures, by critical behavior polymer solutions, by engineering equations of state, and by molecular simulation results. The availability of two vapor pressures enables straightforward application of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to estimate boiling temperatures at other points. In the presented approach, there are three parameters for the boiling temperature correlations and one parameter for the critical temperature plus 72 functional groups. The parameters are regressed through a database consisting of 336 hydrocarbons and 642 non-hydrocarbons. The database consists of various chemical families including aliphatics, olefinics, naphthenics, aromatics, alcohols, amines, nitriles, thiols, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, halocarbons, silicones, and acids. The average absolute percent deviations (AAD%) between the correlated and experimental temperatures are calculated in comparison with the Joback-Reid and Gani approaches. For the enthalpy of vaporization at T = 298 K, the Joback model makes calculations possible at 1.33 kPa by assuming that Hvap is constant over this range. Also, Kolska and Gani have reported a correlation for heat of vaporization at the normal boiling point which is used in this study. We obtain (3.5, 4.7, and 4.1) AAD% in temperature for the present work using the Joback-Reid and Gani methods, respectively. Additionally, the accuracy of the present work is evaluated by calculating the

  2. Thermo field dynamics: a quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, F.; Marinaro, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of the theory of thermo field dynamics (TFD) is presented. TFD is introduced and developed by Umezawa and his coworkers at finite temperature. The most significant concept in TFD is that of a thermal vacuum which satisfies some conditions denoted as thermal state conditions. The TFD permits to reformulate theories at finite temperature. There is no need in an additional principle to determine particle distributions at T ≠ 0. Temperature and other macroscopic parameters are introduced in the definition of the vacuum state. All operator formalisms used in quantum field theory at T=0 are preserved, although the field degrees of freedom are doubled. 8 refs

  3. Chiral symmetry and finite temperature effects in quantum theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Aa.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation of the harmonic oscillator at finite temperature has been carried out, using the Monte Carlo Metropolis algorithm. Accurate results for the energy and fluctuations have been obtained, with special attention to the manifestation of the temperature effects. Varying the degree of symmetry breaking, the finite temperature behaviour of the asymmetric linear model in a linearized mean field approximation has been studied. In a study of the effects of chiral symmetry on baryon mass splittings, reasonable agreement with experiment has been obtained in a non-relativistic harmonic oscillator model

  4. A sum rule description of giant resonances at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.; Quentin, P.; Brack, M.

    1983-01-01

    A generalization of the sum rule approach to collective motion at finite temperature is presented. The m 1 and msub(-1) sum rules for the isovector dipole and the isoscalar monopole electric modes have been evaluated with the modified SkM force for the 208 Pb nucleus. The variation of the resulting giant resonance energies with temperature is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Finite temperature effects in primordial inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, G. B.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Olive, K. A.

    1983-11-01

    We present a detailed study of a recently proposed model for primordial inflation based on an N=1 locally supersymmetric potential. For a large class of parameters with which all cosmological constraints are satisfied, the temperature corrections can be neglected during the inflation period. At higher temperatures, the minimum is not at the origin, but very close to it. Address after July 1, 1983: Theory Group, Fermilab, PO Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510, USA.

  6. Nanoscale dislocation shear loops at static equilibrium and finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Khanh; Capolungo, Laurent; Spearot, Douglas E.

    2017-12-01

    Atomistic simulations are used to determine the resolved shear stress necessary for equilibrium and the resulting geometry of nanoscale dislocation shear loops in Al. Dislocation loops with different sizes and shapes are created via superposition of elemental triangular dislocation displacement fields in the presence of an externally imposed shear stress. First, a bisection algorithm is developed to determine systematically the resolved shear stress necessary for equilibrium at 0 K. This approach allows for the identification of dislocation core structure and a correlation between dislocation loop size, shape and the computed shear stress for equilibrium. It is found, in agreement with predictions made by Scattergood and Bacon, that the equilibrium shape of a dislocation loop becomes more circular with increasing loop size. Second, the bisection algorithm is extended to study the influence of temperature on the resolved shear stress necessary for stability. An approach is presented to compute the effective lattice friction stress, including temperature dependence, for dislocation loops in Al. The temperature dependence of the effective lattice friction stress can be reliably computed for dislocation loops larger than 16.2 nm. However, for dislocation loops smaller than this threshold, the effective lattice friction stress shows a dislocation loop size dependence caused by significant overlap of the stress fields on the interior of the dislocation loops. Combined, static and finite temperature atomistic simulations provide essential data to parameterize discrete dislocation dynamics simulations.

  7. Nonperturbative finite-temperature Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrol, Anton K.; Mitter, Mario; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Strodthoff, Nils

    2018-03-01

    We present nonperturbative correlation functions in Landau-gauge Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature. The results are obtained from the functional renormalisation group within a self-consistent approximation scheme. In particular, we compute the magnetic and electric components of the gluon propagator, and the three- and four-gluon vertices. We also show the ghost propagator and the ghost-gluon vertex at finite temperature. Our results for the propagators are confronted with lattice simulations and our Debye mass is compared to hard thermal loop perturbation theory.

  8. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a

  9. Finite-temperature behavior of the Bose polaron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Jesper; Parish, Meera M.; Christensen, Rasmus S.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a mobile impurity immersed in a Bose gas at finite temperature. Using perturbation theory valid for weak coupling between the impurity and the bosons, we derive analytical results for the energy and damping of the impurity for low and high temperatures, as well as for temperatures close...... to the critical temperature $T_c$ for Bose-Einstein condensation. These results show that the properties of the impurity vary strongly with temperature. The energy exhibits an intriguing non-monotonic behavior close to $T_c$, and the damping rises sharply close to $T_c$. We finally discuss how these effects can...

  10. Finite-temperature gauge theory from the transverse lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley, S; van de Sande, B

    2005-10-14

    Numerical computations are performed and analytic bounds are obtained on the excited spectrum of glueballs in SU(inifinity) gauge theory, by transverse lattice Hamiltonian methods. We find an exponential growth of the density of states, implying a finite critical (Hagedorn) temperature. It is argued that the Nambu-Goto string model lies in a different universality class.

  11. Effective potential of light quark interactions at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipskikh, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The model of an open bosonic string with free ends is applied to construct the effective interaction potential for two light quarks at finite temperatures. This potential is shown to be a second-order potential with respect to the interquark distance

  12. Quarkonia at finite temperature in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... physics pp. 881–899. Quarkonia at finite temperature in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. SAUMEN DATTA. Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road,. Mumbai 400 005, India. E-mail: saumen@theory.tifr.res.in. DOI: 10.1007/s12043-015-0975-y; ...

  13. Comparison between microscopic methods for finite-temperature Bose gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, S.P.; Negretti, Antonio; Proukakis, N.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the equilibrium properties of a weakly interacting, trapped quasi-one-dimensional Bose gas at finite temperatures and compare different theoretical approaches. We focus in particular on two stochastic theories: a number-conserving Bogoliubov (NCB) approach and a stochastic Gross-Pitaev...

  14. Optimizing performance of half-metals at finite temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, J. J.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    Several aspects of half-metallic magnetism at finite temperature are discussed. Since NiMnSb is the simplest half-metal and the longest known it will be used as an example. Also it is a half-metal with remarkable little on-site Coulomb repulsion. Consequently it is a half-metal that is not notably

  15. Measurement of QCD gluon propagator at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Takuya [Hiroshima Univ., Information Media Center, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Atsushi [Yamagata Univ., Faculty of Education, Yamagata (Japan); Sakai, Sunao [Hiroshima Univ., Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We calculate gluon screening masses in quenched SU(3) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature by using stochastic gauge fixing method. Although gluon propagator is gauge dependent quantity and is not physical object, we extract the screening masses of SU(3) gluon by the behaviour of gauge fixed gluon propagator. We examine temperature dependences of the electric and magnetic screening masses at the regions, T/T{sub c} = 1 - 6. We also check their gauge dependence is very small. (author)

  16. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis

  17. Real-Time Finite-Temperature Holography and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaolun

    This dissertation begins with a brief review of basic concepts of holography (AdS/CFT correspondence, Chapter 1). A complete prescription for computing real-time correlators in strongly-coupled conformal field theories at finite-temperature using holography is proposed and checked, and all scalar real-time 3-point correlators of the relativistic conformal field theory are computed at the tree level of dual gravity theory (Chapter 2). The causal 3-point correlators are found to have a simple structure which can be easily generalized to higher n-point correlators and higher spin operators. Then the same prescription is applied to non-relativistic holography (Chapter 3). All scalar real-time 2-point correlators and time-ordered and causal 3-point correlators of finite-temperature Schrödinger field theory are computed there. In the last two chapters, the prescription for relativistic real-time finite-temperature holography and in particular the causal 3-point correlators derived earlier, are used to study various properties of a strongly-coupled plasma, specifically that of N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills field theory. By computing causal energy-stress tensor 3-point correlators analytically in the hydrodynamic regime and matching them with the holographic result, and through the use of newly developed second order Kubo formulae, all five second order transport coefficients of the relativistic conformal hydrodynamics are systematically and consistently computed (Chapter 4). Jet quenching in a strongly-coupled plasma at finite-temperature and finite-chemical potential is also studied by an analytic computation of causal R-current 3-point correlators in large momentum regime. A more detailed and comprehensive picture than previously known emerges (Chapter 5). The dependence of typical jet stopping distance on its initial energy has an exponent 1/4, rather than the 1/3 which was widely known, and the jet quenching is enhanced by introducing a chemical potential to the

  18. Fragmentation of giant dipole resonance at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the main part of a width of a collective giant resonance built on the ground state in heavy nuclei is due to coupling of one-phonon vibrational states with more complex ones like two phonon or two-particle - two-hole. So it seems natural that the same idea was also explored in studying of the formation and dependence on temperature of a width of giant resonances built on a compound nuclear state. The first microscopic calculations of a giant dipole resonance width at finite temperature have demonstrated its weak dependence on T whereas the experimental width Γ exp strongly increases up to T≤3 MeV. The observed thermal behaviour of Γ exp was attributed mainly to thermal fluctuations of a nuclear shape at finite T . However, further theoretical studies of the problem have shown a strengthening of the GDR spreading with T. We calculate a fragmentation of the giant dipole resonance in hot spherical nuclei within the approach based on the quasiparticle-phonon model extended to finite temperature in with the formalism of thermofield dynamics. The fragmentation of collective giant dipole vibrations at finite T is due to the coupling with 'two-thermal phonon' configurations. The energies and structures of thermal phonon states are calculated from the thermal RPA temperature dependence of the variance σ th of a theoretical E1 strength function and the experimental GDR width Γ exp in 120 Sn. The coupling of thermal phonons is determined by their fermionic structure. The variance σ th of the E1 strength function is found continuously increasing with temperature. The main reason of this behavior is the coupling of the dipole phonons with very low-lying particle-particle (hole-hole) thermal phonons. These phonons are noncollective ones and they appear only at T≠0. The calculated T dependence of σ th is quite similar to that of the experimental width Γ exp in 120 Sn and 208 Pb

  19. Finite temperature LGT in a finite box with BPS monopole boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Molodtsov, S.V.; Mueller-Preussker, M.; Veselov, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Finite temperature SU(2) lattice gauge theory is investigated in a 3D cubic box with fixed boundary conditions (b.c.) provided by a discretized, static BPS monopole solution with varying core scale μ. For discrete μ-values we find stable classical solutions either of electro-magnetic ('dyon') or of purely magnetic type inside the box. Near the deconfinement transition we study the influence of the b.c. on the quantized fields inside the box. In contrast to the purely magnetic background field case, for the dyon case we observe confinement for temperatures above the usual critical one

  20. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  1. A code for obtaining temperature distribution by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ELEFIB Fortran language computer code using finite element method for calculating temperature distribution of linear and two dimensional problems, in permanent region or in the transient phase of heat transfer, is presented. The formulation of equations uses the Galerkin method. Some examples are shown and the results are compared with other papers. The comparative evaluation shows that the elaborated code gives good values. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Observable Vortex Properties in Finite Temperature Bose Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, A. J.; Zaremba, E.; Barenghi, C. F.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of vortices in finite temperature atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, focussing on decay rates, precession frequencies and core brightness, motivated by a recent experiment (Freilich et al. Science 329, 1182 (2010)) in which real-time dynamics of a single vortex was observed. Using the ZNG formalism based on a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate coupled to a semi-classical Boltzmann equation for the thermal cloud, we find a rapid nonlinear increase of ...

  3. Non-local Thirring model at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manias, M.V.; Naon, C.M.; Trobo, M.L. [La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica]|[Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina)

    1998-08-17

    We extend a recently proposed non-local and non-covariant version of the Thirring model to the finite-temperature case. We obtain a completely bosonized expression for the partition function, describing the thermodynamics of the collective modes which are the underlying excitations of this system. From this result we derive closed formulae for the free-energy, specific-heat, two-point correlation functions and momentum distribution, as functionals of electron-electron coupling potentials. (orig.) 15 refs.

  4. Spotlighting quantum critical points via quantum correlations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werlang, T.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    We extend the program initiated by T. Werlang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 095702 (2010)] in several directions. Firstly, we investigate how useful quantum correlations, such as entanglement and quantum discord, are in the detection of critical points of quantum phase transitions when the system is at finite temperatures. For that purpose we study several thermalized spin models in the thermodynamic limit, namely, the XXZ model, the XY model, and the Ising model, all of which with an external magnetic field. We compare the ability of quantum discord, entanglement, and some thermodynamic quantities to spotlight the quantum critical points for several different temperatures. Secondly, for some models we go beyond nearest neighbors and also study the behavior of entanglement and quantum discord for second nearest neighbors around the critical point at finite temperature. Finally, we furnish a more quantitative description of how good all these quantities are in spotlighting critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite T, bridging the gap between experimental data and those theoretical descriptions solely based on the unattainable absolute zero assumption.

  5. Topological terms induced by finite temperature and density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, A.J.; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)

    1986-01-01

    In (3+1)-dimensional finite-temperature and -density SU(2) gauge theories with left-handed fermions, the three-dimensional Chern-Simons term (topological mass) can be induced by radiative corrections. This result is derived by use of a family's index theorem which also implies that in many other quantum field theories various additional lower-dimensional topological terms can be induced. In the high-temperature limit these terms dominate the partition function, which suggests applications to early-Universe cosmology

  6. Baryon number dissipation at finite temperature in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Raby, S.; Starkman, G.

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the phenomenon of baryon number violation at finite temperature in the standard model, and derive the relaxation rate for the baryon density in the high temperature electroweak plasma. The relaxation rate, γ is given in terms of real time correlation functions of the operator E·B, and is directly proportional to the sphaleron transition rate, Γ: γ preceq n f Γ/T 3 . Hence it is not instanton suppressed, as claimed by Cohen, Dugan and Manohar (CDM). We show explicitly how this result is consistent with the methods of CDM, once it is recognized that a new anomalous commutator is required in their approach. 19 refs., 2 figs

  7. Repulsive Casimir force at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2009-01-01

    We study the zero and finite temperature Casimir force acting on a perfectly conducting piston with arbitrary cross section moving inside a closed cylinder with infinitely permeable walls. We show that at any temperature, the Casimir force always tends to move the piston away from the walls and toward its equilibrium position. In the case of a rectangular piston, exact expressions for the Casimir force are derived. In the high-temperature regime, we show that the leading term of the Casimir force is linear in temperature and therefore the Casimir force has a classical limit. Due to duality, all these results also hold for an infinitely permeable piston moving inside a closed cylinder with perfectly conducting walls.

  8. PT Symmetry and QCD: Finite Temperature and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Ogilvie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of PT symmetry to quantum chromodynamics (QCD, the gauge theory of the strong interactions, is explored in the context of finite temperature and density. Two significant problems in QCD are studied: the sign problem of finite-density QCD, and the problem of confinement. It is proven that the effective action for heavy quarks at finite density is PT-symmetric. For the case of 1+1 dimensions, the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian, although not Hermitian, has real eigenvalues for a range of values of the chemical potential μ, solving the sign problem for this model. The effective action for heavy quarks is part of a potentially large class of generalized sine-Gordon models which are non-Hermitian but are PT-symmetric. Generalized sine-Gordon models also occur naturally in gauge theories in which magnetic monopoles lead to confinement. We explore gauge theories where monopoles cause confinement at arbitrarily high temperatures. Several different classes of monopole gases exist, with each class leading to different string tension scaling laws. For one class of monopole gas models, the PT-symmetric affine Toda field theory emerges naturally as the effective theory. This in turn leads to sine-law scaling for string tensions, a behavior consistent with lattice simulations.

  9. Quarkonium at finite temperature: towards realistic phenomenology from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnier, Yannis [Institute of Theoretical Physics, EPFL,CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kaczmarek, Olaf [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld,D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Rothkopf, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University,Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-12-16

    We present the finite temperature spectra of both bottomonium and charmonium, obtained from a consistent lattice QCD based potential picture. Starting point is the complex in-medium potential extracted on full QCD lattices with dynamical u,d and s quarks, generated by the HotQCD collaboration. Using the generalized Gauss law approach, vetted in a previous study on quenched QCD, we fit Re[V] with a single temperature dependent parameter m{sub D}, the Debye screening mass, and confirm the up to now tentative values of Im[V]. The obtained analytic expression for the complex potential allows us to compute quarkonium spectral functions by solving an appropriate Schrödinger equation. These spectra exhibit thermal widths, which are free from the resolution artifacts that plague direct reconstructions from Euclidean correlators using Bayesian methods. In the present adiabatic setting, we find clear evidence for sequential melting and derive melting temperatures for the different bound states. Quarkonium is gradually weakened by both screening (Re[V]) and scattering (Im[V]) effects that in combination lead to a shift of their in-medium spectral features to smaller frequencies, contrary to the mass gain of elementary particles at finite temperature.

  10. Gravitational collapse of a magnetized fermion gas with finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Gaspar, I. [Instituto de Geofisica y Astronomia (IGA), La Habana (Cuba); Perez Martinez, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Sussman, Roberto A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico); Ulacia Rey, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized fermion gas at finite temperature near the collapsing singularity of a Bianchi-I spacetime. Considering a general set of appropriate and physically motivated initial conditions, we transform Einstein-Maxwell field equations into a complete and self-consistent dynamical system amenable for numerical work. The resulting numerical solutions reveal the gas collapsing into both, isotropic (''point-like'') and anisotropic (''cigar-like''), singularities, depending on the initial intensity of the magnetic field. We provide a thorough study of the near collapse behavior and interplay of all relevant state and kinematic variables: temperature, expansion scalar, shear scalar, magnetic field, magnetization, and energy density. A significant qualitative difference in the behavior of the gas emerges in the temperature range T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -6} and T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -3}. (orig.)

  11. Finite temperature effects on monopole and dipole excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Y F; Paar, N; Vretenar, D; Meng, J

    2011-01-01

    The relativistic random phase approximation based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon couplings has been extended to finite temperature and employed in studies of multipole excitations within the temperature range T = 1 - 2 MeV. The model calculations showed that isoscalar giant monopole and isovector giant dipole resonances are only slightly modified with temperature, but additional transition strength appears at low energies because of thermal unblocking of single-particle orbitals close to the Fermi level. The analysis of low-lying states shows that isoscalar monopole response in 132 Sn results from single particle transitions, while the isovector dipole strength for 60 Ni, located around 10 MeV, is composed of several single particle transitions, accumulating a small degree of collectivity.

  12. Induced lattice dielectric gauge theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.A.; Petrov, V.K.; Zinovjev, G.M.

    1993-11-01

    Some properties of the lattice dielectric gauge theories (LDGT) at finite temperature are studied and discussed. We have found several essential points to be mentioned: 1) deconfinement phase transition at certain values of dielectric potential parameters takes place; 2) space-like Wilson loop obeys area law at any temperature; 3) a possibility to introduce gauge invariant mass for dielectric field leads to existence of magnetic charge and sources of gluon current screening; such properties could mean a lack of infrared problem in dielectric theories unlike pure Yang-Mills theories at T ≠ 0. We show how an effective theory for static modes of high-temperature lattice Willson QCD can appear to be LDGT performing a corresponding reduction and discuss the general properties of the effective model obtained. (author)

  13. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  14. Finite-temperature dynamics of the Mott insulating Hubbard chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Alberto; Essler, Fabian H. L.; Feiguin, Adrian E.

    2018-01-01

    We study the dynamical response of the half-filled one-dimensional Hubbard model for a range of interaction strengths U and temperatures T by a combination of numerical and analytical techniques. Using time-dependent density matrix renormalization group computations we find that the single-particle spectral function undergoes a crossover to a spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid regime at temperatures T ˜J =4 t2/U for sufficiently large U >4 t . At smaller values of U and elevated temperatures the spectral function is found to exhibit two thermally broadened bands of excitations, reminiscent of what is found in the Hubbard-I approximation. The dynamical density-density response function is shown to exhibit a finite-temperature resonance at low frequencies inside the Mott gap, with a physical origin similar to the Villain mode in gapped quantum spin chains. We complement our numerical computations by developing an analytic strong-coupling approach to the low-temperature dynamics in the spin-incoherent regime.

  15. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures

  16. Effects of interactions on dynamic correlations of hard-core bosons at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate how dynamic correlations of hard-core bosonic excitation at finite temperature are affected by additional interactions besides the hard-core repulsion which prevents them from occupying the same site. We focus especially on dimerized spin systems, where these additional interactions between the elementary excitations, triplons, lead to the formation of bound states, relevant for the correct description of scattering processes. In order to include these effects quantitatively, we extend the previously developed Brückner approach to include also nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions correctly in a low-temperature expansion. This leads to the extension of the scalar Bethe-Salpeter equation to a matrix-valued equation. As an example, we consider the Heisenberg spin ladder to illustrate the significance of the additional interactions on the spectral functions at finite temperature, which are proportional to inelastic neutron scattering rates.

  17. Electrostatic attraction of coupled Wigner crystals: finite temperature effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A W; Pincus, P; Levine, D; Fertig, H A

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we present a unified physical picture for the electrostatic attraction between two coupled planar Wigner crystals at finite temperature. This model may facilitate our conceptual understanding of counterion-mediated attractions between (highly) similarly charged planes. By adopting an elastic theory, we show that the total attractive force between them can be (approximately) decomposed into a short-ranged and a long-ranged component. They are evaluated below the melting temperature of the Wigner crystals. In particular, we analyze the temperature dependence of the short-ranged attraction, arising from ground-state configuration, and we argue that thermal fluctuations may drastically reduce its strength. Also, the long-range force agrees exactly with that based on the charge-fluctuation approach. Furthermore, we take quantum contributions to the long-ranged (fluctuation-induced) attraction into account and show how the fractional power law, which scales as d(-7/2) for large interplanar distance d at zero temperature, crosses over to the classical regime d(-3) via an intermediate regime of d(-2).

  18. Thermo field dynamics in the treatment of the nuclear pairing problem at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O.; DePaoli, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    The use of the thermo field dynamics, in dealing with the study of nuclear properties at finite temperature, is discussed for the case of a nuclear Hamiltonian which includes a single-particle term and a monopole pairing residual two-body interaction. The rules of the thermo fields dynamics are applied to double the Hilbert space, thus accounting for the thermal occupation of single-particle states, and to construct dual spaces, both for single-particle (BCS) and collective (RPA) degrees of freedom. It is shown that the rules of the thermo field dynamics yield to a temperature dependence of the equations describing quasiparticle and phonon excitations which is similar to the one found in the more conventional finite temperature Wick's theorem approach, namely: By dealing with thermal averages. (orig.)

  19. Monte Carlo studies of supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with sixteen supercharges at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos N; Hanada, Masanori; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2008-01-18

    We present the first Monte Carlo results for supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with 16 supercharges at finite temperature. The recently proposed nonlattice simulation enables us to include the effects of fermionic matrices in a transparent and reliable manner. The internal energy nicely interpolates the weak coupling behavior obtained by the high temperature expansion, and the strong coupling behavior predicted from the dual black-hole geometry. The Polyakov line asymptotes at low temperature to a characteristic behavior for a deconfined theory, suggesting the absence of a phase transition. These results provide highly nontrivial evidence for the gauge-gravity duality.

  20. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density from Taylor expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In the first part, I present an overview of recent Lattice QCD simulations at finite temperature and density. In particular, we discuss fluctuations of conserved charges: baryon number, electric charge and strangeness. These can be obtained from Taylor expanding the QCD pressure as a function of corresponding chemical potentials. Our simulations were performed using quark masses corresponding to physical pion mass of about 140 MeV and allow a direct comparison to experimental data from ultra-relativistic heavy ion beams at hadron colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the second part, we discuss computational challenges for current and future exascale Lattice simulations with a focus on new silicon developments from Intel and NVIDIA.

  1. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-15

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  2. Finite-temperature quantum simulations of mixed rare gas clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwly, Markus; Doll, J D

    2010-06-21

    Finite-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations are presented for mixed neon/argon rare gas clusters containing up to n=10 atoms. For the smallest clusters (n=3) comparison with rigorous bound state calculations and experiments shows that the present approach is accurate to within fractions of wavenumbers for energies and to within a few percent or better for rotational constants. For larger cluster sizes, for which no rigorous quantum calculations are available, comparison with experiment becomes even more favorable. In all simulations accurate pair potentials for the rare gas-rare gas interactions are employed and comparison with high-level electronic structure calculations suggest that many-body interactions play a minor role. For the largest clusters investigated (Ne(4)Ar(6)) gradual melting of the neon phase is observed while the argon-phase remains structurally intact.

  3. Two aspects of the quantum chromodynamics' transition at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This thesis concerns two aspects of the relation between chiral symmetry breaking and confinement. The first aspect is the relations between different topological objects. The relation between monopoles and center vortices and the relation between instantons and monopoles are well established, in this thesis, we explore the relation between instantons (of finite temperature, called calorons) and center vortices in SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory in Chapter 3 and Chapter 4, respectively. The second aspect is about the order parameters. The dual condensate introduced by E. Bilgici et al. is a novel observable that relates the order parameter of chiral symmetry breaking (chiral condensate) and confinement (Polyakov loop). In this thesis, we investigate the dual condensate on dynamical staggered fermions and explore a new dual operator: the dual quark density in Chapter 5.

  4. Quantum gases finite temperature and non-equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Szymanska, Marzena; Davis, Matthew; Gardiner, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The 1995 observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapours spawned the field of ultracold, degenerate quantum gases. Unprecedented developments in experimental design and precision control have led to quantum gases becoming the preferred playground for designer quantum many-body systems. This self-contained volume provides a broad overview of the principal theoretical techniques applied to non-equilibrium and finite temperature quantum gases. Covering Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and the more recently realised exciton-polariton condensates, it fills a gap by linking between different methods with origins in condensed matter physics, quantum field theory, quantum optics, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics. Thematically organised chapters on different methodologies, contributed by key researchers using a unified notation, provide the first integrated view of the relative merits of individual approaches, aided by pertinent introductory chapters and the guidance of ed...

  5. Finite temperature holographic duals of 2-dimensional BCFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, J.

    2015-07-01

    We consider holographic duals of 2-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of a boundary, interface, defect and/or junction, referred to collectively as BCFTs. In general, the presence of a boundary reduces the SO(2, 2) conformal symmetry to SO(2, 1) and the dual geometry is realized as a warped product of the form , where is not compact. In particular, it will contain points where the warp factor of the AdS 2 space diverges, leading to asymptotically AdS 3 regions. We show that the AdS 2 space-time may always be replaced with an AdS 2-"black-hole" space-time. We argue the resulting geometry describes the BCFT at finite temperature. To motivate this claim, we compute the entanglement entropy holographically for a segment centered around the defect or ending on the boundary and find agreement with a known universal formula.

  6. Finite-Temperature Properties of Three-Dimensional Chiral Helimagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Misako; Hoshino, Shintaro; Masaki, Yusuke; Kishine, Jun-ichiro; Kato, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    We study a three-dimensional (3d) classical chiral helimagnet at finite temperatures through analysis of a spin Hamiltonian, which is defined on a simple cubic lattice and consists of the Heisenberg exchange, monoaxial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, and the Zeeman energy due to a magnetic field applied in the plane perpendicular to the helical axis. We take account of the quasi-two-dimensionality of the known monoaxial chiral helimagnet CrNb3S6 and we adopt three methods: (i) a conventional mean-field (MF) analysis, which we call the 3dMF method, (ii) a hybrid method called the 2dMC-1dMF method, which is composed of a classical Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and a MF approximation applied respectively to the intra- and interlayer interactions, and (iii) a simple-MC simulation (3dMC) at zero field. The temperature dependence of the magnetization calculated by the 3dMF method shows a cusp-like structure similar to that observed in experiments. In the absence of a magnetic field, both 2dMC-1dMF and 3dMC yield similar values of the transition temperature. The 2dMC-1dMF method provides a quantitative description of the thermodynamic properties, even under an external field, at an accessible numerical cost.

  7. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  8. Complete Tangent Stiffness for eXtended Finite Element Method by including crack growth parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mougaard, J.F.; Poulsen, P.N.; Nielsen, L.O.

    2013-01-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) is a useful tool for modeling the growth of discrete cracks in structures made of concrete and other quasi‐brittle and brittle materials. However, in a standard application of XFEM, the tangent stiffness is not complete. This is a result of not including...... the crack geometry parameters, such as the crack length and the crack direction directly in the virtual work formulation. For efficiency, it is essential to obtain a complete tangent stiffness. A new method in this work is presented to include an incremental form the crack growth parameters on equal terms...... with the degrees of freedom in the FEM‐equations. The complete tangential stiffness matrix is based on the virtual work together with the constitutive conditions at the crack tip. Introducing the crack growth parameters as direct unknowns, both equilibrium equations and the crack tip criterion can be handled...

  9. Finite temperature holographic duals of 2-dimensional BCFTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-06

    We consider holographic duals of 2-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of a boundary, interface, defect and/or junction, referred to collectively as BCFTs. In general, the presence of a boundary reduces the SO(2,2) conformal symmetry to SO(2,1) and the dual geometry is realized as a warped product of the form AdS{sub 2}×M, where M is not compact. In particular, it will contain points where the warp factor of the AdS{sub 2} space diverges, leading to asymptotically AdS{sub 3} regions. We show that the AdS{sub 2} space-time may always be replaced with an AdS{sub 2}-“black-hole” space-time. We argue the resulting geometry describes the BCFT at finite temperature. To motivate this claim, we compute the entanglement entropy holographically for a segment centered around the defect or ending on the boundary and find agreement with a known universal formula.

  10. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the stability of the smallest gold cages, namely Au16 and Au17, at finite temperatures. First, we obtain the ground state structure along with at least 50 distinct isomers for both the clusters. This is followed by the finite temperature simulations of ...

  11. Response of Bose-Einstein condensates to external perturbations at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theory of the linear response of a Bose-Einstein-condensed gas to external perturbations at finite temperature. The theory developed here is the basis of a recent quantitative explanation of the measurements of condensate excitations and decay rates made at JILA [D. S. Jin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 764 (1997)]. The formalism is based on a dynamic, number-conserving, mean-field scheme and is valid in the collisionless limit of well-defined quasiparticles. The theory is gapless, consistent with the generalized Kohn theorem for the dipole modes, and includes the time-dependent normal and anomalous averages, Beliaev and Landau processes, and all relevant finite-size effects. The important physical process where the thermal cloud is driven directly by the external perturbation is explicitly included. This is required for consistency with the dipole modes and is also needed to explain the JILA observations

  12. Endemic infrared divergences in QED3 at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Pok Man; Swanson, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that massless QED in three dimensions contains endemic infrared divergences. It is argued that these divergences do not affect observables; furthermore, it is possible to choose a gauge that renders the theory finite.

  13. Wilson-Polyakov loops for critical strings and superstrings at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    An open string with end-points fixed at spatial separation L is a string theory analogue of the static quark-antiquark system in quenched QCD. Folowing a review of the quantum mechanics of this system in critical bosonic string theory the partition function at finite β (the inverse temperature) for fixed end-point open strings is discussed. This is related by a conformal transformation ('world-sheet duality') to the correlation function of two closed strings fixed at distinct spatial points (a string theory analogue of two Wilson-Polyakov loops). Temperature duality (β → β' = 4π 2 /β) relates this correlation function, in turn, to the finite-temperature Green function for a closed strong propagating between initial and final states that are at distinct (euclidean) space-time points. In addition, spatial duality relates the fixed end-point open string to the familiar open string with free end-points. A generalization to fixed end-points superstrings is suggested, in which the superalgebra may be viewed as the spatial dual of the usual open-string superalgebra. At zero temperature world-sheet duality relates the partition function of supersymmetric fixed end-point open strings to the correlation function of point-like closed-string states. These couple to combinations of the scalar and pseudoscalar states of a type-2b superstring superfield. At finite temperature supersymmetry is broken and this correlation function involves the propagation of non-supersymmetric states with non-zero winding numbers (which formally include a tachyon at temperatures above the Hagedorn transition). Temperature duality again relates the partition function to the finite-temperature Green function describing the propagator for point-like closed-string states of the dual theory, in which supersymmetry is broken. The singularity that arises in the critical bosonic theory as L is reduced below L = 2 π√α' is absent in the superstring and the static potential is well defined for all

  14. Lattice QCD at finite temperature with Wilson fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The subatomic world is governed by the strong interactions of quarks and gluons, described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Quarks experience confinement into colour-less objects, i.e. they can not be observed as free particles. Under extreme conditions such as high temperature or high density, this constraint softens and a transition to a phase where quarks and gluons are quasi-free particles (Quark-Gluon-Plasma) can occur. This environment resembles the conditions prevailing during the early stages of the universe shortly after the Big Bang. The phase diagram of QCD is under investigation in current and future collider experiments, for example at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) or at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Due to the strength of the strong interactions in the energy regime of interest, analytic methods can not be applied rigorously. The only tool to study QCD from first principles is given by simulations of its discretised version, Lattice QCD (LQCD). These simulations are in the high-performance computing area, hence, the numerical aspects of LQCD are a vital part in this field of research. In recent years, Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) have been incorporated in these simulations as they are a standard tool for general purpose calculations today. In the course of this thesis, the LQCD application CL 2 QCD has been developed, which allows for simulations on GPUs as well as on traditional CPUs, as it is based on OpenCL. CL 2 QCD constitutes the first application for Wilson type fermions in OpenCL. It provides excellent performance and has been applied in physics studies presented in this thesis. The investigation of the QCD phase diagram is hampered by the notorious sign-problem, which restricts current simulation algorithms to small values of the chemical potential. Theoretically, studying unphysical parameter ranges allows for constraints on the phase diagram. Of utmost importance is the clarification of the order of the finite

  15. Bethe ansatz approach to quantum sine Gordon thermodynamics and finite temperature excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotos, X.

    1982-01-01

    Takahashi and Suzuki (TS) using the Bethe ansatz method developed a formalism for the thermodynamics of the XYZ spin chain. Translating their formalism to the quantum sine-Gordon system, the thermodynamics and finite temperature elementary excitations are analyzed. Criteria imposed by TS on the allowed states simply correspond to the condition of normalizability of the wave functions. A set of coupled nonlinear integral equations for the thermodynamic equilibrium densities for particular values of the coupling constant in the attractive regime is derived. Solving numerically these Bethe ansatz equations, curves of the specific heat as a function of temperature are obtained. The soliton contribution peaks at a temperature of about 0.4 soliton masses shifting downward as the classical limit is approached. The weak coupling regime is analyzed by deriving the Bethe ansatz equations including the charged vacuum excitations. It is shown that they are necessary for a consistent presentation of the thermodynamics

  16. The finite temperature density matrix and two-point correlations in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhmann, Frank; Hasenclever, Nils P.; Seel, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    We derive finite temperature versions of integral formulae for the two-point correlation functions in the antiferromagnetic XXZ chain. The derivation is based on the summation of density matrix elements characterizing a finite chain segment of length m. On this occasion we also supply a proof of the basic integral formula for the density matrix presented in an earlier publication.

  17. Manifestations of the axial anomaly in finite temperature QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogut, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the flavor singlet meson correlators and screening masses in quenched and N f = 2 QCD at N t = 8. The consequences of our results for the realization of the U A (1) symmetry at finite T are discussed and an interpretation of our measurements in terms of the behavior of the low lying fermionic modes is proposed

  18. A holographic model for QCD in the Veneziano limit at finite temperature and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alho, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä,P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Järvinen, M. [Physics Department, University of Crete,P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Kajantie, K. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kiritsis, E. [Physics Department, University of Crete,P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); APC, Université Paris 7,Bâtiment Condorcet, 75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Theory Group, Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rosen, C. [Physics Department, University of Crete,P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tuominen, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-04-22

    A holographic model of QCD in the limit of large number of colors, N{sub c}, and massless fermion flavors, N{sub f}, but constant ratio x{sub f}=N{sub f}/N{sub c} is analyzed at finite temperature and chemical potential. The five dimensional gravity model contains three bulk fields: a scalar dilaton sourcing TrF{sup 2}, a scalar tachyon dual to q-macron q and a 4-vector dual to the baryon current q-macron γ{sup μ}q. The main result is the μ,T phase diagram of the holographic theory. A first order deconfining transition along T{sub h}(μ) and a chiral transition at T{sub χ}(μ)>T{sub h}(μ) are found. The chiral transition is of second order for small μ and becomes of first order at larger μ. The two regimes are separated by a tricritical point. The dependence of thermodynamical quantities including the speed of sound and susceptibilities on the chemical potential and temperature is computed. A new quantum critical regime is found at zero temperature and finite chemical potential. It is controlled by an AdS{sub 2}×R{sup 3} geometry and displays semi-local criticality.

  19. A holographic model for QCD in the Veneziano limit at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Alho, T.; Kajantie, K.; Kiritsis, E.; Rosen, C.; Tuominen, K.

