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Sample records for include dysmorphic features

  1. Patterns of Dysmorphic Features in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, L.E.; Chow, E.W.C.; Weksberg, R.; Honer, W.G.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital dysmorphic features are prevalent in schizophrenia and may reflect underlying neurodevelopmental abnormalities. A cluster analysis approach delineating patterns of dysmorphic features has been used in genetics to classify individuals into more etiologically homogeneous subgroups. In the present study, this approach was applied to schizophrenia, using a sample with a suspected genetic syndrome as a testable model. Subjects (n = 159) with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were ascertained from chronic patient populations (random, n=123) or referred with possible 22q11 deletion syndrome (referred, n = 36). All subjects were evaluated for presence or absence of 70 reliably assessed dysmorphic features, which were used in a three-step cluster analysis. The analysis produced four major clusters with different patterns of dysmorphic features. Significant between-cluster differences were found for rates of 37 dysmorphic features (P dysmorphic features (P = 0.0001), and validating features not used in the cluster analysis: mild mental retardation (P = 0.001) and congenital heart defects (P = 0.002). Two clusters (1 and 4) appeared to represent more developmental subgroups of schizophrenia with elevated rates of dysmorphic features and validating features. Cluster 1 (n = 27) comprised mostly referred subjects. Cluster 4 (n= 18) had a different pattern of dysmorphic features; one subject had a mosaic Turner syndrome variant. Two other clusters had lower rates and patterns of features consistent with those found in previous studies of schizophrenia. Delineating patterns of dysmorphic features may help identify subgroups that could represent neurodevelopmental forms of schizophrenia with more homogeneous origins. PMID:11803519

  2. Case Report: Congenital Erythroleukemia in a Premature Infant with Dysmorphic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin, Heidi; van der Walt, Jon; Holder, Muriel; George, Simi

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of pure erythroleukemia, diagnosed at autopsy, in a dysmorphic premature infant who died of multiorgan failure within 24 hours of birth. Dysmorphic features included facial and limb abnormalities with long philtrum, microagnathia, downturned mouth, short neck as well as abnormal and missing nails, missing distal phalanx from the second toe, and overlapping toes. Internal findings included gross hepatomegaly and patchy hemorrhages in the liver, splenomegaly, and cardiomegaly; and subdural, intracerebral, and intraventricular hemorrhages. Histology revealed infiltration of bone marrow, kidney, heart, liver, adrenal, lung, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testis, thymus, and placenta by pure erythroleukemia. Only 6 cases of congenital erythroleukemia have been previously reported with autopsy findings similar to those of this case. The dysmorphic features, although not fitting any specific syndrome, make this case unique. Congenital erythroleukemia and possible syndromes suggested by the dysmorphic features are discussed.

  3. Double trisomy 48,XXX,+18 with multiple dysmorphic features.

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    Jiang, Zi-Yan; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Zou, Chao-Chun

    2015-02-01

    Chromosomal abnormality is a common cause of congenital anomalies, psychiatric disorders, and mental retardation. However, the double trisomy 48,XXX,+18 is a rare chromosome abnormality. Case report and literature review. A 7-hour-old girl presented to our unit because of poor response after birth. She presented with multiple dysmorphic features, including small for gestational age infant, flat nasal bridge, widely-spaced eyes, the left thumb deformities, flat facial profile, raised sternum, ventricular septal defect, the third lateral brain ventricle enlargement, and small liver. This case expands the spectrum of malformations reported in association with the double trisomy 48,XXX,+18. The literature on 16 fetuses or infants with the 48,XXX,+18 were also reviewed. These data suggested that in patients with clinical features similar to trisomy 18, especially with anomalies of the ears and/or reproductive malformations, double trisomy (48,XXX,+18) should be considered and karyotyping should be performed although it is a rare disease.

  4. Loose anagen hair syndrome associated with colobomas and dysmorphic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Brandrup, Flemming; Clemmensen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    Loose anagen hair syndrome is an uncommon congenital disorder. It may occur in association with other syndromes and dysmorphic features. We report a girl who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for this syndrome as proposed by Tosti (Arch Dermatol 2002, 138: 521-522). She also had several other...

  5. MLPA analysis for a panel of syndromes with mental retardation reveals imbalances in 5.8% of patients with mental retardation and dysmorphic features, including duplications of the Sotos syndrome and Williams-Beuren syndrome regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Bryndorf, Thue

    2007-01-01

    MLPA analysis for a panel of syndromes with mental retardation (MRS-MLPA) was used for investigation of 258 mentally retarded and dysmorphic patients with normal conventional karyotypes (P064 probe set, MRC-Holland, for detection of (micro)deletions associated with 1p36-deletion, Sotos, Williams...... referred with a clinical suspicion of a specific syndrome, which was confirmed in 17 patients (21.3%). The remaining 90 patients were referred because of mental retardation and dysmorphism but without suspicion of a specific syndrome. Seven imbalances, including four duplications, were detected in these 90...

  6. A Case with Mental Retardation, Gynecomastia and Dysmorphic Features

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    Ozge Ozalp Yuregir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The 17 years old boy was diagnosed as Borjeson Forsmann Lehmann Syndrome who was referred to our Genetic Diagnosis Center for his dysmorphic features, obesity, gynecomasty and mental retardation . There are so many diseases in differantial diagnosis of obesity and mental retardation that BFLS is a rare one of them. We aimed to discuss the findings of the patient clinically diagnosed as BFLS within the scope of literature. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1: 60-63

  7. A Case with Mental Retardation, Gynecomastia and Dysmorphic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Ozalp Yuregir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The 17 years old boy was diagnosed as Borjeson Forsmann Lehmann Syndrome who was referred to our Genetic Diagnosis Center for his dysmorphic features, obesity, gynecomasty and mental retardation . There are so many diseases in differantial diagnosis of obesity and mental retardation that BFLS is a rare one of them. We aimed to discuss the findings of the patient clinically diagnosed as BFLS within the scope of literature. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1.000: 60-63

  8. Deletions in 16p13 including GRIN2A in patients with intellectual disability, various dysmorphic features, and seizure disorders of the rolandic region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reutlinger, C.; Helbig, I.; Gawelczyk, B.; Subero, J.I.; Tonnies, H.; Muhle, H.; Finsterwalder, K.; Vermeer, S.; Pfundt, R.; Sperner, J.; Stefanova, I.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Spiczak, S. von; Baalen, A. van; Boor, R.; Siebert, R.; Stephani, U.; Caliebe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Seizure disorders of the rolandic region comprise a spectrum of different epilepsy syndromes ranging from benign rolandic epilepsy to more severe seizure disorders including atypical benign partial epilepsy/pseudo-Lennox syndrome,electrical status epilepticus during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner

  9. Dysmorphic Facial Features and Other Clinical Characteristics in Two Patients with PEX1 Gene Mutations

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    Gunduz, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are a group of genetically heterogeneous metabolic diseases related to dysfunction of peroxisomes. Dysmorphic features, neurological abnormalities, and hepatic dysfunction can be presenting signs of peroxisomal disorders. Here we presented dysmorphic facial features and other clinical characteristics in two patients with PEX1 gene mutation. Follow-up periods were 3.5 years and 1 year in the patients. Case I was one-year-old girl that presented with neurodevelopmental delay, hepatomegaly, bilateral hearing loss, and visual problems. Ophthalmologic examination suggested septooptic dysplasia. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed nonspecific gliosis at subcortical and periventricular deep white matter. Case II was 2.5-year-old girl referred for investigation of global developmental delay and elevated liver enzymes. Ophthalmologic examination findings were consistent with bilateral nystagmus and retinitis pigmentosa. Cranial MRI was normal. Dysmorphic facial features including broad nasal root, low set ears, downward slanting eyes, downward slanting eyebrows, and epichantal folds were common findings in two patients. Molecular genetic analysis indicated homozygous novel IVS1-2A>G mutation in Case I and homozygous p.G843D (c.2528G>A) mutation in Case II in the PEX1 gene. Clinical findings and developmental prognosis vary in PEX1 gene mutation. Kabuki-like phenotype associated with liver pathology may indicate Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSD). PMID:27882258

  10. Phenotype in girls and women with Turner syndrome: Association between dysmorphic features, karyotype and cardio-aortic malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Iris; Duijnhouwer, Anthonie; Kapusta, Livia; Kempers, Marlies; Roeleveld, Nel; Schokking, Michiel; Smeets, Dominique; Freriks, Kim; Timmers, Henri; van Alfen-van der Velden, Janiëlle

    2018-06-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder characterized by the (partial) absence or a structural aberration of the second sex chromosome and is associated with a variety of phenotypes with specific physical features and cardio-aortic malformations. The objective of this study was to gain a better insight into the differences in dysmorphic features between girls and women with TS and to explore the association between these features, karyotype and cardio-aortic malformations. This prospective study investigated 14 dysmorphic features of TS girls and women using a checklist. Three major phenotypic patterns were recognized (severe phenotype, lymphatic phenotype and skeletal phenotype). Patient data including karyotype and cardio-aortic malformations (bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and aortic coarctation (COA)) were collected. Associations between the prevalence of dysmorphic features, karyotype and cardio-aortic malformations were analysed using chi 2 -test and odds ratios. A total of 202 patients (84 girls and 118 women) were analysed prospectively. Differences in prevalence of dysmorphic features were found between girls and women. A strong association was found between monosomy 45,X and the phenotypic patterns. Furthermore, an association was found between COA and lymphatic phenotype, but no association was found between karyotype and cardio-aortic malformations. This study uncovered a difference in dysmorphic features between girls and women. Monosomy 45,X is associated with a more severe phenotype, lymphatic phenotype and skeletal phenotype. All patients with TS should be screened for cardio-aortic malformations, because in contrast to previous reports, karyotype and cardio-aortic malformations showed no significant association. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Dysmorphic features and developmental outcome of 2-year-old children.

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    Seggers, Jorien; Haadsma, Maaike L; Bos, Arend F; Heineman, Maas Jan; Middelburg, Karin J; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the associations between dysmorphic features and neurological, mental, psychomotor, and behavioural development in order to improve our understanding of aetiological pathways leading to minor developmental problems. In our cross-sectional study, 272 generally healthy 2-year-olds (143 males, 129 females; median gestational age 39 weeks, [range 30-43wks]), born after a parental history of subfertility either with or without fertility treatment, were examined. Dysmorphic features were classified as abnormalities (clinically relevant or not), minor anomalies, or common variants according to Merks' classification system. Hempel's neurological assessment resulted in a neurological optimality score (NOS) and fluency score. Mental and psychomotor development were assessed with the Dutch version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and behavioural development with the Achenbach Child Behaviour Checklist. Of the different types of dysmorphic feature, clinically relevant abnormalities were most strongly associated with a lower NOS (difference -2.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] -4.23 to -0.83) and fluency score (difference -0.62, 95% CI -1.1 to -0.15). The presence of one or more abnormalities (clinically relevant or not) or one or more common variants was significantly associated with a lower NOS, and the presence of three or more minor anomalies was associated with lower fluency scores. Dysmorphic features were not associated with mental, psychomotor, or behavioural development. As dysmorphic features originate during the first trimester of pregnancy, the association between dysmorphic features and minor alterations in neurodevelopment may suggest an early ontogenetic origin of subtle neurological deviations. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Ring 2 chromosome associated with failure to thrive, microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uriarte, Arelí; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; de la Fuente Cortez, Beatriz; Puente, Viviana Gómez; Campos, María Del Roble Velazco; de Villarreal, Laura E Martínez

    2013-10-15

    We report here a child with a ring chromosome 2 [r(2)] associated with failure to thrive, microcephaly and dysmorphic features. The chromosomal aberration was defined by chromosome microarray analysis, revealing two small deletions of 2p25.3 (139 kb) and 2q37.3 (147 kb). We show the clinical phenotype of the patient, using a conventional approach and the molecular cytogenetics of a male with a history of prenatal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), failure to thrive, microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. The phenotype is very similar to that reported in other clinical cases with ring chromosome 2. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Neurobiological Features and an Updated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Arienzo, Donatello; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2013-01-01

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) affects approximately 2% of the population and involves misperceived defects of appearance along with obsessive preoccupation and compulsive behaviors. There is evidence of neurobiological abnormalities associated with symptoms in BDD, although research to date is still limited. This review covers the latest neuropsychological, genetic, neurochemical, psychophysical, and neuroimaging studies and synthesizes these findings into an updated (yet still preliminary) neurobiological model of the pathophysiology of BDD. We propose a model in which visual perceptual abnormalities, along with frontostriatal and limbic system dysfunction, may combine to contribute to the symptoms of impaired insight and obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors expressed in BDD. Further research is necessary to gain a greater understanding of the etiological formation of BDD symptoms and their evolution over time. PMID:25419211

  14. Dysmorphic features and developmental outcome of 2-year-old children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seggers, Jorien; Haadsma, Maaike L.; Bos, Arend F.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Middelburg, Karin J.; Van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2014-01-01

    AimThe aim of this study was to assess the associations between dysmorphic features and neurological, mental, psychomotor, and behavioural development in order to improve our understanding of aetiological pathways leading to minor developmental problems. MethodIn our cross-sectional study, 272

  15. Dysmorphic features and developmental outcome of 2-year-old children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seggers, Jorien; Haadsma, Maaike L.; Bos, Arend F.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Middelburg, Karin J.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the associations between dysmorphic features and neurological, mental, psychomotor, and behavioural development in order to improve our understanding of aetiological pathways leading to minor developmental problems. In our cross-sectional study, 272 generally

  16. Mutations in HIVEP2 are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinfeld, Hallie; Cho, Megan T.; Retterer, Kyle; Person, Rick; Schaefer, G. Bradley; Danylchuk, Noelle; Malik, Saleem; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Wheeler, Patricia G.; van Gassen, Koen L I; Terhal, P. A.; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon A.; Monaghan, Kristin G.; Henderson, Lindsay B.; Chung, Wendy K.

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer binding protein 2 (HIVEP2) has been previously associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay in three patients. Here, we describe six patients with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features with de novo likely

  17. Ring chromosome 9 in a girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour Sibbesen, Else; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Alosi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a female child with dysmorphic features and developmental delay. Chromosome microarray analysis followed by conventional karyotyping revealed a ring chromosome 9 with a 12 Mb deletion at 9pter-p23 and a 540 kb deletion at 9q34.3-qter. Four percent of the analyzed cells...

  18. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and its Association With Body Features in Female Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffi Ahamed, Shaik; Enani, Jawaher; Alfaraidi, Lama; Sannari, Lujain; Algain, Rihaf; Alsawah, Zainah; Al Hazmi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing psychiatric disorder. So far there have not been any studies on BDD in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in female medical students and to investigate whether there is an association between BDD and body features of concern, social anxiety and symptoms of BDD. A cross sectional study was carried out on female medical students of the college of medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during January to April, 2015. Data were collected using the body image disturbance questionnaire, Body dysmorphic disorder symptomatology and social interaction anxiety scale. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analysis were used to analyze the results. Out of 365 students who filled out the questionnaire, 4.4% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.54% to 7.04%) were positive for BDD with skin (75%) and fat (68.8%) as the most frequent body features of concern. Ten features (skin, fat, chest, hips, buttocks, arms, legs, lips, fingers, and shoulders) out of twenty-six were significantly associated with BDD. Arms and chest were independently associated with BDD. The odds of presence of body concern related to "arms" was 4.3 (95% C.I: 1.5, 12.1) times more in BDD subjects than non-BDD subjects, while concern about "chest" was 3.8 (1.3, 10.9) times more when compared to non-BDD subjects. No statistically significant association was observed between BDD and social anxiety (P = 0.13). This was the first study conducted in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) on female medical students, which quantified the prevalence of BDD and identified the body features associated with it. Body dysmorphic disorder is prevalent in female medical students but it is relatively rare and an unnoticed disorder.

  19. Population differences in dysmorphic features among children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

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    May, Philip A; Gossage, J Phillip; Smith, Matthew; Tabachnick, Barbara G; Robinson, Luther K; Manning, Melanie; Cecanti, Mauro; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Khaole, Nathaniel; Buckley, David; Kalberg, Wendy O; Trujillo, Phyllis M; Hoyme, H Eugene

    2010-05-01

    To examine the variation in significant dysmorphic features in children from 3 different populations with the most dysmorphic forms of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), and partial fetal alcohol syndrome (PFAS). Advanced multiple regression techniques are used to determine the discriminating physical features in the diagnosis of FAS and PFAS among children from Northern Plains Indian communities, South Africa, and Italy. Within the range of physical features used to identify children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, specifically FAS and PFAS, there is some significant variation in salient diagnostic features from one population to the next. Intraclass correlations in diagnostic features between these 3 populations is 0.20, indicating that about 20% of the variability in dysmorphology core features is associated with location and, therefore, specific racial/ethnic population. The highly significant diagnostic indicators present in each population are identified for the full samples of FAS, PFAS, and normals and also among children with FAS only. A multilevel model for these populations combined indicates that these variables predict dysmorphology unambiguously: small palpebral fissures, narrow vermillion, smooth philtrum, flat nasal bridge, and fifth finger clinodactyly. Long philtrum varies substantially as a predictor in the 3 populations. Predictors not significantly related to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders dysmorphology across the 3 populations are centile of height (except in Italy) strabismus, interpupilary distance, intercanthal distance, and heart murmurs. The dysmorphology associated with FAS and PFAS vary across populations, yet a particular array of common features occurs in each population, which permits a consistent diagnosis across populations.

  20. Three Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in a Patient with Developmental Delay, Mental Retardation, and Dysmorphic Features

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    Jie Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized three supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs simultaneously present in a 2-year- and 10-month-old male patient with mental retardation and dysmorphic features. Peripheral blood chromosome analysis revealed two to three SMCs in 25/26 cells analyzed. The remaining one cell had one SMC. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH showed mosaicism for gains of 5q35.3, 15q11.2q13.3, and 18p11.21q11.1 regions. All three gains contain multiple OMIM genes. FISH studies indicated that one of the SMCs is a dicentric ring 15 with two copies of the 15q11.2q13.3 region including SNRPN/UBE3A and two copies of the 5q35.3 region. One of the der(18s contains the 18 centromere and 18p11.2 regions, while the other der(18 has a signal for the 18 centromere only. The phenotype of the patient is compared with that of patients with tetrasomy 15q11.2q13.3, trisomy 5q35.3, and trisomy 18p11.2. Our study demonstrates that aCGH and FISH analyses are powerful tools, which complement the conventional cytogenetic analysis for the identification of SMCs.

  1. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms and Associated Clinical Features among Australian University Students

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    Bartsch, Dianna

    2007-01-01

    The current study addressed the frequency of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms among university students and investigated the predictors of dysmorphic concern. Six hundred and nineteen Australian university students completed measures assessing BDD, dysmorphic concern, self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, self-oriented and socially…

  2. Photoanthropometric study of dysmorphic features of the face in children with autism and asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, Piotr; Kapinos-Gorczyca, Agnieszka; Ziora, Katarzyna; Oświęcimska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Childhood autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social interactions, verbal and non-verbal communication and by a pattern of stereotypical behaviors and interests. The aim of this study was to estimate the dysmorphic facial features of children with autism and children with Asperger syndrome. The examination was conducted on 60 children (30 with childhood autism and 30 with Asperger syndrome). The photo anthropometric method used in this study followed the protocol established by Stengel-Rutkowski et al. The performed statistical analysis showed that in patients with childhood autism, the anteriorly rotated ears and the long back of the nose appeared more often. In the group of children with autism, there was a connection between the amount of dysmorphies and the presence of some somatic diseases in the first-degree relatives. There was also a connection between the motor coordination and the age the child began to walk. In patients with childhood autism, there were certain dysmorphies (like the anterior rotated ears and the long back of the nose) which appeared more often. Although the connection was not statistically significant, it seemed to concur with data from the literature. Formulation of the other conclusions would require broader studies e.g. dealing with a familial analysis of dysmorphic features.

  3. Photoanthropometric Study of Dysmorphic Features of the Face in Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

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    Katarzyna Ziora

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Childhood autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social interactions, verbal and non-verbal communication and by a pattern of stereotypical behaviors and interests. The aim of this study was to estimate the dysmorphic facial features of children with autism and children with Asperger syndrome . Methods: The examination was conducted on 60 children (30 with childhood autism and 30 with Asperger syndrome. The photo anthropometric method used in this study followed the protocol established by Stengel-Rutkowski et al . Results: The performed statistical analysis showed that in patients with childhood autism, the anteriorly rotated ears and the long back of the nose appeared more often. In the group of children with autism, there was a connection between the amount of dysmorphies and the presence of some somatic diseases in the first-degree relatives. There was also a connection between the motor coordination and the age the child began to walk. Discussion: In patients with childhood autism, there were certain dysmorphies (like the anterior rotated ears and the long back of the nose which appeared more often. Although the connection was not statistically significant, it seemed to concur with data from the literature . Conclusion: Formulation of the other conclusions would require broader studies e.g. dealing with a familial analysis of dysmorphic features.

  4. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder and associated features in German adolescents: A self-report survey.

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    Möllmann, Anne; Dietel, Fanny A; Hunger, Antje; Buhlmann, Ulrike

    2017-08-01

    Prior research has not yet investigated the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in adolescents and young adults based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). In the current study, the point prevalence of BDD, comorbid symptoms, and associated features, such as appearance-related suicidality, level of insight or history of plastic surgeries, were examined in a non-clinical sample of German adolescents and young adults (n=308), between 15 and 21 years old, using self-report measures. Eleven participants (3.6%; 95% CI=[1.9, 5.8]) met DSM-5 criteria for BDD. Self-reported BDD (vs. no-BDD) was related to respondents showing significantly more obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms and lower degrees of insight regarding appearance concerns. Significantly more adolescents and young adults with vs. without self-reported BDD (36.4% vs. 8.8%) reported appearance-related suicidal ideation. In conclusion, body dysmorphic symptoms are common in adolescents and young adults and are associated with high rates of comorbid symptoms and suicidal ideation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical features of muscle dysmorphia among males with body dysmorphic disorder.

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    Pope, Courtney G; Pope, Harrison G; Menard, William; Fay, Christina; Olivardia, Roberto; Phillips, Katharine A

    2005-12-01

    Muscle dysmorphia - a pathological preoccupation with muscularity - appears to be a form of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) with a focus on muscularity. However, little is known about muscle dysmorphia in men with BDD, and no study has compared men with BDD who do and do not report muscle dysmorphia. To explore this issue, we reviewed the histories of 63 men with BDD; we compared those rated as having a history of muscle dysmorphia with those who had BDD but not muscle dysmorphia in several domains. The 14 men with muscle dysmorphia resembled the 49 comparison men in demographic features, BDD severity, delusionality, and number of non-muscle-related body parts of concern. However, those with muscle dysmorphia were more likely to have attempted suicide, had poorer quality of life, and had a higher frequency of any substance use disorder and anabolic steroid abuse. Thus, muscle dysmorphia was associated with greater psychopathology.

  6. 19p13.3 aberrations are associated with dysmorphic features and deviant psychomotor development.

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    Siggberg, L; Olsén, P; Näntö-Salonen, K; Knuutila, S

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe 2 patients with de novo genomic imbalances of 19p13.3. Using high-resolution microarray analysis, we detected a 1.25-Mb deletion in one patient and a 0.81- Mb duplication in another. The resulting phenotypes are quite different; one is a 2-year-old boy with macrocephaly and normal growth, while the other is a 9-year-old boy with microcephaly and growth retardation since birth. Both have dysmorphic features and psychomotor developmental delay. This report gives evidence of the effect of small aberrations of chromosome 19 and describes the phenotypes arising from a duplication and deletion of the same location at 19p13.3. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Seizures and EEG features in 74 patients with genetic-dysmorphic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfei, Enrico; Raviglione, Federico; Franceschetti, Silvana; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Milani, Donatella; Selicorni, Angelo; Riva, Daria; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Binelli, Simona

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common findings in chromosome aberrations. Types of seizures and severity may significantly vary both between different conditions and within the same aberration. Hitherto specific seizures and EEG patterns are identified for only few syndromes. We studied 74 patients with defined genetic-dysmorphic syndromes with and without epilepsy in order to assess clinical and electroencephalographic features, to compare our observation with already described electro-clinical phenotypes, and to identify putative electroencephalographic and/or seizure characteristics useful to address the diagnosis. In our population, 10 patients had chromosomal disorders, 19 microdeletion or microduplication syndromes, and 32 monogenic syndromes. In the remaining 13, syndrome diagnosis was assessed on clinical grounds. Our study confirmed the high incidence of epilepsy in genetic-dysmorphic syndromes. Moreover, febrile seizures and neonatal seizures had a higher incidence compared to general population. In addition, more than one third of epileptic patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. EEG study revealed poor background organization in 42 patients, an excess of diffuse rhythmic activities in beta, alpha or theta frequency bands in 34, and epileptiform patterns in 36. EEG was completely normal only in 20 patients. No specific electro-clinical pattern was identified, except for inv-dup15, Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Nevertheless some specific conditions are described in detail, because of notable differences from what previously reported. Regarding the diagnostic role of EEG, we found that--even without any epileptiform pattern--the generation of excessive rhythmic activities in different frequency bandwidths might support the diagnosis of a genetic syndrome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. An exceptional Albanian family with seven children presenting with dysmorphic features and mental retardation: maternal phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigel Corina

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylketonuria is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism which can cause severe damage to the patient or, in the case of maternal phenylketonuria, to the foetus. The maternal phenylketonuria syndrome is caused by high blood phenylalanine concentrations during pregnancy and presents with serious foetal anomalies, especially congenital heart disease, microcephaly and mental retardation. Case presentation We report on an affected Albanian woman and her seven children. The mother is affected by phenylketonuria and is a compound heterozygote for two pathogenetic mutations, L48S and P281L. The diagnosis was only made in the context of her children, all of whom have at least one severe organic malformation. The first child, 17 years old, has a double-chambered right ventricle, vertebral malformations and epilepsy. She is also mentally retarded, microcephalic, exhibits facial dysmorphies and small stature. The second child, a girl 15 years of age, has severe mental retardation with microcephaly, small stature and various dysmorphic features. The next sibling, a boy, died of tetralogy of Fallot at the age of three months. He also had multiple vertebral and rib malformations. The subsequent girl, now eleven years old, has mental retardation, microcephaly and epilepsy along with facial dysmorphy, partial deafness and short stature. The eight-year-old child is slightly mentally retarded and microcephalic. A five-year-old boy was a premature, dystrophic baby and exhibits mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly and clinodactyly of the fifth finger on both hands. Following a miscarriage, our index case, the youngest child at two years of age, is microcephalic and mentally retarded and shows minor facial anomalies. All children exhibit features of phenylalanine embryopathy caused by maternal phenylketonuria because the mother had not been diagnosed earlier and, therefore, never received any diet. Conclusion This is

  9. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzonca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A; Nürnberg, Peter; van Gassen, Koen L I; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-11-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical syndromes with various degrees of severity arise from a single gene, a single mutation, or from different mutations showing similar functional defects. Accordingly, several genes coding for GABAA receptor subunits have been linked to a spectrum of benign to severe epileptic disorders and it was shown that a loss of function presents the major correlated pathomechanism. Here, we identified six variants in GABRA3 encoding the α3-subunit of the GABAA receptor. This gene is located on chromosome Xq28 and has not been previously associated with human disease. Five missense variants and one microduplication were detected in four families and two sporadic cases presenting with a range of epileptic seizure types, a varying degree of intellectual disability and developmental delay, sometimes with dysmorphic features or nystagmus. The variants co-segregated mostly but not completely with the phenotype in the families, indicating in some cases incomplete penetrance, involvement of other genes, or presence of phenocopies. Overall, males were more severely affected and there were three asymptomatic female mutation carriers compared to only one male without a clinical phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation studies could not explain the phenotypic variability in females. Three detected missense variants are localized in the extracellular GABA-binding NH2-terminus, one in the M2-M3 linker and one in the M4 transmembrane segment of the α3-subunit. Functional studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a variable but significant reduction of GABA-evoked anion currents for all mutants compared to wild-type receptors. The degree of current reduction correlated partially with the phenotype

  10. Gonadal mosaicism in ARID1B gene causes intellectual disability and dysmorphic features in three siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Sobreira, Nara; Akawi, Nadia A; Al-Shamsi, Aisha M; John, Anne; Pramathan, Thachillath; Valle, David; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding the AT-rich interaction domain-containing protein 1B (ARID1B) has recently been shown to be one of the most frequently mutated genes in patients with intellectual disability (ID). The phenotypic spectrums associated with variants in this gene vary widely ranging for mild to severe non-specific ID to Coffin-Siris syndrome. In this study, we evaluated three children from a consanguineous Emirati family affected with ID and dysmorphic features. Genomic DNA from all affected siblings was analyzed using CGH array and whole-exome sequencing (WES). Based on a recessive mode of inheritance, homozygous or compound heterozygous variants shared among all three affected children could not be identified. However, further analysis revealed a heterozygous variant (c.4318C>T; p.Q1440*) in the three affected children in an autosomal dominant ID causing gene, ARID1B. This variant was absent in peripheral blood samples obtained from both parents and unaffected siblings. Therefore, we propose that the most likely explanation for this situation is that one of the parents is a gonadal mosaic for the variant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a gonadal mosaicism inheritance of an ARID1B variant leading to familial ID recurrence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Dominant ELOVL1 mutation causes neurological disorder with ichthyotic keratoderma, spasticity, hypomyelination and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, Anna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Kłosowska-Kosicka, Kamila; Mika, Adriana; Gruchota, Jakub; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta; Kowalewski, Cezary; Pollak, Agnieszka; Stradomska, Teresa Joanna; Kmieć, Tomasz; Jakubowski, Rafał; Gasperowicz, Piotr; Walczak, Anna; Śladowski, Dariusz; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Korniszewski, Lech; Kosińska, Joanna; Obersztyn, Ewa; Nowak, Wieslaw; Śledziński, Tomasz; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Płoski, Rafał

    2018-06-01

    Ichthyosis and neurological involvement occur in relatively few known Mendelian disorders caused by mutations in genes relevant both for epidermis and neural function. To identify the cause of a similar phenotype of ichthyotic keratoderma, spasticity, mild hypomyelination (on MRI) and dysmorphic features (IKSHD) observed in two unrelated paediatric probands without family history of disease. Whole exome sequencing was performed in both patients. The functional effect of prioritised variant in ELOVL1 (very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) elongase) was analysed by VLCFA profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in stably transfected HEK2932 cells and in cultured patient's fibroblasts. Probands shared novel heterozygous ELOVL1 p.Ser165Phe mutation (de novo in one family, while in the other family, father could not be tested). In transfected cells p.Ser165Phe: (1) reduced levels of FAs C24:0-C28:0 and C26:1 with the most pronounced effect for C26:0 (P=7.8×10 -6  vs HEK293 cells with wild type (wt) construct, no difference vs naïve HEK293) and (2) increased levels of C20:0 and C22:0 (P=6.3×10 -7 , P=1.2×10 -5 , for C20:0 and C22:0, respectively, comparison vs HEK293 cells with wt construct; P=2.2×10 -7 , P=1.9×10 -4 , respectively, comparison vs naïve HEK293). In skin fibroblasts, there was decrease of C26:1 (P=0.014), C28:0 (P=0.001) and increase of C20:0 (P=0.033) in the patient versus controls. There was a strong correlation (r=0.92, P=0.008) between the FAs profile of patient's fibroblasts and that of p.Ser165Phe transfected HEK293 cells. Serum levels of C20:0-C26:0 FAs were normal, but the C24:0/C22:0 ratio was decreased. The ELOVL1 p.Ser165Phe mutation is a likely cause of IKSHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Clinical features of muscle dysmorphia among males with body dysmorphic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Courtney G.; Pope, Harrison G.; Menard, William; Fay, Christina; Olivardia, Roberto; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2005-01-01

    Muscle dysmorphia – a pathological preoccupation with muscularity – appears to be a form of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) with a focus on muscularity. However, little is known about muscle dysmorphia in men with BDD, and no study has compared men with BDD who do and do not report muscle dysmorphia. To explore this issue, we reviewed the histories of 63 men with BDD; we compared those rated as having a history of muscle dysmorphia with those who had BDD but not muscle dysmorphia in several do...

  13. 3p interstitial deletion including PRICKLE2 in identical twins with autistic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Miyajima, Masakazu; Shimojima, Keiko; Kondo, Satoshi; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Microdeletion and microduplication syndromes without characteristic dysmorphic features are difficult to diagnose without chromosomal microarrays. We describe the clinical course and genetic findings of monozygotic twins with intellectual disabilities and autistic features associated with mild facial dysmorphism and microdeletion of chromosome 3p14. The postnatal course of the second twin was complicated by intestinal malrotation, whereas that of the first twin was unremarkable. Both twins had several mild dysmorphic features including upswept frontal hair, low-set posterior rotated ears, arched down-slanting eyebrows, prominent forehead, epicanthic folds, micrognathia, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, short philtrum, and camptodactyly of the bilateral fifth fingers. They had autistic features such as poor eye contact and no social smile, stereotyped behaviors, and preference for solitary play. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed de novo 6.88-Mb deletions of 3p14 (chr3: 60,472,496-67,385,119) involving 17 genes in both twins. The deleted region contained 17 genes, five of which are known or presumed to be related to central nervous system disorders: FEZF2, SYNPR, ATXN7, PRICKLE2, and MAGI1. We consider that PRICKLE2 is the most likely causative gene for the autistic features exhibited by these individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perihan Cam Ray

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Body dysmorphic disorder is a type of mental illness, wherein the affected person is concerned with body image, manifested as excessive concern about and preoccupation with a perceived defect of their physical features. Although it is a common disease and has been defined in the literature over a century, it is not a well known disease. Chronic, treatment resistant and sometimes delusional nature could result in severe functional impairment. The diagnosis and appropriate therapy of disorder are crucial because of increased suicidality and reduction in life quality. In this article the symptoms, etiology, clinical features and treatment of body dysmorphic disorder are briefly reviewed.

  15. Novel de novo pathogenic variant in the NR2F2 gene in a boy with congenital heart defect and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadia, Jariya; Gonzales, Patrick R; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2018-04-16

    The NR2F2 gene plays an important role in angiogenesis and heart development. Moreover, this gene is involved in organogenesis in many other organs in mouse models. Variants in this gene have been reported in a number of patients with nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defect, and in one patient with congenital heart defect and dysmorphic features. Here we report an 11-month-old Caucasian male with global developmental delay, dysmorphic features, coarctation of the aorta, and ventricular septal defect. He was later found to have a pathogenic mutation in the NR2F2 gene by whole exome sequencing. This is the second instance in which an NR2F2 mutation has been identified in a child with a congenital heart defect and other anomalies. This case suggests that some variants in NR2F2 may cause syndromic forms of congenital heart defect. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Macrocephaly, epilepsy, autism, dysmorphic features, and mental retardation in two sisters: a new autosomal recessive syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Orstavik, K H; Strømme, P; Ek, J; Torvik, A; Skjeldal, O H

    1997-01-01

    We report two sisters with macrocephaly, epilepsy, and severe mental retardation. The first child was a 14 year old girl born at term after a normal pregnancy, with birth weight 3600 g and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC) 36 cm (75th centile). Her head size increased markedly during the first six months of life, and was later stable at 2-3 cm above the 97.5th centile. Her development was characterised by psychomotor delay, epilepsy, and autistic features. Her face appeared mildly dysmorphi...

  17. 抑郁症合并躯体变形障碍的临床特征%CLINICAL FEATURES OF DEPRESSION WITH BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程宇

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical features of depression with body dysmorphic disorder .Meth‐ods A comparative study on the clinical data of 138 patients who had depression with or without body dysmorphic disorder was conducted .Results Of the 17 patients (12 .32% ) with depression and body dysmor‐phic disorder ,the levels of anxiety ,despair ,psychomotor inhibition ,self‐accusation ,self‐guilty and sui‐cidal behavior were found much higher than those in the patients without body dysmorphic disorder .The attack time in patients with body dysmorphic disorder was earlier than that in patientd without body dys‐morphic disorder ,and the combined treatments were frequently used .There existed no significant differ‐ence in onset time and curative effect between the two groups .Conclusion Body dysmorphic disorder is common in patients with depression ,and measures for preventing suicide in patients with body dysmorphic disorder should be taken .%目的:探讨抑郁症合并躯体变形障碍的临床特征。方法对138例抑郁症患者按照合并躯体变形障碍和不合并躯体变形障碍分为两组,对比分析两组患者的临床资料。结果抑郁症合并躯体变形障碍者17例(12.32%),其焦虑、绝望、精神运动性抑制、自责自罪、自杀行为显著高于不合并躯体障碍者,其发病年龄较早,联合用药较多,而起效时间、疗效与不合并躯体变形障碍者无显著性差异。结论躯体变形障碍在抑郁症中并非少见,对伴有躯体变形障碍的抑郁症患者应谨防自杀行为的发生。

  18. Severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and dysmorphic features in neonate with a deletion involving TWIST1 and PHF14: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinagl, Carina; Melum, Guro Reinholt; Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Andresen, Jannicke Hanne

    2017-08-17

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a well-known disease of the newborn that in most cases responds well to treatment with nitric oxide and treatment of any underlying causes. Genetic causes of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn are rare. The TWIST1 gene is involved in morphogenetics, and deletions are known to cause Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Deletions of PHF14 have never been reported in neonates, but animal studies have shown a link between severe defects in lung development and deletions of this gene. There have not, to the best of our knowledge, been any publications of a link between the genes TWIST1 and PHF14 and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, making this a novel finding. We describe a white male neonate born at term to non-consanguineous white parents; he presented with dysmorphic features and a therapy-refractory persistent pulmonary hypertension. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed the presence of a 14.7 Mb interstitial deletion on chromosome 7, encompassing the genes TWIST1 and PHF14. The TWIST1 gene can explain our patient's dysmorphic features. His severe persistent pulmonary hypertension has, however, not been described before in conjunction with the TWIST1 gene, but could be explained by involvement of PHF14, consistent with findings in animal experiments showing lethal respiratory failure with depletion of PHF14. These findings are novel and of importance for the clinical management and diagnostic workup of neonates with severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and dysmorphic features.

  19. Including product features in process redesign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars; Hauksdóttir, Dagný; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    do not take into account how the product features are applied throughout the process, which makes it difficult to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the activities in the processes and to generate significant improvements. The suggested approach models the product family using the so......This article suggests a visual modelling method for integrating models of product features with business process models for redesigning the business processes involving specifications of customer-tailored products and services. The current methods for redesigning these types of business processes......-called product variant master and the business process modelling notation for modelling the process flow. The product model is combined with the process map by identifying features used in each step of the process flow. Additionally, based on the information absorbed from the integrated model, the value stream...

  20. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Dilzell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome.

  1. Monozygotic twins with a de novo 0.32 Mb 16q24.3 deletion, including TUBB3 presenting with developmental delay and mild facial dysmorphism but without overt brain malformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Hove, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    been associated with missense mutations in this group of genes. Here, we report two patients, monozygotic twins, carrying a de novo 0.32 Mb deletion of chromosome 16q24.3 including the TUBB3 gene. The patients presented with global developmental delay, mild facial dysmorphism, secondary microcephaly...

  2. Proximal 21q deletion as a result of a de novo unbalanced t(12;21) translocation in a patient with dysmorphic features, hepatomegaly, thick myocardium and delayed psychomotor development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Damgaard, Ida N; Cornelius, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    of the region from 32.3 Mb to 37.1 Mb was more crucial than the deletion of other regions. CASE PRESENTATION: In this study we describe a female patient with dysmorphic features, hepatomegaly, thick myocardium and psychomotor delay. Conventional karyotyping was initially interpreted as full monosomy 21...

  3. The face in marfan syndrome: A 3D quantitative approach for a better definition of dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Claudia; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Gibelli, Daniele M; Codari, Marina; Marelli, Susan; Trifirò, Giuliana; Pini, Alessandro; Sforza, Chiarella

    2018-04-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare hereditable disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene FBN1. Timely diagnosis of MFS is essential to prevent life-threatening cardiovascular complications; nevertheless it can be difficult owing to the phenotypic variability of the syndrome. No clear quantitative definition of facial abnormalities associated with MFS is available. The aim of this study was to improve the definition of the facial phenotype associated with MFS and to verify the usefulness of a 3D noninvasive quantitative approach for its early recognition. 3D facial images of 61 Italian subjects with MFS, aged 16-64 years (21 males, 38 ± 15 years; 40 females, 41 ± 13 years) were obtained by stereophotogrammetry. From the coordinates of 17 soft-tissue facial landmarks, linear distances and angles were computed; z score values were calculated to compare patients with healthy reference subjects (400 males, 379 females) matched for sex and age. Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons. All subjects with MFS showed greater facial divergence (P sex differences. Quantitative abnormalities identified in this study enrich information about the facial dysmorphism in MFS and confirm its usefulness for early recognition of the disease. Clin. Anat. 31:380-386, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cosmetic Professionals' Awareness of Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Theo K; Mulkens, Sandra; van der Lei, Berend

    2017-02-01

    Preoccupation with a perceived appearance flaw is the main feature of body dysmorphic disorder. The majority of these patients seek and often receive some sort of cosmetic procedure, although this condition is considered to be a contraindication. This study evaluates cosmetic professionals' recognition of body dysmorphic disorder and the way they act on this. Members of Dutch professional associations for aesthetic plastic surgery, dermatology, and cosmetic medicine received an online survey by means of their association's digital mailing lists; the survey was completed by 173 respondents. Most participants indicated being more or less familiar with the diagnostic criteria and clinical picture of body dysmorphic disorder. Approximately two-thirds of the participants reported that they had encountered between one and five of these patients in their practice over the past year, a percentage that is significantly lower than the estimated prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder. The majority of professionals sometimes or often address body image problems during consultation, most of them collaborate with psychologists or psychiatrists when encountering a patient with body dysmorphic disorder, and approximately 70 percent had refused to perform a procedure in such a patient. Our results converge with those of previous studies, showing that most cosmetic professionals have some degree of awareness of body dysmorphic disorder, although the number they report encountering in clinical practice departs from prevalence figures. When a patient is identified as having body dysmorphic disorder, the professionals use this knowledge to guide their decision to perform a cosmetic procedure.

  5. A Case of 17q21.31 Microduplication and 7q31.33 Microdeletion, Associated with Developmental Delay, Microcephaly, and Mild Dysmorphic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Mc Cormack

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent cryptic microdeletion and microduplication syndromes have recently started to reveal themselves with the advent of microarray technology. Analysis has shown that low-copy repeats (LCRs have allowed chromosome regions throughout the genome to become hotspots for nonallelic homologous recombination to take place. Here, we report a case of a 7.5-year-old girl who manifests microcephaly, developmental delay, and mild dysmorphic features. Microarray analysis identified a microduplication in chromosome 17q21.31, which encompasses the CRHR1, MAPT, and KANSL1 genes, as well as a microdeletion in chromosome 7q31.33 that is localised within the GRM8 gene. To our knowledge this is one of only a few cases of 17q21.31 microduplication. The clinical phenotype of patients with this microduplication is milder than of those carrying the reciprocal microdeletions, and suggests that the lower incidence of the former compared to the latter may be due to underascertainment.

  6. Deletion of 7q34-q36.2 in two siblings with mental retardation, language delay, primary amenorrhea, and dysmorphic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Line T; Møller, Rikke S; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    We describe a chromosome rearrangement, ins(7;13)(q32q34;q32), which segregates in a three generation family, giving rise to three individuals with an unbalanced rearrangement. Two of the individuals, a sister and a brother, were investigated further in this study. They had minor facial dysmorphi...... patients with previously reported patients, supports that haploinsuffiency of CNTNAP2 can result in language delay and/or autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, we report on the second women with a deletion involving NOBOX who is affected by primary amenorrhea.......We describe a chromosome rearrangement, ins(7;13)(q32q34;q32), which segregates in a three generation family, giving rise to three individuals with an unbalanced rearrangement. Two of the individuals, a sister and a brother, were investigated further in this study. They had minor facial dysmorphism...... and neuropsychiatric disorders including mental retardation, language delay and epilepsy. The sister had primary amenorrhea. Array CGH revealed a 12.2¿Mb deletion at 7q34-q36.2 including more than 60 genes where CNTNAP2 and NOBOX are of special interest. Comparison of the clinical and cytogenetic findings of our...

  7. Complex chromosome rearrangement in a child with microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features and mosaicism for a terminal deletion del(18(q21.32-qter investigated by FISH and array-CGH: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokotas Haris

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 7 years and 4 months old Greek boy with mild microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. He was a sociable child with maxillary hypoplasia, epicanthal folds, upslanting palpebral fissures with long eyelashes, and hypertelorism. His ears were prominent and dysmorphic, he had a long philtrum and a high arched palate. His weight was 17 kg (25th percentile and his height 120 cm (50th percentile. High resolution chromosome analysis identified in 50% of the cells a normal male karyotype, and in 50% of the cells one chromosome 18 showed a terminal deletion from 18q21.32. Molecular cytogenetic investigation confirmed a del(18(q21.32-qter in the one chromosome 18, but furthermore revealed the presence of a duplication in q21.2 in the other chromosome 18. The case is discussed concerning comparable previously reported cases and the possible mechanisms of formation.

  8. Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... compulsive disorder. Environment. Your environment, life experiences and culture may contribute to body dysmorphic disorder, especially if they involve negative social evaluations about your body or self-image, or even childhood neglect or abuse. Risk factors ...

  9. A twin study of body dysmorphic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, B; Rijsdijk, F; Anson, M; Iervolino, A C; Cherkas, L; Spector, T; Mataix-Cols, D

    2012-09-01

    Dysmorphic concern refers to an excessive preoccupation with a perceived or slight defect in physical appearance. It lies on a continuum of severity from no or minimal concerns to severe concerns over one's appearance. The present study examined the heritability of dysmorphic concerns in a large sample of twins. Twins from the St Thomas UK twin registry completed a valid and reliable self-report measure of dysmorphic concerns, which also includes questions about perceived body odour and malfunction. Twin modelling methods (female twins only, n=3544) were employed to decompose the variance in the liability to dysmorphic concerns into additive genetic, shared and non-shared environmental factors. Model-fitting analyses showed that genetic factors accounted for approximately 44% [95% confidence intervals (CI) 36-50%] of the variance in dysmorphic concerns, with non-shared environmental factors and measurement error accounting for the remaining variance (56%; 95% CI 50-63%). Shared environmental factors were negligible. The results remained unchanged when excluding individuals reporting an objective medical condition/injury accounting for their concern in physical appearance. Over-concern with a perceived or slight defect in physical appearance is a heritable trait, with non-shared environmental factors also playing an important role in its causation. The results are relevant for various psychiatric disorders characterized by excessive concerns in body appearance, odour or function, including but not limited to body dysmorphic disorder.

  10. A de novo 11q23 deletion in a patient presenting with severe ophthalmologic findings, psychomotor retardation and facial dysmorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek-Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Bayram, Yavuz; Ütine, Gülen Eda; Alanay, Yasemin; Boduroğlu, Koray

    2014-01-01

    Distal 11q deletion, previously known as Jacobsen syndrome, is caused by segmental aneusomy for the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 11. Typical clinical features include facial dysmorphism, mild-to-moderate psychomotor retardation, trigonocephaly, cardiac defects, and thrombocytopenia. There is a significant variability in the range of clinical features. We report herein a five-year-old girl with severe ophthalmological findings, facial dysmorphism, and psychomotor retardation with normal platelet function, in whom a de novo 11q23 deletion was detected, suggesting that distal 11q monosomy should be kept in mind in patients presenting with dysmorphic facial features and psychomotor retardation even in the absence of hematological findings.

  11. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Patients Presenting for Cosmetic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Altintas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Body dysmorphic disorder is an obsessive-compulsive related psychiatric disorder characterized by excessive preoccupation about an imagined or slight defect in appearance. Preoccupation of the appearance with the skin, hair and nose are most common. Impairment of the quality of life, comorbidity of the psychiatric and personality disorder are related with body dysmorphic disorder. Nowadays, cosmetic procedure has become increasingly popular especially among women. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among patients seeking cosmetic treatment in surgery or dermatology clinics is higher than general population. As postoperatively some patients dissatisfied with the surgery, dermatologists and surgeons should be informed about body dysmorphic disorder. This aim of this review was to assess prevalance, clinical features, motivational factors of patients with body dysmorphic disorder presenting for cosmetic medical treatments. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 324-338

  12. Chromosome 12q24.31-q24.33 deletion causes multiple dysmorphic features and developmental delay: First mosaic patient and overview of the phenotype related to 12q24qter defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakati Nadia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imbalances of the 12q telomere are rare; only a few patients having 12q24.31-q24.33 deletions were reported. Interestingly none of these were mosaic. Although some attempts have been made to establish phenotype/genotype interaction for the deletions in this region, no clear relationship has been established to date. Results We have clinically screened more than 100 patients with dysmorphic features, mental retardation and normal karyotype using high density oligo array-CGH (aCGH and identified a ~9.2 Mb hemizygous interstitial deletion at the 12q telomere (Chromosome 12: 46,XY,del(12(q24.31q24.33 in a severely developmentally retarded patient having dysmorphic features such as low set ears, microcephaly, undescended testicles, bent elbow, kyphoscoliosis, and micropenis. Parents were found to be not carriers. MLPA experiments confirmed the aCGH result. Interphase FISH revealed mosaicism in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusions Since conventional G-Banding technique missed the abnormality; this work re-confirms that any child with unexplained developmental delay and systemic involvement should be studied by aCGH techniques. The FISH technique, however, would still be useful to further delineate the research work and identify such rare mosaicism. Among the 52 deleted genes, P2RX2, ULK1, FZD10, RAN, NCOR2 STX2, TESC, FBXW8, and TBX3 are noteworthy since they may have a role in observed phenotype.

  13. Body dysmorphic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jawad, Mustafa Bashir M; Sjögren, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is defined by a preoccupation of one or more non-existent or slight defects or flaws in the physical appearance. The prevalence is 1.7-2.4% in the general population with a higher incidence rate in women. The rate of suicidal ideation is as high as 80%, and up to 25...

  14. Body dysmorphic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatte, Julia; Vulink, Nienke; Kemperman, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a mental disorder by which the patient is obsessed with a perceived or minor defect in appearance, usually affecting the skin, hair, or nose, a defect hardly or not seen by others. This obsession can cause severe suffering and suicidality. Most patients consult a

  15. Body dysmorphic disorder: history and curiosities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Roccia, Maria Grazia; Castillo, David; ALHarbi, Mana; Tchernev, Georgi; Chokoeva, Anastasia; Lotti, Torello; Fioranelli, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by excessive preoccupation with an absent or minimal physical deformity. It causes severe distress and impairs normal functioning. In the last centuries, this disorder has been mentioned in the medical literature by important mental health practitioners by different names, such as "dysmorphophobia" or "dermatologic hypochondriasis". However, not until the last century was it included among the obsessive-compulsive disorders, although its classification has changed over time.Patients with body dysmorphic disorder constantly seek cosmetic treatments in order to improve their physical appearance, which more often deteriorates their mental condition. The high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in cosmetic medical practice has led in this field of study to the new science "cosmetic psychodermatology". This paper presents a summary of important facts about body dysmorphic disorder and its description throughout the history of medicine.

  16. [Body dysmorphic disorder : Anxiety about deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, T; Brähler, E

    2016-05-01

    Between 0.8 and 1.8 % of the German population suffers from a body dysmorphic disorder. In specific settings like dermatological offices up to 11.9 % of patients suffer from this disease. The highest prevalence could be found in the field of cosmetic dermatology with a prevalence of 13.1 %. Until now, the diagnosis has been made too rarely. The body dysmorphic disorder is a chronic psychic disease, in which the patients feel disfigured and experience shame and disgust at the same time. Comorbidities like social phobia, depression, suicidality, and eating disorders are frequent. The diagnosis is made using questionnaires (e.g., dysmorphic concern questionnaire) or by use of the DSM-5 manual. An early diagnosis seems to be important to avoid chronification and suicidal ideas. Therapeutic approaches should include cognitive behavioral therapies as well as the use of SSRIs.

  17. Prevalence and correlates of body dysmorphic disorder in a community sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sophie C; Turner, Cynthia M; Mond, Jonathan; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2017-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder typically begins in adolescence, yet little is known about the prevalence and correlates of the disorder in this age group. The current study aimed to explore the presenting features of adolescents meeting probable criteria for body dysmorphic disorder in a large community sample, and compare levels of comorbid psychopathology, quality of life and mental health service use between adolescents with probable body dysmorphic disorder and those without. Questionnaires were completed at school by 3149 adolescents: 63% male, aged 12-18 years ( M = 14.58). These assessed Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) body dysmorphic disorder criteria, past mental health service use and symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder, anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders. In male participants, additional measures assessed quality of life, muscularity concerns, emotional symptoms, peer problems, conduct problems and hyperactivity. The prevalence of probable body dysmorphic disorder was 1.7%; there was no sex difference in prevalence, but older adolescents reported higher prevalence than younger adolescents. Probable body dysmorphic disorder participants reported substantially elevated levels of psychopathology, quality of life impairment and mental health service use compared to non-body dysmorphic disorder participants. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in adolescents is similar to adult samples, and probable body dysmorphic disorder is associated with comorbidity, distress and functional impairment in a community sample. Further research is required to better understand the presentation of body dysmorphic disorder in adolescents, and to improve diagnosis and treatment.