    2014-01-01

    A holographic model of QCD in the limit of large number of colors, $N_c$, and massless fermion flavors, $N_f$, but constant ratio $x_f=N_f/N_c$ is analyzed at finite temperature and chemical potential. The five dimensional gravity model contains three bulk fields: a scalar dilaton sourcing ${\\rm Tr}F^2$, a scalar tachyon dual to $\\bar qq$ and a 4-vector dual to the baryon current $\\bar q \\gamma^{\\mu} q$. The main result is the $\\mu,T$ phase diagram of the holographic theory. A first order deconfining transition along $T_h(\\mu)$ and a chiral transition at $T_\\chi(\\mu)>T_h(\\mu)$ are found. The chiral transition is of second order for small $\\mu$ and becomes of first order at larger $\\mu$. The two regimes are separated by a tricritical point. The dependence of thermodynamical quantities including the speed of sound and susceptibilities on the chemical potential and temperature is computed. A new quantum critical regime is found at zero temperature and finite chemical potential. It is controlled by an AdS$_2\\time...

  20. Isovector pairing effect on nuclear moment of inertia at finite temperature in N = Z even–even systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M.R.; Belabbas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Expressions of temperature-dependent perpendicular (ℑ⊥) and parallel (ℑ‖) moments of inertia, including isovector pairing effects, have been established using the cranking method. They are derived from recently proposed temperature-dependent gap equations. The obtained expressions generalize the conventional finite-temperature BCS (FTBCS) ones. Numerical calculations have been carried out within the framework of the schematic Richardson model as well as for nuclei such as N = Z, using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods–Saxon mean-field. ℑ⊥ and ℑ‖ have been studied as a function of the temperature. It has been shown that the isovector pairing effect on both the perpendicular and parallel moments of inertia is non-negligible at finite temperature. These correlations must thus be taking into account in studies of warm rotating nuclei in the N ≃ Z region. (author)

  1. Schwinger α-PARAMETRIC Representation of Finite Temperature Field Theories:. Renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, M.; Kassou-Ou-Ali, A.

    We present the extension of the zero temperature Schwinger α-representation to the finite temperature scalar field theories. We give, in a compact form, the α-integrand of Feynman amplitudes of these theories. Using this representation, we analyze short-range divergences, and recover in a simple way the known result that the counterterms are temperature-independent.

  2. Finite-temperature phase structure of lattice QCD with Wilson quark action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Ukawa, A.; Umemura, T.

    1996-01-01

    The long-standing issue of the nature of the critical line of lattice QCD with the Wilson quark action at finite temperatures, defined to be the line of vanishing pion screening mass, and its relation to the line of finite-temperature chiral transition is examined. Presented are both analytical and numerical evidence that the critical line forms a cusp at a finite gauge coupling, and that the line of chiral transition runs past the tip of the cusp without touching the critical line. Implications on the continuum limit and the flavor dependence of chiral transition are discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Finite-temperature mobility of a particle coupled to a fermionic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castella, H.; Zotos, X.

    1996-01-01

    We study numerically the finite-temperature and frequency mobility of a particle coupled by a local interaction to a system of spinless fermions in one dimension. We find that when the model is integrable (particle mass equal to the mass of fermions) the static mobility diverges. Further, an enhanced mobility is observed over a finite parameter range away from the integrable point. We present an analysis of the finite-temperature static mobility based on a random matrix theory description of the many-body Hamiltonian. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Reduced one-body density matrix of Tonks–Girardeau gas at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiao-Chen; Hao Ya-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    With thermal Bose–Fermi mapping method, we investigate the Tonks–Girardeau gas at finite temperature. It is shown that at low temperature, the Tonks gas displays the Fermi-like density profiles, and with the increase in temperature, the Tonks gas distributes in wider region. The reduced one-body density matrix is diagonal dominant in the whole temperature region, and the off-diagonal elements shall vanish rapidly with the deviation from the diagonal part at high temperature. (paper)

  5. Theory of metallic magnetism at finite temperatures in bulk materials and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, J. B.; Razee, S. S. A.; Szunyogh, L.; Gyorffy, B. L.

    2002-06-01

    A review of ‘first-principles’ theoretical work that describes the properties of magnetic metallic materials at finite temperatures is given. The key assumption is that a time-scale separation can be identified. There are the thermally induced spin fluctuations which are long-lived compared to the time electrons take to move from one lattice site to another. The dependence on the spin-polarised electronic structures of the systems is emphasised including the role of ‘local exchange splitting’ inferred even in the paramagnetic states. The disordered local moment picture which provides the basis of a mean field theory is discussed and its results for bulk transition metals and alloys recalled. Finally, new results for this picture in metallic thin films are reported. In particular comparison with calculated magnetic ordering temperatures of iron films on copper substrates is made with those deduced from experiment and an interpretation in terms of the electronic structure is given.

  6. Finite temperature effects in Bose-Einstein condensed dark matter halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Madarassy, Enikö J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Once the critical temperature of a cosmological boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Zero temperature condensed dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian gravitational condensate, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state, with barotropic index equal to one. In the present paper we analyze the effects of the finite dark matter temperature on the properties of the dark matter halos. We formulate the basic equations describing the finite temperature condensate, representing a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation that takes into account the presence of the thermal cloud. The static condensate and thermal cloud in thermodynamic equilibrium is analyzed in detail, by using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and Thomas-Fermi approximations. The condensed dark matter and thermal cloud density and mass profiles at finite temperatures are explicitly obtained. Our results show that when the temperature of the condensate and of the thermal cloud are much smaller than the critical Bose-Einstein transition temperature, the zero temperature density and mass profiles give an excellent description of the dark matter halos. However, finite temperature effects may play an important role in the early stages of the cosmological evolution of the dark matter condensates

  7. QCD sum rule studies at finite density and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Youngshin

    2010-01-21

    In-medium modifications of hadronic properties have a strong connection to the restoration of chiral symmetry in hot and/or dense medium. The in-medium spectral functions for vector and axial-vector mesons are of particular interest in this context, considering the experimental dilepton production data which signal the in-medium meson properties. In this thesis, finite energy sum rules are employed to set constraints for the in-medium spectral functions of vector and axial-vector mesons. Finite energy sum rules for the first two moments of the spectral functions are investigated with emphasis on the role of a scale parameter related to the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD. It is demonstrated that these lowest moments of vector current spectral functions do permit an accurate sum rule analysis with controlled inputs, such as the QCD condensates of lowest dimensions. In contrast, the higher moments contain uncertainties from the higher dimensional condensates. It turns out that the factorization approximation for the four-quark condensate is not applicable in any of the cases studied in this work. The accurate sum rules for the lowest two moments of the spectral functions are used to clarify and classify the properties of vector meson spectral functions in a nuclear medium. Possible connections with the Brown-Rho scaling hypothesis are also discussed. (orig.)

  8. Restoration of singlet axial symmetry at finite temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Benic, S.; Horvatic, D.; Kekez, D.; Klabucar, D.

    2012-01-01

    To accomodate recent RHIC data on eta prime multiplicity, we propose a minimal modification of the Witten-Veneziano relation at high temperature. This renders a significant drop of eta prime mass at high temperature signaling a restoration of the U(1)A, and the Goldstone character of etaprime.

  9. Current correlation functions of ideal Fermi gas at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The diamagnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature has also been obtained from transverse current correlation function as its long wave- length and static limit, which smoothly cross over from known quantum values to the classical limit with increase in temperature. Keywords. Fermi gas; diamagnetic susceptibility; ...

  10. Temperature definition for a finite number of classical spin-half particles: A canonical ensemble approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q.H.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    A canonical ensemble for non-interacting classical spin-half systems containing small number of particles is developed to deal with the definition of temperature based upon the equal a priori probabilities which is the fundamental hypothesis of the statistical mechanics. When the number of spins is finite, the temperature of the system differs from that of bath, and the difference stays almost the same above a turning temperature and gets larger rapidly as the temperature decreases below it

  11. Charmonium spectrum at finite temperature from a Bayesian analysis of QCD sum rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morita Kenji

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Making use of a recently developed method of analyzing QCD sum rules, we investigate charmonium spectral functions at finite temperature. This method employs the Maximum Entropy Method, which makes it possible to directly obtain the spectral function from the sum rules, without having to introduce any strong assumption about its functional form. Finite temperature effects are incorporated into the sum rules by the change of the various gluonic condensates that appear in the operator product expansion. These changes depend on the energy density and pressure at finite temperature, which are extracted from lattice QCD. As a result, J/ψ and ηc dissolve into the continuum already at temperatures around 1.0 ~ 1.1 Tc.

  12. Finite-temperature properties of multiferroic BiFeO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornev, Igor; Lisenkov, S; Haumont, R

    2007-01-01

    An effective Hamiltonian scheme is developed to study finite-temperature properties of multiferroic BiFeO3. This approach reproduces very well (i) the symmetry of the ground state, (ii) the Néel and Curie temperatures, and (iii) the intrinsic magnetoelectric coefficients (that are very weak...

  13. Quark matter and quark stars at finite temperature in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Min; Jia, Yu-Yue; Wang, Shu-Mei; Ma, Hong-Yang [Qingdao Technological University, School of Science, Qingdao (China); Li, Xiao-Hua [University of South China, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Cooperative Innovation Center for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology and Equipment, Hengyang (China)

    2017-08-15

    We extend the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model to include two types of vector interaction. Using these two types of vector interaction in NJL model, we study the quark symmetry free energy in asymmetric quark matter, the constituent quark mass, the quark fraction, the equation of state (EOS) for β-equilibrium quark matter, the maximum mass of QSs at finite temperature, the maximum mass of proto-quark stars (PQSs) along the star evolution, and the effects of the vector interaction on the QCD phase diagram. We find that comparing zero temperature case, the values of quark matter symmetry free energy get larger with temperature increasing, which will reduce the difference between the fraction of u, d and s quarks and stiffen the EoS for β-equilibrium quark matter. In particular, our results indicate that the maximum masses of the quark stars increase with temperature because of the effects of the quark matter symmetry free energy, and we find that the heating(cooling) process for PQSs will increase (decrease) the maximum mass within NJL model. (orig.)

  14. Understanding the structure of nuclei at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktash, C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to briefly review several works on nuclear structure and to enumerate a few of the difficulties encountered in the interpretation of the experimental results. To be brief, comments are confined to the studies in the particle-bound regime, i.e., a temperature range of T ≤ 1 MeV. Among the interesting topics to be addressed in this temperature range are the question of thermal fluctuations, and the variations of the pairing correlations, shape parameters, nuclear collectivity, and rotational damping width with spin and excitation energy

  15. I. Surface properties of neutron-rich nuclei. II. Pion condensation at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolehmainen, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    In part I, the energy density formalism, the Thomas-Fermi approximation, and Skyrme-type interactions were used to describe the energy density of a semi-infinite slab of neturon-rich nuclear matter at zero temperature. The existence of a drip phase at low proton fractions is allowed in addition to the more dense nuclear phase, and various bulk properties of both phases are found when the system is in equilibrium. The usual definition of the surface energy is extended to apply to the case where drip is present. Assuming a Fermi function type density profile, a constrained variational calculation is performed to determine the neutron and proton surface diffuseness parameters, the thickness of the neutron skin, and the surface energy. Results are obtained for proton fractions reanging from 0.5 (symmetric nuclear matter) to zero (pure neutron matter) for most Skyrme-type interactions in common use. The results are in close agreement with the predictions of the droplet model, as well as with the results of more exact calculations in those cases where the more exact results exist (only for symmetric or nearly symmetric matter in most cases). Significantly different asymmetry dependences for different interactions are found. In part II, several simple but increasingly complex models are used to calculate the threshold for charged pion condensation in neutron-rich nuclear matter at finite temperature. Unlike in mean field theory descriptions of pion condensation, the effects of thermal excitations of the pion field are included. The thermal pion excitations have two important effects: first, to modify the phase diagram qualitatively from that predicted by mean field theory, and second, to make the phase transition to a spatially nonuniform condensed state at finite temperature always first, rather than second, order

  16. Decisive role of nuclear quantum effects on surface mediated water dissociation at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, Yair; Donadio, Davide; Ceriotti, Michele; Rossi, Mariana

    2018-03-01

    Water molecules adsorbed on inorganic substrates play an important role in several technological applications. In the presence of light atoms in adsorbates, nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) influence the structural stability and the dynamical properties of these systems. In this work, we explore the impact of NQEs on the dissociation of water wires on stepped Pt(221) surfaces. By performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with van der Waals corrected density functional theory, we note that several competing minima for both intact and dissociated structures are accessible at finite temperatures, making it important to assess whether harmonic estimates of the quantum free energy are sufficient to determine the relative stability of the different states. We thus perform ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) in order to calculate these contributions taking into account the conformational entropy and anharmonicities at finite temperatures. We propose that when adsorption is weak and NQEs on the substrate are negligible, PIMD simulations can be performed through a simple partition of the system, resulting in considerable computational savings. We then calculate the full contribution of NQEs to the free energies, including also anharmonic terms. We find that they result in an increase of up to 20% of the quantum contribution to the dissociation free energy compared with the harmonic estimates. We also find that the dissociation process has a negligible contribution from tunneling but is dominated by zero point energies, which can enhance the rate of dissociation by three orders of magnitude. Finally we highlight how both temperature and NQEs indirectly impact dipoles and the redistribution of electron density, causing work function changes of up to 0.4 eV with respect to static estimates. This quantitative determination of the change in the work function provides a possible approach to determine experimentally the most stable configurations of water

  17. Finite Element Analysis of the Random Response Suppression of Composite Panels at Elevated Temperatures using Shape Memory Alloy Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Zhong, Z. W.; Mei, Chuh

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study on the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) for suppression of the random response of composite panels due to acoustic loads at elevated temperatures is presented. The constitutive relations for a composite lamina with embedded SMA fibers are developed. The finite element governing equations and the solution procedures for a composite plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads are presented. Solutions include: 1) Critical buckling temperature; 2) Flat panel random response; 3) Thermal postbuckling deflection; 4) Random response of a thermally buckled panel. The preliminary results demonstrate that the SMA fibers can completely eliminate the thermal postbuckling deflection and significantly reduce the random response at elevated temperatures.

  18. Simulation of temperature distribution by finite element analysis on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several optical and mechanical components of the beamline are exposed to high intensity synchrotron radiation while in operation. The temperature rise on different components of the beamline on exposure to the synchrotron beam has been simulated by finite element analysis. Design of the cooling mechanism for each of ...

  19. Renormalization group analysis of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirofumi.

    1988-03-01

    We re-investigate the behaviour of the effective coupling constant using the gauge invariant Wilson loop in Minkowsky space-time. The result tells us that the interaction of static q-q-bar pair becomes weak at high temperatures and at large distances. (author)

  20. A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vanishing lattice spacing a are controlled by the dimensionless number aT = 1 Nτ this decrease in Tc leads to an even higher computational effort which depends on the number of lattice points in the temporal (temperature) direction Nτ to some large power. Finally, standard (staggered or Wilson) discretizations of fermions ...

  1. Quarkonia at finite temperature in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... The connection between quarkonia and deconfinement began with the remarkable paper of Matsui and Satz [1]. .... As T С 0, a stable meson contributes a similar term to the spectral function in QCD ... As we are interested in the spectral function, ρ, at temperatures А3Tc, where perturba- tion theory may not ...

  2. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  3. Population dynamics of excited atoms in non-Markovian environments at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Hong-Mei; Fang Mao-Fa

    2015-01-01

    The population dynamics of a two-atom system, which is in two independent Lorentzian reservoirs or in two independent Ohmic reservoirs respectively, where the reservoirs are at zero temperature or finite temperature, is studied by using the time-convolutionless master-equation method. The influences of the characteristics and temperature of a non-Markovian environment on the population of the excited atoms are analyzed. We find that the population trapping of the excited atoms is related to the characteristics and the temperature of the non-Markovian environment. The results show that, at zero temperature, the two atoms can be effectively trapped in the excited state both in the Lorentzian reservoirs and in the Ohmic reservoirs. At finite temperature, the population of the excited atoms will quickly decay to a nonzero value. (paper)

  4. A SIMPLE DERIVATION OF FINITE-TEMPERATURE CFT CORRELATORS FROM THE BTZ BLACK HOLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple Lie-algebraic approach to momentum-space two-point functions of two-dimensional conformal field theory at finite temperature dual to the BTZ black hole. Making use of the real-time prescription of AdS/CFT correspondence and ladder equations of the Lie algebra so(2,2 ∼= sl(2,RL⊕sl(2,RR, we show that the finite-temperature two-point functions in momentum space satisfy linear recurrence relations with respect to the left and right momenta. These recurrence relations are exactly solvable and completely determine the momentum-dependence of retarded and advanced two-point functions of finite-temperature conformal field theory.

  5. The Schwinger α-PARAMETRIC Representation of the Finite-Temperature Field Theory:. Renormalization II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Mabrouk; Kassou-Ou-Ali, Ahmed

    We extend to finite-temperature field theories, involving charged scalar or nonvanishing spin particles, the α parametrization of field theories at zero temperature. This completes a previous work concerning the scalar theory. As there, a function θ, which contains all temperature dependence, appears in the α integrand. The function θ is an extension of the usual theta function. The implications of the α parametrization for the renormalization problem are discussed.

  6. A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nf=2, std. Figure 2. The critical temperature. On the left, Tc is given in units of the vector meson mass. The results [11–15] originate from a variety of improved actions for NF. 2. On the right, results [11] for 2 and 3 improved ´p4µ staggered quarks are compared to. NF. 2 standard (std) simulations, all normalized to the string ...

  7. Including fluid shear viscosity in a structural acoustic finite element model using a scalar fluid representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2013-01-01

    An approximate boundary condition is developed in this paper to model fluid shear viscosity at boundaries of coupled fluid-structure system. The effect of shear viscosity is approximated by a correction term to the inviscid boundary condition, written in terms of second order in-plane derivatives of pressure. Both thin and thick viscous boundary layer approximations are formulated; the latter subsumes the former. These approximations are used to develop a variational formation, upon which a viscous finite element method (FEM) model is based, requiring only minor modifications to the boundary integral contributions of an existing inviscid FEM model. Since this FEM formulation has only one degree of freedom for pressure, it holds a great computational advantage over the conventional viscous FEM formulation which requires discretization of the full set of linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The results from thick viscous boundary layer approximation are found to be in good agreement with the prediction from a Navier-Stokes model. When applicable, thin viscous boundary layer approximation also gives accurate results with computational simplicity compared to the thick boundary layer formulation. Direct comparison of simulation results using the boundary layer approximations and a full, linearized Navier-Stokes model are made and used to evaluate the accuracy of the approximate technique. Guidelines are given for the parameter ranges over which the accurate application of the thick and thin boundary approximations can be used for a fluid-structure interaction problem. PMID:23729844

  8. Fate of dynamical phase transitions at finite temperatures and in open systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayr, N.; Fleischhauer, M.; Sirker, J.

    2018-01-01

    When a quantum system is quenched from its ground state, the time evolution can lead to nonanalytic behavior in the return rate at critical times tc. Such dynamical phase transitions (DPTs) can occur, in particular, for quenches between phases with different topological properties in Gaussian models. In this paper we discuss Loschmidt echos generalized to density matrices and obtain results for quenches in closed Gaussian models at finite temperatures as well as for open-system dynamics described by a Lindblad master equation. While cusps in the return rate are always smoothed out by finite temperatures we show that dissipative dynamics can be fine-tuned such that DPTs persist.

  9. Finite-Temperature Signatures of Spin Liquids in Frustrated Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei

    2018-02-01

    Finite-temperature properties of the frustrated Hubbard model are theoretically examined by using the recently proposed thermal pure quantum state, which is an unbiased numerical method for performing finite-temperature calculations. By performing systematic calculations for the frustrated Hubbard model, we show that the geometrical frustration controls the characteristic energy scale of the metal-insulator transitions. We also find that entropy remains large even at moderately high temperatures around the region where the quantum spin liquid is expected to appear at zero temperature. We propose that this is a useful criterion for determining whether the target systems have chances of becoming the quantum spin liquid or the non-magnetic insulator at zero temperature.

  10. Compressibility, zero sound, and effective mass of a fermionic dipolar gas at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, J. P.; Das Sarma, S.

    2010-01-01

    The compressibility, zero-sound dispersion, and effective mass of a gas of fermionic dipolar molecules is calculated at finite temperature for one-, two-, and three-dimensional uniform systems, and in a multilayer quasi-two-dimensional system. The compressibility is nonmonotonic in the reduced temperature, T/T F , exhibiting a maximum at finite temperature. This effect might be visible in a quasi-low-dimensional experiment, providing a clear signature of the onset of many-body quantum degeneracy effects. The collective mode dispersion and effective mass show similar nontrivial temperature and density dependence. In a quasi-low-dimensional system, the zero-sound mode may propagate at experimentally attainable temperatures.

  11. Single-bubble sonoluminescence as Dicke superradiance at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio Alcalde, M.; Quevedo, H.; Svaiter, N. F.

    2014-12-01

    Sonoluminescence is a process in which a strong sound field is used to produce light in liquids. We explain sonoluminescence as a phase transition from ordinary fluorescence to a superradiant phase. We consider a spin-boson model composed of a single bosonic mode and an ensemble of N identical two-level atoms. We assume that the whole system is in thermal equilibrium with a reservoir at temperature β-1. We show that, in a ultrastrong-coupling regime, between the two-level atoms and the electromagnetic field it is possible to have a cooperative interaction of the molecules of the gas in the interior of the bubble with the field, generating sonoluminescence.

  12. EXACT SOLUTION TO FINITE TEMPERATURE SFDM: NATURAL CORES WITHOUT FEEDBACK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-quality observations of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. However, the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. One mechanism used to reconcile the simulations with the observed data is the feedback from star formation. While this mechanism may be successful in isolated dwarf galaxies, its success in LSB galaxies remains unclear. Additionally, the inclusion of too much feedback in the simulations is a double-edged sword—in order to obtain a cored DM distribution from an initially cuspy one, the feedback recipes usually require one to remove a large quantity of baryons from the center of the galaxies; however, some feedback recipes produce twice the number of satellite galaxies of a given luminosity and with much smaller mass-to-light ratios from those that are observed. Therefore, one DM profile that produces cores naturally and that does not require large amounts of feedback would be preferable. We find both requirements to be satisfied in the scalar field dark matter model. Here, we consider that DM is an auto-interacting real scalar field in a thermal bath at temperature T with an initial Z 2 symmetric potential. As the universe expands, the temperature drops so that the Z 2 symmetry is spontaneously broken and the field rolls down to a new minimum. We give an exact analytic solution to the Newtonian limit of this system, showing that it can satisfy the two desired requirements and that the rotation curve profile is no longer universal.

  13. Slave-particle approach to the finite-temperature properties of ultracold Bose gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiancong; Yu Yue; Li Jinbin

    2006-01-01

    By using slave particle (slave boson and slave fermion) techniques on the Bose-Hubbard model, we study the finite temperature properties of ultracold Bose gases in optical lattices. The phase diagrams at finite temperature are depicted by including different types of slave particles and the effect of the finite types of slave particles is estimated. The superfluid density is evaluated using the Landau second order phase transition theory. The atom density, excitation spectrum, and dispersion curve are also computed at various temperatures, and how the Mott-insulator evolves as the temperature increases is demonstrated. For most quantities to be calculated, we find that there are no qualitative differences in using the slave boson or the slave fermion approaches. However, when studying the stability of the mean field state, we find that in contrast to the slave fermion approach, the slave boson mean field state is not stable. Although the slave boson mean field theory gives a qualitatively correct phase boundary, it corresponds to a local maximum of Landau free energy and cannot describe the second order phase transition because the coefficient a 4 of the fourth order term is always negative in the free energy expansion

  14. Induced Chern-Simons term in lattice QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.A.; Petrov, V.K.; Zinov'ev, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The general conditions when the Chern-Simons action could arise (in continuum limit) as non universal contribution of fermionic determinant of finite-temperature lattice QCD are formulated. The dependence of this action coefficient on non universal parameters (a chemical potential, vacuum features, etc.) is investigated in detail. Special attention is paid to the role of possible 0 >-condensate existence. 42 refs. (author)

  15. Improved holographic Yang–Mills at finite temperature: comparison with data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürsoy, U.; Kiritsis, E.; Mazzanti, L.; Nitti, F.

    2009-01-01

    The semi-phenomenological improved holographic model for QCD is confronted with data of the pure glue, large-Nc gauge theory. After fitting two phenomenological parameters in the potential, the model can reproduce in detail all thermodynamic functions at finite temperature. It also reproduces in

  16. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  17. Finite-temperature charge transport in the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, F.; Steinigeweg, R.; Heidrich-Meisner, F.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.

    2015-01-01

    We study the charge conductivity of the one-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model at finite temperature using the method of dynamical quantum typicality, focusing at half filling. This numerical approach allows us to obtain current autocorrelation functions from systems with as many as 18 sites, way

  18. Symmetry restoration in the Georgi-Glashow model at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra Junior, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Symmetry restoration in the SU(5) model is analysed by means of finite temperature field theory. In our calculations symmetry restoration is due to topological defects which appear thanks to thermodynamical effects. We apply our results in cosmology, in order to explain the primordial inhomogeneity. Our results are compatible with Zeldovich's spectrum. (author) [pt

  19. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature; Quantentheoretische und klassische Vakuum-Kraefte bei Temperatur Null und bei endlicher Temperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-15

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of {Dirac_h}. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  20. A finite-temperature Hartree-Fock code for shell-model Hamiltonians

    OpenAIRE

    Bertsch, G. F.; Mehlhaff, J. M

    2016-01-01

    The codes HFgradZ.py and HFgradT.py find axially symmetric minima of a Hartree-Fock energy functional for a Hamiltonian supplied in a shell-model basis. The functional to be minimized is the Hartree-Fock energy for zero-temperature properties or the Hartree-Fock grand potential for finite-temperature properties. Various constraints may be imposed on the minima.

  1. Convective cells of internal gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere with finite temperature gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Onishchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated vortex structures (e.g. convective cells of internal gravity waves (IGWs in the earth's atmosphere with a finite vertical temperature gradient. A closed system of nonlinear equations for these waves and the condition for existence of solitary convective cells are obtained. In the atmosphere layers where the temperature decreases with height, the presence of IGW convective cells is shown. The typical parameters of such structures in the earth's atmosphere are discussed.

  2. On the calculation of finite-temperature effects in field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.T.; Frenkel, J.; Taylor, J.C.

    1991-03-01

    We discuss an alternative method for computing finite-temperature effects in field theories, within the framework of the imaginary-time formalism. Our approach allows for a systematic calculation of the high temperature expansion in terms of Riemann Zeta functions. The imaginary-time result is analytically continued to the complex plane. We are able to obtain the real-time limit of the real and the imaginary parts of the Green functions. (author)

  3. Unbounded 1/f-spectrum from quantum fluctuations of the Coulomb potential at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2008-01-01

    Experimentally observed unboundedness of flicker noise spectrum is explained on the basis of a finite-temperature theory of quantum electromagnetic fluctuations produced by electrons in an external electric field. Account of the photon heat bath and external field effects results in a 1/f-contribution to the power spectrum of fluctuations, which is odd in frequency, and gives rise to a finite contribution to the voltage correlation function. The derived expression is shown to be in agreement with the experimental data on flicker noise measurements in metal films

  4. Evaluation of Temperature and Stress Distribution on 2 Different Post Systems Using 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Değer, Yalçın; Adigüzel, Özkan; Yiğit Özer, Senem; Kaya, Sadullah; Seyfioğlu Polat, Zelal; Bozyel, Bejna

    2015-11-29

    BACKGROUND The mouth is exposed to thermal irritation from hot and cold food and drinks. Thermal changes in the oral cavity produce expansions and contractions in tooth structures and restorative materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature and stress distribution on 2 different post systems using the 3-dimensional (3D) finite element method. MATERIAL AND METHODS The 3D finite element model shows a labio-lingual cross-sectional view of the endodontically treated upper right central incisor and supporting periodontal ligament with bone structures. Stainless steel and glass fiber post systems with different physical and thermal properties were modelled in the tooth restored with composite core and ceramic crown. We placed 100 N static vertical occlusal loading onto the center of the incisal surface of the tooth. Thermal loads of 0°C and 65°C were applied on the model for 5 s. Temperature and thermal stresses were determined on the labio-lingual section of the model at 6 different points. RESULTS The distribution of stress, including thermal stress values, was calculated using 3D finite element analysis. The stainless steel post system produced more temperature and thermal stresses on the restorative materials, tooth structures, and posts than did the glass fiber reinforced composite posts. CONCLUSIONS Thermal changes generated stresses in the restorative materials, tooth, and supporting structures.

  5. Studies in the derivative expansion and finite temperature quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karev, A.

    1987-01-01

    The real time formalism of the finite temperature quantum field theories is discussed. It is then applied to calculate the Witten index in supersymmetric quantum mechanics. The Witten index is an order parameter of supersymmetry breaking. The author calculation of the Witten index shows that supersymmetry is spontaneously broken at finite temperature, reinstating the conclusions of earlier studies. The derivative expansion is a useful technique for studying low energy effective theories. We use this method in two space-time dimensions and show how the solubility of certain theories arises in this approach. We further apply this technique to show the temperature independence of the Abelian chiral anomaly, particularly in the context of the Schwinger model

  6. Finite-Temperature Variational Monte Carlo Method for Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Kensaku; Ido, Kota; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    A new computational method for finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated electrons is proposed by extending the variational Monte Carlo method originally developed for the ground state. The method is based on the path integral in the imaginary-time formulation, starting from the infinite-temperature state that is well approximated by a small number of certain random initial states. Lower temperatures are progressively reached by the imaginary-time evolution. The algorithm follows the framework of the quantum transfer matrix and finite-temperature Lanczos methods, but we extend them to treat much larger system sizes without the negative sign problem by optimizing the truncated Hilbert space on the basis of the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). This optimization algorithm is equivalent to the stochastic reconfiguration (SR) method that has been frequently used for the ground state to optimally truncate the Hilbert space. The obtained finite-temperature states allow an interpretation based on the thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state instead of the conventional canonical-ensemble average. Our method is tested for the one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models and its accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated.

  7. On colour non-singlet representations of the quark-gluon system at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.; Paria, L.

    2000-01-01

    We use a group theoretical technique to project out the partition function for a system of quarks, antiquarks and gluons onto a particular representation of the internal symmetry group SU(3): the colour singlet, colour octet and colour 27-plet, at finite temperature. We do this to calculate the thermodynamic quantities for those representations. We also calculate the change in free energy of the plasma droplet formed from the hot hadronic gas. We find that the size of the droplet in the colour-octet representation is smaller than that in the colour-singlet representations at different temperatures in the vicinity of the critical temperatures of the phase transitions. (orig.)

  8. Fermionic spectral functions in backreacting p-wave superconductors at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, G.L.; Grandi, N.E.; Lugo, A.R. [Instituto de Física de La Plata - CONICET & Departamento de Física - UNLP,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-04-14

    We investigate the spectral function of fermions in a p-wave superconducting state, at finite both temperature and gravitational coupling, using the AdS/CFT correspondence and extending previous research. We found that, for any coupling below a critical value, the system behaves as its zero temperature limit. By increasing the coupling, the “peak-dip-hump” structure that characterizes the spectral function at fixed momenta disappears. In the region where the normal/superconductor phase transition is first order, the presence of a non-zero order parameter is reflected in the absence of rotational symmetry in the fermionic spectral function at the critical temperature.

  9. Relativistic BCS-BEC crossover at finite temperature and its application to color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Lianyi; Zhuang Pengfei

    2007-01-01

    The nonrelativistic G 0 G formalism of BCS-BEC crossover at finite temperature is extended to relativistic fermion systems. The uncondensed pairs contribute a pseudogap to the fermion excitations. The theory recovers the BCS mean field approximation at zero temperature and the nonrelativistic results in a proper limit. For massive fermions, when the coupling strength increases, there exist two crossovers from the weak coupling BCS superfluid to the nonrelativistic BEC state and then to the relativistic BEC state. For color superconductivity at moderate baryon density, the matter is in the BCS-BEC crossover region, and the behavior of the pseudogap is quite similar to that found in high temperature superconductors

  10. Effective theory for heavy quark QCD at finite temperature and density with stochastic quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis we presented the derivation as well as the numerical and analytical treatment of an effective theory for lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD). We derived the effective theory directly from LQCD, which allows us to systematically introduce further improvements. The derivation was performed by means of an expansion around the limit of infinite quark masses and infinite gauge coupling. Using this theory we were able to derive results in the region of large densities. This region is, due to the sign problem, inaccessible to standard LQCD approaches. Although LQCD simulations at large densities have been performed recently by applying stochastic quantization, those are still limited to lattice with low numbers of timeslices and therefor can not reach the low temperature region. Furthermore, they can not be crosschecked with Monte-Carlo simulations. Since the equivalence between stochastic quantization and Monte-Carlo is unproven for the case of finite density systems, new approaches to access the cold dense region of the QCD phase diagram are desirable. The effective theory presented in this thesis provides such an approach. We introduced continuum QCD in chapter 2. In chapter 3 we presented how LQCD, i.e. QCD in a discretized space-time, can be formulated and used as a tool to explore the non-perturbative regions of the QCD phase diagram. Special emphasis was placed on simulations at finite baryon densities and the numerical problems that arise in this region. These problems are caused by the complexification of the action and are known as the sign problem. We gave a detailed presentation of the derivation of our effective theory in chapter 4. For this we performed expansions around the limit of strong coupling and static quarks, κ=β=0, introducing corrections order by order in the expansion parameters κ and β. Truncating the theory at different orders allowed us to determine the parameter region where the convergence to full LQCD is good. The gauge

  11. Effects of Fierz transformation on gap equation and CEP at finite chemical potential and finite temperature in Hartree-Fock approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuqing; Ping, Jialun; Zong, Hongshi

    2017-12-01

    Three representations of Nambu-Jona-Lasinio interaction Lagrangians are constructed by Fierz transformation, and gap equation and critical end point in these three representations at finite temperature and finite chemical potential are studied. We find that the values of the quark mass and the critical end point are different in these three representations because of the consideration of Hartree-Fock approximation in our calculation.

  12. Quantum dynamics at finite temperature: Time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christov, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the ground state and the dissipative quantum dynamics of interacting charged particles in an external potential at finite temperature. The recently devised time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo (TDQMC) method allows a self-consistent treatment of the system of particles together with bath oscillators first for imaginary-time propagation of Schrödinger type of equations where both the system and the bath converge to their finite temperature ground state, and next for real time calculation where the dissipative dynamics is demonstrated. In that context the application of TDQMC appears as promising alternative to the path-integral related techniques where the real time propagation can be a challenge.

  13. Finite temperature formalism for non-Abelian gauge theories in the physical phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1995-09-01

    We establish a new framework of finite temperature field theory for Yang-Mills theories in the physical phase space eliminating all unphysical degrees of freedom. Relating our method to the imaginary time formalism of James and Landshoff in the temporal axial gauge, we calculate the two-loop pressure and provide a systematic and unique method to construct the additional vertices encountered in their approach.

  14. Finite temperature formalism for nonabelian gauge theories in the physical phase space

    OpenAIRE

    Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1995-01-01

    We establish a new framework of finite temperature field theory for Yang-Mills theories in the physical phase space eliminating all unphysical degrees of freedoms. Relating our method to the imaginary time formalism of James and Landshoff in temporal axial gauge, we calculate the two-loop pressure and provide a systematic and unique method to construct the additional vertices encountered in their approach.

  15. Finite temperature formalism for non-Abelian gauge theories in the physical phase space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachbagauer, H. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique ENSLAPP, Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)

    1995-09-15

    We establish a new framework of finite temperature field theory for Yang-Mills theories in the physical phase space eliminating all unphysical degrees of freedom. Relating our method to the imaginary time formalism of James and Landshoff in the temporal axial gauge, we calculate the two-loop pressure and provide a systematic and unique method to construct the additional vertices encountered in their approach.

  16. Finite Temperature Effective Potential for Spontaneously Broken $\\lambda \\Phi^4$ Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1994-01-01

    We present a self-consistent calculation of the finite temperature effective potential for $\\lambda \\Phi^4$ theory in four dimensions using a composite operator effective action. We find that in a spontaneously broken theory not only the so-called daisy and superdaisy graphs contribute to the next-to-leading order thermal mass, but also resummed non-local diagrams are of the same order, thus altering the effective potential at small effective mass.

  17. Spectral correlations of the massive QCD Dirac operator at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, Burkhard; Wettig, Tilo; Guhr, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    We use the graded eigenvalue method, a variant of the supersymmetry technique, to compute the universal spectral correlations of the QCD Dirac operator in the presence of massive dynamical quarks. The calculation is done for the chiral Gaussian unitary ensemble of random matrix theory with an arbitrary Hermitian matrix added to the Dirac matrix. This case is of interest for schematic models of OCD at finite temperature

  18. Simulation on Temperature Field of Radiofrequency Lesions System Based on Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, D; Qian, Z; Li, W; Qian, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly describes the way to get the volume model of damaged region according to the simulation on temperature field of radiofrequency ablation lesion system in curing Parkinson's disease based on finite element method. This volume model reflects, to some degree, the shape and size of the damaged tissue during the treatment with all tendencies in different time or core temperature. By using Pennes equation as heat conduction equation of radiofrequency ablation of biological tissue, the author obtains the temperature distribution field of biological tissue in the method of finite element for solving equations. In order to establish damage models at temperature points of 60 deg. C, 65 deg. C, 70 deg. C, 75 deg. C, 80 deg. C, 85 deg. C and 90 deg. C while the time points are 30s, 60s, 90s and 120s, Parkinson's disease model of nuclei is reduced to uniform, infinite model with RF pin at the origin. Theoretical simulations of these models are displayed, focusing on a variety of conditions about the effective lesion size on horizontal and vertical. The results show the binary complete quadratic non-linear joint temperature-time models of the maximum damage diameter and maximum height. The models can comprehensively reflect the degeneration of target tissue caused by radio frequency temperature and duration. This lay the foundation for accurately monitor of clinical RF treatment of Parkinson's disease in the future.