  18. A novel malformation complex of bilateral and symmetric preaxial radial ray-thumb aplasia and lower limb defects with minimal facial dysmorphic features: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Krebs, Alexander; Grill, Franz

    2008-10-24

    Radial hemimelia is a congenital abnormality characterised by the partial or complete absence of the radius. The longitudinal hemimelia indicates the absence of one or more bones along the preaxial (medial) or postaxial (lateral) side of the limb. Preaxial limb defects occurred more frequently with a combination of microtia, esophageal atresia, anorectal atresia, heart defects, unilateral kidney dysgenesis, and some axial skeletal defects. Postaxial acrofacial dysostoses are characterised by distinctive facies and postaxial limb deficiencies, involving the 5th finger, metacarpal/ulnar/fibular/and metatarsal. The patient, an 8-year-old-boy with minimal craniofacial dysmorphic features but with profound upper limb defects of bilateral and symmetrical absence of the radius and the thumbs respectively. In addition, there was a unilateral tibio-fibular hypoplasia (hemimelia) associated with hypoplasia of the terminal phalanges and malsegmentation of the upper thoracic vertebrae, causing effectively the development of thoracic kyphosis. In the typical form of the preaxial acrofacial dysostosis, there are aberrations in the development of the first and second branchial arches and limb buds. The craniofacial dysmorphic features are characteristic such as micrognathia, zygomatic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and preaxial limb defects. Nager and de Reynier in 1948, who used the term acrofacial dysostosis (AFD) to distinguish the condition from mandibulofacial dysostosis. Neither the facial features nor the limb defects in our present patient appear to be absolutely typical with the previously reported cases of AFD. Our patient expands the phenotype of syndromic preaxial limb malformation complex. He might represent a new syndromic entity of mild naso-maxillary malformation in connection with axial and extra-axial malformation complex.

  19. Pharmacological Treatment Of Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kevin; Nezgovorova, Vera; Uzunova, Genoveva; Schlussel, Danya; Hollander, Eric

    2018-04-26

    Body dysmorphic disorder is a challenging disorder that manifests as erroneously perceived flaws in one's physical appearance and repetitive behaviors in response to appearance concerns. This disorder is also frequently comorbid with other psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder and autism spectrum disorder. It is currently understood to arise from a combination of biological, psychological, and environmental factors. Treatment of body dysmorphic disorder typically consists of a combination of pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. However, not all patients respond to treatment, and BDD symptoms remain even in those who do respond. This review outlines current pharmacological and neuromodulation treatments for body dysmorphic disorder, and suggests directions for future studies of novel treatments such as augmentation with atypical antipsychotics and the use of intranasal oxytocin in cases of body dysmorphic disorder that show residual symptomatology even with tailored monotherapy. There is emerging evidence suggesting that non-invasive neurostimulatory techniques, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, may be of value in treatment-resistant cases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Body dysmorphic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jawad, Mustafa Bashir M; Sjögren, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is defined by a preoccupation of one or more non-existent or slight defects or flaws in the physical appearance. The prevalence is 1.7-2.4% in the general population with a higher incidence rate in women. The rate of suicidal ideation is as high as 80%, and up to 25......% of the patients attempt to commit suicide. Comorbidities, such as obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and anxiety, are frequent. These patients may seek cosmetic or dermatologic rather than psychological treatment. In the view of the high prevalence and risk of suicide, recognizing this disorder...

  1. A novel syndrome of paediatric cataract, dysmorphism, ectodermal features, and developmental delay in Australian Aboriginal family maps to 1p35.3-p36.32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gecz Jozef

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel phenotype consisting of cataract, mental retardation, erythematous skin rash and facial dysmorphism was recently described in an extended pedigree of Australian Aboriginal descent. Large scale chromosomal re-arrangements had previously been ruled out. We have conducted a genome-wide scan to map the linkage region in this family. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP markers on the Affymetrix 10K SNP array was conducted and analysed using MERLIN. Three positional candidate genes (ZBTB17, EPHA2 and EPHB2 were sequenced to screen for segregating mutations. Results Under a fully penetrant, dominant model, the locus for this unique phenotype was mapped to chromosome 1p35.3-p36.32 with a maximum LOD score of 2.41. The critical region spans 48.7 cM between markers rs966321 and rs1441834 and encompasses 527 transcripts from 364 annotated genes. No coding mutations were identified in three positional candidate genes EPHA2, EPHB2 or ZBTB17. The region overlaps with a previously reported region for Volkmann cataract and the phenotype has similarity to that reported for 1p36 monosomy. Conclusions The gene for this syndrome is located in a 25.6 Mb region on 1p35.3-p36.32. The known cataract gene in this region (EPHA2 does not harbour mutations in this family, suggesting that at least one additional gene for cataract is present in this region.

  2. Pulmonary nodule characterization, including computer analysis and quantitative features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholmai, Brian J; Koo, Chi Wan; Johnson, Geoffrey B; White, Darin B; Raghunath, Sushravya M; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Moynagh, Michael R; Lindell, Rebecca M; Hartman, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary nodules are commonly detected in computed tomography (CT) chest screening of a high-risk population. The specific visual or quantitative features on CT or other modalities can be used to characterize the likelihood that a nodule is benign or malignant. Visual features on CT such as size, attenuation, location, morphology, edge characteristics, and other distinctive "signs" can be highly suggestive of a specific diagnosis and, in general, be used to determine the probability that a specific nodule is benign or malignant. Change in size, attenuation, and morphology on serial follow-up CT, or features on other modalities such as nuclear medicine studies or MRI, can also contribute to the characterization of lung nodules. Imaging analytics can objectively and reproducibly quantify nodule features on CT, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging. Some quantitative techniques show great promise in helping to differentiate benign from malignant lesions or to stratify the risk of aggressive versus indolent neoplasm. In this article, we (1) summarize the visual characteristics, descriptors, and signs that may be helpful in management of nodules identified on screening CT, (2) discuss current quantitative and multimodality techniques that aid in the differentiation of nodules, and (3) highlight the power, pitfalls, and limitations of these various techniques.

  3. The first missense mutation of NHS gene in a Tunisian family with clinical features of NHS syndrome including cardiac anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chograni, Manèl; Rejeb, Imen; Jemaa, Lamia Ben; Châabouni, Myriam; Bouhamed, Habiba Chaabouni

    2011-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) or X-linked cataract-dental syndrome is a disease of unknown gene action mechanism, characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features and, in some cases, mental retardation. We performed linkage analysis in a Tunisian family with NHS in which affected males and obligate carrier female share a common haplotype in the Xp22.32-p11.21 region that contains the NHS gene. Direct sequencing of NHS coding exons and flanking intronic sequences allowed us to identify the first missense mutation (P551S) and a reported SNP-polymorphism (L1319F) in exon 6, a reported UTR-SNP (c.7422 C>T) and a novel one (c.8239 T>A) in exon 8. Both variations P551S and c.8239 T>A segregate with NHS phenotype in this family. Although truncations, frame-shift and copy number variants have been reported in this gene, no missense mutations have been found to segregate previously. This is the first report of a missense NHS mutation causing NHS phenotype (including cardiac defects). We hypothesize also that the non-reported UTR-SNP of the exon 8 (3'-UTR) is specific to the Tunisian population.

  4. [Body dysmorphic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Katharina; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Allroggen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common disorder with a point prevalence of 0.7-2.4 %. BDD is characterized by the patient's excessive concern with an imagined or slight defect in physical appearance. BDD usually begins in adolescence. Comorbidity rates and also suicidality rates are high. The course of BDD tends to be chronic. According to the present state of knowledge, cognitive-behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are valuable options in the therapy of BDD. The case report describes a recent case of BDD with typical clinical and therapy-related characteristics. The aim of this work is to strengthen the awareness of BDD in clinical practice of child and adolescent psychiatry, facilitating an adequate diagnosis and treatment of the affected individuals.

  5. Patient Selection in Plastic Surgery: Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Sahin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plastic surgery is a branch of medicine that provides significant improvements to the people with positive changes. But first of all, this branch has a characteristic which requires analysing patients' psychological situation very carefully. Plastic surgeons are often confronted by patients with mental disorders seeking aesthetic surgery. It is imperative for surgeons to recognize possible underlying psychiatric illnesses. Common psychiatric conditions seen in cosmetic surgery patients include body dysmorphic disorder (BDD, narcissistic personality disorder and histrionic personality disorders. BDD is of particular importance to plastic surgeons. Because outrageous dissatisfaction with one's appearance may conceal psychopathologic traits that are not always easily recognizable, and which, if neglected, may result in serious iatrogenic and medicolegal consequences, we hope that this paper will help plastic surgeons in ultimately preventing patient and surgeon dissatisfaction within the population of patients with psychiatric disorders, and should recognize the diagnostic features of body dysmorphic disorder and screen psychologically unstable patients who may never be satisfied with surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 109-115

  6. Validation of Spanish Language Evaluation Instruments for Body Dysmorphic Disorder and the Dysmorphic Concern Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senín-Calderón, Cristina; Valdés-Díaz, María; Benítez-Hernández, Ma M; Núñez-Gaitán, Ma C; Perona-Garcelán, Salvador; Martínez-Cervantes, Rafael; Rodríguez-Testal, Juan F

    2017-01-01

    Dysmorphic concern (DC) refers to excessive preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in physical appearance with social avoidance and behavior directed at controlling the defect in appearance. This study attempted to adapt the factor structure of two instruments that cover the DC construct, the Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire (DCQ) and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination Self-Report (BDDE-SR), to Spanish and establish their psychometric properties. A total of 920 subjects (62.7% women, M age = 32.44 years) participated. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of both scales found adequate goodness of fit indices. A one-dimensional structure was found for the DCQ and two first-order factors (dissatisfaction/preoccupation with body image (BI) and BI avoidance behavior) were identified for the BDDE-SR. The psychometric test-retest reliability and validity properties (content, convergent, and discriminant) were satisfactory. It is suggested that the DC construct includes both cognitive and behavioral aspects and may represent a continuum of severity with Body Dysmorphic Disorder at the end.

  7. Validation of Spanish Language Evaluation Instruments for Body Dysmorphic Disorder and the Dysmorphic Concern Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Senín-Calderón

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dysmorphic concern (DC refers to excessive preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in physical appearance with social avoidance and behavior directed at controlling the defect in appearance. This study attempted to adapt the factor structure of two instruments that cover the DC construct, the Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire (DCQ and the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination Self-Report (BDDE-SR, to Spanish and establish their psychometric properties. A total of 920 subjects (62.7% women, Mage = 32.44 years participated. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of both scales found adequate goodness of fit indices. A one-dimensional structure was found for the DCQ and two first-order factors (dissatisfaction/preoccupation with body image (BI and BI avoidance behavior were identified for the BDDE-SR. The psychometric test–retest reliability and validity properties (content, convergent, and discriminant were satisfactory. It is suggested that the DC construct includes both cognitive and behavioral aspects and may represent a continuum of severity with Body Dysmorphic Disorder at the end.

  8. New perspectives in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kevin; Nezgovorova, Vera; Hollander, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a disabling illness with a high worldwide prevalence. Patients demonstrate a debilitating preoccupation with one or more perceived defects, often marked by poor insight or delusional convictions. Multiple studies have suggested that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and various cognitive behavioral therapy modalities are effective first-line treatments in decreasing BDD severity, relieving depressive symptoms, restoring insight, and increasing quality of life. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also recently been shown to be effective for relapse prevention. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the current understanding of BDD, including its clinical features, epidemiology, genetics, and current treatment modalities. Additional research is needed to fully elucidate the relationship between BDD and comorbid illnesses such as obsessive–compulsive-related disorders and depression and to develop therapies for refractory patients and those who have contraindications for pharmacological intervention. PMID:29636904

  9. Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder (Dysmorphophobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Anukriti; Rastogi, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Dysmorphophobia is a psychiatric condition which frequently presents in the clinics of dermatologists and plastic surgeons. This disorder (also called body dysmorphic disorder) is troublesome to the patient whilst being confusing for the doctor. This commonly undiagnosed condition can be detected by a few simple steps. Timely referral to a psychiatrist benefits most patients suffering from it. This article describes with a case vignette, how to recognize body dysmorphic disorder presenting in the dermatological or aesthetic surgery set up. Diagnostic criteria, eitiology, approach to patient, management strategy and when to refer are important learning points. The importance of recognizing this disorder timely and referring the patient to the psychiatrist for appropriate treatment is crucial. This article covers all aspects of body dysmorphic disorder relevant to dermatologists and plastic surgeons and hopes to be useful in a better understanding of this disorder. PMID:26644741

  10. The dysmorphic lung: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations are not infrequent and can be discovered in adults. It is, therefore, necessary to know their radiological manifestations in order to avoid diagnostic errors. We classify the congenital lung malformations in two main groups: dysmorphic lung and focal pulmonary malformations. We review the radiological spectrum of dysmorphic lung, based on a classification that emphasises the pulmonary abnormality, adding variants when diaphragmatic or venous abnormalities are present. In our opinion this approach allows for a rational use of advanced imaging techniques (CT, MRI). (orig.). With 13 figs

  11. The dysmorphic lung: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, J.M. [SDI-UDIAT, Consorci Hospitalari del Parc Tauli, Parc Tauli s/n, E-08208 Barcelona (Spain)]|[Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Caceres, J. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-08-01

    Congenital lung malformations are not infrequent and can be discovered in adults. It is, therefore, necessary to know their radiological manifestations in order to avoid diagnostic errors. We classify the congenital lung malformations in two main groups: dysmorphic lung and focal pulmonary malformations. We review the radiological spectrum of dysmorphic lung, based on a classification that emphasises the pulmonary abnormality, adding variants when diaphragmatic or venous abnormalities are present. In our opinion this approach allows for a rational use of advanced imaging techniques (CT, MRI). (orig.). With 13 figs.

  12. High prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in patients seeking rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picavet, Valerie A; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P; Gabriëls, Lutgardis; Jorissen, Mark; Hellings, Peter W

    2011-08-01

    Nasal aesthetic deformities may be associated with significant body image dissatisfaction. The only diagnostic category in the current list of psychiatric disorders that directly addresses these concerns is body dysmorphic disorder. This large-scale study determined the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder and its symptoms in patients seeking rhinoplasty and evaluated the clinical profile of these patients. Two hundred twenty-six patients were given questionnaires including demographic characteristics, visual analogue scales for nasal shape, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for body dysmorphic disorder to assess severity of symptoms, a generic quality-of-life questionnaire, and the Derriford Appearance Scale 59, to assess appearance-related disruption of everyday living. Independent observers scored the nasal shape. Thirty-three percent of patients showed at least moderate symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder. Aesthetic goals (p dysmorphic disorder scores correlated inversely with the subjective nasal scoring (n = 210, p dysmorphic disorder symptoms significantly reduced the generic quality of life (n = 160, p dysmorphic disorder symptoms in an aesthetic rhinoplasty population is high. Patients undergoing revision rhinoplasty and with psychiatric history are particularly at risk. Body dysmorphic disorder symptoms significantly reduce the quality of life and cause significant appearance-related disruption of everyday living. Risk, III.

  13. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. Methods This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Results Videofluoroscopy sw...

  14. 77 FR 48550 - Technicolor Creative Services, Post Production Feature Mastering Division Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Services, Post Production Feature Mastering Division Including On-Site Leased Workers From Ajilon... Services, Post Production Feature Mastering Division, Hollywood, California (subject firm). The worker... the workers meet the eligibility requirements of the Trade Act of 1974. Conclusion After careful...

  15. Partial monosomy Xq(Xq23 --> qter) and trisomy 4p(4p15.33 --> pter) in a woman with intractable focal epilepsy, borderline intellectual functioning, and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartocci, Arnaldo; Striano, Pasquale; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Fichera, Marco; Castiglia, Lucia; Galesi, Ornella; Michelucci, Roberto; Elia, Maurizio

    2008-06-01

    Studies of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities may provide information about clinical and EEG phenotypes and possibly to identify new epilepsy genes. We describe a female patient with intractable focal epilepsy, borderline intellectual functioning, and facial dysmorphisms, in whom genetic study (i.e., karyotype and array-CGH analysis) revealed a distal trisomy 4p and distal monosomy Xq. Although any genetic hypothesis remains speculative, several genes are located in the 4p chromosome segment involved in the rearrangement, some of which may be related to epilepsy.

  16. Morphometric study of the true S1 and S2 of the normal and dysmorphic sacralized sacra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Ayşegül; Alemdaroğlu, Kadir Bahadır; Özmeriç, Ahmet; Yücens, Mehmet; Göksülük, Dinçer

    2017-06-12

    This study aimed to generate data for the S1 and S2 alar pedicle and body and the alar orientations for both dysmorphic and normal sacra. The study comprised two groups: Group N consisted of 53 normal sacra and Group D included 10 dysmorphic sacra. Various features such as alar pedicle circumference; anterior, middle, and posterior axis of the sacral ala; sacral body height and width; and sagittal thickness were measured. In group N, the median anterior axis of the alae was observed to be 30° on the right and 25° on the left, the median midline axis was found to be 20° on the right and 15° on the left, and the median posterior alar axis was -15° on the right and -20° on the left. The true S1 and S2 alar pedicle circumferences were observed to be significantly smaller in group D, which demonstrated a shorter S1 alar pedicle mean circumference, significantly narrower S1 body mean width, and considerably tapered sagittal thickness. Our analysis indicated that dysmorphic sacra have a lower sagittal thickness and width of bodies and smaller alar pedicles, which explains the difficulties in their percutaneous fixation.

  17. Gender similarities and differences in 200 individuals with body dysmorphic disorder⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Menard, William; Fay, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Background Gender is a critically important moderator of psychopathology. However, gender similarities and differences in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have received scant investigation. In this study, we examined gender similarities and differences in the broadest sample in which this topic has been examined. Methods Two hundred subjects with BDD recruited from diverse sources were assessed with a variety of standard measures. Results There were more similarities than differences between men and women, but many gender differences were found. The men were significantly older and more likely to be single and living alone. Men were more likely to obsess about their genitals, body build, and thinning hair/balding; excessively lift weights; and have a substance use disorder. In contrast, women were more likely to obsess about their skin, stomach, weight, breasts/chest, buttocks, thighs, legs, hips, toes, and excessive body/facial hair, and they were excessively concerned with more body areas. Women also performed more repetitive and safety behaviors, and were more likely to camouflage and use certain camouflaging techniques, check mirrors, change their clothes, pick their skin, and have an eating disorder. Women also had earlier onset of subclinical BDD symptoms and more severe BDD as assessed by the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination. However, men had more severe BDD as assessed by the Psychiatric Status Rating Scale for Body Dysmorphic Disorder, and they had poorer Global Assessment of Functioning Scale scores, were less likely to be working because of psychopathology, and were more likely to be receiving disability, including disability for BDD. Conclusions The clinical features of BDD in men and women have many similarities but also some interesting and important differences. These findings have implications for the detection and treatment of BDD. PMID:16490564

  18. Suicidality in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.

    2008-01-01

    Suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and completed suicide appear common in individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Available evidence indicates that approximately 80% of individuals with BDD experience lifetime suicidal ideation and 24% to 28% have attempted suicide. Although data on completed suicide are limited and preliminary, the suicide rate appears markedly high. These findings underscore the importance of recognizing and effectively treating BDD. However, BDD is underrecognized in clinical settings even though it is relatively common and often presents to psychiatrists and other mental health practitioners, dermatologists, surgeons, and other physicians. This article reviews available evidence on suicidality in BDD and discusses how to recognize and diagnose this often secret disorder. Efficacious treatments for BDD, ie, serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) and cognitive-behavioral therapy, are also discussed. Although data are limited, it appears that SRIs often diminish suicidality in these patients. Additional research is greatly needed on suicidality rates, characteristics, correlates, risk factors, treatment, and prevention of suicidality in BDD. PMID:18449358

  19. Including pride and its group-based, relational, and contextual features in theories of contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gavin Brent

    2017-01-01

    Sentiment includes emotional and enduring attitudinal features of contempt, but explaining contempt as a mixture of basic emotion system affects does not adequately address the family resemblance structure of the concept. Adding forms of individual, group-based, and widely shared arrogance and contempt is necessary to capture the complex mixed feelings of proud superiority when "looking down upon" and acting harshly towards others.

  20. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Some Key Issues for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Koran, Lorrin M.; Didie, Elizabeth R.; Fallon, Brian A.; Feusner, Jamie; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, has been described for more than a century and increasingly studied over the past several decades. This paper provides a focused review of issues pertaining to BDD that are relevant to DSM-V. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V: 1) Criterion A may benefit from some rewording, without changing its focus or meaning; 2) Potential disadvantages of adding a new criterion to reflect BDD compulsive behaviors seem to outweigh potential advantages, but adding such a criterion remains an option that can be considered; 3) A clinical significance criterion seems necessary for BDD to differentiate it from normal appearance concerns; 4) BDD and eating disorders have some overlapping features and need to be differentiated; some minor changes to DSM-IV’s criterion C are suggested; 5) BDD should not be broadened to include body integrity identity disorder (apotemnophilia) or olfactory reference syndrome; 6) There is no compelling evidence for including diagnostic features or subtypes that are specific to gender-related, age-related, or cultural manifestations of BDD; 7) Adding muscle dysmorphia as a specifier may have clinical utility; and 8) The ICD-10 criteria for hypochondriacal disorder are not suitable for BDD, and there is no empirical evidence that BDD and hypochondriasis are the same disorder. The issue of how BDD’s delusional variant should be classified in DSM-V is briefly discussed and will be addressed more extensively in a separate paper. PMID:20533368

  1. Body dysmorphic disorder: some key issues for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Wilhelm, Sabine; Koran, Lorrin M; Didie, Elizabeth R; Fallon, Brian A; Feusner, Jamie; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, has been described for more than a century and increasingly studied over the past several decades. This article provides a focused review of issues pertaining to BDD that are relevant to DSM-V. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V: (1) Criterion A may benefit from some rewording, without changing its focus or meaning; (2) There are both advantages and disadvantages to adding a new criterion to reflect compulsive BDD behaviors; this possible addition requires further consideration; (3) A clinical significance criterion seems necessary for BDD to differentiate it from normal appearance concerns; (4) BDD and eating disorders have some overlapping features and need to be differentiated; some minor changes to DSM-IV's criterion C are suggested; (5) BDD should not be broadened to include body integrity identity disorder (apotemnophilia) or olfactory reference syndrome; (6) There is no compelling evidence for including diagnostic features or subtypes that are specific to gender-related, age-related, or cultural manifestations of BDD; (7) Adding muscle dysmorphia as a specifier may have clinical utility; and (8) The ICD-10 criteria for hypochondriacal disorder are not suitable for BDD, and there is no empirical evidence that BDD and hypochondriasis are the same disorder. The issue of how BDD's delusional variant should be classified in DSM-V is briefly discussed and will be addressed more extensively in a separate article. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Accurate Detection of Dysmorphic Nuclei Using Dynamic Programming and Supervised Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Marlies; De Vylder, Jonas; Catrysse, Hannes; Robijns, Joke; Philips, Wilfried; De Vos, Winnok H

    2017-01-01

    A vast array of pathologies is typified by the presence of nuclei with an abnormal morphology. Dysmorphic nuclear phenotypes feature dramatic size changes or foldings, but also entail much subtler deviations such as nuclear protrusions called blebs. Due to their unpredictable size, shape and intensity, dysmorphic nuclei are often not accurately detected in standard image analysis routines. To enable accurate detection of dysmorphic nuclei in confocal and widefield fluorescence microscopy images, we have developed an automated segmentation algorithm, called Blebbed Nuclei Detector (BleND), which relies on two-pass thresholding for initial nuclear contour detection, and an optimal path finding algorithm, based on dynamic programming, for refining these contours. Using a robust error metric, we show that our method matches manual segmentation in terms of precision and outperforms state-of-the-art nuclear segmentation methods. Its high performance allowed for building and integrating a robust classifier that recognizes dysmorphic nuclei with an accuracy above 95%. The combined segmentation-classification routine is bound to facilitate nucleus-based diagnostics and enable real-time recognition of dysmorphic nuclei in intelligent microscopy workflows.

  3. Accurate Detection of Dysmorphic Nuclei Using Dynamic Programming and Supervised Classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies Verschuuren

    Full Text Available A vast array of pathologies is typified by the presence of nuclei with an abnormal morphology. Dysmorphic nuclear phenotypes feature dramatic size changes or foldings, but also entail much subtler deviations such as nuclear protrusions called blebs. Due to their unpredictable size, shape and intensity, dysmorphic nuclei are often not accurately detected in standard image analysis routines. To enable accurate detection of dysmorphic nuclei in confocal and widefield fluorescence microscopy images, we have developed an automated segmentation algorithm, called Blebbed Nuclei Detector (BleND, which relies on two-pass thresholding for initial nuclear contour detection, and an optimal path finding algorithm, based on dynamic programming, for refining these contours. Using a robust error metric, we show that our method matches manual segmentation in terms of precision and outperforms state-of-the-art nuclear segmentation methods. Its high performance allowed for building and integrating a robust classifier that recognizes dysmorphic nuclei with an accuracy above 95%. The combined segmentation-classification routine is bound to facilitate nucleus-based diagnostics and enable real-time recognition of dysmorphic nuclei in intelligent microscopy workflows.

  4. Delusional versus nondelusional body dysmorphic disorder: recommendations for DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Hart, Ashley S.; Simpson, Helen Blair; Stein, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    The core feature of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is distressing or impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in one’s physical appearance. BDD beliefs are characterized by varying degrees of insight, ranging from good (ie, recognition that one’s BDD beliefs are not true) through “absent insight/delusional” beliefs (ie, complete conviction that one’s BDD beliefs are true). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd ed., rev. (DSM-III-R) and The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) classified BDD’s nondelusional form in the somatoform section of the manual and its delusional form in the psychosis section, as a type of delusional disorder, somatic type (although DSM-IV allowed double-coding of delusional BDD as both a psychotic disorder and BDD). However, little or no evidence on this issue was available when these editions were published. In this article, we review the classification of BDD’s delusional and nondelusional variants in earlier editions of DSM and the limitations of their approaches. We then review empirical evidence on this topic, which has become available since DSM-IV was developed. Available evidence indicates that across a range of validators, BDD’s delusional and nondelusional variants have many more similarities than differences, including response to pharmacotherapy. Based on these data, we propose that BDD’s delusional and nondelusional forms be classified as the same disorder and that BDD’s diagnostic criteria include an insight specifier that spans a range of insight, including absent insight/delusional BDD beliefs. We hope that this recommendation will improve care for patients with this common and often-severe disorder. This increased understanding of BDD may also have implications for other disorders that have an “absent insight/delusional” form. PMID:23659348

  5. Demographic Characteristics, Phenomenology, Comorbidity, and Family History in 200 Individuals With Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Menard, William; Fay, Christina; Weisberg, Risa

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder in the largest sample for which a wide range of clinical features has been reported. The authors also compared psychiatrically treated and untreated subjects. Body dysmorphic disorder usually began during adolescence, involved numerous body areas and behaviors, and was characterized by poor insight, high comorbidity rates, and high rates of functional impairment, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. There were far more similarities than differences between the currently treated and untreated subjects, although the treated subjects displayed better insight and had more comorbidity. PMID:16000674

  6. How do people with body dysmorphic disorder view themselves? A thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Joanna; Reavey, Paula; Anne Fineberg, Naomi

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Objectives. To examine the accounts of people with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and qualitatively explore self perceptions. Methods. Eleven people with BDD were interviewed using a semi-structured schedule. Participants brought photographs of themselves and drew a self-portrait. Transcribed interviews were analysed using a thematic analysis. Results. The most common theme was increased threat perception resulting in disordered interpersonal relationships. Other themes included the wish for regularity and symmetry in appearance, an idealised childhood self, the duty to look good, and a focus on specific "defective" features rather than general ugliness. Conclusions. Using thematic analysis and visual methods, we identified core themes that appear to characterise the way individuals with BDD perceive themselves and their interpersonal relationships. Thematic analysis offers promise as a tool to explore the overlap between BDD and other putatively related mental health problems.

  7. New perspectives in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Hong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD is a disabling illness with a high worldwide prevalence. Patients demonstrate a debilitating preoccupation with one or more perceived defects, often marked by poor insight or delusional convictions. Multiple studies have suggested that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and various cognitive behavioral therapy modalities are effective first-line treatments in decreasing BDD severity, relieving depressive symptoms, restoring insight, and increasing quality of life. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also recently been shown to be effective for relapse prevention. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the current understanding of BDD, including its clinical features, epidemiology, genetics, and current treatment modalities. Additional research is needed to fully elucidate the relationship between BDD and comorbid illnesses such as obsessive–compulsive-related disorders and depression and to develop therapies for refractory patients and those who have contraindications for pharmacological intervention.

  8. Dysmorphic disorders: clinical and nosological heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Medvedev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical picture of dysmorphophobia (DMP (dysmorphia, DM has been inadequately investigated; its descriptions are contradictory.Objective: to study the clinical structure of DMP (DM on a sample of plastic or cosmetic surgery patients.Patients and methods. An examination was made in of 103 patients, including 81 (78.6% women (mean age, 35.8±4.9 years and 22 (21.4% men (mean age, 30.9±5.7 years, who had gone to a clinic of cosmetic or plastic surgery with complaints of objectively unverified appearance defects and DM signs and given consent to take part in the investigation. All the patients underwent clinical and psychopathological examination; in so doing the follow-up data in the past 1-3 tears were borne in mind. Their somatic condition was analyzed on the basis of the data available in the medical documents and the results of laboratory, clinical, and instrumental studies.Results. The dysmorphic syndrome has been found to have overvalued, hypochondriacal, obsessive-compulsive, depressive, and delusional forms. It has been established that DM can manifest within schizophrenia, personality disorders, affective disorders, and organic mental diseases. Differential diagnostic criteria for different types of DM in heterogeneous psychopathological disorders are given.

  9. Dysfunctional Metacognitive Beliefs in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinodini, Zahra; Sedighi, Sahar; Rahimi, Mandana Baghertork; Noorbakhsh, Simasadat; Esfahani, Sepideh Rajezi

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the correlation of body dysmorphic disorder, with metacognitive subscales, metaworry and thought-fusion. The study was conducted in a correlation framework. Sample included 155 high school students in Isfahan, Iran in 2013-2014, gathered through convenience sampling. To gather data about BDD, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD was applied. Then, Meta Cognitive Questionnaire, Metaworry Questionnaire, and Thought-Fusion Inventory were used to assess metacognitive subscales, metaworry and thought-fusion. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using Pearson correlation and multiple regressions in SPSS 18. Result indicated YBOCS-BDD scores had a significant correlation with scores from MCQ (Pdysmorphic disorder was significantly related to metacognitive subscales, metaworry, and thought fusion in high school students in Isfahan, which is in line with previous studies. A deeper understanding of these processes can broaden theory and treatment of BDD, thereby improve the lives of sufferers and potentially protect others from developing this devastating disorder. PMID:26493420

  10. RELAP5-3D Code Includes ATHENA Features and Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemke, Richard A.; Davis, Cliff B.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2006-01-01

    Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, SF 6 , xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5-3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  11. Case Conceptualization and Treatment of Comorbid Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didie, Elizabeth R.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2010-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and eating disorders often co-occur and share some clinical features. In addition, the co-occurrence of BDD and an eating disorder may be associated with greater impairment in functioning. Furthermore, clinical impressions suggest that this comorbidity may be more treatment resistant than either disorder alone. The…

  12. Dysmorphology and mental retardation: molecular cytogenetic studies in dysmorphic mentally retarded patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buggenhout, G.J.C.M. van; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Mieloo, H.; Syrrou, M.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Brunner, H.G.; Fryns, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    In an institutionalised population of 471 mentally retarded adult residents (436 males and 35 females), 18 patients (16 males and 2 females) with dysmorphic features were selected to perform FISH studies by using subtelomeric probes to discover cryptic terminal deletions or duplications,

  13. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) was performed for all patients with clinical dysphagia (n = 13, 14.1%) but not for patients without clinical dysphagia. Typical findings of dysphagia (pharyngeal pooling, n = 11 and/or nasal regurgitation, n = 4) was detected by VFSS in all patients with clinical dysphagia. Eleven patients with dysphagia (84.6%) had anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ) antibody. By univariate analysis, the average age and the male to female ratio, internal malignancy, and anti-TIF-1γ antibody were significantly higher and the frequency of interstitial lung diseases and manual muscle testing (MMT) scores of sternomastoid and dertoid muscles were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia than in patients without dysphagia. Among patients with anti-TIF-1γ antibody, the mean age, the ratios of male to female and internal malignancy were significantly higher and mean MMT scores of sternomastoid muscle were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia compared with patients without dysphagia. By multivariable analysis, the risk of dysphagia was strongly associated with the existence of internal malignancy and ant-TIF-1γ antibody and was also associated with reduced scores of manual muscle test of sternomastoid muscle. Dysphagia was markedly improved after the treatment against myositis in all 13 patients. These findings indicate that dysphagia can develop frequently in patients with internal malignancy, anti-TIF-1γ antibody, or severe muscle weakness of sternomastoid muscle.

  14. Dysmorphic concern is related to delusional proneness and negative affect in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Charlotte; Thomas, Neil; Stephens, Jessie; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2016-06-30

    Body image concerns are common in the general population and in some mental illnesses reach pathological levels. We investigated whether dysmorphic concern with appearance (a preoccupation with minor or imagined defects in appearance) is explained by psychotic processes in a community sample. In a cross-sectional design, two hundred and twenty six participants completed an online survey battery including: The Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire; the Peters Delusional inventory; the Aberrant Salience Inventory; and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Participants were native English speakers residing in Australia. Dysmorphic concern was positively correlated with delusional proneness, aberrant salience and negative emotion. Regression established that negative emotion and delusional proneness predicted dysmorphic concern, whereas, aberrant salience did not. Although delusional proneness was related to body dysmorphia, there was no evidence that it was related to aberrant salience. Understanding the contribution of other psychosis processes, and other health related variables to the severity of dysmorphic concern will be a focus of future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Age of heart disease presentation and dysmorphic nuclei in patients with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core, Jason Q; Mehrabi, Mehrsa; Robinson, Zachery R; Ochs, Alexander R; McCarthy, Linda A; Zaragoza, Michael V; Grosberg, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear shape defects are a distinguishing characteristic in laminopathies, cancers, and other pathologies. Correlating these defects to the symptoms, mechanisms, and progression of disease requires unbiased, quantitative, and high-throughput means of quantifying nuclear morphology. To accomplish this, we developed a method of automatically segmenting fluorescently stained nuclei in 2D microscopy images and then classifying them as normal or dysmorphic based on three geometric features of the nucleus using a package of Matlab codes. As a test case, cultured skin-fibroblast nuclei of individuals possessing LMNA splice-site mutation (c.357-2A>G), LMNA nonsense mutation (c.736 C>T, pQ246X) in exon 4, LMNA missense mutation (c.1003C>T, pR335W) in exon 6, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome, and no LMNA mutations were analyzed. For each cell type, the percentage of dysmorphic nuclei, and other morphological features such as average nuclear area and average eccentricity were obtained. Compared to blind observers, our procedure implemented in Matlab codes possessed similar accuracy to manual counting of dysmorphic nuclei while being significantly more consistent. The automatic quantification of nuclear defects revealed a correlation between in vitro results and age of patients for initial symptom onset. Our results demonstrate the method's utility in experimental studies of diseases affecting nuclear shape through automated, unbiased, and accurate identification of dysmorphic nuclei.

  16. Opitz C syndrome: Trigonocephaly, mental retardation and craniofacial dysmorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Avina Fierro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 4-year-old female child with a dysmorphic and neurological syndrome of trigonocephaly, mental and psychomotor retardation and dysmorphic facial features. The anomalies of the face were the following: slight upward palpebral fissures, ocular hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge, hypoplastic nasal root, short nose with anteverted nares; small low set ears, smooth broad philtrum and thin upper lip. The patient had important cerebral anomalies with diffuse alterations in white matter that caused developmental delay with verbal and nonverbal disabilities and severe learning difficulties. This clinical presentation is compatible with the diagnosis of the Opitz C syndrome, a heterogeneous disease of multiple neurological and craniofacial abnormalities. The physical sign more detectable and notorious is the trigonocephaly that is manifested by a prominent metopic suture, but also can be distinguished the other minor facial anomalies that are found in the eyes, nose, mouth and ears that constitute the phenotype of the disorder. The neurological development was altered by the compression of the cerebral frontal lobes with narrowing of this cerebral area, producing hypotonia with muscle weakness, epileptic episodes manifested by seizures, and neurobehavioral and neurocognitive disorders. This syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance trait; our patient had no chromosomal abnormality in the usual karyotype but the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique showed a balanced translocation between the chromosomes two and eleven: t(2:11 (q32.2/q24.

  17. An HMM posterior decoder for sequence feature prediction that includes homology information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.

    2005-01-01

    Motivation: When predicting sequence features like transmembrane topology, signal peptides, coil-coil structures, protein secondary structure or genes, extra support can be gained from homologs. Results: We present here a general hidden Markov model (HMM) decoding algorithm that combines probabil......Motivation: When predicting sequence features like transmembrane topology, signal peptides, coil-coil structures, protein secondary structure or genes, extra support can be gained from homologs. Results: We present here a general hidden Markov model (HMM) decoding algorithm that combines......://phobius.cgb.ki.se/poly.html . An implementation of the algorithm is available on request from the authors....

  18. Psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder improves body dysmorphic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Angela; Sawyer, Alice T; Aderka, Idan M; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2013-10-01

    Social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder are considered nosologically distinct disorders. In contrast, some cognitive models suggest that social anxiety disorder and body dysmorphic disorder share similar cognitive maintenance factors. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of psychological treatments for social anxiety disorder on body dysmorphic disorder concerns. In Study 1, we found that 12 weekly group sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy led to significant decreases in body dysmorphic symptom severity. In Study 2, we found that an attention retraining intervention for social anxiety disorder was associated with a reduction in body dysmorphic concerns, compared to a placebo control condition. These findings support the notion that psychological treatments for individuals with primary social anxiety disorder improve co-occurring body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Body dysmorphic disorder in the dermatology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior. Although other organs can be involved-for example, the shape of the nose or a portion of an ear- the skin, hair, and nails are most commonly involved, while the patient constantly seeks reassurance about appearance from friends and family. There is a broad spectrum of severity in body dysmorphic disorder, ranging from obsessional worry to frank delusion, and the psychiatric comorbidities-anxiety, depression, and personality disorder-are prominent parts of the picture. Unfortunately, the psychiatric comorbidities and the negative impact on every aspect of the patient's life may not be recognized by dermatologists and other non-psychiatric physicians, so that effective treatment is often not instituted or appropriate referrals made. This paper describes the incidence, possible etiologies, and clinical picture of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology patients and discusses interpersonal approaches that may permit appropriate treatment or referral to take place. Specific treatments and prognosis are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitty, L. S.; Griffin, D. R.; Meaney, C.; Barrett, A.; Khalil, A.; Pajkrt, E.; Cole, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed

  1. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Patients Seeking Abdominoplasty, Rhinoplasty, and Rhytidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Nahas, Fábio Xerfan; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Tavares, Hermano; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2016-02-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder may negatively affect self-perception of body shape and lead patients to seek cosmetic surgery. This study estimates the level of body dissatisfaction and prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in candidates for three plastic surgical procedures. Three hundred patients of both sexes divided into three groups (abdominoplasty, n = 90; rhinoplasty, n =151; and rhytidectomy, n =59) were classified as having (n =51, n =79, and n =25, respectively) or not having (n =39, n =72, and n =34, respectively) body dysmorphic disorder symptoms, based on the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination, which was administered preoperatively. Prevalence rates of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in the abdominoplasty, rhinoplasty, and rhytidectomy groups were 57, 52, and 42 percent, respectively. Significant between-group differences were observed regarding age (p dysmorphic disorder symptoms (p dysmorphic disorder severity were observed in the abdominoplasty (p dysmorphic disorder severity was significantly associated with degree of body dissatisfaction (mean Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination total scores; p < 0.001), avoidance behaviors (p< 0.001), sexual abuse (p = 0.026), suicidal ideation (p < 0.001), and suicide attempt (p = 0.012). Abdominoplasty candidates showed the highest prevalence; rhytidectomy candidates exhibited the highest percentage of severe cases, and rhinoplasty candidates had the lowest percentage of severe cases.

  2. The presence, predictive utility, and clinical significance of body dysmorphic symptoms in women with eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Both eating disorders (EDs) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are disorders of body image. This study aimed to assess the presence, predictive utility, and impact of clinical features commonly associated with BDD in women with EDs. Methods Participants recruited from two non-clinical cohorts of women, symptomatic and asymptomatic of EDs, completed a survey on ED (EDE-Q) and BDD (BDDE-SR) psychopathology, psychological distress (K-10), and quality of life (SF-12). Results A strong correlation was observed between the total BDDE-SR and the global EDE-Q scores (r = 0.79, p 0.05) measured appearance checking, reassurance-seeking, camouflaging, comparison-making, and social avoidance. In addition to these behaviors, inspection of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) revealed that BDDE-SR items measuring preoccupation and dissatisfaction with appearance were most predictive of ED cases (Se and Sp > 0.60). Higher total BDDE-SR scores were associated with greater distress on the K-10 and poorer quality of life on the SF-12 (all p < 0.01). Conclusions Clinical features central to the model of BDD are common in, predictive of, and associated with impairment in women with EDs. Practice implications are that these features be included in the assessment and treatment of EDs. PMID:24999401

  3. Occupational methaemoglobinaemia. Mechanisms of production, features, diagnosis and management including the use of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Sally M

    2003-01-01

    Methaemoglobin is formed by oxidation of ferrous (FeII) haem to the ferric (FeIII) state and the mechanisms by which this occurs are complex. Most cases are due to one of three processes. Firstly, direct oxidation of ferrohaemoglobin, which involves the transfer of electrons from ferrous haem to the oxidising compound. This mechanism proceeds most readily in the absence of oxygen. Secondly, indirect oxidation, a process of co-oxidation which requires haemoglobin-bound oxygen and is involved, for example, in nitrite-induced methaemoglobinaemia. Thirdly, biotransformation of a chemical to an active intermediate that initiates methaemoglobin formation by a variety of mechanisms. This is the means by which most aromatic compounds, such as amino- and nitro-derivatives of benzene, produce methaemoglobin. Methaemoglobinaemia is an uncommon occupational occurrence. Aromatic compounds are responsible for most cases, their lipophilic nature and volatility facilitating absorption during dermal and inhalational exposure, the principal routes implicated in the workplace. Methaemoglobinaemia presents clinically with symptoms and signs of tissue hypoxia. Concentrations around 80% are life-threatening. Features of toxicity may develop over hours or even days when exposure, whether by inhalation or repeated skin contact, is to relatively low concentrations of inducing chemical(s). Not all features observed in patients with methaemoglobinaemia are due to methaemoglobin formation. For example, the intravascular haemolysis caused by oxidising chemicals such as chlorates poses more risk to life than the methaemoglobinaemia that such chemicals induce. If an occupational history is taken, the diagnosis of methaemoglobinaemia should be relatively straightforward. In addition, two clinical observations may help: firstly, the victim is often less unwell than one would expect from the severity of 'cyanosis' and, secondly, the 'cyanosis' is unresponsive to oxygen therapy. Pulse oximetry is

  4. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitty, L S; Griffin, D R; Meaney, C; Barrett, A; Khalil, A; Pajkrt, E; Cole, T J

    2011-03-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed diagnosis of achondroplasia were obtained from our databases, records reviewed, sonographic features and measurements determined and charts of fetal size constructed using the LMS (lambda-mu-sigma) method and compared with charts used in normal pregnancies. Cases referred to our regional genetics laboratory for molecular diagnosis using cell-free fetal DNA were identified and results reviewed. Twenty-six cases were scanned in our unit. Fetal size charts showed that femur length was usually on or below the 3(rd) centile by 25 weeks' gestation, and always below the 3(rd) by 30 weeks. Head circumference was above the 50(th) centile, increasing to above the 95(th) when compared with normal for the majority of fetuses. The abdominal circumference was also increased but to a lesser extent. Commonly reported sonographic features were bowing of the femora, frontal bossing, short fingers, a small chest and polyhydramnios. Analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in six pregnancies confirmed the presence of the c.1138G > A mutation in the FGRF3 gene in four cases with achondroplasia, but not the two subsequently found to be growth restricted. These data should improve the accuracy of diagnosis of achondroplasia based on sonographic findings, and have implications for targeted molecular confirmation that can reliably and safely be carried out using cell-free fetal DNA. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. MR features of the developing perianterior horn structure including subcallosal fasciculus in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    To describe the changes in the magnetic resonance (MR) signal of the perianterior horn structure (PAS) with increasing age, we studied 69 infants and children aged between 3 days and 9.4 years (average: 2.8 years) without any neurological deficits. T1- and T2-weighted images and FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) images were obtained in the axial plane. Based on a comparison of the intensity of the PAS with that of the cortex in each sequence (T1-WI/FLAIR/T2-WI), we classified the signal-intensity patterns into four types: I, low/low/high; II, low/high/high; III, iso/high/high; IV, high/low/low. Signal-intensity types I, II, III and IV were seen in 22, 8, 17, and 22 subjects, respectively, with younger subjects showing type I or II intensity patterns and older subjects showing type III or IV. In addition, T1-weighted and FLAIR images of subjects with a type I intensity pattern showed a rim of an isointensity component around the PAS that histologically coincided with migrating glial cells. The low-intensity area on FLAIR and T2-WI images of subjects with a type IV intensity pattern may represent myelinated fibers of the subcallosal fasciculus (ScF). The intensity of the MR signals of the PAS changes with increasing age, and this change may reflect histological features. A better understanding of these characteristics may help us to clarify myelination abnormalities, particularly those related to the ScF in the frontal lobe in infants and children. (orig.)

  6. CT features of lymphobronchial tuberculosis in children, including complications and associated abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Susan; Andronikou, Savvas [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Johannesburg (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert [Stellenbosch University, Department Paediatrics, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2012-08-15

    Lymphobronchial tuberculosis (TB) is tuberculous lymphadenopathy involving the airways, which is particularly common in children. To describe CT findings of lymphobronchial TB in children, the parenchymal complications and associated abnormalities. CT scans of children with lymphobronchial TB were reviewed retrospectively. Lymphadenopathy, bronchial narrowing, parenchymal complications and associations were documented. Infants comprised 51% of patients. The commonest site of lymphadenopathy was the subcarinal mediastinum (97% of patients). Bronchial compression was seen in all children (259 bronchi, of these 28% the bronchus intermedius) with severe or complete stenosis in 23% of affected bronchi. Parenchymal complications were present in 94% of patients, including consolidation (88%), breakdown (42%), air trapping (38%), expansile pneumonia (28%), collapse (17%) and bronchiectasis (9%), all predominantly on the right side (63%). Associated abnormalities included ovoid lesions, miliary nodules, pleural disease and intracavitary bodies. Airway compression was more severe in infants and most commonly involved the bronchus intermedius. Numerous parenchymal complications were documented, all showing right-side predominance. (orig.)

  7. Slowly progressive fluent aphasia; Clinical features and an imaging study including MRI, SPECT and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Momose, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwata, Makoto (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Bando, Mitsuaki

    1991-05-01

    Three patients with slowly progressive fluent aphasia are reported. One of the patients presented with memory disturbance. They were characterized clinically by having selective deficits in vocabulary, which resulted in impairment of confrontation naming, and auditory comprehension. MRI showed an atrophy not only in the left temporal lobe (including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri), hippocampus, parahippocampual gyrus, and fusiform gyrus, but also in the left parietal lobe. I-123 IMP SPECT and F-18 FDG PET were used to determine regional cerebral blood flow and regional cerebral metabolic rate, respectively. In addition to the decreased tracer uptake in the left temporal and/or parietal lobe, a decreased uptake was seen in the bilateral basal ganglia, the inner side of the temporal lobe (including the bilateral hippocampus), the right anterior temporal lobe, and the left thalamus. These findings may deny the previous thought that lesions are localized in slowly progressive fluent aphasia. Furthermore, noticeable difficulty in naming, i.e., patients unable to recognize the right answer, are considered attributable to widespread lesions from the whole left temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, to the right temporal lobe. (N.K.).

  8. Correlates of dysmorphic concern in people seeking cosmetic enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, David J.; Molton, Michael; Hoffman, Keturah; Preston, Neil J.; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical correlates of dysmorphic concern in persons seeking cosmetic enhancement from cosmetic physicians. Method A questionnaire survey of 137 patients attending the practices of two cosmetic physicians. Results Four subjects (2.9%; 95% CI = 0.8%–7.3%) had a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), but many more expressed overconcern with physical appearance (‘dysmorphic concern’). Dysmorphic concern accounted for a substantial amount of the variance for mood, social anxiety, and impairment in work and social functioning, while concerns related to how self or others perceive the putative flaw in appearance, impacted significantly on work and leisure activities, but did not apparently influence mood and social anxiety to any significant degree. Conclusions Dysmorphic concern is a broad dimensional construct that is related to both inter- and intrapsychic distress and disablement associated with people seeking cosmetic enhancement PMID:15209836

  9. Genome mining of Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 reveals symbiotic features including genes related to plant interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Luna, Stefany Daniela; Cruz Vázquez, Angélica Patricia; Jiménez Suárez, Verónica; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.; Sánchez, Sergio

    2018-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are wide-spread and associated with plant physiological benefits, yet their genomes and secondary metabolites remain largely unidentified. In this study, we explored the genome of the endophyte Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 for discovery of potential novel molecules as well as genes and metabolites involved in host interactions. The complete genomes of seven Streptomyces and three other more distantly related bacteria were used to define the functional landscape of this unique microbe. The S. scabrisporus NF3 genome is larger than the average Streptomyces genome and not structured for an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle; this and the fact that can grow in R2YE media implies that it could include a soil-living stage. The genome displays an enrichment of genes associated with amino acid production, protein secretion, secondary metabolite and antioxidants production and xenobiotic degradation, indicating that S. scabrisporus NF3 could contribute to the metabolic enrichment of soil microbial communities and of its hosts. Importantly, besides its metabolic advantages, the genome showed evidence for differential functional specificity and diversification of plant interaction molecules, including genes for the production of plant hormones, stress resistance molecules, chitinases, antibiotics and siderophores. Given the diversity of S. scabrisporus mechanisms for host upkeep, we propose that these strategies were necessary for its adaptation to plant hosts and to face changes in environmental conditions. PMID:29447216

  10. Genome mining of Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 reveals symbiotic features including genes related to plant interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Diana Ceapă

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria are wide-spread and associated with plant physiological benefits, yet their genomes and secondary metabolites remain largely unidentified. In this study, we explored the genome of the endophyte Streptomyces scabrisporus NF3 for discovery of potential novel molecules as well as genes and metabolites involved in host interactions. The complete genomes of seven Streptomyces and three other more distantly related bacteria were used to define the functional landscape of this unique microbe. The S. scabrisporus NF3 genome is larger than the average Streptomyces genome and not structured for an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle; this and the fact that can grow in R2YE media implies that it could include a soil-living stage. The genome displays an enrichment of genes associated with amino acid production, protein secretion, secondary metabolite and antioxidants production and xenobiotic degradation, indicating that S. scabrisporus NF3 could contribute to the metabolic enrichment of soil microbial communities and of its hosts. Importantly, besides its metabolic advantages, the genome showed evidence for differential functional specificity and diversification of plant interaction molecules, including genes for the production of plant hormones, stress resistance molecules, chitinases, antibiotics and siderophores. Given the diversity of S. scabrisporus mechanisms for host upkeep, we propose that these strategies were necessary for its adaptation to plant hosts and to face changes in environmental conditions.

  11. Review of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives including certain features pertaining to weapon proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.C.; Rosenstroch, B.

    1978-01-01

    Largely as a result of concerns over nuclear weapon proliferation, the U.S. program to develop and commercialize the plutonium-fueled breeder reactor has been slowed down; interest in alternative fuel cycles has increased. The report offers an informal review of the various nuclear fuel cycle options including some aspects relevant to weapon proliferation, although no complete review of the latter subject is attempted. Basic principles governing breeding, reactor safety, and efficient utilization of fission energy resources (thorium and uranium) are discussed. The controversial problems of weapon proliferation and its relation to fuel reprocessing (which is essential for efficient fuel cycles) are reviewed and a number of proposed approaches to reducing proliferation risks are noted. Some representative specific reactor concepts are described, with emphasis on their development status, their potentials for resource utilization, and their implications for proliferation

  12. The clinical and radiological features of Fanconi's anaemia pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Kerviler, E.; Guermazi, A.; Zagdanski, A.-M.; Gluckman, E.; Frija, J.

    2000-01-01

    Fanconi's anaemia is a severe refractory anaemia, associated with congenital malformations in approximately two-thirds of cases. Although these malformations may involve every organ system, suggestive dysmorphic features include growth retardation, radial ray deformities and urinary malformations. These malformations are not specific for Fanconi's anaemia, but should be recognized during pregnancy, or later in childhood, and suggest the possibility of inherited haematopoiesis disorders. De Kerviler, E. (2000)

  13. Body dysmorphic disorder: prevalence and outcomes in an oculofacial plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Austin J; Perry, Julian D

    2015-06-01

    To determine the prevalence, associated factors, and surgical outcomes of patients with body dysmorphic disorder in an oculofacial surgery practice. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of a consecutive case series. Participants consisted of a consecutive series of 728 patients who completed the Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire in an oculofacial surgery practice at The Cole Eye Institute between November 2013 and June 2014. A questionnaire score ≥9 was used as a positive screen for body dysmorphic disorder. Three control patients scoring ≤8 in the same month were randomly selected for each positive-screening patient. Main outcome measures included number of reoperations, surgical complications, and follow-up visits; preoperative and postoperative pain scores; and the technician word count. Categorical variables were analyzed with Pearson χ(2) tests or Fisher exact tests, while continuous variables were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests or t tests. A total of 728 patients completed the questionnaire and 50 (6.9%) scored 9 or more. Using a confidence interval of 95%, patients in the positive questionnaire screen group were younger (P = .004), had more eyelid surgeries (P = .007), experienced higher rates of complications after surgery (P = .002), reported higher postoperative pain scores (P = .034), required more reoperations (P = .050), and had a higher technician word count compared to the control group (P = .003). The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in an oculofacial surgical setting matches reports from other surgical specialties, and is significantly higher than in the general population. Patients screening positively for body dysmorphic disorder tend to have higher postoperative pain scores and more postoperative complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Presentation of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Medical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.

    2006-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common psychiatric illness that often presents to mental health professionals as well as nonpsychiatric physicians. However, BDD usually goes unrecognized and undiagnosed in clinical settings. It is important to recognize and accurately diagnose BDD because this often secret illness may be debilitating. Patients with BDD typically have markedly impaired functioning, notably poor quality of life, and a high rate of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Thus, it is important to screen patients for BDD and avoid misdiagnosing it as another illness. Nonpsychiatric treatments (eg, dermatologic, surgical), which most patients seek and receive, appear ineffective for BDD and can be risky for physicians to provide. This article provides a clinically focused overview of BDD, including its symptoms, morbidity, case examples, nonpsychiatric (ie, cosmetic) treatment, diagnostic “do’s” and “don’ts,” and suggestions for how to persuade patients to accept appropriate psychiatric care. PMID:17183412

  15. Classifying dysmorphic syndromes by using artificial neural network based hierarchical decision tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Merve Erkınay; Telatar, Ziya; Eroğul, Osman; Tunca, Yusuf

    2018-05-01

    Dysmorphic syndromes have different facial malformations. These malformations are significant to an early diagnosis of dysmorphic syndromes and contain distinctive information for face recognition. In this study we define the certain features of each syndrome by considering facial malformations and classify Fragile X, Hurler, Prader Willi, Down, Wolf Hirschhorn syndromes and healthy groups automatically. The reference points are marked on the face images and ratios between the points' distances are taken into consideration as features. We suggest a neural network based hierarchical decision tree structure in order to classify the syndrome types. We also implement k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) and artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers to compare classification accuracy with our hierarchical decision tree. The classification accuracy is 50, 73 and 86.7% with k-NN, ANN and hierarchical decision tree methods, respectively. Then, the same images are shown to a clinical expert who achieve a recognition rate of 46.7%. We develop an efficient system to recognize different syndrome types automatically in a simple, non-invasive imaging data, which is independent from the patient's age, sex and race at high accuracy. The promising results indicate that our method can be used for pre-diagnosis of the dysmorphic syndromes by clinical experts.

  16. Subthreshold body dysmorphic disorder in adolescents: Prevalence and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sophie C; Mond, Jonathan; Turner, Cynthia M; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to establish the prevalence of subthreshold body dysmorphic disorder (subthreshold-BDD) in a community sample of adolescents, and to compare disorder correlates in individuals with subthreshold-BDD to those with probable full-syndrome BDD (probable-BDD) and those without BDD (non-BDD). Self-report questionnaires assessing DSM-IV BDD criteria, past mental health service use, and symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder, anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders, were completed by 3149 Australian high school students (mean age =14.6 years, 63.5% male). Male participants also completed measures assessing quality of life, muscularity concerns, emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity, and peer problems. The prevalence of subthreshold-BDD was 3.4%, and probable-BDD was 1.7%. Compared to the non-BDD group, subthreshold-BDD was associated with elevated symptoms of comorbid psychopathology and greater past mental health service use, and in male-only measures, with poorer quality of life and elevated muscularity concerns. Subthreshold-BDD participants reported significantly lower mental health service use, and fewer symptoms of depression, eating disorders, and hyperactivity than probable-BDD participants, however, other comorbid symptoms did not differ significantly between these groups. These findings indicate that subthreshold-BDD is associated with substantial difficulties for adolescents in the general community. BDD screening should include subthreshold presentations, as these may be an important target for early intervention programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-dimensional navigation is more accurate than two-dimensional navigation or conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous sacroiliac screw fixation in the dysmorphic sacrum: a randomized multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matityahu, Amir; Kahler, David; Krettek, Christian; Stöckle, Ulrich; Grutzner, Paul Alfred; Messmer, Peter; Ljungqvist, Jan; Gebhard, Florian

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of computer-assisted sacral screw fixation compared with conventional techniques in the dysmorphic versus normal sacrum. Review of a previous study database. Database of a multinational study with 9 participating trauma centers. The reviewed group included 130 patients, 72 from the navigated group and 58 from the conventional group. Of these, 109 were in the nondysmorphic group and 21 in the dysmorphic group. Placement of sacroiliac (SI) screws was performed using standard fluoroscopy for the conventional group and BrainLAB navigation software with either 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for the navigated group. Accuracy of SI screw placement by 2-dimensional and 3D navigation versus conventional fluoroscopy in dysmorphic and nondysmorphic patients, as evaluated by 6 observers using postoperative computerized tomography imaging at least 1 year after initial surgery. Intraobserver agreement was also evaluated. There were 11.9% (13/109) of patients with misplaced screws in the nondysmorphic group and 28.6% (6/21) of patients with misplaced screws in the dysmorphic group, none of which were in the 3D navigation group. Raw agreement between the 6 observers regarding misplaced screws was 32%. However, the percent overall agreement was 69.0% (kappa = 0.38, P dysmorphic proximal sacral segment. We recommend the use of 3D navigation, where available, for insertion of SI screws in patients with normal and dysmorphic proximal sacral segments. Therapeutic level I.

  18. Set shifting and visuospatial organization deficits in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jennifer L; Weingarden, Hilary; Reuman, Lillian; Abrams, Dylan; Mothi, Suraj S; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-11-24

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) over-attend to perceived defect(s) in their physical appearance, often becoming "stuck" obsessing about perceived flaws and engaging in rituals to hide flaws. These symptoms suggest that individuals with BDD may experience deficits in underlying neurocognitive functions, such as set-shifting and visuospatial organization. These deficits have been implicated as risk and maintenance factors in disorders with similarities to BDD but have been minimally investigated in BDD. The present study examined differences in neurocognitive functions among BDD participants (n = 20) compared to healthy controls (HCs; n = 20). Participants completed neuropsychological assessments measuring set-shifting (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Intra-Extra Dimensional Set Shift [IED] task) and visuospatial organization and memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test [ROCF]). Results revealed a set-shifting deficit among BDD participants compared to HCs on the IED. On the ROCF, BDD participants exhibited deficits in visuospatial organization compared to HCs, but they did not differ in visuospatial memory compared to HCs. Results did not change when accounting for depression severity. Findings highlight neurocognitive deficits as potential endophenotype markers of clinical features (i.e., delusionality). Understanding neuropsychological deficits may clarify similarities and differences between BDD and related disorders and may guide targets for BDD treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Body dysmorphic disorder in cosmetic surgery - prevalence, psychiatric comorbidity and outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundscheid, T; van der Hulst, R R W J; Rutten, B P F; Leue, C

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from body dysmorphic disorder (bdd) are preoccupied with a slight or imagined defect in appearance. First of all, to review the literature on the prevalence of bdd in cosmetic surgery and thereafter to review the literature on psychiatric comorbidity and the outcome of surgical interventions. We based our search strategy on Embase, Medline and PubMed, using the search terms 'body dysmorphic disorder', 'cosmetic surgery', 'prevalence', 'comorbidity' and 'outcome'. Our search covered English and Dutch literature published after the introduction of bdd in dsm-iii-r and before 1 November, 2013. A study of the relevant articles enabled us to access additional articles mentioned in these texts. Our initial search strategy turned out to be too narrow. It was therefore broadened to include 'body dysmorphic disorder', 'cosmetic surgery', and 'prevalence'. Eventually we included 23 original articles. In 11 of these the prevalence of bdd varied from 3.2 to 53.6%. Twelve articles on psychiatric comorbidity revealed predominantly mood and anxiety disorders on axis I and cluster C personality disorders on axis II. Only two studies reported on the outcome of cosmetic surgery performed on bdd patients; surgical interventions, however, seemed to result in new preoccupations with the prolongation of psychiatric comorbidity. bdd is a common psychiatric disorder that can sometimes lead to cosmetic surgery. However, pre-operative screening of bdd patients is vital so that efficient psychiatric treatment can be initiated and patients are not subjected to surgical interventions which may be ineffective or even harmful.

  20. A Review of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Its Presentation in Different Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufaddel, Amir; Osman, Ossama T.; Almugaddam, Fadwa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common psychiatric disorder characterized by preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance. This review aimed to explore epidemiology, clinical features, comorbidities, and treatment options for BDD in different clinical settings. Data Source and Study Selection: A search of the literature from 1970 to 2011 was performed using the MEDLINE search engine. English-language articles, with no restriction regarding the type of articles, were identified using the search terms body dysmorphic disorder, body dysmorphic disorder clinical settings, body dysmorphic disorder treatment, and body dysmorphic disorder & psychodermatology. Results: BDD occurs in 0.7% to 2.4% of community samples and 13% of psychiatric inpatients. Etiology is multifactorial, with recent findings indicating deficits in visual information processing. There is considerable overlap between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in symptom etiology and response to treatment, which has led to suggestions that BDD can be classified with anxiety disorders and OCD. A recent finding indicated genetic overlap between BDD and OCD. Over 60% of patients with BDD had a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 38% had social phobia, which tends to predate the onset of BDD. Studies reported a high level of comorbidity with depression and social phobia occurring in > 70% of patients with BDD. Individuals with BDD present frequently to dermatologists (about 9%–14% of dermatologic patients have BDD). BDD co-occurs with pathological skin picking in 26%–45% of cases. BDD currently has 2 variants: delusional and nondelusional, and both variants respond similarly to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), which may have effect on obsessive thoughts and rituals. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has the best established treatment results. Conclusions: A considerable overlap exists between BDD and other psychiatric disorders such as OCD, anxiety, and delusional

  1. Recent advances in understanding and managing body dysmorphic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Georgina; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Mataix-Cols, David

    2017-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common and disabling psychiatric disorder characterised by excessive and persistent preoccupation with perceived defects or flaws in one's appearance, which are unnoticeable to others, and associated repetitive behaviours (eg, mirror checking). The disorder generally starts in adolescence, but often goes unnoticed and is severely underdiagnosed. Left untreated, BDD typically persists and causes marked functional impairment in multiple domains. This clinical review considers recent advances in the epidemiology and classification of BDD, including its reclassification in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders under the new ‘Obsessive–Compulsive and Related Disorders’ chapter. Key issues in assessment are outlined including the use of validated screening instruments to minimise misdiagnosis and the importance of risk assessment in this population given the high rates of suicidality and inappropriate use of cosmetic treatments. In addition, current knowledge regarding the causes and mechanisms underlying BDD are summarised. The recommended treatments for BDD are outlined, namely cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Both CBT and pharmacotherapy have been shown to be efficacious treatments for BDD in adult populations, and evidence is emerging to support their use in young people. Although the majority of patients improve with existing evidence-based treatment, a large proportion are left with clinically significant residual symptoms. Priorities for future research are therefore discussed including the need to further refine and evaluate existing interventions with the goal of improving treatment outcomes and to increase their availability. PMID:28729345

  2. Body dysmorphic disorder and orthodontics--an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Marshneil Trista; Farella, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Patients with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) often seek aesthetic medical treatment including orthodontics to correct their perceived physical defects. When the disorder pertains to the dentofacial region, it is important for orthodontists to be familiar with this condition. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on BDD and its relationship to orthodontics. PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were searched for publications relating to BDD and orthodontics. Further articles were sourced from the reference lists of the articles identified through the search. The literature recommends that orthodontic patients suspected of having BDD should be referred to a psychiatrist for a definitive diagnosis and subsequent management. However, this may be difficult to implement in clinical practice. Management by a psychiatrist could include pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy. There is still debate as to whether orthodontic treatment should be provided for these patients. As health care workers providing aesthetic treatment to patients, orthodontists should be aware of BDD and its implications. Risks include repeated requests for unnecessary treatment, dissatisfaction with the result and thus potential for litigation. BDD still remains a challenge to diagnose, and further research is needed to determine the appropriate management of orthodontic patients suffering from the disorder.

  3. Thalamic Massa Intermedia Duplication in a Dysmorphic 14 month-old Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T

    2015-06-01

    The massa intermedia is an inconstant parenchymal band connecting the medial thalami. It may be thickened in various disease processes such as Chiari II malformation or absent in other disease states. However, the massa intermedia may also be absent in up to 30% of normal human brains. To the best of my knowledge, detailed imaging findings of massa intermedia duplication have only been described in a single case report. An additional case of thalamic massa intermedia duplication discovered on a routine brain MR performed for dysmorphic facial features is reported herein.

  4. Personality traits as vulnerability factors in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid; Martin, Alexandra

    2013-11-30

    Cognitive behavioural models consider certain personality traits to be risk factors for the development of Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). Research on personality traits in BDD is scarce, therefore this study examined perfectionism, aesthetic sensitivity and the behavioural inhibition system (BIS) in BDD. Furthermore, the association between these personality traits and the extent of dysmorphic concerns was investigated. Individuals with BDD (n=58) and a population based control sample (n=2071), selected from a representative German population survey, completed self-report questionnaires assessing DSM-5 criteria of BDD, dysmorphic concerns, perfectionism, aesthetic sensitivity and BIS-reactivity. Individuals with BDD reported significantly higher degrees of perfectionism as well as of BIS-reactivity compared to the population based control sample, whereas the groups did not differ significantly regarding aesthetic sensitivity. However, for the total sample, each of the personality traits was related dimensionally to dysmorphic concerns. Current BDD models consider perfectionism and aesthetic sensitivity to be vulnerability factors. In addition to these concepts, the present study suggests that BIS-reactivity is related to BDD. Self-reported aesthetic sensitivity was not found to be specifically pronounced in BDD, but along with perfectionism and BIS-reactivity aesthetic sensitivity was generally associated with dysmorphic concerns. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The clinical and radiological features of Fanconi's anaemia pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerviler, E.; Guermazi, A.; Zagdanski, A.-M.; Gluckman, E.; Frija, J

    2000-05-01

    Fanconi's anaemia is a severe refractory anaemia, associated with congenital malformations in approximately two-thirds of cases. Although these malformations may involve every organ system, suggestive dysmorphic features include growth retardation, radial ray deformities and urinary malformations. These malformations are not specific for Fanconi's anaemia, but should be recognized during pregnancy, or later in childhood, and suggest the possibility of inherited haematopoiesis disorders. De Kerviler, E. (2000)

  6. Clinical spectrum of immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial dysmorphism (ICF syndrome).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagleitner, M.M.; Lankester, A.; Maraschio, P.; Hulten, M.; Fryns, J.P.; Schuetz, C.; Gimelli, G.; Davies, E.G.; Gennery, A.R.; Belohradsky, B.H.; Groot, R. de; Gerritsen, E.J.; Mattina, T.; Howard, P.J.; Fasth, A.; Reisli, I.; Furthner, D.; Slatter, M.A.; Cant, A.J.; Cazzola, G.; Dijken, P.J. van; Deuren, M. van; Greef, J.C. de; Maarel, S.M. van der; Weemaes, C.M.R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial dysmorphism (ICF syndrome) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterised by facial dysmorphism, immunoglobulin deficiency and branching of chromosomes 1, 9 and 16 after PHA stimulation of lymphocytes. Hypomethylation of DNA of a

  7. A de novo 11p12-p15.4 duplication in a patient with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, mental retardation, and dysmorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonietta; Striano, Pasquale; Gimelli, Stefania; Ciampa, Clotilde; Santulli, Lia; Caranci, Ferdinando; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Gimelli, Giorgio; Striano, Salvatore; Zara, Federico

    2010-03-01

    We report a 22-year-old male patient with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, mental retardation and dysmorphisms. Standard cytogenetic analysis revealed a de novo interstitial duplication of the short arm of chromosome 11 (11p). High density array-CGH analysis showed that the rearrangement spans about 35Mb on chromosome 11p12-p15.4. Duplications of 11p are rare and usually involve the distal part of the chromosome arm (11p15), being not associated with epilepsy, whereas our patient showed a unique epileptic phenotype associated with mental retardation and dysmorphic features. The role of some rearranged genes in epilepsy pathogenesis in this patient is also discussed.

  8. Major features of immunesenescence, including reduced thymic output, are ameliorated by high levels of physical activity in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Niharika Arora; Pollock, Ross D; Lazarus, Norman R; Harridge, Stephen; Lord, Janet M

    2018-04-01

    It is widely accepted that aging is accompanied by remodelling of the immune system including thymic atrophy and increased frequency of senescent T cells, leading to immune compromise. However, physical activity, which influences immunity but declines dramatically with age, is not considered in this literature. We assessed immune profiles in 125 adults (55-79 years) who had maintained a high level of physical activity (cycling) for much of their adult lives, 75 age-matched older adults and 55 young adults not involved in regular exercise. The frequency of naïve T cells and recent thymic emigrants (RTE) were both higher in cyclists compared with inactive elders, and RTE frequency in cyclists was no different to young adults. Compared with their less active counterparts, the cyclists had significantly higher serum levels of the thymoprotective cytokine IL-7 and lower IL-6, which promotes thymic atrophy. Cyclists also showed additional evidence of reduced immunesenescence, namely lower Th17 polarization and higher B regulatory cell frequency than inactive elders. Physical activity did not protect against all aspects of immunesenescence: CD28 -ve CD57 +ve senescent CD8 T-cell frequency did not differ between cyclists and inactive elders. We conclude that many features of immunesenescence may be driven by reduced physical activity with age. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder in an adult inpatient setting†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Michelle; Menard, William; Fleming-Ives, Kathryn; Modha, Poonam; Cerullo, Hilary; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, is an often-severe, understudied disorder. We determined BDD’s prevalence and clinical features on a general adult psychiatric inpatient unit. To our knowledge, only one previous prevalence study has been done in this setting. Method One hundred patients completed 3 self-report measures: the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDD-Q), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Those who screened positive for BDD were interviewed to confirm DSM-IV BDD and its clinical features. Charts were reviewed for demographic and clinical information. Results BDD was diagnosed in 16.0% (95% CI=8.7–23.3%) (n=16) of patients. A high proportion of those with BDD reported that BDD symptoms contributed to suicidality. Patients revealed BDD symptoms to a mean of only 15.1%±33.7% lifetime mental health clinicians; only one (6.3%) reported symptoms to his current inpatient psychiatrist. Most did not disclose their symptoms due to embarrassment. Those with BDD were younger (P=.008) and had higher CES-D scores (P=.008). The two groups did not significantly differ on BAI score, demographic characteristics or discharge diagnoses. Conclusions BDD is relatively common but underdiagnosed in psychiatric inpatients and is associated with more severe depressive symptoms. PMID:18164943

  10. Body dysmorphic disorder: Latest neuroanatomical and neuropsychological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasios, K; Michopoulos, I

    2017-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a perceived defect or flaw in physical appearance that is not observable or appears slight to others. It leads to severe distress and functional impairment. Cognitive-behavioural and neurobiological similarities to obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have led to its newly conceived classification as an obsessive compulsive related disorder (OCRD). In the process of investigating the neurobiology of BDD, neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have been conducted. This review presents the most recent research findings and their connection with BDD clinical features. Imaging studies have shown increased total white matter volume and caudate volume asymmetry in BDD patients. These findings are consistent with the striatal topography model of OCRDs. Other studies have showed perfusion deficits in bilateral anterior-medial temporal and occipital regions and asymmetric perfusion in parietal lobes. In addition, correlation between symptom severity and left inferior frontal gyrus volume reflects the degree of detailed, analytic encoding that occurs on day-to-day basis when viewing others and themselves, and that likely underlies their symptoms. Finally, positive correlation between right amygdala volume and symptom severity signifies pathological fear circuitry engagement, hypervigilance and heightened sensitivity to social situations. Neuropsychological studies of BDD reveal deficits in strategic organization, learning and free recall after short and long delays. Executive function deficits are related to spatial working memory and subsequent thinking speed as well as impaired higher level planning ability. BDD patients' organizational strategies tend to focus on detail rather than on larger, global clustering features. They are characterized by abnormal visual processing of both details and global elements, inaccurate processing of global elements and reduced flexibility in switching visual

  11. Airborne electromagnetic detection of shallow seafloor topographic features, including resolution of multiple sub-parallel seafloor ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbancich, Julian; Boyd, Graham

    2014-05-01

    The HoistEM helicopter time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) system was flown over waters in Backstairs Passage, South Australia, in 2003 to test the bathymetric accuracy and hence the ability to resolve seafloor structure in shallow and deeper waters (extending to ~40 m depth) that contain interesting seafloor topography. The topography that forms a rock peak (South Page) in the form of a mini-seamount that barely rises above the water surface was accurately delineated along its ridge from the start of its base (where the seafloor is relatively flat) in ~30 m water depth to its peak at the water surface, after an empirical correction was applied to the data to account for imperfect system calibration, consistent with earlier studies using the same HoistEM system. A much smaller submerged feature (Threshold Bank) of ~9 m peak height located in waters of 35 to 40 m depth was also accurately delineated. These observations when checked against known water depths in these two regions showed that the airborne TEM system, following empirical data correction, was effectively operating correctly. The third and most important component of the survey was flown over the Yatala Shoals region that includes a series of sub-parallel seafloor ridges (resembling large sandwaves rising up to ~20 m from the seafloor) that branch out and gradually decrease in height as the ridges spread out across the seafloor. These sub-parallel ridges provide an interesting topography because the interpreted water depths obtained from 1D inversion of TEM data highlight the limitations of the EM footprint size in resolving both the separation between the ridges (which vary up to ~300 m) and the height of individual ridges (which vary up to ~20 m), and possibly also the limitations of assuming a 1D model in areas where the topography is quasi-2D/3D.

  12. A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Approach for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Buhlmann, Ulrike; Hayward, Laura C.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Dimaite, Ruta

    2010-01-01

    Although body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been described in the literature for more than a century, there has been only a limited focus on the development of cognitive behavioral treatments for BDD. Our case report provides a detailed description of a course of cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for an individual with BDD. The patient was…

  13. Childhood Abuse and Neglect in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didie, Elizabeth R.; Tortolani, Christina C.; Pope, Courtney G.; Menard, William; Fay, Christina; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: No published studies have examined childhood abuse and neglect in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). This study examined the prevalence and clinical correlates of abuse and neglect in individuals with this disorder. Methods: Seventy-five subjects (69.3% female, mean age = 35.4 +/- 12.0) with DSM-IV BDD completed the Childhood Trauma…

  14. ['Barbie Doll Syndrome'. A case report of body dysmorphic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Maria; Jahn, Rebecca; Stolba, Karin; Ossege, Michael

    2018-03-01

    This case report aims to present a 37-year-old women striving to shape her body like a Barbie doll of which she has been fascinated since childhood. She could hardly tolerate any deviation from this beauty ideal. She has been admitted to the psychosomatic ward due to an eating disorder. The ICD-10 and DSM-5 criteria were established for axis I disorders and the German version of the SCID II interview (for DSM-4) was applied for axis II disorders. Additionally, the "modified Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for body dysmorphic disorder" was carried out. The diagnosis of dysmorphophobia (ICD-10: F45.21) or body dysmorphic disorder (DSM-5: 300.7) and bulimia nervosa (ICD-10: F50.2; DSM-5: 307.51) was confirmed. The patient fulfilled criteria of an avoidant, depressive and histrionic personality disorder. Psychopharmacological treatment with Fluoxetine was started and the patient participated in an intensive inpatient psychosomatic program. The body image, self-concept and the sense of shame were therapeutic key topics. The present case report focuses on body dysmorphic disorder as a distinctive entity with high prevalence. Diagnostic criteria of different classification systems were contrasted and comorbidity with eating disorders was discussed. In clinical praxis, body dysmorphic disorder remains underdiagnosed, especially when cooccurring with an eating disorder. However, the correct diagnosis could be relevant for therapy planning.

  15. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Easing the Distress of Distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, Cynthia M.

    People who suffer from body dysmorphic disorder believe that their body is defected and that this defect makes them ugly. Their distorted body image can be precipitated by many internal and external factors and as a result of their imagined defect, these normal-appearing individuals exhibit self-defeating behaviors. The disorder can lead to the…

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

    2010-01-01

    The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, James C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)

  18. What Rhinoplasty Surgeons Should Know about Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichert, M.; Scheithauer, M.; Hoffmann, T. K.; Hellings, P.; Picavet, V.

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by an excessive concern with a non-existing or slight defect in physical appearance. BDD patients frequently show impaired judgment regarding the psychiatric origin of their concerns and often seek aesthetic treatment to resolve

  19. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With regard to delusional disorder-somatic subtype there may be a relationship with body dysmorphic disorder. There are reports that some delusional disorders can evolve to become schizophrenia. Similarly, the treatment of such disorders with antipsychotics has been documented. This report describes a case of ...

  20. Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

  1. Abnormalities of Object Visual Processing in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feusner, Jamie D.; Hembacher, Emily; Moller, Hayley; Moody, Teena D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder may have perceptual distortions for their appearance. Previous studies suggest imbalances in detailed relative to configural/holistic visual processing when viewing faces. No study has investigated the neural correlates of processing non-symptom-related stimuli. The objective of this study was to determine whether individuals with body dysmorphic disorder have abnormal patterns of brain activation when viewing non-face/non-body object stimuli. Methods Fourteen medication-free participants with DSM-IV body dysmorphic disorder and 14 healthy controls participated. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants matched photographs of houses that were unaltered, contained only high spatial frequency (high detail) information, or only low spatial frequency (low detail) information. The primary outcome was group differences in blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes. Results The body dysmorphic disorder group showed lesser activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and precuneus for low spatial frequency images. There were greater activations in medial prefrontal regions for high spatial frequency images, although no significant differences when compared to a low-level baseline. Greater symptom severity was associated with lesser activity in dorsal occipital cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex for normal and high spatial frequency images. Conclusions Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder have abnormal brain activation patterns when viewing objects. Hypoactivity in visual association areas for configural and holistic (low detail) elements and abnormal allocation of prefrontal systems for details is consistent with a model of imbalances in global vs. local processing. This may occur not only for appearance but also for general stimuli unrelated to their symptoms. PMID:21557897

  2. Design data and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants including cumulative index for Volumes I--VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    Design data, safety features, and site characteristics are summarized for 12 nuclear power units in 6 power stations in the United States. Six pages of data are presented for each station, consisting of thermal-hydraulic and nuclear factors, containment features, emergency-core-cooling systems, site features, circulating water system data, and miscellaneous factors. In addition, an aerial perspective is presented for each plant. This volume covers plants with docket numbers 50-553 through 50-569 (Phipps Bend, Black Fox, Yellow Creek, and NEP) and two earlier plants not previously reported--Hope Creek (50-354, 50-355) and WPPSS 1 and 4 (50-460, 50-513). Indexes for this volume and the five earlier volumes are presented in three forms--by docket number, by plant name, and by participating utility

  3. Therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Lichtenstein, Linn; Alström, Katarina; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2016-02-02

    To evaluate the efficacy of therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) compared with online supportive therapy. A 12 week single blind parallel group randomised controlled trial. Academic medical centre. 94 self referred adult outpatients with a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder and a modified Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (BDD-YBOCS) score of ≥ 20. Concurrent psychotropic drug treatment was permitted if the dose had been stable for at least two months before enrolment and remained unchanged during the trial. Participants received either BDD-NET (n=47) or supportive therapy (n=47) delivered via the internet for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the BDD-YBOCS score after treatment and follow-up (three and six months from baseline) as evaluated by a masked assessor. Responder status was defined as a ≥ 30% reduction in symptoms on the scale. Secondary outcomes were measures of depression (MADRS-S), global functioning (GAF), clinical global improvement (CGI-I), and quality of life (EQ5D). The six month follow-up time and all outcomes other than BDD-YBOCS and MADRS-S at 3 months were not pre-specified in the registration at clinicaltrials.gov because of an administrative error but were included in the original trial protocol approved by the regional ethics committee before the start of the trial. BDD-NET was superior to supportive therapy and was associated with significant improvements in severity of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-YBOCS group difference -7.1 points, 95% confidence interval -9.8 to -4.4), depression (MADRS-S group difference -4.5 points, -7.5 to -1.4), and other secondary measures. At follow-up, 56% of those receiving BDD-NET were classed as responders, compared with 13% receiving supportive therapy. The number needed to treat was 2.34 (1.71 to 4.35). Self reported satisfaction was high. CBT can be delivered safely via the internet to patients with body

  4. [Body dysmorphic disorder and aesthetic surgery: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfant, N; Henry, A-S; Ta, P; Trimaille, A; Philandrianos, C; Hu, W

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are preoccupied with an imagined or minor defect in appearance that causes significant distress and impairment in social and occupational functioning. Despite a rate of up to 15% of BDD patients reported in cosmetic surgery settings, there is no consensus on the best management for these patients. The main purpose of this article was to conduct a literature review on BDD and cosmetic surgery. Properly trained healthcare professionals in recognizing and diagnosing this pathology is essential for the delivery of quality psychiatric care while taking into account the high prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder patients in cosmetic surgery and the poor outcome of these patients following cosmetic procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurocognitive Functioning in Young Adults with Subclinical Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Austin W; Redden, Sarah A; Grant, Jon E

    2018-03-01

    Despite reasonable knowledge of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), little is known of its cognitive antecedents. In this study, we evaluated executive functioning and decision-making in people at risk of developing BDD using neuropsychological tests. Participants were non-treatment seeking volunteers (18-29 years) recruited from the general community, and split into two groups: those "at risk" of developing BDD (N = 5) and controls (N = 82). Participants undertook the One-Touch Stockings of Cambridge, Cambridge Gamble and Spatial Working Memory tasks and were assessed with the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire. Results showed that the at-risk subjects performed significantly worse on a measure of executive function, whereas measures of risk-seeking behavior, quality of decision-making, and spatial working memory were largely intact. The findings suggest that selective cognitive dysfunction may already be present in terms of executive functioning in those at risk of developing BDD, even before psychopathology arises.

  6. Skin picking disorder with co-occurring body dysmorphic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Redden, Sarah A; Leppink, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    There is clinical overlap between skin picking disorder (SPD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), but little research has examined clinical and cognitive correlates of the two disorders when they co-occur. Of 55 participants with SPD recruited for a neurocognitive study and two pharmacological st...... unique clinical and cognitive aspects of SPD may be more pronounced. Future work should explore possible subgroups in SPD and whether these predict different treatment outcomes....

  7. A Case of Treatment- resistant Depression and Body Dysmorphic Disorder: The Role of Electroconvulsive Therapy Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Ram S; San Gabriel, Maria Chona P; Longshore, Carrol T; Schnur, David B

    2016-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is a common, often disabling condition, and is frequently comorbid with major depressive disorder. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors constitute first line set of somatic interventions but the management of refractory patients remains challenging. Electroconvulsive therapy, an often highly beneficial treatment for medication resistant-depression, is not considered an effective therapeutic alternative for treatment refractory body dysmorphic disorder. Here we present a 50-year-old woman with body dysmorphic disorder and comorbid major depressive disorder who remained incapacitated and suicidal despite several trials with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antipsychotic medication. Depressive and dysmorphic symptoms appeared to resolve with electroconvulsive therapy, and remission was sustained for two months. Electroconvulsive therapy has an important place in the management of treatment- resistant depression associated with body dysmorphic disorder, and, in select cases, may be effective for dysmorphic symptoms as well.

  8. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Among Patients Seeking Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Drew B; Duggal, Claire S; Gabriel, Allen; Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Carlson, Grant W; Losken, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in physical appearance. It has significant implications for patients who desire breast reconstruction, because patient satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome is a substantial contributor to the success of the procedure. The authors estimated the prevalence of BDD among women seeking breast reconstruction by surveying patients with the previously validated Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire (DCQ). One hundred eighty-eight women who presented for immediate or delayed breast reconstruction completed the DCQ anonymously, during initial consultation with a plastic surgeon. Two groups of respondents were identified: those who desired immediate reconstruction and those who planned to undergo delayed reconstruction. The prevalence of BDD among breast reconstruction patients was compared between the 2 groups, and the overall prevalence was compared with published rates for the general public. Body dysmorphic disorder was significantly more prevalent in breast reconstruction patients than in the general population (17% vs 2%; P < .001). It also was much more common among patients who planned to undergo delayed (vs immediate) reconstruction (34% vs 13%; P = .004). Relative to the general public, significantly more women who sought breast reconstruction were diagnosed as having BDD. Awareness of the potential for BDD will enable clinicians to better understand their patients' perspectives and discuss realistic expectations at the initial consultation. Future studies are warranted to examine the implications of BDD on patient satisfaction with reconstructive surgery. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  9. Benchmarking spliced alignment programs including Spaln2, an extended version of Spaln that incorporates additional species-specific features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiroaki; Gotoh, Osamu

    2012-11-01

    Spliced alignment plays a central role in the precise identification of eukaryotic gene structures. Even though many spliced alignment programs have been developed, recent rapid progress in DNA sequencing technologies demands further improvements in software tools. Benchmarking algorithms under various conditions is an indispensable task for the development of better software; however, there is a dire lack of appropriate datasets usable for benchmarking spliced alignment programs. In this study, we have constructed two types of datasets: simulated sequence datasets and actual cross-species datasets. The datasets are designed to correspond to various real situations, i.e. divergent eukaryotic species, different types of reference sequences, and the wide divergence between query and target sequences. In addition, we have developed an extended version of our program Spaln, which incorporates two additional features to the scoring scheme of the original version, and examined this extended version, Spaln2, together with the original Spaln and other representative aligners based on our benchmark datasets. Although the effects of the modifications are not individually striking, Spaln2 is consistently most accurate and reasonably fast in most practical cases, especially for plants and fungi and for increasingly divergent pairs of target and query sequences.

  10. Rejection Sensitivity Mediates the Relationship between Social Anxiety and Body Dysmorphic Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Angela; Asnaani, Anu; Gutner, Cassidy; Cook, Courtney; Wilhelm, Sabine; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the role of rejection sensitivity in the relationship between social anxiety and body dysmorphic concerns. To test our hypothesis that rejection sensitivity mediates the link between social anxiety and body dysmorphic concerns, we administered self-report questionnaires to 209 student volunteers. Consistent with our prediction, rejection sensitivity partially mediated the relationship between social anxiety symptoms and body dysmorphic concerns. The implications of the overlap between these constructs are discussed. PMID:21741203

  11. Brain connectome modularity in weight-restored anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A; Leow, A; Zhan, L; GadElkarim, J; Moody, T; Khalsa, S; Strober, M; Feusner, JD

    2017-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) frequently co-occur, and have several overlapping phenomenological features. Little is known about their shared neurobiology. Aims To compare modular organization of brain structural connectivity. Methods We acquired diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data on unmedicated individuals with BDD (n=29), weight-restored AN (n=24), and healthy controls (HC) (n=31). We constructed connectivity matrices using whole-brain white matter tractography, and compared modular structures across groups. Results AN showed abnormal modularity involving frontal, basal ganglia, and posterior cingulate nodes. There was a trend in BDD for similar abnormalities, but no significant differences compared with AN. In AN, poor insight correlated with longer path length in right caudal anterior cingulate and right posterior cingulate. Conclusions Abnormal network organization patterns in AN, partially shared with BDD, may have implications for understanding integration between reward and habit/ritual formation, as well as conflict monitoring/error detection. PMID:27429183

  12. A comparison of self-esteem and perfectionism in anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Andrea S; Thomas, Jennifer J; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Matheny, Natalie L; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have identified phenotypic similarities between anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which share the common feature of negative body image. Studies comparing endophenotypes that may cut across both disorders-as suggested by the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria-are limited. Sixty-nine individuals (AN, n = 24; BDD, n = 23; mentally healthy controls [MHCs], n = 22) completed diagnostic interviews and self-reports assessing self-esteem and perfectionism. Clinical groups showed greater perfectionism in almost all subdimensions as well as poorer self-esteem compared with MHCs, with no clinical group differences when controlling for level of depression. Depression was a mediator of the relationship between symptom severity and self-esteem in both clinical groups. Comparable low self-esteem and greater perfectionism in AN and BDD corroborated existing etiological models and previous studies. Depression was a significant contributor to negative self-esteem in both disorders.

  13. Body Dysmorphic Symptoms, Functional Impairment, and Depression: The Role of Appearance-Based Teasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D

    2016-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is associated with elevated social and occupational impairment and comorbid depression, but research on risk factors for body dysmorphic symptoms and associated outcomes is limited. Appearance-based teasing may be a potential risk factor. To examine the specificity of this factor, the authors assessed self-reported appearance-based teasing, body dysmorphic, and obsessive-compulsive symptom severity, functional impairment (i.e., social, occupational, family impairment), and depression in a nonclinical sample of undergraduates. As hypothesized, appearance-based teasing was positively correlated with body dysmorphic symptoms. The correlation between teasing and body dysmorphic symptoms was stronger than that between teasing and obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Last, body dysmorphic symptom severity and appearance-based teasing interacted in predicting functional impairment and depression. Specifically, appearance-based teasing was positively associated with depression and functional impairment only in those with elevated body dysmorphic symptoms. When a similar moderation was tested with obsessive-compulsive, in place of body dysmorphic, symptom severity, the interaction was nonsignificant. Findings support theory that appearance-based teasing is a specific risk factor for body dysmorphic symptoms and associated functional impairment.

  14. Comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder: prevalence, explanatory theories, and clinical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías Á

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Álvaro Frías,1,2 Carol Palma,1,2 Núria Farriols,1,2 Laura González2 1FPCEE Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, 2Adult Outpatient Mental Health Center, Hospital de Mataró – CSdM, Mataró, Spain Background: With the advent of the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD has been subsumed into the obsessive-compulsive disorders and related disorders (OCDRD category. Objective: We aimed to determine the empirical evidence regarding the potential relationship between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD based on the prevalence data, etiopathogenic pathways, and clinical characterization of patients with both disorders. Method: A comprehensive search of databases (PubMed and PsycINFO was performed. Published manuscripts between 1985 and May 2015 were identified. Overall, 53 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Results: Lifetime comorbidity rates of BDD–OCD are almost three times higher in samples with a primary diagnosis of BDD than those with primary OCD (27.5% vs 10.4%. However, other mental disorders, such as social phobia or major mood depression, are more likely among both types of psychiatric samples. Empirical evidence regarding the etiopathogenic pathways for BDD–OCD comorbidity is still inconclusive, whether concerning common shared features or one disorder as a risk factor for the other. Specifically, current findings concerning third variables show more divergences than similarities when comparing both disorders. Preliminary data on the clinical characterization of the patients with BDD and OCD indicate that the deleterious clinical impact of BDD in OCD patients is greater than vice versa. Conclusion: Despite the recent inclusion of BDD within the OCDRD, data from comparative studies between BDD and OCD need further evidence for supporting this nosological approach. To better define this issue, comparative studies between BDD, OCD, and social phobia

  15. Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale for patients seeking esthetic surgery: cross-cultural validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Tatiana Dalpasquale; Brito, Maria José Azevedo de; Piccolo, Mônica Sarto; Rosella, Maria Fernanda Normanha da Silva Martins; Sabino, Miguel; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2016-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is one of the most sought-after esthetic operations among individuals with body dysmorphic disorder. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale. Cross-cultural validation study conducted in a plastic surgery outpatient clinic of a public university hospital. Between February 2014 and March 2015, 80 consecutive patients of both sexes seeking rhinoplasty were selected. Thirty of them participated in the phase of cultural adaptation of the instrument. Reproducibility was tested on 20 patients and construct validity was assessed on 50 patients, with correlation against the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Body Dysmorphic Disorder. The Brazilian version of the instrument showed Cronbach's alpha of 0.805 and excellent inter-rater reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.873; P Dysmorphic Disorder and the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.981, thus showing good accuracy for discriminating between presence and absence of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder. Forty-six percent of the patients had body dysmorphic symptoms and 54% had moderate to severe appearance-related obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The Brazilian version of the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale is a reproducible instrument that presents face, content and construct validity.

  16. Preoperative symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder determine postoperative satisfaction and quality of life in aesthetic rhinoplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picavet, Valerie A.; Gabriëls, Loes; Grietens, Jente; Jorissen, Mark; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P.; Hellings, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    In patients seeking aesthetic rhinoplasty, a high prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms has recently been reported. However, the impact of these symptoms on the outcomes after rhinoplasty remains elusive. This large-scale study determines the influence of preoperative body dysmorphic

  17. Visual selective attention in body dysmorphic disorder, bulimia nervosa and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollei, Ines; Horndasch, Stefanie; Erim, Yesim; Martin, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral models postulate that selective attention plays an important role in the maintenance of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). It is suggested that individuals with BDD overfocus on perceived defects in their appearance, which may contribute to the excessive preoccupation with their appearance. The present study used eye tracking to examine visual selective attention in individuals with BDD (n=19), as compared to individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) (n=21) and healthy controls (HCs) (n=21). Participants completed interviews, questionnaires, rating scales and an eye tracking task: Eye movements were recorded while participants viewed photographs of their own face and attractive as well as unattractive other faces. Eye tracking data showed that BDD and BN participants focused less on their self-rated most attractive facial part than HCs. Scanning patterns in own and other faces showed that BDD and BN participants paid as much attention to attractive as to unattractive features in their own face, whereas they focused more on attractive features in attractive other faces. HCs paid more attention to attractive features in their own face and did the same in attractive other faces. Results indicate an attentional bias in BDD and BN participants manifesting itself in a neglect of positive features compared to HCs. Perceptual retraining may be an important aspect to focus on in therapy in order to overcome the neglect of positive facial aspects. Future research should aim to disentangle attentional processes in BDD by examining the time course of attentional processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Surgeon Diagnostic Accuracy in Facial Plastic and Oculoplastic Surgery Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Andrew W; Ishii, Lisa; Joseph, Shannon S; Smith, Jane I; Su, Peiyi; Bater, Kristin; Byrne, Patrick; Boahene, Kofi; Papel, Ira; Kontis, Theda; Douglas, Raymond; Nelson, Christine C; Ishii, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relative contraindication for facial plastic surgery, but formal screening is not common in practice. The prevalence of BDD in patients seeking facial plastic surgery is not well documented. To establish the prevalence of BDD across facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practice settings, and estimate the ability of surgeons to screen for BDD. This multicenter prospective study recruited a cohort of 597 patients who presented to academic and private facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practices from March 2015 to February 2016. All patients were screened for BDD using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ). After each clinical encounter, surgeons independently evaluated the likelihood that a participating patient had BDD. Validated instruments were used to assess satisfaction with facial appearance including the FACE-Q, Blepharoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (BOE), Facelift Outcomes Evaluation (FOE), Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE), and Skin Rejuvenation Outcomes Evaluation (SROE). Across participating practices (9 surgeons, 3 sites), a total of 597 patients were screened for BDD: 342 patients from site 1 (mean [SD] age, 44.2 [16.5] years); 158 patients, site 2 (mean [SD] age, 46.0 [16.2] years), site 3, 97 patients (mean [SD] age, 56.3 [15.5] years). Overall, 58 patients [9.7%] screened positive for BDD by the BDDQ instrument, while only 16 of 402 patients [4.0%] were clinically suspected of BDD by surgeons. A higher percentage of patients presenting for cosmetic surgery (37 of 283 patients [13.1%]) compared with those presenting for reconstructive surgery (21 of 314 patients [6.7%]) screened positive on the BDDQ (odds ratio, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.20-3.68; P = .01). Surgeons were only able to correctly identify 2 of 43 patients (4.7%) who screened positive for BDD on the BDDQ, and the positive likelihood ratio was only 1.19 (95% CI, 0.28-5.07). Patients screening positive for BDD by the BDDQ had lower

  19. Randomised controlled trials of psychological & pharmacological treatments for body dysmorphic disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan L; Wilding, Helen E; Castle, David J

    2016-11-30

    Treatment for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) often involves a combination of psychological and pharmacological interventions. However, only a small number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been undertaken examining the efficacy of different therapeutic interventions. The aim of this study was to systematically review the RCTs involving psychological and pharmacological interventions for the treatment of BDD. The literature was searched to June 2015, and studies were included if they were written in English, empirical research papers published in peer-review journals, specifically assessed BDD patients, and involved a RCT assessing BDD symptoms pre- and post-intervention. Nine studies were identified: six involving psychological and three involving pharmacological interventions. Cognitive behaviour therapy, metacognitive therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were identified as treatments with potential benefit. The small number of RCTs and the heterogeneity of findings emphasises the need for more high quality RCTs assessing both psychological and pharmacological interventions for BDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Emotion recognition in body dysmorphic disorder: application of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhlmann, Ulrike; Winter, Anna; Kathmann, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by perceived appearance-related defects, often tied to aspects of the face or head (e.g., acne). Deficits in decoding emotional expressions have been examined in several psychological disorders including BDD. Previous research indicates that BDD is associated with impaired facial emotion recognition, particularly in situations that involve the BDD sufferer him/herself. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the ability to read other people's emotions among 31 individuals with BDD, and 31 mentally healthy controls. We applied the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task, in which participants are presented with a series of pairs of eyes, one at a time, and are asked to identify the emotion that describes the stimulus best. The groups did not differ with respect to decoding other people's emotions by looking into their eyes. Findings are discussed in light of previous research examining emotion recognition in BDD. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Contraindication or Ethical Justification for Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, Merle; Gillam, Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Is Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery for an adolescent with Body Dysmorphic Disorder ever ethically justified? Cosmetic genital surgery (specifically labioplasty) for adolescent girls is one of the most ethically controversial forms of cosmetic surgery and Body Dysmorphic Disorder is typically seen as a contraindication for cosmetic surgery. Two key ethical concerns are (1) that Body Dysmorphic Disorder undermines whatever capacity for autonomy the adolescent has; and (2) even if there is valid parental consent, the presence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder means that cosmetic surgery will fail in its aims. In this article, we challenge, in an evidence-based way, the standard view that Body Dysmorphic Disorder is a contraindication for genital cosmetic surgery in adolescents. Our argument gathers together and unifies a substantial amount of disparate research in the context of an ethical argument. We focus on empirical questions about benefit and harm, because these are ethically significant. Answers to these questions affect the answer to the ethical question. We question the claim that there would be no benefit from surgery in this situation, and we consider possible harms that might be done if treatment is refused. For an adolescent with Body Dysmorphic Disorder, the most important thing may be to avoid harm. We find ourselves arguing for the ethical justifiability of cosmetic labioplasty for an adolescent with Body Dysmorphic Disorder, even though we recognize that it is a counter intuitive position. We explain how we reached our conclusion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A Review of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Aesthetic Surgery Patients and the Legal Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Iliana E; Spitz, Jamie; Barry, David R; Cohen, Mimis

    2017-08-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is an often under-recognized yet severe psychiatric illness. There is limited guidance for plastic surgeons in the USA in how to recognize and manage patients with BDD and protect themselves from potential litigation and harm. Therefore, in collaboration with legal counsel, we remind our profession of the serious nature of patients with BDD, provide warning signs for recognizing BDD, and critically evaluate the validity of informed consent and the legal ramifications of operating on such patients in the USA. A literature review was performed to clearly define the psychopathology of BDD and identify cases of patients with BDD who underwent cosmetic surgery resulting in potential threats to the surgeon. An additional search of the legal literature was performed in collaboration with legal counsel to identify key cases of patients with BDD attempting litigation following cosmetic surgery procedures. The diagnostic criteria and psychopathology of BDD are presented. Warning signs are highlighted to alert the plastic surgeon to patients at high risk for BDD. Strategies for legal protection include a pre-procedure checklist for patients that are suspected of having a BDD diagnosis. Body dysmorphic disorder is prevalent in the cosmetic surgery population. Patients with BDD often have a poor outcome following aesthetic surgery, which can result in a dangerous or even deadly situation for the surgeon. We aim to remind aesthetic plastic surgeons of the psychopathology, severity, and specific risks associated with operating on patients with BDD while suggesting specific protective strategies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please

  3. Brain imaging findings of patients with congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism neuropathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.; Penev, L.; Hadjidekov, V.; Chamova, T.; Guergeltcheva, V.; Tournev, I.; Tournev, I.; Bojinova, V.; Kaprelian, A.; Tzoneva, D.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, observed in patients of Gypsy ancestry. All patients are homozygous for the same mutation in the CTDP1 gene mapping to 18qter. The clinical manifestations of the disease include congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, peripheral neuropathy due to primary hypomyelination, intellectual impairment and involvement of central nervous system.The aim of this study is to analyze CNS magnetic resonance imaging findings of patients with CCFDN syndrome and to apply severity score system. MRI of 20 patients (10 children - 4 girls and 6 boys and 10 adults - 6 women and 4 men with CCFDN was performed on 1,5T unit. We apply severity score system (previously used for metachromatic leukodystrophy) to evaluate patients with CCFDN which was adapted to the changes observed in CCFDN patients. This score system assessed WM involvement, as well as the presence of cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. We have found pathologic findings in 19 patients (95%). White matter hyperintensities were found in 18 and cerebral atrophy in 18 patients. The severity score have varied from 0 to 18 points. In contrast to previous studies we have found higher frequency of white matter hyperintensities. The findings are more prominent with patients' age. The most common MRI findings are cerebral atrophy and periventricular hyperintensities. This study gives the first detailed description of MRI findings in CCFDN syndrome patients where severity score system was applied. The score system could be applied in follow-up studies to evaluate progression of CNS findings. (authors)

  4. A new form of spondyloperipheral dysplasia with facial dysmorphism, flattened vertebrae, hypoplastic pelvis, brachydactyly and soft tissue syndactyly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitoh, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old Japanese boy with spondyloperipheral skeletal dysplasia associated with facial dysmorphism, pelvic abnormalities, and distinctive hands and feet. Radiographic manifestations included mild platyspondyly with posterior scalloping, small flared ilia with shallow acetabulae, mesomelic shortening of long bones, marked delay of carpal bone maturation, and brachydactyly with hypoplastic middle and terminal phalanges bilaterally in both hands and feet. There was bilateral soft tissue syndactyly of the 2nd and 3rd interdigital spaces of the hands, the 2nd interdigital space of the feet, with hypoplastic nails. The clinical and radiographic manifestations in this case appear to represent a unique type of skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  5. What is included with your online e-cigarette order? An analysis of e-cigarette shipping, product and packaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Amanda Y; Derrick, Jason C; Abrantes, Anthony S; Williams, Rebecca S

    2016-06-29

    The electronic cigarette industry is growing, with youth using e-cigarettes at higher rates than they are using cigarettes, and retail and online sales projected to reach $10 billion in 2017. Minimal regulation of the production and marketing of e-cigarettes exists to date, which has allowed companies to promote unsupported claims. We assessed the shipping, product features and packaging of a wide variety of e-cigarettes purchased online by adults and youth. The most popular internet e-cigarette vendors were identified from a larger study of internet tobacco vendors. Between August 2013 and June 2014, adults made 56 purchase attempts from online vendors, and youth made 98 attempts. Packages received were assessed for exterior and internal packaging features, including product information, health warnings and additional materials. We analysed a total of 125 orders featuring 86 unique brands of e-cigarettes. The contents were rarely indicated on package exteriors. Product information came with just 60% of orders and just 38.4% included an instruction manual. Only 44.6% of products included a health warning, and some had unsupported claims, such as lack of secondhand smoke exposure. Additionally, some products were leaking e-liquid and battery fluid on arrival. A large variety of e-cigarette products are manufactured and marketed to consumers. Many products do not include instructions for use, and unsupported claims are being presented to consumers. Effective federal regulation of the manufacturing, packaging, product information and health claims surrounding e-cigarettes is necessary to ensure consumers are presented with accurate e-cigarette use information. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Patients With Cosmetic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Sheng Lai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD refers to a preoccupation with an imagined or grossly exaggerated minor physical defect. Those with BDD might seek medical help (cosmetic surgery rather than attend a psychiatric clinic. Therefore, it is often underdiagnosed. To investigate the prevalence of BDD, we reviewed the medical records of 817 individuals who sought cosmetic surgery during a 3-year period. The outcome after surgery was described for those with BDD. Our results showed that 63 (7.7% patients had BDD, of which 54 (85.7% were diagnosed at preoperative evaluation. However, nine (14.3% patients went undiagnosed and all had a bad outcome after cosmetic surgery. BDD was not uncommon at the cosmetic surgery clinic. Our results support the idea that cosmetic surgery should be avoided for patients with BDD. The development of a more effective diagnostic procedure could help address this issue.