  19. Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge at zero and finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available I report on recent results obtained within the Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge. By relating the Gribov confinement scenario to the center vortex picture of confinement it is shown that the Coulomb string tension is tied to the spatial string tension. For the quark sector a vacuum wave functional is used which results in variational equations which are free of ultraviolet divergences. The variational approach is extended to finite temperatures by compactifying a spatial dimension. For the chiral and deconfinement phase transition pseudo-critical temperatures of 170MeV and 198 MeV, respectively, are obtained.

  20. The effective potential for composite operator in the scalar model at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananos, G.N.J.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2000-10-01

    We discuss the φ 4 and φ 6 theory defined in a flat D-dimensional space-time. We assume that the system is in equilibrium with a thermal bath at temperature β -1 . To obtain non-perturbative result, the 1?N expansion is used. The method of the composite operator for summing a large set of Feynman graphs, is developed for the finite temperature system. The resumed effective potential and the analysis of the D=3 and D=4 cases are given .(author)

  1. Electrical conductivity of Dirac/Schrödinger hybrid electron systems at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanh, Nguyen Quoc; Linh, Dang Khanh

    2018-04-01

    We calculate the dielectric function of a system composed of a Bernal bilayer graphene (BLG) and an ordinary two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), separated by a spacer, as a function of temperature T, interlayer distance d and spacer dielectric constant ε2 . Based on the results for dielectric function, we calculate the finite-temperature electrical conductivity of the first layer in presence of the second one due to the screened Coulomb scattering. We also compare our results with those of BLG-BLG, BLG systems and study the effect of 2DEG materials on the conductivity.

  2. Quantum electrodynamics at a finite temperature with an external field destroying the stability of the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A generating functional for expectation values is found for QED at a finite temperature with an external field which destroys the stability of the vacuum. The equations for connected Green functions and the effective action for the mean field are written out. Their representation is obtained in the form of an integral over the proper time for the Green function taking into account temperature effects in a constant uniform field. By means of this representation the polarization operator for the mean field in an external constant uniform field has been calculated

  3. Quantum electrodynamics at finite temperatures in presence of an external field violating the vacuum stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A functional generating expectation values is obtained for QED at a finite temperature in presence of an external field violating the vacuum stability. Equations for connected Green's functions and the effective action for the mean field are derived. The Green function is obtained as an integral with respect of the proper time; the representation takes into account temperature effects in a constant homogeneous field. The polarization operator for the mean field in an external constant homogeneous field is calculated by means of the integral representation

  4. The Fermion boson interaction within the linear sigma model at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, H.C.G. [Fundacao de Ensino Superior de Sao Joao del Rei (FUNREI), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais (DCNAT)

    2000-07-01

    We study the interaction of massless bosons at finite temperature. Specifically, we calculate the self-energy of massless fermions due to interaction with massless bosons at high temperature, which is the region where thermal effects are maximal. The calculations are concentrated in the limit of vanishing fermion three momentum and after considering the effective boson dressed mass, we obtain the damping rate of the fermion. It is shown that in the limit k{sub O} <

  5. Covariance analysis of finite temperature density functional theory: symmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, A; Maza, X Roca

    2015-01-01

    We study symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature, with particular emphasis on the liquid-gas phase transition. We use a standard covariance analysis to propagate statistical uncertainties from the density functional to the thermodynamic properties. We use four functionals with known covariance matrices to obtain as wide a set of results as possible. Our findings suggest that thermodynamical properties are very well constrained by fitting data at zero temperature. The propagated statistical errors in the liquid-gas phase transition parameters are relatively small. (paper)

  6. Conductance distributions of one-dimensional disordered wires at finite temperature and bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foieri, Federico; Sánchez, María José; Arrachea, Liliana; Gopar, Victor A.

    2006-10-01

    We calculate the distribution of the conductance G in a one-dimensional disordered wire at finite temperature T and bias voltage V in an independent-electron picture and assuming full coherent transport. At high enough temperature and bias voltage, where several resonances of the system contribute to the conductance, the distribution P(G(T,V)) can be represented with good accuracy by autoconvolutions of the distribution of the conductance at zero temperature and zero bias voltage. The number of convolutions depends on T and V . In the regime of very low T and V , where only one resonance is relevant to G(T,V) , the conductance distribution is analyzed by a resonant tunneling conductance model. Strong effects of finite T and V on the conductance distribution are observed and well described by our theoretical analysis, as we verify by performing a number of numerical simulations of a one-dimensional disordered wire at different temperatures, voltages, and lengths of the wire. Analytical estimates for the first moments of P(G(T,V)) at high temperature and bias voltage are also provided.

  7. Finite temperature and the Polyakov loop in the covariant variational approach to Yang-Mills Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quandt Markus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the covariant variational approach for Yang-Mills theory in Landau gauge to non-zero temperatures. Numerical solutions for the thermal propagators are presented and compared to high-precision lattice data. To study the deconfinement phase transition, we adapt the formalism to background gauge and compute the effective action of the Polyakov loop for the colour groups SU(2 and SU(3. Using the zero-temperature propagators as input, all parameters are fixed at T = 0 and we find a clear signal for a deconfinement phase transition at finite temperatures, which is second order for SU(2 and first order for SU(3. The critical temperatures obtained are in reasonable agreement with lattice data.

  8. Finite-temperature effects on conductance modulation by local doping in graphene with multiple magnetic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, Nojoon; Lidorikis, Elefterios

    2015-12-01

    The electronic and transport properties of graphene modulated by magnetic barrier arrays are derived at finite temperatures. Prominent conductance gaps, originating from quantum interference effects are found in the periodic array case. When a structural defect is inserted in the array, sharp defect modes of high conductance appear within the conductance gaps. These modes are shifted by local doping in the defect region, resulting in large contrast in the ballistic conductance of graphene sheet. In general it is found that sensitivity is strongly dependent on temperature due to smoothing out of the defect-induced peaks and transport gaps. This temperature dependence, however, offers the added capability for sub-mK temperature sensing resolution, and thus an opportunity towards ultra-sensitive combined electrochemical-calorimetric sensing.

  9. Renormalisation of a self-consistent scheme in quantum field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinosa, Urko

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, we study the renormalisation of a self-consistent technique in quantum field theory at finite temperature. The so-called two-particle-irreducible scheme is useful to deal with strongly interacting quantum systems where the fluctuations are however soft enough to distribute the main interactions among quasiparticle degrees of freedom. Numerous non-relativistic systems follow this quasiparticle picture but also relativistic ones such as the quark gluon plasma (high temperature phase of Quantum Chromodynamics). The success of such techniques stems essentially from the fact that these are non-perturbative methods. This is however the source of a certain number of difficulties in particular in the framework of quantum field theories since ultraviolet divergences have to be eliminated in a non-perturbative context. This thesis shows how to proceed with the renormalisation of this scheme in the case of a scalar theory with φ 4 interaction, at finite temperature. We also discuss the independence of the counterterms with respect to temperature, which is a crucial question when defining trustworthy physical quantities. (author) [fr

  10. Holographic zero sound at finite temperature in the Sakai-Sugimoto model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiNunno, Brandon S. [Theory Group, Department of Physics and Texas Cosmology Center,The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78712 (United States); Ihl, Matthias [Centro de Física do Porto e Departamento de Física e Astronomia,Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto,Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Jokela, Niko [Departamento de Física de Partículas e Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxías (IGFAE), Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pedraza, Juan F. [Theory Group, Department of Physics and Texas Cosmology Center,The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78712 (United States)

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, we study the fate of the holographic zero sound mode at finite temperature and non-zero baryon density in the deconfined phase of the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD. We establish the existence of such a mode for a wide range of temperatures and investigate the dispersion relation, quasi-normal modes, and spectral functions of the collective excitations in four different regimes, namely, the collisionless quantum, collisionless thermal, and two distinct hydrodynamic regimes. For sufficiently high temperatures, the zero sound completely disappears, and the low energy physics is dominated by an emergent diffusive mode. We compare our findings to Landau-Fermi liquid theory and to other holographic models.

  11. Heavy quark free energies for three quark systems at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, Kay; Karsch, Frithjof; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Vogt, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We study the free energy of static three quark systems in singlet, octet, decuplet, and average color channels in the quenched approximation and in 2-flavor QCD at finite temperature. We show that in the high temperature phase singlet and decuplet free energies of three quark systems are well described by the sum of the free energies of three diquark systems plus self-energy contributions of the three quarks. In the confining low temperature phase we find evidence for a Y-shaped flux tube in SU(3) pure gauge theory, which is less evident in 2-flavor QCD due to the onset of string breaking. We also compare the short distance behavior of octet and decuplet free energies to the free energies of single static quarks in the corresponding color representations.

  12. Finite temperature spin-dynamics and phase transitions in spin-orbital models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-C.

    2010-04-29

    We study finite temperature properties of a generic spin-orbital model relevant to transition metal compounds, having coupled quantum Heisenberg-spin and Ising-orbital degrees of freedom. The model system undergoes a phase transition, consistent with that of a 2D Ising model, to an orbitally ordered state at a temperature set by short-range magnetic order. At low temperatures the orbital degrees of freedom freeze-out and the model maps onto a quantum Heisenberg model. The onset of orbital excitations causes a rapid scrambling of the spin spectral weight away from coherent spin-waves, which leads to a sharp increase in uniform magnetic susceptibility just below the phase transition, reminiscent of the observed behavior in the Fe-pnictide materials.

  13. Zeta-function regularization approach to finite temperature effects in Kaluza-Klein space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bytsenko, A.A.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    1992-01-01

    In the framework of heat-kernel approach to zeta-function regularization, in this paper the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature for scalar and spinor fields on Kaluza-Klein space-time of the form M p x M c n , where M p is p-dimensional Minkowski space-time is evaluated. In particular, when the compact manifold is M c n = H n /Γ, the Selberg tracer formula associated with discrete torsion-free group Γ of the n-dimensional Lobachevsky space H n is used. An explicit representation for the thermodynamic potential valid for arbitrary temperature is found. As a result a complete high temperature expansion is presented and the roles of zero modes and topological contributions is discussed

  14. Phase structure of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature: Large-N and continuum limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O., E-mail: oleg@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Chelnokov, V., E-mail: chelnokov@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Gravina, M., E-mail: gravina@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Papa, A., E-mail: papa@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    We study numerically three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature, for N=5,6,8,12,13 and 20 on lattices with temporal extension N{sub t}=2,4,8. For each model, we locate phase transition points and determine critical indices. We propose also the scaling of critical points with N. The data obtained enable us to verify the scaling near the continuum limit for the Z(N) models at finite temperatures.

  15. Phase structure of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature: Large-N and continuum limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V.; Gravina, M.; Papa, A.

    2014-01-01

    We study numerically three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature, for N=5,6,8,12,13 and 20 on lattices with temporal extension N t =2,4,8. For each model, we locate phase transition points and determine critical indices. We propose also the scaling of critical points with N. The data obtained enable us to verify the scaling near the continuum limit for the Z(N) models at finite temperatures

  16. Improvement of magnetic hardness at finite temperatures: Ab initio disordered local-moment approach for YCo5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Munehisa; Banerjee, Rudra; Staunton, Julie B.

    2014-08-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy and magnetization of the prototypical rare-earth magnet YCo5 is calculated from first principles, utilizing the relativistic disordered local-moment approach. We discuss a strategy to enhance the finite-temperature anisotropy field by hole doping, paving the way for an improvement of the coercivity near room temperature or higher.

  17. Finite-temperature behavior of an impurity in the spin-1/2 XXZ chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahagi, Ryoko; Deguchi, Tetsuo; Sato, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We study the zero- and the finite-temperature behavior of the integrable spin-1/2 XXZ periodic chain with an impurity by the algebraic and thermal Bethe ansatz methods. We evaluate the local magnetization on the impurity site at zero temperature analytically and derive the impurity susceptibility exactly from it. In the graphs of the impurity specific heat versus temperature, we show how the impurity spin becomes more liberated from the bulk many-body effect as the exchange coupling between the impurity spin and other spins decreases and that at low temperature it couples strongly to them such as in the Kondo effect. Thus, we observe not only the crossover behavior from the high- to the low-temperature regime, but another from the N-site chain to the (N − 1)-site chain with a free impurity spin. We also show that the estimate of the Wilson ratio at a given low temperature is independent of the impurity parameter if its absolute value is small enough with respect to the temperature and the universality class is described by the XXZ anisotropy in terms of the dressed charge. (paper)

  18. Gluon scattering in N=4 super Yang-Mills at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Katsushi; Iwasaki, Koh; Nastase, Horatiu

    2008-01-01

    We extend the AdS/CFT prescription of Alday and Maldacena to finite temperature T, defining an amplitude for gluon scattering in N=4 Super Yang-Mills at strong coupling from string theory. It is defined by a lightlike 'Wilson loop' living at the horizon of the T-dual to the black hole in AdS space. Unlike the zero temperature case, this is different from the Wilson loop contour defined at the boundary of the AdS black hole metric. Thus at nonzero T there is no relation between gluon scattering amplitudes and the Wilson loop. We calculate a gauge theory observable that can be interpreted as the amplitude at strong coupling for forward scattering of a low energy gluon (E >T) in both cutoff and generalized dimensional regularization. The generalized dimensional regularization is defined in string theory as an IR modified dimensional reduction. For this calculation, the corresponding usual Wilson loop of the same boundary shape was argued to be related to the jet quenching parameter of the finite temperature N=4 SYM plasma, while the gluon scattering amplitude is related to the viscosity coefficient. (author)

  19. Iterative optimized effective potential and exact exchange calculations at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Modine, Normand Arthur; Muller, Richard Partain; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lippert, Ross A.; Sears, Mark P.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2006-01-01

    We report the implementation of an iterative scheme for calculating the Optimized Effective Potential (OEP). Given an energy functional that depends explicitly on the Kohn-Sham wave functions, and therefore, implicitly on the local effective potential appearing in the Kohn-Sham equations, a gradient-based minimization is used to find the potential that minimizes the energy. Previous work has shown how to find the gradient of such an energy with respect to the effective potential in the zero-temperature limit. We discuss a density-matrix-based derivation of the gradient that generalizes the previous results to the finite temperature regime, and we describe important optimizations used in our implementation. We have applied our OEP approach to the Hartree-Fock energy expression to perform Exact Exchange (EXX) calculations. We report our EXX results for common semiconductors and ordered phases of hydrogen at zero and finite electronic temperatures. We also discuss issues involved in the implementation of forces within the OEP/EXX approach.

  20. Non-local observables at finite temperature in AdS/CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Miekley, Nina

    2018-03-01

    Within gauge/gravity duality, we consider the AdS-Schwarzschild metric in arbitrary dimensions. We obtain analytical closed-form results for the two-point function, Wilson loop and entanglement entropy for strip geometries in the finite-temperature field-theory dual. According to the duality, these are given by the area of minimal surfaces of different dimension in the gravity background. Our analytical results involve generalised hypergeometric functions. We show that they reproduce known numerical results to great accuracy. Our results allow to identify new physical behaviour: for instance, we consider the entanglement density, i.e. the difference of entanglement entropies at finite and vanishing temperature divided by the volume of the entangling region. For field theories of dimension seven or higher, we find that the entanglement density displays non-monotonic behaviour as function of ℓ · T , with ℓ the strip width and T the temperature. This implies that the area theorem, proven for RG flows in general dimensions, does not apply here. This may signal the emergence of new degrees of freedom for AdS Schwarzschild black holes in eight or more dimensions.

  1. Phase structure of 3DZ(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V.; Cortese, G.; Gravina, M.; Papa, A.; Surzhikov, I.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a numerical study of the phase transitions in three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature for N>4. Using the dual formulation of the models and a cluster algorithm we locate the position of the critical points and study the critical behavior across both phase transitions in details. In particular, we determine various critical indices, compute the average action and the specific heat. Our results are consistent with the two transitions being of infinite order. Furthermore, they belong to the universality class of two-dimensional Z(N) vector spin models

  2. Correspondence between imaginary-time and real-time finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobes, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is known that one-particle-irreducible graphs found using the imaginary-time formalism of finite-temperature field theory differ in general with those of the real-time formalism. Here it is shown that within the real-time formalism one can consider a sum of graphs, motivated by causality arguments, which at least in a number of simple examples agree with the corresponding analytically continued imaginary-time result. The occurrence of multiple statistical factors in this sum of graphs is discussed

  3. Finite-temperature orbital-free DFT molecular dynamics: Coupling PROFESS and QUANTUM ESPRESSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasiev, Valentin V.; Sjostrom, Travis; Trickey, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of orbital-free free-energy functionals in the PROFESS code and the coupling of PROFESS with the QUANTUM ESPRESSO code are described. The combination enables orbital-free DFT to drive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on the same footing (algorithms, thermostats, convergence parameters, etc.) as for Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT. All the non-interacting free-energy functionals implemented are single-point: the local density approximation (LDA; also known as finite-T Thomas-Fermi, ftTF), the second-order gradient approximation (SGA or finite-T gradient-corrected TF), and our recently introduced finite-T generalized gradient approximations (ftGGA). Elimination of the KS orbital bottleneck via orbital-free methodology enables high-T simulations on ordinary computers, whereas those simulations would be costly or even prohibitively time-consuming for KS molecular dynamics (MD) on very high-performance computer systems. Example MD simulations on H over a temperature range 2000 K ≤ T ≤4,000,000 K are reported, with timings on small clusters (16-128 cores) and even laptops. With respect to KS-driven calculations, the orbital-free calculations are between a few times through a few hundreds of times faster.

  4. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Impact and Frictional Motion Responses Including Fluid—Structure Coupling Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear three dimensional (3D single rack model and a nonlinear 3D whole pool multi-rack model are developed for the spent fuel storage racks of a nuclear power plant (NPP to determine impacts and frictional motion responses when subjected to 3D excitations from the supporting building floor. The submerged free standing rack system and surrounding water are coupled due to hydrodynamic fluid-structure interaction (FSI using potential theory. The models developed have features that allow consideration of geometric and material nonlinearities including (1 the impacts of fuel assemblies to rack cells, a rack to adjacent racks or pool walls, and rack support legs to the pool floor; (2 the hydrodynamic coupling of fuel assemblies with their storing racks, and of a rack with adjacent racks, pool walls, and the pool floor; and (3 the dynamic motion behavior of rocking, twisting, and frictional sliding of rack modules. Using these models 3D nonlinear time history dynamic analyses are performed per the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC criteria. Since few such modeling, analyses, and results using both the 3D single and whole pool multiple rack models are available in the literature, this paper emphasizes description of modeling and analysis techniques using the SOLVIA general purpose nonlinear finite element code. Typical response results with different Coulomb friction coefficients are presented and discussed.

  5. A finite element model of the lower limb during stance phase of gait cycle including the muscle forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffo Kaze, Arnaud; Maas, Stefan; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Wolf, Claude; Pape, Dietrich

    2017-12-07

    Results of finite element (FE) analyses can give insight into musculoskeletal diseases if physiological boundary conditions, which include the muscle forces during specific activities of daily life, are considered in the FE modelling. So far, many simplifications of the boundary conditions are currently made. This study presents an approach for FE modelling of the lower limb for which muscle forces were included. The stance phase of normal gait was simulated. Muscle forces were calculated using a musculoskeletal rigid body (RB) model of the human body, and were subsequently applied to a FE model of the lower limb. It was shown that the inertial forces are negligible during the stance phase of normal gait. The contact surfaces between the parts within the knee were modelled as bonded. Weak springs were attached to the distal tibia for numerical reasons. Hip joint reaction forces from the RB model and those from the FE model were similar in magnitude with relative differences less than 16%. The forces of the weak spring were negligible compared to the applied muscle forces. The maximal strain was 0.23% in the proximal region of the femoral diaphysis and 1.7% in the contact zone between the tibia and the fibula. The presented approach based on FE modelling by including muscle forces from inverse dynamic analysis of musculoskeletal RB model can be used to perform analyses of the lower limb with very realistic boundary conditions. In the present form, this model can be used to better understand the loading, stresses and strains of bones in the knee area and hence to analyse osteotomy fixation devices.

  6. Behaviour of `free-standing' hollow Au nanocages at finite temperatures: a BOMD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Krati; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2015-10-01

    Finite-temperature behaviour of a hollow golden cage (HGC) plays a crucialrole in its potential applications as a catalyst, drug delivery agent, contrasting agent and so on. This physico-chemical property of HGCs is not well understood so far. In that context, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations are performed on a well-known 'free-standing' HGC. The cluster considered in this study is the ground state Au18 cluster (a cage with a diameter of about >5.5 Å). The results thus obtained are compared with the BOMD simulation results reported earlier on Au32 icosahedron cage, a conformation with a diameter of nearly. The sphericity of both the clusters is studied using a shape deformation parameter as a function of time and temperature. These results are supplemented by radial distribution function at various temperatures. The observations and analysis of results indicate that, both the clusters retain an HGC conformation from 300 to 400 K, admitting structural fluxionality by the Au18 cluster. Remarkably, the Au18 cluster is able to maintain its hollowness and sphericity up to a high temperature of 1000 K. Underlying structural and electronic properties influencing the individualistic behaviour of cages are highlighted. Composition of the frontier molecular orbitals and the charge distribution play a crucial role in the finite-temperature behaviour of the Au cages. The conclusions are supplemented by supporting calculations on another degenerate ground state Au18 hollow cage and a well-known pyramidal Au18 cage at 300 and 400 K.

  7. Finite element model to study temperature distribution in skin and deep tissues of human limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mamta; Pardasani, K R

    2016-12-01

    The temperature of body tissues is viewed as an indicator of tissue response in clinical applications since ancient times. The tissue temperature depends on various physical and physiological parameters like blood flow, metabolic heat generation, thermal conductivity of tissues, shape and size of organs etc. In this paper a finite element model has been proposed to study temperature distribution in skin and deep tissues of human limbs. The geometry of human limb is taken as elliptical tapered shape. It is assumed that outer surface of the limb is exposed to the environment. The appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on physical conditions of the problem. The model has been developed for a three dimensional steady state case. Hexahedral circular sectoral elements are used to discretize the region. The results have been computed to obtain temperature profiles and study the relation of tissue temperature with the parameters like atmospheric temperature, rate of evaporation, thickness of tissues layers and shape of the limb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural flexibility of the sulfur mustard molecule at finite temperature from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Joanna; Goclon, Jakub; Rodziewicz, Pawel

    2016-04-05

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the most dangerous chemical compounds used against humans, mostly at war conditions but also in terrorist attacks. Even though the sulfur mustard has been synthesized over a hundred years ago, some of its molecular properties are not yet resolved. We investigate the structural flexibility of the SM molecule in the gas phase by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Thorough conformation analysis of 81 different SM configurations using density functional theory is performed to analyze the behavior of the system at finite temperature. The conformational diversity is analyzed with respect to the formation of intramolecular blue-shifting CH⋯S and CH⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that all structural rearrangements between SM local minima are realized either in direct or non-direct way, including the intermediate structure in the last case. We study the lifetime of the SM conformers and perform the population analysis. Additionally, we provide the anharmonic dynamical finite temperature IR spectrum from the Fourier Transform of the dipole moment autocorrelation function to mimic the missing experimental IR spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Finite deformations of functionally graded shell under outer pressure with steady state temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Panchal, Rekha; Sahni, Manoj; Sharma, Richa

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, finite elastic and plastic stresses have been determined for functionally graded shell using the concepts of transition theory and generalized measure of strain i.e. nonlinear terms in the displacements are also considered while in classical theory only infinitesimal strain theory concept has been applied. In this problem of spherical shell, temperature has been applied at the internal surface while pressure is considered to be applied at the external surface. From the detailed analysis, it has been noticed that temperature and pressure have significant effects on functionally graded shell. In this paper, it is found that external pressure required for the fully plastic state from initial yielding is on the higher side for the shell made up of highly functionally graded material as compared to the shell made up of less functionally graded material.

  10. Finite element analysis of spot laser of steel welding temperature history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibib Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding process reduces the heat input to the work-piece which is the main goal in aerospace and electronics industries. A finite element model for axi-symmetric transient heat conduction has been used to predict temperature distribution through a steel cylinder subjected to CW laser beam of rectangular beam profile. Many numerical improvements had been used to reduce time of calculation and size of the program so as to achieve the task with minimum time required. An experimental determined absorptivity has been used to determine heat induced when laser interact with material. The heat affected zone and welding zone have been estimated to determine the effect of welding on material. The ratio of depth to width of the welding zone can be changed by proper selection of beam power to meet the specific production requirement. The temperature history obtained numerically has been compared with experimental data indicating good agreement.

  11. Finite element investigation of temperature dependence of elastic properties of carbon nanotube reinforced polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Rouhi, Saeed

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the elastic modulus of the polypropylene matrix reinforced by carbon nanotubes at different temperatures. To this end, the finite element approach is employed. The nanotubes with different volume fractions and aspect ratios (the ratio of length to diameter) are embedded in the polymer matrix. Besides, random and regular algorithms are utilized to disperse carbon nanotubes in the matrix. It is seen that as the pure polypropylene, the elastic modulus of carbon nanotube reinforced polypropylene decreases by increasing the temperature. It is also observed that when the carbon nanotubes are dispersed parallelly and the load is applied along the nanotube directions, the largest improvement in the elastic modulus of the nanotube/polypropylene nanocomposites is obtained.

  12. Energy-momentum tensor correlation function in Nf = 2 + 1 full QCD at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniguchi Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We measure correlation functions of the nonperturbatively renormalized energy-momentum tensor in Nf = 2 + 1 full QCD at finite temperature by applying the gradient flow method both to the gauge and quark fields. Our main interest is to study the conservation law of the energy-momentum tensor and to test whether the linear response relation is properly realized for the entropy density. By using the linear response relation we calculate the specific heat from the correlation function. We adopt the nonperturba-tively improved Wilson fermion and Iwasaki gauge action at a fine lattice spacing = 0:07 fm. In this paper the temperature is limited to a single value T ≃ 232 MeV. The u, d quark mass is rather heavy with mπ=mρ ≃ 0:63 while the s quark mass is set to approximately its physical value.

  13. Finite element analysis and modeling of temperature distribution in turning of titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moola Mohan Reddy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V have been widely used in aerospace, and medical applications and the demand is ever-growing due to its outstanding properties. In this paper, the finite element modeling on machinability of Ti-6Al-4V using cubic boron nitride and polycrystalline diamond tool in dry turning environment was investigated. This research was carried out to generate mathematical models at 95% confidence level for cutting force and temperature distribution regarding cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The Box-Behnken design of experiment was used as Response Surface Model to generate combinations of cutting variables for modeling. Then, finite element simulation was performed using AdvantEdge®. The influence of each cutting parameters on the cutting responses was investigated using Analysis of Variance. The analysis shows that depth of cut is the most influential parameter on resultant cutting force whereas feed rate is the most influential parameter on cutting temperature. Also, the effect of the cutting-edge radius was investigated for both tools. This research would help to maximize the tool life and to improve surface finish.

  14. Finite-Temperature Relativistic Time-Blocking Approximation for Nuclear Strength Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Herlik; Litvinova, Elena

    2017-09-01

    This work presents an extension of the relativistic nuclear field theory (RNFT) developed throughout the last decade as an approach to the nuclear many-body problem, based on QHD meson-nucleon Lagrangian and relativistic field theory. The unique feature of RNFT is a consistent connection of the high-energy scale of heavy mesons, the medium-energy range of pion, and the low-energy domain of emergent collective vibrations (phonons). RNFT has demonstrated a very good performance in various nuclear structure calculations across the nuclear chart and, in particular, provides a consistent input for description of the two phases of r-process nucleosynthesis: neutron capture and beta decay. Further inclusion of finite temperature effects presented here allows for an extension of the method to highly excited compound nuclei. The covariant response theory in the relativistic time-blocking approximation (RTBA) is generalized for thermal effects, adopting the Matsubara Green's function formalism to the RNFT framework. The finite-temperature RTBA is implemented numerically to calculate multipole strength functions in medium-mass and heavy nuclei. The obtained results will be discussed in comparison to available experimental data and in the context of possible consequences for astrophysics.

  15. Projection after variation in the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanto, P.

    2017-11-01

    The finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approximation often breaks symmetries of the underlying many-body Hamiltonian. Restricting the calculation of the HFB partition function to a subspace with good quantum numbers through projection after variation restores some of the correlations lost in breaking these symmetries, although effects of the broken symmetries such as sharp kinks at phase transitions remain. However, the most general projection after variation formula in the finite-temperature HFB approximation is limited by a sign ambiguity. Here, I extend the Pfaffian formula for the many-body traces of HFB density operators introduced by Robledo [L. M. Robledo, Phys. Rev. C. 79, 021302(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevC.79.021302] to eliminate this sign ambiguity and evaluate the more complicated many-body traces required in projection after variation in the most general HFB case. The method is validated through a proof-of-principle calculation of the particle-number-projected HFB thermal energy in a simple model.

  16. Finite temperature corrections to tachyon mass in intersecting D-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Varun [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi,Delhi 110007 (India); Chowdhury, Sudipto Paul [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg,Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Sarkar, Swarnendu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi,Delhi 110007 (India)

    2017-04-19

    We continue with the analysis of finite temperature corrections to the Tachyon mass in intersecting branes which was initiated in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063. In this paper we extend the computation to the case of intersecting D3 branes by considering a setup of two intersecting branes in flat-space background. A holographic model dual to BCS superconductor consisting of intersecting D8 branes in D4 brane background was proposed in https://www.doi.org/10.1016/j.nuclphysb.2011.07.011. The background considered here is a simplified configuration of this dual model. We compute the one-loop Tachyon amplitude in the Yang-Mills approximation and show that the result is finite. Analyzing the amplitudes further we numerically compute the transition temperature at which the Tachyon becomes massless. The analytic expressions for the one-loop amplitudes obtained here reduce to those for intersecting D1 branes obtained in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063 as well as those for intersecting D2 branes.

  17. Finite temperature corrections to tachyon mass in intersecting D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, Varun; Chowdhury, Sudipto Paul; Sarkar, Swarnendu

    2017-01-01

    We continue with the analysis of finite temperature corrections to the Tachyon mass in intersecting branes which was initiated in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063. In this paper we extend the computation to the case of intersecting D3 branes by considering a setup of two intersecting branes in flat-space background. A holographic model dual to BCS superconductor consisting of intersecting D8 branes in D4 brane background was proposed in https://www.doi.org/10.1016/j.nuclphysb.2011.07.011. The background considered here is a simplified configuration of this dual model. We compute the one-loop Tachyon amplitude in the Yang-Mills approximation and show that the result is finite. Analyzing the amplitudes further we numerically compute the transition temperature at which the Tachyon becomes massless. The analytic expressions for the one-loop amplitudes obtained here reduce to those for intersecting D1 branes obtained in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP09(2014)063 as well as those for intersecting D2 branes.

  18. Spectral functions in finite temperature SU(3) gauge theory and applications to transport phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Michael

    2014-12-10

    In this thesis, gluon spectral functions in SU(3) gauge theory are calculated at finite temperature. The temperature range covers the confining regime below T{sub c} to the high temperature regime, where perturbation theory is applicable. The numerical tool is the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) employing euclidean, non-perturbative, Landau gauge gluon propagators, obtained with the Functional Renormalisation Group and Lattice QCD, as input. The spectral function is related to the propagators by an integral equation. MEM is a complex multidimensional optimisation algorithm to invert such integral equations, corresponding to an analytic continuation of the numerical data. A continuation of a discreet set of data cannot be unambiguous. The occuring ambiguities are resolved by introducing a priori knowledge of the asymptotic shape of the spectral function, in the form of a model function. Thereby, MEM simultaneously optimizes the spectral function to the input propagators and the model, leading to a unique model-dependent solution. Standard-MEM assumes positive definite spectral functions, whereas gluons show a violation of positivity in the spectral function, due to confinement. Therefore, an extended-MEM algorithm is proposed. The main application of this thesis is the calculation of the shear viscosity in units of the entropy density. A Kubo relation connects shear viscosity to the low frequency limit of a certain energy-momentum tensor correlation function. For this correlation function a loop representation of finite order in terms of gluon spectral functions is derived. That allows to calculate (η)/(s) from first principles in SU(3) for the first time for arbitrary temperatures. Further, a mapping of the SU(3) results for (η)/(s) to QCD is proposed.

  19. Distributed Control of Nonlinear Aircraft Structures Including Aerodynamic and Temperature Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzou, H

    2004-01-01

    .... Distributed sensing/actuation, thermoelectromechanical/control equations and boundary conditions including elastic, temperature, and piezoelectric couplings are derived and applied to distributed...

  20. Finite element modeling of temperature load effects on the vibration of local modes in multi-cable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treyssède, Fabien

    2018-01-01

    Understanding thermal effects on the vibration of local (cable-dominant) modes in multi-cable structures is a complicated task. The main difficulty lies in the modification by temperature change of cable tensions, which are then undetermined. This paper applies a finite element procedure to investigate the effects of thermal loads on the linear dynamics of prestressed self-weighted multi-cable structures. Provided that boundary conditions are carefully handled, the discretization of cables with nonlinear curved beam elements can properly represent the thermoelastic behavior of cables as well as their linearized dynamics. A three-step procedure that aims to replace applied pretension forces with displacement continuity conditions is used. Despite an increase in the computational cost related to beam rotational degrees of freedom, such an approach has several advantages. Nonlinear beam finite elements are usually available in commercial codes. The overall method follows a thermoelastic geometrically non-linear analysis and hereby includes the main sources of non-linearities in multi-cable structures. The effects of cable bending stiffness, which can be significant, are also naturally accounted for. The accuracy of the numerical approach is assessed thanks to an analytical model for the vibration of a single inclined cable under temperature change. Then, the effects of thermal loads are investigated for two cable bridges, highlighting how natural frequencies can be affected by temperature. Although counterintuitive, a reverse relative change of natural frequency may occur for certain local modes. This phenomenon can be explained by two distinct mechanisms, one related to the physics intrinsic to cables and the other related to the thermal deflection of the superstructure. Numerical results show that cables cannot be isolated from the rest of the structure and the importance of modeling the whole structure for a quantitative analysis of temperature effects on the

  1. Perturbative study in quantum field theory at finite temperature, application to lepton pair production from a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-12-01

    The main topic of this thesis is a perturbative study of Quantum Field Theory at Finite Temperature. The real-time formalism is used throughout this work. We show the cancellation of infrared and mass singularities in the case of the first order QCD corrections to lepton pair production from a quark-gluon plasma. Two methods of calculation are presented and give the same finite result in the limit of vanishing quark mass. These finite terms are analysed and give small corrections in the region of interest for ultra-relativistic heavy ions collisions, except for a threshold factor. Specific techniques for finite temperature calculations are explicited in the case of the fermionic self-energy in QED [fr

  2. Length and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Huang, Yanhui; Cao, Bingyang; To, Albert C.

    2017-09-01

    Carbyne is an ideal one-dimensional conductor and the thinnest interconnection in an ultimate nano-device and it requires an understanding of the mechanical properties that affect device performance and reliability. Here, we report the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne, obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation study based on the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential. To avoid confusion in assigning the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne, the value of the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne (4.148 Å2) was deduced via experiment and adopted in our study. Ends-constraints effects on the ultimate stress (maximum force) of the carbyne chains are investigated, revealing that the molecular dynamics simulation results agree very well with the experimental results. The ultimate strength, Young's Modulus and maximum strain of carbyne are rather sensitive to the temperature and all decrease with the temperature. Opposite tendencies of the length dependence of the overall ultimate strength and maximum strain of carbyne at room temperature and very low temperature have been found, and analyses show that this originates in the ends effect of carbyne.

  3. Entanglement negativity and sudden death in the toric code at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, O.; Castelnovo, C.

    2018-04-01

    We study the fate of quantum correlations at finite temperature in the two-dimensional toric code using the logarithmic entanglement negativity. We are able to obtain exact results that give us insight into how thermal excitations affect quantum entanglement. The toric code has two types of elementary excitations (defects) costing different energies. We show that an O (1 ) density of the lower energy defect is required to degrade the zero-temperature entanglement between two subsystems in contact with one another. However, one type of excitation alone is not sufficient to kill all quantum correlations, and an O (1 ) density of the higher energy defect is required to cause the so-called sudden death of the negativity. Interestingly, if the energy cost of one of the excitations is taken to infinity, quantum correlations survive up to arbitrarily high temperatures, a feature that is likely shared with other quantum spin liquids and frustrated systems in general, when projected down to their low-energy states. We demonstrate this behavior both for small subsystems, where we can prove that the negativity is a necessary and sufficient condition for separability, as well as for extended subsystems, where it is only a necessary condition. We further observe that the negativity per boundary degree of freedom at a given temperature increases (parametrically) with the size of the boundary, and that quantum correlations between subsystems with extended boundaries are more robust to thermal fluctuations.

  4. Electric control of emergent magnonic spin current and dynamic multiferroicity in magnetic insulators at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Chotorlishvili, L.; Guo, Guang-hua; Berakdar, J.

    2018-04-01

    Conversion of thermal energy into magnonic spin currents and/or effective electric polarization promises new device functionalities. A versatile approach is presented here for generating and controlling open circuit magnonic spin currents and an effective multiferroicity at a uniform temperature with the aid of spatially inhomogeneous, external, static electric fields. This field applied to a ferromagnetic insulator with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya type coupling changes locally the magnon dispersion and modifies the density of thermally excited magnons in a region of the scale of the field inhomogeneity. The resulting gradient in the magnon density can be viewed as a gradient in the effective magnon temperature. This effective thermal gradient together with local magnon dispersion result in an open-circuit, electric field controlled magnonic spin current. In fact, for a moderate variation in the external electric field the predicted magnonic spin current is on the scale of the spin (Seebeck) current generated by a comparable external temperature gradient. Analytical methods supported by full-fledge numerics confirm that both, a finite temperature and an inhomogeneous electric field are necessary for this emergent non-equilibrium phenomena. The proposal can be integrated in magnonic and multiferroic circuits, for instance to convert heat into electrically controlled pure spin current using for example nanopatterning, without the need to generate large thermal gradients on the nanoscale.

  5. Metallic magnetism at finite temperatures studied by relativistic disordered moment description: Theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, A.; Simon, E.; Balogh, L.; Szunyogh, L.; dos Santos Dias, M.; Staunton, J. B.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a self-consistent relativistic disordered local moment (RDLM) scheme aimed at describing finite-temperature magnetism of itinerant metals from first principles. Our implementation in terms of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker multiple-scattering theory and the coherent potential approximation allows us to relate the orientational distribution of the spins to the electronic structure, thus a self-consistent treatment of the distribution is possible. We present applications for bulk bcc Fe, L10-FePt, and FeRh ordered in the CsCl structure. The calculations for Fe show significant variation of the local moments with temperature, whereas according to the mean-field treatment of the spin fluctuations the Curie temperature is overestimated. The magnetic anisotropy of FePt alloys is found to depend strongly on intermixing between nominally Fe and Pt layers, and it shows a power-law behavior as a function of magnetization for a broad range of chemical disorder. In the case of FeRh we construct a lattice constant vs temperature phase diagram and determine the phase line of metamagnetic transitions based on self-consistent RDLM free-energy curves.

  6. Finite temperature properties of NiTi from first principles simulations: Structure, mechanics, and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Lawson, John W.

    2017-05-01

    We present a procedure to determine temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of crystalline materials from density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD). Finite temperature properties (structural, thermal, and mechanical properties) of the phases (ground state monoclinic B33, martensitic B19', and austenitic B2) of the shape memory alloy NiTi are investigated. Fluctuation formulas and numerical derivatives are used to evaluate mechanical and thermal properties. A modified version of thermodynamic upsampling is used to predict properties in the high DFT convergence threshold limit from low threshold simulations. DFT convergence thresholds. In addition, a thermodynamic integration expression is developed to compute free energies from isobaric DFT-MD simulations that accounts for volume changes. Structural parameters, elastic constants, volume expansion, and specific heats as a function of temperature are evaluated. Phase transitions between B2 and B19' and between B19' and B33 are characterized according to their thermal energy, entropy, and free energy differences as well as their latent heats. Anharmonic effects are shown to play a large role in both stabilizing the austenite B2 phase and suppressing the martensitic phase transition. The quasiharmonic approximation to the free energy results in large errors in estimating the martensitic transition temperature by neglecting these large anharmonic components.

  7. Faithful state transfer between two-level systems via an actively cooled finite-temperature cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárkány, Lőrinc; Fortágh, József; Petrosyan, David

    2018-03-01

    We consider state transfer between two qubits—effective two-level systems represented by Rydberg atoms—via a common mode of a microwave cavity at finite temperature. We find that when both qubits have the same coupling strength to the cavity field, at large enough detuning from the cavity mode frequency, quantum interference between the transition paths makes the swap of the excitation between the qubits largely insensitive to the number of thermal photons in the cavity. When, however, the coupling strengths are different, the photon-number-dependent differential Stark shift of the transition frequencies precludes efficient transfer. Nevertheless, using an auxiliary cooling system to continuously extract the cavity photons, we can still achieve a high-fidelity state transfer between the qubits.

  8. Dominant two-loop corrections to the MSSM finite temperature effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    We show that two-loop corrections to the finite temperature effective potential in the MSSM can have a dramatic effect on the strength of the electroweak phase transition, making it more strongly first order. The change in the order parameter v/Tc can be as large as 75% of the one-loop daisy improved result. This effect can be decisive to widen the region in parameter space where erasure of the created baryons by sphaleron processes after the transition is suppressed and hence, where electroweak baryogenesis might be successful. We find an allowed region with tan β< or∼4.5 and a Higgs boson with standard couplings and mass below 80 GeV within the reach of LEP II. (orig.)

  9. Complex Langevin simulation of QCD at finite density and low temperature using the deformation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Keitro; Nishimura, Jun; Shimasaki, Shinji

    2018-03-01

    We study QCD at finite density and low temperature by using the complex Langevin method. We employ the gauge cooling to control the unitarity norm and intro-duce a deformation parameter in the Dirac operator to avoid the singular-drift problem. The reliability of the obtained results are judged by the probability distribution of the magnitude of the drift term. By making extrapolations with respect to the deformation parameter using only the reliable results, we obtain results for the original system. We perform simulations on a 43 × 8 lattice and show that our method works well even in the region where the reweighing method fails due to the severe sign problem. As a result we observe a delayed onset of the baryon number density as compared with the phase-quenched model, which is a clear sign of the Silver Blaze phenomenon.

  10. Screening and deconfinement of sources in finite temperature SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Damgaard, P H

    1994-01-01

    Deconfinement and screening of higher-representation sources in finite-temperature SU(2) lattice gauge theory is investigated by both analytical and numerical means. The effective Polyakov-line action at strong coupling is simulated by an efficient cluster-updating Monte Carlo algorithm for the case of d\\!=\\!4 dimensions. The results compare very favourably with an improved mean-field solution. The limit d\\!\\to\\!\\infty of the SU(2) theory is shown to be highly singular as far as critical behaviour is concerned. In that limit the leading amplitudes of higher representation Polyakov lines vanish at strong coupling, and subleading exponents become dominant. Each of the higher-representation sources then effectively carry with them their own critical exponents.

  11. Inherent stress correlations in a quiescent two-dimensional liquid: Static analysis including finite-size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Anaël

    2017-11-01

    After constructing a formalism to analyze spatial stress correlations in two-dimensional equilibrated liquids, we show that the sole conjunction of mechanical balance and material isotropy demands all anisotropic components of the inherent state (IS) stress autocorrelation matrix to decay at long range as 1 /r2 in the large system size limit. Furthermore, analyzing numerical simulation data for an equilibrated supercooled liquid, we bring evidence that, in finite-sized periodic systems, the autocorrelations of pressure and shear stresses present uniform backgrounds of amplitudes proportional to the inverse cell area. These backgrounds bring relevant contributions to macroscopic IS stress fluctuations, with the consequence that the latter scale as inverse area, yet in an anomalous way, inconsistent with viewing an IS as equivalent, in the thermodynamic limit, to an ensemble of independent finite-sized subsystems. In that sense, ISs are not spatially ergodic.

  12. DWBA (d,N) Calculations Including Dirac Phenomenological Potentials and an Exact Treatment of Finite-range Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric

    2005-04-01

    An algorithm for the inclusion of both Dirac phenomenological potentials and an exact treatment of finite-range effects within the DWBA is presented. The numerical implementation of this algorithm is used to calculate low-energy deuteron stripping cross sections, analyzing powers, and polarizations. These calculations are compared with experimental data where available. The impact of using several commonly employed nuclear potentials (Reid soft-core, Bonn, Argonne v18) for the internal deuteron wave function is also examined.

  13. Vibronic Boson Sampling: Generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling for Molecular Vibronic Spectra at Finite Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joonsuk; Yung, Man-Hong

    2017-08-07

    Molecular vibroic spectroscopy, where the transitions involve non-trivial Bosonic correlation due to the Duschinsky Rotation, is strongly believed to be in a similar complexity class as Boson Sampling. At finite temperature, the problem is represented as a Boson Sampling experiment with correlated Gaussian input states. This molecular problem with temperature effect is intimately related to the various versions of Boson Sampling sharing the similar computational complexity. Here we provide a full description to this relation in the context of Gaussian Boson Sampling. We find a hierarchical structure, which illustrates the relationship among various Boson Sampling schemes. Specifically, we show that every instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling with an initial correlation can be simulated by an instance of Gaussian Boson Sampling without initial correlation, with only a polynomial overhead. Since every Gaussian state is associated with a thermal state, our result implies that every sampling problem in molecular vibronic transitions, at any temperature, can be simulated by Gaussian Boson Sampling associated with a product of vacuum modes. We refer such a generalized Gaussian Boson Sampling motivated by the molecular sampling problem as Vibronic Boson Sampling.

  14. Finite-temperature Gutzwiller approximation and the phase diagram of a toy model for V2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Matteo; Capone, Massimo; Fabrizio, Michele

    2013-05-01

    We exploit exact inequalities that refer to the entropy of a distribution to derive a simple variational principle at finite temperature for trial density matrices of Gutzwiller and Jastrow type. We use the result to extend at finite temperature the Gutzwiller approximation, which we apply to study a two-orbital model that we believe captures some essential features of V2O3. We indeed find that the phase diagram of the model bears many similarities to that of real vanadium sesquioxide. In addition, we show that in a Bethe lattice, where the finite-temperature Gutzwiller approximation provides a rigorous upper bound of the actual free energy, the results compare well with the exact phase diagram obtained by dynamical mean-field theory.

  15. The Energy-Momentum Tensor at Finite Temperature in Arbitrary Curved Space-Times : Particles and Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Naohito, NAKAZAWA; Research Institute for Theoretical Physics Hiroshima University

    1985-01-01

    We formulate a field-theoretical method at finite temperature to calculate a thermal energy-momentum tensor in arbitrary curved space-times using a momentum-space representation of the thermal Green's function in terms of Riemann normal coordinates. In particular, the thermal energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field is calculated by the high-temperature expansion. A locally observed temperature is obtained by requiring the conservation law of the thermal energy-momentum tensor.

  16. Elastic properties of paramagnetic austenitic steel at finite temperature: Longitudinal spin fluctuations in multicomponent alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhihua; Schönecker, Stephan; Chen, Dengfu; Li, Wei; Long, Mujun; Vitos, Levente

    2017-11-01

    We propose a first-principles framework for longitudinal spin fluctuations (LSFs) in disordered paramagnetic (PM) multicomponent alloy systems and apply it to investigate the influence of LSFs on the temperature dependence of two elastic constants of PM austenitic stainless steel Fe15Cr15Ni. The magnetic model considers individual fluctuating moments in a static PM medium with first-principles-derived LSF energetics in conjunction with describing chemical disorder and randomness of the transverse magnetic component in the single-site alloy formalism and disordered local moment (DLM) picture. A temperature-sensitive mean magnetic moment is adopted to accurately represent the LSF state in the elastic-constant calculations. We make evident that magnetic interactions between an LSF impurity and the PM medium are weak in the present steel alloy. This allows gaining accurate LSF energetics and mean magnetic moments already through a perturbation from the static DLM moments instead of a tedious self-consistent procedure. We find that LSFs systematically lower the cubic shear elastic constants c' and c44 by ˜6 GPa in the temperature interval 300-1600 K, whereas the predominant mechanism for the softening of both elastic constants with temperature is the magneto-volume coupling due to thermal lattice expansion. We find that non-negligible local magnetic moments of Cr and Ni are thermally induced by LSFs, but they exert only a small influence on the elastic properties. The proposed framework exhibits high flexibility in accurately accounting for finite-temperature magnetism and its impact on the mechanical properties of PM multicomponent alloys.

  17. Including temperature in a wavefunction description of the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Michael; Grossmann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a wavefunction methodology to account for finite temperature initial conditions in the quantum Rabi model. The approach is based on the Davydov Ansatz together with a statistical sampling of the canonical harmonic oscillator initial density matrix. Equations of motion are gained from a variational principle and numerical results are compared to those of the thermal Hamiltonian approach. For a system consisting of a single spin and a single oscillator and for moderate coupling strength, we compare our new results with full quantum ones as well as with other Davydov-type results based on alternative sampling/summation strategies. All of these perform better than the ones based on the thermal Hamiltonian approach. The best agreement is shown by a Boltzmann weighting of individual eigenstate propagations. Extending this to a bath of many oscillators will, however, be very demanding numerically. The use of any one of the investigated stochastic sampling approaches will then be favorable.

  18. SU(2 color NJL model and EOS of quark-hadron matter at finite temperature and density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise Wolfram

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the NJL model with the Polyakov loop in the SU(2-color case for the EOS of quark-hadron matter at finite temperature and density. We consider the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and the diquark condensation together with the behavior of the Polyakov loop for the phase diagram of quark-hadron matter. We discuss the spectrum of mesons and diquark baryons (boson at finite temperature and density.We derive also the linear sigma model Lagrangian for diquark baryon and mesons.

  19. Anhamonic finite temperature effects on the Raman and Infrared spectra to determine the crystal structure phase III of solid molecular hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ranber; Azadi, Sam; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the Raman and IR spectra, as well as electronic properties at zero and finite temperature to elucidate the crystal structure of phase III of solid molecular hydrogen. We find that anharmonic finite temperature are particularly important and qualitatively influences the main conclusions. While P6$_3$/m is the most likely candidate for phase III at the nuclear ground state, at finite temperature the C2/c structure appears to be more suitable.

  20. Magnetic hyperfine field at a Cd impurity diluted in RCo{sub 2} at finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, A.L. de, E-mail: alexandre.oliveira@ifrj.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Nilópolis – RJ (Brazil); Chaves, C.M., E-mail: cmch@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, N.A. de [Instituto de Física Armando Dias Tavares, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Troper, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    The local magnetic moments and the magnetic hyperfine fields at an s–p Cd impurity diluted in inter-metallic Laves phase compounds RCo{sub 2} (R=Gd, Tb) at finite temperatures are calculated. For other rare earth elements (light or heavy) the pure compounds display a magnetic first order transition and are not describable by our formalism. The host has two coupled lattices (R and Co) both having itinerant d electrons but only the rare earth lattice has localized f electrons. They all contribute to the magnetization of the host and also to the local moment and to the magnetic hyperfine field at the impurity. The investigation of magnetic hyperfine field in these materials then provides valuable information on the d-itinerant electrons and also on the localized (4f) magnetic moments. For the d–d electronic interaction we use the Hubbard–Stratonovich identity thus allowing the employment of functional integral in the static saddle point approximation. Our model reproduces quite well the experimental data. - Highlights: • A functional integral method in the static limit, producing site disorder, is used. • The site disorder is treated with the coherent potential approximation (CPA) • A Friedel sum rule gives a self-consistency condition for the impurity energy. • The experimental curve of hyperfine fields×temperature is very well reproduced.

  1. Modeling of thermoelectric module operation in inhomogeneous transient temperature field using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Radovan H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of research and operation modeling of the new systems for cooling of cutting tools based on thermoelectric module. A copper inlay with thermoelectric module on the back side was added to a standard turning tool for metal processing. For modeling and simulating the operation of thermoelectric module, finite element method was used as a method for successful solving the problems of inhomogeneous transient temperature field on the cutting tip of lathe knives. Developed mathematical model is implemented in the software package PAK-T through which numerical results are obtained. Experimental research was done in different conditions of thermoelectric module operation. Cooling of the hot module side was done by a heat exchanger based on fluid using automatic temperature regulator. After the calculation is done, numerical results are in good agreement with experimental. It can be concluded that developed mathematical model can be used successfully for modeling of cooling of cutting tools. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR32036

  2. Particle-particle and hole-hole RPA correlations at finite temperature and the temperature dependence of the level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh Mau, N.

    1989-01-01

    The pp-hh RPA equations obtained by summing the infinite series of ladder, upwards- and backwards-going diagrams in the temperature two-particle Green functions are derived at finite temperature. The contribution to the thermodynamic grand potential due to pp-hh RPA correlations is calculated simultaneously to that of ph RPA correlations. A schematic model is constructed which shows that, as for ph RPA states, the energies of pp and hh RPA states have no temperature dependence at not too high temperature. Within the same model, the temperature dependence of the level density parameter is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Holographic Real-Time Finite-Temperature 3-Point Correlators and Their Applications on Second Order Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaolun; Vaman, Diana; Arnold, Peter; Barnes, Edwin; Xiao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    We built up a complete real-time prescription for calculating n- point correlators of finite-temperature conformal field theory operators using holography. We found it amounts to integrating only the right quadrant of the black hole, and then adapting the finite temperature analog of Veltman's circling rules to gravity tree-level diagrams to calculate correlators. We constructed a complete mapping between the real-time finite- temperature field theory and its real-time dual supergravity description. We subjected our prescription to several checks. We gave, for the first time, concrete formulas for all real- time 3-point correlators. We applied the above to study second order hydrodynamics in 4-d conformal field theories. We derived Kubo relations for second order transport coefficients in terms of 3-point stress tensor retarded correlators. For N=4 super Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling and finite temperature we computed these stress tensor 3-point correlators using AdS/CFT. The small momentum expansion of the 3-point correlators in terms of transport coefficients is matched with AdS result and the coefficients are retrieved consitently. Our method allows for a unified treatment of hydrodynamic coefficients and can be systematically generalized to higher order hydrodynamics.

  4. Determining surface wave attenuation by modeling surface wave amplitudes including finite-frequency focusing and defocusing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a technique that uses cluster analysis method to efficiently measure Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude anomalies. Amplitude anomaly measurements have been made on the vertical components of all permanent stations recording LHZ data from IRIS. We currently consider earthquakes with Ms>5.5 between 1990 and 2004 and correct for source phase and magnitude according to the CMT. This technique leads to a large set of amplitude measurements at 7mHz, 10mHz, 15mHz and 20mHz. We discard data with erroneously large amplitude anomalies (|dlnA|>1) and inconsistent instrument responses and we only use earthquakes recorded by more than 30 stations. Out of about 250000 raw measurements for each frequency, about 140000 measurements are retained for inverting for attenuation structure. Similar to Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), phase and amplitude data are inverted together for phase velocity maps, attenuation maps, and source and receiver terms. However, we use the 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel of Zhou et al, (2004) to model the focusing-defocusing effects. Ray theory, which has been used to date, gives amplitude anomaly predictions which depend strongly on short wavelength structure and so are very sensitive to how phase velocity maps are smoothed. Our resulting attenuation maps show structures correlating well with surface tectonics, with high attenuation in regions of ridges, back-arc basins and western North America, and low attenuation in stable continental shields. The success of getting reasonable attenuation structures demonstrates the feasibility of applying 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel to real data.

  5. A Mixed Enthalpy-Temperature Finite Element Method For Generalized Phase-Change Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars

    2003-01-01

    In a large number of problems of engineering interest the transition of the material from one phase to another is of vital importance in describing the overall physical behaviour. Common applications include metal casting, freezing and thawing of foodstuffs and other biological materials, ground...... freezing and solar energy storage. The phase-change problem is characterized by an abrupt change in enthalpy per unit temperature in a narrow temperature range around the freezing point....

  6. A combined multibody and finite element approach for dynamic interaction analysis of high-speed train and railway structure including post-derailment behavior during an earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, M.; Wakui, H.; Sogabe, M.; Matsumoto, N.; Tanabe, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A combined multibody and finite element approach is given to solve the dynamic interaction of a Shinkansen train (high-speed train in Japan) and the railway structure including post-derailment during an earthquake effectively. The motion of the train is expressed in multibody dynamics. Efficient mechanical models to express interactions between wheel and track structure including post-derailment are given. Rail and track elements expressed in multibody dynamics and FEM are given to solve contact problems between wheel and long railway components effectively. The motion of a railway structure is modeled with various finite elements and rail and track elements. The computer program has been developed for the dynamic interaction analysis of a Shinkansen train and railway structure including post derailment during an earthquake. Numerical examples are demonstrated.

  7. Breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs at finite temperature in 93-98Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Algin, E.; Chankova, R.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Mitchell, G. E.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The S shape of the canonical heat-capacity curve is known as a signature of the pairing transition, and along an isotopic chain it is significantly more pronounced for nuclei with an even number of neutrons than for those with an odd number. Although the heat capacities extracted from experimental level densities in 93-98 Mo exhibit a clear S shape, they do not show such an odd-even staggering. To understand the underlying physics, we analyze thermal quantities evaluated from the partition function calculated using the static-path plus random-phase approximation (SPA+RPA) in a monopole pairing model with number-parity projection. The calculated level densities reproduce very well the experimental data, and they also agree with estimates made using the back-shifted Fermi-gas model. We clarify the reason why the heat capacities for Mo isotopes do not show odd-even staggering of the S shape. We also discuss thermal odd-even mass differences in 94-97 Mo that were calculated using the three-, four-, and five-point formulas. These thermal mass differences are regarded as indicators of pairing correlations at finite temperature

  8. Scanning tunnelling microscope light emission: Finite temperature current noise and over cut-off emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J

    2017-06-14

    The spectral distribution of light emitted from a scanning tunnelling microscope junction not only bears its intrinsic plasmonic signature but is also imprinted with the characteristics of optical frequency fluc- tuations of the tunnel current. Experimental spectra from gold-gold tunnel junctions are presented that show a strong bias (V b ) dependence, curiously with emission at energies higher than the quantum cut-off (eV b ); a component that decays monotonically with increasing bias. The spectral evolution is explained by developing a theoretical model for the power spectral density of tunnel current fluctuations, incorporating finite temperature contribution through consideration of the quantum transport in the system. Notably, the observed decay of the over cut-off emission is found to be critically associated with, and well explained in terms of the variation in junction conductance with V b . The investigation highlights the scope of plasmon-mediated light emission as a unique probe of high frequency fluctuations in electronic systems that are fundamental to the electrical generation and control of plasmons.

  9. Finite temperature effective action, AdS_5 black holes, and 1/N expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís; Liu, H; Wadia, S; Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Gomez, Cesar; Liu, Hong; Wadia, Spenta

    2005-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological matrix model to study string theory in AdS_5 \\times S_5 in the canonical ensemble. The model reproduces all the known qualitative features of the theory. In particular, it gives a simple effective potential description of Euclidean black hole nucleation and the tunnelling between thermal AdS and the big black hole. It also has some interesting predictions. We find that there exists a critical temperature at which the Euclidean small black hole undergoes a Gross-Witten phase transition. We identify the phase transition with the Horowitz-Polchinski point where the black hole horizon size becomes comparable to the string scale. The appearance of the Hagedorn divergence of thermal AdS is due to the merger of saddle points corresponding to the Euclidean small black hole and thermal AdS. The merger can be described in terms of a cusp (A_3) catastrophe and divergences at the perturbative string level are smoothed out at finite string coupling using standard techniques of catastrophe the...

  10. Effective field theories of QCD for heavy quarkonia at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo

    2011-07-27

    Quarkonia, i.e. heavy quark-antiquark bound states, represent one of the most important probes in the experimental investigation, through heavy-ion collisions, of the high-temperature region of the phase diagram of QCD, where the onset of a deconfined medium, the quark-gluon plasma, is expected. Such bound states were hypothesized to dissociate in this plasma due to the screening of the colour charges and experimental data from SPS, RHIC and very recently also LHC indeed show a suppression pattern. In this thesis we extend the well-established and successful zero temperature framework of Non-Relativistic (NR) Effective Field Theories (EFTs) (NRQCD, pNRQCD) for the study of heavy quarkonia (production, spectroscopy, decays,..) to finite temperatures. This is achieved by integrating out in sequence the scales that characterize a NR bound state and those that are typical of a thermal medium, in the possible hierarchies that are relevant for quarkonia in the quark-gluon plasma. Within this framework we show how the potential that governs the evolution of the quark-antiquark pair is derived from QCD in a modern and rigorous way, thereby bridging the gap between phenomenological potential models and QCD. We show how the EFTs can be systematically improved and how effects that cannot be encoded in a potential arise naturally in the EFT, giving rise to new mechanisms of dissociation. We use this EFT framework to compute the spectrum and width of quarkonia in a particular setting that is relevant for the phenomenology of the ground states of bottomonium at the LHC. We also analyze within this framework the correlator of Polyakov loops, which is related to the thermodynamical free energy of heavy quark-antiquark pairs in the medium. As such, lattice computations thereof were frequently used as input for potential models. With our approach we are able to clarify the relation between these free energies and the real-time potential describing the dynamics of quarkonia, finding

  11. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  12. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B.

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si 3 N 4 . Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of the Ca-Sn system based on finite temperature quantities from first-principles and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, M.; Kozlov, A.; Arroyave, R.; Liu, Z.K.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic model of the Ca-Sn system was obtained, utilizing the first-principles total energies and heat capacities calculated from 0 K to the melting points of the major phases. Since the first-principles result for the formation energy of the dominating Ca 2 Sn intermetallic phase is drastically different from the reported experimental data, we performed two types of thermodynamic modeling: one based on the first-principles output and the other based on the experimental data. In the former modeling, the Gibbs energies of the intermetallic compounds were fully quantified from the first-principles finite temperature properties and the superiority of the former thermodynamic description is demonstrated. It is shown that it is the combination of finite temperature first-principle calculations and the Calphad modeling tool that provides a sound basis for identifying and deciding on conflicting key thermodynamic data in the Ca-Sn system

  14. THERMODYNAMICS AND HEAVY-QUARK FREE ENERGIES AT FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY WITH TWO FLAVORS OF IMPROVED WILSON QUARKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAEZAWA,Y.; HATSUDA, T.; AOKI, S.; KANAYA, K.; EJIRI, S.; ISHII, N.; UKITA, N.; UMEDA, T.

    2007-07-30

    Thermodynamics of two-flavor QCD at finite temperature and density is studied on a 16{sup 3} x 4 lattice, using a renormalization group improved gauge action and the clover improved Wilson quark action. In the simulations along lines of constant m{sub PS}/m{sub V}, we calculate the Taylor expansion coefficients of the heavy-quark free energy with respect to the quark chemical potential ({mu}{sub q}) up to the second order. By comparing the expansion coefficients of the free energies between quark(Q) and antiquark({anti Q}), and between Q and Q, we find a characteristic difference at finite {mu}{sub q} due to the first order coefficient of the Taylor expansion. We also calculate the quark number and isospin susceptibilities, and find that the second order coefficient of the quark number susceptibility shows enhancement around the pseudo-critical temperature.

  15. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  16. Potential of energy harvesting in barium titanate based laminates from room temperature to cryogenic/high temperatures: measurements and linking phase field and finite element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Fumio; Fox, Marina; Mori, Kotaro; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Omote, Kenji

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the energy harvesting characteristics of piezoelectric laminates consisting of barium titanate (BaTiO3) and copper (Cu) from room temperature to cryogenic/high temperatures both experimentally and numerically. First, the output voltages of the piezoelectric BaTiO3/Cu laminates were measured from room temperature to a cryogenic temperature (77 K). The output power was evaluated for various values of load resistance. The results showed that the maximum output power density is approximately 2240 nW cm‑3. The output voltages of the BaTiO3/Cu laminates were also measured from room temperature to a higher temperature (333 K). To discuss the output voltages of the BaTiO3/Cu laminates due to temperature changes, phase field and finite element simulations were combined. A phase field model for grain growth was used to generate grain structures. The phase field model was then employed for BaTiO3 polycrystals, coupled with the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau theory and the oxygen vacancies diffusion, to calculate the temperature-dependent piezoelectric coefficient and permittivity. Using these properties, the output voltages of the BaTiO3/Cu laminates from room temperature to both 77 K and 333 K were analyzed by three dimensional finite element methods, and the results are presented for several grain sizes and oxygen vacancy densities. It was found that electricity in the BaTiO3 ceramic layer is generated not only through the piezoelectric effect caused by a thermally induced bending stress but also by the temperature dependence of the BaTiO3 piezoelectric coefficient and permittivity.

  17. Modeling of the Direct Current Generator Including the Magnetic Saturation and Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Mercado-Samur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the inclusion of temperature effect on the field resistance on the direct current generator model DC1A, which is valid to stability studies is proposed. First, the linear generator model is presented, after the effect of magnetic saturation and the change in the resistance value due to temperature produced by the field current are included. The comparison of experimental results and model simulations to validate the model is used. A direct current generator model which is a better representation of the generator is obtained. Visual comparison between simulations and experimental results shows the success of the proposed model, because it presents the lowest error of the compared models. The accuracy of the proposed model is observed via Modified Normalized Sum of Squared Errors index equal to 3.8979%.

  18. Non-Fermi Liquid Behavior and Continuously Tunable Resistivity Exponents in the Anderson-Hubbard Model at Finite Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Niravkumar D. [The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Mukherjee, Anamitra [National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni (India); Kaushal, Nitin [The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Moreo, Adriana [The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dagotto, Elbio R. [The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-24

    Here, we employ a recently developed computational many-body technique to study for the first time the half-filled Anderson-Hubbard model at finite temperature and arbitrary correlation U and disorder V strengths. Interestingly, the narrow zero temperature metallic range induced by disorder from the Mott insulator expands with increasing temperature in a manner resembling a quantum critical point. Our study of the resistivity temperature scaling Tα for this metal reveals non-Fermi liquid characteristics. Moreover, a continuous dependence of α on U and V from linear to nearly quadratic is observed. We argue that these exotic results arise from a systematic change with U and V of the “effective” disorder, a combination of quenched disorder and intrinsic localized spins.

  19. Experimental Investigation and 3D Finite Element Prediction of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Sourced from Oxyacetylene Flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali, Adam Umar; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Abdul-Rani, Ahmad Majdi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D transient finite element modelling of the workpiece temperature field produced during the travelling heat sourced from oxyacetylene flame. The proposed model was given in terms of preheat-only test applicable during thermally enhanced machining using the oxyacetylene flame as a heat source. The FEA model as well as the experimental test investigated the surface temperature distribution on 316L stainless steel at scanning speed of 100mm/min, 125mm/min 160mm/min, 200mm/min and 250mm/min. The parametric properties of the heat source maintained constant are; lead distance L d =10mm, focus height F h =7.5mm, oxygen gas pressure P oxy =15psi and acetylene gas pressure P acty =25psi. An experimental validation of the temperature field induced on type 316L stainless steel reveal that temperature distribution increases when the travelling speed decreases. (paper)

  20. A non-linear, finite element, heat conduction code to calculate temperatures in solids of arbitrary geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.

    1987-01-01

    Structures often operate at elevated temperatures. Temperature calculations are needed so that the design can accommodate thermally induced stresses and material changes. A finite element computer called FEAT has been developed to calculate temperatures in solids of arbitrary shapes. FEAT solves the classical equation for steady state conduction of heat. The solution is obtained for two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) or for three-dimensional problems. Gap elements are use to simulate interfaces between neighbouring surfaces. The code can model: conduction; internal generation of heat; prescribed convection to a heat sink; prescribed temperatures at boundaries; prescribed heat fluxes on some surfaces; and temperature-dependence of material properties like thermal conductivity. The user has a option of specifying the detailed variation of thermal conductivity with temperature. For convenience to the nuclear fuel industry, the user can also opt for pre-coded values of thermal conductivity, which are obtained from the MATPRO data base (sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The finite element method makes FEAT versatile, and enables it to accurately accommodate complex geometries. The optional link to MATPRO makes it convenient for the nuclear fuel industry to use FEAT, without loss of generality. Special numerical techniques make the code inexpensive to run, for the type of material non-linearities often encounter in the analysis of nuclear fuel. The code, however, is general, and can be used for other components of the reactor, or even for non-nuclear systems. The predictions of FEAT have been compared against several analytical solutions. The agreement is usually better than 5%. Thermocouple measurements show that the FEAT predictions are consistent with measured changes in temperatures in simulated pressure tubes. FEAT was also found to predict well, the axial variations in temperatures in the end-pellets(UO 2 ) of two fuel elements irradiated

  1. Measurement of Temperature and Soil Properties for Finite Element Model Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, ADOT&PF personnel have used TEMP/W, a commercially available two-dimensional finite element program, to conduct thermal modeling of various : embankment configurations in an effort to reduce the thawing of ice-rich permafrost through...

  2. Fast thermal simulations and temperature optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning, including realistic 3D vessel networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H. P.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Bel, A.; Crezee, J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate thermal simulations in hyperthermia treatment planning require discrete modeling of large blood vessels. The very long computation time of the finite difference based DIscrete VAsculature model (DIVA) developed for this purpose is impractical for clinical applications. In this work, a fast

  3. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  4. Calculation of spin and orbital magnetizations in Fe slab systems at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibay-Alonso, R [Facultad de Ciencias FIsico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Conjunto Universitario Camporredondo, Edificio ' D' , 25000 Saltillo (Mexico); Reyes-Reyes, M [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis PotosI, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis PotosI (Mexico); Urrutia-Banuelos, EfraIn [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Lopez-Sandoval, R [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion CientIfica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216, San Luis PotosI (Mexico)

    2010-02-10

    The temperature dependence of spin and orbital local magnetizations is theoretically determined for the non-bulk atomic region of (001) and (110) Fe slab systems. A d band Hamiltonian, including spin-orbit coupling terms, was used to model the slabs, which were emulated by using Fe films of sufficient thickness to reach a bulk behavior at their most inner atomic layers. The temperature effects were considered within the static approximation and a simple mean field theory was used to integrate the local magnetic moment and charge thermal fluctuations. The results reflect a clear interplay between electronic itinerancy and the local atomic environment and they can be physically interpreted from the local small charge transfers occurring in the superficial region of the slabs. For recovering the experimental behavior on the results for the (001) slab system, the geometrical relaxations at its non-bulk atomic layers and a d band filling variation are required. A study on the magnetic anisotropy aspects in the superficial region of the slabs is additionally performed by analyzing the results for the orbital local magnetization calculated along two different magnetization directions in both slab systems.

  5. Calculation of spin and orbital magnetizations in Fe slab systems at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay-Alonso, R; Reyes-Reyes, M; Urrutia-Banuelos, EfraIn; Lopez-Sandoval, R

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spin and orbital local magnetizations is theoretically determined for the non-bulk atomic region of (001) and (110) Fe slab systems. A d band Hamiltonian, including spin-orbit coupling terms, was used to model the slabs, which were emulated by using Fe films of sufficient thickness to reach a bulk behavior at their most inner atomic layers. The temperature effects were considered within the static approximation and a simple mean field theory was used to integrate the local magnetic moment and charge thermal fluctuations. The results reflect a clear interplay between electronic itinerancy and the local atomic environment and they can be physically interpreted from the local small charge transfers occurring in the superficial region of the slabs. For recovering the experimental behavior on the results for the (001) slab system, the geometrical relaxations at its non-bulk atomic layers and a d band filling variation are required. A study on the magnetic anisotropy aspects in the superficial region of the slabs is additionally performed by analyzing the results for the orbital local magnetization calculated along two different magnetization directions in both slab systems.

  6. Element size and other restrictions in finite-element modeling of reinforced concrete at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Josephine Voigt; Jomaas, Grunde; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    One of the accepted approaches for postpeak finite-element modeling of RC comprises combining plain concrete, reinforcement, and interaction behaviors. In these, the postpeak strain-softening behavior of plain concrete is incorporated by the use of fracture energy concepts. This study attempts to...... variation in values. Application of the evaluated fracture energy values shows that these impose severe element size and reinforcement ratio limits. The effect of the limits is illustrated for a RC specimen. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.......One of the accepted approaches for postpeak finite-element modeling of RC comprises combining plain concrete, reinforcement, and interaction behaviors. In these, the postpeak strain-softening behavior of plain concrete is incorporated by the use of fracture energy concepts. This study attempts...

  7. Seismic response trends evaluation via long term monitoring and finite element model updating of an RC building including soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, F.; Omenzetter, P.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response trends evaluation and finite element model updating of a reinforced concrete building monitored for a period of more than two years. The three storey reinforced concrete building is instrumented with five tri-axial accelerometers and a free-field tri-axial accelerometer. The time domain N4SID system identification technique was used to obtain the frequencies and damping ratios considering flexible base models taking into account the soil-structure-interaction (SSI) using 50 earthquakes. Trends of variation of seismic response were developed by correlating the peak response acceleration at the roof level with identified frequencies and damping ratios. A general trend of decreasing frequencies was observed with increased level of shaking. To simulate the behavior of the building, a three dimensional finite element model (FEM) was developed. To incorporate real in-situ conditions, soil underneath the foundation and around the building was modeled using spring elements and non-structural components (claddings and partitions) were also included. The developed FEM was then calibrated using a sensitivity based model updating technique taking into account soil flexibility and non-structural components as updating parameters. It was concluded from the investigation that knowledge of the variation of seismic response of buildings is necessary to better understand their behavior during earthquakes, and also that the participation of soil and non-structural components is significant towards the seismic response of the building and these should be considered in models to simulate the real behavior.

  8. Finite temperature Casimir energy in closed rectangular cavities: a rigorous derivation based on a zeta function technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2007-01-01

    We derive rigorously explicit formulae of the Casimir free energy at finite temperature for massless scalar field and electromagnetic field confined in a closed rectangular cavity with different boundary conditions by a zeta regularization method. We study both the low and high temperature expansions of the free energy. In each case, we write the free energy as a sum of a polynomial in temperature plus exponentially decay terms. We show that the free energy is always a decreasing function of temperature. In the cases of massless scalar field with the Dirichlet boundary condition and electromagnetic field, the zero temperature Casimir free energy might be positive. In each of these cases, there is a unique transition temperature (as a function of the side lengths of the cavity) where the Casimir energy changes from positive to negative. When the space dimension is equal to two and three, we show graphically the dependence of this transition temperature on the side lengths of the cavity. Finally we also show that we can obtain the results for a non-closed rectangular cavity by letting the size of some directions of a closed cavity go to infinity, and we find that these results agree with the usual integration prescription adopted by other authors

  9. Non-Markovian finite-temperature two-time correlation functions of system operators of a pure-dephasing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Jian, Chung-Chin; Chen, Po-Wen

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the non-Markovian finite-temperature two-time correlation functions (CF's) of system operators of a pure-dephasing spin-boson model in two different ways, one by the direct exact operator technique and the other by the recently derived evolution equations, valid to second order in the system-environment interaction Hamiltonian. This pure-dephasing spin-boson model that is exactly solvable has been extensively studied as a simple decoherence model. However, its exact non-Markovian finite-temperature two-time system operator CF's, to our knowledge, have not been presented in the literature. This may be mainly due to the fact, illustrated in this article, that in contrast to the Markovian case, the time evolution of the reduced density matrix of the system (or the reduced quantum master equation) alone is not sufficient to calculate the two-time system operator CF's of non-Markovian open systems. The two-time CF's obtained using the recently derived evolution equations in the weak system-environment coupling case for this non-Markovian pure-dephasing model happen to be the same as those obtained from the exact evaluation. However, these results significantly differ from the non-Markovian two-time CF's obtained by wrongly directly applying the quantum regression theorem (QRT), a useful procedure to calculate the two-time CF's for weak-coupling Markovian open systems. This demonstrates clearly that the recently derived evolution equations generalize correctly the QRT to non-Markovian finite-temperature cases. It is believed that these evolution equations will have applications in many different branches of physics.