  7. Body dysmorphic disorder: Diagnosis, clinical aspects and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Ahluwalia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the increased demand to undertake dental aesthetic and reconstructive procedures, it is imperative for all dental clinicians to have an understanding of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Patient's preoccupations with perceived defect in appearance or excessive concern about minimal flaws are among diagnostic criteria of BDD. Such patients are difficult to please and often undergo cosmetic procedures such as orthodontic treatment. Methodology: Literature search in PubMed/MEDLINE was conducted from 1891 to 2015. A manual search of relevant articles and review was done and relevant data was collected and analysed. Results: One of the most common areas of preoccupation is the dento-facial region, with up to 20% of patients diagnosed with BDD expressing specific concern regarding their dental appearance. Conclusion: BDD patients often request multiple aesthetic procedures, but remain unsatisfied with their treatment results.

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Youth with Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Rogers, Jamison

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defect(s) in appearance, usually begins during early adolescence and appears to be common in youth. BDD is characterized by substantial impairment in psychosocial functioning and markedly high rates of suicidality. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) tailored to BDD’s unique features is the best tested and most promising psychosocial treatment for adults with BDD. CBT has been used for youth with BDD, but it has not been systematically developed for or tested in this age group, and there is a pressing need for this work to be done. This article focuses on CBT for BDD in adults and youth, possible adaptations for youth, and the need for treatment research in youth. We also discuss BDD’s prevalence, clinical features, how to diagnose BDD in youth, recommended pharmacotherapy for BDD (serotonin-reuptake inhibitors), and treatments that are not recommended (surgery and other cosmetic treatments). PMID:21440856

  9. Penile Dysmorphic Disorder: Development of a Screening Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Carmona, Lina; Fiorito, Chiara; Wells, Hannah; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    Penile dysmorphic disorder (PDD) is shorthand for men diagnosed with body dysmorphic disorder, in whom the size or shape of the penis is their main, if not their exclusive, preoccupation causing significant shame or handicap. There are no specific measures for identifying men with PDD compared to men who are anxious about the size of their penis but do not have PDD. Such a measure might be helpful for treatment planning, reducing unrealistic expectations, and measuring outcome after any psychological or physical intervention. Our aim was, therefore, to validate a specific measure, termed the Cosmetic Procedure Screening Scale for PDD (COPS-P). Eighty-one male participants were divided into three groups: a PDD group (n = 21), a small penis anxiety group (n = 37), and a control group (n = 23). All participants completed the COPS-P as well as standardized measures of depression, anxiety, social phobia, body image, quality of life, and erectile function. Penis size was also measured. The final COPS-P was based on nine items. The scale had good internal reliability and significant convergent validity with measures of related constructs. It discriminated between the PDD group, the small penis anxiety group, and the control group. This is the first study to develop a scale able to discriminate between those with PDD and men anxious about their size who did not have PDD. Clinicians and researchers may use the scale as part of an assessment for men presenting with anxiety about penis size and as an audit or outcome measure after any intervention for this population.

  10. Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale for patients seeking esthetic surgery: cross-cultural validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Dalpasquale Ramos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Rhinoplasty is one of the most sought-after esthetic operations among individuals with body dysmorphic disorder. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-cultural validation study conducted in a plastic surgery outpatient clinic of a public university hospital. METHODS: Between February 2014 and March 2015, 80 consecutive patients of both sexes seeking rhinoplasty were selected. Thirty of them participated in the phase of cultural adaptation of the instrument. Reproducibility was tested on 20 patients and construct validity was assessed on 50 patients, with correlation against the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Body Dysmorphic Disorder. RESULTS: The Brazilian version of the instrument showed Cronbach's alpha of 0.805 and excellent inter-rater reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.873; P < 0.001 and intra-rater reproducibility (ICC = 0.939; P < 0.001. Significant differences in total scores were found between patients with and without symptoms (P < 0.001. A strong correlation (r = 0.841; P < 0.001 was observed between the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Body Dysmorphic Disorder and the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.981, thus showing good accuracy for discriminating between presence and absence of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder. Forty-six percent of the patients had body dysmorphic symptoms and 54% had moderate to severe appearance-related obsessive-compulsive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian version of the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Scale is a reproducible instrument that presents face, content and construct validity.

  11. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou; Li, Yiu-Wah

    2003-01-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented. (orig.)

  12. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou; Li, Yiu-Wah

    2003-03-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented.

  13. The Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Female Adolescents of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Esnaashari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Body dysmorphic disorder is one of the common disorders in which adolescents give excessive attention to their appearances. In fact, it may causes disruptions in adolescents' individual and social life. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in female adolescents of Yazd. Method: In this cross-sectional study, the population consisted of all high school female students of Yazd (N= 10737 in 2012-2013, among which 371 students were selected as the study sample by using Cochran formula and cluster sampling method. Moreover, the participants completed a series of demographic questions as well as the questionnaire of Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Body Dysmorphic Disorder (Y-BOCS-BDD. Results: The findings revealed that 41% of sample were reported to have unusual concern about appearance and body shape in range of low to very severe. As a matter of fact, most of them experienced moderate severity and 7.1% showed severe body dysmorphic disorder that required immediate psychological intervention. The prevalence in female adolescents was estimated as 7.1% and most prevalent age of suffering was 17. Conclusion: In this research, it was endeavored to provide a more realistic image of body dysmorphic disorder in Yazd adolescents by utilizing a precise methodology. Considering the high prevalence of this disorder in female adolescents and its adverse consequences, some programs are recommended to be applied for diagnosis and early treatment of body dysmorphic disorder to promote adolescents mental health.

  14. Safe Zone Quantification of the Third Sacral Segment in Normal and Dysmorphic Sacra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, John S; Reilly, Mark C; Shaath, Mohammad K; Changoor, Stuart; Eastman, Jonathan; Routt, Milton Lee Chip; Sirkin, Michael S; Adams, Mark R

    2018-04-01

    To quantify the osseous anatomy of the dysmorphic third sacral segment and assess its ability to accommodate internal fixation. Retrospective chart review of a trauma database. University Level 1 Trauma Center. Fifty-nine patients over the age of 18 with computed tomography scans of the pelvis separated into 2 groups: a group with normal pelvic anatomy and a group with sacral dysmorphism. The sacral osseous area was measured on computed tomography scans in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes in normal and dysmorphic pelves. These measurements were used to determine the possibility of accommodating a transiliac transsacral screw in the third sacral segment. In the normal group, the S3 coronal transverse width averaged 7.71 mm and the S3 axial transverse width averaged 7.12 mm. The mean S3 cross-sectional area of the normal group was 55.8 mm. The dysmorphic group was found to have a mean S3 coronal transverse width of 9.49 mm, an average S3 axial transverse width of 9.14 mm, and an S3 cross-sectional area of 77.9 mm. The third sacral segment of dysmorphic sacra has a larger osseous pathway available to safely accommodate a transiliac transsacral screw when compared with normal sacra. The S3 segment of dysmorphic sacra can serve as an additional site for screw placement when treating unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures.

  15. Body dysmorphic concerns, social adaptation, and motivation for psychotherapeutic support in dermatological outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Viktoria; Fluhr, Joachim W; Schliemann-Willers, Sibylle; Elsner, Peter; Strauß, Bernhard; Stangier, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Dermatologists are increasingly confronted with patients affected by body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). BDD is characterized by excessive preoccupation with one or more perceived defect(s) or flaw(s) in physical appearance which are not observable or appear slight to others. So far, there have been only few studies examining the prevalence of BDD in dermatological outpatients. In addition, the need for psychotherapeutic support in dermatological outpatients with body dysmorphic concerns has not yet been systematically examined. The objective of the present study was therefore to investigate the frequency of body dysmorphic concerns as well as social adaptation and the need for psychotherapeutic support in the aforementioned patient group. A total of 252 dermatological outpatients seen at a German university hospital were consecutively enrolled, and examined using the Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire, the Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale, and the German version of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale. 7.9 % of all outpatients (unselected sample) showed positive test results, suggesting clinically relevant body dysmorphic concerns. Patients with clinically relevant body dysmorphic concerns exhibited poor social adaptation. Contrary to expectations, these patients revealed a high motivation for change, indicating the necessity for psychotherapeutic support. Our findings confirm previous prevalence rates of BDD in dermatological outpatients, and highlight the need for providing psychotherapeutic support to dermatological patients. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Preoperative symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder determine postoperative satisfaction and quality of life in aesthetic rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picavet, Valerie A; Gabriëls, Loes; Grietens, Jente; Jorissen, Mark; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P; Hellings, Peter W

    2013-04-01

    In patients seeking aesthetic rhinoplasty, a high prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms has recently been reported. However, the impact of these symptoms on the outcomes after rhinoplasty remains elusive. This large-scale study determines the influence of preoperative body dysmorphic disorder symptoms on patients' postoperative satisfaction and quality of life, using validated questionnaires. A 1-year prospective study of 166 adult patients undergoing cosmetic rhinoplasty in a tertiary referral center was performed. Severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms was assessed by the modified Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. Postoperative satisfaction was evaluated using a visual analog scale for patients' appraisal of nasal shape and the Rhinoplasty Outcome Evaluation. Generic quality of life was quantified by the Sheehan Disability Scale, whereas the appearance-related disruption of everyday life was measured by the Derriford Appearance Scale-59. Preoperative body dysmorphic disorder symptom scores inversely correlated with postoperative satisfaction at 3 months (visual analog scale nasal shape: rho = -0.43, p dysmorphic disorder symptom scores positively correlated with Sheehan Disability Scale scores and Derriford Appearance Scale-59 scores at 3 months (rho = 0.43, p dysmorphic disorder symptoms on subjective outcomes after rhinoplasty, hence unveiling a crucial factor in patient dissatisfaction after aesthetic rhinoplasty.

  17. Local Chromatin Features Including PU.1 and IKAROS Binding and H3K4 Methylation Shape the Repertoire of Immunoglobulin Kappa Genes Chosen for V(DJ Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise S. Matheson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available V(DJ recombination is essential for the generation of diverse antigen receptor (AgR repertoires. In B cells, immunoglobulin kappa (Igκ light chain recombination follows immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh recombination. We recently developed the DNA-based VDJ-seq assay for the unbiased quantitation of Igh VH and DH repertoires. Integration of VDJ-seq data with genome-wide datasets revealed that two chromatin states at the recombination signal sequence (RSS of VH genes are highly predictive of recombination in mouse pro-B cells. It is unknown whether local chromatin states contribute to Vκ gene choice during Igκ recombination. Here we adapt VDJ-seq to profile the Igκ VκJκ repertoire and present a comprehensive readout in mouse pre-B cells, revealing highly variable Vκ gene usage. Integration with genome-wide datasets for histone modifications, DNase hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding and germline transcription identified PU.1 binding at the RSS, which was unimportant for Igh, as highly predictive of whether a Vκ gene will recombine or not, suggesting that it plays a binary, all-or-nothing role, priming genes for recombination. Thereafter, the frequency with which these genes recombine was shaped both by the presence and level of enrichment of several other chromatin features, including H3K4 methylation and IKAROS binding. Moreover, in contrast to the Igh locus, the chromatin landscape of the promoter, as well as of the RSS, contributes to Vκ gene recombination. Thus, multiple facets of local chromatin features explain much of the variation in Vκ gene usage. Together, these findings reveal shared and divergent roles for epigenetic features and transcription factors in AgR V(DJ recombination and provide avenues for further investigation of chromatin signatures that may underpin V(DJ-mediated chromosomal translocations.

  18. Ten-year outcome including patterns of failure and toxicity for adjuvant whole abdominopelvic irradiation in high-risk and poor histologic feature patients with endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Kimberly D.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Weiner, Sheldon; Podratz, Karl; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Schray, Mark; Mitchell, Christina; Sherman, Alfred; Chen, Peter; Brabbins, Donald A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of treatment using adjuvant whole abdominal irradiation (WAPI) with a pelvic/vaginal boost in patients with Stage I-III endometrial carcinoma at high risk of intra-abdominopelvic recurrence, including clear cell (CC) and serous-papillary (SP) histologic features. Methods and Materials: In a prospective nonrandomized trial, 119 patients were treated with adjuvant WAPI between November 1981 and April 2000. All patients were analyzed, including those who did not complete therapy. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range 39-88). Thirty-eight patients (32%) had 1989 FIGO Stage I-II disease and 81 (68%) had Stage III. The pathologic features included the following: 64 (54%) with deep myometrial invasion, 48 (40%) with positive peritoneal cytologic findings, 69 (58%) with high-grade lesions, 21 (18%) with positive pelvic/para-aortic lymph nodes, and 44 (37%) with SP or CC histologic findings. Results: The mean follow-up was 5.8 years (range 0.2-14.7). For the entire group, the 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rate was 75% and 69% and the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 58% and 48%, respectively. When stratified by histologic features, the 5- and 10-year CSS rate for adenocarcinoma was 76% and 71%, and for serous papillary/CC subtypes, it was 74% and 63%, respectively (p=0.917). The 5- and 10-year DFS rate for adenocarcinoma was 60% and 50% and was 54% and 37% serous papillary/CC subtypes, respectively (p=0.498). For surgical Stage I-II, the 5-year CSS rate was 82% for adenocarcinoma and 87% for SP/CC features (p=0.480). For Stage III, it was 75% and 57%, respectively (p=0.129). Thirty-seven patients had a relapse, with the first site of failure the abdomen/pelvis in 14 (38%), lung in 8 (22%), extraabdominal lymph nodes in 7 (19%), vagina in 6 (16%), and other in 2 (5%). When stratified by histologic variant, 32% of patients with adenocarcinoma and 30% with the SP/CC subtype developed recurrent disease. Most

  19. A systematic review of visual processing and associated treatments in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilharz, F; Castle, D J; Grace, S; Rossell, S L

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have explored abnormal visual processing, yet it is unclear how this relates to treatment. The aim of this study was to summarize our current understanding of visual processing in BDD and review associated treatments. The literature was collected through PsycInfo and PubMed. Visual processing articles were included if written in English after 1970, had a specific BDD group compared to healthy controls and were not case studies. Due to the lack of research regarding treatments associated with visual processing, case studies were included. A number of visual processing abnormalities are present in BDD, including face recognition, emotion identification, aesthetics, object recognition and gestalt processing. Differences to healthy controls include a dominance of detailed local processing over global processing and associated changes in brain activation in visual regions. Perceptual mirror retraining and some forms of self-exposure have demonstrated improved treatment outcomes, but have not been examined in isolation from broader treatments. Despite these abnormalities in perception, particularly concerning face and emotion recognition, few BDD treatments attempt to specifically remediate this. The development of a novel visual training programme which addresses these widespread abnormalities may provide an effective treatment modality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A recognizable systemic connective tissue disorder with polyvalvular heart dystrophy and dysmorphism associated with TAB2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritelli, M; Morlino, S; Giacopuzzi, E; Bernardini, L; Torres, B; Santoro, G; Ravasio, V; Chiarelli, N; D'Angelantonio, D; Novelli, A; Grammatico, P; Colombi, M; Castori, M

    2018-01-01

    Deletions encompassing TAK1-binding protein 2 (TAB2) associated with isolated and syndromic congenital heart defects. Rare missense variants are found in patients with a similar phenotype as well as in a single individual with frontometaphyseal dysplasia. We describe a family and an additional sporadic patient with polyvalvular heart disease, generalized joint hypermobility and related musculoskeletal complications, soft, velvety and hyperextensible skin, short limbs, hearing impairment, and facial dysmorphism. In the first family, whole-exome sequencing (WES) disclosed the novel TAB2 c.1398dup (p.Thr467Tyrfs*6) variant that eliminates the C-terminal zinc finger domain essential for activation of TAK1 (TGFβ-activated kinase 1)-dependent signaling pathways. The sporadic case carryed a ~2 Mb de novo deletion including 28 genes also comprising TAB2. This study reveal an association between TAB2 mutations and a phenotype resembling Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with severe polyvalvular heart disease and subtle facial dysmorphism. Our findings support the existence of a wider spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with TAB2 perturbations and emphasize the role of TAK1 signaling network in human development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder by Proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jennifer L; Mothi, Suraj Sarvode; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing or impairing preoccupation with a perceived defect in physical appearance. BDD by proxy (BDDBP) is a significant but understudied variant of BDD in which the primary preoccupation involves perceived imperfections of another person. Like BDD, individuals with BDDBP engage in time-consuming rituals to "fix" the other person's appearance or alleviate distress. Avoidance is common and the impact of BDDBP on social functioning is profound. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the best-studied and most promising psychological treatment for BDD, but no studies have examined its generalizability to the BDDBP variant. We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome of CBT modified for BDDBP in a sample of 6 adults with primary BDDBP. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 12-20weeks. Mean symptom severity (BDDBP-YBOCS) dropped from the moderately severe range at pretreatment to the subclinical range at posttreatment, t(6)=10.7, p<.001, d=3.3. One hundred percent of treatment completers were responders (≥30% reduction in BDDBP-YBOCS). Insight also improved. Treatment gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this represents the first treatment study for BDDBP. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Body dysmorphic disorder and cosmetic dermatology: more than skin deep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, David J; Phillips, Katharine A; Dufresne, Raymond G

    2006-01-01

    Summary Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is relatively common in cosmetic practise, yet it remains under-recognized. BDD patients are unnaturally concerned with minimal or non-existent flaws, most commonly in the skin (e.g. facial acne or scarring) and hair (e.g. hair loss). Many patients develop social avoidance and suffer occupational or academic impairment. More severely ill patients may become housebound or even attempt suicide. Despite the minimal or non-existent nature of the perceived appearance flaws, patients with BDD may request dermatological treatments such as isotretinoin or dermabrasion. Although treatment outcome has received little investigation, it appears that most patients are dissatisfied with dermatological treatment and, even if the outcome is objectively acceptable, they do not worry any the less about their appearance afterwards. In contrast, a majority of patients respond to serotonin reuptake inhibitors or cognitive behavioural therapy. Treatment of these patients is best given by an experienced health professional. This may be a mental health professional or a dermatologist with an interest in psychological medicine. PMID:17147563

  3. Brazilian version of the body dysmorphic disorder examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Renata Trajano Borges; Sabino Neto, Miguel; Natour, Jamil; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Jones, Anamaria; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2008-03-06

    Body image improvement is considered to be the main reason for undergoing plastic surgery. The objective was to translate the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination (BDDE) into Brazilian Portuguese and to adapt and validate this questionnaire for use in Brazil. Cross-sectional survey, at the Department of Plastic Surgery of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. The BDDE was first translated into Portuguese and then back-translated into English. These translations were then discussed by healthcare professionals in order to establish the final Brazilian version. In a second stage, the validity and reliability of the BDDE were assessed. For this, patients were initially interviewed by two interviewers and subsequently, by only one of these interviewers. On the first occasion, in addition to the BDDE, the body shape questionnaire (BSQ) and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale were also applied. These questionnaires were applied to 90 patients. Six questions were modified during the assessment of cultural equivalence. Cronbach's alpha was 0.89 and the intraclass correlation coefficients for interobserver and test-retest reliability were 0.91 and 0.87, respectively. Pearson's coefficient showed no correlation between the BDDE and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (0.22), whereas there was a moderate correlation between the BDDE and the BSQ (0.64). The BDDE was successfully translated and adapted, with good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity.

  4. [An old "new" disease: body dysmorphic disorder (dysmorphophobia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Pál

    2010-10-31

    Body dysmorphic disorder causes significant suffering and serious impairment in psychosocial functions. However, this disease with dangerous risks is scarcely mentioned in the Hungarian medical literature. The objective of the author is to give a detailed review about this almost unknown, but relatively common disorder. The serious disorder of body perception is in the centre of symptoms, leading to social isolation, anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive phenomena. The disorder often remains unrecognized because of the lack of insight of disease. Comorbidity with affective disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, alcoholism and substance use disorders is common. The life quality of affected patients is bad, the risk of suicide or violence is high. Biological, psychological and sociocultural factors play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of the disorder. Imaging techniques and neuropsychological measures revealed changes characteristic for the disease. Childhood abuse and neglect, appearance-related critical remarks, stressors and the impact of media are also supposed to have role in the development of the disorder. The point prevalence is 0.7-2.5% in the general population, however, in special groups such as in tertiary students, psychiatric, dermatological and cosmetic surgery patients the prevalence rates may be much higher. Typically, the disease begins in early adolescence, and it persists and deteriorates without treatment, showing a chronic course. By means of pharmacotherapy and/or psychotherapy long-during improvement or full recovery can be achieved within a relatively short period of time.

  5. Personality disorders and traits in patients with body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K A; McElroy, S L

    2000-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have been postulated to have schizoid, narcissistic, and obsessional personality traits and to be sensitive, introverted, perfectionistic, and insecure. However, data on personality traits and disorders in BDD are limited. This study assessed 148 subjects with BDD, 26 of whom participated in a fluvoxamine treatment study; 74 subjects were assessed for personality disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIII-R Personality Disorders (SCID-II), 100 subjects completed the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), and 51 subjects completed the Rathus Assertiveness Scale. Forty-two subjects (57%) had one or more personality disorders, with avoidant personality disorder (43%) being most common, followed by dependent (15%), obsessive-compulsive (14%), and paranoid (14%) personality disorders. On the NEO-FFI, the mean scores were in the very high range for neuroticism, the low range for extraversion and conscientiousness, the low-average range for agreeableness, and the average range for openness to experience. On the Rathus Assertiveness Scale, the mean score was -17.1 +/- 32.0 for women and -17.0 +/- 32.3 for men. Among fluvoxamine responders, the number of personality disorders significantly decreased between the study baseline and endpoint. These findings suggest that the rate of personality disorders in BDD is relatively high, with avoidant personality disorder being most common. The high neuroticism scores and low extraversion scores are consistent with this finding.

  6. Brazilian version of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Trajano Borges Jorge

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Body image improvement is considered to be the main reason for undergoing plastic surgery. The objective was to translate the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination (BDDE into Brazilian Portuguese and to adapt and validate this questionnaire for use in Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional survey, at the Department of Plastic Surgery of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: The BDDE was first translated into Portuguese and then back-translated into English. These translations were then discussed by healthcare professionals in order to establish the final Brazilian version. In a second stage, the validity and reliability of the BDDE were assessed. For this, patients were initially interviewed by two interviewers and subsequently, by only one of these interviewers. On the first occasion, in addition to the BDDE, the body shape questionnaire (BSQ and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale were also applied. These questionnaires were applied to 90 patients. RESULTS: Six questions were modified during the assessment of cultural equivalence. Cronbach's alpha was 0.89 and the intraclass correlation coefficients for interobserver and test-retest reliability were 0.91 and 0.87, respectively. Pearson's coefficient showed no correlation between the BDDE and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (0.22, whereas there was a moderate correlation between the BDDE and the BSQ (0.64. CONCLUSIONS: The BDDE was successfully translated and adapted, with good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity.

  7. Pharmacotherapy Relapse Prevention in Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Keshaviah, Aparna; Dougherty, Darin D; Stout, Robert L; Menard, William; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is common, distressing, and often severely impairing. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear efficacious, but the few existing pharmacotherapy studies were short term (≤4 months), and no relapse prevention studies or continuation phase studies have been conducted to the authors' knowledge. The authors report results from the first relapse prevention study in body dysmorphic disorder. Adults (N=100) with DSM-IV body dysmorphic disorder received open-label escitalopram for 14 weeks (phase 1); 58 responders were then randomized to double-blind continuation treatment with escitalopram versus switch to placebo for 6 months (phase 2). Reliable and valid outcome measures were utilized. In phase 1, 67.0% of treated subjects and 81.1% of subjects who completed phase 1 responded to escitalopram. Body dysmorphic disorder severity (in both the intent-to-treat and the completer groups) and insight, depressive symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life significantly improved from baseline to end of phase 1. In phase 2, time to relapse was significantly longer with escitalopram than with placebo treatment (hazard ratio=2.72, 95% CI=1.01-8.57). Phase 2 relapse proportions were 18% for escitalopram and 40% for placebo. Among escitalopram-treated subjects, body dysmorphic disorder severity significantly decreased over time during the continuation phase, with 35.7% of subjects showing further improvement. There were no significant group differences in body dysmorphic disorder severity or insight, depressive symptoms, psychosocial functioning, or quality of life. Continuation-phase escitalopram delayed time to relapse, and fewer escitalopram-treated subjects relapsed than did placebo-treated subjects. Body dysmorphic disorder severity significantly improved during 6 additional months of escitalopram treatment following acute response; more than one-third of escitalopram-treated subjects experienced further improvement.

  8. Emotion recognition bias for contempt and anger in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhlmann, Ulrike; Etcoff, Nancy L; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) patients are preoccupied with imagined defects or flaws in appearance (e.g., size or shape of nose). They are afraid of negative evaluations by others and often suffer significant morbidity including hospitalization and suicide attempts. Many patients experience ideas of reference, e.g., they often believe others take special notice of their "flaw". Facial expressions play an important role in conveying negative or positive feelings, and sympathy or rejection. In this study, we investigated emotion recognition deficits in 18 BDD patients and 18 healthy controls. Participants were presented with two questionnaires accompanying facial photographs. One questionnaire included self-referent scenarios ("Imagine that the bank teller is looking at you. What is his facial expression like?"), whereas the other one included other-referent scenarios ("Imagine that the bank teller is looking at a friend of yours," etc.), and participants were asked to identify the corresponding emotion (e.g., anger, contempt, neutral, or surprise). Overall, BDD patients, relative to controls, had difficulty identifying emotional expressions in self-referent scenarios. They misinterpreted more expressions as contemptuous and angry in self-referent scenarios than did controls. However, they did not have significantly more difficulties identifying emotional expressions in other-referent scenarios than controls. Thus, poor insight and ideas of reference, common in BDD, might be related to a bias for misinterpreting other people's emotional expressions as negative. Perceiving others as rejecting might reinforce concerns about one's personal perceived ugliness and social desirability.

  9. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Isomura, Kayoko; Anson, Martin; Turner, Cynthia; Monzani, Benedetta; Cadman, Jacinda; Bowyer, Laura; Heyman, Isobel; Veale, David; Krebs, Georgina

    2015-11-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically starts in adolescence, but evidence-based treatments are yet to be developed and formally evaluated in this age group. We designed an age-appropriate cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for adolescents with BDD and evaluated its acceptability and efficacy in a pilot randomized controlled trial. Thirty adolescents aged 12 to 18 years (mean = 16.0, SD = 1.7) with a primary diagnosis of BDD, together with their families, were randomly assigned to 14 sessions of CBT delivered over 4 months or a control condition of equivalent duration, consisting of written psycho-education materials and weekly telephone monitoring. Blinded evaluators assessed participants at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, and at 2-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD, Adolescent Version (mean baseline score = 37.13, SD = 4.98, range = 24-43). The CBT group showed a significantly greater improvement than the control group, both at posttreatment (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = -11.26 [-17.22 to -5.31]; p = .000) and at 2-month follow-up (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = -9.62 [-15.74 to -3.51]; p = .002). Six participants (40%) in the CBT group and 1 participant (6.7%) in the control condition were classified as responders at both time points (χ(2) = 4.658, p = .031). Improvements were also seen on secondary measures, including insight, depression, and quality of life at posttreatment. Both patients and their families deemed the treatment as highly acceptable. Developmentally tailored CBT is a promising intervention for young people with BDD, although there is significant room for improvement. Further clinical trials incorporating lessons learned in this pilot study and comparing CBT and pharmacological therapies, as well as their combination, are warranted. Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder; http

  10. Visual processing in anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder: similarities, differences, and future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Sarah K.; Bohon, Cara; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are psychiatric disorders that involve distortion of the experience of one’s physical appearance. In AN, individuals believe that they are overweight, perceive their body as “fat,” and are preoccupied with maintaining a low body weight. In BDD, individuals are preoccupied with misperceived defects in physical appearance, most often of the face. Distorted visual perception may contribute to these cardinal symptoms, and may be a common underlying phenotype. This review surveys the current literature on visual processing in AN and BDD, addressing lower- to higher-order stages of visual information processing and perception. We focus on peer-reviewed studies of AN and BDD that address ophthalmologic abnormalities, basic neural processing of visual input, integration of visual input with other systems, neuropsychological tests of visual processing, and representations of whole percepts (such as images of faces, bodies, and other objects). The literature suggests a pattern in both groups of over-attention to detail, reduced processing of global features, and a tendency to focus on symptom-specific details in their own images (body parts in AN, facial features in BDD), with cognitive strategy at least partially mediating the abnormalities. Visuospatial abnormalities were also evident when viewing images of others and for non-appearance related stimuli. Unfortunately no study has directly compared AN and BDD, and most studies were not designed to disentangle disease-related emotional responses from lower-order visual processing. We make recommendations for future studies to improve the understanding of visual processing abnormalities in AN and BDD. PMID:23810196

  11. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Chamova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients’ age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  12. Comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder: prevalence, explanatory theories, and clinical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, Álvaro; Palma, Carol; Farriols, Núria; González, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background With the advent of the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been subsumed into the obsessive-compulsive disorders and related disorders (OCDRD) category. Objective We aimed to determine the empirical evidence regarding the potential relationship between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) based on the prevalence data, etiopathogenic pathways, and clinical characterization of patients with both disorders. Method A comprehensive search of databases (PubMed and PsycINFO) was performed. Published manuscripts between 1985 and May 2015 were identified. Overall, 53 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Results Lifetime comorbidity rates of BDD–OCD are almost three times higher in samples with a primary diagnosis of BDD than those with primary OCD (27.5% vs 10.4%). However, other mental disorders, such as social phobia or major mood depression, are more likely among both types of psychiatric samples. Empirical evidence regarding the etiopathogenic pathways for BDD–OCD comorbidity is still inconclusive, whether concerning common shared features or one disorder as a risk factor for the other. Specifically, current findings concerning third variables show more divergences than similarities when comparing both disorders. Preliminary data on the clinical characterization of the patients with BDD and OCD indicate that the deleterious clinical impact of BDD in OCD patients is greater than vice versa. Conclusion Despite the recent inclusion of BDD within the OCDRD, data from comparative studies between BDD and OCD need further evidence for supporting this nosological approach. To better define this issue, comparative studies between BDD, OCD, and social phobia should be carried out. PMID:26345330

  13. The classification of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sophie C; Baillie, Andrew J; Mond, Jonathan; Turner, Cynthia M; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) was categorised in DSM-5 within the newly created 'obsessive-compulsive and related disorders' chapter, however this classification remains subject to debate. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test competing models of the co-occurrence of symptoms of BDD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety, and eating disorders in a community sample of adolescents, and to explore potential sex differences in these models. Self-report questionnaires assessing disorder symptoms were completed by 3149 Australian adolescents. The fit of correlated factor models was calculated separately in males and females, and measurement invariance testing compared parameters of the best-fitting model between males and females. All theoretical models of the classification of BDD had poor fit to the data. Good fit was found for a novel model where BDD symptoms formed a distinct latent factor, correlated with affective disorder and eating disorder latent factors. Metric non-invariance was found between males and females, and the majority of factor loadings differed between males and females. Correlations between some latent factors also differed by sex. Only cross-sectional data were collected, and the study did not assess a broad range of DSM-5 defined eating disorder symptoms or other disorders in the DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders chapter. This study is the first to statistically evaluate competing models of BDD classification. The findings highlight the unique features of BDD and its associations with affective and eating disorders. Future studies examining the classification of BDD should consider developmental and sex differences in their models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Gender differences and prevalence in a Pakistani medical student population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaqar Talha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect which causes significant distress or impairment in functioning. Few studies have assessed gender differences in BDD in a non clinical population. Also no study assessed BDD in medical students. This study was designed to determine the point prevalence of BDD in Pakistani medical students and the gender differences in prevalence of BDD, body foci of concern and symptoms of BDD. Methods The medical students enrolled in a medical university in Karachi, Pakistan filled out a self-report questionnaire which assessed clinical features of BDD. BDD was diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Results Out of the 156 students, 57.1% were female. A total of 78.8% of the students reported dissatisfaction with some aspect of their appearance and 5.8% met the DSM-IV criteria for BDD. The male to female ratio for BDD was 1.7. Regarding gender differences in body foci of concern, the top three reported foci of concern in male students were head hair (34.3%, being fat (32.8%, skin (14.9% and nose(14.9%, whereas in females they were being fat (40.4%, skin (24.7% and teeth (18%. Females were significantly more concerned about being fat (p = 0.005. Male students were significantly more concerned about being thin (p = 0.01 and about head hair (p = 0.012. Conclusion BDD is fairly common in our medical student population, with a higher prevalence in males. Important gender differences in BDD symptomatology and reported body foci of concern were identified which reflected the influence of media on body image perception. The impact of cultural factors on the prevalence as well as gender differences in BDD symptomatology was also established.

  15. Ellis–van Creveld syndrome with facial dysmorphic features in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    This rare condition is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable expression. .... set ears, megalocornea, upward slant of palperal fissures, broad depressed nasal bridge, short bulbus nose, thin upper ... the skull, depression of nasal bridge and a pointed chin. Eidel- man and Rosenzweig [31] reported mandibular ...

  16. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y.; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzoca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A.; Nürnberg, Peter; Van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical

  17. Body Dysmorphic, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Social Anxiety Disorder Beliefs as Predictors of In Vivo Stressor Responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, E Marie; Straub, Kelsey T; Smith, April R; Clerkin, Elise M

    2017-06-01

    This study tested the potential transdiagnostic nature of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD) beliefs, in addition to testing the specificity of those beliefs, in predicting how individuals responded to symptom-specific stressors. Participants included 127 adults (75% women) with a broad range of symptom severity. Path analysis was used to evaluate whether specific maladaptive beliefs predicted distress in response to symptom-relevant stressors over and above other beliefs and baseline distress. SAD beliefs emerged as a significant predictor of distress in response to a mirror gazing (BDD-relevant), a thought (OCD-relevant), and a public speaking (SAD-relevant) task, controlling for other disorder beliefs and baseline distress. BDD beliefs were also a robust predictor of BDD stressor responding. Results suggest that social anxiety-relevant beliefs may function as a transdiagnostic risk factor that predicts in vivo symptoms across a range of problem areas.

  18. Investigation of a Patient With a Partial Trisomy 16q Including the Fat Mass and Obesity Associated Gene (FTO): Fine Mapping and FTO Gene Expression Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, L.; Delemarre-van d Waal, H.A.; Han, J.C.; Ylstra, B.; Eijk, P.; Nesterova, M.; Heutink, P.; Stratakis, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    A female patient with a partial trisomy 16q was described previously. Her clinical characteristics included obesity, severe anisomastia, moderate to severe mental retardation, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, dysmorphic facies, and contractions of the small joints. In this article, we

  19. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prazeres AM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Angélica M Prazeres,1 Antônio L Nascimento,1 Leonardo F Fontenelle1,21Anxiety and Depression Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Niterói, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder.Keywords: dysmorphophobia, behavioral therapy, cognitive therapy, literature review

  20. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Angélica M; Nascimento, Antônio L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder. PMID:23467711

  1. Hysteroscopic outpatient metroplasty to expand dysmorphic uteri (HOME-DU technique): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Spiezio Sardo, A; Florio, P; Nazzaro, G; Spinelli, M; Paladini, D; Di Carlo, C; Nappi, C

    2015-02-01

    The new classification system of uterine anomalies from the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy defines T-shaped and tubular-shaped infantilis uteri as 'dysmorphic'. Such malformations have been proven to be associated with poor reproductive performance. A prospective observational study was conducted with 30 infertile women with dysmorphic uterus who underwent the novel Hysteroscopic Outpatient Metroplasty to Expand Dysmorphic Uteri (HOME-DU ) technique. Incisions are made on the uterine walls with a 5 Fr bipolar electrode. The procedure was conducted in outpatients under conscious sedation, using a 5-mm office hysteroscope. The technique was successful in all cases without complications. A net increase of uterine volume was found, as measured at hysteroscopy and three-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound (P dysmorphic uteri. Although the cohort was small, pregnancy and live births outcomes were favourable in this poor-prognosis group, implying desirable benefits, which should be compared with other techniques. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Application of a Behavioral Model for the Treatment of Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Dena; Neziroglu, Fugen; Roberts, Marty

    2007-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by an obsessive concern over a perceived flaw in bodily appearance. If a minor flaw does exist, the patient displays unwarranted distress. This preoccupation typically leads to compulsive behaviors, such as mirror checking or mirror avoiding, camouflaging, and seeking reassurance from others…

  3. Victimization, social anxiety, and body dysmorphic concerns: appearance-based rejection sensitivity as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavell, Cassie H; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Farrell, Lara J; Webb, Haley

    2014-09-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by extreme preoccupation with perceived deficits in physical appearance, and sufferers experience severe impairment in functioning. Previous research has indicated that individuals with BDD are high in social anxiety, and often report being the victims of appearance-based teasing. However, there is little research into the possible mechanisms that might explain these relationships. The current study examined appearance-based rejection sensitivity as a mediator between perceived appearance-based victimization, social anxiety, and body dysmorphic symptoms in a sample of 237 Australian undergraduate psychology students. Appearance-based rejection sensitivity fully mediated the relationship between appearance-based victimization and body dysmorphic symptoms, and partially mediated the relationship between social anxiety and body dysmorphic symptoms. Findings suggest that individuals high in social anxiety or those who have a history of more appearance-based victimization may have a bias towards interpreting further appearance-based rejection, which may contribute to extreme appearance concerns such as BDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Placebo-Controlled Study of Pimozide Augmentation of Fluoxetine in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Although body dysmorphic disorder often responds to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), most patients do not respond or respond only partially. However, placebo-controlled studies of augmentation of SRIs have not been done. Furthermore, although 40%–50% of patients are delusional, studies of antipsychotic medications have not been done. Method Twenty-eight patients with body dysmorphic disorder or its delusional variant participated in an 8-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study of pimozide augmentation of fluoxetine. Results Pimozide was not more effective than placebo: two (18.2%) of 11 subjects responded to pimozide and three (17.6%) of 17 subjects responded to placebo. There was no significant effect of baseline delusionality on endpoint severity of body dysmorphic disorder. Delusionality did not decrease significantly more with pimozide than placebo. Conclusions Pimozide augmentation of fluoxetine treatment for body dysmorphic disorder was not more effective than placebo, even in more delusional patients. Further studies of augmentation for SRIs are needed. PMID:15677604

  5. The Relationship between Body Dysmorphic Disorder Behaviors and the Acquired Capability for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tracy K.; Didie, Elizabeth R.; Menard, William; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2012-01-01

    In a sample of 200 individuals diagnosed with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), we utilized the interpersonal-psychological theory for suicide as a framework to examine BDD behaviors that might be associated with suicide risk, insofar as they might increase the acquired capability for suicide. We predicted that physically painful BDD behaviors…

  6. Body dysmorphic disorder screening in maxillofacial outpatients presenting for orthognathic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulink, N. C. C.; Rosenberg, A.; Plooij, J. M.; Koole, R.; Bergé, S. J.; Denys, D.

    2008-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a severe psychiatric disease with delusions about defects in appearance for which patients seek surgical help. This is the first European study to determine the half-year prevalence of BDD in a maxillofacial outpatient clinic. A total of 160 patients with

  7. The relationship between perceived social support and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms: the role of gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Luana; Weingarden, Hilary M; LeBlanc, Nicole J; Siev, Jedidiah; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2011-09-01

    Whether social support is associated with severity of body dysmorphic symptoms is unknown. To address this gap in the literature, the present study aims to examine the association between three domains of perceived social support (i.e., family, friends, and significant others) and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. Participants (N = 400) with symptoms consistent with diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder completed measures of symptomatology and social support via the internet. More perceived social support from friends and significant others was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms for males, and more perceived social support from family and friends was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms among females. Additionally, gender moderated the association between perceived social support from significant others and symptom severity, such that perceived social support from a significant other was significantly negatively associated with body dysmorphic symptom severity in males, but not females. The present study implicates social support as an important area of future body dysmorphic disorder research.

  8. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in patients referred to Razi hospital cosmetic clinic with complaints of cosmetic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhooshang Ehsani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD is characterized by a preoccupation with an imagined defect in ones appearance or an exaggeration of a slight physical anomaly. Any part of the appearance may be the focuse of BDD patients. Thus preoccupation with appearance leads to significant damages of social and job functioning. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of BDD in patients referred to cosmetic clinic of Razi hospital.Methods: Patients visiting cosmetic clinic of Razi hospital were selected if they agreed to participate in the study. They were evaluated by Yale brown obsessive compulsive scale modified for body dysmorphic disorder (YBOCS-BDD as well as questionnaires containing demographic characteristics of patients including gender, educational status, marital status, history of reference to psychiatrist or psychologist, other medication, history of cosmetic surgery and rate of satisfaction of cosmetic surgery. YBOCS-BDD questionnaires then processed by educated specialist to determine BDD score of patie-nts. Demographic questionnaires, also analysed to evaluate epidemiologic properties of patients visiting cosmetic clinic of Razi hospital.Results: The prevalence of BDD in current sample was 33.3%. 70.7% of BDD patients were female while 29.3% were male. The commonest age range was 21-50 years (82.8%. 65.5% were educated to level of diploma or lower, while 34.5% had academic degrees. 51.7% were married. 20.7% had history of reference to psychiatrist or psycholo-gist. 17/2% had history of cosmetic surgery with satisfaction ranging from unsatisfied (20% to relative satisfaction (80%. None were fully satisfied.Conclusion: BDD had high prevalence in patients visiting cosmetic clinic of Razi skin hospital. This high rate of prevalence show the necessity of diagnosis of BDD in skin patients and it is critical for them to refer to psychiatrists or psychologists.

  9. Evaluation of Relationship Between Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Self-Esteem in Rhinoplasty Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Bahadir; Erdim, Ibrahim; Ozbay, Isa; Oghan, Fatih; Oncu, Fatih; Erdogdu, Zeynep; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between body dysmorphic syndrome and self-esteem in rhinoplasty candidates. A negative statistical correlation was evident between Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination-Self Report (BDDE-SR) scores. In terms of responses to the first Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ) question, which focuses on general attitude toward body dysmorphic syndrome, the average RSES "YES" score was significantly less than the "NO" score. No significant differences appeared between RSES scores and scores for the 4th subgroup of BDDQ questions (subgroups A, B, and C; these questions explore how much time is spent daily on maintenance of bodily appearance). However, significant differences appeared between scores for the 4th subgroup of BDDQ questions and BDDE-SR scores. The average BDD-SR score of subgroup A (less than 1 hour spent on bodily maintenance) was significantly lower than those of group B (1-3 hours) and group C (more than 3 hours). However, no significant differences appeared in average BDD-SR scores between subgroups B and C. In this prospective study, 56 patients (31 females and 25 males) were evaluated preoperatively using the BDDQ, the BDDE-SR, and the RSES. Patients younger than 15 years and those with deformities caused by trauma were excluded. Rhinoplasty candidates had higher levels of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Although patients with low RSES scores were more likely to have BDD, rhinoplasty candidates were not notably deficient in self-esteem. However, in rhinoplasty candidates with low RSES scores, the frequency of BDD was elevated. Therefore, the authors suggest that rhinoplasty candidates with low RSES scores should be investigated carefully in terms of BDD.

  10. Long-Term Outcomes of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Georgina; de la Cruz, Lorena Fernández; Monzani, Benedetta; Bowyer, Laura; Anson, Martin; Cadman, Jacinda; Heyman, Isobel; Turner, Cynthia; Veale, David; Mataix-Cols, David

    2017-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for adolescent body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in the short term, but longer-term outcomes remain unknown. The current study aimed to follow up a group of adolescents who had originally participated in a randomized controlled trial of CBT for BDD to determine whether treatment gains were maintained. Twenty-six adolescents (mean age = 16.2, SD = 1.6) with a primary diagnosis of BDD received a course of developmentally tailored CBT and were followed up over 12 months. Participants were assessed at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the clinician-rated Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD. Secondary outcomes included measures of insight, depression, quality of life, and global functioning. BDD symptoms decreased significantly from pre- to posttreatment and remained stable over the 12-month follow-up. At this time point, 50% of participants were classified as responders and 23% as remitters. Participants remained significantly improved on all secondary outcomes at 12-month follow-up. Neither baseline insight nor baseline depression predicted long-term outcomes. The positive effects of CBT appear to be durable up to 12-month follow-up. However, the majority of patients remained symptomatic and vulnerable to a range of risks at 12-month follow-up, indicating that longer-term monitoring is advisable in this population. Future research should focus on enhancing the efficacy of CBT in order to improve long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Attentional biases in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD): Eye-tracking using the emotional Stroop task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Lin; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterised by repetitive behaviours and/or mental acts occurring in response to preoccupations with perceived defects or flaws in physical appearance. This study aimed to examine attentional biases in BDD via the emotional Stroop task with two modifications: i) incorporating an eye-tracking paradigm, and ii) employing an obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) control group. Twenty-one BDD, 19 OCD and 21 HC participants, who were age-, sex-, and IQ-matched, were included. A card version of the emotional Stroop task was employed based on seven 10-word lists: (i) BDD-positive, (ii) BDD-negative, (iii) OCD-checking, (iv) OCD-washing, (v) general positive, (vi) general threat, and (vii) neutral (as baseline). Participants were asked to read aloud words and word colours consecutively, thereby yielding accuracy and latency scores. Eye-tracking parameters were also measured. Participants with BDD exhibited significant Stroop interference for BDD-negative words relative to HC participants, as shown by extended colour-naming latencies. In contrast, the OCD group did not exhibit Stroop interference for OCD-related nor general threat words. Only mild eye-tracking anomalies were uncovered in clinical groups. Inspection of individual scanning styles and fixation heat maps however revealed that viewing strategies adopted by clinical groups were generally disorganised, with avoidance of certain disorder-relevant words and considerable visual attention devoted to non-salient card regions. The operation of attentional biases to negative disorder-specific words was corroborated in BDD. Future replication studies using other paradigms are vital, given potential ambiguities inherent in emotional Stroop task interpretation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expansion of the clinical phenotype of the distal 10q26.3 deletion syndrome to include ataxia and hyperemia of the hands and feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaria, Melanie; Srour, Myriam; Michaud, Jacques L; Doja, Asif; Miller, Elka; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Goldsmith, Claire; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M

    2017-06-01

    Distal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10 is associated with a dysmorphic craniofacial appearance, microcephaly, behavioral issues, developmental delay, intellectual disability, and ocular, urogenital, and limb abnormalities. Herein, we present clinical, molecular, and cytogenetic investigations of four patients, including two siblings, with nearly identical terminal deletions of 10q26.3, all of whom have an atypical presentation of this syndrome. Their prominent features include ataxia, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and hyperemia of the hands and feet, and they do not display many of the other features commonly associated with deletions of this region. These results point to a novel gene locus associated with ataxia and highlight the variability of the clinical presentation of patients with deletions of this region. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Few Evidence-Based Features of Dietary Interventions Included in Photo Diet Tracking Mobile Apps for Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Sarah; Dunn, Caroline; Wilcox, Sara; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2016-11-01

    Apps using digital photos to track dietary intake and provide feedback are common, but currently there has been no research examining what evidence-based strategies are included in these apps. A content analysis of mobile apps for photo diet tracking was conducted, including whether effective techniques for interventions promoting behavior change, including self-regulation, for healthy eating (HE) are targeted. An initial search of app stores yielded 34 apps (n = 8 Android and Apple; n = 11 Android; n = 15 Apple). One app was removed (unable to download), and other apps (n = 4) were unable to be rated (no longer available). Remaining apps (n = 29) were downloaded, reviewed, and coded by 2 independent reviewers to determine the number of known effective self-regulation and other behavior change techniques included. The raters met to compare their coding of the apps, calculate interrater agreement, resolve any discrepancies, and come to a consensus. Six apps (21%) did not utilize any of the behavior change techniques examined. Three apps (10%) provided feedback to users via crowdsourcing or collective feedback from other users and professionals, 7 apps (24%) used crowdsourcing or collective feedback, 1 app (3%) used professionals, and 18 apps (62%) did not provide any dietary feedback to users. Few photo diet-tracking apps include evidence-based strategies to improve dietary intake. Use of photos to self-monitor dietary intake and receive feedback has the potential to reduce user burden for self-monitoring, yet photo diet tracking apps need to incorporate known effective behavior strategies for HE, including self-regulation. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  14. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to distinguish cases of delusional disorder of somatic subtype from severe somatization .... features suggestive of a paranoid schizophrenia. Paranoid schizophrenia ... Of note is that the patient's personality and psychosocial functioning were ...

  15. Duodenal atresia in 17q12 microdeletion including HNF1B: a new associated malformation in this syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Woo, Jennifer S; Bomberg, Eric M; Wallace, W Dean; Peredo, Jane; Dipple, Katrina M

    2014-12-01

    Deletions of chromosome 17q12 [OMIM 614527] encompass a wide range of phenotypes, including renal cysts, diabetes mellitus, pancreatic structural abnormalities, genital tract anomalies, developmental delay, learning difficulties, and more recently, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. To date, gastrointestinal malformations have not been fully characterized in this syndrome. In this case report, we describe a four-year-old girl with a 17q12 microdeletion who was born with duodenal atresia, bilateral renal cysts, left kidney dysplasia, a midline cystic structure at the conus medullaris, and dysmorphic features. Both the patient and her affected father were found to have a deletion of 17q12, which encompasses the HNF1B (hepatocyte nuclear factor beta). It is hypothesized that HNF1B may play a role in intestinal differentiation and development. Our clinical report further expands the pre-and post-natal presentation of this rare microdeletion syndrome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Prevalence of and associations between body dysmorphic concerns, obsessive beliefs and social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahmand, Usha; Shahbazi, Zeynab

    2015-03-01

    Physical attractiveness has been of concern in different cultures and at different times. Physical attractiveness can influence one's thoughts and actions, and concerns regarding body image can be destructive, giving rise to psychological problems. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of body dysmorphic concerns, related sex differences and comorbidity with social anxiety and obsessive beliefs. Using a stratified and cluster sampling procedure, 1,200 males and females were randomly selected. Self-report measures on body image, social anxiety and obsessive beliefs were distributed of which 843 completed questionnaires (54.9% males and 45.1% females) were returned (return rate of 70.25%). Therefore, data pertaining to 463 males and 380 females ranging in age from 17 to 20 years with a mean age of 18.12 years (SD = 1.06) were analyzed. Findings suggest a prevalence rate of 19.1% for body dysmorphic disorder, 23.6% for social anxiety and 8.8% for obsessive beliefs. Both social anxiety and obsessive beliefs were found to be comorbid with body dysmorphic concerns. The percentage of individuals reporting comorbid social anxiety (12.9%) was greater than that of those reporting comorbid obsessive beliefs (6.4%). Males with body dysmorphic concerns reported more obsessive beliefs (8.2% versus 4.1%), while their female counterparts reported more social anxiety (23.4% versus 4.2%). In males, body image concerns appear to be more cognitive in quality, while in females, body image concerns seem more emotional in tone. As the measures used do not yield formal diagnoses, findings should be viewed with caution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Antenatal Diagnosis of Jeune Syndrome (Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia) with Micromelia and Facial Dysmorphism on Second-Trimester Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, Kewal A.; Suthar, Pokhraj P.; Bhesania, Siddharth R.; Patel, Ankitkumar

    2015-01-01

    Jeune syndrome is a rare congenital malformation with a reported incidence of 1 in 100,000–130,000 live births. Thoracic hypoplasia is the most striking abnormality of this disorder. Here we report a case of Jeune syndrome with marked thoracic hypoplasia, micromelia and facial dysmorphism, which was diagnosed on a second-trimester antenatal real-time three-dimensional ultrasound. A 24-year-old primigravida came for routine anomaly scan at 19 weeks of gestation. Transabdominal grey scale and real time 3D ultrasound (US) was done with GE Logiq P5 with curvilinear array transducers (4C and 4D3C-L). US findings were consistent with the diagnosis of Jeune syndrome (Asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia). Jeune syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder with a spectrum of abnormalities of which thoracic hypoplasia is the most striking. It can be diagnosed on early antenatal US by its characteristic skeletal and morphological features which can guide further management of pregnancy in form of termination or preparation for surgical correction of the deformity

  18. [Prevalence of depression and body dysmorphic disorder in patients before functional rhinosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, M; Rustige, L; Lindemann, J

    2014-11-01

    Psychiatric disorders are known to influence the result of many surgical procedures. Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is found in many patients undergoing plastic surgery. The prevalence before functional rhinosurgery has not been examined so far. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and BDD before functional rhinosurgery. 201 patients were prospectively examined with a questionnaire before functional rhinosurgery. Beck-Depression-Index was used to rate depression, the PISA body dsymorphic symptom scale was used to evaluate the likelihood that a patient suffers from body dysmoprhic disorder. 186 patients returned a complete questionnaire. In 33.9% showed a mild or strong indication for a body dysmorphic disorder. Patients who were planned to undergo septorhinoplasty had a significantly higher scores in the PISA-scale compared to patients before septoplasty. 1.7% patients were depressive without a significant difference between the planned surgical procedure. Many patients before functional septorhinoplasty show signs of body dysmorphic disorder. Whether this influences the subjective clinical outcome needs to be evaluated in further studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Relative relationships of general shame and body shame with body dysmorphic phenomenology and psychosocial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D; Davidson, Eliza; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a perceived flaw in appearance and repetitive avoidance behaviors. BDD involves severe psychosocial outcomes (e.g., depression, suicidality, functional impairment). Identifying correlates of BDD symptoms and outcomes can inform treatment. Shame, a painful emotion felt in response to critical self-judgment, may be one key correlate. However, research on shame in BDD is scarce and previous studies have not distinguished general shame from body shame. This study examines the relative relationships between body shame and general shame with body dysmorphic phenomenology and psychosocial outcomes. Participants ( N = 184) were recruited online via BDD organizations and completed a survey. Path analysis was used to examine associations between body and general shame with 1) body dysmorphic phenomenology and 2) depression severity, suicide risk, and functional impairment. Both types of shame were differentially related to outcomes. Body shame was more strongly related to phenomenology, whereas general shame was more strongly related to psychosocial outcomes. Thus, it may be important for BDD treatment to focus on reducing both general and body shame. Further research should evaluate whether current treatments adequately address and reduce general and body shame, and whether addressing shame promotes better treatment outcomes.