  10. Non-Markovian finite-temperature two-time correlation functions of system operators of a pure-dephasing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Jian, Chung-Chin; Chen, Po-Wen

    2010-07-01

    We evaluate the non-Markovian finite-temperature two-time correlation functions (CF’s) of system operators of a pure-dephasing spin-boson model in two different ways, one by the direct exact operator technique and the other by the recently derived evolution equations, valid to second order in the system-environment interaction Hamiltonian. This pure-dephasing spin-boson model that is exactly solvable has been extensively studied as a simple decoherence model. However, its exact non-Markovian finite-temperature two-time system operator CF’s, to our knowledge, have not been presented in the literature. This may be mainly due to the fact, illustrated in this article, that in contrast to the Markovian case, the time evolution of the reduced density matrix of the system (or the reduced quantum master equation) alone is not sufficient to calculate the two-time system operator CF’s of non-Markovian open systems. The two-time CF’s obtained using the recently derived evolution equations in the weak system-environment coupling case for this non-Markovian pure-dephasing model happen to be the same as those obtained from the exact evaluation. However, these results significantly differ from the non-Markovian two-time CF’s obtained by wrongly directly applying the quantum regression theorem (QRT), a useful procedure to calculate the two-time CF’s for weak-coupling Markovian open systems. This demonstrates clearly that the recently derived evolution equations generalize correctly the QRT to non-Markovian finite-temperature cases. It is believed that these evolution equations will have applications in many different branches of physics.

  11. Rationalizing the role of structural motif and underlying electronic structure in the finite temperature behavior of atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan, Anju; Joshi, Kavita

    2014-01-01

    Melting in finite size systems is an interesting but complex phenomenon. Many factors affect melting and owing to their interdependencies it is a challenging task to rationalize their roles in the phase transition. In this work, we demonstrate how structural motif of the ground state influences melting transition in small clusters. Here, we report a case with clusters of aluminum and gallium having same number of atoms, valence electrons, and similar structural motif of the ground state but drastically different melting temperatures. We have employed Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics to simulate the solid-like to liquid-like transition in these clusters. Our simulations have reproduced the experimental trends fairly well. Further, the detailed analysis of isomers has brought out the role of the ground state structure and underlying electronic structure in the finite temperature behavior of these clusters. For both clusters, isomers accessible before cluster melts have striking similarities and does have strong influence of the structural motif of the ground state. Further, the shape of the heat capacity curve is similar in both the cases but the transition is more spread over for Al 36 which is consistent with the observed isomerization pattern. Our simulations also suggest a way to characterize transition region on the basis of accessibility of the ground state at a specific temperature

  12. The finite temperature QCD phase transition and the thermodynamic equation of state. An investigation employing lattice QCD with Nf=2 twisted mass quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Florian

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we report about an investigation of the finite temperature crossover/phase transition of quantum chromodynamics and the evaluation of the thermodynamic equation of state. To this end the lattice method and the Wilson twisted mass discretisation of the quark action are used. This formulation is known to have an automatic improvement of lattice artifacts and thus an improved continuum limit behaviour. This work presents first robust results using this action for the non-vanishing temperature case. We investigate the chiral limit of the two flavour phase transition with several small values of the pion mass in order to address the open question of the order of the transition in the limit of vanishing quark mass. For the currently simulated pion masses in the range of 300 to 700 MeV we present evidence that the finite temperature transition is a crossover transition rather than a genuine phase transition. The chiral limit is investigated by comparing the scaling of the observed crossover temperature with the mass including several possible scenarios. Complementary to this approach the chiral condensate as the order parameter for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is analysed in comparison with the O(4) universal scaling function which characterises a second order transition. With respect to thermodynamics the equation of state is obtained from the trace anomaly employing the temperature integral method which provides the pressure and energy density in the crossover region. The continuum limit of the trace anomaly is studied by considering several values of N τ and the tree-level correction technique.

  13. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.; Singh, H.; Dhindaw, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. ► Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. ► Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. ► Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  14. Correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in SU(2) gauge theory at finite temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K.; Karsch, F.; Pica, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We calculate correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition of (3+1)-dimensional SU(2) gauge theory and discuss their critical behavior in the vicinity of the second order deconfinement transition. We show that correlation functions...... of the trace of the energy momentum tensor diverge uniformly at the critical point in proportion to the specific heat singularity. Correlation functions of the pressure, on the other hand, stay finite at the critical point. We discuss the consequences of these findings for the analysis of transport...

  15. Effects of charge non-neutrality and finite beta on the electron temperature gradient modes in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, A.; Liu, D. Z.; Livingstone, S.

    2004-03-01

    Local kinetic analysis of the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode in Tokamaks indicates that the effects of charge non-neutrality are significant in the parameter regime of Tokamaks. The maximum growth rate occurs at (k/k(De))(2) 0.5 when the electron temperature and density are varied over a wide range. The growth rate becomes dependent on the beta factor even though the ETG mode is predominantly electrostatic. Finite beta stabilization of the ETG mode requires a large ballooning parameter so as to cause an effective drift reversal. Mixing length estimate yields an electron thermal diffusivity chi(e) qnu(Te) (c/omega(pe))(2) rootbeta(e) / L-n where c/omega(pe) is the electron skin depth.

  16. Exact effective action for (1+1)-dimensional fermions in an Abelian background at finite temperature and chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Soraya G.; Perez, Silvana

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of a nonzero chemical potential in (1+1)-dimensional quantum field models at finite temperature. We particularly consider massless fermions in an Abelian gauge field background and calculate the effective action by evaluating the n-point functions. We find that the structure of the amplitudes corresponds to a generalization of the structure noted earlier in a calculation without a chemical potential (the associated integrals carry the dependence on the chemical potential). Our calculation shows that the chiral anomaly is unaffected by the presence of a chemical potential at finite temperature. However, unlike in the absence of a chemical potential, odd point functions do not vanish. We trace this to the fact that in the presence of a chemical potential the generalized charge conjugation symmetry of the theory allows for such amplitudes. In fact, we find that all the even point functions are even functions of μ, while the odd point functions are odd functions of μ which is consistent with this generalized charge conjugation symmetry. We show that the origin of the structure of the amplitudes is best seen from a formulation of the theory in terms of left- and right-handed spinors. The calculations are also much simpler in this formulation and it clarifies many other aspects of the theory.

  17. Finite Element Analysis in the Estimation of Air-Gap Torque and Surface Temperature of Induction Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mr., J. Ravi Kumar; Banakara, Basavaraja, Dr.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents electromagnetic and thermal behavior of Induction Motor (IM) through the modeling and analysis by applying multiphysics coupled Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Therefore prediction of the magnetic flux, electromagnetic torque, stator and rotor losses and temperature distribution inside an operating electric motor are the most important issues during its design. Prediction and estimation of these parameters allows design engineers to decide capability of the machine for the proposed load, temperature rating and its application for which it is being designed ensuring normal motor operation at rated conditions. In this work, multiphysics coupled electromagnetic - thermal modeling and analysis of induction motor at rated and high frequency has carried out applying Arkkio’s torque method. COMSOL Multiphysics software is used for modeling and finite element analysis of IM. Transient electromagnetic torque, magnetic field distribution, speed-torque characteristics of IM were plotted and studied at different frequencies. This proposed work helps in the design and prediction of accurate performance of induction motor specific to various industrial drive applications. Results obtained are also validated with experimental analysis. The main purpose of this model is to use it as an integral part of the design aiming to system optimization of Variable Speed Drive (VSD) and its components using coupled simulations.

  18. Force delivery of NiTi orthodontic arch wire at different magnitude of deflections and temperatures: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, M F; Mahmud, A S; Mokhtar, N

    2018-01-01

    NiTi arch wires are used widely in orthodontic treatment due to its superelastic and biocompatibility properties. In brackets configuration, the force released from the arch wire is influenced by the sliding resistances developed on the arch wire-bracket contact. This study investigated the evolution of the forces released by a rectangular NiTi arch wire towards possible intraoral temperature and deflection changes. A three dimensional finite element model was developed to measure the force-deflection behavior of superelastic arch wire. Finite element analysis was used to distinguish the martensite fraction and phase state of arch wire microstructure in relation to the magnitude of wire deflection. The predicted tensile and bending results from the numerical model showed a good agreement with the experimental results. As contact developed between the wire and bracket, binding influenced the force-deflection curve by changing the martensitic transformation plateau into a slope. The arch wire recovered from greater magnitude of deflection released lower force than one recovered from smaller deflection. In contrast, it was observed that the plateau slope increased from 0.66N/mm to 1.1N/mm when the temperature was increased from 26°C to 46°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the pyramid. Both the clusters melt around 780 K, a temperature much below the bulk melting temperature. However, Au19 undergoes a vacancy-assisted melting transition leading to a broad peak in the heat capacity curve whereas Au20 with a symmetric ground state has a well-defined peak in the heat capacity curve. 846.

  20. Application of the Finite Elemental Analysis to Modeling Temperature Change of the Vaccine in an Insulated Packaging Container during Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Changfeng; Cheng, Yujie; Shen, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrated an attempt to predict temperatures of a perishable product such as vaccine inside an insulated packaging container during transport through finite element analysis (FEA) modeling. In order to use the standard FEA software for simulation, an equivalent heat conduction coefficient is proposed and calculated to describe the heat transfer of the air trapped inside the insulated packaging container. The three-dimensional, insulated packaging container is regarded as a combination of six panels, and the heat flow at each side panel is a one-dimension diffusion process. The transit-thermal analysis was applied to simulate the heat transition process from ambient environment to inside the container. Field measurements were carried out to collect the temperature during transport, and the collected data were compared to the FEA simulation results. Insulated packaging containers are used to transport temperature-sensitive products such as vaccine and other pharmaceutical products. The container is usually made of an extruded polystyrene foam filled with gel packs. World Health Organization guidelines recommend that all vaccines except oral polio vaccine be distributed in an environment where the temperature ranges between +2 to +8 °C. The primary areas of concern in designing the packaging for vaccine are how much of the foam thickness and gel packs should be used in order to keep the temperature in a desired range, and how to prevent the vaccine from exposure to freezing temperatures. This study uses numerical simulation to predict temperature change within an insulated packaging container in vaccine cold chain. It is our hope that this simulation will provide the vaccine industries with an alternative engineering tool to validate vaccine packaging and project thermal equilibrium within the insulated packaging container.

  1. Finite-temperature effective potential of a system with spontaneously broken symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E.P. [Yaroslavl State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    A quantum-mechanical system with spontaneously broken symmetry is considered the effective potential is determined, and it is shown that with reduction of temperature the system undergoes a phase transition of the first kind.

  2. Determination of safe operating conditions for gasketed flange joint under combined internal pressure and temperature: A finite element approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Performance of a flange joint is characterised mainly by its 'strength' and 'sealing capability'. A number of analytical and experimental studies have been conducted to study these characteristics under internal pressure loading. However, with the advent of new technological trends for high temperature and pressure applications, an increased demand for analysis is recognized. The effect of steady-state thermal loading makes the problem more complex as it leads to combined application of internal pressure and temperature. The present design codes do not address the effects of temperature on the structural integrity and sealing ability. In addition, the available design solutions do not solve problems of failure of a gasketed flange joint even under bolt up and internal pressure loading conditions. To investigate joint strength and sealing capability under combined internal pressure and different steady-state thermal loading, a 3D nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) of a gasketed flange joint is carried out and its behaviour is discussed. To determine the safe operating conditions or the actual joint load capacity, the joint is further analyzed for different internal pressures keeping the temperature constant

  3. A finite element model of the L4-L5-S1 human spine segment including the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Hector E; Gómez, Lessby; García, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to study disc degeneration and the risk of injury during occupational activities, a new finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5-S1 segment of the human spine was developed based on the anthropometry of a typical Colombian worker. Beginning with medical images, the programs CATIA and SOLIDWORKS were used to generate and assemble the vertebrae and create the soft structures of the segment. The software ABAQUS was used to run the analyses, which included a detailed model calibration using the experimental step-wise reduction data for the L4-L5 component, while the L5-S1 segment was calibrated in the intact condition. The range of motion curves, the intradiscal pressure and the lateral bulging under pure moments were considered for the calibration. As opposed to other FE models that include the L5-S1 disc, the model developed in this study considered the regional variations and anisotropy of the annulus as well as a realistic description of the nucleus geometry, which allowed an improved representation of experimental data during the validation process. Hence, the model can be used to analyze the stress and strain distributions in the L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs of workers performing activities such as lifting and carrying tasks.

  4. Inverse Interpolation: The Rate of Enzymatic Reaction based Finite differences, Formulas for obtaining intermediate values of Temperature, Substrate Concentration, Enzyme Concentration and their Estimation of Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Nizam Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Inverse interpolation is the process of finding the values of the argument corresponding to a given value of the function when the latter is intermediate between two tabulated values. The finite differences are differences between the values of the function or the difference between the past differences. Finite differences are forward difference, backward difference and divide difference. Temperature, concentration of substrate, concentration of enzyme and other factors are affected the rate ...

  5. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants with cylindrical symmetry: 1. Properly working devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnorr Jörg

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active Magnetic Resonance Imaging implants are constructed as resonators tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system with a specific field strength. The resonating circuit may be embedded into or added to the normal metallic implant structure. The resonators build inductively coupled wireless transmit and receive coils and can amplify the signal, normally decreased by eddy currents, inside metallic structures without affecting the rest of the spin ensemble. During magnetic resonance imaging the resonators generate heat, which is additional to the usual one described by the specific absorption rate. This induces temperature increases of the tissue around the circuit paths and inside the lumen of an active implant and may negatively influence patient safety. Methods This investigation provides an overview of the supplementary power absorbed by active implants with a cylindrical geometry, corresponding to vessel implants such as stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters. The knowledge of the overall absorbed power is used in a finite volume analysis to estimate temperature maps around different implant structures inside homogeneous tissue under worst-case assumptions. The "worst-case scenario" assumes thermal heat conduction without blood perfusion inside the tissue around the implant and mostly without any cooling due to blood flow inside vessels. Results The additional power loss of a resonator is proportional to the volume and the quality factor, as well as the field strength of the MRI system and the specific absorption rate of the applied sequence. For properly working devices the finite volume analysis showed only tolerable heating during MRI investigations in most cases. Only resonators transforming a few hundred mW into heat may reach temperature increases over 5 K. This requires resonators with volumes of several ten cubic centimeters, short inductor circuit paths with only a few 10 cm and a quality

  6. Automatic CT-based finite element model generation for temperature-based death time estimation: feasibility study and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Sebastian; Muggenthaler, Holger; Hubig, Michael; Erdmann, Bodo; Weiser, Martin; Zachow, Stefan; Heinrich, Andreas; Güttler, Felix Victor; Teichgräber, Ulf; Mall, Gita

    2017-05-01

    Temperature-based death time estimation is based either on simple phenomenological models of corpse cooling or on detailed physical heat transfer models. The latter are much more complex but allow a higher accuracy of death time estimation, as in principle, all relevant cooling mechanisms can be taken into account.Here, a complete workflow for finite element-based cooling simulation is presented. The following steps are demonstrated on a CT phantom: Computer tomography (CT) scan Segmentation of the CT images for thermodynamically relevant features of individual geometries and compilation in a geometric computer-aided design (CAD) model Conversion of the segmentation result into a finite element (FE) simulation model Computation of the model cooling curve (MOD) Calculation of the cooling time (CTE) For the first time in FE-based cooling time estimation, the steps from the CT image over segmentation to FE model generation are performed semi-automatically. The cooling time calculation results are compared to cooling measurements performed on the phantoms under controlled conditions. In this context, the method is validated using a CT phantom. Some of the phantoms' thermodynamic material parameters had to be determined via independent experiments.Moreover, the impact of geometry and material parameter uncertainties on the estimated cooling time is investigated by a sensitivity analysis.

  7. Screening of heavy quarks and hadrons at finite temperature and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, M.

    2006-09-22

    Heavy quarks and hadrons placed in a strongly interacting thermal and baryon chemical quantum field are screened by the medium. I calculate the free energies of heavy quarks and anti-quarks and hadron correlation functions on a 16{sup 3} x 4 lattice in 2-flavour QCD with a bare quark mass of m/T=0.4. The dependence on the interparticle distance determines the screening masses as a function of temperature and density. The Taylor expansion method is used for the baryon chemical potential. The heavy quark screening masses turn out to be in good agreement with perturbation theory for temperatures T>2T{sub c}. The hadron screening masses are consistent with the free quark propagation in the large temperature regime. (orig.)

  8. The bottomonium spectrum at finite temperature from N f = 2 + 1 lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, G.; Allton, C.; Harris, T.; Kim, S.; Lombardo, M. P.; Ryan, S. M.; Skullerud, J.-I.

    2014-07-01

    We present results on the bottomonium spectrum at temperatures above and below the deconfinement crossover temperature, T c , from dynamical lattice QCD simulations. The heavy quark is treated with a non-relativistic effective field theory on the lattice and serves as a probe of the hot medium. Ensembles with a finer spatial lattice spacing and a greater range of temperatures below T c than those previously employed by this collaboration are used. In addition, there are N f = 2 + 1 flavours of Wilson clover quark in the sea with M π ≈ 400 MeV and we perform a more careful tuning of the bottom quark mass in this work. We calculate the spectral functions of S and P wave bottomonium states using the maximum entropy method and confirm earlier findings on the survival of the ground state S wave states up to at least 2 T c and the immediate dissociation of the P wave states above T c .

  9. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed

  10. Screening of heavy quarks and hadrons at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, M.

    2006-01-01

    Heavy quarks and hadrons placed in a strongly interacting thermal and baryon chemical quantum field are screened by the medium. I calculate the free energies of heavy quarks and anti-quarks and hadron correlation functions on a 16 3 x 4 lattice in 2-flavour QCD with a bare quark mass of m/T=0.4. The dependence on the interparticle distance determines the screening masses as a function of temperature and density. The Taylor expansion method is used for the baryon chemical potential. The heavy quark screening masses turn out to be in good agreement with perturbation theory for temperatures T>2T c . The hadron screening masses are consistent with the free quark propagation in the large temperature regime. (orig.)

  11. Theory of neutron scattering from superfluid 4He at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, E.; Griffin, A.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) for a Bose-condensed system is calculated microscopically at temperatures where there are a significant number of thermally excited quasiparticles present. Our work is based on the one-loop diagrammatic approximation, which has been used by Wong and Gould to discuss the low-temperature limit. In our numerical calculations (for Q = 0.35 and 0.8 A -1 ) of proper, irreducible quantities, we use the Bogoliubov approximation for the coherence factors in conjunction with the experimentally determined quasiparticle spectrum. We find that at high temperatures, the collisionless phonon resonance exhibited by S(Q,ω) has a width which increases with the number of thermally excited rotons, in rough agreement with the neutron scattering data of Cowley and Woods as well as those of Woods and Svensson. Our results are compared with those based on a phenomenological treatment of the phonon-roton coupling

  12. Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge: From the vacuum to finite temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The variational Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge is reviewedand the essential results obtained in recent years are summarized. First the results for thevacuum sector are discussed, with a special emphasis on the mechansim of confinementand chiral symmetry breaking. Then the deconfinement phase transition is described byintroducing temperature in the Hamiltonian approach via compactification of one spatialdimension. The effective action for the Polyakov loop is calculated and the order of thephase transition as well as the critical temperatures are obtained for the color group SU(2 and SU(3. In both cases, our predictions are in good agreement with lattice calculations.

  13. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements, direct solvers and data space Gauss-Newton, parallelized on SMP computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M. A.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an algorithm for 3D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permits incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used for the forward solution, parameter jacobians, and model update. The forward simulator, jacobians calculations, as well as synthetic and real data inversion are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequency or small material admittivity, the E-field requires divergence correction. Using Hodge decomposition, correction may be applied after the forward solution is calculated. It allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization is computed using the MUMPS library, which shows moderately good scalability through 12 processor cores but limited gains beyond that. The factored matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the jacobians of field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure and several topographic models. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of electromagnetic waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run time tests indicate that for meshes as large as 150x150x60 elements, MT forward response and jacobians can be calculated in ~2.5 hours per frequency. For inversion, we implemented data space Gauss-Newton method, which offers reduction in memory requirement and a significant speedup of the parameter step versus model space approach. For dense matrix operations we use tiling approach of PLASMA library, which shows very good scalability. In synthetic

  14. Spin-polarized versus chiral condensate in quark matter at finite temperature and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providencia, Joao

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low...

  15. Role of N defects in paramagnetic CrN at finite temperatures from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, E.; Alling, B.; Steneteg, P.; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of defects in paramagnetic materials at high temperature constitute a formidable challenge to solid-state theory due to the interaction of magnetic disorder, vibrations, and structural relaxations. CrN is a material where these effects are particularly large due to a strong magnetolattice coupling and a tendency for deviations from the nominal 1:1 stoichiometry. In this work, we present a first-principles study of nitrogen vacancies and nitrogen interstitials in CrN at elevated temperature. We report on formation energetics, the geometry of interstitial nitrogen dimers, and the impact on the electronic structure caused by the defects. We find a vacancy formation energy of 2.28 eV with a small effect of temperature, i.e., a formation energy for N interstitial in the form of a -oriented split bond of 3.77 eV with an increase to 3.97 at 1000 K. Vacancies are found to add three electrons, while split-bond interstitial adds one electron to the conduction band. The band gap of defect-free CrN is smeared out due to vibrations, although it is difficult to draw a conclusion about the exact temperature at which the band gap closes from our calculations. However, it is clear that at 900 K there is a nonzero density of electronic states at the Fermi level. At 300 K, our results indicate a border case where the band gap is about to close.

  16. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W.; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF A HYDROCYCLONE INCLUDING THE SIMULATION OF AIR-CORE EFFECT, USING THE FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Felipe Aguilera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The hydrocyclone is one of the most used classification equipment in industry, particularly in mineral processing. Maybe its main characteristic is to be a hydrodynamic separation equipment, whereby it has a high production capability and different levels of efficiency are depending on the geometrical configuration, operational parameters and the type of material to be processed. Nevertheless, there are a few successful studies regarding the modelling and simulation of its hydrodynamic principles, because the flow behavior inside is quite complex. Most of the current models are empirical and they are not applicable to all cases and types of minerals. One of the most important problems to be solved, besides the cut size and the effect of the physical properties of the particles, is the distribution of the flow inside the hydrocyclone, because if the work of the equipment is at low slurry densities, very clear for small hydrocyclones, its mechanic behavior is a consequence of the kind of liquid used as continuous phase, being water the most common liquid. This work shows the modelling and simulation of the hydrodynamic behavior of a suspension inside a hydrocyclone, including the air core effect, through the use of finite differences method. For the developing of the model, the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM for the evaluation of turbulence, and the Volume of Fluid (VOF to study the interaction between water and air were used. Finally, the model shows to be significant for experimental data, and for different conditions of an industrial plant.

  18. Deconfinement and universality in the 3DU(1) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature: study in the dual formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine,UA-03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Gravina, M.; Papa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and INFN - Gruppo collegato di Cosenza,I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-09-10

    We study analytically and numerically the three-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature in the dual formulation. For an appropriate disorder operator, we obtain the renormalization group equations describing the critical behavior of the model in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition. These equations are used to check the validity of the Svetitsky-Yaffe conjecture regarding the critical behavior of the lattice U(1) model. Furthermore, we perform numerical simulations of the model for N{sub t}=1,2,4,8 and compute, by a cluster algorithm, the dual correlation functions and the corresponding second moment correlation length. In this way we locate the position of the critical point and calculate critical indices.

  19. Direct evaluation of boson dynamics via finite-temperature time-dependent variation with multiple Davydov states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Wang, Lu; Zhao, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in quantum optics allow for exploration of boson dynamics in dissipative many-body systems. However, the traditional descriptions of quantum dissipation using reduced density matrices are unable to capture explicit information of bath dynamics. In this work, efficient evaluation of boson dynamics is demonstrated by combining the multiple Davydov Ansatz with finite-temperature time-dependent variation, going beyond what state-of-the-art density matrix approaches are capable to offer for coupled electron-boson systems. To this end, applications are made to excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems, singlet fission in organic thin films, and circuit quantum electrodynamics in superconducting devices. Thanks to the multiple Davydov Ansatz, our analysis of boson dynamics leads to clear revelation of boson modes strongly coupled to electronic states, as well as in-depth description of polaron creation and destruction in the presence of thermal fluctuations.

  20. Quark matter and quark stars in strong magnetic fields at finite temperature within the confined-isospin-density-dependent mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Hong-Yang; Wang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2018-03-01

    We study the properties of strange quark matter (SQM) and quark stars (QSs) in strong magnetic fields within the extended confined isospin-density-dependent mass (CIDDM) model including the temperature dependence of the equivalent mass for quarks. The quark symmetry energy, quark symmetry free energy, and the equation of state (EOS) of SQM in constant magnetic fields at finite temperature are investigated, and it is found that including the temperature dependence in CIDDM model and considering strong magnetic fields can both significantly influence the properties of the SQM and the maximum mass of quark stars. Using the density-dependent magnetic field and assuming two extreme cases for the magnetic field orientation in QSs (the radial orientation in which the local magnetic fields are along the radial direction and the transverse orientation in which the local magnetic fields are randomly oriented but perpendicular to the radial orientation), we analyze the mass-radius relations for different stages of the protoquark stars (PQSs) along the star evolution. Our results indicate that the maximum mass of magnetized PQSs may depend on not only the strength distribution and the orientation of the magnetic fields inside the PQSs, but also the heating process and the cooling process in the star evolution.

  1. Gluon and ghost propagator studies in lattice QCD at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouane, Rafik

    2013-04-29

    Gluon and ghost propagators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) computed in the infrared momentum region play an important role to understand quark and gluon confinement. They are the subject of intensive research thanks to non-perturbative methods based on Dyson-Schwinger (DS) and functional renormalization group (FRG) equations. Moreover, their temperature behavior might also help to explore the chiral and deconfinement phase transition or crossover within QCD at non-zero temperature. Our prime tool is the lattice discretized QCD (LQCD) providing a unique ab-initio non-perturbative approach to deal with the computation of various observables of the hadronic world. We investigate the temperature dependence of Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators in pure gluodynamics and in full QCD. Regarding the gluon propagator, we compute its longitudinal D{sub L} as well its transversal D{sub T} components. The aim is to provide a data set in terms of fitting formulae which can be used as input for DS (or FRG) equations. We deal with full (N{sub f}=2) LQCD with the twisted mass fermion discretization. We employ gauge field configurations provided by the tmfT collaboration for temperatures in the crossover region and for three fixed pion mass values in the range [300,500] MeV. Finally, within SU(3) pure gauge theory (at T=0) we compute the Landau gauge gluon propagator according to different gauge fixing criteria. Our goal is to understand the influence of gauge copies with minimal (non-trivial) eigenvalues of the Faddeev-Popov operator.

  2. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  3. Vortex line in a neutral finite-temperature superfluid Fermi gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Nicolai; Bruun, G. M.; Schneider, B. I.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of an isolated vortex in a dilute two-component neutral superfluid Fermi gas is studied within the context of self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Various thermodynamic properties are calculated, and the shift in the critical temperature due to the presence of the vortex is ...... is analyzed. The gapless excitations inside the vortex core are studied, and a scheme to detect these states and thus the presence of the vortex is examined. The numerical results are compared with various analytical expressions when appropriate....

  4. Symmetry breaking patterns of the 3-3-1 model at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J.S. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Fisica de Altas Energias, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ramos, Rudnei O. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-06-15

    We consider the minimal version of an extension of the standard electroweak model based on the SU(3){sub c} x SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub X} gauge symmetry (the 3-3-1 model). We analyze the most general potential constructed from three scalars in the triplet representation of SU(3){sub L}, whose neutral components develop nonzero vacuum expectation values, giving mass for all the model's massive particles. For different choices of parameters, we obtain the particle spectrum for the two symmetry breaking scales: one where the SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub X} group is broken down to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} and a lower scale similar to the standard model one. Within the considerations used, we show that the model encodes two first-order phase transitions, respecting the pattern of symmetry restoration. The last transition, corresponding to the standard electroweak one, is found to be very weak first-order, most likely turning second-order or a crossover in practice. However, the first transition in this model can be strongly first-order, which might happen at a temperature not too high above the second one. We determine the respective critical temperatures for symmetry restoration for the model. (orig.)

  5. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants: 2. Defects on active MRI implants causing hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grönemeyer Dietrich HW

    2006-05-01

    investigations. The finite volume analysis calculates the time developing temperature maps for the model of a broken linear metallic wire embedded in tissue. Half of the total hot spot power loss is assumed to diffuse into both wire parts at the location of a defect. The energy is distributed from there by heat conduction. Additionally the effect of blood perfusion and blood flow is respected in some simulations because the simultaneous appearance of all worst case conditions, especially the absence of blood perfusion and blood flow near the hot spot, is very unlikely for vessel implants. Results The analytical solution as worst case scenario as well as the finite volume analysis for near worst case situations show not negligible volumes with critical temperature increases for part of the modeled hot spot situations. MR investigations with a high rf-pulse density lasting below a minute can establish volumes of several cubic millimeters with temperature increases high enough to start cell destruction. Longer exposure times can involve volumes larger than 100 mm3. Even temperature increases in the range of thermal ablation are reached for substantial volumes. MR sequence exposure time and hot spot power loss are the primary factors influencing the volume with critical temperature increases. Wire radius, wire material as well as the physiological parameters blood perfusion and blood flow inside larger vessels reduce the volume with critical temperature increases, but do not exclude a volume with critical tissue heating for resonators with a large product of resonator volume and quality factor. Conclusion The worst case scenario assumes thermal equilibrium for a hot spot embedded in homogeneous tissue without any cooling due to blood perfusion or flow. The finite volume analysis can calculate the results for near and not close to worst case conditions. For both cases a substantial volume can reach a critical temperature increase in a short time. The analytical solution, as absolute

  6. Finite Element Study into the effect of footwear temperature on the Forces transmitted to the foot during quasi- static compression loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariatmadari, M R; English, R; Rothwell, G

    2010-01-01

    The determination of plantar stresses using computational footwear models which include temperature effects are crucial to predict foam performance in service and to aid material development and product design. Finite Element Method (FEM) provides an efficient computational framework to investigate the foot-footwear interaction. The aim of this research is to use FEM to investigate the effect of varying footwear temperature on plantar stresses. The results obtained will provide data which can be used to help optimise shoe design in terms of minimising damaging stresses in the foot particularly for individuals with diabetes who are susceptible to lower extremity complications. The FE simulation results showed significant reductions in foot stresses with the modifications from FE model (1) without footwear to model (2) with midsole only and to model (3) with midsole and insole. In summary, insole and midsole layers made from various foam materials aim to reduce the Ground Reaction Forces (GRF's) and foot stresses considerably and temperature variation can affect their cushioning and consequently the shock attenuation properties. The loss of footwear cushioning effect can have important clinical implications for those individuals with a history of lower limb overuse injuries or diabetes.

  7. Finite-temperature fidelity-metric approach to the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Daniel D.; Müller, Cord A.; Kastner, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The fidelity metric has recently been proposed as a useful and elegant approach to identify and characterize both quantum and classical phase transitions. We study this metric on the manifold of thermal states for the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model. For the isotropic LMG model, we find that the metric reduces to a Fisher-Rao metric, reflecting an underlying classical probability distribution. Furthermore, this metric can be expressed in terms of derivatives of the free energy, indicating a relation to Ruppeiner geometry. This allows us to obtain exact expressions for the (suitably rescaled) metric in the thermodynamic limit. The phase transition of the isotropic LMG model is signalled by a degeneracy of this (improper) metric in the paramagnetic phase. Due to the integrability of the isotropic LMG model, ground-state level crossings occur, leading to an ill-defined fidelity metric at zero temperature.

  8. Finite-temperature fidelity-metric approach to the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, Daniel D; Mueller, Cord A; Kastner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The fidelity metric has recently been proposed as a useful and elegant approach to identify and characterize both quantum and classical phase transitions. We study this metric on the manifold of thermal states for the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model. For the isotropic LMG model, we find that the metric reduces to a Fisher-Rao metric, reflecting an underlying classical probability distribution. Furthermore, this metric can be expressed in terms of derivatives of the free energy, indicating a relation to Ruppeiner geometry. This allows us to obtain exact expressions for the (suitably rescaled) metric in the thermodynamic limit. The phase transition of the isotropic LMG model is signalled by a degeneracy of this (improper) metric in the paramagnetic phase. Due to the integrability of the isotropic LMG model, ground-state level crossings occur, leading to an ill-defined fidelity metric at zero temperature.

  9. Finite-temperature phase transitions of third and higher order in gauge theories at large N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Pisarski, Robert D.; Skokov, Vladimir V.

    2018-02-01

    We study phase transitions in S U (∞ ) gauge theories at nonzero temperature using matrix models. Our basic assumption is that the effective potential is dominated by double trace terms for the Polyakov loops. As a function of the various parameters, related to terms linear, quadratic, and quartic in the Polyakov loop, the phase diagram exhibits a universal structure. In a large region of this parameter space, there is a continuous phase transition whose order is larger than second. This is a generalization of the phase transition of Gross, Witten, and Wadia. Depending upon the detailed form of the matrix model, the eigenvalue density and the behavior of the specific heat near the transition differ drastically. We speculate that in the pure gauge theory, although the deconfining transition is thermodynamically of first order, it can be nevertheless conformally symmetric at infinite N .

  10. D* and B* mesons in strange hadronic medium at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabra Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the effect of density and temperature of isospin symmetric strange medium on the shift in masses and decay constants of vector D and B mesons using chiral SU(3 model and QCD sum rule approach. In the present investigation the values of quark and gluon condensates are calculated from the chiral SU(3 model and these condensatesare further used as input in the QCD Sum rule framework to calculate the in-medium masses and decay constants of vector D and B mesons. These in medium properties of vector D and B mesons may be helpful to understand the experimental observables of the experiments like CBM and PANDA under FAIR project at GSI, Germany. The results which are observed in present work are also compared with the previous predictions.

  11. Stochastic mean-field theory: Method and application to the disordered Bose-Hubbard model at finite temperature and speckle disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissbort, Ulf; Hofstetter, Walter; Thomale, Ronny

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the stochastic mean-field theory (SMFT) method, which is a new approach for describing disordered Bose systems in the thermodynamic limit including localization and dimensional effects. We explicate the method in detail and apply it to the disordered Bose-Hubbard model at finite temperature, with on-site box disorder, as well as experimentally relevant unbounded speckle disorder. We find that disorder-induced condensation and re-entrant behavior at constant filling are only possible at low temperatures, beyond the reach of current experiments [M. Pasienski, D. McKay, M. White, and B. DeMarco, e-print arXiv:0908.1182]. Including off-diagonal hopping disorder as well, we investigate its effect on the phase diagram in addition to pure on-site disorder. To make connection to present experiments on a quantitative level, we also combine SMFT with an LDA approach and obtain the condensate fraction in the presence of an external trapping potential.

  12. The rate dependent response of a bistable chain at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benichou, Itamar; Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.; Givli, Sefi

    2016-10-01

    We study the rate dependent response of a bistable chain subjected to thermal fluctuations. The study is motivated by the fact that the behavior of this model system is prototypical to a wide range of nonlinear processes in materials physics, biology and chemistry. To account for the stochastic nature of the system response, we formulate a set of governing equations for the evolution of the probability density of meta-stable configurations. Based on this approach, we calculate the behavior for a wide range of parametric values, such as rate, temperature, overall stiffness, and number of elements in the chain. Our results suggest that fundamental characteristics of the response, such as average transition stress and hysteresis, can be captured by a simple law which folds the influence of all these factors into a single non-dimensional quantity. We also show that the applicability of analytical results previously obtained for single-well systems can be extended to systems having multiple wells by proper definition of rate and of the transition stress.

  13. A density variational approach to nuclear giant resonances at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleissl, P.; Brack, M.; Quentin, P.; Meyer, J.

    1989-02-01

    We present a density functional approach to the description of nuclear giant resonances (GR), using Skyrme type effective interactions. We exploit hereby the theorems of Thouless and others, relating RPA sum rules to static (constrained) Hartree-Fock expectation values. The latter are calculated both microscopically and, where shell effects are small enough to allow it, semiclassically by a density variational method employing the gradient-expanded density functionals of the extended Thomas-Fermi model. We obtain an excellent overall description of both systematics and detailed isotopic dependence of GR energies, in particular with the Skyrme force SkM. For the breathing modes (isoscalar and isovector giant monopole modes), and to some extent also for the isovector dipole mode, the A-dependence of the experimental peak energies is better described by coupling two different modes (corresponding to two different excitation operators) of the same spin and parity and evaluating the eigenmodes of the coupled system. Our calculations are also extended to highly excited nuclei (without angular momentum) and the temperature dependence of the various GR energies is discussed

  14. A Mixed Enthalpy-Temperature Finite Element Method For Generalized Phase-Change Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars

    2003-01-01

    In a large number of problems of engineering interest the transition of the material from one phase to another is of vital importance in describing the overall physical behaviour. Common applications include metal casting, freezing and thawing of foodstuffs and other biological materials, ground ...

  15. Finite-Temperature Non-equilibrium Quasicontinuum Method based on Langevin Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marian, J; Venturini, G; Hansen, B; Knap, J; Ortiz, M; Campbell, G

    2009-05-08

    The concurrent bridging of molecular dynamics and continuum thermodynamics presents a number of challenges, mostly associated with energy transmission and changes in the constitutive description of a material across domain boundaries. In this paper, we propose a framework for simulating coarse dynamic systems in the canonical ensemble using the Quasicontinuum method (QC). The equations of motion are expressed in reduced QC coordinates and are strictly derived from dissipative Lagrangian mechanics. The derivation naturally leads to a classical Langevin implementation where the timescale is governed by vibrations emanating from the finest length scale occurring in the computational cell. The equations of motion are integrated explicitly via Newmark's ({beta} = 0; {gamma} = 1/2) method, leading to a robust numerical behavior and energy conservation. In its current form, the method only allows for wave propagations supported by the less compliant of the two meshes across a heterogeneous boundary, which requires the use of overdamped dynamics to avoid spurious heating due to reflected vibrations. We have applied the method to two independent crystallographic systems characterized by different interatomic potentials (Al and Ta) and have measured thermal expansion in order to quantify the vibrational entropy loss due to homogenization. We rationalize the results in terms of system size, mesh coarseness, and nodal cluster diameter within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation. For Al, we find that the entropy loss introduced by mesh coarsening varies linearly with the element size, and that volumetric effects are not critical in driving the anharmonic behavior of the simulated systems. In Ta, the anomalies of the interatomic potential employed result in negative and zero thermal expansion at low and high temperatures, respectively.

  16. Renormalization of self-consistent approximation schemes at finite temperature II: applications to the sunset diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hees, H. van; Knoll, J.

    2001-01-01

    The theoretical concepts for the renormalization of self-consistent Dyson resummations, deviced in the first paper of this series, are applied to first example cases for the φ 4 -theory. Besides the tadpole (Hartree) approximation as a novel part the numerical solutions are presented which includes the sunset self-energy diagram into the self-consistent scheme based on the Φ-derivable approximation or 2PI effective action concept. (orig.)

  17. Renormalization of self-consistent approximation schemes at finite temperature. II. Applications to the sunset diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hees, Hendrik van; Knoll, Joern

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical concepts for the renormalization of self-consistent Dyson resummations, devised in the first paper of this series, are applied to first example cases of φ 4 theory. In addition to the tadpole (Hartree) approximation, as a novel part the numerical solutions are presented, which include the sunset self-energy diagram into the self-consistent scheme based on the Φ-derivable approximation or the two-particle irreducible effective action concept

  18. A unified approach to hadron phenomenology at zero and finite temperatures in a hard-wall AdS/QCD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiyuan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Ma, Bo-Qiang [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-15

    We propose a unified approach to study meson, nucleon and Δ-baryon properties at zero and finite temperatures in the context of hard-wall AdS/QCD model. We first combine some previous works dealing with mesons and baryons separately, and introduce a new parameter ξ so that the model could give a universal description of spectrum and couplings of both sectors in a self-consistent way. All observables calculated numerically show reasonable agreement with experimental data. We then study these observables at nonzero temperature by modifying the AdS space-time into AdS-Schwarzschild space-time. Numerically solving the model, we find an interesting temperature dependence of the spectrum and the couplings. We also make a prediction on the finite-temperature decay width of some nucleon and Δ excited states. (orig.)

  19. Effects of thermal and particle-number fluctuations on the giant isovector dipole modes for the 58Ni nucleus in the finite-temperature random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Dinhdang; Nguyen Zuythang

    1988-01-01

    Using the realistic single-particle energy spectrum obtained in the Woods-Saxon nucleon mean-field potential, we calculate the BCS pairing gap for 58 Ni as a function of temperature taking into account the thermal and particle-number fluctuations. The strength distributions of the electric dipole transitions and the centroids of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IV-GDR) are computed in the framework of the finite-temperature random-phase approximation (RPA) based on the Hamiltonian of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with separate dipole forces. It is shown that the change of the pairing gap at finite temperature can noticeably influence the IV-GDR localisation in realistic nuclei. By taking both thermal and quasiparticle fluctuations in the pairing gap into account the effect of the phase transition from superfluid to normal in the temperature dependence of the IV-GDR centroid is completely smeared out. (author)

  20. Computation of the flash-temperature at the wheel-rail contact using a 3D finite element model and its comparison with analytical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.; Wu, J.; Petrov, R.H.; Sietsma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The coupled mechanical–thermal behaviour of wheel and rail materials under rolling contact is studied to determine the temperature rise due to the frictional heat. The wheel–rail frictional rolling contact problem is solved using the three–dimensional finite element (FE) method. The FE model

  1. EFFECTS OF NEUTRINO ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS ON NEUTRINO INTERACTION WITH FINITE TEMPERATURE ELECTRON MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Sulaksono

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross-section of neutrino interaction with dense and warm electron gasses has been calculated by takinginto account the neutrino electromagnetic form factors. The significant effect of electromagnetic properties of neutrinocan be found if the neutrino dipole moment, μ ν , is ≥ 5.10-9 μB and neutrino charge radius, Rv, is ≥ 5.10-6 MeV-1. Theimportance of the retarded correction, detailed balance and Pauli blocking factors is shown and analyzed. Many-bodyeffects on the target matter which are included via random phase approximation (RPA correlation as well as photoneffective mass are also investigated.

  2. Possible Many-Body Localization in a Long-Lived Finite-Temperature Ultracold Quasineutral Molecular Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sous, John; Grant, Edward

    2018-03-01

    We argue that the quenched ultracold plasma presents an experimental platform for studying the quantum many-body physics of disordered systems in the long-time and finite energy-density limits. We consider an experiment that quenches a plasma of nitric oxide to an ultracold system of Rydberg molecules, ions, and electrons that exhibits a long-lived state of arrested relaxation. The qualitative features of this state fail to conform with classical models. Here, we develop a microscopic quantum description for the arrested phase based on an effective many-body spin Hamiltonian that includes both dipole-dipole and van der Waals interactions. This effective model appears to offer a way to envision the essential quantum disordered nonequilibrium physics of this system.

  3. On the finite temperature λφ4 model. Is there a first order phase transition in (λφ4)3?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1995-11-01

    We investigate the behavior at finite temperature of the massive λ φ 4 model in a D-dimensional spacetime, performing a renormalization up to the order of one loop. In this approximation we show that the thermal mass increase with the temperature, while the thermal coupling constant decrease with the temperature. We establish that in the (λφ 4 ) 3 model there is a temperature β * -1 above which the coupling constant becomes negative. We argue that the system could develop a first order phase transition, where the origin corresponds to a metastable vacuum. (author). 29 refs

  4. Analysis of transient thermal stresses in an orthotropic finite rectangular plate exhibiting temperature-dependent material properties by finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Yoshihiro

    1983-01-01

    Recently, the analysis of thermal stress problem taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account has been regarded as an important subject since the various industrial problems concerning thermal stress occur at relatively large temperature gradient. Only the analysis of one-dimensional thermal stress has been made so far, taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account. In this study, in order to examine the effect of the temperature dependence of material constants on the thermal stress arising in a two-dimensional temperature field, the thermal stress problem of an orthotropic rectangular plate was formulated by using stress functions, taking the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, Young's modulus, coefficient of linear expansion and Poisson's ratio in consideration. The effects of the temperature dependence of material constants on temperature distribution and thermal stress distribution were examined by carrying out the numerical analysis by difference method. The numerical analysis was carried out for an isotropic rectangular plate of low carbon steel, of which the data on the temperature dependence of material constants are available. The temperature drop of 8 deg C at maximum as compared with the case of constant material properties was obtained. (Kako, I.)

  5. Icosahedron-fcc transition size by molecular dynamics simulation of Lennard-Jones clusters at a finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, T; Torchet, G; de Feraudy, M F; Koga, K

    2001-03-01

    We studied finite-temperature ensembles of solid clusters produced by cooling liquid droplets either by evaporation or by a thermostat through a molecular dynamics calculation using the Lennard-Jones potential. The ensembles consist of either single or binary component clusters with 25% of the atoms 8% smaller in diameter than the other 75%. These clusters (380 clusters in total) exhibit various structures in the size range of n=160-2200, where n is the number of atoms in a cluster. For increasing size, the clusters show a gradual transition from icosahedral to a variety of structures: decahedral, face centered cubic, a small amount of hexagonal, and some icosahedral structures. They are asymmetrical or faulted. Electron diffraction patterns calculated with average structure factors of clusters after grouping them into several size regions are very similar to those experimentally observed. The size transition is around n=450 for single component clusters whatever the cooling process, evaporation or thermostat. This size is smaller than the experimental transition size estimated for argon clusters formed in a supersonic expansion. The transition size for binary component clusters is around n=600 for evaporative cooling, and larger for thermostatic cooling. The larger transition size found for the binary component clusters is consistent with the large icosahedral Au-Fe and Au-Cu alloy clusters observed experimentally.

  6. Summaries of reports of the 30. Conference on low-temperature physics. Pt. 1. Fundamental questions of superconductivity including HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Thesis of reporsts of the 30th Conference on low-temperature physics are presented. Fundamental problems of superconductivity are discussed including HTSC in bulk crystals, in thin films of Josephson junctions, ceramics and heterostructures. Specific features of superconductor structure and magnetic properties and also different mechanisms of superconductivity are analyzed

  7. Third-order perturbative lattice and complex Langevin analyses of the finite-temperature equation of state of nonrelativistic fermions in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loheac, Andrew C.; Drut, Joaquín E.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the pressure and density equations of state of unpolarized nonrelativistic fermions at finite temperature in one spatial dimension with contact interactions. For attractively interacting regimes, we perform a third-order lattice perturbation theory calculation, assess its convergence properties by comparing with hybrid Monte Carlo results (there is no sign problem in this regime), and demonstrate agreement with real Langevin calculations. For repulsive interactions, we present lattice perturbation theory results as well as complex Langevin calculations, with a modified action to prevent uncontrolled excursions in the complex plane. Although perturbation theory is a common tool, our implementation of it is unconventional; we use a Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to decouple the system and automate the application of Wick's theorem, thus generating the diagrammatic expansion, including symmetry factors, at any desired order. We also present an efficient technique to tackle nested Matsubara frequency sums without relying on contour integration, which is independent of dimension and applies to both relativistic and nonrelativistic systems, as well as all energy-independent interactions. We find exceptional agreement between perturbative and nonperturbative results at weak couplings, and furnish predictions based on complex Langevin at strong couplings. We additionally present perturbative calculations of up to the fifth-order virial coefficient for repulsive and attractive couplings. Both the lattice perturbation theory and complex Langevin formalisms can easily be extended to a variety of situations including polarized systems, bosons, and higher dimension.

  8. Investigations of α-helix↔β-sheet transition pathways in a miniprotein using the finite-temperature string method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Karplus, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A parallel implementation of the finite-temperature string method is described, which takes into account the invariance of coordinates with respect to rigid-body motions. The method is applied to the complex α-helix↔β-sheet transition in a β-hairpin miniprotein in implicit solvent, which exhibits much of the complexity of conformational changes in proteins. Two transition paths are considered, one derived from a linear interpolant between the endpoint structures and the other derived from a targeted dynamics simulation. Two methods for computing the conformational free energy (FE) along the string are compared, a restrained method, and a tessellation method introduced by E. Vanden-Eijnden and M. Venturoli [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194103 (2009)]. It is found that obtaining meaningful free energy profiles using the present atom-based coordinates requires restricting sampling to a vicinity of the converged path, where the hyperplanar approximation to the isocommittor surface is sufficiently accurate. This sampling restriction can be easily achieved using restraints or constraints. The endpoint FE differences computed from the FE profiles are validated by comparison with previous calculations using a path-independent confinement method. The FE profiles are decomposed into the enthalpic and entropic contributions, and it is shown that the entropy difference contribution can be as large as 10 kcal/mol for intermediate regions along the path, compared to 15–20 kcal/mol for the enthalpy contribution. This result demonstrates that enthalpic barriers for transitions are offset by entropic contributions arising from the existence of different paths across a barrier. The possibility of using systematically coarse-grained representations of amino acids, in the spirit of multiple interaction site residue models, is proposed as a means to avoid ad hoc sampling restrictions to narrow transition tubes. PMID:24811667

  9. Investigations of α-helix↔β-sheet transition pathways in a miniprotein using the finite-temperature string method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Karplus, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A parallel implementation of the finite-temperature string method is described, which takes into account the invariance of coordinates with respect to rigid-body motions. The method is applied to the complex α-helix↔β-sheet transition in a β-hairpin miniprotein in implicit solvent, which exhibits much of the complexity of conformational changes in proteins. Two transition paths are considered, one derived from a linear interpolant between the endpoint structures and the other derived from a targeted dynamics simulation. Two methods for computing the conformational free energy (FE) along the string are compared, a restrained method, and a tessellation method introduced by E. Vanden-Eijnden and M. Venturoli [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194103 (2009)]. It is found that obtaining meaningful free energy profiles using the present atom-based coordinates requires restricting sampling to a vicinity of the converged path, where the hyperplanar approximation to the isocommittor surface is sufficiently accurate. This sampling restriction can be easily achieved using restraints or constraints. The endpoint FE differences computed from the FE profiles are validated by comparison with previous calculations using a path-independent confinement method. The FE profiles are decomposed into the enthalpic and entropic contributions, and it is shown that the entropy difference contribution can be as large as 10 kcal/mol for intermediate regions along the path, compared to 15–20 kcal/mol for the enthalpy contribution. This result demonstrates that enthalpic barriers for transitions are offset by entropic contributions arising from the existence of different paths across a barrier. The possibility of using systematically coarse-grained representations of amino acids, in the spirit of multiple interaction site residue models, is proposed as a means to avoid ad hoc sampling restrictions to narrow transition tubes

  10. Driven interfaces in random media at finite temperature: existence of an anomalous zero-velocity phase at small external force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The motion of driven interfaces in random media at finite temperature T and small external force F is usually described by a linear displacement h{G}(t) approximately V(F,T)t at large times, where the velocity vanishes according to the creep formula as V(F,T) approximately e;{-K(T)F;{mu}} for F-->0 . In this paper, we question this picture on the specific example of the directed polymer in a two-dimensional random medium. We have recently shown [C. Monthus and T. Garel, J. Phys. A 41, 255002 (2008)] that its dynamics for F=0 can be analyzed in terms of a strong disorder renormalization procedure, where the distribution of renormalized barriers flows towards some "infinite disorder fixed point." In the present paper, we obtain that for small F , this "infinite disorder fixed point" becomes a "strong disorder fixed point" with an exponential distribution of renormalized barriers. The corresponding distribution of trapping times then only decays as a power law P(tau) approximately 1tau;{1+alpha} , where the exponent alpha(F,T) vanishes as alpha(F,T) proportional, variant F micro as F-->0 . Our conclusion is that in the small force region alpha(F,T)alpha(F,T)} , i.e., the asymptotic velocity vanishes V=0 . This analysis is confirmed by numerical simulations of a directed polymer with a metric constraint driven in a traps landscape. We moreover obtain that the roughness exponent, which is governed by the equilibrium value zeta{eq}=23 up to some large scale, becomes equal to zeta=1 at the largest scales.

  11. Thermal aging of traditional and additively manufactured foams: analysis by time-temperature-superposition, constitutive, and finite-element models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weisgraber, T. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Small, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lewicki, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Duoss, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spadaccini, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearson, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, T. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Maxwell, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Cellular solids or foams are a very important class of materials with diverse applications ranging from thermal insulation and shock absorbing support cushions, to light-weight structural and floatation components, and constitute crucial components in a large number of industries including automotive, aerospace, electronics, marine, biomedical, packaging, and defense. In many of these applications the foam material is subjected to long periods of continuous stress, which can, over time, lead to a permanent change in structure and a degradation in performance. In this report we summarize our modeling efforts to date on polysiloxane foam materials that form an important component in our systems. Aging of the materials was characterized by two measured quantities, i.e., compression set and load retention. Results of accelerated aging experiments were analyzed by an automated time-temperaturesuperposition (TTS) approach, which creates a master curve that can be used for long-term predictions (over decades) under ambient conditions. When comparing such master curves for traditional (stochastic) foams with those for recently 3D-printed (i.e., additively manufactured, or AM) foams, it became clear that AM foams have superior aging behavior. To gain deeper understanding, we imaged the microstructure of both foams using X-ray computed tomography, and performed finite-element analysis of the mechanical response within these microstructures. This indicates a wider stress variation in the stochastic foam with points of more extreme local stress as compared to the 3D printed material.

  12. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  13. Simultaneous optimization of monolayer formation factors, including temperature, to significantly improve nucleic acid hybridization efficiency on gold substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pris, Andrew D; Ostrowski, Sara G; Garaas, Sarah D

    2010-04-20

    Past literature investigations have optimized various single factors used in the formation of thiolated, single stranded DNA (ss-DNA) monolayers on gold. In this study a more comprehensive approach is taken, where a design of experiment (DOE) is employed to simultaneously optimize all of the factors involved in construction of the capture monolayer used in a fluorescence-based hybridization assay. Statistical analysis of the fluorescent intensities resulting from the DOE provides empirical evidence for the importance and the optimal levels of traditional and novel factors included in this investigation. We report on the statistical importance of a novel factor, temperature of the system during monolayer formation of the capture molecule and lateral spacer molecule, and how proper usage of this temperature factor increased the hybridization signal 50%. An initial theory of how the physical factor of heat is mechanistically supplementing the function of the lateral spacer molecule is provided.

  14. Multi-field coupling finite element analysis for determining the influence of temperature field on die service life during precision-forming process of steel synchronizer ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jun; Luo, Shan-Ming; Li, Feng-Qiang; Xu, Chen-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Failure analysis shows that increased die temperature caused by severe plastic deformation of material and heat conduction between hot billet and cavity significantly affects the distortion of gear cavity in steel synchronizer ring forging process. The forging process of steel synchronizer ring and die temperature distribution under different forging conditions are analyzed through finite element method. Simulation results show that severe plastic deformation occurs in the gear cavity. The improvement of lubrication condition results in decreased die temperature. When the initial billet temperature is high, the die temperature is also high. Increasing forging speed in a certain range facilitates the die temperature decrease. The distribution of die temperature in synthetic forming technology is more reasonable than that of one step forging. The synthetic forming technology is adopted in production to reduce the effects of severe plastic deformation caused by die temperature. The ejection mechanism and control system of the double disc friction press are improved to reduce the contact time between the hot billet and cavity. Experimental results show that synthetic forming technology is reasonable, and that the die service life is prolonged.

  15. Multi-field coupling finite element analysis for determining the influence of temperature field on die service life during precision-forming process of steel synchronizer ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun; Luo, Shan-Ming; Li, Feng-Qiang; Xu, Chen-Bing [Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen (China)

    2017-07-15

    Failure analysis shows that increased die temperature caused by severe plastic deformation of material and heat conduction between hot billet and cavity significantly affects the distortion of gear cavity in steel synchronizer ring forging process. The forging process of steel synchronizer ring and die temperature distribution under different forging conditions are analyzed through finite element method. Simulation results show that severe plastic deformation occurs in the gear cavity. The improvement of lubrication condition results in decreased die temperature. When the initial billet temperature is high, the die temperature is also high. Increasing forging speed in a certain range facilitates the die temperature decrease. The distribution of die temperature in synthetic forming technology is more reasonable than that of one step forging. The synthetic forming technology is adopted in production to reduce the effects of severe plastic deformation caused by die temperature. The ejection mechanism and control system of the double disc friction press are improved to reduce the contact time between the hot billet and cavity. Experimental results show that synthetic forming technology is reasonable, and that the die service life is prolonged.

  16. Recent Progress on Labfit: a Multispectrum Analysis Program for Fitting Lineshapes Including the Htp Model and Temperature Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cich, Matthew J.; Guillaume, Alexandre; Drouin, Brian; Benner, D. Chris

    2017-06-01

    Multispectrum analysis can be a challenge for a variety of reasons. It can be computationally intensive to fit a proper line shape model especially for high resolution experimental data. Band-wide analyses including many transitions along with interactions, across many pressures and temperatures are essential to accurately model, for example, atmospherically relevant systems. Labfit is a fast multispectrum analysis program originally developed by D. Chris Benner with a text-based interface. More recently at JPL a graphical user interface was developed with the goal of increasing the ease of use but also the number of potential users. The HTP lineshape model has been added to Labfit keeping it up-to-date with community standards. Recent analyses using labfit will be shown to demonstrate its ability to competently handle large experimental datasets, including high order lineshape effects, that are otherwise unmanageable.

  17. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard-Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids.

  18. Effects of temperature-dependent viscosity on fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical rectangular duct with a finite pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An incompressible fully developed laminar flow in a helical rectangular duct having finite pitch and curvature with temperature-dependent viscosity under heating condition is studied in this work. Both the cases of one wall heated and four walls heated are studied. The cross-sectional dimensions of the rectangular duct are 2a and 2b. The aspect ratio n=2b/2a is 0.5. Water is used as the fluid and Reynolds number (Re is varied in the range of 100 to 400. The secondary flow with temperature-dependent viscosity is enhanced markedly as compared to constant viscosity. An additional pair of vortices is obtained near the center of the outer wall at Re=400 for the model of four walls heated with temperature-dependent viscosity, y, while for constant viscosity, the appearance of two additional vortices near the outer wall cannot be found. Besides, the axial velocity decreases and the temperature increases at the central region of the rectangular duct when the temperature-dependent viscosity is considered. Due to the decrease of the viscosity near the walls, the friction factor obtained with temperature-dependent viscosity is lower than that of constant viscosity, while the convective heat transfer for temperature-dependent viscosity is significantly enhanced owing to the strengthened secondary flow. Especially for four heated walls, the effects of viscosity variation on the flow resistance and heat transfer are more significant.

  19. Inertial mass of the chiral quark-loop soliton in the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleif, M.; Wuensch, R.

    1996-04-01

    We consider the mass of the one-loop hedgehog soliton of the bosonized SU(2) Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model embedded in hot nuclear matter minimiced by a gas of constituent quarks. We prove that the proper-time regularized and self-consistently determined soliton in a heat bath obeys Poincare's invariance up order V 2 . At finite temperature and chemical potential, we show that the inertial mass obtained in the perturbative pushing approach coincides with the total internal energy of the soliton. (orig.)

  20. Implementation of constitutive equations for creep damage mechanics into the ABAQUS finite element code - some practical cases in high temperature component design and life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segle, P.; Samuelson, L.Aa.; Andersson, Peder; Moberg, F.

    1996-01-01

    Constitutive equations for creep damage mechanics are implemented into the finite element program ABAQUS using a user supplied subroutine, UMAT. A modified Kachanov-Rabotnov constitutive equation which accounts for inhomogeneity in creep damage is used. With a user defined material a number of bench mark tests are analyzed for verification. In the cases where analytical solutions exist, the numerical results agree very well. In other cases, the creep damage evolution response appear to be realistic in comparison with laboratory creep tests. The appropriateness of using the creep damage mechanics concept in design and life assessment of high temperature components is demonstrated. 18 refs

  1. NCEL: two dimensional finite element code for steady-state temperature distribution in seven rod-bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrehor, M.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an application of the finite element method to the heat transfer study in seven-pin models of LMFBR fuel subassembly. The developed code NCEL solves two-dimensional steady state heat conduction equation in the whole subassembly model cross-section and enebles to perform the analysis of thermal behaviour in both normal and accidental operational conditions as eccentricity of the central rod or full or partial (porous) blockage of some part of the cross-flow area. The heat removal is simulated by heat sinks in coolant under conditions of subchannels slug flow approximation

  2. Modelling of the material flow of Nd-Fe-B magnets under high temperature deformation via finite element simulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Lee, Yen-I; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Hsiao, Po-Jen; You, Jr-Shian; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wei, Chia-Min

    2017-01-01

    Hot deformation of Nd-Fe-B magnets has been studied for more than three decades. With a good combination of forming processing parameters, the remanence and (BH) max values of Nd-Fe-B magnets could be greatly increased due to the formation of anisotropic microstructures during hot deformation. In this work, a methodology is proposed for visualizing the material flow in hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets via finite element simulation. Material flow in hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets could be predicted by simulation, which fitted with experimental results. By utilizing this methodology, the correlation between strain distribution and magnetic properties enhancement could be better understood.

  3. Multi-parametric study of temperature and thermal damage of tumor exposed to high-frequency nanosecond-pulsed electric fields based on finite element simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yan; Rui, Shaoqin; Li, Chengxiang; Yao, Chenguo; Xu, Jin; Bian, Changhao; Tang, Xuefeng

    2017-07-01

    High-frequency nanosecond-pulsed electric fields were recently introduced for tumor or abnormal tissue ablation to solve some problems of conventional electroporation. However, it is necessary to study the thermal effects of high-field-intensity nanosecond pulses inside tissues. The multi-parametric analysis performed here is based on a finite element model of liver tissue with a tumor that has been punctured by a pair of needle electrodes. The pulse voltage used in this study ranges from 1 to 4 kV, the pulse width ranges from 50 to 500 ns, and the repetition frequency is between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. The total pulse length is 100 μs, and the pulse burst repetition frequency is 1 Hz. Blood flow and metabolic heat generation have also been considered. Results indicate that the maximum instantaneous temperature at 100 µs can reach 49 °C, with a maximum instantaneous temperature at 1 s of 40 °C, and will not cause thermal damage during single pulse bursts. By parameter fitting, we can obtain maximum instantaneous temperature at 100 µs and 1 s for any parameter values. However, higher temperatures will be achieved and may cause thermal damage when multiple pulse bursts are applied. These results provide theoretical basis of pulse parameter selection for future experimental researches.

  4. Finite strain anisotropic elasto-plastic model for the simulation of the forming and testing of metal/short fiber reinforced polymer clinch joints at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, A.; Rolfes, R.; Behrens, A.; Bouguecha, A.; Hübner, S.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.

    2017-10-01

    There is a strong trend in the automotive industry to reduce car body-, chassis- and power-train mass in order to lower carbon emissions. More wide spread use of lightweight short fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) is a promising approach to attain this goal. This poses the challenge of how to integrate new SFRP components by joining them to traditional sheet metal structures. Recently (1), the clinching technique has been successfully applied as a suitable joining method for dissimilar material such as SFRP and Aluminum. The material pairing PA6GF30 and EN AW 5754 is chosen for this purpose due to their common application in industry. The current contribution presents a verification and validation of a finite strain anisotropic material model for SFRP developed in (2) for the FE simulation of the hybrid clinching process. The finite fiber rotation during forming and separation, and thus the change of the preferential material direction, is represented in this model. Plastic deformations in SFRP are considered in this model via an invariant based non-associated plasticity formulation following the multiplicative decomposition approach of the deformation gradient where the stress-free intermediate configuration is introduced. The model allows for six independent characterization curves. The aforementioned material model allows for a detailed simulation of the forming process as well as a simulative prediction of the shear test strength of the produced joint at room temperature.

  5. 3D finite element simulation of temperature distribution, residual stress and distortion on 304 stainless steel plates using GTA welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatkumar, D.; Ravindran, D. [National Engineering College, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    In the present study, the distortion induced in rectangular plate of AISI 304 SS during autogenous GTA welding process is measured experimentally and further validated using Finite element (FE) analysis. The thermal histories are measured at fixed locations over the surface of the plate and the results are compared with FE analysis. The Gaussian surface and Volumetric heat source models are simulated and transient heat transfer analysis is performed. The heat source models have been tested with two different speeds. The effectiveness of change in thermal histories of the heat sources have been studied and reported. In FE analysis, the sequentially coupled thermomechanical analysis is performed using the thermal histories as input and the distortion of the plates are predicted and compared with experimental measurements. The large and small displacement theories are employed for the above purpose and the effectiveness of the theories are reported. The edge deformation of the plates have been measured and validated for both the theories. The residual stress and distortion at the mid span are predicted and discussed. The results predicted using large displacement theory is in good agreement with measured values.

  6. Magnetism and thermodynamic properties of a spin-1/2 ferrimagnetic diamond XY chain in magnetic fields at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Tai-Min; Ma, Yan-Ming; Ge, Chong-Yuan; Sun, Shu-Sheng; Jia, Wei-Ye; Li, Qing-Yun; Shi, Xiao-Fei; Li, Lin; Zhu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    The elementary excitation spectra of a one-dimensional ferrimagnetic diamond chain in the spin-1/2 XY model at low temperatures have been calculated by using an invariant eigen-operator (IEO) method, the energies of elementary excitations in different specific cases are discussed, and the analytic solutions of three critical magnetic field intensities (H C1 , H C2 , and H peak ) are given. The magnetization versus external magnetic field curve displays a 1/3 magnetization plateau at low temperatures, in which H C1 is the critical magnetic field intensity from the disappearance of the 1/3 magnetization plateau to spin-flop states, H C2 is the critical magnetic field intensity from spin-flop states to the saturation magnetization, and H peak is the critical magnetic field intensity when the temperature magnetization shows a peak in the external magnetic field. The temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat show a double peak structure. The entropy and the magnetic susceptibility versus external magnetic field curves also exhibit a double peak structure, and the positions of the two peaks correspond to H C1 and H C2 , respectively. This derives from the competition among different types of energies: the temperature-dependent thermal disorder energy, the potential energy of the spin magnetic moment, the ferromagnetic exchange interaction energy, and the anti-ferromagnetic exchange interaction energy. However at low temperatures, the specific heat as a function of external magnetic field curve exhibits minima at the above two critical points (H C1 and H C2 ). The origins of the above phenomena are discussed in detail.

  7. Finite-temperature second-order many-body perturbation and Hartree–Fock theories for one-dimensional solids: An application to Peierls and charge-density-wave transitions in conjugated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao; Ryu, Shinsei; Hirata, So

    2014-01-01

    Finite-temperature extensions of ab initio Gaussian-basis-set spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (HF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories are implemented for infinitely extended, periodic, one-dimensional solids and applied to the Peierls and charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene. The HF theory predicts insulating CDW ground states for both systems in their equidistant structures at low temperatures. In the same structures, they turn metallic at high temperatures. Starting from the “dimerized” low-temperature equilibrium structures, the systems need even higher temperatures to undergo a Peierls transition, which is accompanied by geometric as well as electronic distortions from dimerized to non-dimerized forms. The conventional finite-temperature MP2 theory shows a sign of divergence in any phase at any nonzero temperature and is useless. The renormalized finite-temperature MP2 (MP2R) theory is divergent only near metallic electronic structures, but is well behaved elsewhere. MP2R also predicts CDW and Peierls transitions occurring at two different temperatures. The effect of electron correlation is primarily to lower the Peierls transition temperature

  8. Experimental and finite element study of the effect of temperature and moisture on the tangential tensile strength and fracture behavior in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2014-01-01

    to a moisture content (MC) of 18% before TSt tests at 20°C, 60°C, and 90°C were carried out. The maximum stress results of the disc simulations by FEM were compared with the experimental strength results at the same temperature levels. There is a rather good agreement between the results of modeling......Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments...... and numerical simulations by finite element modeling (FEM) concerning the TSt and fracture behavior of Norway spruce under various climatic conditions. Thin log disc specimens were studied to simplify the description of the moisture flow in the samples. The specimens designed for TS were acclimatized...

  9. Finite Element Modelling of the effect of tool rake angle on tool temperature and cutting force during high speed machining of AISI 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, S.; Roshan, A.; Ariffin, M. K. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a Finite Element Method (FEM) based on the ABAQUS explicit software which involves Johnson-Cook material model was used to simulate cutting force and tool temperature during high speed machining (HSM) of AISI 4340 steel. In this simulation work, a tool rake angle ranging from 0° to 20° and a range of cutting speeds between 300 to 550 m/min was investigated. The purpose of this simulation analysis was to find optimum tool rake angle where cutting force is smallest as well as tool temperature is lowest during high speed machining. It was found that cutting forces to have a decreasing trend as rake angle increased to positive direction. The optimum rake angle observed between 10° and 18° due to decrease of cutting force as 20% for all simulated cutting speeds. In addition, increasing cutting tool rake angle over its optimum value had negative influence on tool's performance and led to an increase in cutting temperature. The results give a better understanding and recognition of the cutting tool design for high speed machining processes.

  10. Two-dimensional finite difference model to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise in cold climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Babita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-02-01

    Thermoregulation is a complex mechanism regulating heat production within the body (chemical thermoregulation) and heat exchange between the body and the environment (physical thermoregulation) in such a way that the heat exchange is balanced and deep body temperatures are relatively stable. The external heat transfer mechanisms are radiation, conduction, convection and evaporation. The physical activity causes thermal stress and poses challenges for this thermoregulation. In this paper, a model has been developed to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise under cold climate. It is assumed that the subject is doing exercise initially and comes to rest at time t = 0. The human limb is assumed to be of cylindrical shape. The peripheral region of limb is divided into three natural components namely epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues (SST). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on the physical conditions of the problem. Finite difference has been employed for time, radial and angular variables. The numerical results have been used to obtain temperature profiles in the SST region immediately after continuous exercise for a two-dimensional unsteady state case. The results have been used to analyze the thermal stress in relation to light, moderate and vigorous intensity exercise.

  11. Numerical Evaluation of Temperature Field and Residual Stresses in an API 5L X80 Steel Welded Joint Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailson A. Da Nóbrega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic materials undergo many metallurgical changes when subjected to welding thermal cycles, and these changes have a considerable influence on the thermo-mechanical properties of welded structures. One method for evaluating the welding thermal cycle variables, while still in the project phase, would be simulation using computational methods. This paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field and residual stresses in a multipass weld of API 5L X80 steel, which is extensively used in oil and gas industry, using the Finite Element Method (FEM. In the simulation, the following complex phenomena were considered: the variation in physical and mechanical properties of the material as a function of the temperature, welding speed and convection and radiation mechanisms. Additionally, in order to characterize a multipass weld using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process for the root pass and the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes, the analytical heat source proposed by Goldak and Chakravarti was used. In addition, we were able to analyze the influence of the mesh refinement in the simulation results. The findings indicated a significant variation of about 50% in the peak temperature values. Furthermore, changes were observed in terms of the level and profile of the welded joint residual stresses when more than one welding pass was considered.

  12. Introduction to the theory and application of a unified Bohm criterion for arbitrary-ion-temperature collision-free plasmas with finite Debye lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, L.; Jelić, N.; Kuhn, S.; Tskhakaya, D. D.

    2018-04-01

    At present, identifying and characterizing the common plasma-sheath edge (PSE) in the conventional fluid approach leads to intrinsic oversimplifications, while the kinetic one results in unusable over-generalizations. In addition, none of these approaches can be justified in realistic plasmas, i.e., those which are characterized by non-negligible Debye lengths and a well-defined non-negligible ion temperature. In an attempt to resolve this problem, we propose a new formulation of the Bohm criterion [D. Bohm, The Characteristics of Electrical Discharges in Magnetic Fields (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1949)], which is here expressed in terms of fluid, kinetic, and electrostatic-pressure contributions. This "unified" Bohm criterion consists of a set of two equations for calculating the ion directional energy (i.e., the mean directional velocity) and the plasma potential at the common PSE, and is valid for arbitrary ion-to-electron temperature ratios. It turns out to be exact at any point of the quasi-neutral plasma provided that the ion differential polytropic coefficient function (DPCF) of Kuhn et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 013503 (2006)] is employed, with the advantage that the DPCF is an easily measurable fluid quantity. Moreover, our unified Bohm criterion holds in plasmas with finite Debye lengths, for which the famous kinetic criterion formulated by Harrison and Thompson [Proc. Phys. Soc. 74, 145 (1959)] fails. Unlike the kinetic criterion in the case of negligible Debye length, the kinetic contribution to the unified Bohm criterion, arising due to the presence of negative and zero velocities in the ion velocity distribution function, can be calculated separately from the fluid term. This kinetic contribution disappears identically at the PSE, yielding strict equality of the ion directional velocity there and the ion sound speed, provided that the latter is formulated in terms of the present definition of DPCFs. The numerical values of these velocities are found for the

  13. Department of Physics, Nara Women's University, Nara 630, Japan: Learning from stochastic rules under finite temperature - optimal temperature and asymptotic learning curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezu, Tatsuya

    1997-11-01

    In learning under external disturbance, it is expected that some tolerance in the system will optimize the learning process. In this paper, we give one example of this in learning from stochastic rules by the Gibbs algorithm. Using the replica method, we show that for the case of output noise, there exists an optimal temperature at which the generalization error is a minimum. This temperature exists even in the limit of large training sets and is determined by the stable replica symmetric solution. On the other hand, for other types of noise no such temperature exists and the asymptotic behaviour is determined by the one-step replica symmetric breaking solution. Further, the asymptotic expressions for learning curves are derived. They are precisely the same as those for the minimum-error algorithm.

  14. Melting and freezing in a finite slab due to a linearly decreasing free-stream temperature of a convective boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roday Anand P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional melting and freezing problem in a finite slab with time-dependent convective boundary condition is solved using the heat-balance integral method. The temperature, T4 1(t, is applied at the left face and decreases linearly with time while the other face of the slab is imposed with a constant convective boundary condition where T4 2 is held at a fixed temperature. In this study, the initial condition of the solid is subcooled (initial temperature is below the melting point. The temperature, T4 1(t at time t = 0 is so chosen such that convective heating takes place and eventually the slab begins to melt (i. e., T4 1(0 > Tf > T4 2. The transient heat conduction problem, until the phase-change starts, is also solved using the heat-balance integral method. Once phase-change process starts, the solid-liquid interface is found to proceed to the right. As time continues, and T4,1(t decreases with time, the phase-change front slows, stops, and may even reverse direction. Hence this problem features sequential melting and freezing of the slab with partial penetration of the solid-liquid front before reversal of the phase-change process. The effect of varying the Biot number at the right face of the slab is investigated to determine its impact on the growth/recession of the solid-liquid interface. Temperature profiles in solid and liquid regions for the different cases are reported in detail. One of the results for Biot number, Bi2=1.5 are also compared with those obtained by having a constant value of T4 1(t.