  20. Potential link between body dysmorphic disorder symptoms and alexithymia in an eating-disordered treatment-seeking sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Andrea Siân; Sullivan, Karen Anne

    2011-09-30

    This study aimed to explore the manifestation of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in a sample of people with eating disorders and to investigate possible associations between body dysmorphia and alexithymia. Forty patients currently seeking treatment for an eating disorder completed a battery of six measures assessing alexithymia, mood, eating behaviours, weight-related body image, body dysmorphia and non-weight related body image. Significant moderate positive correlations (Pearson's r) between selected variables were found, suggesting that participants with high levels of dysmorphic concern (imagined ugliness) have more difficulty with the affective elements of alexithymia, that is, identifying and describing feelings. When depression, eating attitudes, and weight-related body image concerns were controlled for, significant moderate positive correlations between this alexithymia factor and dysmorphic concerns remained present. An independent-samples t-test between eating-disordered participants with and without symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) revealed significant group differences in difficulties identifying feelings. This pattern of results was replicated when the groups were identified on the basis of dysmorphic concerns, as opposed to BDD symptoms. This study highlights the associations between alexithymia and body dysmorphia that have not previously been demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of comorbid body dysmorphic disorder on the response to sequential pharmacological trials for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Juliana B; Costa, Daniel Lc; Cassab, Raony Cc; Pereira, Carlos Ab; Miguel, Euripedes C; Shavitt, Roseli G

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to investigate the impact of comorbid body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on the response to sequential pharmacological trials in adult obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. The sequential trial initially involved fluoxetine monotherapy followed by one of three randomized, add-on strategies: placebo, clomipramine or quetiapine. We included 138 patients in the initial phase of fluoxetine, up to 80 mg or the maximum tolerated dosage, for 12 weeks. We invited 70 non-responders to participate in the add-on trial; as 54 accepted, we allocated 18 to each treatment group and followed them for an additional 12 weeks. To evaluate the combined effects of sex, age, age at onset, initial severity, type of augmentation and BDD on the response to sequential treatments, we constructed a model using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Of the 39 patients who completed the study (OCD-BDD, n = 13; OCD-non-BDD, n = 26), the OCD-BDD patients were less likely to be classified as responders than the OCD-non-BDD patients (Pearson Chi-Square = 4.4; p = 0.036). In the GEE model, BDD was not significantly associated with a worse response to sequential treatments (z-robust = 1.77; p = 0.07). The predictive potential of BDD regarding sequential treatment strategies for OCD did not survive when the analyses were controlled for other clinical characteristics. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Can understanding the neurobiology of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) inform treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell, Susan L; Harrison, Ben J; Castle, David

    2015-08-01

    We aim to provide a clinically focused review of the neurobiological literature in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), with a focus on structural and functional neuroimaging. There has been a recent influx of studies examining the underlying neurobiology of BDD using structural and functional neuroimaging methods. Despite obvious symptom similarities with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), no study to date has directly compared the two groups using neuroimaging techniques. Studies have established that there are limbic and visual cortex abnormalities in BDD, in contrast to fronto-striatal differences in OCD. Such data suggests affect or visual training maybe useful in BDD. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  3. Eumorphic Plastic Surgery: Expectation Versus Satisfaction in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Micai, Alessandro; Boriani, Filippo

    2016-08-01

    Eumorphic Plastic Surgery aims at improving the severe psychosocial pain caused by a deformity. Dysmorphopathology is an increasingly relevant problem facing the plastic surgeon. The aim of this study is to describe the perioperative questionnaires created by the senior author and to present a cohort of plastic surgery patients suffering from dysmorphopathies. These patients were prospectively followed and evaluated with the proposed questionnaires through their surgical pathway to explore the degree of satisfaction or disappointment compared to expectations. All candidates for plastic surgery procedures between April 2011 and June 2013 were included in the study. Preoperatively, all patients completed the Patient Expectation Questionnaire (E-pgm). Twelve months postoperatively, they completed the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (S-pgm). The E-pgm and S-pgm were compared to evaluate the consistency between the patient's preoperative expectations and postoperative evaluations. A total of 158 patients were included in the study. Out of them, 79 % experienced an improvement or no variation between preoperative expectations and postoperative satisfaction. With regard to the motivation for undergoing surgery, 91 % showed that the surgical procedure met the motivation. An overall positive perioperative change in life was experienced by 93 % of patients. The E-pgm questionnaire proved to be a valid and reliable tool for the selection of suitable candidates for surgery and for identification of dysmorphophobic patients. Enhancing the doctor-patient relationship and communication can reduce ambiguity and avoid troublesome misunderstandings, litigation and other legal implications. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. GAPO syndrome : a new case of this rare syndrome and a review of the relative importance of different phenotypic features in diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacon, W; Hall, RK; Roset, JP; Boukari, A; Tenenbaum, H; Walter, B

    1999-01-01

    The case of GAPO syndrome reported here is the 24th recorded case, 23 cases having been published previously. The 29-year-old male under discussion presents all the typical features of the syndrome, having short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features. total alopecia and pseudoanodontia. Orally,

  5. Patients with mild to moderate body dysmorphic disorder may benefit from rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Gabriel Almeida Arruda; de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Nahas, Fabio Xerfan; Tavares, Hermano; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Dini, Gal Moreira; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2014-05-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is one of the most common psychiatric conditions found in patients seeking cosmetic surgery. BDD is also a challenge for plastic surgeons because it is still an underdiagnosed mental disorder. The aims of this study were to prospectively investigate whether patients with mild to moderate BDD are suitable for rhinoplasty, and to assess BDD severity and patient satisfaction with the surgical outcome 1 year after the intervention. All women (n = 116) seeking rhinoplasty at a university hospital between September 2009 and August 2010 were recruited for the study and assessed for BDD. The final sample consisted of 31 patients aged 32 (standard deviation (SD), 10) years with mild to moderate BDD who underwent rhinoplasty. The participants were assessed preoperatively (baseline) and 1 year postoperatively with the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination (BDDE). Most patients (22/31, 71%) were of African descent. Socio-demographic variables and the extent of the nasal deformities had no effect on the severity of BDD symptoms and patient satisfaction with surgery outcome. At the 1-year postoperative follow-up, there was a significant decrease from baseline in BDDE scores and time spent by patients worrying about their appearance; 25 (25/31, 81%) patients experienced complete remission from BDD and 28 (28/31, 90%) were satisfied with the results of surgery. Rhinoplasty may be indicated in the treatment of female patients with mild to moderate BDD. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Body dysmorphic disorder in patients undergoing septorhinoplasty surgery: should we be performing routine screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, J; Randhawa, P; Hannan, S A; Long, J; Goh, S; O'Shea, N; Saleh, H; Hansen, E; Veale, D; Andrews, P

    2017-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is defined as having a preoccupation with a perceived flaw in one's appearance, which appears slight to others and significantly interferes with a person's functioning. When undetected in septorhinoplasty patients, it will often lead to poor outcomes. We performed a prospective cohort study to determine the prevalence of BDD in our patients and whether surgical correction could be considered. We recruited 34 patients being considered for septorhinoplasty in a tertiary referral rhinology clinic and a control group of 50 from the otology clinic giving a total of 84. Participants completed the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), the sino-nasal outcome test-23 (SNOT-23) and underwent nasal inspiratory peak flow (NIPF). Those found to be at high risk for BDD were referred to a clinical psychologist. Of the septorhinoplasty patients, 11 (32%) were high risk for BDD. Following psychological assessment, 7 (63%) patients were felt to be unsuitable for surgery and were offered psychological therapy. SNOT-23 scores were significantly higher in the BDD group indicating a negative impact on quality of life. NIPF readings were not significantly different in the BDD group compared to the control group. The BDDQ is a valid tool for identifying patients at risk of BDD. A close working relationship with clinical psychology has been advantageous to help the selection process of candidates for surgery when there is a high risk of BDD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Metacognitive therapy for body dysmorphic disorder patients in Iran: acceptability and proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Mehdi; Mulkens, Sandra; Kalantari, Mehrdad; Molavi, Hossein; Bahrami, Fatemeh

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of metacognitive therapy (MCT) on symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and on symptoms of thought-fusion, by means of a wait-list controlled clinical trial. Participants were referred from dermatology and cosmetic surgery clinics in the city of Isfahan, Iran, and 20 patients were selected on the basis of DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for BDD. They were randomly assigned to either the experimental or the wait-list control group. The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD-YBOCS) and the Thought-Fusion Inventory (TFI) were used as the outcome measures. The experimental group received 8 weekly metacognitive intervention sessions. The control group was in the waiting-list until the end of the follow-up. Measures were taken at pre-test, post-test (after 2 months) and follow-up (after 6-months). The results of analysis of variance showed that MCT significantly reduced the symptoms of BDD and of thought-fusion, compared to the wait-list. Effects on both outcome measures were maintained at 6-months follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Congenital axis dysmorphism in a medieval skeleton : …secunda a vertendo epistropheus….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travan, Luciana; Saccheri, Paola; Toso, Francesco; Crivellato, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    We describe here the axis dysmorphism that we observed in the skeletal remains of a human child dug up from a fifteenth century cemetery located in north-eastern Italy. This bone defect is discussed in the light of pertinent literature. We performed macroscopical examination and CT scan analysis of the axis. Axis structure was remarkably asymmetric. Whilst the left half exhibited normal morphology, the right one was smaller than normal, and its lateral articular surface showed horizontal orientation. In addition, the odontoid process appeared leftward deviated and displayed a supplementary articular-like facet situated on the right side of its surface. These findings suggest a diagnosis of unilateral irregular segmentation of atlas and axis, a rare dysmorphism dependent upon disturbances of notochordal development in early embryonic life. Likewise other malformations of the craniovertebral junction, this axis defect may alter the delicate mechanisms of upper neck movements and cause a complex series of clinical symptoms. This is an emblematic case whereby human skeletal remains may provide valuable information on the anatomical defects of craniovertebral junction.

  9. Body dysmorphic factors and mental health problems in people seeking rhinoplastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanbakht, M; Nazari, A; Javanbakht, A; Moghaddam, L

    2012-02-01

    There has been increasing number of requests for cosmetic rhinoplastic surgery among Iranian people in different age groups in recent years. One risk for people who undergo such plastic operations is the presence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which can complicate the result and decrease the rate of satisfaction from surgery. This study aimed to investigate mental health problems in people seeking rhinoplastic surgery. In this case-control study, the scores of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and DCQ (Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire) were obtained from 50 individuals who were candidates for rhinoplasty, and the results were compared with a normal control group. The total GHQ score and scores in anxiety, depression, and social dysfunction sub-scales were higher among the study group. This was the same for the DCQ score. However, the scores of somatization sub-scale of GHQ were not significantly different between the two groups. Psychiatric evaluation of candidates for rhinoplasty seems necessary for prevention of unnecessary and repetitive surgical operations.

  10. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  11. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amy; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Enander, Jesper; Radua, Joaquim; Mataix-Cols, David

    2016-08-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder unlikely to remit without treatment. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for BDD was conducted, including published and unpublished trials to 26th November 2015. Primary outcomes were validated BDD measures; secondary outcomes included depression and insight. Meta-regressions were conducted to examine potential effects of variables on the primary outcome, including socio-demographic variables, comorbidity, symptom severity/duration, concomitant medication, treatment duration, and methodological quality of the RCTs. Seven RCTs (N=299) met inclusion criteria. CBT was superior to waitlist or credible psychological placebo in reducing BDD (7 studies; delta=-1.22, 95% CI=-1.66 to -0.79) and depression symptoms (5 studies; delta=-0.49, 95% CI=-0.76 to -0.22). CBT was associated with improvements in insight/delusionality (4 studies; delta=-0.56, 95% CI=-0.93 to -0.19). Improvement in BDD was maintained after 2-4months follow-up (3 studies; delta=-0.89, 95% CI=-1.24 to -0.54). Meta-regression analyses did not reveal any significant predictors of outcome. CBT is an efficacious treatment for BDD but there is substantial room for improvement. The specificity and long-term effects of CBT for BDD require further evaluation using credible control conditions. Additional trials comparing CBT with pharmacological therapies, as well as their combination, are warranted. Tele-care options, such as Internet-based CBT, hold great promise to increase access to evidence-based treatment for a majority of patients who need it and should be evaluated further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Plastic Surgery and Dermatology Patients: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rafael Vilela Eiras

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in plastic surgery and dermatology patients, by performing a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. The most relevant studies published originally in any language were analyzed. The literature search was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Scielo databases. The final sample comprised 33 publications that were submitted to meta-analysis. The study verified that 15.04% of plastic surgery patients had body dysmorphic disorder (range 2.21-56.67%); patient mean age was 34.54 ± 12.41 years, and most were women (74.38%). Among dermatology patients, 12.65% (range 4.52-35.16%) had body dysmorphic disorder; patient mean age was 27.79 ± 9.03 years, and most were women (76.09%). Both plastic surgeons and dermatologists must adequately assess their patients to identify those with a higher likelihood of body dysmorphic disorder and should arrange multidisciplinary care for such individuals. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  13. Enhancing the Detection of Dysmorphic Red Blood Cells and Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells with a Modified Urinalysis Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Su, Yu; Shukuya, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2017-01-11

    Urinary sediment is used to evaluate patients with possible urinary tract diseases. Currently, numerous protocols are applied to detect dysmorphic red blood cells (RBCs) and renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) in urinary sediment. However, distinct protocols are used by nephrologists and medical technologists for specimen concentration and observation, which leads to major discrepancies in the differential counts of formed elements such as dysmorphic RBCs and RTECs and might interfere with an accurate clinical diagnosis. To resolve these problems, we first tested a modified urinalysis protocol with an increased relative centrifuge force and concentration factor in 20 biopsy-confirmed glomerulonephritis patients with haematuria. We successfully improved the recovery ratio of dysmorphic RBCs in clinical specimens from 34.7% to 42.0% (P dysmorphic RBCs were detected using a bright field microscope, with results comparable to those using a standard phase contrast microscope. Finally, we applied Sternheimer stain to enhance the contrast of RTECs in the urinary sediments. We concluded that this modified urinalysis protocol significantly enhanced the quality of urinalysis.

  14. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  15. Identification of a rare 17p13.3 duplication including the BHLHA9 and YWHAE genes in a family with developmental delay and behavioural problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capra Valeria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletions and duplications of the PAFAH1B1 and YWHAE genes in 17p13.3 are associated with different clinical phenotypes. In particular, deletion of PAFAH1B1 causes isolated lissencephaly while deletions involving both PAFAH1B1 and YWHAE cause Miller-Dieker syndrome. Isolated duplications of PAFAH1B1 have been associated with mild developmental delay and hypotonia, while isolated duplications of YWHAE have been associated with autism. In particular, different dysmorphic features associated with PAFAH1B1 or YWHAE duplication have suggested the need to classify the patient clinical features in two groups according to which gene is involved in the chromosomal duplication. Methods We analyze the proband and his family by classical cytogenetic and array-CGH analyses. The putative rearrangement was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results We have identified a family segregating a 17p13.3 duplication extending 329.5 kilobases by FISH and array-CGH involving the YWHAE gene, but not PAFAH1B1, affected by a mild dysmorphic phenotype with associated autism and mental retardation. We propose that BHLHA9, YWHAE, and CRK genes contribute to the phenotype of our patient. The small chromosomal duplication was inherited from his mother who was affected by a bipolar and borderline disorder and was alcohol addicted. Conclusions We report an additional familial case of small 17p13.3 chromosomal duplication including only BHLHA9, YWHAE, and CRK genes. Our observation and further cases with similar microduplications are expected to be diagnosed, and will help better characterise the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with 17p13.3 microduplications.

  16. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou [Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Li, Yiu-Wah [Department of Radiology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2003-03-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented. (orig.)

  17. Local Chromatin Features Including PU.1 and IKAROS Binding and H3K4 Methylation Shape the Repertoire of Immunoglobulin Kappa Genes Chosen for V(D)J Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Louise S; Bolland, Daniel J; Chovanec, Peter; Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon; Koohy, Hashem; Corcoran, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is essential for the generation of diverse antigen receptor (AgR) repertoires. In B cells, immunoglobulin kappa ( Igκ ) light chain recombination follows immunoglobulin heavy chain ( Igh ) recombination. We recently developed the DNA-based VDJ-seq assay for the unbiased quantitation of Igh VH and DH repertoires. Integration of VDJ-seq data with genome-wide datasets revealed that two chromatin states at the recombination signal sequence (RSS) of VH genes are highly predictive of recombination in mouse pro-B cells. It is unknown whether local chromatin states contribute to Vκ gene choice during Igκ recombination. Here we adapt VDJ-seq to profile the Igκ VκJκ repertoire and present a comprehensive readout in mouse pre-B cells, revealing highly variable Vκ gene usage. Integration with genome-wide datasets for histone modifications, DNase hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding and germline transcription identified PU.1 binding at the RSS, which was unimportant for Igh , as highly predictive of whether a Vκ gene will recombine or not, suggesting that it plays a binary, all-or-nothing role, priming genes for recombination. Thereafter, the frequency with which these genes recombine was shaped both by the presence and level of enrichment of several other chromatin features, including H3K4 methylation and IKAROS binding. Moreover, in contrast to the Igh locus, the chromatin landscape of the promoter, as well as of the RSS, contributes to Vκ gene recombination. Thus, multiple facets of local chromatin features explain much of the variation in Vκ gene usage. Together, these findings reveal shared and divergent roles for epigenetic features and transcription factors in AgR V(D)J recombination and provide avenues for further investigation of chromatin signatures that may underpin V(D)J-mediated chromosomal translocations.

  18. Similar PDK1-AKT-mTOR pathway activation in balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons of type II focal cortical dysplasia with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-xiang; Lin, Kun; Kang, De-zhi; Liu, Xin-xiu; Wang, Xing-fu; Zheng, Shu-fa; Yu, Liang-hong; Lin, Zhang-ya

    2015-05-01

    Dysmorphic neurons and balloon cells constitute the neuropathological hallmarks of type II focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) with refractory epilepsy. The genesis of these cells may be critical to the histological findings in type II FCD. Recent work has shown enhanced activation of the mTOR cascade in both balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons, suggesting a common pathogenesis for these two neuropathological hallmarks. A direct comparative analysis of balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons might identify a molecular link between balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons. Here, we addressed whether PDK1-AKT-mTOR activation differentiates balloon cells from dysmorphic neurons. We used immunohistochemistry with antibodies against phosphorylated (p)-PDK1 (Ser241), p-AKT (Thr308), p-AKT (Ser473), p-mTOR (Ser2448), p-P70S6K (Thr229), and p-p70S6 kinase (Thr389) in balloon cells compared with dysmorphic neurons. Strong or moderate staining for components of the PDK1-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway was observed in both balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons. However, only a few pyramidal neurons displayed weak staining in control group (perilesional neocortex and histologically normal neocortex). Additionally, p-PDK1 (Ser241) and p-AKT (Thr308) staining in balloon cells were stronger than in dysmorphic neurons, whereas p-P70S6K (Thr229) and p-p70S6 kinase (Thr389) staining in balloon cells was weaker than in dysmorphic neurons. In balloon cells, p-AKT (Ser473) and p-mTOR (Ser2448) staining was comparable with the staining in dysmorphic neurons. Our data support the previously suggested pathogenic relationship between balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons concerning activation of the PDK1-AKT-mTOR, which may play important roles in the pathogenesis of type II FCD. Differential expression of some components of the PDK1-AKT-mTOR pathway between balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons may result from cell-specific gene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Small deletions of SATB2 cause some of the clinical features of the 2q33.1 microdeletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available Recurrent deletions of 2q32q33 have recently been reported as a new microdeletion syndrome. Clinical features of this syndrome include severe mental retardation, growth retardation, dysmorphic features, thin and sparse hair, feeding difficulties and cleft or high palate. The commonly deleted region contains at least seven genes. Haploinsufficiency of one of these genes, SATB2, a DNA-binding protein that regulates gene expression, has been implicated as causative in the cleft or high palate of individuals with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. In this study we describe three individuals with smaller microdeletions of this region, within 2q33.1. The deletions ranged in size from 173.1 kb to 185.2 kb and spanned part of SATB2. Review of clinical records showed similar clinical features among these individuals, including severe developmental delay and tooth abnormalities. Two of the individuals had behavioral problems. Only one of the subjects presented here had a cleft palate, suggesting reduced penetrance for this feature. Our results suggest that deletion of SATB2 is responsible for several of the clinical features associated with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome.

  20. A critical review of cosmetic treatment outcomes in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Laura; Krebs, Georgina; Mataix-Cols, David; Veale, David; Monzani, Benedetta

    2016-12-01

    A high proportion of individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) undergo cosmetic treatments in an attempt to 'fix' perceived defect/s in their physical appearance. Despite the frequency with which such procedures are sought, few studies have prospectively examined the outcomes of cosmetic procedures in individuals with BDD. This article aims to critically review the literature and discuss the current debate that exists on outcomes of cosmetic treatment for individuals with BDD. An emerging literature suggests the majority of individuals with BDD have poor outcomes after cosmetic interventions; however, based on the current literature, it cannot be fully ruled out that certain individuals with mild BDD and localised appearance concerns may benefit from these interventions. Gaps in the current literature are highlighted, alongside recommendations for future research. Carefully conducted longitudinal studies with well-characterised patient populations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective attention to imagined facial ugliness is specific to body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocholewski, Anja; Kliem, Sören; Heinrichs, Nina

    2012-03-01

    Cognitive-behavioral models postulate that biases in selective attention are key factors contributing to susceptibility to and maintenance of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Visual attention in particular toward the imagined defect in appearance may be a crucial element. The present study therefore examined whether individuals with BDD showed increased visual attention to flaws in their own and in unfamiliar faces. Twenty individuals with BDD, 20 individuals with social phobia, and 20 mentally healthy individuals participated in an eye-tracking experiment. Participants were instructed to gaze at the photographs of 15 pictures of themselves and several unfamiliar faces. Only patients with BDD showed heightened selective visual attention to the imagined defect in their own face, as well to corresponding regions in other, unfamiliar faces. The results support the assumption that there is a specific attentional bias in BDD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between self-discrepancy and worries about penis size in men with body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Bramley, Sally; Troglia, Andrea; Carmona, Lina; Fiorito, Chiara; Wells, Hannah; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    We explored self-discrepancy in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerned about penis size, men without BDD but anxious about penis size, and controls. Men with BDD (n=26) were compared to those with small penis anxiety (SPA; n=31) and controls (n=33), objectively (by measuring) and investigating self-discrepancy: actual size, ideal size, and size they felt they should be according to self and other. Most men under-estimated their penis size, with the BDD group showing the greatest discrepancy between perceived and ideal size. The SPA group showed a larger discrepancy than controls. This was replicated for the perceptions of others, suggesting the BDD group internalised the belief that they should have a larger penis size. There was a significant correlation between symptoms of BDD and this discrepancy. This self-actual and self-ideal/self-should discrepancy and the role of comparing could be targeted in therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Automatic and strategic measures as predictors of mirror gazing among individuals with body dysmorphic disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Elise M; Teachman, Bethany A

    2009-08-01

    The current study tests cognitive-behavioral models of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) by examining the relationship between cognitive biases and correlates of mirror gazing. To provide a more comprehensive picture, we investigated both relatively strategic (i.e., available for conscious introspection) and automatic (i.e., outside conscious control) measures of cognitive biases in a sample with either high (n = 32) or low (n = 31) BDD symptoms. Specifically, we examined the extent that (1) explicit interpretations tied to appearance, as well as (2) automatic associations and (3) strategic evaluations of the importance of attractiveness predict anxiety and avoidance associated with mirror gazing. Results indicated that interpretations tied to appearance uniquely predicted self-reported desire to avoid, whereas strategic evaluations of appearance uniquely predicted peak anxiety associated with mirror gazing, and automatic appearance associations uniquely predicted behavioral avoidance. These results offer considerable support for cognitive models of BDD, and suggest a dissociation between automatic and strategic measures.

  4. Perceptual and cognitive biases in individuals with body dysmorphic disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Elise M; Teachman, Bethany A

    2008-01-01

    Given the extreme focus on perceived physical defects in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), we expected that perceptual and cognitive biases related to physical appearance would be associated with BDD symptomology. To examine these hypotheses, participants ( N = 70) high and low in BDD symptoms completed tasks assessing visual perception and cognition. As expected, there were significant group differences in self-, but not other-, relevant cognitive biases. Perceptual bias results were mixed, with some evidence indicating that individuals high (versus low) in BDD symptoms literally see themselves in a less positive light. Further, individuals high in BDD symptoms failed to demonstrate a normative self-enhancement bias. Overall, this research points to the importance of assessing both cognitive and perceptual biases associated with BDD symptoms, and suggests that visual perception may be influenced by non-visual factors.

  5. Automatic and Strategic Measures as Predictors of Mirror Gazing Among Individuals with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Elise M.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2011-01-01

    The current study tests cognitive-behavioral models of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) by examining the relationship between cognitive biases and correlates of mirror gazing. To provide a more comprehensive picture, we investigated both relatively strategic (i.e., available for conscious introspection) and automatic (i.e., outside conscious control) measures of cognitive biases in a sample with either high (n=32) or low (n=31) BDD symptoms. Specifically, we examined the extent that 1) explicit interpretations tied to appearance, as well as 2) automatic associations and 3) strategic evaluations of the importance of attractiveness predict anxiety and avoidance associated with mirror gazing. Results indicated that interpretations tied to appearance uniquely predicted self-reported desire to avoid, while strategic evaluations of appearance uniquely predicted peak anxiety associated with mirror gazing, and automatic appearance associations uniquely predicted behavioral avoidance. These results offer considerable support for cognitive models of BDD, and suggest a dissociation between automatic and strategic measures. PMID:19684496

  6. Selfie use: The implications for psychopathology expression of body dysmorphic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preoccupation with a body part can lead to indulgence in various forms of coping behavior. Users are frequently using technology as well as selfie to overcome their anxiety to relate to a body part as well as get approval from other online users. The present case highlights the excessive use of selfie to manage the distress-related body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Psychiatric interview and assessment tools were used to elicit information about BDD, technology use, and affective states. Repeated use of selfie has been thought to manage the distress associated with appearance. It implies the need for screening excessive use of technology as comorbid condition and psychoeducation for promotion of healthy use of technology.

  7. Inferring other people's states of mind: Comparison across social anxiety, body dysmorphic, and obsessive-compulsive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhlmann, Ulrike; Wacker, Renata; Dziobek, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are characterized by fears of negative evaluation by others (related to one's own incompetence or flawed appearance, respectively). Previous research has shown that individuals with SAD and BDD exhibit difficulty identifying facial expressions and interpretive biases for threat in social situations. The current study aimed at further investigating social cognition in SAD, BDD, and mentally healthy controls (35 individuals per group, respectively). Further, 35 individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) as a clinical control group not characterized by evaluation fears were included. The Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC) was applied. It consists of 45 video sequences depicting interactions among four people at a dinner party. Participants are instructed to evaluate each scenario with respect to the characters' emotions, thoughts, and intentions from a bystander perspective (i.e. other-referent context). Only the socially anxious groups (SAD and BDD) were overall less accurate than the other groups in correctly interpreting the social situations, whereas no difference was obtained between the OCD and the control group. Further analyses indicated that the SAD and BDD groups were less accurate in identifying other people's thoughts and intentions, whereas, again, no difference was observed between the OCD and control groups. In addition, the SAD group was less accurate in inferring thoughts and intentions than the OCD group. Interestingly, the groups did not differ with respect to identifying other people's emotions. These results mostly confirm existing cognitive-behavioral models of SAD and BDD emphasizing that biased interpretation of what others think or intend is one of the key factors maintaining social anxiety and appearance-related concerns. Our study shows that this bias generalizes to social situations in which individuals take a third-person observer perspective

  8. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms and Body Weight Concerns in Patients Seeking Abdominoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Maria José Azevedo de; Nahas, Fábio Xerfan; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Gama, Maria Gabriela; Sucupira, Eduardo Rodrigues; Ramos, Tatiana Dalpasquale; Felix, Gabriel de Almeida Arruda; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2016-03-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is one of the most common psychiatric conditions found in patients seeking cosmetic surgery, and body contouring surgery is most frequently sought by patients with BDD. To estimate the prevalence and severity of BDD symptoms in patients seeking abdominoplasty. Ninety patients of both sexes were preoperatively divided into two groups: patients with BDD symptoms (n = 51) and those without BDD symptoms (n = 39) based both on the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination (BDDE) and clinical assessment. Patients in the BDD group were classified as having mild to moderate or severe symptoms, according to the BDDE. Body weight and shape concerns were assessed using the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ). The prevalence of BDD symptoms was 57%. There were significant associations between BDD symptoms and degree of body dissatisfaction, level of preoccupation with physical appearance, and avoidance behaviors. Mild to moderate and severe symptoms of BDD were present in 41% and 59% of patients, respectively, in the BDD group. It was found that the more severe the symptoms of BDD, the higher the level of concern with body weight and shape (P < .001). Patients having distorted self-perception of body shape, or distorted comparative perception of body image were respectively 3.67 or 5.93 times more likely to show more severe symptoms of BDD than those with a more accurate perception. Candidates for abdominoplasty had a high prevalence of BDD symptoms, and body weight and shape concerns were associated with increased symptom severity. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Classification of body dysmorphic disorder - what is the advantage of the new DSM-5 criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; de Zwaan, Martina; Martin, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    In DSM-5 the diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been subjected to two important changes: Firstly, BDD has been assigned to the category of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Secondly, a new criterion has been defined requiring the presence of repetitive behaviors or mental acts in response to appearance concerns. The aims of this study were to report the prevalence rates of BDD based on a DSM-5 diagnosis, and to evaluate the impact of the recently introduced DSM-5 criteria for BDD by comparing the prevalence rates (DSM-5 vs. BDD-criteria (DSM-IV/DSM-5), dysmorphic concerns, and depressive symptoms, were assessed in a representative sample of the German general population (N=2129, aged 18-65years). The association between BDD case identification based on DSM-IV and DSM-5 was strong (Phi=.95, p<.001), although point prevalence of BDD according to DSM-5 was slightly lower (2.9%, n=62 vs. 3.2%, n=68). Approximately one third of the identified BDD (DSM-5) cases reported time-consuming behavioral acts in response to appearance concerns. In detail, 0.8% of the German general population fulfilled the BDD criteria and reported repetitive acts of at least one hour/day. The revised criteria of BDD in DSM-5 do not seem to have an impact on prevalence rates. However, the recently added B-criterion reflects more precisely the clinical symptoms of BDD, and may be useful for distinguishing between various severity levels related to repetitive behaviors/mental acts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Body Dysmorphic Disorder in aesthetic rhinoplasty: Validating a new screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakis, Garyfalia; Picavet, Valerie A; Gabriëls, Loes; Grietens, Jente; Hellings, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    To validate a new screening tool for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in patients seeking aesthetic rhinoplasty. We performed a prospective instrument validation study in an academic rhinology clinic. The Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire-Aesthetic Surgery (BDDQ-AS) is a seven-item short questionnaire validated in 116 patients undergoing aesthetic rhinoplasty. Screening was positive if the patient acknowledged on the BDDQ-AS that he/she was concerned about their appearance (question 1 = yes) AND preoccupied with these concerns (question 2 = yes) AND that these concerns caused at least moderate distress or impairment in different domains of daily life (question 3 or 4 or 5 or 6 ≥ 3 or question 7 = yes). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the BDDQ-AS to the Sheehan Disability Scale and the Derriford Appearance Scale-59. To determine concurrent validity, the BDDQ-AS was compared to the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD. Finally, the predictive value of the BDDQ-AS on satisfaction 12 months after rhinoplasty was evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the Rhinoplasty Outcome Evaluation. Reliability of the BDDQ-AS was adequate, with Cronbach alpha = .83 for rhinoplasty patients and .84 for controls. Sensitivity was 89.6% and specificity 81.4%. BDDQ-AS-positive patients (n = 55) were more impaired in daily life and experienced more appearance-related distress and dysfunction compared to BDDQ-AS-negative patients. Moreover, they had more severe BDD symptoms. Finally, BDDQ-AS-positive patients were less satisfied after surgery compared to BDDQ-AS-negative patients. We hereby validated a new screening tool for BDD in an aesthetic rhinoplasty population. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1739-1745, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Biallelic Variants in OTUD6B Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome Associated with Seizures and Dysmorphic Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santiago-Sim, Teresa; Burrage, Lindsay C; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    regulators of the ubiquitin system. OTUD6B encodes a member of the ovarian tumor domain (OTU)-containing subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes. Herein, we report biallelic pathogenic variants in OTUD6B in 12 individuals from 6 independent families with an intellectual disability syndrome associated...

  12. Haploinsufficiency of the Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Causes Syndromic Developmental and Speech Delay, Postnatal Microcephaly, and Dysmorphic Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stankiewicz, P.; Khan, T.N.; Szafranski, P.; Slattery, L.; Streff, H.; Vetrini, F.; Bernstein, J.A.; Brown, C.W.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Rednam, S.; Scollon, S.; Bergstrom, K.L.; Parsons, D.W.; Plon, S.E.; Vieira, M.W.; Quaio, C.; Baratela, W.A.R.; Guio, J.C.A.; Armstrong, R.; Mehta, S.G.; Rump, P.; Pfundt, R.P.; Lewandowski, R.; Fernandes, E.M.; Shinde, D.N.; Tang, S.; Hoyer, J.; Zweier, C.; Reis, A.; Bacino, C.A.; Xiao, R.; Breman, A.M.; Smith, J.L.; Katsanis, N.; Bostwick, B.; Popp, B.; Davis, E.E.; Yang, Y

    2017-01-01

    Bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF) is the largest subunit of nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF), a member of the ISWI chromatin-remodeling complex. However, the clinical consequences of disruption of this complex remain largely uncharacterized. BPTF is required for

  13. Anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder: A comparison of body image concerns and explicit and implicit attractiveness beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A S; Thomas, J J; Greenberg, J L; Elliott, C M; Matheny, N L; Wilhelm, S

    2015-06-01

    Although body image is central to the etiological models of anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder, studies comparing body image and beliefs about attractiveness between the disorders are rare. Sixty-nine individuals (anorexia nervosa: n=24, body dysmorphic disorder: n=23, healthy controls: n=22) completed self-report measures (body image and general psychopathology), diagnostic interviews, and Go/No-Go Association tasks measuring implicit associations. Compared to controls, both clinical groups exhibited greater negative body image, a more negative attitude toward their physical selves, and more dysfunctional coping strategies (ps<.001). Also, both clinical groups shared greater explicit beliefs about the importance of attractiveness (ps<.001). In addition to supporting previous research with regard to comparable body image disturbance, this study also showed that beliefs regarding the importance of appearance (e.g., "one must be attractive to be successful") might be a fruitful target for therapy across both disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptom Scale: Development and preliminary validation of a self-report scale of symptom specific dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Rosenfield, Elizabeth; Kasarskis, Irina; Blashill, Aaron J

    2016-06-01

    The Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptom Scale (BDD-SS) is a new self-report measure used to examine the severity of a wide variety of symptoms associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). The BDD-SS was designed to differentiate, for each group of symptoms, the number of symptoms endorsed and their severity. This report evaluates and compares the psychometric characteristics of the BDD-SS in relation to other measures of BDD, body image, and depression in 99 adult participants diagnosed with BDD. Total scores of the BDD-SS showed good reliability and convergent validity and moderate discriminant validity. Analyses of the individual BDD-SS symptom groups confirmed the reliability of the checking, grooming, weight/shape, and cognition groups. The current findings indicate that the BDD-SS can be quickly administered and used to examine the severity of heterogeneous BDD symptoms for research and clinical purposes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Clinical and Neurobehavioral Features of Three Novel Kabuki Syndrome Patients with Mosaic KMT2D Mutations and a Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Francesca Romana; Cocciadiferro, Dario; Augello, Bartolomeo; Alfieri, Paolo; Pes, Valentina; Vancini, Alessandra; Caciolo, Cristina; Squeo, Gabriella Maria; Malerba, Natascia; Adipietro, Iolanda; Novelli, Antonio; Sotgiu, Stefano; Gherardi, Renzo; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Merla, Giuseppe

    2017-12-28

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and variable intellectual disability caused by mutations in KMT2D/MLL2 and KDM6A/UTX , two interacting chromatin modifier responsible respectively for 56-75% and 5-8% of the cases. To date, three KS patients with mosaic KMT2D deletions in blood lymphocytes have been described. We report on three additional subjects displaying KMT2D gene mosaics including one in which a single nucleotide change results in a new frameshift mutation (p.L1199HfsX7), and two with already-known nonsense mutations (p.R4484X and p.R5021X). Consistent with previously published cases, mosaic KMT2D mutations may result in mild KS facial dysmorphisms and clinical and neurobehavioral features, suggesting that these characteristics could represent the handles for genetic testing of individuals with slight KS-like traits.

  16. Clinical and Neurobehavioral Features of Three Novel Kabuki Syndrome Patients with Mosaic KMT2D Mutations and a Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Romana Lepri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Kabuki syndrome (KS is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and variable intellectual disability caused by mutations in KMT2D/MLL2 and KDM6A/UTX, two interacting chromatin modifier responsible respectively for 56–75% and 5–8% of the cases. To date, three KS patients with mosaic KMT2D deletions in blood lymphocytes have been described. We report on three additional subjects displaying KMT2D gene mosaics including one in which a single nucleotide change results in a new frameshift mutation (p.L1199HfsX7, and two with already-known nonsense mutations (p.R4484X and p.R5021X. Consistent with previously published cases, mosaic KMT2D mutations may result in mild KS facial dysmorphisms and clinical and neurobehavioral features, suggesting that these characteristics could represent the handles for genetic testing of individuals with slight KS-like traits.

  17. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Bianchin; Lorenzo Tribi; Aronne Reverzani; Patrizia Formigoni; Valeria Polizzi

    2015-01-01

    We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome), suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration ...

  18. Disease: H00206 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MVA show the symptoms, including dysmorphic features, cataracts, neurologic symptoms. The majority of patien...ts with HIDS experience only recurrent febrile crises, without any neurologic abnormalities or dysmorphic

  19. A 15q24 microduplication, reciprocal to the recently described 15q24 microdeletion, in a boy sharing clinical features with 15q24 microdeletion syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, A.B. Kiholm; Hove, H.D.; Kirchhoff, M.

    2008-01-01

    A 15q24 microduplication, reciprocal to the minimal critical region for the recently described 15q24 microdeletion syndrome, was found in a 2-year-old boy by 244k Agilent oligoarray CGH analysis. The boy had global developmental delay and dysmorphic facial features, digital and genital abnormalit...

  20. Deletion of 11q12.3-11q13.1 in a patient with intellectual disability and childhood facial features resembling Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Martine Isabel; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Nazaryan, Lusine

    2015-01-01

    Deletions within 11q12.3-11q13.1 are very rare and to date only two cases have been described in the literature. In this study we describe a 23-year-old male patient with intellectual disability, behavioral problems, dysmorphic features, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux and skeletal abnormalities...

  1. Identifying significant environmental features using feature recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Environmental Analysis at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has expressed an interest in feature-recognition capability because it may help analysts identify environmentally sensitive features in the landscape, : including those r...

  2. Modifying interpretation biases in body dysmorphic disorder: Evaluation of a brief computerized treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Berta J; Cougle, Jesse R

    2016-12-01

    Individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD; N = 40) were enrolled in a randomized, four-session trial comparing interpretation bias modification (IBM) training designed to target social evaluation- and appearance-related interpretation biases with a placebo control training condition (PC). Sessions took place over the course of two weeks (two sessions per week). Analyses indicated that, relative to the PC condition, IBM led to a significant increase in benign biases and reduction in threat biases at post-treatment. IBM also led to greater reductions in BDD symptoms compared to PC, though this effect was present at high but not low levels of pre-treatment BDD symptoms. Additionally, compared to PC, IBM led to lower urge to check and lower fear in response to an in vivo appearance-related stressor (having their picture taken from different angles), though the latter effect was present only among those reporting elevated fear at pre-treatment. The effects of treatment on interpretation biases and BDD symptoms were largely maintained at a one-month follow-up assessment. Moderated-mediation analyses showed that change in threat bias mediated the effect of condition on post-treatment symptoms for individuals high in pre-treatment BDD symptoms. The current study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of IBM for BDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Imagery Rescripting for Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Multiple-Baseline Single-Case Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Rob; Veale, David; Freeston, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) often experience negative distorted images of their appearance, and research suggests these may be linked to memories of adverse events such as bullying or teasing. This study evaluates imagery rescripting (ImR) as an intervention for BDD. In this article, we present a multiple-baseline single-case experimental design testing imagery rescripting as a brief, stand-alone intervention, with six individuals with BDD that related to aversive memories. The impact of the intervention was assessed by self-reported daily measures of symptom severity (preoccupation with appearance, appearance-related checking behaviors, appearance-related distress, and strength of belief that their main problem is their appearance) and standardized clinician ratings of BDD severity (Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for BDD). Four out of six of the participants responded positively to the intervention, with clinically meaningful improvement in symptomatology. Overall response was rapid; improvements began within the first week post-ImR intervention. From a small sample it is cautiously concluded that imagery rescripting may show promise as a module in cognitive-behavioral therapy for BDD, and is worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Body dysmorphic disorder in different settings: A systematic review and estimated weighted prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Gledhill, Lucinda J; Christodoulou, Polyxeni; Hodsoll, John

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to systematically review the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in a variety of settings. Weighted prevalence estimate and 95% confidence intervals in each study were calculated. The weighted prevalence of BDD in adults in the community was estimated to be 1.9%; in adolescents 2.2%; in student populations 3.3%; in adult psychiatric inpatients 7.4%; in adolescent psychiatric inpatients 7.4%; in adult psychiatric outpatients 5.8%; in general cosmetic surgery 13.2%; in rhinoplasty surgery 20.1%; in orthognathic surgery 11.2%; in orthodontics/cosmetic dentistry settings 5.2%; in dermatology outpatients 11.3%; in cosmetic dermatology outpatients 9.2%; and in acne dermatology clinics 11.1%. Women outnumbered men in the majority of settings but not in cosmetic or dermatological settings. BDD is common in some psychiatric and cosmetic settings but is poorly identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening for Body Dysmorphic Disorder in a Dermatology Outpatient Setting at a Tertiary Care Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanveer, Fibin; Khunger, Niti

    2016-01-01

    Context: A distressing pre-occupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance with a marked negative effect on the patient's life is the core symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Aim: To screen the patients attending a dermatology clinic at a tertiary care centre for BDD using the BDD-dermatology version (DV) questionnaire. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study enrolled 245 consecutive patients from the dermatology outpatients clinic. Methods: The demographic details were collected and the DV of BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A 5-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern and patients who scored ≥3 were excluded from the study. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were statistically analysed. Differences between the groups were investigated by Chi-square analysis for categorical variables, and Fisher exact test wherever required. Results: A total of 177 patients completed the study, and of these, eight patients screened positive for BDD. The rate of BDD in patients presenting with cosmetic complaints was 7.5% and in those with general dermatology, complaints were 2.1%, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.156). Facial flaws (62.5%) were the most common concern followed by body asymmetry (25%). Conclusion: The rates of BDD found in this study are comparable but at a lower rate than that reported in literature data. PMID:27761090

  6. Patient-identified events implicated in the development of body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Curley, Erin E; Renshaw, Keith D; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the causes of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), but researchers have proposed a diathesis-stress model. This study uses a patient-centered approach to identify stressful events to which patients attribute the development of their BDD symptoms. An Internet-recruited sample of 165 adults with BDD participated. A large minority of participants attributed the development of their BDD to a triggering event. Bullying experiences were the most commonly described type of event. Additionally, most events were interpersonal and occurred during grade school or middle school. There were no differences in severity of psychosocial outcomes between participants who did or did not attribute their BDD to a specific triggering event. However, participants who specifically attributed their BDD development to a bullying experience had poorer psychosocial outcomes (i.e., perceived social support, depression severity, functional impairment, quality of life) compared to those who attributed their BDD development to another type of triggering event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Body dysmorphic disorder symptoms and risk for suicide: The role of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A M; Arditte Hall, K A; Rosenfield, E; Timpano, K R

    2016-12-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is associated with elevated suicidality. Little is known about why BDD patients are at increased risk. The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) could clarify suicidality in BDD, and theorizes that perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness lead to suicidal desire, while an acquired capability for suicide is necessary to attempt suicide. No study has investigated how BDD symptoms relate to IPTS constructs or mediators of the relationship between BDD and suicidality. Individuals (N=235) enrolled in Amazon.com's Mechanical Turk (MTurk), who had appearance concerns, completed questionnaires about BDD, depression, eating pathology, and suicide risk. MTurk is an online data collection platform in which participants complete surveys for payment. BDD symptoms predicted suicidal desire, but not acquired capability for suicide. Depression mediated the relationship between BDD and suicidal desire. Research should examine how fluctuations in BDD affect suicide risk. Replication in a clinical sample may inform treatments for BDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impairment in local and global processing and set-shifting in body dysmorphic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, Lauren; Hovav, Sarit; Helleman, Gerhard; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by distressing and often debilitating preoccupations with misperceived defects in appearance. Research suggests that aberrant visual processing may contribute to these misperceptions. This study used two tasks to probe global and local visual processing as well as set shifting in individuals with BDD. Eighteen unmedicated individuals with BDD and 17 non-clinical controls completed two global-local tasks. The embedded figures task requires participants to determine which of three complex figures contained a simpler figure embedded within it. The Navon task utilizes incongruent stimuli comprised of a large letter (global level) made up of smaller letters (local level). The outcome measures were response time and accuracy rate. On the embedded figures task, BDD individuals were slower and less accurate than controls. On the Navon task, BDD individuals processed both global and local stimuli slower and less accurately than controls, and there was a further decrement in performance when shifting attention between the different levels of stimuli. Worse insight correlated with poorer performance on both tasks. Taken together, these results suggest abnormal global and local processing for non-appearance related stimuli among BDD individuals, in addition to evidence of poor set-shifting abilities. Moreover, these abnormalities appear to relate to the important clinical variable of poor insight. Further research is needed to explore these abnormalities and elucidate their possible role in the development and/or persistence of BDD symptoms. PMID:24972487

  9. Reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulink, Nienke C; Planting, Robin S; Figee, Martijn; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    Though the dopaminergic system is implicated in Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders (OCRD), the dopaminergic system has never been investigated in-vivo in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). In line with consistent findings of reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), we hypothesized that the dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in the striatum will be lower in patients with BDD in comparison to healthy subjects. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor Binding Potential (BPND) was examined in 12 drug-free BDD patients and 12 control subjects pairwise matched by age, sex, and handedness using [(123)I]iodobenzamide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT; bolus/constant infusion technique). Regions of interest were the caudate nucleus and the putamen. BPND was calculated as the ratio of specific striatal to binding in the occipital cortex (representing nonspecific binding). Compared to controls, dopamine D2/3 receptor BPND was significantly lower in BDD, both in the putamen (p=0.017) and caudate nucleus (p=0.022). This study provides the first evidence of a disturbed dopaminergic system in BDD patients. Although previously BDD was classified as a separate disorder (somatoform disorder), our findings give pathophysiological support for the recent reclassification of BDD to the OCRD in DSM-5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Muscle Dysmorphia Among Entry-Level Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, John D A; Bowsher, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and muscle dysmorphia (MD) in enlisted U.S. military personnel; and secondarily, to determine supplement use and relationship with BDD and MD. A survey of advanced individual training of tri-service personnel at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, was performed combining the dysmorphia concern questionnaire, the MD symptom questionnaire, a supplement questionnaire, and demographic factors. Of the 1,320 service members approached, 1,150 (87.1%) completed the survey. The majority of participants were male, 62.8% (n = 722) and Army soldiers 59.0% (n = 679). The prevalence rate of BDD was 13.0% in males and 21.7% in females. The prevalence of MD was 12.7% in males and 4.2% in females. There was a strong correlation between having BDD and using supplements to get thinner (odds ratio 5.1; 95% confidence interval 3.4-7.8; p dysmorphias in mental health providers, primary care providers, and commanders and justifies further military specific BDD and MD research. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jennifer L; Mothi, Suraj Sarvode; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common and severe disorder that typically onsets in adolescence, but often goes unrecognized. Despite BDD's severity and early onset, treatment outcome research on adolescent BDD is scarce. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the gold-standard psychosocial treatment for BDD in adults and has shown promise in adolescents. The current study examined the development and testing of a new CBT for adolescents with BDD. We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 13 adolescents (mean age 15.23years, range: 13-17) with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in 12-22 weekly individual sessions. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were used to assess BDD and related symptoms pre- and posttreatment and at 3- and 6-months follow-up. At posttreatment, BDD and related symptoms (e.g., insight, mood) were significantly improved. Scores on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for BDD indicated a 50% (intent-to-treat) and 68% (completer) improvement in BDD symptoms. Seventy-five percent of adolescents who started treatment and 100% of completers were considered treatment responders. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. High patient satisfaction ratings and patient feedback indicated that treatment was acceptable. This represents the largest study of a psychosocial treatment for adolescent BDD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A novel mutation in GMPPA in siblings with apparent intellectual disability, epilepsy, dysmorphism, and autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Wendy A; Sobreira, Nara; Wiame, Elsa; Marbaix, Alexandre; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Franzka, Patricia; Riley, Lisa G; Worgan, Lisa; Hübner, Christian A; Christodoulou, John; Adès, Lesley C

    2017-08-01

    GMPPA encodes the GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase A protein (GMPPA). The function of GMPPA is not well defined, however it is a homolog of GMPPB which catalyzes the reaction that converts mannose-1-phosphate and guanosine-5'-triphosphate to GDP-mannose. Previously, biallelic mutations in GMPPA were reported to cause a disorder characterized by achalasia, alacrima, neurological deficits, and intellectual disability. In this study, we report a female proband with achalasia, alacrima, hypohydrosis, apparent intellectual disability, seizures, microcephaly, esotropia, and craniofacial dysmorphism. Exome sequencing identified a previously unreported homozygous c.853+1G>A variant in GMPPA in the proband and her affected sister. Their unaffected parents were heterozygous, and unaffected brother homozygous wild type for this variant. Lymphoblast cells from the affected sisters showed complete loss of the GMPPA protein by Western blotting, and increased levels of GDP-mannose in lymphoblasts on high performance liquid chromatography. Based on our findings and the previous report describing patients with an overlapping phenotype, we conclude that this novel variant in GMPPA, identified by exome sequencing in the proband and her affected sister, is the genetic cause of their phenotype and may expand the known phenotype of this recently described glycosylation disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among South African university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Dlagnikova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD among South African students is explored in this article. BDD is regarded as an obsessive-compulsive-related disorder characterised by a preoccupation with one or more perceived defects or flaws in physical appearance and expressed in repetitive behaviours or mental acts as a response to the appearance concerns, causing clinically significant distress or impairment in functioning.  Objectives. To determine the prevalence of BDD among undergraduate students (N=395 at an inner-city university.  Methods. Proportionate stratified random cluster sampling was used to select the sample. The students completed a demographics survey and the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire.  Results and conclusion. An overall prevalence rate of 5.1% was found in this study, which is similar to prevalence rates reported in existing literature among student populations. No clinically significant differences in the severity of the BDD were found on the demographic variables of gender, race or sexual orientation. However, students differed significantly in their experience of the severity of the disorder in terms of age, in that students over the age of 21 reported higher severity levels than students under the age of 21. Although the prevalence of the disorder compares with that in other countries, its severity seems to increase with age among South African students.

  14. Facial discrimination in body dysmorphic, obsessive-compulsive and social anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Claudia; Wiesendahl, Wiebke; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Stangier, Ulrich; Kathmann, Norbert; Buhlmann, Ulrike

    2016-02-28

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by preoccupation with perceived flaws in one's own appearance. Several risk factors such as aesthetic perceptual sensitivity have been proposed to explain BDD's unique symptomatology. Although research on facial discrimination is limited so far, the few existing studies have produced mixed results. Thus, the purpose of this study was to further examine facial discrimination in BDD. We administered a facial discrimination paradigm, which allows to assess the ability to identify slight to strong facial changes (e.g., hair loss, acne) when presented with an original (unmodified) facial image, relative to a changed (modified) facial image. The experiment was administered in individuals with BDD, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and mentally healthy controls (32 per group, respectively). Overall, groups did not differ with respect to their ability to correctly identify facial aberrations when presented with other people's faces. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of enhanced general aesthetic perceptual sensitivity in individuals with (vs. without) BDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening for body dysmorphic disorder in a dermatology outpatient setting at a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fibin Thanveer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A distressing pre-occupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance with a marked negative effect on the patient's life is the core symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Aim: To screen the patients attending a dermatology clinic at a tertiary care centre for BDD using the BDD-dermatology version (DV questionnaire. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study enrolled 245 consecutive patients from the dermatology outpatients clinic. Methods: The demographic details were collected and the DV of BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A 5-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern and patients who scored ≥3 were excluded from the study. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were statistically analysed. Differences between the groups were investigated by Chi-square analysis for categorical variables, and Fisher exact test wherever required. Results: A total of 177 patients completed the study, and of these, eight patients screened positive for BDD. The rate of BDD in patients presenting with cosmetic complaints was 7.5% and in those with general dermatology, complaints were 2.1%, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.156. Facial flaws (62.5% were the most common concern followed by body asymmetry (25%. Conclusion: The rates of BDD found in this study are comparable but at a lower rate than that reported in literature data.

  16. Therapist-guided, Internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET): a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Ivanov, Volen Z; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). However, most sufferers do not have access to this treatment. One way to increase access to CBT is to administer treatment remotely via the Internet. This study piloted a novel therapist-supported, Internet-based CBT program for BDD (BDD-NET). Design Uncontrolled clinical trial. Participants Patients (N=23) were recruited through self-referral and assessed face to face at a clinic specialising in obsessive–compulsive and related disorders. Suitable patients were offered secure access to BDD-NET. Intervention BDD-NET is a 12-week treatment program based on current psychological models of BDD that includes psychoeducation, functional analysis, cognitive restructuring, exposure and response prevention, and relapse prevention modules. A dedicated therapist provides active guidance and feedback throughout the entire process. Main outcome measure The clinician-administered Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for BDD (BDD-YBOCS). Symptom severity was assessed pretreatment, post-treatment and at the 3-month follow-up. Results BDD-NET was deemed highly acceptable by patients and led to significant improvements on the BDD-YBOCS (p=<0.001) with a large within-group effect size (Cohen's d=2.01, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.97). At post-treatment, 82% of the patients were classified as responders (defined as≥30% improvement on the BDD-YBOCS). These gains were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures of depression, global functioning and quality of life also showed significant improvements with moderate to large effect sizes. On average, therapists spent 10 min per patient per week providing support. Conclusions The results suggest that BDD-NET has the potential to greatly increase access to CBT, at least for low-risk individuals with moderately severe BDD symptoms and reasonably good insight. A randomised controlled trial of BDD-NET is warranted

  17. Shadows of Beauty - Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Concerns in Germany is Increasing: Data from Two Representative Samples from 2002 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, Tanja; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Braehler, Elmar; Schut, Christina; Peters, Eva; Kupfer, Jörg

    2016-08-23

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a psychosomatic disease associated with reduced quality of life and suicidal ideations. Increasing attention to beauty and the development of beauty industries lead to the hypothesis that BDD is increasing. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis in two representative samples of Germans, assessed in 2002 and 2013. In 2002, n = 2,066 and in 2013, n = 2,508 Germans were asked to fill in the Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire (DCQ), which assesses dysmorphic concerns. Subclinical and clinical dysmorphic concerns increased from 2002 to 2013 (subclinical from 0.5% to 2.6%, OR = 5.16 (CI95% = 2.64; 10.06); clinical from 0.5% to 1.0%, OR = 2.20 (CI95% = 1.03; 4.73). Women reported more dysmorphic concerns than men, with rates of 0.7% subclinical and 0.8 clinical BDD in women and 0.3% subclinical and 0.1% clinical BDD in men in 2002. In 2013, 2.8% subclinical and 1.2% clinical BDD were found in women and 2.4% subclinical and 0.8% clinical BDD in men. Further studies should assess predictors for developing a BDD and evaluate factors determining the efficacy of disease-specific psychotherapeutic and psychotropic drug treatments.

  18. The frequency of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology and cosmetic dermatology clinics: a study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogruk Kacar, S; Ozuguz, P; Bagcioglu, E; Coskun, K S; Uzel Tas, H; Polat, S; Karaca, S

    2014-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing and impairing preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in appearance. There are few reports on the prevalence of BDD in the Turkish population. To investigate the frequency of BDD in dermatology settings, and to compare the results from cosmetic dermatology with those from general dermatology settings. This cross-sectional study recruited 400 patients from cosmetic dermatology (CD) (n = 200) and general dermatology (GD) clinics (n = 200). A mini-survey was used to collect demographic and clinical characteristics, and the dermatology version of a brief self-report BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A five-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern, which was performed by dermatologists, and patients who scored ≥ 3 were excluded from the study. In total, 318 patients (151 in the CD group and 167 in the GD group) completed the study, and of these, 20 were diagnosed with BDD. The CD group had a higher rate of BDD (8.6%) than the GD group (4.2%) but this was not significant (P = 0.082). The major concern focused on body and weight (40.0%), followed by acne (25.0%). The number of cosmetic procedures in dermatology practices is increasing Therefore, it is becoming more important to recognize patients with BDD. Although the rates of BDD found in the present study are in agreement with the literature data, population-based differences still exist between this study and previous studies. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Aberrant Dynamic Connectivity for Fear Processing in Anorexia Nervosa and Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rangaprakash

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD share distorted perceptions of appearance with extreme negative emotion, yet the neural phenotypes of emotion processing remain underexplored in them, and they have never been directly compared. We sought to determine if shared and disorder-specific fronto-limbic connectivity patterns characterize these disorders. FMRI data was obtained from three unmedicated groups: BDD (n = 32, weight-restored AN (n = 25, and healthy controls (HC; n = 37, while they viewed fearful faces and rated their own degree of fearfulness in response. We performed dynamic effective connectivity modeling with medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC, and amygdala as regions-of-interest (ROI, and assessed associations between connectivity and clinical variables. HCs exhibited significant within-group bidirectional mPFC-amygdala connectivity, which increased across the blocks, whereas BDD participants exhibited only significant mPFC-to-amygdala connectivity (P < 0.05, family-wise error corrected. In contrast, participants with AN lacked significant prefrontal-amygdala connectivity in either direction. AN showed significantly weaker mPFC-to-amygdala connectivity compared to HCs (P = 0.0015 and BDD (P = 0.0050. The mPFC-to-amygdala connectivity was associated with greater subjective fear ratings (R2 = 0.11, P = 0.0016, eating disorder symptoms (R2 = 0.33, P = 0.0029, and anxiety (R2 = 0.29, P = 0.0055 intensity scores. Our findings, which suggest a complex nosological relationship, have implications for understanding emotion regulation circuitry in these related psychiatric disorders, and may have relevance for current and novel therapeutic approaches.

  20. Appearance evaluation of others' faces and bodies in anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Teena D; Shen, Vivian W; Hutcheson, Nathan L; Henretty, Jennifer R; Sheen, Courtney L; Strober, Michael; Feusner, Jamie D

    2017-02-01

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) exhibit distorted perception and negative evaluations of their own appearance; however, little is known about how they perceive others' appearance, and whether or not the conditions share perceptual distortions. Thirty participants with BDD, 22 with AN, now weight-restored, and 39 healthy comparison participants (HC) rated photographs of others' faces and bodies on attractiveness, how overweight or underweight they were, and how much photographs triggered thoughts of their own appearance. We compared responses among groups by stimulus type and by level-of-detail (spatial frequency). Compared to HCs, AN and BDD had lower attractiveness ratings for others' bodies and faces for high-detail and low-detail images, rated bodies as more overweight, and were more triggered to think of their own appearance for faces and bodies. In AN, symptom severity was associated with greater triggering of thoughts of own appearance and higher endorsement of overweight ratings for bodies. In BDD, symptom severity was associated with greater triggering of thoughts of own appearance for bodies and higher overweight ratings for low-detail images. BDD was more triggered to think of own facial appearance than AN. AN and BDD show similar behavioral phenotypes of negative appearance evaluations for others' faces and bodies, and have thoughts of their own appearance triggered even for images outside of their primary appearance concerns, suggesting a more complex cross-disorder body-image phenotype than previously assumed. Future treatment strategies may benefit from addressing how these individuals evaluate others in addition to themselves. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:127-138). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Adjunctive antipsychotic in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder - A retrospective naturalistic case note study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Khan, Akif A; Fineberg, Naomi A

    2015-06-01

    A retrospective naturalistic case note study to determine the frequency, co-morbidity and treatment-response of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Records from 280 patients attending a highly specialised obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)/BDD service were analysed. The clinical outcome was measured either through scoring of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) for OCD/BDD, or textual analysis of case notes for evidence of symptomatic improvement, treatment tolerability, and premature disengagement. A total of 32 patients (11.43%) were diagnosed with BDD. Of these, 28 (87.5%) had at least one co-morbidity. All patients were offered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Adjunctive low-dose antipsychotic was prescribed for 21 (66%) patients. Overall, 18/32 (56%) responded, and 7/32 (22%) disengaged prematurely. Patients offered antipsychotic, SSRI and CBT (n = 21) were compared with those offered SSRI and CBT only (n = 11). The treatment was well-tolerated. Whereas there was no significant inter-group difference in the clinical response rate, premature disengagement occurred less frequently in the antipsychotic-treated patients (9.5% versus 45%; Fisher's Exact Test P = 0.0318). BDD frequently presents with co-morbidity, treatment-resistance and premature disengagement. Adjunctive antipsychotic was associated with significantly better treatment adherence, but responder rates did not differ significantly, possibly related to the small sample-size. A well-powered randomised controlled study is warranted, to determine clinical outcomes with adjunctive antipsychotic in BDD.

  2. Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A; Didie, Elizabeth; Buhlmann, Ulrike; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Fama, Jeanne M; Keshaviah, Aparna; Steketee, Gail

    2014-05-01

    There are few effective treatments for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and a pressing need to develop such treatments. We examined the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a manualized modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for BDD (CBT-BDD). CBT-BDD utilizes core elements relevant to all BDD patients (e.g., exposure, response prevention, perceptual retraining) and optional modules to address specific symptoms (e.g., surgery seeking). Thirty-six adults with BDD were randomized to 22 sessions of immediate individual CBT-BDD over 24 weeks (n=17) or to a 12-week waitlist (n=19). The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD (BDD-YBOCS), Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory-II were completed pretreatment, monthly, posttreatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. The Sheehan Disability Scale and Client Satisfaction Inventory (CSI) were also administered. Response to treatment was defined as ≥30% reduction in BDD-YBOCS total from baseline. By week 12, 50% of participants receiving immediate CBT-BDD achieved response versus 12% of waitlisted participants (p=0.026). By posttreatment, 81% of all participants (immediate CBT-BDD plus waitlisted patients subsequently treated with CBT-BDD) met responder criteria. While no significant group differences in BDD symptom reduction emerged by Week 12, by posttreatment CBT-BDD resulted in significant decreases in BDD-YBOCS total over time (d=2.1, p<0.0001), with gains maintained during follow-up. Depression, insight, and disability also significantly improved. Patient satisfaction was high, with a mean CSI score of 87.3% (SD=12.8%) at posttreatment. CBT-BDD appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and efficacious treatment that warrants more rigorous investigation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder are associated with abnormalities in processing visual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Lai, T M; Bohon, C; Loo, S K; McCurdy, D; Strober, M; Bookheimer, S; Feusner, J

    2015-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are characterized by distorted body image and are frequently co-morbid with each other, although their relationship remains little studied. While there is evidence of abnormalities in visual and visuospatial processing in both disorders, no study has directly compared the two. We used two complementary modalities--event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)--to test for abnormal activity associated with early visual signaling. We acquired fMRI and ERP data in separate sessions from 15 unmedicated individuals in each of three groups (weight-restored AN, BDD, and healthy controls) while they viewed images of faces and houses of different spatial frequencies. We used joint independent component analyses to compare activity in visual systems. AN and BDD groups demonstrated similar hypoactivity in early secondary visual processing regions and the dorsal visual stream when viewing low spatial frequency faces, linked to the N170 component, as well as in early secondary visual processing regions when viewing low spatial frequency houses, linked to the P100 component. Additionally, the BDD group exhibited hyperactivity in fusiform cortex when viewing high spatial frequency houses, linked to the N170 component. Greater activity in this component was associated with lower attractiveness ratings of faces. Results provide preliminary evidence of similar abnormal spatiotemporal activation in AN and BDD for configural/holistic information for appearance- and non-appearance-related stimuli. This suggests a common phenotype of abnormal early visual system functioning, which may contribute to perceptual distortions.

  4. Degree connectivity in body dysmorphic disorder and relationships with obsessive and compulsive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucke, Jan C; Sepulcre, Jorge; Buhlmann, Ulrike; Kathmann, Norbert; Moody, Teena; Feusner, Jamie D

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are categorized within the same major diagnostic group and both show regional brain hyperactivity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the basal ganglia during symptom provocation. While recent studies revealed that degree connectivity of these areas is abnormally high in OCD and positively correlates with symptom severity, no study has investigated degree connectivity in BDD. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the local and distant degree of functional connectivity in all brain areas between 28 unmedicated BDD participants and 28 demographically matched healthy controls during a face-processing task. Correlational analyses tested for associations between degree connectivity and symptom severity assessed by the BDD version of the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale (BDD-Y-BOCS). Reduced local amygdalar connectivity was found in participants with BDD. No differences in distant connectivity were found. BDD-Y-BOCS scores significantly correlated with the local connectivity of the posterior-lateral OFC, and distant connectivity of the posterior-lateral and post-central OFC, respectively. These findings represent preliminary evidence that individuals with BDD exhibit brain-behavioral associations related to obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors that are highly similar to correlations previously found in OCD, further underscoring their related pathophysiology. This relationship could be further elucidated through investigation of resting-state functional connectivity in BDD, ideally in direct comparison with OCD and other obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence and heritability of body dysmorphic symptoms in adolescents and young adults: a population-based nationwide twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Ivanov, Volen Z; Mataix-Cols, David; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Lundström, Sebastian; Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Monzani, Benedetta; Lichtenstein, Paul; Rück, Christian

    2018-02-28

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) usually begins during adolescence but little is known about the prevalence, etiology, and patterns of comorbidity in this age group. We investigated the prevalence of BDD symptoms in adolescents and young adults. We also report on the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences on BDD symptoms, and the risk for co-existing psychopathology. Prevalence of BDD symptoms was determined by a validated cut-off on the Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire (DCQ) in three population-based twin cohorts at ages 15 (n = 6968), 18 (n = 3738), and 20-28 (n = 4671). Heritability analysis was performed using univariate model-fitting for the DCQ. The risk for co-existing psychopathology was expressed as odds ratios (OR). The prevalence of clinically significant BDD symptoms was estimated to be between 1 and 2% in the different cohorts, with a significantly higher prevalence in females (1.3-3.3%) than in males (0.2-0.6%). The heritability of body dysmorphic concerns was estimated to be 49% (95% CI 38-54%) at age 15, 39% (95% CI 30-46) at age 18, and 37% (95% CI 29-42) at ages 20-28, with the remaining variance being due to non-shared environment. ORs for co-existing neuropsychiatric and alcohol-related problems ranged from 2.3 to 13.2. Clinically significant BDD symptoms are relatively common in adolescence and young adulthood, particularly in females. The low occurrence of BDD symptoms in adolescent boys may indicate sex differences in age of onset and/or etiological mechanisms. BDD symptoms are moderately heritable in young people and associated with an increased risk for co-existing neuropsychiatric and alcohol-related problems.

  6. Long-Term Outcome of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Naturalistic Case Series of 1 to 4 Years After a Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Anson, Martin

    2015-11-01

    There is some evidence for the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) after 1 to 6months but none in the long term. The aim of this study was to follow up the participants in a randomized controlled trial of CBT versus anxiety management to determine whether or not the treatment gains were maintained over time. Thirty of the original 39 participants who had CBT were followed up over 1 to 4years and assessed using a number of clinician and self-report measures, which included the primary outcome measure of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for BDD. Outcome scores generally maintained over time from end of treatment to long-term follow-up. There was a slight deterioration from n=20 (51.3%) to n=18 (46.2%) who met improvement criteria at long-term follow-up. Eleven (28.2%) were in full remission and 22 (56.4%) were in partial remission. The gains made were generally maintained at long-term follow-up. However, there were a significant number of participants who maintained chronic symptoms after treatment and may need a longer-term or more complex intervention and active medication management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Novel interstitial deletion of 10q24.3-25.1 associated with multiple congenital anomalies including lobar holoprosencephaly, cleft lip and palate, and hypoplastic kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltekova, Iskra T; Hurteau-Millar, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2014-12-01

    Chromosome 10q deletions are rare and phenotypically diverse. Such deletions differ in length and occur in numerous regions on the long arm of chromosome 10, accounting for the wide clinical variability. Commonly reported findings include dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, developmental delay, and genitourinary abnormalities. Here, we report on a female patient with a novel interstitial 5.54 Mb deletion at 10q24.31-q25.1. This patient had findings in common with a previously reported patient with an overlapping deletion, including renal anomalies and an orofacial cleft, but also demonstrated lobar holoprosencephaly and a Dandy-Walker malformation, features which have not been previously reported with 10q deletions. An analysis of the region deleted in our patient showed numerous genes, such as KAZALD1, PAX2, SEMA4G, ACTRA1, INA, and FGF8, whose putative functions may have played a role in the phenotype seen in our patient. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  9. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  10. Evidence for a genetic overlap between body dysmorphic concerns and obsessive-compulsive symptoms in an adult female community twin sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, Benedetta; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Iervolino, Alessandra C; Anson, Martin; Cherkas, Lynn; Mataix-Cols, David

    2012-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is thought to be etiologically related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but the available evidence is incomplete. The current study examined the genetic and environmental sources of covariance between body dysmorphic and obsessive-compulsive symptoms in a community sample of adult twins. A total of 2,148 female twins (1,074 pairs) completed valid and reliable measures of body dysmorphic concerns and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The data were analyzed using bivariate twin modeling methods and the statistical programme Mx. In the best-fitting model, the covariation between body dysmorphic and obsessive-compulsive traits was largely accounted for by genetic influences common to both phenotypes (64%; 95% CI: 0.50-0.80). This genetic overlap was even higher when specific obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions were considered, with up to 82% of the phenotypic correlation between the obsessing and symmetry/ordering symptom dimensions and dysmorphic concerns being attributable to common genetic factors. Unique environmental factors, although influencing these traits individually, did not substantially contribute to their covariation. The results remained unchanged when excluding individuals reporting an objective medical condition/injury accounting for their concern in physical appearance. The association between body dysmorphic concerns and obsessive-compulsive symptoms is largely explained by shared genetic factors. Environmental risk factors were largely unique to each phenotype. These results support current recommendations to group BDD together with OCD in the same DSM-5 chapter, although comparison with other phenotypes such as somatoform disorders and social phobia is needed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Water Distribution Lines, Includes water pipes (not connections to structures, fire hydrants and other features. Capture in Microstation and does not contain attribution. Has annotation and is converted to GIS semi-anually. Only available upon permission., Published in 2011, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Howard County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Water Distribution Lines dataset current as of 2011. Includes water pipes (not connections to structures, fire hydrants and other features. Capture in Microstation...

  12. Development of a Repeatable Protocol to Uniformly Coat Internal Complex Geometries of Fine Featured 3D Printed Objects with Ceramic Material, including Determination of Viscosity Limits to Properly Coat Certain Pore Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-18

    HEPA filters are commonly used in air filtration systems ranging in application from simple home systems to the more advanced networks used in research and development. Currently, these filters are most often composed of glass fibers with diameter on the order of one micron with polymer binders. These fibers, as well as the polymers used, are known to be fragile and can degrade or become extremely brittle with heat, severely limiting their use in high temperature applications. Ceramics are one promising alternative and can enhance the filtration capabilities compared to the current technology. Because ceramic materials are more thermally resistant and chemically stable, there is great interest in developing a repeatable protocol to uniformly coat fine featured polymer objects with ceramic material for use as a filter. The purpose of this experiment is to determine viscosity limits that are able to properly coat certain pore sizes in 3D printed objects, and additionally to characterize the coatings themselves. Latex paint was used as a surrogate because it is specifically designed to produce uniform coatings.

  13. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Java programs called Featureous that addresses this issue. Featureous allows a programmer to easily establish feature-code traceability links and to analyze their characteristics using a number of visualizations. Featureous is an extension to the NetBeans IDE, and can itself be extended by third...

  14. Feature Article

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Feature Article. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 80-85 Feature Article. What's New in Computers Windows 95 · Vijnan Shastri · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89 Feature ...

  15. Anxiety and Shame as Risk Factors for Depression, Suicidality, and Functional Impairment in Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D; Wilhelm, Sabine; Tangney, June P; DiMauro, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) are associated with elevated depression, suicidality, functional impairment, and days housebound, yet little research has identified risk factors for these outcomes. Using path analysis, the present study examined anxiety and shame as risk factors for these outcomes across Internet-recruited self-report groups (BDD [n = 114], OCD [n = 114], and healthy control [HC; n = 133]). Paths from anxiety and shame to outcomes were similar and mostly significant across BDD and OCD, compared to non-significant paths for HCs, with one exception: the path from shame to depression was significant in the BDD group (b = 0.32) but non-significant in the OCD group (b = 0.07). Findings underscore similarities in BDD and OCD, supporting their reclassification into the same Obsessive Compulsive Related Disorders category. Results emphasize the importance of targeting shame, in addition to anxiety, in treatments for BDD and OCD.

  16. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bianchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome, suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration was not optimal. The decision made was to position Vibrant Soundbridge, a middle ear implant, with an original surgical application due to hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity. Intubation procedure was complicated due to child craniofacial deformities. Postoperative hearing rehabilitation involved a multidisciplinary team, showing improved social skills and language development.

  17. High-Dose Glycine Treatment of Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder in a 5-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Louis Cleveland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an individual who was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD at age 17 when education was discontinued. By age 19, he was housebound without social contacts except for parents. Adequate trials of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, two with atypical neuroleptics, were ineffective. Major exacerbations following ear infections involving Group A -hemolytic streptococcus at ages 19 and 20 led to intravenous immune globulin therapy, which was also ineffective. At age 22, another severe exacerbation followed antibiotic treatment for H. pylori. This led to a hypothesis that postulates deficient signal transduction by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR. Treatment with glycine, an NMDAR coagonist, over 5 years led to robust reduction of OCD/BDD signs and symptoms except for partial relapses during treatment cessation. Education and social life were resumed and evidence suggests improved cognition. Our findings motivate further study of glycine treatment of OCD and BDD.

  18. De Novo Mutations in CHD4, an ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeler Gene, Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome with Distinctive Dysmorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karin; Terhal, Paulien A; Cohen, Lior; Bruccoleri, Michael; Irving, Melita; Martinez, Ariel F; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Machol, Keren; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Pengfei; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Beuten, Joke; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Haude, Katrina; Fong, Chin-To; Enns, Gregory M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fan, Judith; Gotway, Garrett; Ghorbani, Mohammad; van Gassen, Koen; Monroe, Glen R; van Haaften, Gijs; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Campeau, Philippe M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-10-06

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Also known as Mi2β, CHD4 is an integral subunit of a well-characterized histone deacetylase complex. Here we report five individuals with de novo missense substitutions in CHD4 identified through whole-exome sequencing and web-based gene matching. These individuals have overlapping phenotypes including developmental delay, intellectual disability, hearing loss, macrocephaly, distinct facial dysmorphisms, palatal abnormalities, ventriculomegaly, and hypogonadism as well as additional findings such as bone fusions. The variants, c.3380G>A (p.Arg1127Gln), c.3443G>T (p.Trp1148Leu), c.3518G>T (p.Arg1173Leu), and c.3008G>A, (p.Gly1003Asp) (GenBank: NM_001273.3), affect evolutionarily highly conserved residues and are predicted to be deleterious. Previous studies in yeast showed the equivalent Arg1127 and Trp1148 residues to be crucial for SNF2 function. Furthermore, mutations in the same positions were reported in malignant tumors, and a de novo missense substitution in an equivalent arginine residue in the C-terminal helicase domain of SMARCA4 is associated with Coffin Siris syndrome. Cell-based studies of the p.Arg1127Gln and p.Arg1173Leu mutants demonstrate normal localization to the nucleus and HDAC1 interaction. Based on these findings, the mutations potentially alter the complex activity but not its formation. This report provides evidence for the role of CHD4 in human development and expands an increasingly recognized group of Mendelian disorders involving chromatin remodeling and modification. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, body dysmorphic disorder, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, Johanna E; Zhou, Shi; Coutts, Rosanne A; Booker, Ray

    2015-05-01

    The current study aimed to (a) determine the rates of symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD), body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), and eating disorder; (b) determine the relationships among symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders; and (c) provide a comprehensive comparison of symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia. The participants (N = 648, mean age = 29.5 years, SD = 10.1) participated in an online survey, consisting of Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire, and the Eating Attitude Test-26. Results indicated that 110 participants (17%) were at risk of having MD, 69 participants (10.6%) were at risk of having BDD, and 219 participants (33.8%) were at risk of having an eating disorder. Furthermore, 36 participants (5.6%) were found at risk of having both MD and BDD, and 60 participants (9.3%) were at risk of having both MD and an eating disorder. Significant correlations and associations were found between symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. Support was provided for the comorbidity of, and symptomatic similarities between, symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. This may reflect a shared pathogenesis between symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders. Strength and conditioning professionals, exercise scientists, athletic trainers, and personal trainers should be aware that adult males who are working out with weights (i.e., free weights or machines) may be at increased risk of having MD, BDD, and eating disorders.

  20. Seeing in the Mind's eye: Imagery rescripting for patients with body dysmorphic disorder. A single case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Viktoria; Stangier, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Intrusive images of appearance play an important role in the maintenance of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and are often linked to negative autobiographical experiences. However, to date there is no study examining the use and efficacy of imagery rescripting in BDD. This study investigated imagery rescripting in six patients with BDD, using a single case series A-B design. The intervention consisted of two treatment sessions (T1, T2). BDD and depressive symptoms were evaluated prior to (T1), post (T2) and two weeks after intervention (FU), using the Yale -Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for BDD (BDD-YBOCS), the Body Dysmorphic Symptoms Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory. At post-treatment, significant reductions in negative affect, distress, vividness and encapsulated beliefs associated with images and memories as well as an increased control were observed for five of six patients. These were maintained or decreased at two weeks follow-up. Scores on the BDD-YBOCS indicated a significant 26% improvement in BDD severity at follow-up for the whole group. Considering response as a ≥ 30% reduction in BDD-YBOCS score, four of six patients were classified as treatment responders. At follow-up, significant improvements in BDD and depressive symptoms were observed for the whole group. The small sample size and the lack of a control group limit the generalizability of our results. The findings indicate the potential efficacy of imagery rescripting, and highlight the need for further controlled trials. Imagery rescripting should be considered as a treatment technique within the cognitive framework of BDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SHOX gene defects and selected dysmorphic signs in patients of idiopathic short stature and Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeldova, K; Solc, R; Baxova, A; Zapletalova, J; Kebrdlova, V; Gaillyova, R; Prasilova, S; Soukalova, J; Mihalova, R; Lnenicka, P; Florianova, M; Stekrova, J

    2012-01-10

    The aim of the study was to analyze frequency of SHOX gene defects and selected dysmorphic signs in patients of both idiopathic short stature (ISS) and Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD), all derived from the Czech population. Overall, 98 subjects were analyzed in the study. Inclusion criteria were the presence of short stature (-2.0 SD), in combination with at least one of the selected dysmorphic signs for the ISS+ group; and the presence of Madelung deformity, without positive karyotyping for the LWD+ group. Each proband was analyzed by use of P018 MLPA kit, which covers SHOX and its regulatory sequences. Additionally, mutational analysis was done of the coding portions of the SHOX. Both extent and breakpoint localizations in the deletions/duplications found were quite variable. Some PAR1 rearrangements were detected, without obvious phenotypic association. In the ISS+ group, MLPA analysis detected four PAR1 deletions associated with a SHOX gene defect, PAR1 duplication with an ambiguous effect, and two SHOX mutations (13.7%). In the LWD+ group, MLPA analysis detected nine deletions in PAR1 region, with a deleterious effect on SHOX, first reported case of isolated SHOX enhancer duplication, and SHOX mutation (68.8%). In both ISS+ and LWD+ groups were positivity associated with a disproportionately short stature; in the ISS+ group, in combination with muscular hypertrophy. It seems that small PAR1 rearrangements might be quite frequent in the population. Our study suggests disproportionateness, especially in combination with muscular hypertrophy, as relevant indicators of ISS to be the effect of SHOX defect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reactor protection system including engineered features actuation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmaers, W.

    1982-01-01

    The safety concept requires to ensure that - the reactor protection system - the active engineered safeguard - and the necessary auxiliary systems are so designed and interfaced in respect of design and mode of action that, in the event of single component failure reliable control of the consequences of accidents remains ensured at all times and that the availability of the power plant is not limited unnecessarily. In order to satisfy these requirements due, importance was attached to a consistent spacial separation of the mutually redundant subsystems of the active safety equipment. The design and layout of the reactor protection system, of the power supply (emergency power supply), and of the auxiliary systems important from the safety engineering point of view, are such that their subsystems also largely satisfy the requirements of independence and spacial separation. (orig./RW)

  3. Systematic evaluation program review of NRC Safety Topic VI-10.A associated with the electrical, instrumentation and control portions of the testing of reactor trip system and engineered safety features, including response time for the Dresden station, Unit II nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Leger-Barter, G.

    1980-11-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation and review of NRC Safety Topic VI-10.A, associated with the electrical, instrumentation, and control portions of the testing of reactor trip systems and engineered safety features including response time for the Dresden II nuclear power plant, using current licensing criteria

  4. A case report of two male siblings with autism and duplication of Xq13-q21, a region including three genes predisposing for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Elisabet; Vujic, Mihailo; Kärrstedt, Ewa-Lotta; Erlandsson, Anna; Gillberg, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder, severe behaviour problems and duplication of the Xq12 to Xq13 region have recently been described in three male relatives. To describe the psychiatric comorbidity and dysmorphic features, including craniosynostosis, of two male siblings with autism and duplication of the Xq13 to Xq21 region, and attempt to narrow down the number of duplicated genes proposed to be leading to global developmental delay and autism. We performed DNA sequencing of certain exons of the TWIST1 gene, the FGFR2 gene and the FGFR3 gene. We also performed microarray analysis of the DNA. In addition to autism, the two male siblings exhibited severe learning disability, self-injurious behaviour, temper tantrums and hyperactivity, and had no communicative language. Chromosomal analyses were normal. Neither of the two siblings showed mutations of the sequenced exons known to produce craniosynostosis. The microarray analysis detected an extra copy of a region on the long arm of chromosome X, chromosome band Xq13.1-q21.1. Comparison of our two cases with previously described patients allowed us to identify three genes predisposing for autism in the duplicated chromosomal region. Sagittal craniosynostosis is also a new finding linked to the duplication.

  5. Glacial Features (Point) - Quad 168 (EPPING, NH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of New Hampshire — The Glacial Features (Point) layer describes point features associated with surficial geology. These glacial features include, but are not limited to, delta forsets,...

  6. Feature Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection and reduction are key to robust multivariate analyses. In this talk I will focus on pros and cons of various variable selection methods and focus on those that are most relevant in the context of HEP.

  7. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  8. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhouche Ahmed; Benomar Ali; Errguig Leila; Lachhab Lamiae; Bouslam Naima; Aasfara Jehanne; Sefiani Sanaa; Chabraoui Layachi; El Fahime Elmostafa; El Quessar Abdeljalil; Jiddane Mohamed; Yahyaoui Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurologic...

  9. Spectrum of mucocutaneous, ocular and facial features and delineation of novel presentations in 62 classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, M; Dordoni, C; Venturini, M; Ciaccio, C; Morlino, S; Chiarelli, N; Zanca, A; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Zoppi, N; Castori, M; Ritelli, M

    2017-12-01

    Classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) is characterized by marked cutaneous involvement, according to the Villefranche nosology and its 2017 revision. However, the diagnostic flow-chart that prompts molecular testing is still based on experts' opinion rather than systematic published data. Here we report on 62 molecularly characterized cEDS patients with focus on skin, mucosal, facial, and articular manifestations. The major and minor Villefranche criteria, additional 11 mucocutaneous signs and 15 facial dysmorphic traits were ascertained and feature rates compared by sex and age. In our cohort, we did not observe any mandatory clinical sign. Skin hyperextensibility plus atrophic scars was the most frequent combination, whereas generalized joint hypermobility according to the Beighton score decreased with age. Skin was more commonly hyperextensible on elbows, neck, and knees. The sites more frequently affected by abnormal atrophic scarring were knees, face (especially forehead), pretibial area, and elbows. Facial dysmorphism commonly affected midface/orbital areas with epicanthal folds and infraorbital creases more commonly observed in young patients. Our findings suggest that the combination of ≥1 eye dysmorphism and facial/forehead scars may support the diagnosis in children. Minor acquired traits, such as molluscoid pseudotumors, subcutaneous spheroids, and signs of premature skin aging are equally useful in adults. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin–Siris-like syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin–Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted. PMID:28250421

  11. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin-Siris-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-08-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin-Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted.

  12. Is Body Dysmorphic Disorder Associated with Abnormal Bodily Self-Awareness? A Study Using the Rubber Hand Illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ryan A.; Enticott, Peter G.; Hohwy, Jakob; Castle, David J.; Rossell, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from past research suggests that behaviours and characteristics related to body dissatisfaction may be associated with greater instability of perceptual body image, possibly due to problems in the integration of body-related multisensory information. We investigated whether people with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a condition characterised by body image disturbances, demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which arises as a result of multisensory integration processes when a rubber hand and the participant's hidden real hand are stimulated in synchrony. Overall, differences in RHI experience between the BDD group and healthy and schizophrenia control groups (n = 17 in each) were not significant. RHI strength, however, was positively associated with body dissatisfaction and related tendencies. For the healthy control group, proprioceptive drift towards the rubber hand was observed following synchronous but not asynchronous stimulation, a typical pattern when inducing the RHI. Similar drifts in proprioceptive awareness occurred for the BDD group irrespective of whether stimulation was synchronous or not. These results are discussed in terms of possible abnormalities in visual processing and multisensory integration among people with BDD. PMID:24925079

  13. Stress exposure and generation: A conjoint longitudinal model of body dysmorphic symptoms, peer acceptance, popularity, and victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Haley J; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Mastro, Shawna

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the bidirectional (conjoint) longitudinal pathways linking adolescents' body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms with self- and peer-reported social functioning. Participants were 367 Australian students (45.5% boys, mean age=12.01 years) who participated in two waves of a longitudinal study with a 12-month lag between assessments. Participants self-reported their symptoms characteristic of BDD, and perception of peer acceptance. Classmates reported who was popular and victimized in their grade, and rated their liking (acceptance) of their classmates. In support of both stress exposure and stress generation models, T1 victimization was significantly associated with more symptoms characteristic of BDD at T2 relative to T1, and higher symptom level at T1 was associated with lower perceptions of peer acceptance at T2 relative to T1. These results support the hypothesized bidirectional model, whereby adverse social experiences negatively impact symptoms characteristic of BDD over time, and symptoms also exacerbate low perceptions of peer-acceptance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder on a psychiatric inpatient ward and the value of a screening question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Akyüz, Elvan U; Hodsoll, John

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on an inpatient ward in the UK with a larger sample than previously studied and to investigate the value of a simple screening question during an assessment interview. Four hundred and thirty two consecutive admissions were screened for BDD on an adult psychiatric ward over a period of 13 months. Those who screened positive had a structured diagnostic interview for BDD. The prevalence of BDD was estimated to be 5.8% (C.I. 3.6-8.1%). Our screening question had a slightly low specificity (76.6%) for detecting BDD. The strength of this study was a larger sample size and narrower confidence interval than previous studies. The study adds to previous observations that BDD is poorly identified in psychiatric inpatients. BDD was identified predominantly in those presenting with depression, substance misuse or an anxiety disorder. The screening question could be improved by excluding those with weight or shape concerns. Missing the diagnosis is likely to lead to inappropriate treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Is body dysmorphic disorder associated with abnormal bodily self-awareness? A study using the rubber hand illusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A Kaplan

    Full Text Available Evidence from past research suggests that behaviours and characteristics related to body dissatisfaction may be associated with greater instability of perceptual body image, possibly due to problems in the integration of body-related multisensory information. We investigated whether people with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD, a condition characterised by body image disturbances, demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion (RHI, which arises as a result of multisensory integration processes when a rubber hand and the participant's hidden real hand are stimulated in synchrony. Overall, differences in RHI experience between the BDD group and healthy and schizophrenia control groups (n = 17 in each were not significant. RHI strength, however, was positively associated with body dissatisfaction and related tendencies. For the healthy control group, proprioceptive drift towards the rubber hand was observed following synchronous but not asynchronous stimulation, a typical pattern when inducing the RHI. Similar drifts in proprioceptive awareness occurred for the BDD group irrespective of whether stimulation was synchronous or not. These results are discussed in terms of possible abnormalities in visual processing and multisensory integration among people with BDD.

  16. Is body dysmorphic disorder associated with abnormal bodily self-awareness? A study using the rubber hand illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ryan A; Enticott, Peter G; Hohwy, Jakob; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from past research suggests that behaviours and characteristics related to body dissatisfaction may be associated with greater instability of perceptual body image, possibly due to problems in the integration of body-related multisensory information. We investigated whether people with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a condition characterised by body image disturbances, demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which arises as a result of multisensory integration processes when a rubber hand and the participant's hidden real hand are stimulated in synchrony. Overall, differences in RHI experience between the BDD group and healthy and schizophrenia control groups (n = 17 in each) were not significant. RHI strength, however, was positively associated with body dissatisfaction and related tendencies. For the healthy control group, proprioceptive drift towards the rubber hand was observed following synchronous but not asynchronous stimulation, a typical pattern when inducing the RHI. Similar drifts in proprioceptive awareness occurred for the BDD group irrespective of whether stimulation was synchronous or not. These results are discussed in terms of possible abnormalities in visual processing and multisensory integration among people with BDD.

  17. Prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder among psychiatric outpatients with mood, anxiety or somatoform disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Job; van Rood, Yanda R; van der Wee, Nic J; den Hollander-Gijsman, Margien; van Noorden, Martijn S; Giltay, Erik J; Zitman, Frans G

    2012-09-01

    To describe the prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) compared with other psychiatric outpatients with a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Outpatients referred for treatment of a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder were routinely assessed at intake. A structured interview (MINI-Plus), observer-based and self-rating instruments were administered by an independent assessor. Among our sample of 3798 referred patients, 2947 patients were diagnosed with at least one DSM-IV mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Of these patients 1.8% (n = 54) met the diagnostic criteria for BDD. In comparison with other outpatients, patients with BDD were on average younger, less often married and were more often living alone. Highly prevalent comorbid diagnoses were major depression (in 46.3% of cases), social anxiety disorder (in 35.2% of cases) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (in 16.7% of cases). Furthermore, patients with BDD had higher scores on the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) as well as lower scores on the Short Form 36 social role functioning. BDD is frequently associated with depression, social phobia and OCD. Patients with BDD have more distress and more impaired interpersonal functioning.

  18. A case of fetal valproate syndrome with new features expanding the phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; AlDohami, Hessa S.; Shareefi, Osama M.

    2009-01-01

    Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) is a well-recognized constellation of dysmorphic features, and neurodevelopmental retardation that results from prenatal exposure to the anticonvulsant valproic acid. In this report, we describe a case with typical features of FVS. A 23-year-old lady with post-traumatic epilepsy controlled by sodium valproate (Depakene) 500 mg twice daily throughout pregnancy as monotherapy, gave birth to a female baby with facial features characteristic of FVS, and severe radial ray reduction. She also had wide-spaced nipples and short neck, features not described before. Sodium valproate, a widely used anticonvulsant and mood regulator, is a well-recognized teratogen that can result in severe limb deformities, craniosynostosis, neural tube defects and neurodevelopmental retardation. Therefore, we recommend that valproic acid must be avoided during pregnancy, as new generation of anticonvulsant drugs have emerged into the market. (author)

  19. Failure to thrive as primary feature in two patients with subtle chromosomal aneuploidy: Interstitial deletion 2q33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, K.; Mulla, W.; Stump, T. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelpha, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It is well known that patients with chromosomal aneuploidy present with multiple congenital anomalies and dysmorphia, and that they may have associated failure to thrive. However, rarely is failure to thrive the predominant presenting feature. We report two such patients. Patient 1 had a marked history of failure to thrive, (weight 50% for 5 1/2 months at 20 months, length 50% for 15 months at 20 months). Patient 2 was noted to be growth retarded at 2 months upon presenting to the hospital with respiratory symptoms (weight 50% for a newborn, length 50% for 36 weeks gestation). There was relative head sparing in both patients. Chromosome analysis in patient 1, prompted by a negative work-up for the failure to thrive, and emerging evidence of developmental delay, revealed a 46,XY,del(2)(q32.2q33) karyotype. Chromosome analysis in patient 2, done as part of a complete workup for the failure to thrive, revealed a 46,XX,del(2)(q33.2q33.2 or q33.2q33.3) karyotype. On careful examination, subtle dysmorphic features were seen. In both patients these included a long flat philtrum, thin upper lip and high arched palate. Patient 1 also had a small posterior cleft of the palate. These patients have the smallest interstitial deletions of chromosome 2 so far reported. Their deletions overlap within 2q33 although they are not identical. Review of the literature reveals 15 patients with interstitial deletions which include 2q33. Marked growth retardation is reported in 14 of these cases. Cleft palate/abnormal uvula were frequently associated. These cases illustrate the need to include high resolution chromosomal studies as part of a complete work-up for unexplained failure to thrive.

  20. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  1. Associations in the longitudinal course of body dysmorphic disorder with major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Stout, Robert L

    2006-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is an impairing and relatively common disorder that has high comorbidity with certain Axis I disorders. However, the longitudinal associations between BDD and comorbid disorders have not previously been examined. Such information may shed light on the nature of BDD's relationship to putative "near-neighbor" disorders, such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and social phobia. This study examined time-varying associations between BDD and these comorbid disorders in 161 participants over 1-3 years of follow-up in the first prospective longitudinal study of the course of BDD. We found that BDD had significant longitudinal associations with major depression--that is, change in the status of BDD and major depression was closely linked in time, with improvement in major depression predicting BDD remission, and, conversely, improvement in BDD predicting depression remission. We also found that improvement in OCD predicted BDD remission, but that BDD improvement did not predict OCD remission. No significant longitudinal associations were found for BDD and social phobia (although the results for analyses of OCD and social phobia were less numerically stable). These findings suggest (but do not prove) that BDD may be etiologically linked to major depression and OCD, i.e., that BDD may be a member of both the putative OCD spectrum and the affective spectrum. However, BDD does not appear to simply be a symptom of these comorbid disorders, as BDD symptoms persisted in a sizable proportion of subjects who remitted from these comorbid disorders. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BDD's relationship to commonly co-occurring disorders, as this issue has important theoretical and clinical implications.

  2. JCE Feature Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  3. New features in MEDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical interface to the EPICS control system. This paper describes new features that have been added to MEDM in the last two years. These features include new editing capabilities, a PV Info dialog box, a means of specifying limits and precision, a new implementation of the Cartesian Plot, new features for several objects, new capability for the Related Display, help, a user-configurable Execute Menu, reconfigured start-up options, and availability for Windows 95/98/NT. Over one hundred bugs have been fixed, and the program is quite stable and in extensive use

  4. Featuring animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ritter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algonquian languages are famous for their animacy-based grammatical properties—an animacy based noun classification system and direct/inverse system which gives rise to animacy hierarchy effects in the determination of verb agreement. In this paper I provide new evidence for the proposal that the distinctive properties of these languages is due to the use of participant-based features, rather than spatio-temporal ones, for both nominal and verbal functional categories (Ritter & Wiltschko 2009, 2014. Building on Wiltschko (2012, I develop a formal treatment of the Blackfoot aspectual system that assumes a category Inner Aspect (cf. MacDonald 2008, Travis 1991, 2010. Focusing on lexical aspect in Blackfoot, I demonstrate that the classification of both nouns (Seinsarten and verbs (Aktionsarten is based on animacy, rather than boundedness, resulting in a strikingly different aspectual system for both categories. 

  5. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Veale, MD, FRCPsych

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures. Veale D, Miles S, Read J, Troglia A, Wylie K, and Muir G. Sexual functioning and behavior of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared with men anxious about penis size and with controls: A cohort study. Sex Med 2015;3:147–155.

  6. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis. Aim: To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns. Methods: An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recru...

  7. Prenatal Diagnosis of a 2.5 Mb De Novo 17q24.1q24.2 Deletion Encompassing KPNA2 and PSMD12 Genes in a Fetus with Craniofacial Dysmorphism, Equinovarus Feet, and Syndactyly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Emmanuelle Naud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial 17q24.1 or 17q24.2 deletions were reported after conventional cytogenetic analysis or chromosomal microarray analysis in patients presenting intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism, and/or malformations. We report on a fetus with craniofacial dysmorphism, talipes equinovarus, and syndactyly associated with a de novo 2.5 Mb 17q24.1q24.2 deletion. Among the deleted genes, KPNA2 and PSMD12 are discussed for the correlation with the fetal phenotype. This is the first case of prenatal diagnosis of 17q24.1q24.2 deletion.

  8. The MECP2 variant c.925C>T (p.Arg309Trp) causes intellectual disability in both males and females without classic features of Rett syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Stephens, K

    2016-01-01

    . Intriguingly, the mother of an affected male patient is an asymptomatic carrier of this variant. It is therefore likely that the p.(Arg309Trp) variation does not necessarily lead to male lethality, and it results in a wide range of clinical features in females, probably influenced by different X......-pair substitution affecting Arg309 at the C-terminal end of the transcriptional repression domain (TRD). All patients have intellectual disability and present with some RTT features, but they do not fulfill the clinical criteria for typical or atypical RTT. Most of the patients also have mild facial dysmorphism...

  9. Dependency Parsing with Transformed Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxiang Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dependency parsing is an important subtask of natural language processing. In this paper, we propose an embedding feature transforming method for graph-based parsing, transform-based parsing, which directly utilizes the inner similarity of the features to extract information from all feature strings including the un-indexed strings and alleviate the feature sparse problem. The model transforms the extracted features to transformed features via applying a feature weight matrix, which consists of similarities between the feature strings. Since the matrix is usually rank-deficient because of similar feature strings, it would influence the strength of constraints. However, it is proven that the duplicate transformed features do not degrade the optimization algorithm: the margin infused relaxed algorithm. Moreover, this problem can be alleviated by reducing the number of the nearest transformed features of a feature. In addition, to further improve the parsing accuracy, a fusion parser is introduced to integrate transformed and original features. Our experiments verify that both transform-based and fusion parser improve the parsing accuracy compared to the corresponding feature-based parser.

  10. Sensorineural Deafness, Distinctive Facial Features and Abnormal Cranial Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R.; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2008-01-01

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. PMID:18553554

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of a 1.6-Mb 4p16.3 interstitial microdeletion encompassing FGFRL1 and TACC3 associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome facial dysmorphism and short long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Haploinsufficiency of FGFRL1 and TACC3 at 4p16.3 can be associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate of WHS facial dysmorphism and short long bones. Prenatal diagnosis of facial cleft with short long bones should raise a suspicion of chromosome microdeletion syndromes.

  12. Heart defects and other features of the 22q11 distal deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Christina Ringmann; Graakjaer, Jesper; Heinl, Ulrike D

    2013-01-01

    patients with 22q11 distal deletions, of whom two have complex congenital heart malformation, thus broadening the phenotypic spectrum. We compare cardiac malformations reported in 22q11 distal deletion to those reported in the common 22q11 deletion syndrome. We also review the literature for patients...... with 22q11 distal deletions, and discuss the possible roles of haploinsufficiency of the MAPK1 gene. We find the most frequent features in 22q11 distal deletion to be developmental delay or learning disability, short stature, microcephalus, premature birth with low birth weight, and congenital heart...... malformation ranging from minor anomalies to complex malformations. Behavioral problems are also seen in a substantial portion of patients. The following dysmorphic features are relatively common: smooth philtrum, abnormally structured ears, cleft palate/bifid uvula, micro-/retrognathia, upslanting palpebral...

  13. Digitotalar dysmorphism: Molecular elucidation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obtained for molecular studies. Since the distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are genetically heterogeneous, an unbiased approach to mutation ... Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa, with an interest in molecular genetics of connective ...

  14. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  15. Feature displacement interpolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Andresen, Per Rønsholt

    1998-01-01

    Given a sparse set of feature matches, we want to compute an interpolated dense displacement map. The application may be stereo disparity computation, flow computation, or non-rigid medical registration. Also estimation of missing image data, may be phrased in this framework. Since the features...... often are very sparse, the interpolation model becomes crucial. We show that a maximum likelihood estimation based on the covariance properties (Kriging) show properties more expedient than methods such as Gaussian interpolation or Tikhonov regularizations, also including scale......-selection. The computational complexities are identical. We apply the maximum likelihood interpolation to growth analysis of the mandibular bone. Here, the features used are the crest-lines of the object surface....

  16. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  17. Dysmorphic choroid plexuses and hydrocephalus associated with increased nuchal translucency: early ultrasound markers of de novo thanatophoric dysplasia type II with cloverleaf skull (Kleeblattschaedel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonni, Gabriele; Palmisano, Marcella; Ginocchi, Vladimiro; Ventura, Alessandro; Baldi, Maurizia; Baffico, Ave Maria

    2014-11-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) type II presenting in the first trimester with increased nuchal translucency (NT) and cloverleaf skull (Kleeblattschaedel) have been scantly reported in the medical record. Abnormal choroid plexus has been seen in association with fetal anomalies. Here we described a case of increased NT associated with indented choroid plexuses, early onset hydrocephalus and cloverleaf skull in a fetus subsequently diagnosed at early second trimester to carry a de novo mutation encoding for TD type II. The findings of dysmorphic choroid plexus, early onset hydrocephalus and cloverleaf skull at first trimester scan may be early, useful ultrasound markers of TD type II. Molecular analysis to control for possible overlapping syndromes were performed and resulted negative. Postmortem X-ray and 3D-CT scan confirmed the cloverleaf skull, narrow thorax, straight femur with rhizomelic shortening of the limbs and the presence of a communicating hydrocephalus. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  18. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  19. An autosomal recessive leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa maps to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhouche Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-gene disorders related to ischemic stroke seem to be an important cause of stroke in young patients without known risk factors. To identify new genes responsible of such diseases, we studied a consanguineous Moroccan family with three affected individuals displaying hereditary leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa that appears to segregate in autosomal recessive pattern. Methods All family members underwent neurological and radiological examinations. A genome wide search was conducted in this family using the ABI PRISM linkage mapping set version 2.5 from Applied Biosystems. Six candidate genes within the region linked to the disease were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Evidence of linkage was obtained on chromosome 17q24.2-25.3. Analysis of recombination events and LOD score calculation suggests linkage of the responsible gene in a genetic interval of 11 Mb located between D17S789 and D17S1806 with a maximal multipoint LOD score of 2.90. Sequencing of seven candidate genes in this locus, ATP5H, FDXR, SLC25A19, MCT8, CYGB, KCNJ16 and GRIN2C, identified three missense mutations in the FDXR gene which were also found in a homozygous state in three healthy controls, suggesting that these variants are not disease-causing mutations in the family. Conclusion A novel locus for leucoencephalopathy with ischemic stroke, dysmorphic syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa has been mapped to chromosome 17q24.2-25.3 in a consanguineous Moroccan family.