  15. Calculation of the magnetic anisotropy energy and finite-temperature magnetic properties of transition-metal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay-Alonso, R; Villasenor-Gonzalez, P; Dorantes-Davila, J; Pastor, G M

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy at the interface (IMAE) of Co films deposited on the Pd(111) surface are determined in the framework of a self-consistent, real-space tight-binding method at zero temperature. Significant spin moments are induced at the Pd atoms at the interface which have an important influence on the observed reorientation transitions as a function of Co film thickness. Film-substrate hybridizations are therefore crucial for the magneto-anisotropic behaviour of thin transition-metal films deposited on metallic non-magnetic substrates. Furthermore, using a real-space recursive expansion of the local Green function and within the virtual-crystal approximation we calculate the magnetization curves and the Curie temperature T C for free-standing Fe films

  16. Calculation of the magnetic anisotropy energy and finite-temperature magnetic properties of transition-metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibay-Alonso, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Villasenor-Gonzalez, P [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Dorantes-Davila, J [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Pastor, G M [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, UMR 5626 du CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    2004-06-09

    The magnetic anisotropy energy at the interface (IMAE) of Co films deposited on the Pd(111) surface are determined in the framework of a self-consistent, real-space tight-binding method at zero temperature. Significant spin moments are induced at the Pd atoms at the interface which have an important influence on the observed reorientation transitions as a function of Co film thickness. Film-substrate hybridizations are therefore crucial for the magneto-anisotropic behaviour of thin transition-metal films deposited on metallic non-magnetic substrates. Furthermore, using a real-space recursive expansion of the local Green function and within the virtual-crystal approximation we calculate the magnetization curves and the Curie temperature T{sub C} for free-standing Fe films.

  17. Effects of finite temperature on two-photon transitions in a Rydberg atom in a high-Q cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.R.; Joshi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cavity temperature on an effective two-level atom undergoing two-photon transitions in a high-Q cavity are investigated. The quantum statistical properties of the field and the dynamical properties of the atom in this case are studied and compared with those for an atom making one-photon transitions between the two levels. The analysis is based on the solution of the equation for the density matrix in the secular approximation which is known to be a valid approximation in the case of a Rydberg atom in a high-Q cavity. (orig.)

  18. Spin-orbit coupling and applied magnetic field effects on electromagnetically induced transparency of a quantum ring at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Setareh, F.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2018-03-01

    A wide variety of semiconductor nanostructures have been fabricated and studied experimentally and alongside theoretical investigations show the great role they have in new generation opto-electronic devices. However, mathematical modeling provide important information due to their definitive goal of predicting features and understanding of such structures' behavior under different circumstances. Hence, in the current work, the effects of applied magnetic field, temperature and dimensions of the structure on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a GaAs quantum ring are studied while both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) are taken into account. The Schrödinger equation is solved in cylindrical coordinate with axial symmetry and in order to study the EIT, the imaginary (absorption) and real (refractive index) parts of susceptibility as well as the group velocity of the probe light pulse are investigated. The absorption and refractive index plots show that, for a specific frequency of probe field the absorption vanishes and refractive index becomes unity (known as EIT) while around such frequency the group index is positive (sub-luminal probe propagation) and for higher and lower frequencies it alters to negative (super-luminal probe propagation). The numerical results reveal that the EIT frequency, transparency window and sub(super)-luminal frequency intervals shift as we change applied magnetic field, temperature and also the structure dimensions.

  19. Magnetic materials at finite temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenbach, Markus [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perera, Meewanage Dilina N. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Center for Simulational Physics; Landau, David P [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Center for Simulational Physics; Nicholson, Don M. [Univ. of North Carolina, Asheville, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Yin, Junqi [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). National Inst. for Computational Sciences; Brown, Greg [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles-derived simulations.

  20. The contact-temperature ignition (CTI) criteria for propagating chemical reactions including the effect of moisture and application to Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    To assure the continued absence of uncontrolled condensed-phase chemical reactions in connection with the Hanford waste materials, efforts have been underway including both theoretical and experimental investigations to clarify the requirements for such reactions. This document defines the differences and requirements for homogeneous runaway and propagating chemical reactions incuding a discussion of general contact-temperature ignition (CTI) condition for propagating reactions that include the effect of moisture. The CTI condition implies that the contact temperature or interface temperature between reacted and unreacted materials must exceed the ignition temperature and is compared to experimental data including both synthetic ferrocyanide and surrogate organic materials. In all cases, the occurrences of ignition accompanied by self-propagating reactions are consistent with the theoretical anticipations of the CTI condition

  1. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  2. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  3. Electron–phonon coupling from finite differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2018-02-01

    The interaction between electrons and phonons underlies multiple phenomena in physics, chemistry, and materials science. Examples include superconductivity, electronic transport, and the temperature dependence of optical spectra. A first-principles description of electron–phonon coupling enables the study of the above phenomena with accuracy and material specificity, which can be used to understand experiments and to predict novel effects and functionality. In this topical review, we describe the first-principles calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences. The finite differences approach provides several advantages compared to alternative methods, in particular (i) any underlying electronic structure method can be used, and (ii) terms beyond the lowest order in the electron–phonon interaction can be readily incorporated. But these advantages are associated with a large computational cost that has until recently prevented the widespread adoption of this method. We describe some recent advances, including nondiagonal supercells and thermal lines, that resolve these difficulties, and make the calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences a powerful tool. We review multiple applications of the calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences, including the temperature dependence of optical spectra, superconductivity, charge transport, and the role of defects in semiconductors. These examples illustrate the advantages of finite differences, with cases where semilocal density functional theory is not appropriate for the calculation of electron–phonon coupling and many-body methods such as the GW approximation are required, as well as examples in which higher-order terms in the electron–phonon interaction are essential for an accurate description of the relevant phenomena. We expect that the finite difference approach will play a central role in future studies of the electron–phonon interaction.

  4. Using density functional theory to describe slowly varying fluctuations at finite temperatures: local magnetic moments in Gd and the 'not so local' moments of Ni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Julie B; Marmodoro, Alberto; Ernst, Arthur

    2014-07-09

    We briefly describe the density functional theory (DFT)-based 'disordered local moment' (DLM) picture for magnetism at finite temperatures. It shows how relatively slowly fluctuating local moments can emerge from the interacting electrons of many materials. Such entities have rigid magnitudes and fluctuate their orientations from atomic site to atomic site on a timescale long compared to other electronic times. We illustrate this theory with calculations of the magnetocaloric effect in Gd where we find excellent agreement with experiments. Fluctuating moments do not appear to establish naturally over such small regions for some other materials. We show how the DFT-DLM theory can be extended to these materials with the use of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonlocal coherent potential approximation (KKR-NLCPA) to allow for more extensive, slow magnetic fluctuations. We present the first application of this approach by revisiting the description of the magnetic fluctuations prevalent in the paramagnetic state of nickel. We find that local moments can emerge above Tc and that these form coherently over small clumps of atomic sites (4-8 sites).

  5. Using density functional theory to describe slowly varying fluctuations at finite temperatures: local magnetic moments in Gd and the ‘not so local’ moments of Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Julie B.; Marmodoro, Alberto; Ernst, Arthur

    2014-07-01

    We briefly describe the density functional theory (DFT)-based ‘disordered local moment’ (DLM) picture for magnetism at finite temperatures. It shows how relatively slowly fluctuating local moments can emerge from the interacting electrons of many materials. Such entities have rigid magnitudes and fluctuate their orientations from atomic site to atomic site on a timescale long compared to other electronic times. We illustrate this theory with calculations of the magnetocaloric effect in Gd where we find excellent agreement with experiments. Fluctuating moments do not appear to establish naturally over such small regions for some other materials. We show how the DFT-DLM theory can be extended to these materials with the use of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonlocal coherent potential approximation (KKR-NLCPA) to allow for more extensive, slow magnetic fluctuations. We present the first application of this approach by revisiting the description of the magnetic fluctuations prevalent in the paramagnetic state of nickel. We find that local moments can emerge above Tc and that these form coherently over small clumps of atomic sites (4-8 sites).

  6. Finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, J.I.; Landshoff, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    Particle number is not conserved in relativistic theories although both lepton and baryon number are. Therefore when discussing the thermodynamics of a quantum field theory one uses the grand canonical formalism. The entropy S is maximised, keeping fixed the ensemble averages E and N of energy and lepton number. Two lagrange multipliers are introduced. (author)

  7. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  8. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India. Abstract. We review two ... tem, from which its energy density, pressure etc. can be obtained. But to describe the heavy-ion ... quantity follows the same steps as for its vacuum counterpart, with the replacement of free vacuum propagators by free ...

  9. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules. We show that, when the spectral sides of the sum rules are calculated correctly, they do not lead to any new results, but reproduce those of the vacuum sum rules.

  10. finite induc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    com. Email: singh_shivaraj@rediffmail.com. In this article we provide a solution to a problem in the famous analysis book [1] by Rudin. It does not use trans- finite induction, and readers may find it more transpar- ent than the treatment in [2]. Here is ...

  11. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  12. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  13. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  14. [Antibacterial actin of vinegar against food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Part 2). Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on bactericidal activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entani, E; Asai, M; Tsujihata, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Ohta, M

    1997-05-01

    Bactericidal effects of various kinds of AWASEZU (processed vinegar, 2.5% acidity) on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other bacteria were examined. the order of bactericidal activities was NIHAIZU (3.5% NaCl was added) > SANBA-IZU (3.5% NaCl and 10% sucrose were added) > plain vinegar (spirit vinegar) > AMAZU (10% sucrose was added). This indicates that their activities were enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride and suppressed by the addition of sugar. On the other hand, when soy sauce was used instead of sodium chloride, the order of bactericidal activities was plain vinegar > AMAZU > NIHAIZU > SANBAIZU. This is mainly because their activities were suppressed by the increase in the pH value. The effect of sodium chloride (0.01-15%) and temperature (10-50 degrees C) on bactericidal activities against E. coli O157:H7 in spirit vinegar (0.5-2.5% acidity) was further examined. When vinegar was used in combination with sodium chloride, predominant synergism on the bactericidal activity was observed. Their activities were markedly enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride in proportion to the concentration. In addition to this, at higher temperatures spirit vinegar killed bacteria much more rapidly. It should be noted that the bactericidal activity of spirit vinegar was extremely enhanced by the combined use of the addition of sodium chloride and the rise of temperature. For example, in 2.5% acidity vinegar, the time required for 3 log decrease in viable cell numbers at 20 degrees C was shortened to 1/140-fold by the addition of 5% sodium chloride, shortened to 1/51-fold by the rise of the reaction temperature at 40 degrees C, and shortened to 1/830-fold; 0.89 minutes by both the addition of 5% sodium chloride and the rise of temperature at 40 degrees C. In order to propose the methods to prevent food poisoning by bacterial infection, bactericidal activities of vinegar solution containing sodium chloride on cooking tools and

  15. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly Negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Lisonek, P.; Markvorsen, Steen

    1998-01-01

    We prove that, if a finite metric space is of strictly negative type, then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by the infinite extender (load vector). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all spaces on two, three, or four points, all trees, and all finite subspaces of Eu...

  16. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R and D resulted in 7 R and D 100 Awards including the 2010 R and D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  17. A contribution to quantum cryptography in finite-dimensional systems including further results from the field of quantum information theory; Ein Beitrag zur Quantenkryptographie in endlichdimensionalen Systemen nebst weiteren Ergebnissen aus dem Gebiet der Quanteninformationstheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranade, Kedar S.

    2009-02-04

    This PhD thesis deals with quantum-cryptographic protocols which allow general finite-dimensional quantum systems (qudits) as carriers of information in contrast to the predominantly used two-dimensional quantum systems (qubits). The main focus of investigations is the maximum tolerable error rate of such protocols and its behaviour as a function of the dimension of the information carriers. For this purpose, several concepts are introduced which allow the treatment of this problem. In particular, protocols are presented which work up to a maximum tolerate error rate, and it is shown that a wide class of protocols cannot be used for higher error rates. Among other things, it turns out that the maximum tolerable error rate for two-basis protocols increases up to 50% for high dimensions. Apart from the above-mentioned main subjects of this thesis, some other results from the field of quantum information theory are given, which were achieved during this PhD project. (orig.)

  18. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  19. Finite size scaling and lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Finite size (Fisher) scaling is investigated for four dimensional SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories without quarks. It allows to disentangle violations of (asymptotic) scaling and finite volume corrections. Mass spectrum, string tension, deconfinement temperature and lattice β-function are considered. For appropriate volumes, Monte Carlo investigations seem to be able to control the finite volume continuum limit. Contact is made with Luescher's small volume expansion and possibly also with the asymptotic large volume behavior. 41 refs., 19 figs

  20. Screening mutations of OTOF gene in Chinese patients with auditory neuropathy, including a familial case of temperature-sensitive auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict-Alderfer Cindy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in OTOF gene, encoding otoferlin, cause DFNB9 deafness and non-syndromic auditory neuropathy (AN. The aim of this study is to identify OTOF mutations in Chinese patients with non-syndromic auditory neuropathy. Methods 73 unrelated Chinese Han patients with AN, including one case of temperature sensitive non-syndromic auditory neuropathy (TS-NSRAN and 92 ethnicity-matched controls with normal hearing were screened. Forty-five pairs of PCR primers were designed to amplify all of the exons and their flanking regions of the OTOF gene. The PCR products were sequenced and analyzed for mutation identification. Results Five novel possibly pathogenic variants (c.1740delC, c.2975_2978delAG, c.1194T>A, c.1780G>A, c.4819C > T were identified in the group of 73 AN patients, in which two novel mutant alleles (c.2975_2978delAG + c.4819C > T were identified in one Chinese TS-NSRAN case. Besides, 10 non-pathogenic variants of the OTOF gene were found in AN patients and controls. Conclusions Screening revealed that mutations in the OTOF gene account for AN in 4 of 73(5.5% sporadic AN patients, which shows a lower genetic load of that gene in contrast to the previous studies based on other populations. Notably, we found two novel mutant alleles related to temperature sensitive non-syndromic auditory neuropathy. This mutation screening study further confirms that the OTOF gene contributes to ANs and to TS-NSRAN.

  1. Applications of the KKR-DCA: A Finite-Temperature Density Functional Theory to Predict Chemical Short-Range Order Effects in Disordered Metallic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biava, D. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2009-03-01

    Short-range order (SRO) is ubiquitous in metallic alloys, affecting changes in their electronic, thermodynamic, mechanical, magnetic, and structural properties. For example, SRO is responsible for the yield-strength anomalies observed in Cu-Al at high temperatures, i.e., the materials is more resistant to dislocation motion at high temperature than it is at room temperature. Within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostorker (KKR) electronic-structure method, we present results using the dynamical cluster approximations (DCA) to obtain the temperature-dependent SRO in disordered alloys. We obtain the KKR-DCA SRO energetics versus local neighbor SRO parameters and minimize it at fixed temperature to predict the SRO. We show that the calculated SRO at fixed temperature compares well with available experimental results, and then correlate the results to the electronic structure. We discuss how an accurate analytic estimate can be made for the SRO in most metals due to the dependence of the grand potential on SRO.

  2. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  3. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  4. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...... matrix of a finite metric space is both hypermetric and regular, then it is of strictly negative type. We show that the strictly negative type finite subspaces of spheres are precisely those which do not contain two pairs of antipodal points....

  5. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  6. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmenhove, B.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2003-09-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous.

  7. Real-time temperature control system based on the finite element method for liver radiofrequency ablation: effect of the time interval on control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yosuke; Watanabe, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Nozomu; Lu, XiaoWei; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hashizume, Makoto; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is increasingly being used to treat liver cancer because it is minimally invasive. However, it is difficult for operators to control the size of the coagulation zones precisely, because no method has been established to form an adequate and suitable ablation area. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new system that can control the coagulation zone size. The system operates as follows: 1) the liver temperature is estimated using a temperature-distribution simulator to reduce invasiveness; 2) the output power of the RF generator is controlled automatically according to the liver temperature. To use this system in real time, both the time taken to calculate the temperature in the simulation and the control accuracy are important. We therefore investigated the relationship between the time interval required to change the output voltage and temperature control stability in RF ablation. The results revealed that the proposed method can control the temperature at a point away from the electrode needle to obtain the desired ablation size. It was also shown to be necessary to reduce the time interval when small tumors are cauterized to avoid excessive treatment. In contrast, such high frequency feedback control is not required when large tumors are cauterized.

  8. Standard and routine metabolic rates of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus), including the effects of body mass and acute temperature change

    OpenAIRE

    Dowd, William Wesley; Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G; Musick, J A

    2006-01-01

    Standard and routine metabolic rates (SMRs and RMRs, respectively) of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus) were measured over a range of body sizes (n=34) and temperatures normally associated with western Atlantic coastal nursery areas. The mean SMR Q(10) (increase in metabolic rate with temperature) was 2.9 +/- 0.2. Heart rate decreased with increasing body mass but increased with temperature at a Q(10) of 1.8-2.2. Self-paired measures of SMR and RMR were obtained for 15 individua...

  9. Finite Element Model of Gear Induction Hardening

    OpenAIRE

    Hodek, J; Zemko, M; Shykula, P

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a finite element model of a gear induction hardening process. The gear was surface-heated by an induction coil and quickly cooled by spraying water. The finite element model was developed as a three-dimensional model. The electromagnetic field, temperature field, stress distribution and microstructure distribution were examined. Temperature and microstructural characteristics were measured and used. The gear material data was obtained in part by mea...

  10. Large magnetic coils-design accompanying calculation and optimization. Regarding orthotropic interlayers, temperature and elastic supports-derivation of a special finite element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzer, J.F.; Sievers, A.; Welzel, R.

    1976-10-01

    This paper deals with finite element calculations of large coils as they are used as main coils in Tokamaks. They consist of copper layers with glass fibre reinforced resin interlayers inbedded in a strong steel ring. In a first analysis model the several epoxy layers are condensed to only one the tickness of which is equal to the sum of the single sizes. This fictitious layer is assumed to lie in the middle of the copper and is treated as an orthotropic material. In a following changed model the epoxy layer is situated between the steel ring and the copper. In this location the epoxy was suspected to suffer from the highest shear stresses. Both models employ springy trusses as supporting features which simulate the real elastic behaviour of a sustaining vault. Special attentions are given a) to the shear stresses in the epoxy, b) to the hot and cold states of the coils, and c) to the forces transferred from the coils to the sustaining vault. An optimal structure design is carried out concerning the steel ring. (orig./GG) [de

  11. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: bramiozo@gmail.com [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  12. Prediction of temperature and damage in an irradiated human eye-Utilization of a detailed computer model which includes a vectorial blood stream in the choroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussner, Nico; Holl, Lukas; Nowak, Timo; Beuth, Thorsten; Spitzer, Martin S; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-08-01

    The work presented here describes the development and use of a three-dimensional thermo-dynamic model of the human eye for the prediction of temperatures and damage thresholds under irradiation. This model takes into account the blood flow by the implementation of a vectorial blood stream in the choroid and also uses the actual physiological extensions and tissue parameters of the eye. Furthermore it considers evaporation, radiation and convection at the cornea as well as the eye lid. The predicted temperatures were successfully validated against existing eye models in terms of corneal and global thermal behaviour. The model׳s predictions were additionally checked for consistency with in-vivo temperature measurements of the cornea, the irradiated retina and its damage thresholds. These thresholds were calculated from the retinal temperatures using the Arrhenius integral. Hence the model can be used to predict the temperature increase and irradiation hazard within the human eye as long as the absorption values and the Arrhenius coefficients are known and the damage mechanism is in the thermal regime. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oscillations of the static meson fields at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Friman, B.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1996-04-01

    The spatial dependence of static meson correlation functions at finite baryon density is studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In contrast to the finite temperature case, we find that the correlation functions at finite density are not screened but exhibit long-range oscillations. The observed phenomenon is analogous to the Friedel oscillations in a degenerate electron gas. (orig.)

  14. Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Membré, J.M.; Leporq, B.; Vialette, M.; Mettler, E.; Perrier, L.; Thuault, D.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one

  15. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  16. The effects of different nano particles of Al2O3 and Ag on the MHD nano fluid flow and heat transfer in a microchannel including slip velocity and temperature jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimipour, Arash; D'Orazio, Annunziata; Shadloo, Mostafa Safdari

    2017-02-01

    The forced convection of nanofluid flow in a long microchannel is studied numerically according to the finite volume approach and by using a developed computer code. Microchannel domain is under the influence of a magnetic field with uniform strength. The hot inlet nanofluid is cooled by the heat exchange with the cold microchannel walls. Different types of nanoparticles such as Al2O3 and Ag are examined while the base fluid is considered as water. Reynolds number are chosen as Re=10 and Re=100. Slip velocity and temperature jump boundary conditions are simulated along the microchannel walls at different values of slip coefficient for different amounts of Hartmann number. The investigation of magnetic field effect on slip velocity and temperature jump of nanofluid is presented for the first time. The results are shown as streamlines and isotherms; moreover the profiles of slip velocity and temperature jump are drawn. It is observed that more slip coefficient corresponds to less Nusselt number and more slip velocity especially at larger Hartmann number. It is recommended to use Al2O3-water nanofluid instead of Ag-water to increase the heat transfer rate from the microchannel walls at low values of Re. However at larger amounts of Re, the nanofluid composed of nanoparticles with higher thermal conductivity works better.

  17. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  18. Finite element model of magnetoconvection of a ferrofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.M.; Cader, Tahir; Finlayson, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined natural and magnetic convective heat transfer through a ferrofluid in a cubic enclosure is simulated numerically. The momentum equation includes a magnetic term that arises when a magnetic fluid is in the presence of a magnetic field gradient and a temperature gradient. In order to validate the theory, the wall temperature isotherms and Nusselt numbers are compared to experimental work of Sawada et al. (Int. J. Appl. Electromagn. Mater. 4 (1994) 329). Results are obtained using standard computational fluid dynamics codes, with modifications to account for the Langevin factor when needed. The CFD code FIDAP uses the finite element method, sometimes with a user-defined subroutine. The CFD code FEMLAB uses the finite element method with a user-supplied body force

  19. The pion quasiparticle in the low-temperature phase of QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt Bastian B.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend our previous studies [PhysRevD.90.054509, PhysRevD.92.094510] of the pion quasiparticle in the low-temperature phase of two-flavor QCD with support from chiral effective theory. This includes the analysis performed on a finite temperature ensemble of size 20 × 643 at T ≈ 151MeV and a lighter zero-temperature pion mass mπ ≈ 185 MeV. Furthermore, we investigate the Gell-Mann–Oakes-Renner relation at finite temperature and the Dey-Eletsky-Ioffe mixing theorem at finite quark mass.

  20. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  1. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    plitude waves and finite amplitude waves. This article provides a brief introduction to finite amplitude wave theories. Some of the general characteristics of waves as well as the importance of finite amplitude wave theories are touched upon. 2. Small Amplitude Waves. The topmost and the lowest levels of the waves are re-.

  2. Mathematical model for predicting topographical properties of poly (ε-caprolactone) melt electrospun scaffolds including the effects of temperature and linear transitional speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Junghyuk; Mohtaram, Nima Khadem; Willerth, Stephanie M; Jun, Martin B G; Lee, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Melt electrospinning can be used to fabricate various fibrous biomaterial scaffolds with a range of mechanical properties and varying topographical properties for different applications such as tissue scaffold and filtration and etc, making it a powerful technique. Engineering the topography of such electrospun microfibers can be easily done by tuning the operational parameters of this process. Recent experimental studies have shown promising results for fabricating various topographies, but there is no body of work that focuses on using mathematical models of this technique to further understand the effect of operational parameters on these properties of microfiber scaffolds. In this study, we developed a novel mathematical model using numerical simulations to demonstrate the effect of temperature, feed rate and flow rate on controlling topographical properties such as fiber diameter of these spun fibrous scaffolds. These promising modelling results are also compared to our previous and current experimental results. Overall, we show that our novel mathematical model can predict the topographical properties affected by key operational parameters such as change in temperature, flow rate and feed rate, and this model could serve as a promising strategy for the controlling of topographical properties of such structures for different applications. (paper)

  3. Temperature and moisture conditions for life in the extreme arid region of the Atacama desert: four years of observations including the El Nino of 1997-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Gomez-Silva, Benito; Caceres-Villanueva, Luis; Andersen, Dale T.; Landheim, Ragnhild

    2003-01-01

    The Atacama along the Pacific Coast of Chile and Peru is one of the driest and possibly oldest deserts in the world. It represents an extreme habitat for life on Earth and is an analog for life in dry conditions on Mars. We report on four years (September 1994-October 1998) of climate and moisture data from the extreme arid region of the Atacama. Our data are focused on understanding moisture sources and their role in creating suitable environments for photosynthetic microorganisms in the desert surface. The average air temperature was 16.5 degrees C and 16.6 degrees C in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The maximum air temperature recorded was 37.9 degrees C, and the minimum was -5.7 degrees C. Annual average sunlight was 336 and 335 W m(-2) in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Winds averaged a few meters per second, with strong fohn winds coming from the west exceeding 12 m s(-1). During our 4 years of observation there was only one significant rain event of 2.3 mm, which occurred near midnight local time. We suggest that this event was a rainout of a heavy fog. It is of interest that the strong El Nino of 1997-1998 brought heavy rainfall to the deserts of Peru, but did not bring significant rain to the central Atacama in Chile. Dew occurred at our station frequently following high nighttime relative humidity, but is not a significant source of moisture in the soil or under stones. Groundwater also does not contribute to surface moisture. Only the one rain event of 2.3 mm resulted in liquid water in the soil and beneath stones for a total of only 65-85 h over 4 years. The paucity of liquid water under stones is consistent with the apparent absence of hypolithic (under-stone) cyanobacteria, the only known primary producers in such extreme deserts.

  4. Chiral crossover transition in a finite volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Jia, Wenbao; Sun, An; Zhang, Liping; Zong, Hongshi

    2018-02-01

    Finite volume effects on the chiral crossover transition of strong interactions at finite temperature are studied by solving the quark gap equation within a cubic volume of finite size L. With the anti-periodic boundary condition, our calculation shows the chiral quark condensate, which characterizes the strength of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, decreases as L decreases below 2.5 fm. We further study the finite volume effects on the pseudo-transition temperature {T}{{c}} of the crossover, showing a significant decrease in {T}{{c}} as L decreases below 3 fm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475085, 11535005, 11690030, 51405027), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (020414380074), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M591808) and Open Research Foundation of State Key Lab. of Digital Manufacturing Equipment & Technology in Huazhong University of Science & Technology (DMETKF2015015)

  5. Viscoelastic creep of high-temperature concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Marchertas, A.H.; Bazant, Z.P.

    1985-01-01

    Presented in this report is the analytical model for analysis of high temperature creep response of concrete. The creep law used is linear (viscoelastic), the temperature and moisture effects on the creep rate and also aging are included. Both constant and transient temperature as well as constant and transient moisture conditions are considered. Examples are presented to correlate experimental data with parameters of the analytical model by the use of a finite element scheme

  6. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  7. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  8. Documentation of SPECTROM-55: A finite element thermohydrogeological analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osnes, J.D.; Ratigan, J.L.; Loken, M.C.; Parrish, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    SPECTROM-55 is a finite element computer program for analyses of coupled heat and fluid transfer through fully saturated porous media. The code is part of the SPECTROM (Special Purpose Engineering Codes for Thermal/ROck Mechanics) series of special purpose finite element programs, that address the many unique rock mechanics problems resulting from storage of radioactive waste in geologic formations. This document presents the theoretical basis for the mathematical model, the finite element formulation of the problem, and a description of the input data for the program along with details about program support and continuing documentation. The program is especially suited for analyses of the regional hydrogeology in the vicinity of a heat-generating nuclear waste repository. These applications typically involved forced and free convection in a ground-water flow system. The program provides transient or steady-state temperatures, pressures, and fluid velocities resulting from the application of a variety of initial and boundary conditions to bodies with complicated shapes. The boundary conditions include constant heat and fluid fluxes, convective heat transfer, constant temperature, and constant pressure. Initial temperatures and pressures can be specified. Composite systems of anisotropic materials, such as geologic strata, can be defined in either planar or axisymmetric configurations. Constant or varying volumetric heat generation, such as decaying heat generation from radioactive waste, can be specified

  9. UV-photodegradation of desipramine: Impact of concentration, pH and temperature on formation of products including their biodegradability and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, Nareman D.H.; Mahmoud, Waleed M.M.; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Desipramine (DMI) is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant, and it is the major metabolite of imipramine (IMI) and lofepramine (LMI); IMI and LMI are two of the most commonly used tricyclic antidepressants. If DMI enters the aquatic environment, it can be transformed by the environmental bacteria or UV radiation. Therefore, photolysis of DMI in water was performed using a simulated sunlight Xenon-lamp and a UV-lamp. Subsequently, the biodegradability of DMI and its photo-transformation products (PTPs) formed during its UV photolysis was studied. The influence of variable conditions, such as initial DMI concentration, solution pH, and temperature, on DMI UV photolysis behavior was also studied. The degree of mineralization of DMI and its PTPs was monitored. A Shimadzu HPLC-UV apparatus was used to follow the kinetic profile of DMI during UV-irradiation; after that, ion-trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography were used to monitor and identify the possible PTPs. The environmentally relevant properties and selected toxicity properties of DMI and the non-biodegradable PTPs were predicted using different QSAR models. DMI underwent UV photolysis with first-order kinetics. Quantum yields were very low. DOC values indicated that DMI formed new PTPs and was not completely mineralized. Analysis by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that the photolysis of DMI followed three main photolysis pathways: isomerization, hydroxylation, and ring opening. The photolysis rate was inversely proportional to initial DMI concentration. The pH showed a significant impact on the photolysis rate of DMI, and on the PTPs in terms of both formation kinetics and mechanisms. Although temperature was expected to increase the photolysis rate, it showed a non-significant impact in this study. Results from biodegradation tests and QSAR analysis revealed that DMI and its PTPs are not readily biodegradable and that some PTPs may be human and/or eco

  10. UV-photodegradation of desipramine: Impact of concentration, pH and temperature on formation of products including their biodegradability and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Nareman D.H.; Mahmoud, Waleed M.M. [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Olsson, Oliver [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kümmerer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.kuemmerer@leuphana.de [Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1 C13, DE 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Desipramine (DMI) is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant, and it is the major metabolite of imipramine (IMI) and lofepramine (LMI); IMI and LMI are two of the most commonly used tricyclic antidepressants. If DMI enters the aquatic environment, it can be transformed by the environmental bacteria or UV radiation. Therefore, photolysis of DMI in water was performed using a simulated sunlight Xenon-lamp and a UV-lamp. Subsequently, the biodegradability of DMI and its photo-transformation products (PTPs) formed during its UV photolysis was studied. The influence of variable conditions, such as initial DMI concentration, solution pH, and temperature, on DMI UV photolysis behavior was also studied. The degree of mineralization of DMI and its PTPs was monitored. A Shimadzu HPLC-UV apparatus was used to follow the kinetic profile of DMI during UV-irradiation; after that, ion-trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography were used to monitor and identify the possible PTPs. The environmentally relevant properties and selected toxicity properties of DMI and the non-biodegradable PTPs were predicted using different QSAR models. DMI underwent UV photolysis with first-order kinetics. Quantum yields were very low. DOC values indicated that DMI formed new PTPs and was not completely mineralized. Analysis by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that the photolysis of DMI followed three main photolysis pathways: isomerization, hydroxylation, and ring opening. The photolysis rate was inversely proportional to initial DMI concentration. The pH showed a significant impact on the photolysis rate of DMI, and on the PTPs in terms of both formation kinetics and mechanisms. Although temperature was expected to increase the photolysis rate, it showed a non-significant impact in this study. Results from biodegradation tests and QSAR analysis revealed that DMI and its PTPs are not readily biodegradable and that some PTPs may be human and/or eco

  11. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  12. EPR spectroscopy of MRI-related Gd(III) complexes: simultaneous analysis of multiple frequency and temperature spectra, including static and transient crystal field effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, S; Borel, A; Helm, L; Belorizky, E; Fries, P H; Merbach, A E

    2001-03-21

    For the first time, a very general theoretical method is proposed to interpret the full electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra at multiple temperatures and frequencies in the important case of S-state metal ions complexed in liquid solution. This method is illustrated by a careful analysis of the measured spectra of two Gd3+ (S = 7/2) complexes. It is shown that the electronic relaxation mechanisms at the origin of the EPR line shape arise from the combined effects of the modulation of the static crystal field by the random Brownian rotation of the complex and of the transient zero-field splitting. A detailed study of the static crystal field mechanism shows that, contrarily to the usual global models involving only second-order terms, the fourth and sixth order terms can play a non-negligible role. The obtained parameters are well interpreted in the framework of the physics of the various underlying relaxation processes. A better understanding of these mechanisms is highly valuable since they partly control the efficiency of paramagnetic metal ions in contrast agents for medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  13. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 18-20: Sound; Temperature, Heat, and Thermodynamics: First Law; and Kinetic Theory of Gases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  14. Finite-volume model for chemical vapor infiltration incorporating radiant heat transfer. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.W.; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Most finite-volume thermal models account for the diffusion and convection of heat and may include volume heating. However, for certain simulation geometries, a large percentage of heat flux is due to thermal radiation. In this paper a finite-volume computational procedure for the simulation of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in three dimensional complex enclosures is developed. The radiant heat transfer is included as a source term in each volume element which is derived by Monte Carlo ray tracing from all possible radiating and absorbing faces. The importance of radiative heat transfer is illustrated in the modeling of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of tubes. The temperature profile through the tube preform matches experimental measurements only when radiation is included. An alternative, empirical approach using an {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} thermal conductivity for the gas space can match the initial temperature profile but does not match temperature changes that occur during preform densification.

  15. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  16. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  17. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  18. Causality in finite temperature quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Some properties of various 'real time' formalisms are examined. The authors discuss conceptual (and sometimes very important) differences between the Niemi-Semmenoff method, the Closed Time Path formalism, and Thermo Field Dynamics. (author). 15 refs

  19. Meson Correlators in Finite Temperature Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    De Forcrand, Philippe; Hashimoto, T; Hioki, S; Matsufuru, H; Miyamura, O; Nakamura, A; Takaishi, T; Umeda, T; Stamatescu, I O; CERN. Geneva; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2001-01-01

    We analyze temporal and spatial meson correlators in quenched lattice QCD at T>0. Below T_c we observe little change in the meson properties as compared with T=0. Above T_c we observe new features: chiral symmetry restoration and signals of plasma formation, but also indication of persisting mesonic (metastable) states and different temporal and spatial masses in the mesonic channels. This suggests a complex picture of QGP in the region 1 - 1.5 T_c.

  20. temperature overspecification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different finite difference schemes for solving the two-dimensional parabolic inverse problem with temperature overspecification are considered. These schemes are developed for indentifying the control parameter which produces, at any given time, a desired temperature distribution at a given point in the spatial domain. The numerical methods discussed, are based on the (3,3 alternating direction implicit (ADI finite difference scheme and the (3,9 alternating direction implicit formula. These schemes are unconditionally stable. The basis of analysis of the finite difference equation considered here is the modified equivalent partial differential equation approach, developed from the 1974 work of Warming and Hyett [17]. This allows direct and simple comparison of the errors associated with the equations as well as providing a means to develop more accurate finite difference schemes. These schemes use less central processor times than the fully implicit schemes for two-dimensional diffusion with temperature overspecification. The alternating direction implicit schemes developed in this report use more CPU times than the fully explicit finite difference schemes, but their unconditional stability is significant. The results of numerical experiments are presented, and accuracy and the Central Processor (CPU times needed for each of the methods are discussed. We also give error estimates in the maximum norm for each of these methods.

  1. The finite element method in engineering, 2nd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This work provides a systematic introduction to the various aspects of the finite element method as applied to engineering problems. Contents include: introduction to finite element method; solution of finite element equations; solid and structural mechanics; static analysis; dynamic analysis; heat transfer; fluid mechanics and additional applications

  2. Experimental Determination of the Recovery Factor and Analytical Solution of the Conical Flow Field for a 20 deg Included Angle Cone at Mach Numbers of 4.6 and 6.0 and Stagnation Temperatures to 2600 degree R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfyl, Frank A.; Presley, Leroy L.

    1961-01-01

    The local recovery factor was determined experimentally along the surface of a thin-walled 20 deg included angle cone for Mach numbers near 6.0 at stagnation temperatures between 1200 deg R and 2600 deg R. In addition, a similar cone configuration was tested at Mach numbers near 4.5 at stagnation temperatures of approximately 612 deg R. The local Reynolds number based on flow properties at the edge of the boundary layer ranged between 0.1 x 10(exp 4) and 3.5 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R and between 6 x 10(exp 4) and 25 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures near 612 deg R. The results indicated, generally, that the recovery factor can be predicted satisfactorily using the square root of the Prandtl number. No conclusion could be made as to the necessity of evaluating the Prandtl number at a reference temperature given by an empirical equation, as opposed to evaluating the Prandtl number at the wall temperature or static temperature of the gas at the cone surface. For the tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R (indicated herein as the tests conducted in the slip-flow region), two definite trends in the recovery data were observed - one of increasing recovery factor with decreasing stagnation pressure, which was associated with slip-flow effects and one of decreasing recovery factor with increasing temperature. The true cause of the latter trend could not be ascertained, but it was shown that this trend was not appreciably altered by the sources of error of the magnitude considered herein. The real-gas equations of state were used to determine accurately the local stream properties at the outer edge of the boundary layer of the cone. Included in the report, therefore, is a general solution for the conical flow of a real gas using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state. The largest effect of temperature was seen to be in the terms which were dependent upon the internal energy of the gas. The pressure and hence the pressure drag terms were

  3. Oscillations of the static meson fields at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Friman, B.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1996-04-01

    The spatial dependence of static meson correlation functions at finite baryon density is studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In contrast to the finite temperature case, we find that the correlation functions at finite density are not screened but exhibit long-range oscillations. The observed phenomenon is analogous to the Friedel oscillations in a degenerate electron gas. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  4. An introduction to finite projective planes

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Abraham Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Geared toward both beginning and advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this self-contained treatment offers an elementary approach to finite projective planes. Following a review of the basics of projective geometry, the text examines finite planes, field planes, and coordinates in an arbitrary plane. Additional topics include central collineations and the little Desargues' property, the fundamental theorem, and examples of finite non-Desarguesian planes.Virtually no knowledge or sophistication on the part of the student is assumed, and every algebraic system that arises is defined and

  5. Finite element method for neutron diffusion problems in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, T.Y.C.; Hansen, K.F.