  20. Complex Topographic Feature Ontology Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanka, Dalia E.; Jerris, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic ontologies are examined as effective data models for the representation of complex topographic feature types. Complex feature types are viewed as integrated relations between basic features for a basic purpose. In the context of topographic science, such component assemblages are supported by resource systems and found on the local landscape. Ontologies are organized within six thematic modules of a domain ontology called Topography that includes within its sphere basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Context is constructed not only as a spatial and temporal setting, but a setting also based on environmental processes. Types of spatial relations that exist between components include location, generative processes, and description. An example is offered in a complex feature type ‘mine.’ The identification and extraction of complex feature types are an area for future research.

  1. Imaging features of thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunaci, M.; Tunaci, A.; Engin, G.; Oezkorkmaz, B.; Acunas, G.; Acunas, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey); Dincol, G. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey)

    1999-07-01

    Thalassemia is a kind of chronic, inherited, microcytic anemia characterized by defective hemoglobin synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. In all thalassemias clinical features that result from anemia, transfusional, and absorptive iron overload are similar but vary in severity. The radiographic features of {beta}-thalassemia are due in large part to marrow hyperplasia. Markedly expanded marrow space lead to various skeletal manifestations including spine, skull, facial bones, and ribs. Extramedullary hematopoiesis (ExmH), hemosiderosis, and cholelithiasis are among the non-skeletal manifestations of thalassemia. The skeletal X-ray findings show characteristics of chronic overactivity of the marrow. In this article both skeletal and non-skeletal manifestations of thalassemia are discussed with an overview of X-ray findings, including MRI and CT findings. (orig.)

  2. Imaging features of thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaci, M.; Tunaci, A.; Engin, G.; Oezkorkmaz, B.; Acunas, G.; Acunas, B.; Dincol, G.

    1999-01-01

    Thalassemia is a kind of chronic, inherited, microcytic anemia characterized by defective hemoglobin synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. In all thalassemias clinical features that result from anemia, transfusional, and absorptive iron overload are similar but vary in severity. The radiographic features of β-thalassemia are due in large part to marrow hyperplasia. Markedly expanded marrow space lead to various skeletal manifestations including spine, skull, facial bones, and ribs. Extramedullary hematopoiesis (ExmH), hemosiderosis, and cholelithiasis are among the non-skeletal manifestations of thalassemia. The skeletal X-ray findings show characteristics of chronic overactivity of the marrow. In this article both skeletal and non-skeletal manifestations of thalassemia are discussed with an overview of X-ray findings, including MRI and CT findings. (orig.)

  3. Banks and Financial Services, The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009 with the intent to map critical infrastructure in the Coastal Zone. The initial four parishes included Lafourche, Plaquemine, St. , Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Banks and Financial Services dataset current as of 2011. The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was...

  4. Banks and Financial Services, The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009 with the intent to map critical infrastructure in the Coastal Zone. The initial four parishes included Lafourche, Plaquemine, St. , Published in 2011, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Banks and Financial Services dataset current as of 2011. The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was...

  5. Hospitals, The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009 with the intent to map critical infrastructure in the Coastal Zone. The initial four parishes included Lafourche, Plaquemine, St. , Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Hospitals dataset current as of 2011. The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009...

  6. Hospitals, The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009 with the intent to map critical infrastructure in the Coastal Zone. The initial four parishes included Lafourche, Plaquemine, St., Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Hospitals dataset current as of 2011. The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009...

  7. MRI features of chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Liu Xia; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MR imaging features of chondroblastoma. Methods: MRI examinations of 20 patients with histological proven chondmblastoma were reviewed retrospectively. The MRI findings of chondroblastoma including the signal intensity, the shape, the growth patterns, and the surrounding bone marrow edema and the adjacent soft tissue edema, the periosteal reaction, the adjacent joint effusion were analyzed. Results: All 20 cases demonstrated heterogeneous MR signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI images and showed lobular margins. Sixteen cases demonstrated expansive growth patterns. Surrounding bone marrow edema was found in 18 cases and adjacent soft tissue edema in 14 cases. Periosteal reaction was identified in 6 cases. In 7 cases the tumor extended to adjacent soft tissue. Adjacent joint effusion was visible on MRI in 6 cases. Conclusion: Heterogeneous signal intensity, lobular margins and expansive growth pattern, adjacent bone marrow and soft tissue edema were the common features of chondroblastoma on MRI. (authors)

  8. Features of Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disabilities in FXS include a range from moderate learning disabilities to more severe intellectual disabilities. Physical features may ... intellectual disability. Others may have moderate or mild learning disabilities, emotional/mental health issues, general anxiety and/or ...

  9. X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: New Features and a Novel EDA Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasta, Salvatore; Carlone, Giorgia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; Chiappe, Francesca; Bassanese, Francesco; Piras, Roberta; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Brazzelli, Valeria; Verrotti, Alberto; Marseglia, Gian L

    2017-01-01

    We described a 5-year-old male with hypodontia, hypohidrosis, and facial dysmorphisms characterized by a depressed nasal bridge, maxillary hypoplasia, and protuberant lips. Chromosomal analysis revealed a normal 46,XY male karyotype. Due to the presence of clinical features of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED), the EDA gene, located at Xq12q13.1, of the patient and his family was sequenced. Analysis of the proband's sequence revealed a missense mutation (T to A transversion) in hemizygosity state at nucleotide position 158 in exon 1 of the EDA gene, which changes codon 53 from leucine to histidine, while heterozygosity at this position was detected in the slightly affected mother; moreover, this mutation was not found in the publically available Human Gene Mutation Database. To date, our findings indicate that a novel mutation in EDA is associated with X-linked HED, adding it to the repertoire of EDA mutations. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Autosomal Dominant STAT3 Deficiency and Hyper-IgE Syndrome Molecular, Cellular, and Clinical Features From a French National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Melki, Isabelle; Natividad, Angels; Puel, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Yun, Ling; Thumerelle, Caroline; Oksenhendler, Eric; Boutboul, David; Thomas, Caroline; Hoarau, Cyrille; Lebranchu, Yvon; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cazorla, Celine; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Micheau, Marguerite; Tron, Fran[cedil]cois; Baruchel, Andre; Barlogis, Vincent; Palenzuela, Gilles; Mathey, Catherine; Dominique, Stephane; Body, Gerard; Munzer, Martine; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jaussaud, Rolland; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Blanche, Stephane; Debre, Marianne; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lambert, Nathalie; Grandin, Virginie; Ndaga, Stephanie; Jacques, Corinne; Harre, Chantal; Forveille, Monique; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Durandy, Anne; Bodemer, Christine; Suarez, Felipe; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is the main genetic etiology of hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome. We documented the molecular, cellular, and clinical features of 60 patients with heterozygous STAT3 mutations from 47 kindreds followed in France. We identified 11 known and 13 new mutations of STAT3. Low levels of interleukin (IL)-6-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (or accumulation) of STAT3 were observed in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B cells) from all STAT3-deficient patients tested. The immunologic phenotype was characterized by high serum IgE levels (96% of the patients), memory B-cell lymphopenia (94.5%), and hypereosinophilia (80%). A low proportion of IL-17A-producing circulating T cells was found in 14 of the 15 patients tested. Mucocutaneous infections were the most frequent, typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus (all patients) and Candida albicans (85%). Up to 90% of the patients had pneumonia, mostly caused by Staph. aureus (31%) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (30%). Recurrent pneumonia was associated with secondary bronchiectasis and pneumatocele (67%), as well as secondary aspergillosis (22%). Up to 92% of the patients had dermatitis and connective tissue abnormalities, with facial dysmorphism (95%), retention of decidual teeth (65%), osteopenia (50%), and hyperextensibility (50%). Four patients developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The clinical outcome was favorable, with 56 patients, including 43 adults, still alive at the end of study (mean age, 21 yr; range, 1 mo to 46 yr). Only 4 patients died, 3 from severe bacterial infection (aged 1, 15, and 29 yr, respectively). Antibiotic prophylaxis (90% of patients), antifungal prophylaxis (50%), and IgG infusions (53%) improved patient health, as demonstrated by the large decrease in pneumonia recurrence. Overall, the prognosis of STAT3 deficiency may be considered good, provided that multiple prophylactic

  11. Object feature extraction and recognition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Min; Xiang Rujian; Wan Yongxing

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of objects, especially flying objects, are analyzed, which include characteristics of spectrum, image and motion. Feature extraction is also achieved. To improve the speed of object recognition, a feature database is used to simplify the data in the source database. The feature vs. object relationship maps are stored in the feature database. An object recognition model based on the feature database is presented, and the way to achieve object recognition is also explained

  12. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  13. Unsupervised Feature Subset Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndberg-Madsen, Nicolaj; Thomsen, C.; Pena, Jose

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies filter and hybrid filter-wrapper feature subset selection for unsupervised learning (data clustering). We constrain the search for the best feature subset by scoring the dependence of every feature on the rest of the features, conjecturing that these scores discriminate some ir...... irrelevant features. We report experimental results on artificial and real data for unsupervised learning of naive Bayes models. Both the filter and hybrid approaches perform satisfactorily....

  14. Accept, distract, or reframe? An exploratory experimental comparison of strategies for coping with intrusive body image thoughts in anorexia nervosa and body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Andrea S; Thomas, Jennifer J; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Rosenfield, Elizabeth H; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2015-02-28

    Negative body image is the hallmark of anorexia nervosa (AN) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). One aspect of body image, appearance-related thoughts, have shown to be a major contributor to relapse, thus further investigation of successful treatment strategies targeting these maladaptive thoughts are warranted. The present study tested an acceptance/mindfulness (AC), a cognitive restructuring (CR), and a distraction strategy with regard to their short-term effectiveness of reducing the frequency of thought occurrence and associated outcomes in participants with AN (n=20), BDD (n=21), and healthy controls (HC; n=22). Although all strategies led to a significant reduction of thought frequency, there was no group × strategy interaction effect in their reduction. Positive affect increased in the BDD group through the AC strategy, but decreased in healthy controls. Acceptance of the thought increased in the CR strategy in AN, whereas that strategy seemed to work least for BDD. Healthy controls showed most acceptance when using distraction. Taken together, the study suggests that all strategies might have their benefits and that it might be worthwhile further investigating differential indication of the strategies with regard to diagnosis and individual factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An Interstitial 4q Deletion with a Mosaic Complementary Ring Chromosome in a Child with Dysmorphism, Linear Skin Pigmentation, and Hepatomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial deletions of 4q are rarely reported, vary in size, and have limited genotype-phenotype correlations. Here, genome-wide array CGH analysis identified a 21.6 Mb region of copy number loss at 4q12-q21.1 in a patient diagnosed with dysmorphism, linear skin pigmentation, and hepatomegaly. An additional small ring chromosome was detected in 5/30 cells examined via G-banding. Confirmation of the origin of the ring chromosome was obtained by FISH analysis which identified that the ring chromosome contained material from the deleted region of chromosome 4 and was therefore complementary to the 21.6 Mb deletion. Further microarray studies in the proband using a different microarray platform showed no evidence of mosaicism. This case highlights the importance of an integrated approach to cytogenetic analysis and demonstrates the value of G-banding for detecting mosaicism, as current microarray platforms are unable to detect low level mosaics.

  16. Phenomenology of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared to men anxious about their penis size and to men without concerns: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Carmona, Lina; Fiorito, Chiara; Wells, Hannah; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-03-01

    Men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) may be preoccupied with the size or shape of the penis, which may be causing significant shame or impairment. Little is known about the characteristics and phenomenology of such men and whether they can be differentiated from men with small penis anxiety (SPA) (who do not have BDD), and men with no penile concerns. Twenty-six men with BDD, 31 men with SPA, and 33 men without penile concerns were compared on psychopathology, experiences of recurrent imagery, avoidance and safety-seeking behaviours. Men with BDD had significantly higher scores than both the SPA group and no penile concern group for measures of imagery, avoidance, safety seeking and general psychopathology. The groups differed on the phenomenology of BDD specific to penile size preoccupation clearly from the worries of SPA, which in turn were different to those of the men without concerns. The common avoidance and safety seeking behaviours were identified in such men that may be used clinically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis. Aim To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns. Methods An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recruited and divided into three groups: BDD (n = 26); SPA (n = 31) and controls (n = 33). Main Outcome Measures The Index of Erectile Function (IEF), sexual identity and history; and interventions to alter the size of their penis. Results Men with BDD compared with controls had reduced erectile dysfunction, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction and overall satisfaction on the IEF. Men with SPA compared with controls had reduced intercourse satisfaction. There were no differences in sexual desire, the frequency of intercourse or masturbation across any of the three groups. Men with BDD and SPA were more likely than the controls to attempt to alter the shape or size of their penis (for example jelqing, vacuum pumps or stretching devices) with poor reported success. Conclusion Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures. PMID:26468378

  18. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis. To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns. An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recruited and divided into three groups: BDD (n = 26); SPA (n = 31) and controls (n = 33). The Index of Erectile Function (IEF), sexual identity and history; and interventions to alter the size of their penis. Men with BDD compared with controls had reduced erectile dysfunction, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction and overall satisfaction on the IEF. Men with SPA compared with controls had reduced intercourse satisfaction. There were no differences in sexual desire, the frequency of intercourse or masturbation across any of the three groups. Men with BDD and SPA were more likely than the controls to attempt to alter the shape or size of their penis (for example jelqing, vacuum pumps or stretching devices) with poor reported success. Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures.

  19. A multiple translocation event in a patient with hexadactyly, facial dysmorphism, mental retardation and behaviour disorder characterised comprehensively by molecular cytogenetics. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Jörg; Heller, Anita; Senger, Gabriele; Starke, Heike; Chudoba, Ilse; Kelbova, Christina; Tönnies, Holger; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Haase, Claudia; Beensen, Volkmar; Zintl, Felix; Claussen, Uwe; Liehr, Thomas

    2003-09-01

    We report a 13-year-old female patient with multiple congenital abnormalities (microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, anteverted dysplastic ears and postaxial hexadactyly), mental retardation, and adipose-gigantism. Ultrasonography revealed no signs of a heart defect or renal abnormalities. She showed no speech development and suffered from a behavioural disorder. CNS abnormalities were excluded by cerebral MRI. Initial cytogenetic studies by Giemsa banding revealed an aberrant karyotype involving three chromosomes, t(2;4;11). By high resolution banding and multicolour fluoresence in-situ hybridisation (M-FISH, MCB), chromosome 1 was also found to be involved in the complex chromosomal aberrations, confirming the karyotype 46,XX,t(2;11;4).ish t(1;4;2;11)(q43;q21.1;p12-p13.1;p14.1). To the best of our knowledge no patient has been previously described with such a complex translocation involving 4 chromosomes. This case demonstrates that conventional chromosome banding techniques such as Giemsa banding are not always sufficient to characterise complex chromosomal abnormalities. Only by the additional utilisation of molecular cytogenetic techniques could the complexity of the present chromosomal rearrangements and the origin of the involved chromosomal material be detected. Further molecular genetic studies will be performed to clarify the chromosomal breakpoints potentially responsible for the observed clinical symptoms. This report demonstrates that multicolour-fluorescence in-situ hybridisation studies should be performed in patients with congenital abnormalities and suspected aberrant karyotypes in addition to conventional Giemsa banding.

  20. A t(5;16) translocation is the likely driver of a syndrome with ambiguous genitalia, facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and speech delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozantürk, Ayşegül; Davis, Erica E; Sabo, Aniko; Weiss, Marjan M; Muzny, Donna; Dugan-Perez, Shannon; Sistermans, Erik A; Gibbs, Richard A; Özgül, Köksal R; Yalnızoglu, Dilek; Serdaroglu, Esra; Dursun, Ali; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    Genetic studies grounded on monogenic paradigms have accelerated both gene discovery and molecular diagnosis. At the same time, complex genomic rearrangements are also appreciated as potent drivers of disease pathology. Here, we report two male siblings with a dysmorphic face, ambiguous genitalia, intellectual disability, and speech delay. Through quad-based whole-exome sequencing and concomitant molecular cytogenetic testing, we identified two copy-number variants (CNVs) in both affected individuals likely arising from a balanced translocation: a 13.5-Mb duplication on Chromosome 16 (16q23.1 → 16qter) and a 7.7-Mb deletion on Chromosome 5 (5p15.31 → 5pter), as well as a hemizygous missense variant in CXorf36 (also known as DIA1R). The 5p terminal deletion has been associated previously with speech delay, whereas craniofacial dysmorphia and genital/urinary anomalies have been reported in patients with a terminal duplication of 16q. However, dosage changes in either genomic region alone could not account for the overall clinical presentation in our family; functional testing of CXorf36 in zebrafish did not induce defects in neurogenesis or the craniofacial skeleton. Notably, literature and database analysis revealed a similar dosage disruption in two siblings with extensive phenotypic overlap with our patients. Taken together, our data suggest that dosage perturbation of genes within the two chromosomal regions likely drives the syndromic manifestations of our patients and highlight how multiple genetic lesions can contribute to complex clinical pathologies.

  1. Spatial features register: toward standardization of spatial features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Janette

    1994-01-01

    As the need to share spatial data increases, more than agreement on a common format is needed to ensure that the data is meaningful to both the importer and the exporter. Effective data transfer also requires common definitions of spatial features. To achieve this, part 2 of the Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS) provides a model for a spatial features data content specification and a glossary of features and attributes that fit this model. The model provides a foundation for standardizing spatial features. The glossary now contains only a limited subset of hydrographic and topographic features. For it to be useful, terms and definitions must be included for other categories, such as base cartographic, bathymetric, cadastral, cultural and demographic, geodetic, geologic, ground transportation, international boundaries, soils, vegetation, water, and wetlands, and the set of hydrographic and topographic features must be expanded. This paper will review the philosophy of the SDTS part 2 and the current plans for creating a national spatial features register as one mechanism for maintaining part 2.

  2. Feature Selection by Reordering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiřina, Marcel; Jiřina jr., M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2005), s. 155-161 ISSN 1738-6438 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : feature selection * data reduction * ordering of features Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  3. Screening for Plant Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Polder, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, an overview of different plant features is given, from (sub)cellular to canopy level. A myriad of methods is available to measure these features using image analysis, and often, multiple methods can be used to measure the same feature. Several criteria are listed for choosing a

  4. A Recurrent De Novo PACS2 Heterozygous Missense Variant Causes Neonatal-Onset Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathy, Facial Dysmorphism, and Cerebellar Dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Jean-Marçais, Nolwenn; Yang, Edward; Heron, Delphine; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Krock, Bryan L; Backer, E; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Sinnema, Margje; Reijnders, Margot R F; Bearden, David; Begtrup, Amber; Telegrafi, Aida; Lunsing, Roelineke J; Burglen, Lydie; Lesca, Gaetan; Cho, Megan T; Smith, Lacey A; Sheidley, Beth R; Moufawad El Achkar, Christelle; Pearl, Phillip L; Poduri, Annapurna; Skraban, Cara M; Tarpinian, Jennifer; Nesbitt, Addie I; Fransen van de Putte, Dietje E; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Rump, Patrick; Chatron, Nicolas; Sabatier, Isabelle; De Bellescize, Julitta; Guibaud, Laurent; Sweetser, David A; Waxler, Jessica L; Wierenga, Klaas J; Donadieu, Jean; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ramsey, Keri M; Nava, Caroline; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Vitobello, Antonio; Tran Mau-Them, Frédéric; Philippe, Christophe; Bruel, Ange-Line; Duffourd, Yannis; Thomas, Laurel; Lelieveld, Stefan H; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke; Brunner, Han G; Keren, Boris; Thevenon, Julien; Faivre, Laurence; Thomas, Gary; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2018-05-03

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) represent a large clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental diseases. The identification of pathogenic genetic variants in DEEs remains crucial for deciphering this complex group and for accurately caring for affected individuals (clinical diagnosis, genetic counseling, impacting medical, precision therapy, clinical trials, etc.). Whole-exome sequencing and intensive data sharing identified a recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense variant in 14 unrelated individuals. Their phenotype was characterized by epilepsy, global developmental delay with or without autism, common cerebellar dysgenesis, and facial dysmorphism. Mixed focal and generalized epilepsy occurred in the neonatal period, controlled with difficulty in the first year, but many improved in early childhood. PACS2 is an important PACS1 paralog and encodes a multifunctional sorting protein involved in nuclear gene expression and pathway traffic regulation. Both proteins harbor cargo(furin)-binding regions (FBRs) that bind cargo proteins, sorting adaptors, and cellular kinase. Compared to the defined PACS1 recurrent variant series, individuals with PACS2 variant have more consistently neonatal/early-infantile-onset epilepsy that can be challenging to control. Cerebellar abnormalities may be similar but PACS2 individuals exhibit a pattern of clear dysgenesis ranging from mild to severe. Functional studies demonstrated that the PACS2 recurrent variant reduces the ability of the predicted autoregulatory domain to modulate the interaction between the PACS2 FBR and client proteins, which may disturb cellular function. These findings support the causality of this recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense in DEEs with facial dysmorphim and cerebellar dysgenesis. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  5. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  6. Disease: H00860 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ory problems. Features supporting this diagnosis include normal general examination with no dysmorphic featu...ive skills, absence of other significant neurologic disturbances, and, with the exception of chorea, normal neurologic examination

  7. Contiguous gene deletion of ELOVL7, ERCC8 and NDUFAF2 in a patient with a fatal multisystem disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Rolf J R J; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeets, Roel

    2009-01-01

    Contiguous gene syndromes affecting the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system have been rarely reported. Here, we describe a patient with apparent mitochondrial encephalomyopathy accompanied by several unusual features, including dysmorphism and hepatopathy, caused by a homozygous triple...

  8. Patienter med basalcellenævussyndrom bør tilbydes tidlig interdisciplinær opfølgning og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christiane; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Jelsig, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    cerebri. Other important clinical features are skeletal abnormalities and facial dysmorphism including macrocephaly. Germ-line mutations are found in PTCH1. Management of the syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach, and in this article management guidelines are reviewed and discussed....

  9. Social cognition and the behavioural phenotype of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Dijkman, M.W.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Koolen, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Recently, the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome was described with characteristic features including developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, and anomalies of the brain and multiple organ systems. With respect to behaviour, scarce data from clinical

  10. Search features of digital libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G. Smith

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional on-line search services such as Dialog, DataStar and Lexis provide a wide range of search features (boolean and proximity operators, truncation, etc. This paper discusses the use of these features for effective searching, and argues that these features are required, regardless of advances in search engine technology. The literature on on-line searching is reviewed, identifying features that searchers find desirable for effective searching. A selective survey of current digital libraries available on the Web was undertaken, identifying which search features are present. The survey indicates that current digital libraries do not implement a wide range of search features. For instance: under half of the examples included controlled vocabulary, under half had proximity searching, only one enabled browsing of term indexes, and none of the digital libraries enable searchers to refine an initial search. Suggestions are made for enhancing the search effectiveness of digital libraries, for instance by: providing a full range of search operators, enabling browsing of search terms, enhancement of records with controlled vocabulary, enabling the refining of initial searches, etc.

  11. Cognitive-behavioral features of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and other subtelomeric microdeletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Gene S; Grossfeld, Paul; Falk, Rena; Battaglia, Agatino; Youngblom, Janey; Simensen, Richard

    2010-11-15

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a complex congenital malformation produced by a loss of genomic material at the locus 4p16.3. In addition to its dysmorphic features, the deletion produces a range of intellectual disability (ID). Many clinical aspects of WHS are well-characterized; however, the cognitive-behavioral characteristics have been rarely examined in a systematic fashion. The purpose of our study was to examine the cognitive-behavioral features of WHS and to compare them to children with other subtelomeric deletions that also produce ID. We recruited 45 children with subtelomeric deletions and examined their cognitive-behavioral abilities using a neuropsychological assessment battery composed of standardized instruments. Nineteen children were diagnosed with WHS and 26 children with one of three other subtelomeric deletions-11q25 (Jacobsen syndrome), deletion 2q37, and inversion duplication deletion 8p21-23. We found children with WHS to be more severely impacted cognitively than children from any of the other groups. Their overall adaptive behavior was lower as well. However, children with WHS exhibit strengths in socialization skills comparable to the levels attained by the other groups we assessed. Importantly, the proportion of children with WHS with autism or autistic-like features is significantly lower than the rates of autism found in the other subtelomeric disorders we examined. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Sensorineural deafness, distinctive facial features, and abnormal cranial bones: a new variant of Waardenburg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H

    2008-07-15

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair, and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Impact of geometry and viewing angle on classification accuracy of 2D based analysis of dysmorphic faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmar, Tobias; Maus, Baerbel; Wurtz, Rolf P; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Boehringer, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Digital image analysis of faces has been demonstrated to be effective in a small number of syndromes. In this paper we investigate several aspects that help bringing these methods closer to clinical application. First, we investigate the impact of increasing the number of syndromes from 10 to 14 as compared to an earlier study. Second, we include a side-view pose into the analysis and third, we scrutinize the effect of geometry information. Picture analysis uses a Gabor wavelet transform, standardization of landmark coordinates and subsequent statistical analysis. We can demonstrate that classification accuracy drops from 76% for 10 syndromes to 70% for 14 syndromes for frontal images. Including side-views achieves an accuracy of 76% again. Geometry performs excellently with 85% for combined poses. Combination of wavelets and geometry for both poses increases accuracy to 93%. In conclusion, a larger number of syndromes can be handled effectively by means of image analysis.

  14. Volcanic features of Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The volcanic features of Io as detected during the Voyager mission are discussed. The volcanic activity is apparently higher than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms are compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. (U.K.)

  15. Patch layout generation by detecting feature networks

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Yuanhao

    2015-02-01

    The patch layout of 3D surfaces reveals the high-level geometric and topological structures. In this paper, we study the patch layout computation by detecting and enclosing feature loops on surfaces. We present a hybrid framework which combines several key ingredients, including feature detection, feature filtering, feature curve extension, patch subdivision and boundary smoothing. Our framework is able to compute patch layouts through concave features as previous approaches, but also able to generate nice layouts through smoothing regions. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework by comparing with the state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with glomeruloid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, A; Lopez-Beltran, A; Egan, A J; Bostwick, D G

    1998-05-01

    A wide variety of architectural patterns of adenocarcinoma may be seen in the prostate. We have recently encountered a hitherto-undescribed pattern of growth characterized by intraluminal ball-like clusters of cancer cells reminiscent of renal glomeruli, which we refer to as prostatic adenocarcinoma with glomeruloid features. To define the architectural features, frequency, and distribution of prostatic adenocarcinoma with glomeruloid features, we reviewed 202 totally embedded radical prostatectomy specimens obtained between October 1992 and April 1994 from the files of the Mayo Clinic. This series was supplemented by 100 consecutive needle biopsies with prostatic cancer from January to February 1996. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with glomeruloid features was characterized by round to oval epithelial tufts growing within malignant acini, often supported by a fibrovascular core. The epithelial cells were sometimes arranged in semicircular concentric rows separated by clefted spaces. In the radical prostatectomy specimens, nine cases (4.5%) had glomeruloid features. The glomeruloid pattern constituted 5% to 20% of each cancer (mean, 8.33%) and was usually located at the apex or in the peripheral zone of the prostate. Seven cases were associated with a high Gleason score (7 or 8), one with a score of 6, and one with a score of 5. All cases were associated with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and extensive perineural invasion. Pathological stages included T2c (three cases), T3b (four cases), and T3c (two cases); one of the T3b cases had lymph node metastases (N1). Three (3%) of 100 consecutive routine needle biopsy specimens with cancer showed glomeruloid features, and this pattern constituted 5% to 10% of each cancer (mean, 6.7%). The Gleason score was 6 for two cases and 8 for one case. Two cases were associated with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and one case had perineural invasion. Glomeruloid features were not observed in any benign or

  17. Stormwater Infrastructure and other features - Point Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data was collected and compiled for various towns in watersheds (currently including the Missisquoi Basin, Winooski Basin, Connecticut River Basin, Lamoille...

  18. Stormwater Infrastructure and other features - Area Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data was collected and compiled for various towns in watersheds (currently including the Missisquoi Basin, Winooski Basin, Connecticut River Basin, Lamoille...

  19. Stormwater Infrastructure and other features - Linear Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data was collected and compiled for various towns in watersheds (currently including the Missisquoi Basin, Winooski Basin, Connecticut River Basin, Lamoille...

  20. Principal Feature Analysis: A Multivariate Feature Selection Method for fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain decoding with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI requires analysis of complex, multivariate data. Multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA has been widely used in recent years. MVPA treats the activation of multiple voxels from fMRI data as a pattern and decodes brain states using pattern classification methods. Feature selection is a critical procedure of MVPA because it decides which features will be included in the classification analysis of fMRI data, thereby improving the performance of the classifier. Features can be selected by limiting the analysis to specific anatomical regions or by computing univariate (voxel-wise or multivariate statistics. However, these methods either discard some informative features or select features with redundant information. This paper introduces the principal feature analysis as a novel multivariate feature selection method for fMRI data processing. This multivariate approach aims to remove features with redundant information, thereby selecting fewer features, while retaining the most information.

  1. Abdominal cocoon: sonographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy; Sendhilkumar, Karuppusamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    An abdominal cocoon is a rare condition in which the small bowel is encased in a membrane. The diagnosis is usually established at surgery. Here we describe the sonographic features of this condition.

  2. Mesoblastic nephroma: Pathological features

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N.M. El-Badawy

    determined mainly by its histologic type, we found it worthwhile to elaborate more on the gross and microscopic features of ... behavior of mesoblastic nephroma is determined mainly by its his- .... However, it exhibits a nodular growth pattern at.

  3. Slim Battery Modelling Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthomieu, Y.; Prevot, D.

    2011-10-01

    Saft has developed a life prediction model for VES and MPS cells and batteries. The Saft Li-ion Model (SLIM) is a macroscopic electrochemical model based on energy (global at cell level). The main purpose is to predict the battery performances during the life for GEO, MEO and LEO missions. This model is based on electrochemical characteristics such as Energy, Capacity, EMF, Internal resistance, end of charge voltage. It uses fading and calendar law effects on energy and internal impedance vs. time, temperature, End of Charge voltage. Based on the mission profile, satellite power system characteristics, the model proposes the various battery configurations. For each configuration, the model gives the battery performances using mission figures and profiles: power, duration, DOD, end of charge voltages, temperatures during eclipses and solstices, thermal dissipations and cell failures. For the GEO/MEO missions, eclipse and solstice periods can include specific profile such as plasmic propulsion fires and specific balancing operations. For LEO missions, the model is able to simulate high power peaks to predict radar pulses. Saft's main customers have been using the SLIM model available in house for two years. The purpose is to have the satellite builder power engineers able to perform by themselves in the battery pre-dimensioning activities their own battery simulations. The simulations can be shared with Saft engineers to refine the power system designs. This model has been correlated with existing life and calendar tests performed on all the VES and MPS cells. In comparing with more than 10 year lasting life tests, the accuracy of the model from a voltage point of view is less than 10 mV at end Of Life. In addition, thethe comparison with in-orbit data has been also done. b This paper will present the main features of the SLIM software and outputs comparison with real life tests. b0

  4. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  5. Mining Videos for Features that Drive Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    that can be added or removed from the final saliency computation. Examples of these features include intensity contrast, motion energy , color opponent...corresponding to the image. Each pixel in the feature map indicates the energy that the feature in question contributes at that location. In the standard...eye and head animation using a neurobio - logical model of visual attention. In: Bosacchi B, Fogel DB, Bezdek JC (eds) Proceedings of SPIE 48th annual

  6. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffland, Douglas R [Livermore, CA

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  7. Less common CT features of medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, C.S; Segall, H.D.; Miller, C.; Ahmad, J.; McComb, J.G.; Han, J.S.; Park, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    While many medulloblastomas have characteristic features on computed tomography (CT), a significant number have atypical features, including a cystic or necrotic component, calcification, hemorrhage, lack of contrast enhancement, and eccentric location, and/or direct supratentorial extension. Of 30 consecutive untreated cases reviewed by the authors, 14 (47%) had such findings. Failure to make the proper diagnosis will result in some cases if these features are not recognized as possible signs of medulloblastoma

  8. Human Gait Feature Extraction Including a Kinematic Analysis toward Robotic Power Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario I. Chacon-Murguia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes a method for human gait and kinematic analysis. Gait analysis consists of the determination of hip, knee and ankle positions through video analysis. Gait kinematic for the thigh and knee is then generated from this data. Evaluations of the gait analysis method indicate an acceptable performance of 86.66% for hip and knee position estimation, and comparable findings with other reported works for gait kinematic. A coordinate systems assignment is performed according to the DH algorithm and a direct kinematic model of the legs is obtained. The legs' angles obtained from the video analysis are applied to the kinematic model in order to revise the application of this model to robotic legs in a power assisted system.

  9. Annexes to the lecture on reactor protection system including engineered features actuation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmaers, W.

    1982-01-01

    The present paper deals with the fundamentals for a reactor protection system and discusses the following topics: - System lay-out - Analog measured data acquisition - Analog measured data processing - Limit value generation and logical gating - Procesing of the reactor protection actuation signals - Decoupling of the reactor protection system - Mechanical lay-out - Monitoring system and - Emergency control station. (orig./RW)

  10. Psychological Factors Including Demographic Features, Mental Illnesses, and Personality Disorders as Predictors in Internet Addiction Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Problematic internet use is an important social problem among adolescents and has become a global health issue. This study identified predictors and patterns of problematic internet use among adult students.Method: In this study, 400 students were recruited using stratified sampling technique. Participants were selected among students from 4 universities in Tehran and Karaj, Iran, during 2016 and 2017. Internet Addiction Test (IAT, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - Third Edition (MCMI-III, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID-I, and semi-structured interview were used to diagnose internet addiction. Then, the association between main psychiatric disorders and internet addiction was surveyed. Data were analyzed using SPSS18 software by performing descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis methods. P- Values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: After controlling the demographic variables, it was found that narcissistic personality disorder, obsessive- compulsive personality disorder, anxiety, bipolar disorders, depression, and phobia could increase the odds ratio (OR of internet addiction by 2.1, 1.1, 2.6, 1.1, 2.2 and 2.5-folds, respectively (p-value<0.05, however, other psychiatric or personality disorders did not have a significant effect on the equation.Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that some mental disorders affect internet addiction. Considering the sensitivity and importance of the cyberspace, it is necessary to evaluate mental disorders that correlate with internet addiction.

  11. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  12. Personality Features of Motorists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Justinek

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Justinek tries to answer the question whether or not motorists have specific personality features which predispose them for safe and well-mannered driving. A good driver should have sensory abilities which enable psycho-motor coordiation of a vehicle, intellectual and cognitive features that are important for solving problems in new, unknown situations, and emotional and motivational trails defining a driver's maturity. Justmek advocates the belief that in training future drivers greater attention should be paid to developing these features which are vital for safe driving and appropriate behaviour of drivers in traffic. He also suggests certain learning methods leading to development of the above­ mentioned personality traits. Justinek introduces the notion of the 'philosophy of driving' as an essential educational category in training future drivers.

  13. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  14. A novel malformation complex of bilateral and symmetric preaxial radial ray-thumb aplasia and lower limb defects with minimal facial dysmorphic features: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Krebs, Alexander; Grill, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Radial hemimelia is a congenital abnormality characterised by the partial or complete absence of the radius. The longitudinal hemimelia indicates the absence of one or more bones along the preaxial (medial) or postaxial (lateral) side of the limb. Preaxial limb defects occurred more frequently with a combination of microtia, esophageal atresia, anorectal atresia, heart defects, unilateral kidney dysgenesis, and some axial skeletal defects. Postaxial acrofacial dysostoses are char...

  15. Vehicle barriers: emphasis on natural features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, K.G.; Roscoe, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    The recent increase in the use of car and truck bombs by terrorist organizations has led NRC to evaluate the adequacy of licensee security against such threats. As part of this evaluation, one of the factors is the effectiveness of terrain and vegetation in providing barriers against the vehicle entry. The effectiveness of natural features is presented in two contexts. First, certain natural features are presented. Second, the effectiveness of combinations of features is presented. In addition to the discussion of natural features, this report provides a discussion of methods to slow vehicles. Also included is an overview of man-made barrier systems, with particular attention to ditches. 17 refs., 49 figs

  16. Engineering features of ISX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lousteau, D.C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Schaffer, M.J.; Hussung, R.O.

    1975-01-01

    ISX, an Impurity Study Experiment, is presently being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a joint scientific effort between ORNL and General Atomic Company. ISX is a moderate size tokamak dedicated to the study of impurity production, diffusion, and control. The significant engineering features of this device are discussed

  17. Text feature extraction based on deep learning: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Sun, Xiao; Sun, Yunlei; Gao, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Selection of text feature item is a basic and important matter for text mining and information retrieval. Traditional methods of feature extraction require handcrafted features. To hand-design, an effective feature is a lengthy process, but aiming at new applications, deep learning enables to acquire new effective feature representation from training data. As a new feature extraction method, deep learning has made achievements in text mining. The major difference between deep learning and conventional methods is that deep learning automatically learns features from big data, instead of adopting handcrafted features, which mainly depends on priori knowledge of designers and is highly impossible to take the advantage of big data. Deep learning can automatically learn feature representation from big data, including millions of parameters. This thesis outlines the common methods used in text feature extraction first, and then expands frequently used deep learning methods in text feature extraction and its applications, and forecasts the application of deep learning in feature extraction.

  18. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area......The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of the test sample by movement of the probe relative to the surface of the test sample into the specific orientation.; The probe may further comprise a contact detector (14) extending from the supporting body arranged so as to contact the surface of the test sample prior to any one of the plurality...

  19. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  20. Loss of function mutation in LARP7, chaperone of 7SK ncRNA, causes a syndrome of facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Owain, Mohammad; Alzahrani, Fatema; Shuaib, Taghreed; Al-Shamrani, Hussain; Al-Falki, Yahya H; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Alsheddi, Tarfa; Colak, Dilek; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-10-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition. Various molecular mechanisms are known to underlie the disease including impaired mitotic mechanics, abnormal IGF2 expression, perturbed DNA damage response, defective spliceosomal machinery, and abnormal replication licensing. Here, we describe a syndromic form of PD associated with severe intellectual disability and distinct facial features in a large multiplex Saudi family. Analysis reveals a novel underlying mechanism for PD involving depletion of 7SK, an abundant cellular noncoding RNA (ncRNA), due to mutation of its chaperone LARP7. We show that 7SK levels are tightly linked to LARP7 expression across cell lines, and that this chaperone is ubiquitously expressed in the mouse embryo. The 7SK is known to influence the expression of a wide array of genes through its inhibitory effect on the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) as well as its competing role in HMGA1-mediated transcriptional regulation. This study documents a critical role played by ncRNA in human development and adds to the growing list of molecular mechanisms that, when perturbed, converge on the PD phenotype. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Model Checking Feature Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Olsen, Petur; Pedersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an offline approach to analyzing feature interactions in embedded systems. The approach consists of a systematic process to gather the necessary information about system components and their models. The model is first specified in terms of predicates, before being refined to t...... to timed automata. The consistency of the model is verified at different development stages, and the correct linkage between the predicates and their semantic model is checked. The approach is illustrated on a use case from home automation....

  2. Sexual dimorphism in medulloblastoma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, Gian Franco; Ciucci, Alessandra; Marucci, Gianluca; Travaglia, Daniele; Stigliano, Egidio; Foschini, Maria Pia; Scambia, Giovanni; Gallo, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Male sex is a risk factor for medulloblastoma (MB), and is also a negative predictor for clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to assess sex differences in tumour biological features and hormone receptor profiles in a cohort of MB patients. Sixty-four MBs and five normal cerebella were included in the study. Cell proliferation (Ki67), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) and microvessel density (CD31) were evaluated in tumours by immunohistochemistry. Tissues were analysed for oestrogen receptor (ER)α, ERβ1, ERβ2, ERβ5 and androgen receptor (AR) expression. The results demonstrated sex-specific features in MBs, with tumours from females showing a higher apoptosis/proliferation ratio and less tumour vascularization than tumours from males. MBs were negative for ERα and AR, but expressed ERβ isoforms at similar levels between the sexes. Altogether, these findings indicate that signalling mechanisms that control cell turnover and angiogenesis operate more efficiently in females than in males. The lack of sex differences in the hormone receptor profiles suggests that circulating oestrogens could be the major determinants of the sexual dimorphism observed in MB features. Here, we provide molecular support for epidemiological data showing sex differences in MB incidence and outcome, completely defining the hormone receptor profile of the tumours. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Ontology patterns for complex topographic feature yypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanka, Dalia E.

    2011-01-01

    Complex feature types are defined as integrated relations between basic features for a shared meaning or concept. The shared semantic concept is difficult to define in commonly used geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies. The role of spatial relations between complex feature parts was recognized in early GIS literature, but had limited representation in the feature or coverage data models of GIS. Spatial relations are more explicitly specified in semantic technology. In this paper, semantics for topographic feature ontology design patterns (ODP) are developed as data models for the representation of complex features. In the context of topographic processes, component assemblages are supported by resource systems and are found on local landscapes. The topographic ontology is organized across six thematic modules that can account for basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Types of complex feature attributes include location, generative processes and physical description. Node/edge networks model standard spatial relations and relations specific to topographic science to represent complex features. To demonstrate these concepts, data from The National Map of the U. S. Geological Survey was converted and assembled into ODP.

  4. Cherubism: Clinicoradiographic Features and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Guimarães Cabral

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cherubism is a congenital childhood disease of autosomal dominant inheritance. This disease is characterized by painless bilateral enlargement of the jaws, in which bone is replaced with fibrous tissue. The condition has sui generis clinical, radiographic and histological features, of which the clinician should be aware for a better differential diagnosis in the presence of a fibro-osseous lesion affecting the bones of the maxillomandibular complex. The purpose of present paper was to review the literature and to report the most important aspects of cherubism in order to facilitate the study of this disease.Material and Methods: Literature was reviewed about cherubism, emphasizing the relevant clinicoradiographic features and treatment. Literature was selected through a search of PubMed and Scielo electronic databases. The keywords used for search were adolescent, cherubism, cherubism/physiopathology, cherubism/treatment, cherubism/radiography. A manual search of the reference lists of the identified articles and the authors’ article files and recent reviews was conducted to identify additional publications. Those studies that described new features about cherubism were included in this review.Results: In total 44 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Studies that described new features about cherubism physiopathology, diagnostics and treatment were reviewed.Conclusions: Despite the exceptions, cherubism is a clinically well-characterized disease. In cases of a suspicion of cherubism, radiographic examination is essential since the clinical presentation, the location and distribution of the lesions may define the diagnosis. Histopathological examination is complementary. Nowadays, genetic tests should be used for final diagnosis of cherubism.

  5. Features of MCNP6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goorley, T.; James, M.; Booth, T.; Brown, F.; Bull, J.; Cox, L.J.; Durkee, J.; Elson, J.; Fensin, M.; Forster, R.A.; Hendricks, J.; Hughes, H.G.; Johns, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Martz, R.; Mashnik, S.; McKinney, G.; Pelowitz, D.; Prael, R.; Sweezy, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. • MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. • These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Radiation Transport Modeling Team (NEN-5) respectively, have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. • While maintenance and major bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 1.60 and MCNPX 2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities only will be developed and released in MCNP6. • In fact, the initial release of MCNP6 contains numerous new features not previously found in either code. • These new features are summarized in this document. • Packaged with MCNP6 is also the new production release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data files usable by MCNP. • The high quality of the overall merged code, usefulness of these new features, along with the desire in the user community to start using the merged code, have led us to make the first MCNP6 production release: MCNP6 version 1. • High confidence in the MCNP6 code is based on its performance with the verification and validation test suites, comparisons to its predecessor codes, our automated nightly software debugger tests, the underlying high quality nuclear and atomic databases, and significant testing by many beta testers. - Abstract: MCNP6 can be described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and

  6. Pulmonary vasculitis: imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Joon Beom; Im, Jung Gi; Chung, Jin Wook; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jae Hyung; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Song, Jae Woo

    1999-01-01

    Vasculitis is defined as an inflammatory process involving blood vessels, and can lead to destruction of the vascular wall and ischemic damage to the organs supplied by these vessels. The lung is commonly affected. A number of attempts have been made to classify and organize pulmonary vasculitis, but because the clinical manifestations and pathologic features of the condition overlap considerably, these afforts have failed to achieve a consensus. We classified pulmonary vasculitis as belonging to either the angitiis-granulomatosis group, the diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage with capillaritis group, or 'other'. Characteristic radiographic and CT findings of the different types of pulmonary vasculitis are illustrated, with a brief discussion of the respective disease entities

  7. Onychomatricoma with misleading features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, J; Baran, R; Perrin, C; Labrousse, F

    2000-01-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare tumour of the nail matrix with peculiar clinical and histological features and electron microscopic findings. We report on 5 cases with appearances which were misleading. Three presented as longitudinal melanonychia, a previously unreported observation. One case had the appearance of a cutaneous horn. In 3 of the 5 cases the tumour was associated with an onychomycosis and this may thus have been a predisposing factor in the secondary fungal infestation. Onychomatricoma appears as a multi-faceted tumour which can be mimicked by longitudinal melanonychia and/or onychomycosis.

  8. Mutations in a novel gene, NHS, cause the pleiotropic effects of Nance-Horan syndrome, including severe congenital cataract, dental anomalies, and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, Kathryn P; McKay, James D; Sale, Michèle M; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M; Mackey, David A; Wirth, M Gabriela; Elder, James E; Nicoll, Alan; Clarke, Michael P; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Stankovich, James M; Shaw, Marie A; Sharma, Shiwani; Gajovic, Srecko; Gruss, Peter; Ross, Shelley; Thomas, Paul; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim; Gécz, Jozef; Craig, Jamie E

    2003-11-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features, and, in some cases, mental retardation. NHS has been mapped to a 1.3-Mb interval on Xp22.13. We have confirmed the same localization in the original, extended Australian family with NHS and have identified protein-truncating mutations in a novel gene, which we have called "NHS," in five families. The NHS gene encompasses approximately 650 kb of genomic DNA, coding for a 1,630-amino acid putative nuclear protein. NHS orthologs were found in other vertebrates, but no sequence similarity to known genes was identified. The murine developmental expression profile of the NHS gene was studied using in situ hybridization and a mouse line containing a lacZ reporter-gene insertion in the Nhs locus. We found a complex pattern of temporally and spatially regulated expression, which, together with the pleiotropic features of NHS, suggests that this gene has key functions in the regulation of eye, tooth, brain, and craniofacial development.

  9. Multimodal Feature Learning for Video Captioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Video captioning refers to the task of generating a natural language sentence that explains the content of the input video clips. This study proposes a deep neural network model for effective video captioning. Apart from visual features, the proposed model learns additionally semantic features that describe the video content effectively. In our model, visual features of the input video are extracted using convolutional neural networks such as C3D and ResNet, while semantic features are obtained using recurrent neural networks such as LSTM. In addition, our model includes an attention-based caption generation network to generate the correct natural language captions based on the multimodal video feature sequences. Various experiments, conducted with the two large benchmark datasets, Microsoft Video Description (MSVD and Microsoft Research Video-to-Text (MSR-VTT, demonstrate the performance of the proposed model.

  10. MR features of ectopic pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Ken; Togashi, Kaori; Koyama, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP), in which a fertilized ovum implants outside the uterine cavity, is the leading cause of pregnancy-related death in the first trimester. EP is usually suspected by a positive pregnancy test and an empty uterus on transvaginal sonography (TVS). Although TVS is the initial modality of choice, it may occasionally fail to demonstrate the implantation site. When TVS findings are indeterminate, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide better delineation of the focus of EP owing to its excellent tissue contrast. The key MRI features of EP include gestational sac (GS)-like structures that typically appear as a cystic sac-like structure, frequently associated with surrounding acute hematoma of distinct low intensity on T2-weighted images. In tubal pregnancy, an enhanced tubal wall on postcontrast images may be another diagnostic finding. Ruptured EP is inevitably associated with acute hematoma outside these structures. In intrauterine EP, recognition of the relationship between GS-like structure and the myometrium can aid in differentiating from normal pregnancy. Diagnostic pitfalls include heterotopic pregnancy, decidual changes in endometrial cyst and theca lutein cysts mimicking GS-like structures. Knowledge of a spectrum of clinical and MRI features of EP is essential for establishing an accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate management. (orig.)

  11. Feature selection for splice site prediction: A new method using EDA-based feature ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzé Pierre

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of relevant biological features in large and complex datasets is an important step towards gaining insight in the processes underlying the data. Other advantages of feature selection include the ability of the classification system to attain good or even better solutions using a restricted subset of features, and a faster classification. Thus, robust methods for fast feature selection are of key importance in extracting knowledge from complex biological data. Results In this paper we present a novel method for feature subset selection applied to splice site prediction, based on estimation of distribution algorithms, a more general framework of genetic algorithms. From the estimated distribution of the algorithm, a feature ranking is derived. Afterwards this ranking is used to iteratively discard features. We apply this technique to the problem of splice site prediction, and show how it can be used to gain insight into the underlying biological process of splicing. Conclusion We show that this technique proves to be more robust than the traditional use of estimation of distribution algorithms for feature selection: instead of returning a single best subset of features (as they normally do this method provides a dynamical view of the feature selection process, like the traditional sequential wrapper methods. However, the method is faster than the traditional techniques, and scales better to datasets described by a large number of features.

  12. Simultaneous Channel and Feature Selection of Fused EEG Features Based on Sparse Group Lasso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction and classification of EEG signals are core parts of brain computer interfaces (BCIs. Due to the high dimension of the EEG feature vector, an effective feature selection algorithm has become an integral part of research studies. In this paper, we present a new method based on a wrapped Sparse Group Lasso for channel and feature selection of fused EEG signals. The high-dimensional fused features are firstly obtained, which include the power spectrum, time-domain statistics, AR model, and the wavelet coefficient features extracted from the preprocessed EEG signals. The wrapped channel and feature selection method is then applied, which uses the logistical regression model with Sparse Group Lasso penalized function. The model is fitted on the training data, and parameter estimation is obtained by modified blockwise coordinate descent and coordinate gradient descent method. The best parameters and feature subset are selected by using a 10-fold cross-validation. Finally, the test data is classified using the trained model. Compared with existing channel and feature selection methods, results show that the proposed method is more suitable, more stable, and faster for high-dimensional feature fusion. It can simultaneously achieve channel and feature selection with a lower error rate. The test accuracy on the data used from international BCI Competition IV reached 84.72%.

  13. MCNP4A: Features and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes MCNP, states its philosophy, introduces a number of new features becoming available with version MCNP4A, and answers a number of questions asked by participants in the workshop. MCNP is a general-purpose three-dimensional neutron, photon and electron transport code. Its philosophy is ''Quality, Value and New Features.'' Quality is exemplified by new software quality assurance practices and a program of benchmarking against experiments. Value includes a strong emphasis on documentation and code portability. New features are the third priority. MCNP4A is now available at Los Alamos. New features in MCNP4A include enhanced statistical analysis, distributed processor multitasking, new photon libraries, ENDF/B-VI capabilities, X-Windows graphics, dynamic memory allocation, expanded criticality output, periodic boundaries, plotting of particle tracks via SABRINA, and many other improvements. 23 refs

  14. Karst Feature Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Southeastern Minnesota is part of the Upper Mississippi Valley Karst (Hedges and Alexander, 1985) that includes southwestern Wisconsin and northeastern Iowa. Karst...