    1975-06-01

    The use of the finite element method for solving two-dimensional static neutron diffusion problems in hexagonal reactor configurations is considered. It is investigated as a possible alternative to the low-order finite difference method. Various piecewise polynomial spaces are examined for their use in hexagonal problems. The central questions which arise in the design of these spaces are the degree of incompleteness permissible and the advantages of using a low-order space fine-mesh approach over that of a high-order space coarse-mesh one. There is also the question of the degree of smoothness required. Two schemes for the construction of spaces are described and a number of specific spaces, constructed with the questions outlined above in mind, are presented. They range from a complete non-Lagrangian, non-Hermite quadratic space to an incomplete ninth order space. Results are presented for two-dimensional problems typical of a small high temperature gas-cooled reactor. From the results it is concluded that the space used should at least include the complete linear one. Complete spaces are to be preferred to totally incomplete ones. Once function continuity is imposed any additional degree of smoothness is of secondary importance. For flux shapes typical of the small high temperature gas-cooled reactor the linear space fine-mesh alternative is to be preferred to the perturbation quadratic space coarse-mesh one and the low-order finite difference method is to be preferred over both finite element schemes

  6. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  7. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  8. Thomas Fermi model of finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, J.; Rafelski, J.

    1977-01-01

    A relativistic Thomas-Fermi model of finite-nuclei is considered. The effective nuclear interaction is mediated by exchanges of isoscalar scalar and vector mesons. The authors include also a self-interaction of the scalar meson field and the Coulomb repulsion of the protons. The parameters of the model are constrained by the average nuclear properties. The Thomas-Fermi equations are solved numerically for finite, stable nuclei. The particular case of 208 82 Pb is considered in more detail. (Auth.)

  9. Finite size scaling study of Nf=4 finite density QCD on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Takeda, Shinji; Ukawa, Akira

    2013-11-01

    We explore the phase space spanned by the temperature and the chemical potential for four-flavor lattice QCD using the Wilson-clover quark action. In order to determine the order of the phase transition, we apply finite-size scaling analyses to gluonic and quark observables, including plaquette, Polyakov loop, and quark number density, and examine their susceptibility, skewness, kurtosis, and Challa-Landau-Binder cumulant. Simulations were carried out on lattices of a temporal size fixed at Nt=4 and spatial sizes chosen from 63 up to 103. Configurations were generated using the phase-reweighting approach, while the value of the phase of the quark determinant was carefully monitored. The μ-parameter reweighting technique is employed to precisely locate the point of the phase transition. Among various approximation schemes for calculating the ratio of quark determinants needed for μ reweighting, we found the Taylor expansion of the logarithm of the quark determinant to be the most reliable. Our finite-size analyses show that the transition is first order at (β,κ,μ/T)=(1.58,0.1385,0.584±0.008), where (mπ/mρ,T/mρ)=(0.822,0.154). It weakens considerably at (β,κ,μ/T)=(1.60,0.1371,0.821±0.008), where (mπ/mρ,T/mρ)=(0.839,0.150), and a crossover rather than a first-order phase transition cannot be ruled out.

  10. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite......, discrete Gabor coefficients. Reconstruction of a signal from its Gabor coefficients is done by the use of a so-called dual window. This thesis presents a number of iterative algorithms to compute dual and self-dual windows. The Linear Time Frequency Toolbox is a Matlab/Octave/C toolbox for doing basic...... discrete time/frequency and Gabor analysis. It is intended to be both an educational and a computational tool. The toolbox was developed as part of this Ph.D. project to provide a solid foundation for the field of computational Gabor analysis....

  11. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  12. ANSYS mechanical APDL for finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    ANSYS Mechanical APDL for Finite Element Analysis provides a hands-on introduction to engineering analysis using one of the most powerful commercial general purposes finite element programs on the market. Students will find a practical and integrated approach that combines finite element theory with best practices for developing, verifying, validating and interpreting the results of finite element models, while engineering professionals will appreciate the deep insight presented on the program's structure and behavior. Additional topics covered include an introduction to commands, input files, batch processing, and other advanced features in ANSYS. The book is written in a lecture/lab style, and each topic is supported by examples, exercises and suggestions for additional readings in the program documentation. Exercises gradually increase in difficulty and complexity, helping readers quickly gain confidence to independently use the program. This provides a solid foundation on which to build, preparing readers...

  13. Undecidability and finite automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, Jörg; Shallit, Jeffrey; Smith, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Using a novel rewriting problem, we show that several natural decision problems about finite automata are undecidable (i.e., recursively unsolvable). In contrast, we also prove three related problems are decidable. We apply one result to prove the undecidability of a related problem about

  14. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  15. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  16. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  17. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  18. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  19. A New Approach for the Statistical Thermodynamic Theory of the Nonextensive Systems Confined in Different Finite Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui-Yi; Wang, Jian-Hui; Ma, Yong-Li

    2014-06-01

    For a small system at a low temperature, thermal fluctuation and quantum effect play important roles in quantum thermodynamics. Starting from micro-canonical ensemble, we generalize the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical factor from infinite to finite systems, no matter the interactions between particles are considered or not. This generalized factor, similar to Tsallis's q-form as a power-law distribution, has the restriction of finite energy spectrum and includes the nonextensivities of the small systems. We derive the exact expression for distribution of average particle numbers in the interacting classical and quantum nonextensive systems within a generalized canonical ensemble. This expression in the almost independent or elementary excitation quantum finite systems is similar to the corresponding ones obtained from the conventional grand-canonical ensemble. In the reconstruction for the statistical theory of the small systems, we present the entropy of the equilibrium systems and equation of total thermal energy. When we investigate the thermodynamics for the interacting nonextensive systems, we obtain the system-bath heat exchange and "uncompensated heat" which are in the thermodynamical level and independent on the detail of the system-bath coupling. For ideal finite systems, with different traps and boundary conditions, we calculate some thermodynamic quantities, such as the specific heat, entropy, and equation of state, etc. Particularly at low temperatures for the small systems, we predict some novel behaviors in the quantum thermodynamics, including internal entropy production, heat exchanges between the system and its surroundings and finite-size effects on the free energy.

  20. The evolution of the moon - A finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, S.; De Bremaecker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The present lunar evolution model analyzes the thermal history of a self-gravitating spherical planetary body, including the effects of viscous dissipation, internal melting, adiabatic gradient, core formation, variable viscosity, radioactive nucleide decay, and a depth-dependent initial temperature profile, together with physical parameters corresponding to the moon. Although no initial basalt ocean is assumed, partial melting is observed early in the model moon's history. This is suggested to be related to the formation of the basalt maria. The model's present lithospheric thickness is 600 km, with core-mantle temperatures close to 1600 K and surface heat flux of 25.3 mW/sq m. The finite element method is judged to be applicable to the problem of planetary evolution, although faster solution algorithms will be required for the examination of a sufficient number of models.

  1. Bottomonium dissociation in a finite density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a holographic description of the thermal behavior of bb¯ heavy vector mesons inside a plasma at finite temperature and density. The meson dissociation in the medium is represented by the decrease in the height of the spectral function peaks. In order to find a description for the evolution of the quasi-states with temperature and chemical potential it is crucial to use a model that is consistent with the decay constant behavior. The reason is that the height of a spectral function peak is related to the value of the zero temperature decay constant of the corresponding particle. AdS/QCD holographic models are in general not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with radial excitation level. However, it was recently shown that using a soft wall background and calculating the correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, it is possible to describe the observed behavior. Here we extend this proposal to the case of finite temperature T and chemical potential μ. A clear picture of the dissociation of bottomonium states as a function of μ and T emerges from the spectral function. The energy scales where the change in chemical potential leads to changes in the thermal properties of the mesons is consistent with QCD expectations.

  2. Geometrically unfitted finite element methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Burman, Erik; Larson, Mats; Olshanskii, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the state of the art of the rapidly evolving field of integration of geometric data in finite element computations. The contributions to this volume, based on research presented at the UCL workshop on the topic in January 2016, include three review papers on core topics such as fictitious domain methods for elasticity, trace finite element methods for partial differential equations defined on surfaces, and Nitsche’s method for contact problems. Five chapters present original research articles on related theoretical topics, including Lagrange multiplier methods, interface problems, bulk-surface coupling, and approximation of partial differential equations on moving domains. Finally, two chapters discuss advanced applications such as crack propagation or flow in fractured poroelastic media. This is the first volume that provides a comprehensive overview of the field of unfitted finite element methods, including recent techniques such as cutFEM, traceFEM, ghost penalty, and aug...

  3. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  4. Numerical simulation of subsonic and transonic turbulent flows in turbine cascades including wall heat flux and roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louda, P.; Kozel, K.; Sváček, P.; Příhoda, J.

    2012-11-01

    The work deals with numerical simulation of transonic flow in turbine cascade including heat transfer between fluid and blades. The blades are considered either solid, with heat conduction, or with a cavity held at constant temperature above the total temperature of the fluid. The surface of blades is hydraulically smooth or rough. The mathematical model is based on Favre averaged Navier-Stokes equations with SST turbulence model. The heat transfer inside blades is governed by Laplace equation for temperature. The solution for fluid part is obtained by implicit AUMPW+ finite volume method. The solution of Laplace equation is obtained by finite element method. The coupling between the two solvers is discussed including some problems. In the discussion of results, the effects of heat conduction in the blade, internal heating of the blade and surface roughness are observed.

  5. Three-dimensional temperature history of a multipass, filled weldment. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, D.E.; Trinh, T.; Troiano, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual model is developed for the three-dimensional temperature history of a multipass, filled weldment. Property variations with temperature and phase change are included. A mathematical model and finite difference equations are derived from the conceptual model and a solution procedure for the equations is presented

  6. Finite element modeling of multipass GMA welds in steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Distortions from gas metal arc (GMA) multipass welds of thick steel plates were measured in experiments and calculated using finite element analysis. Two- and three-dimensional finite element simulations were compared with the experimentally measured in-plane distortions in a 2-3/4 in. thick steel plate. Thermal analyses were performed using 2D models of the weld cross-section. These temperature histories were used for 2D and 3D mechanical analyses. Data for verification of thermal analyses included weld cross-sections, weld pool crater shape from power-off tests, and embedded and surface thermocouple temperature histories. Mechanical analyses were verified using caliper measurements of shrinkage transverse to the weld and strain gage measurements. Calculated in-plane shrinkage from the 3D model for 4 passes compared well with caliper measurements of a test specimen`s distortion. Two-dimensional mechanical analyses were not capable of predicting the accumulation of shrinkage occurring after the first pass.

  7. A mathematical approach based on finite differences method for analyzing the temperature field in arc welding of stainless steel thin sheets; Desarrollo de un modelo matematico de diferencias finitas para el analisis del campo de temperaturas en la soldadura por arco de chapas finas de acero inoxidable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Conesa, E.J.; Estrems, M.; Miguel, V.

    2010-07-01

    This work develops a finite difference method to evaluate the temperature field in the heat affected zone in butt welding applied to AISI 304 stainless steel thin sheet by GTAW process. A computer program has been developed and implemented by Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) in MS-Excel spreadsheet. The results that are obtained using the numerical application foresee the thermal behaviour of arc welding processes. An experimental methodology has been developed to validate the mathematical model that allows to measure the temperature in several points close to the weld bead. The methodology is applied to a stainless steel sheet with a thickness lower than 3 mm, although may be used for other steels and welding processes as MIG/MAG and SMAW. The data which has been obtained from the experimental procedure have been used to validate the results that have been calculated by the finite differences numerical method. The mathematical model adjustment has been carried out taking into account the experimental results. The differences found between the experimental and theoretical approaches are due to the convection and radiation heat losses, which have not been considered in the simulation model.With this simple model, the designer will be able to calculate the thermal cycles that take place in the process as well as to predict the temperature field in the proximity of the weld bead. (Author). 18 refs.

  8. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  9. Flexoelectric effect in finite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Yurkov, Alexander S.

    2012-08-01

    Static flexoelectric effect in a finite sample of a solid is addressed in terms of phenomenological theory for the case of a thin plate subjected to bending. It has been shown that despite an explicit asymmetry inherent to the bulk constitutive electromechanical equations which take into account the flexoelectric coupling, there exists a situation where electromechanical response for a finite sample is "symmetric." "Symmetric" means that if a sensor and an actuator are made of a flexoelectric element, performance of such devices can be characterized by the same effective piezoelectric coefficient. This behavior is consistent with the thermodynamic arguments offered earlier, being in conflict with the current point of view on the matter in literature. This result was obtained using standard mechanical boundary conditions valid for the case where the polarization vanishes at the surface. It was shown that, for the case where the polarization at the surface is not zero, the aforementioned symmetry of electromechanical response may be violated if standard mechanical boundary conditions are used, leading to a conflict with the thermodynamic arguments. It is suggested that this conflict may be resolved when using modified mechanical boundary conditions. It is also shown that the contribution of surface piezoelectricity to the flexoelectric response of a finite sample is expected to be comparable to that of the static bulk contribution (including materials with high values of the dielectric constant) and to scale as the bulk value of the dielectric constant (similar to the bulk contribution). This finding implies that if the experimentally measured flexoelectric coefficient scales as the dielectric constant of the material, this does not imply that the measured flexoelectric response is controlled by the static bulk contribution to the flexoelectric effect.

  10. Coupled finite element modeling of piezothermoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senousy, M. S.; Rajapakse, R. K. N. D.; Gadala, M.

    2007-04-01

    The governing equations of piezo-thermoelastic materials show full coupling between mechanical, electric, and temperature fields. It is often assumed in the literature that in high-frequency oscillations, the coupling between the temperature and mechanical displacement and electric field is small and, therefore, can be neglected. A solution for the temperature field is then determined from an uncoupled equation. A finite element (FE) model that accounts for full coupling between the mechanical, electric, and thermal fields, nonlinear constitutive behavior and heat generation resulting from dielectric losses under alternating driving fields is under development. This paper presents a linear fully coupled model as an early development of the fully coupled nonlinear FE model. In the linear model, a solution for all field variables is obtained simultaneously and compared with the uncoupled solution. The finite element model is based on the weighted-residual principle and uses 2-D four-node isoparametric finite elements with four degrees of freedom per node. A thin piezoelectric square disk is modeled to obtain some preliminary understanding of the coupled fields in a piezoelectric stack actuator.

  11. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  12. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  13. Simulation analysis of temperature control on RCC arch dam of hydropower station

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIA, Shi-fa

    2017-12-01

    The temperature analysis of roller compacted concrete (RCC) dam plays an important role in their design and construction. Based on three-dimensional finite element method, in the computation of temperature field, many cases are included, such as air temperature, elevated temperature by cement hydration heat, concrete temperature during placing, the influence of water in the reservoir, and boundary temperature. According to the corresponding parameters of RCC arch dam, the analysis of temperature field and stress field during the period of construction and operation is performed. The study demonstrates that detailed thermal stress analysis should be performed for RCC dams to provide a basis to minimize and control the occurrence of thermal cracking.

  14. Finite Cycle Gibbs Measures on Permutations of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz, Inés; Ferrari, Pablo A.; Groisman, Pablo; Leonardi, Florencia

    2015-03-01

    We consider Gibbs distributions on the set of permutations of associated to the Hamiltonian , where is a permutation and is a strictly convex potential. Call finite-cycle those permutations composed by finite cycles only. We give conditions on ensuring that for large enough temperature there exists a unique infinite volume ergodic Gibbs measure concentrating mass on finite-cycle permutations; this measure is equal to the thermodynamic limit of the specifications with identity boundary conditions. We construct as the unique invariant measure of a Markov process on the set of finite-cycle permutations that can be seen as a loss-network, a continuous-time birth and death process of cycles interacting by exclusion, an approach proposed by Fernández, Ferrari and Garcia. Define as the shift permutation . In the Gaussian case , we show that for each , given by is an ergodic Gibbs measure equal to the thermodynamic limit of the specifications with boundary conditions. For a general potential , we prove the existence of Gibbs measures when is bigger than some -dependent value.

  15. Finite elements for analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Akin, J E; Davenport, J H

    1994-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is an analysis tool for problem-solving used throughout applied mathematics, engineering, and scientific computing. Finite Elements for Analysis and Design provides a thoroughlyrevised and up-to-date account of this important tool and its numerous applications, with added emphasis on basic theory. Numerous worked examples are included to illustrate the material.Key Features* Akin clearly explains the FEM, a numerical analysis tool for problem-solving throughout applied mathematics, engineering and scientific computing* Basic theory has bee

  16. A 2-dimensional finite element simulation of cooling in castings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work we present a 2 dimensional finite element simulation of the cooling process in castings. A one way coupling +technique was used to predict the behavior of thermal strains and stresses from the temperature history of casting. The temperature distribution across the casting at different times, the cooling pattern of ...

  17. Equivalent drawbead model in finite element simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleer, Bart D.; Carleer, B.D.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han; Lee, J.K.; Kinzel, G.L.; Wagoner, R.

    1996-01-01

    In 3D simulations of the deep drawing process the drawbead geometries are seldom included. Therefore equivalent drawbeads are used. In order to investigate the drawbead behaviour a 2D plane strain finite element model was used. For verification of this model experiments were performed. The analyses

  18. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  19. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  20. Finite-size scaling on the Ising coexistence line

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sourendu

    1992-01-01

    We report tests of finite-size scaling ansatzes in the low temperature phase of the two-dimensional Ising model. For moments of the magnetisation density, we find good agreement with the new ansatz of Borgs and Koteck\\'y, and clear evi consequences of the convexity of the free energy are not adequately treated in either of these approaches.\\lb {\\it Keywords}\\/: Finite-size scaling, 2-d Ising, pure-phase susceptibility.

  1. Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space – 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space – 2. Amritanshu Prasad. Keywords. Gaussian binomial coefficients, finite vector spaces. Amritanshu Prasad has been at the Institute of. Mathematical Sciences,. Chennai since 2003. His mathematical interests include representation theory, harmonic analysis, and combinatorics ...

  2. A practical method for computation of ductile crack growth by means of finite elements and parametric 3D-modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, F.; Kroening, J.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper originates from a contribution to the safety assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Investigations evaluating the safety against brittle fracture (exclosure of crack initiation and arrest assessments) are completed by calculations concerning ductile crack extension. Crack geometries including the expected crack extension are generated parametrically by a computer code and are used for further calculations with finite element programs. J-integrals of ductile growing cracks located between two comparative contours are determined by interpolation. The comparative contours are loaded by instationary temperature and pressure fields and are evaluated in advance. Taking the stability condition into consideration, the ductile crack extension is determined by pursuing the equilibrium between loading and crack resistance. The automatic modelling and a mathematical program processing the finite element results evaluate the crack growth of the finite element results very effectively. (orig.)

  3. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  4. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  5. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  6. Thermal quench at finite 't Hooft coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ebrahim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using holography we have studied thermal electric field quench for infinite and finite 't Hooft coupling constant. The set-up we consider here is D7-brane embedded in (α′ corrected AdS-black hole background. It is well-known that due to a time-dependent electric field on the probe brane, a time-dependent current will be produced and it will finally relax to its equilibrium value. We have studied the effect of different parameters of the system on equilibration time. As the most important results, for massless fundamental matter, we have observed a universal behaviour in the rescaled equilibration time in the very fast quench regime for different values of the temperature and α′ correction parameter. It seems that in the slow quench regime the system behaves adiabatically. We have also observed that the equilibration time decreases in finite 't Hooft coupling limit.

  7. Statistical finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Iman; Rahemifar, Kaamran; Samani, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique is introduced for tissue deformation and stress analysis. Compared to the conventional Finite Element method, this technique is orders of magnitude faster and yet still very accurate. The proposed technique uses preprocessed data obtained from FE analyses of a number of similar objects in a Statistical Shape Model framework as described below. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the body organs have limited variability, especially in terms of their geometry. As such, it is well suited for calculating tissue displacements of body organs. The proposed technique can be applied in many biomedical applications such as image guided surgery, or virtual reality environment development where tissue behavior is simulated for training purposes.

  8. Finite element analysis of nonisothermal polymer processing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, C.; Roylance, D.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element formulation for the analysis of polymer processing is presented and its use in some typical situation including entry flow, transient Couette flow, and the Graetz (forced convection) problem is illustrated. The element formulations are constructed on the premise that momentum convection can be neglected (polymer melt flows typically have very low Reynolds' numbers), but that convective heat transfer may be significant (high Peclet numbers). Nonisothermal effects are considered important in polymer processing, due in part to the significant heating which may occur due to viscous dissipation, and also to the very strong influence of temperature on fluid viscosity. The flow is treated as Newtonian with the flow field being coupled to the heat transfer equation only through the viscous heat generation.

  9. Magnetization and susceptibility of a parabolic InAs quantum dot with electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions in the presence of a magnetic field at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, CMR College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-11-15

    The magnetization and susceptibility of a two-electron parabolic quantum dot are studied in the presence of electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions as a function of magnetic field and temperature. The spin–orbit interactions are treated by a unitary transformation and an exactly soluble parabolic interaction model is considered to mimic the electron–electron interaction. The theory is finally applied to an InAs quantum dot. Magnetization and susceptibility are calculated using canonical ensemble approach. Our results show that Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime whereas electron–electron interaction reduces them. The temperature however reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. The Rashba spin–orbit interaction is shown to shift the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields whereas the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts it to the lower magnetic field side. Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures. - Highlights: • Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime but reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. • Electron-electron interaction reduces magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic region. • Rashba spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields. • Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards lower magnetic fields. • Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures.

  10. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...... features that justify the development of specialized solution algorithms....

  11. Finite strain discrete dislocation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    A framework for carrying out finite deformation discrete dislocation plasticity calculations is presented. The discrete dislocations are presumed to be adequately represented by the singular linear elastic fields so that the large deformations near dislocation cores are not modeled. The finite

  12. Introduction to nonlinear finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the key concepts of nonlinear finite element analysis procedures. The book explains the fundamental theories of the field and provides instructions on how to apply the concepts to solving practical engineering problems. Instead of covering many nonlinear problems, the book focuses on three representative problems: nonlinear elasticity, elastoplasticity, and contact problems. The book is written independent of any particular software, but tutorials and examples using four commercial programs are included as appendices: ANSYS, NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and MATLAB. In particular, the MATLAB program includes all source codes so that students can develop their own material models, or different algorithms. This book also: ·         Presents clear explanations of nonlinear finite element analysis for elasticity, elastoplasticity, and contact problems ·         Includes many informative examples of nonlinear analyses so that students can clearly understand the nonlinear theory ·    ...

  13. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Solution of the neutronics code dynamic benchmark by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avvakumov, A. V.; Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasilev, A. O.; Strizhov, V. F.

    2016-10-01

    The objective is to analyze the dynamic benchmark developed by Atomic Energy Research for the verification of best-estimate neutronics codes. The benchmark scenario includes asymmetrical ejection of a control rod in a water-type hexagonal reactor at hot zero power. A simple Doppler feedback mechanism assuming adiabatic fuel temperature heating is proposed. The finite element method on triangular calculation grids is used to solve the three-dimensional neutron kinetics problem. The software has been developed using the engineering and scientific calculation library FEniCS. The matrix spectral problem is solved using the scalable and flexible toolkit SLEPc. The solution accuracy of the dynamic benchmark is analyzed by condensing calculation grid and varying degree of finite elements.

  15. FEAST: a two-dimensional non-linear finite element code for calculating stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.

    1986-06-01

    The computer code FEAST calculates stresses, strains, and displacements. The code is two-dimensional. That is, either plane or axisymmetric calculations can be done. The code models elastic, plastic, creep, and thermal strains and stresses. Cracking can also be simulated. The finite element method is used to solve equations describing the following fundamental laws of mechanics: equilibrium; compatibility; constitutive relations; yield criterion; and flow rule. FEAST combines several unique features that permit large time-steps in even severely non-linear situations. The features include a special formulation for permitting many finite elements to simultaneously cross the boundary from elastic to plastic behaviour; accomodation of large drops in yield-strength due to changes in local temperature and a three-step predictor-corrector method for plastic analyses. These features reduce computing costs. Comparisons against twenty analytical solutions and against experimental measurements show that predictions of FEAST are generally accurate to ± 5%

  16. Finite entanglement entropy and spectral dimension in quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-12-01

    What are the conditions on a field theoretic model leading to a finite entanglement entropy density? We prove two very general results: (1) Ultraviolet finiteness of a theory does not guarantee finiteness of the entropy density; (2) If the spectral dimension of the spatial boundary across which the entropy is calculated is non-negative at all scales, then the entanglement entropy cannot be finite. These conclusions, which we verify in several examples, negatively affect all quantum-gravity models, since their spectral dimension is always positive. Possible ways out are considered, including abandoning the definition of the entanglement entropy in terms of the boundary return probability or admitting an analytic continuation (not a regularization) of the usual definition. In the second case, one can get a finite entanglement entropy density in multi-fractional theories and causal dynamical triangulations.

  17. An efficient finite element solution for gear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, C. G.; Parker, R. G.; Vijayakar, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    A finite element formulation for the dynamic response of gear pairs is proposed. Following an established approach in lumped parameter gear dynamic models, the static solution is used as the excitation in a frequency domain solution of the finite element vibration model. The nonlinear finite element/contact mechanics formulation provides accurate calculation of the static solution and average mesh stiffness that are used in the dynamic simulation. The frequency domain finite element calculation of dynamic response compares well with numerically integrated (time domain) finite element dynamic results and previously published experimental results. Simulation time with the proposed formulation is two orders of magnitude lower than numerically integrated dynamic results. This formulation admits system level dynamic gearbox response, which may include multiple gear meshes, flexible shafts, rolling element bearings, housing structures, and other deformable components.

  18. A modified finite element procedure for underwater shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Using the regular finite element method for analyzing wave propagation problems presents difficulties: (a) The finite element mesh gives spurious reflection of the traveling wave and (b) Since a finite element model has to have a finite boundary, the wave is reflected by the outside boundary. However, for underwater shock problems, only the response of the structure is of major interest, not the behavior of the wave itself, and the shock wave can be assumed to be spherical. By taking advantage of the limited scope of the underwater shock problem, a finite element procedure can be developed that eliminates the above difficulties. This procedure not only can give very accurate solutions but it may also include structural nonlinearities and effect of cavitation

  19. Finite entanglement entropy and spectral dimension in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    What are the conditions on a field theoretic model leading to a finite entanglement entropy density? We prove two very general results: (1) Ultraviolet finiteness of a theory does not guarantee finiteness of the entropy density; (2) If the spectral dimension of the spatial boundary across which the entropy is calculated is non-negative at all scales, then the entanglement entropy cannot be finite. These conclusions, which we verify in several examples, negatively affect all quantum-gravity models, since their spectral dimension is always positive. Possible ways out are considered, including abandoning the definition of the entanglement entropy in terms of the boundary return probability or admitting an analytic continuation (not a regularization) of the usual definition. In the second case, one can get a finite entanglement entropy density in multi-fractional theories and causal dynamical triangulations. (orig.)

  20. Finite entanglement entropy and spectral dimension in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzano, Michele [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Rome (Italy); Calcagni, Gianluca [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia

    2017-12-15

    What are the conditions on a field theoretic model leading to a finite entanglement entropy density? We prove two very general results: (1) Ultraviolet finiteness of a theory does not guarantee finiteness of the entropy density; (2) If the spectral dimension of the spatial boundary across which the entropy is calculated is non-negative at all scales, then the entanglement entropy cannot be finite. These conclusions, which we verify in several examples, negatively affect all quantum-gravity models, since their spectral dimension is always positive. Possible ways out are considered, including abandoning the definition of the entanglement entropy in terms of the boundary return probability or admitting an analytic continuation (not a regularization) of the usual definition. In the second case, one can get a finite entanglement entropy density in multi-fractional theories and causal dynamical triangulations. (orig.)

  1. Reverse Engineering Integrated Circuits Using Finite State Machine Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oler, Kiri J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Carl H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-12

    In this paper, we present a methodology for reverse engineering integrated circuits, including a mathematical verification of a scalable algorithm used to generate minimal finite state machine representations of integrated circuits.

  2. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  3. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  4. Documentation of SPECTROM-55: A finite element thermohydrogeological analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osnes, J.D.; Ratigan, J.L.; Loken, M.C.; Parrish, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    SPECTROM-55 is a finite element computer program developed by RE/SPEC Inc. for analyses of coupled heat and fluid transfer through fully saturated porous media. The theoretical basis for the mathematical model, the implementation of the mathematical model into the computer code, the verification and validation efforts with the computer code, and the code support and continuing documentation are described in this document. The program is especially suited for analyses of the regional hydrogeology in the vicinity of a heat-generating nuclear waste repository. These applications typically involve forced and free convection in a ground-water flow system. The program provides transient or steady-state temperatures, pressures, and fluid velocities resulting from the application of a variety of initial and boundary conditions to bodies with complicated shapes. The boundary conditions include constant heat and fluid fluxes, convective heat transfer, constant temperature, and constant pressure. Initial temperatures and pressures can be specified. Composite systems of anisotropic materials, such as geologic strata, can be defined in either planar or axisymmetric configurations. Constant or varying volumetric heat generation, such as decaying heat generation from radioactive waste, can be specified

  5. Finite Element Modeling of Cracks and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čížik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method to the analysis of discontinuous structural systems has received a considerable interest in recent years. Examples of problems in which discontinuities play a prominent role in the physical behaviour of a system are numerous and include various types of contact problems and layered or jointed systems. This paper gives a state-of-the-art report on the different methods developed to date for the finite element modelling of cracks and joints in discontinuous systems. Particular attention, however, has been given to the use of joint/interface elements, since their application is considered to be most appropriate for modelling of all kinds of discontinuities that may present in a structural system. A chronology of development of the main types of joint elements, including their pertinent characteristics, is also given. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual methods and types of joint elements presented are briefly discussed, together with various applications of interest.

  6. Flow Over Backward Facing Step with Inclined Wall Solved by Finite Volume and Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louda, Petr; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2010-09-01

    The work deals with numerical solution of 2D incompressible flow over backward facing step. The inclination angles of the upper wall of the channel were chosen as in measurements by Driver and Seegmiller [1]. Two numerical methods are considered. One is finite volume method, the other one is finite element method. Turbulence is modeled using two-equation turbulence models of k-ω type. The influence of outlet boundary condition is discussed and do-nothing-like condition found suitable also for finite volume method. The comparison of both methods is presented for laminar as well as turbulent cases, including experimental results. The differences of the results are studied using one turbulence model and both numerical methods or one method and more turbulence models. It is found that sensitivity of the computation to these circumstances increases for higher inclination angles (diffuser flow).

  7. Quaternary ammonium room-temperature ionic liquid including an oxygen atom in side chain/lithium salt binary electrolytes: ionic conductivity and 1H, 7Li, and 19F NMR studies on diffusion coefficients and local motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Ohno, Yasutaka; Miyashiro, Hajime; Kobayashi, Yo

    2008-01-31

    A room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) of a quaternary ammonium cation having an ether chain, N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (DEME-TFSA), is a candidate for use as an electrolyte of lithium secondary batteries. In this study, the electrochemical ionic conductivity, sigma, of the neat DEME-TFSA and DEME-TFSA-Li doped with five different concentrations of lithium salt (LiTFSA) was measured and correlated with NMR measurements of the diffusion coefficients D and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1 of the individual components DEME (1H), TFSA (19F), and lithium ion (7Li). The ion conduction of charged ions can be activated with less thermal energy than ion diffusion which contains a contribution from paired ions in DEME-TFSA. In the doped DEME-TFSA-Li samples, the sigma and D values decreased with increasing salt concentration, and within the same sample generally DLisalt concentration at low temperatures. Since plots of the temperature dependence of T1 of the 1H and 7Li resonances showed T1 minima, the correlation times tauc(H) and tauc(Li) were calculated for reorientational motions of DEME and the lithium jump, respectively. At the same temperature, tauc(Li) is longer than tauc(H), suggesting that the molecular motion of DEME occurs more rapidly than the lithium jump. Combining the DLi and tauc(Li), averaged distances for the lithium jump were estimated.

  8. Finite element methods for incompressible flow problems

    CERN Document Server

    John, Volker

    2016-01-01

    This book explores finite element methods for incompressible flow problems: Stokes equations, stationary Navier-Stokes equations, and time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. It focuses on numerical analysis, but also discusses the practical use of these methods and includes numerical illustrations. It also provides a comprehensive overview of analytical results for turbulence models. The proofs are presented step by step, allowing readers to more easily understand the analytical techniques.

  9. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  10. BERSAFE: (BERkeley Structural Analysis by Finite Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    BERSAFE is a well-known finite element system which has been under continuous use and development for over 20 years. The BERSAFE system comprises an inter-compatible set of program modules covering static stress analysis, linear dynamics and thermal analysis. Data generation and results presentation modules are also available, along with special supporting functions including automatic crack growth through a model with adaptive meshing. The functionality of BERSAFE, is nowadays very advanced, both in engineering scope and finite element technology. It has seen many firsts, including the front solution and Virtual Crack Extension methods (VCE). More recent additions which have developed out of the Power Industry's requirements are a finite element computational fluid dynamics code, FEAT, and engineering design assessment procedures. These procedures include R6 and R5 for the assessment of the integrity of structures containing defects below and within the creep regime. To use all this software in a user-friendly manner, a new computational environment has been developed, called 'The Harness' which takes advantage of modern hardware and software philosophies. This provides the tool-kit to undertake complete problems, covering determination of fluid loads, structural analysis and failure assessment. In the following sections we describe briefly various components of the BERSAFE suite. (author)

  11. Resonance integral calculations for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, J.P.H.

    1960-02-01

    Methods of calculation of resonance integrals of finite dilution and temperature are given for both, homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries, together with results obtained from these methods as applied to the design of high temperature reactors. (author)

  12. 2D-finite element stress analysis of NET first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.B.; Daenner, W.; Vieder, G.

    1984-01-01

    The 2D finite element (FE) method is applied for the NET first wall structure to compute the quasi-harmonic steady-state temperature distribution within the wall and to determine the nonlinear (elastic)-stresses under thermomechanical loads. Two different concepts for the wall structure, one having grooves and other one with plane wall, are investigated. The wall's support conditions, nonlinear material and thermal parameters are varied. The hydrostatic liquid lead pressure is also included. The computations are carried out using water as a coolant and the results are described. (author)

  13. Numerical modelling of MPA-CVD reactors with the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul; Sime, Nathan

    2017-07-01

    In this article we develop a fully self consistent mathematical model describing the formation of a hydrogen plasma in a microwave power assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPA-CVD) reactor employed for the manufacture of synthetic diamond. The underlying multi-physics model includes constituent equations for the background gas mass average velocity, gas temperature, electromagnetic field energy and plasma density. The proposed mathematical model is numerically approximated based on exploiting the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We demonstrate the practical performance of this computational approach on a variety of CVD reactor geometries for a range of operating conditions.

  14. Linear dynamic analysis of arbitrary thin shells modal superposition by using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Filho, O.J.A.

    1978-11-01

    The linear dynamic behaviour of arbitrary thin shells by the Finite Element Method is studied. Plane triangular elements with eighteen degrees of freedom each are used. The general equations of movement are obtained from the Hamilton Principle and solved by the Modal Superposition Method. The presence of a viscous type damping can be considered by means of percentages of the critical damping. An automatic computer program was developed to provide the vibratory properties and the dynamic response to several types of deterministic loadings, including temperature effects. The program was written in FORTRAN IV for the Burroughs B-6700 computer. (author)

  15. Finite Size Scaling of Perceptron

    OpenAIRE

    Korutcheva, Elka; Tonchev, N.

    2000-01-01

    We study the first-order transition in the model of a simple perceptron with continuous weights and large, bit finite value of the inputs. Making the analogy with the usual finite-size physical systems, we calculate the shift and the rounding exponents near the transition point. In the case of a general perceptron with larger variety of inputs, the analysis only gives bounds for the exponents.

  16. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  17. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  18. Finite element solution algorithm for incompressible fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element solution algorithm is established for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations governing the transient motion of a viscous incompressible fluid, i.e., hydrodynamics. Dependent variable transformation renders the differential equation description uniformly elliptic. The finite element algorithm is established using the Galerkin criterion on a local basis within the Method of Weighted Residuals. It is unconstrained with respect to system linearity, computational mesh uniformity or solution domain closure regularity. The finite element matrices are established using a linear 'natural coordinate function' description. Computational solutions using the COMOC computer program illustrate the various features of the algorithm including recirculating flows.

  19. Finite element analysis of thermoelastic instability with intermittent contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Koning, A.J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The equations that describe the development of corrugations on block braked wheel treads caused by thermoelastic instability are discretized using the finite element method. The perturbations of temperatures and distortions are described by an amplitude function, which is spatially fixed multiplied

  20. Chiral phase transitions in quantum chromodynamics at finite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cedure the phase structure of gauge theories. At finite temperature/density, however, we should seriously ask whether the preceding results [1] of the DS equation analysis on the chiral phase transition could be relied on being the real consequences of thermal gauge theories. This is because in previous analyses the ...