  15. Odontogenic keratocyst radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartey, N. O.; Saini, T.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical features often patients with odontogenic keratocysts were studied. One patient had Gorlin-GoJtz syndrome. A total of fourteen radiolucent lesions were observed on radiographic examination. All the fourteen lesions were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst after histopathclogical examination of biopsied tissue from the patients. The age at diagnosis ranged from 25-72 years with a mean age of 37.6 years. The male : female ratio was 2.3:1. Thirteen of these lesions occurred in the mandible, nine involved the mandibular third molar region. Involvement of the ramus of the mandible produced a sausage-shaped radiolucency. Cystic lesions which have been present for long periods of time showed scalloped margins, due to the regional resorption of the surrounding bone. The bony ledges present on the cortical bones simulated multilocular appearance in such cases. It was also observed that the lesions in older individuals perforated the cortical plates rather than eliciting a periostally induced bony expansion. (author)

  16. Proctographic features of anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, S; Bartram, C I; Park, H J; Kamm, M A

    1995-12-01

    To document the proctographic features of anismus at evacuation proctography and determine the optimum radiologic measurements for diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with anismus according to clinical and multiple physiologic criteria were examined with evacuation proctography. Structural and functional measurements were compared with those of a group of 20 asymptomatic subjects. No significant difference between patients and control subjects was found with respect to pelvic descent, rectocele, or any anorectal angle measurement. In patients with anismus, initiation of evacuation was prolonged (median, 9 vs 3 seconds for control subjects; P anismus should be abandoned. Patients with anismus demonstrate delayed initiation of evacuation, which is also prolonged and incomplete. Incomplete evacuation after 30 seconds is highly suggestive of anismus.

  17. Multispectral Image Feature Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhian Aguilera

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel feature point descriptor for the multispectral image case: Far-Infrared and Visible Spectrum images. It allows matching interest points on images of the same scene but acquired in different spectral bands. Initially, points of interest are detected on both images through a SIFT-like based scale space representation. Then, these points are characterized using an Edge Oriented Histogram (EOH descriptor. Finally, points of interest from multispectral images are matched by finding nearest couples using the information from the descriptor. The provided experimental results and comparisons with similar methods show both the validity of the proposed approach as well as the improvements it offers with respect to the current state-of-the-art.

  18. More features, greater connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Changes in our political infrastructure, the continuing frailties of our economy, and a stark growth in population, have greatly impacted upon the perceived stability of the NHS. Healthcare teams have had to adapt to these changes, and so too have the technologies upon which they rely to deliver first-class patient care. Here Sarah Hunt, marketing co-ordinator at Aid Call, assesses how the changing healthcare environment has affected one of its fundamental technologies - the nurse call system, argues the case for wireless such systems in terms of what the company claims is greater adaptability to changing needs, and considers the ever-wider range of features and functions available from today's nurse call equipment, particularly via connectivity with both mobile devices, and ancillaries ranging from enuresis sensors to staff attack alert 'badges'.

  19. European Nuclear Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Gonzalez, E.; Diaz Diaz, J.L.; Jimenez, J.L.; Velarde, G.; Navarro, J.M.; Hittner, D.; Dominguez, M.T.; Bollini, G.; Martin, A.; Suarez, J.; Traini, E.; Lang-Lenton, J.

    2004-01-01

    ''European Nuclear Features - ENF'' is a joint publication of the three specialized technical journals, Nuclear Espana (Spain), Revue General Nucleaire (France), and atw - International Journal of Nuclear Power (Germany). The ENF support the international Europeen exchange of information and news about energy and nuclear power. News items, comments, and scientific and technical contributions will cover important aspects of the field. The second issue of ENF contains contributions about theses topics, among others: Institutional and Political Changes in the EU. - CIEMAT Department of Nuclear Fission: A General Overview. - Inertial Fusion Energy at DENIM. - High Temperature Reactors. European Research Programme. - On Site Assistance to Khmelnitsky NPP 1 and 2 (Ukraine). - Dismantling and Decommissioning of Vandellos I. (orig.)

  20. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  1. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  2. CONTRASTIVE CULTURAL FEATURES IN FL TEACHING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FISCHER, MILLA

    CONTRASTIVE CULTURAL FEATURES SHOULD BE INCLUDED WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE GRAMMATICAL LESSON AS A MEANS OF COUNTERBALANCING THE GENERALLY UNSATISFACTORY MATERIAL USED FOR RUSSIAN TEXTS. LESSONS FOR AMERICAN STUDENTS LEARNING RUSSIAN SHOULD INCLUDE PHONOLOGICAL DRILLS ON VOWEL LENGTHS, DISTRIBUTION OF VOICED OBSTRUENTS, AND OBSTRUENT CLUSTERS,…

  3. A prototype feature system for feature retrieval using relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Usery, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    Using a feature data model, geographic phenomena can be represented effectively by integrating space, theme, and time. This paper extends and implements a feature data model that supports query and visualization of geographic features using their non-spatial and temporal relationships. A prototype feature-oriented geographic information system (FOGIS) is then developed and storage of features named Feature Database is designed. Buildings from the U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and subways in Chicago, Illinois are used to test the developed system. The results of the applications show the strength of the feature data model and the developed system 'FOGIS' when they utilize non-spatial and temporal relationships in order to retrieve and visualize individual features.

  4. Langevin simulations of QCD, including fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    We encounter critical slow down in updating when xi/a -> infinite and in matrix inversion (needed to include fermions) when msub(q)a -> 0. A simulation that purports to solve QCD numerically will encounter these limits, so to face the challenge in the title of this workshop, we must cure the disease of critical slow down. Physically, this critical slow down is due to the reluctance of changes at short distances to propagate to large distances. Numerically, the stability of an algorithm at short wavelengths requires a (moderately) small step size; critical slow down occurs when the effective long wavelength step size becomes tiny. The remedy for this disease is an algorithm that propagates signals quickly throughout the system; i.e. one whose effective step size is not reduced for the long wavelength conponents of the fields. (Here the effective ''step size'' is essentially an inverse decorrelation time.) To do so one must resolve various wavelengths of the system and modify the dynamics (in CPU time) of the simulation so that all modes evolve at roughly the same rate. This can be achieved by introducing Fourier transforms. I show how to implement Fourier acceleration for Langevin updating and for conjugate gradient matrix inversion. The crucial feature of these algorithms that lends them to Fourier acceleration is that they update the lattice globally; hence the Fourier transforms are computed once per sweep rather than once per hit. (orig./HSI)

  5. Acromegaly: clinical features at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Lucio; Vilar, Clarice Freitas; Lyra, Ruy; Lyra, Raissa; Naves, Luciana A

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a rare and underdiagnosed disorder caused, in more than 95% of cases, by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. The GH hypersecretion leads to overproduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) which results in a multisystem disease characterized by somatic overgrowth, multiple comorbidities, physical disfigurement, and increased mortality. This article aims to review the clinical features of acromegaly at diagnosis. Acromegaly affects both males and females equally and the average age at diagnosis ranges from 40 to 50 years (up to 5% of cases acromegaly is often diagnosed five to more than ten years after its onset. The typical coarsening of facial features include furrowing of fronthead, pronounced brow protrusion, enlargement of the nose and the ears, thickening of the lips, skin wrinkles and nasolabial folds, as well as mandibular prognathism that leads to dental malocclusion and increased interdental spacing. Excessive growth of hands and feet (predominantly due to soft tissue swelling) is present in the vast majority of acromegalic patients. Gigantism accounts for up to 5% of cases and occurs when the excess of GH becomes manifest in the young, before the epiphyseal fusion. The disease also has rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neoplastic, neurological, and metabolic manifestations which negatively impact its prognosis and patients quality of life. Less than 15% of acromegalic patients actively seek medical attention for change in appearance or enlargement of the extremities. The presentation of acromegaly is more often related to its systemic comorbidities or to local tumor effects.

  6. Use of Dysmorphology for Subgroup Classification on Autism Spectrum Disorder in Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Virginia C. N.; Fung, Cecilia K. Y.; Wong, Polly T. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Data from 1,261 Chinese Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) patients were evaluated and categorized into dysmorphic (10.79%) and non-dysmorphic groups (89.21%) upon physical examination by the presence of dysmorphic features. Abnormal MRI/CT result, IQ scores and epilepsy were significantly associated with the dysmorphic group of ASD children.…

  7. Rhabdomyolysis featuring muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoria, Rajat; Milone, Margherita

    2016-02-15

    Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life threatening condition of various etiology. The association between rhabdomyolysis and muscular dystrophies is under-recognized in clinical practice. To identify muscular dystrophies presenting with rhabdomyolysis at onset or as predominant feature. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of patients with a genetically confirmed muscular dystrophy in whom rhabdomyolysis was the presenting or main clinical manifestation. Thirteen unrelated patients (males=6; females=7) were identified. Median age at time of rhabdomyolysis was 18 years (range, 2-47) and median duration between the first episode of rhabdomyolysis and molecular diagnosis was 2 years. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) muscular dystrophy (n=6) was the most common diagnosis, followed by anoctaminopathy-5 (n=3), calpainopathy-3 (n=2) and dystrophinopathy (n=2). Four patients experienced recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Eight patients were asymptomatic and 3 reported myalgia and exercise intolerance prior to the rhabdomyolysis. Exercise (n=6) and fever (n=4) were common triggers; rhabdomyolysis was unprovoked in 3 patients. Twelve patients required hospitalization. Baseline CK levels were elevated in all patients (median 1200 IU/L; range, 600-3600). Muscular dystrophies can present with rhabdomyolysis; FKRP mutations are particularly frequent in causing such complication. A persistently elevated CK level in patients with rhabdomyolysis warrants consideration for underlying muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Localized scleroderma: imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Uziel, Y.; Chuang, S.; Silverman, E.; Krafchik, B.; Laxer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is distinct from the diffuse form of scleroderma and does not show Raynaud's phenomenon and visceral involvement. The imaging features in 23 patients ranging from 2 to 17 years of age (mean 11.1 years) were reviewed. Leg length discrepancy and muscle atrophy were the most common findings (five patients), with two patients also showing modelling deformity of the fibula. One patient with lower extremity involvement showed abnormal bone marrow signals on MR. Disabling joint contracture requiring orthopedic intervention was noted in one patient. In two patients with ''en coup de sabre'' facial deformity, CT and MR scans revealed intracranial calcifications and white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral frontal lobes, with one also showing migrational abnormality. In a third patient, CT revealed white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral parietal lobe. In one patient with progressive facial hemiatrophy, CT and MR scans showed the underlying hypoplastic left maxillary antrum and cheek. Imaging studies of areas of clinical concern revealed positive findings in half our patients. (orig.)

  9. Localized scleroderma: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Uziel, Y. (Div. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Chuang, S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Silverman, E. (Div. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Krafchik, B. (Div. of Dermatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)); Laxer, R. (Div. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1994-06-01

    Localized scleroderma is distinct from the diffuse form of scleroderma and does not show Raynaud's phenomenon and visceral involvement. The imaging features in 23 patients ranging from 2 to 17 years of age (mean 11.1 years) were reviewed. Leg length discrepancy and muscle atrophy were the most common findings (five patients), with two patients also showing modelling deformity of the fibula. One patient with lower extremity involvement showed abnormal bone marrow signals on MR. Disabling joint contracture requiring orthopedic intervention was noted in one patient. In two patients with ''en coup de sabre'' facial deformity, CT and MR scans revealed intracranial calcifications and white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral frontal lobes, with one also showing migrational abnormality. In a third patient, CT revealed white matter abnormality in the ipsilateral parietal lobe. In one patient with progressive facial hemiatrophy, CT and MR scans showed the underlying hypoplastic left maxillary antrum and cheek. Imaging studies of areas of clinical concern revealed positive findings in half our patients. (orig.)

  10. Currency features for visually impaired people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Sandra L.; Legge, Gordon E.; Shannon, Robert R.; Baer, Norbert S.

    1996-03-01

    The estimated 3.7 million Americans with low vision experience a uniquely difficult task in identifying the denominations of U.S. banknotes because the notes are remarkably uniform in size, color, and general design. The National Research Council's Committee on Currency Features Usable by the Visually Impaired assessed features that could be used by people who are visually disabled to distinguish currency from other documents and to denominate and authenticate banknotes using available technology. Variation of length and height, introduction of large numerals on a uniform, high-contrast background, use of different colors for each of the six denominations printed, and the introduction of overt denomination codes that could lead to development of effective, low-cost devices for examining banknotes were all deemed features available now. Issues affecting performance, including the science of visual and tactile perception, were addressed for these features, as well as for those features requiring additional research and development. In this group the committee included durable tactile features such as those printed with transparent ink, and the production of currency with holes to indicate denomination. Among long-range approaches considered were the development of technologically advanced devices and smart money.

  11. Psychopathological features in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, Francesca; Licchelli, Serena; Serra, Giulia; Piccini, Giorgia; Caciolo, Cristina; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Cirillo, Flavia; Leoni, Chiara; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Marco; Alfieri, Paolo; Vicari, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, skeletal and haematological/lymphatic defects, distinctive facies, cryptorchidism, and a wide spectrum of congenital heart defects. Recurrent features also include variable cognitive deficits and behavioural problems. Recent research has been focused on the assessment of prevalence, age of onset and characterization of psychiatric features in this disorder. Herein, we evaluated the prevalence of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depressive symptoms and syndromes in a cohort of individuals with clinical and molecular diagnosis of NS. The Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS PL) has been used for the assessment of psychiatric disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) have been assessed for the evaluation of anxiety and depressive symptoms and syndromes, whereas Conners Teacher and Parent Rating Scales-long version (CRS-R) have been used to evaluate ADHD. The study included 27 individuals (67% males) with an average age of 10.4 years (range 6-18 years) receiving molecular diagnosis of NS or a clinically related condition, evaluated and treated at the Neuropsychiatric Unit of Children's Hospital Bambino Gesù and at the Center for Rare Diseases of Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, in Rome. Twenty individuals showed mutations in PTPN11, five in SOS1 and two in SHOC2. The mean IQ was 94 (Standard Deviation = 17, min = 56, max = 130). Seventy percent of the individuals (n = 19; 95% Confidence Interval = 52-85%) showed ADHD features, with six individuals reaching DSM-IV-TR criteria for ADHD disorder, and thirteen showing subsyndromal traits. Symptoms or syndrome of anxiety were present in 37% of the cohort

  12. Shapes and features of the primordial bispectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Cheongam-ro 67, Pohang, 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Palma, Gonzalo A.; Sypsas, Spyros, E-mail: jinn-ouk.gong@apctp.org, E-mail: gpalmaquilod@ing.uchile.cl, E-mail: s.sypsas@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago, 837.0415 Chile (Chile)

    2017-05-01

    If time-dependent disruptions from slow-roll occur during inflation, the correlation functions of the primordial curvature perturbation should have scale-dependent features, a case which is marginally supported from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We offer a new approach to analyze the appearance of such features in the primordial bispectrum that yields new consistency relations and justifies the search of oscillating patterns modulated by orthogonal and local templates. Under the assumption of sharp features, we find that the cubic couplings of the curvature perturbation can be expressed in terms of the bispectrum in two specific momentum configurations, for example local and equilateral. This allows us to derive consistency relations among different bispectrum shapes, which in principle could be tested in future CMB surveys. Furthermore, based on the form of the consistency relations, we construct new two-parameter templates for features that include all the known shapes.

  13. CT features of renal epithelioid angiomyolipomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaoyun; Fang Xiangming; Hu Chunhong; Chen Hongwei; Cui Lei; Bao Jian; Yao Xuanjun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the CT and pathological features of renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma (EAML). Methods: Clinical data and CT images from ten cases with EAML proved by surgery and pathology were retrospectively analyzed. All cases were performed with plain and contrast enhanced CT scans. Results: CT features: higher pre-contrasted density than kidney, bulging from kidney, absent of fat, markedly heterogeneous enhancement (quick wash-in and slow wash-out), big size without lobular sign, complete capsule with clear margin and mild necrostic area. Pathological features: diffuse sheets of epithelioid cells were found under microscopy with immunohistochemistrical findings including positivity for HMB-45 and negativity for EMA. Conclusion: Some specific CT features, which is correlated well with the pathological findings, provide helpful information in the primary diagnosis of EAML. (authors)

  14. Present SLAC accelerator computer control system features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, V.; Johnson, R.

    1981-02-01

    The current functional organization and state of software development of the computer control system of the Stanford Linear Accelerator is described. Included is a discussion of the distribution of functions throughout the system, the local controller features, and currently implemented features of the touch panel portion of the system. The functional use of our triplex of PDP11-34 computers sharing common memory is described. Also included is a description of the use of pseudopanel tables as data tables for closed loop control functions

  15. Feature Inference Learning and Eyetracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Bob; Colner, Robert M.; Hoffman, Aaron B.

    2009-01-01

    Besides traditional supervised classification learning, people can learn categories by inferring the missing features of category members. It has been proposed that feature inference learning promotes learning a category's internal structure (e.g., its typical features and interfeature correlations) whereas classification promotes the learning of…

  16. Pharmacological features of osthole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jarząb

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Coumarins are a group of naturally occurring compounds common in the plant world. These substances and their derivatives exhibit a broad range of biological activities.One of the naturally occurring coumarins is osthole, which can most frequently be found in plants of the Apiaceae family. Cnidium monnieri (L. Cusson ex Juss. Angelica pubescens Maxim. and Peucedanum ostruthium (L.. It has anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-convulsant, and antiallergic properties; apart from that, inhibition of platelet aggregation has also been proved. The impact of osthole on bone metabolism has been demonstrated; also its hepatoprotective and neuroprotective properties have been confirmed. The inhibitory effect of this metokcompound on the development of neurodegenerative diseases has been proved in experimental models. Anticancer features of osthole have been also demonstrated both in vitro on different cell lines, and in vivo using animals xenografts. Osthole inhibited proliferation, motility and invasiveness of tumor cells, which may be associated with the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle slowdown. The exact molecular mechanism of osthole anti-cancer mode of action has not been fully elucidated. A synergistic effect of osthole with other anti-tumor substances has been also reported. Modification of its chemical structure led to the synthesis of many derivatives with significant anticancer effects.To sum up, osthole is an interesting therapeutic option, due to both its direct effect on tumor cells, as well as its neuroprotective or anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, there is a chance to use osthole or its synthetic derivatives in the treatment of cancer.

  17. 30 CFR 250.1007 - What to include in applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... features and other pertinent data including area, lease, and block designations; water depths; route...) submitted for a pipeline right-of-way shall bear a signed certificate upon its face by the engineer who made... additional design precautions you took to enable the pipeline to withstand the effects of water currents...

  18. DYNAMIC FEATURE SELECTION FOR WEB USER IDENTIFICATION ON LINGUISTIC AND STYLISTIC FEATURES OF ONLINE TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vorobeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with identification and authentication of web users participating in the Internet information processes (based on features of online texts.In digital forensics web user identification based on various linguistic features can be used to discover identity of individuals, criminals or terrorists using the Internet to commit cybercrimes. Internet could be used as a tool in different types of cybercrimes (fraud and identity theft, harassment and anonymous threats, terrorist or extremist statements, distribution of illegal content and information warfare. Linguistic identification of web users is a kind of biometric identification, it can be used to narrow down the suspects, identify a criminal and prosecute him. Feature set includes various linguistic and stylistic features extracted from online texts. We propose dynamic feature selection for each web user identification task. Selection is based on calculating Manhattan distance to k-nearest neighbors (Relief-f algorithm. This approach improves the identification accuracy and minimizes the number of features. Experiments were carried out on several datasets with different level of class imbalance. Experiment results showed that features relevance varies in different set of web users (probable authors of some text; features selection for each set of web users improves identification accuracy by 4% at the average that is approximately 1% higher than with the use of static set of features. The proposed approach is most effective for a small number of training samples (messages per user.

  19. Discrete Feature Model (DFM) User Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, Joel

    2008-06-01

    This manual describes the Discrete-Feature Model (DFM) software package for modelling groundwater flow and solute transport in networks of discrete features. A discrete-feature conceptual model represents fractures and other water-conducting features around a repository as discrete conductors surrounded by a rock matrix which is usually treated as impermeable. This approximation may be valid for crystalline rocks such as granite or basalt, which have very low permeability if macroscopic fractures are excluded. A discrete feature is any entity that can conduct water and permit solute transport through bedrock, and can be reasonably represented as a piecewise-planar conductor. Examples of such entities may include individual natural fractures (joints or faults), fracture zones, and disturbed-zone features around tunnels (e.g. blasting-induced fractures or stress-concentration induced 'onion skin' fractures around underground openings). In a more abstract sense, the effectively discontinuous nature of pathways through fractured crystalline bedrock may be idealized as discrete, equivalent transmissive features that reproduce large-scale observations, even if the details of connective paths (and unconnected domains) are not precisely known. A discrete-feature model explicitly represents the fundamentally discontinuous and irregularly connected nature of systems of such systems, by constraining flow and transport to occur only within such features and their intersections. Pathways for flow and solute transport in this conceptualization are a consequence not just of the boundary conditions and hydrologic properties (as with continuum models), but also the irregularity of connections between conductive/transmissive features. The DFM software package described here is an extensible code for investigating problems of flow and transport in geological (natural or human-altered) systems that can be characterized effectively in terms of discrete features. With this software, the

  20. Discrete Feature Model (DFM) User Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, Joel (Clearwater Hardrock Consulting, Corvallis, OR (United States))

    2008-06-15

    This manual describes the Discrete-Feature Model (DFM) software package for modelling groundwater flow and solute transport in networks of discrete features. A discrete-feature conceptual model represents fractures and other water-conducting features around a repository as discrete conductors surrounded by a rock matrix which is usually treated as impermeable. This approximation may be valid for crystalline rocks such as granite or basalt, which have very low permeability if macroscopic fractures are excluded. A discrete feature is any entity that can conduct water and permit solute transport through bedrock, and can be reasonably represented as a piecewise-planar conductor. Examples of such entities may include individual natural fractures (joints or faults), fracture zones, and disturbed-zone features around tunnels (e.g. blasting-induced fractures or stress-concentration induced 'onion skin' fractures around underground openings). In a more abstract sense, the effectively discontinuous nature of pathways through fractured crystalline bedrock may be idealized as discrete, equivalent transmissive features that reproduce large-scale observations, even if the details of connective paths (and unconnected domains) are not precisely known. A discrete-feature model explicitly represents the fundamentally discontinuous and irregularly connected nature of systems of such systems, by constraining flow and transport to occur only within such features and their intersections. Pathways for flow and solute transport in this conceptualization are a consequence not just of the boundary conditions and hydrologic properties (as with continuum models), but also the irregularity of connections between conductive/transmissive features. The DFM software package described here is an extensible code for investigating problems of flow and transport in geological (natural or human-altered) systems that can be characterized effectively in terms of discrete features. With this

  1. Venographic features of varicocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seoung Oh; Kim, Myung Joon; Ro, In Woo

    1987-01-01

    The results of a prospective study of 30 patients with scrotal varicocele on the left side during the past 12 months are presented. By means of preoperative venography of the renal, internal spermatic and common iliac veins, the etiologic identification is possible. Varicocele could be distinguished in which the cause arises in the internal spermatic vein and/or proximal nutcracker phenomenon (by compression of ISV between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery) and/or distal nutcracker phenomenon (by obstruction of common iliac vein). Use of preoperative venography is essential to establish the etiology and anatomy of the lesion and its proper selection of treatment methods including subsequent coil embolization

  2. Venographic features of varicocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seoung Oh; Kim, Myung Joon; Ro, In Woo [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-08-15

    The results of a prospective study of 30 patients with scrotal varicocele on the left side during the past 12 months are presented. By means of preoperative venography of the renal, internal spermatic and common iliac veins, the etiologic identification is possible. Varicocele could be distinguished in which the cause arises in the internal spermatic vein and/or proximal nutcracker phenomenon (by compression of ISV between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery) and/or distal nutcracker phenomenon (by obstruction of common iliac vein). Use of preoperative venography is essential to establish the etiology and anatomy of the lesion and its proper selection of treatment methods including subsequent coil embolization.

  3. Clinical features of paralytic strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Ling Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical features of paralytic strabismus and analyze its etiology.METHODS: Eighty-nine cases(97 eyeswere diagnosed with paralytic strabismus and recruited in this study in the Department of Ophthalmology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University between July 2008 and February 2013. The clinical data were recorded including the general and ophthalmic history, symptom, visual acuity, fundus, pupil, eyelid, visual field, eye movement, synoptophore, acting countervail head, ultrasound of eyeball and ocular muscle, color Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid artery, orbital computed tomography(CT, brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI, blood biochemistry and immunologic tests.RESULTS: The medical history disclosed that among these cases, hypertension in 36 cases, diabetic mellitus in 28 cases, hyperlipidemia in 19 cases, heart diseases in 17 cases, ischemic cerebrovascular disease in 12 cases and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. Symptoms included vertigo in 47 cases and binocular temporal amaurosis in 36 cases. The horizontal restriction was manifested in 38 cases 45 eyes, vertical restriction in 42 cases with 42 eyes, and horizontal-and-vertical restriction in 9 cases with 10 eyes. CONCLUSION: Brain vascular ischemic disease is one of the top reasons causing paralytic strabismus. Systemic disease history was found in a high proportion of the cases. It is of great essence to detect the life-threatening ischemia of vertebrobasilar artery system and take priority for treatment.

  4. Novel features of nuclear chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    I review a number of QCD topics where the nuclear environment provides new insights into fundamental aspects of the strong interactions. The topics include novel perspectives for nuclear physics, such as the hidden color of nuclear form factors, the relation of the nuclear force at short distances to quark interchange interactions, the effects of ''color transparency'' on the baryon-to-meson anomaly in hard heavy-ion collisions, flavor-dependent antishadowing, novel exotic multiquark states, the anomalous nuclear dependence of quarkonium hadroproduction, flavor-dependent antishadowing, and the breakdown of sum rules for nuclear structure functions. I also briefly discuss the insights into hadron physics and color confinement that one obtains from light-front holography, including supersymmetric features of the hadron spectrum. I also note that the virtual Compton amplitude on a proton (or nucleus) can be measured for two spacelike photons q{sup 2}{sub 1}, q{sup 2}{sub 2} < 0 using positronium-proton scattering [e{sup +}e{sup -}]p → e{sup +}e{sup -}p{sup '}. (orig.)

  5. AVNG authentication features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thron, Jonathan Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Greg [LLNL; Razinkov, Sergey [VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [VNIIEF

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement (called authentication). An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information. To achieve both goals, the IB allows only very limited, previously agreed-on information to be displayed to the monitoring party. In addition to this limited information from the potentially classified measurement, other measurements are performed and procedures are put in place for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations concerning that material. In this presentation, we will discuss the techniques used in the AVNG attribute measuring system to facilitate authentication of the verification measurements by the monitors. These techniques include measuring unclassified items while allowing more information to be displayed; having the monitor understand the system function, design, and implementation; and randomly selecting the order of measurements.

  6. Enhancing facial features by using clear facial features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofoo, Fanar Fareed Hanna

    2017-09-01

    The similarity of features between individuals of same ethnicity motivated the idea of this project. The idea of this project is to extract features of clear facial image and impose them on blurred facial image of same ethnic origin as an approach to enhance a blurred facial image. A database of clear images containing 30 individuals equally divided to five different ethnicities which were Arab, African, Chines, European and Indian. Software was built to perform pre-processing on images in order to align the features of clear and blurred images. And the idea was to extract features of clear facial image or template built from clear facial images using wavelet transformation to impose them on blurred image by using reverse wavelet. The results of this approach did not come well as all the features did not align together as in most cases the eyes were aligned but the nose or mouth were not aligned. Then we decided in the next approach to deal with features separately but in the result in some cases a blocky effect was present on features due to not having close matching features. In general the available small database did not help to achieve the goal results, because of the number of available individuals. The color information and features similarity could be more investigated to achieve better results by having larger database as well as improving the process of enhancement by the availability of closer matches in each ethnicity.

  7. The relationship between perceived social support and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms: the role of gender O efeito do gênero sobre a relação entre suporte social apreendido e gravidade dos sintomas do transtorno dismórfico corporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Marques

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Whether social support is associated with severity of body dysmorphic symptoms is unknown. To address this gap in the literature, the present study aims to examine the association between three domains of perceived social support (i.e., family, friends, and significant others and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. METHOD: Participants (N = 400 with symptoms consistent with diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder completed measures of symptomatology and social support via the internet. RESULTS: More perceived social support from friends and significant others was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms for males, and more perceived social support from family and friends was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms among females. Additionally, gender moderated the association between perceived social support from significant others and symptom severity, such that perceived social support from a significant other was significantly negatively associated with body dysmorphic symptom severity in males, but not females. CONCLUSION: The present study implicates social support as an important area of future body dysmorphic disorder research.OBJETIVO: Não há informação sobre o impacto do suporte social apreendido sobre a gravidade dos sintomas do transtorno dismórfico corporal. A fim de investigar essa relação, este estudo visa avaliar a associação entre três domínios do suporte social apreendido (familiares, amigos, e relacionamentos amorosos significativos e a gravidade dos sintomas do transtorno dismórfico corporal. MÉTODO: Os participantes (N = 400 com sintomas compatíveis com o diagnóstico de transtorno dismórfico corporal preencheram questionários sobre seus sintomas e suporte social via internet. RESULTADOS: Foi encontrada correlação inversa estatisticamente significativa entre a apreensão do suporte social por parte de amigos e relacionamentos amorosos e a

  8. The relationship between perceived social support and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms: the role of gender O efeito do gênero sobre a relação entre suporte social apreendido e gravidade dos sintomas do transtorno dismórfico corporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Marques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Whether social support is associated with severity of body dysmorphic symptoms is unknown. To address this gap in the literature, the present study aims to examine the association between three domains of perceived social support (i.e., family, friends, and significant others and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. METHOD: Participants (N = 400 with symptoms consistent with diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder completed measures of symptomatology and social support via the internet. RESULTS: More perceived social support from friends and significant others was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms for males, and more perceived social support from family and friends was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms among females. Additionally, gender moderated the association between perceived social support from significant others and symptom severity, such that perceived social support from a significant other was significantly negatively associated with body dysmorphic symptom severity in males, but not females. CONCLUSION: The present study implicates social support as an important area of future body dysmorphic disorder research.OBJETIVO: Não há informação sobre o impacto do suporte social apreendido sobre a gravidade dos sintomas do transtorno dismórfico corporal. A fim de investigar essa relação, este estudo visa avaliar a associação entre três domínios do suporte social apreendido (familiares, amigos, e relacionamentos amorosos significativos e a gravidade dos sintomas do transtorno dismórfico corporal. MÉTODO: Os participantes (N = 400 com sintomas compatíveis com o diagnóstico de transtorno dismórfico corporal preencheram questionários sobre seus sintomas e suporte social via internet. RESULTADOS: Foi encontrada correlação inversa estatisticamente significativa entre a apreensão do suporte social por parte de amigos e relacionamentos amorosos e a

  9. Clinical features of gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. De Angelis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperuricemia and the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU crystals in the joints and soft tissues, consisting of a self-limited acute phase characterized by recurrent attacks of synovitis and a chronic phase in which inflammatory and structural changes of the joints and periarticular tissues may lead to persistent symptoms. Acute gout is characterized by a sudden monoarthritis of rapid onset, with intense pain, mostly affecting the big toe (50% of initial attacks, the foot, ankle, midtarsal, knee, wrist, finger, and elbow. Acute flares also occur in periarticular structures, including bursae and tendons. The presence of characteristic MSU crystals in the joint fluid, appearing needle-like and showing strong negative birefringence by polarized microscopy, is pivotal to confirm the diagnosis of gout. The time interval separating the first attack from subsequent episodes of acute synovitis may be widely variable, ranging from a few days to several years. During the period between acute attacks the patient is asymptomatic even if MSU deposition may continue to increase silently. The factors that control the rate, location, and degree of ongoing deposition in gouty patients are not well defined. Chronic gout is the natural evolution of untreated hyperuricemia in patients with gouty attacks followed by pain-free intercritical periods. It is characterized by the deposition of solid MSU crystal aggregates in a variety of tissues including joints, bursae and tendons. Tophi can occur in a variety of locations including the helix of the ear, olecranon bursa, and over the interphalangeal joints. Their development is usually related with both the degree and the duration of hyperuricemia. About 20% of patients with gout have urinary tract stones and can develop an interstitial urate nephropathy. There is a strong association between hyperuricaemia and the metabolic syndrome (the constellation of insulin resistance

  10. Internet marketing global features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakita Branko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Business environment incessantly bringing a yard of a new challenges to market entities. One of the greatest challenges that companies faced during the last couple of decades was development of information systems as well as a large scale usage of world's greatest computer network - Internet - no matter how big they were or what their activities included. There are many papers about Internet, its development, social and economic significance. However, there is no paper or article written by a local author that systematically and thoroughly treats marketing importance of Internet. This paper presents potentials and business importance of internet marketing in new millennium. It considers internet as a communication, trade and distribution channel. In addition, the paper highlights research potentials of Internet.

  11. Features of multifinality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglanski, Arie W; Köpetz, Catalina; Bélanger, Jocelyn J; Chun, Woo Young; Orehek, Edward; Fishbach, Ayelet

    2013-02-01

    Diverse facets of the multifinality configuration in goal-directed behavior are identified and empirically explored. The multifinality construct denotes a motivational structure wherein a single means is linked to several ends. A multifinality configuration maximizes value that a given means promises to deliver while sacrificing expectancy of attainment due to a dilution effect. Several phenomena implied by multifinality theory are investigated, including an unconscious quest for multifinal means, the constraints that such quest imposes on means to a focal goal, and structural conditions under which an activity may be experienced as intrinsically motivated. Multifinality phenomena appear in numerous domains of social cognition, and the present theory offers a novel perspective on classic motivational effects.

  12. Features partnership in auditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Bondar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The notion of «institution partnerships in the audit» and its importance in Ukraine. Done overview of international experience in the Institute of partnerships in the audit business. Determined the nature of the audit, rights, duties and powers of the partnership during the audit. Done distribution of functions between the partner and the engagement partner in the synthesis of these blocks: taking on a new customer service or continued cooperation with existing customers (clients; familiarization with activities of customer audits, including an understanding of its internal control system; identification and assessment of risks of material misstatement of accounting; audit process and the audit and the formation of the final judgment. On the basis of the distribution of functions between the partner and the engagement partner, defined the overall structure of management system auditing firm. These conditions for implementation of partnerships in the audit business, and identified a number of advantages and disadvantages of partnerships for auditing.

  13. Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

    1992-04-01

    In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure and a simultaneous loss of forced cool of the core

  14. Classifying web pages with visual features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, V.; van Someren, M.; Lupascu, T.; Filipe, J.; Cordeiro, J.

    2010-01-01

    To automatically classify and process web pages, current systems use the textual content of those pages, including both the displayed content and the underlying (HTML) code. However, a very important feature of a web page is its visual appearance. In this paper, we show that using generic visual

  15. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  16. Characterization of a complex rearrangement involving duplication and deletion of 9p in an infant with craniofacial dysmorphism and cardiac anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bartolo Daniel L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Partial duplication and partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 have each been reported in the literature as clinically recognizable syndromes. We present clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings on a five-week-old female infant with concomitant duplication and terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9. To our knowledge ten such cases have previously been reported. Conventional cytogenetic analysis identified additional material on chromosome 9 at band p23. FISH analysis aided in determining the additional material consisted of an inverted duplication with a terminal deletion of the short arm. Microarray analysis confirmed this interpretation and further characterized the abnormality as a duplication of about 32.7 Mb, from 9p23 to 9p11.2, and a terminal deletion of about 11.5 Mb, from 9p24.3 to 9p23. The infant displayed characteristic features of Duplication 9p Syndrome (hypotonia, bulbous nose, single transverse palmar crease, cranial anomalies, as well as features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome (flat nasal bridge, long philtrum, cardiac anomalies despite the deletion being distal to the reported critical region for this syndrome. This case suggests that there are genes or regulatory elements that lie outside of the reported critical region responsible for certain phenotypic features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome. It also underscores the importance of utilizing array technology to precisely define abnormalities involving the short arm of 9p in order to further refine genotype/phenotype associations and to identify additional cases of duplication/deletion.

  17. A novel large deletion of the ICR1 region including H19 and putative enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryssira, Helen; Amenta, Stella; Kanber, Deniz; Sofocleous, Christalena; Lykopoulou, Evangelia; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Cerrato, Flavia; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Bens, Susanne; Riccio, Andrea; Buiting, Karin

    2015-05-06

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a rare pediatric overgrowth disorder with a variable clinical phenotype caused by deregulation affecting imprinted genes in the chromosomal region 11p15. Alterations of the imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at the IGF2/H19 locus resulting in biallelic expression of IGF2 and biallelic silencing of H19 account for approximately 10% of patients with BWS. The majority of these patients have epimutations of the ICR1 without detectable DNA sequence changes. Only a few patients were found to have deletions. Most of these deletions are small affecting different parts of the ICR1 differentially methylated region (ICR1-DMR) removing target sequences for CTCF. Only a very few deletions reported so far include the H19 gene in addition to the CTCF binding sites. None of these deletions include IGF2. A male patient was born with hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms and hypoglycemia suggestive of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Using methylation-specific (MS)-MLPA (Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) we have identified a maternally inherited large deletion of the ICR1 region in a patient and his mother. The deletion results in a variable clinical expression with a classical BWS in the mother and a more severe presentation of BWS in her son. By genome-wide SNP array analysis the deletion was found to span ~100 kb genomic DNA including the ICR1DMR, H19, two adjacent non-imprinted genes and two of three predicted enhancer elements downstream to H19. Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite next generation sequencing revealed hypermethylation of the maternal allele at the IGF2 locus in both, mother and child, although IGF2 is not affected by the deletion. We here report on a novel large familial deletion of the ICR1 region in a BWS family. Due to the deletion of the ICR1-DMR CTCF binding cannot take place and the residual enhancer elements have access to the IGF2 promoters. The aberrant methylation (hypermethylation) of the maternal IGF2

  18. Hong Kong English: phonological features

    OpenAIRE

    Irina-Ana Drobot

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present phonological features of Hong Kong English, which is a variety of New English. I examine features of the sound system (vowel and consonantal systems), characteristics of stress, rhythm, intonation, and phonological processes of the English spoken by Hongkongers. The way in which the accent and characteristics of the Hong Kong variety of English differs from standard, RP English is pointed out. Influences of Chinese and Cantonese on the phonological features ...

  19. Emergent interfaces for feature modularization

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Márcio; Brabrand, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Developers frequently introduce errors into software systems when they fail to recognise module dependencies. Using forty-three software families and Software Product Lines (SPLs), where the majority are commonly used in industrial practice, the authors reports on the feature modularization problem and provides a study of how often it may occur in practice. To solve the problem they present the concept of emergent feature modularization which aims to establish contracts between features to prevent developers from breaking other features when performing a maintenance task.

  20. New PAMTRAK features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahly, B.; Anspach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia is developing a Personnel and Material Tracking System (PAMTRAK) which uses a variety of techniques to monitor material inside a vault in real-time. It can detect material movement using video cameras inside the vault or motion sensors attached to the material. It also contains two prototype attribute monitoring systems that continuously measure material weight, temperature or movement. A site can use any of these alone or together to extend physical inventory intervals. PAMTRAK can reduce the cost of storing material by reducing inventory frequency and radiation exposure to workers. Analysis at Savannah River in 1992 estimated that installing PAMTRAK in the 7 active and future vaults at that site would save $1,073,000 per year by reducing inventory frequency from monthly to yearly. Performing similar calculations now, assuming lower radiation exposure limits of 700m Rem per year, new inventory reduction guidelines allowing a baseline interval of 6 months, and an achieved inventory interval of 3 years, results in an estimated average savings of $400,000 per year. PAMTRAK, since it is real-time, can detect theft or diversion soon enough to give the guard force a chance of recovering the material and apprehending the perpetrator. In performing an inventory a site typically checks only a fraction of the material using random, statistical sampling, while PAMTRAK monitors all material in the vault. In addition to static environments such as vaults, PAMTRAK can be used to protect material in active work areas. Several of the sensor types can ignore activity around material but still report alarms if the material is moved or handled. PAMTRAK includes a personnel tracking capability that allows a site to monitor and restrict personnel movements. It can exclude workers from designated areas unless they have explicit permission to be there. It can also enforce the 2-person rule by requiring a worker to be accompanied by at least one other qualified worker

  1. Gray Matter Heterotopia, Mental Retardation, Developmental Delay, Microcephaly, and Facial Dysmorphisms in a Boy with Ring Chromosome 6: A 10-Year Follow-Up and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Wang, Zhiqing; Wei, Sisi; Liang, Jinqun; Chen, Nuan; OuYang, Haimei; Zeng, Weihong; Chen, Liying; Xie, Xunjie; Jiang, Jianhui

    2018-04-14

    Ring chromosome 6, r(6), is an extremely rare cytogenetic abnormality with clinical heterogeneity which arises typically de novo. The phenotypes of r(6) can be highly variable, ranging from almost normal to severe malformations and neurological defects. Up to now, only 33 cases have been reported in the literature. In this 10-year follow-up study, we report a case presenting distinctive facial features, severe developmental delay, and gray matter heterotopia with r(6) and terminal deletions of 6p25.3 (115426-384174, 268 kb) and 6q26-27 (168697778-170732033, 2.03 Mb) encompassing 2 and 15 candidate genes, respectively, which were detected using G-banding karyotyping, FISH, and chromosomal microarray analysis. We also analyzed the available information on the clinical features of the reported r(6) cases in order to provide more valuable information on genotype-phenotype correlations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of gray matter heterotopia manifested in a patient with r(6) in China, and the deletions of 6p and 6q in our case are the smallest with the precise size of euchromatic material loss currently known. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Novel clinical features of nonconvulsive status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Masao; Yang, Sunghoon; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Kaplan, Peter W.; Hoshiyama, Eisei; Shiromaru-Sugimoto, Azusa; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) has rapidly expanded from classical features such as staring, repetitive blinking, chewing, swallowing, and automatism to include coma, prolonged apnea, cardiac arrest, dementia, and higher brain dysfunction, which were demonstrated mainly after the 2000s by us and other groups. This review details novel clinical features of NCSE as a manifestation of epilepsy, but one that is underdiagnosed, with the best available evidence. Also, we describe the new concept of epilepsy-related organ dysfunction (Epi-ROD) and a novel electrode and headset which enables prompt electroencephalography. PMID:28979770

  3. Imaging features of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuyst, Dimitri De; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Bernaerts, Anja; Gielen, Jan; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging characteristics of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Skeletal tuberculosis represents one-third of all cases of tuberculosis occurring in extrapulmonary sites. Hematogenous spread from a distant focus elsewhere in the body is the cornerstone in the understanding of imaging features of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. The most common presentations are tuberculous spondylitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and soft tissue involvement. The diagnostic value of the different imaging techniques, which include conventional radiography, CT, and MR imaging, are emphasized. Whereas conventional radiography is the mainstay in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis and osteomyelitis, MR imaging may detect associated bone marrow and soft tissue abnormalities. MR imaging is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis, demonstration of the extent of the disease of tuberculous spondylitis, and soft tissue tuberculosis. Moreover, it may be very helpful in the differential diagnosis with pyogenic spondylodiscitis, as it may easily demonstrate anterior corner destruction, the relative preservation of the intervertebral disk, multilevel involvement with or without skip lesions, and a large soft tissue abscess, as these are all arguments in favor of a tuberculous spondylitis. On the other hand, CT is still superior in the demonstration of calcifications, which are found in chronic tuberculous abscesses. (orig.)

  4. PHISICS: New Features and Advancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Rabiti; Y. Wang; G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; J. Cogliati; A. Alfonsi; A. EPiney; T. Grimmett

    2011-06-01

    The PHISICS (Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System) software is under an intensive development at INL. In the last months new features have been added and improvements of the previously existing one performed. The modular approach has created a friendly development environment that allows a quick expansion of the capabilities. In the last months a little amount of work has been dedicated to the improvement of the spherical harmonics based nodal transport solver while the implementation of a solver based on the self adjoint formulation of the discrete ordinate is in the test phase on structured mesh. PHISICS now include a depletion solver with the option to use two different algorithms for the solution of the Bateman equation: the Taylor development of the exponential matrix and the Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method. The coupling with RELAP5 is also available at least in the steady state search mode. The coupling between RELAP5 and PHISICS can also take advantage of the new cross section interpolation module so that the coupling could be performed using an arbitrary number of energy groups.

  5. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  6. Feature extraction using fractal codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.M. Ben Schouten; Paul M. de Zeeuw

    1999-01-01

    Fast and successful searching for an object in a multimedia database is a highly desirable functionality. Several approaches to content based retrieval for multimedia databases can be found in the literature [9,10,12,14,17]. The approach we consider is feature extraction. A feature can be seen as a

  7. Feature Extraction Using Fractal Codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.M. Schouten (Ben); P.M. de Zeeuw (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    htmlabstractFast and successful searching for an object in a multimedia database is a highly desirable functionality. Several approaches to content based retrieval for multimedia databases can be found in the literature [9,10,12,14,17]. The approach we consider is feature extraction. A feature can

  8. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  9. Tolerance-Based Feature Transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, Dennie; Telea, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance-based feature transforms (TFTs) assign to each pixel in an image not only the nearest feature pixels on the boundary (origins), but all origins from the minimum distance up to a user-defined tolerance. In this paper, we compare four simple-to-implement methods for computing TFTs on binary

  10. Image feature detectors and descriptors foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hassaballah, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with a selection of high-quality chapters that cover both theoretical concepts and practical applications of image feature detectors and descriptors. It serves as reference for researchers and practitioners by featuring survey chapters and research contributions on image feature detectors and descriptors. Additionally, it emphasizes several keywords in both theoretical and practical aspects of image feature extraction. The keywords include acceleration of feature detection and extraction, hardware implantations, image segmentation, evolutionary algorithm, ordinal measures, as well as visual speech recognition. .

  11. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B. E-mail: gujralrb@sgpgi.ac.in

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis.

  12. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis

  13. Slow feature analysis: unsupervised learning of invariances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskott, Laurenz; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2002-04-01

    Invariant features of temporally varying signals are useful for analysis and classification. Slow feature analysis (SFA) is a new method for learning invariant or slowly varying features from a vectorial input signal. It is based on a nonlinear expansion of the input signal and application of principal component analysis to this expanded signal and its time derivative. It is guaranteed to find the optimal solution within a family of functions directly and can learn to extract a large number of decorrelated features, which are ordered by their degree of invariance. SFA can be applied hierarchically to process high-dimensional input signals and extract complex features. SFA is applied first to complex cell tuning properties based on simple cell output, including disparity and motion. Then more complicated input-output functions are learned by repeated application of SFA. Finally, a hierarchical network of SFA modules is presented as a simple model of the visual system. The same unstructured network can learn translation, size, rotation, contrast, or, to a lesser degree, illumination invariance for one-dimensional objects, depending on only the training stimulus. Surprisingly, only a few training objects suffice to achieve good generalization to new objects. The generated representation is suitable for object recognition. Performance degrades if the network is trained to learn multiple invariances simultaneously.

  14. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Mert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC. The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN, artificial neural network (ANN, radial basis function neural network (RBFNN, and support vector machine (SVM. The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations and partitioning (20%–40% methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden’s index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC and 95% confidential interval (CI. This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity.

  15. Language Features and Culture Features on Short Message

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone is regarded as“the fifth media”after newspaper,radio,TV and the Internet.The mobile phone short message further highlights the importance of written signs in communication.“The thumb revolution”is eagerly anticipating one kind of trend by the hand replace of mouth,sound substitute for the quiet around us. My paper will analyze the language features and the culture features of mobile phone short messages which are written in Chinese and English.

  16. Transtorno dismórfico corporal em dermatologia: diagnóstico, epidemiologia e aspectos clínicos Body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology: diagnosis, epidemiology and clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Archetti Conrado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available São cada vez mais frequentes as queixas cosméticas, uma vez que objetivam a perfeição das formas do corpo e da pele. Os dermatologistas são consultados para avaliar e tratar essas queixas. Sendo assim, é importante conhecer o Transtorno Dismórfico Corporal, inicialmente chamado de "dismorfofobia", pouco estudado até recentemente. Esse transtorno é relativamente comum, por vezes, incapacitante, e envolve uma percepção distorcida da imagem corporal, caracterizada pela preocupação exagerada com um defeito imaginário na aparência ou com um mínimo defeito corporal presente. A maioria dos pacientes apresenta algum grau de prejuízo no funcionamento social e ocupacional, e como resultado de suas queixas obsessivas com a aparência, podem desenvolver comportamentos compulsivos, e, em casos mais graves, há risco de suicídio. O nível de crença é prejudicado, visto que não reconhecem o seu defeito como mínimo ou inexistente e, frequentemente, procuram tratamentos cosméticos para um transtorno psíquico. A prevalência do transtorno, na população geral, é de 1 a 2% e, em pacientes dermatológicos e de cirurgia cosmética, de 2,9 a 16%. Considerando a alta prevalência do Transtorno Dismórfico Corporal, em pacientes dermatológicos, e que os tratamentos cosméticos raramente melhoram seus sintomas, o treinamento dos profissionais para a investigação sistemática, diagnóstico e encaminhamento para tratamento psiquiátrico é fundamental.Cosmetic concerns are becoming increasingly common in view of the obsession with the perfect body and skin. Dermatologists are often seen to evaluate and treat these conditions. Therefore, it is important to acknowledge the existence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder, also known as dysmorphophobia. Despite being relatively common, this disorder has not been well researched. Sometimes causing impairment, the disease involves a distorted body image perception characterized by excessive preoccupation with

  17. Hong Kong English: phonological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Ana Drobot

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present phonological features of Hong Kong English, which is a variety of New English. I examine features of the sound system (vowel and consonantal systems, characteristics of stress, rhythm, intonation, and phonological processes of the English spoken by Hongkongers. The way in which the accent and characteristics of the Hong Kong variety of English differs from standard, RP English is pointed out. Influences of Chinese and Cantonese on the phonological features of Hong Kong English are noticeable

  18. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  19. Youth job market specific features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Yu. Zhuravleva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers youth job market peculiarities, its specific features and regulation means, determines theoretical and application tasks of qualitative and quantitative comparison of vocations, which are highly in demand at the job market.

  20. Nonmotor Features in Atypical Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kailash P; Stamelou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism (AP) comprises mainly multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD), which are distinct pathological entities, presenting with a wide phenotypic spectrum. The classic syndromes are now called MSA-parkinsonism (MSA-P), MSA-cerebellar type (MSA-C), Richardson's syndrome, and corticobasal syndrome. Nonmotor features in AP have been recognized almost since the initial description of these disorders; however, research has been limited. Autonomic dysfunction is the most prominent nonmotor feature of MSA, but also gastrointestinal symptoms, sleep dysfunction, and pain, can be a feature. In PSP and CBD, the most prominent nonmotor symptoms comprise those deriving from the cognitive/neuropsychiatric domain. Apart from assisting the clinician in the differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease, nonmotor features in AP have a big impact on quality of life and prognosis of AP and their treatment poses a major challenge for clinicians. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinicopathologic Features of Pediatric Oligodendrogliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Tihan, Tarik; Lin, Doris; McDonald, William; Nigro, Janice; Feuerstein, Burt; Jackson, Sadhana; Cohen, Kenneth; Burger, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrogliomas are an important adult form of diffuse gliomas with a distinctive clinical and genetic profile. Histologically similar tumors occurring rarely in children are incompletely characterized. We studied 50 patients with oligodendrogliomas (median age at diagnosis 8 y, range 7mo to 20 y). Tumors resembling dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors or pilocytic astrocytomas or those having a “mixed” histology were excluded. Tumors at first diagnosis were low grade (n=38) or anaplastic (n=12). Histologic features included uniform round cells with perinuclear halos (100%), secondary structures (predominantly perineuronal satellitosis) (90%), calcifications (46%), and microcysts (44%). Sequential surgical specimens were obtained in 8 low-grade oligodendroglioma patients, with only 1 progressing to anaplasia. Studies for 1p19q performed in 40 cases demonstrated intact 1p19q loci in 29 (73%), 1p19q codeletion in 10 (25%), and 1p deletion with intact 19q in 1 (2%). Except for 2 young patients (3 and 11 y of age), patients with 1p19q codeletion were older than 16 years at diagnosis. Mutant IDH1 (R132H) protein immunohistochemistry was positive in 4 (of 22) (18%) cases, 3 of which also had 1p19q codeletion, whereas 1p19q status was not available on the fourth case. There was a nonsignificant trend for worse overall survival in grade III tumors, but no significant association with age, extent of resection, or 1p19q status. In summary, oligodendrogliomas with classic histology occur in the pediatric population but lack 1p19q codeletion and IDH1 (R132H) mutations in most instances. They are predominantly low grade, recur/clinically progress in a subset, but demonstrate a relatively low frequency of histologic progression. PMID:24805856

  2. Clinical Features of Fatal Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Zuei Chen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the clinical features of fatal asthma, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients who died of an acute asthma attack in our hospital during a 15-year period from 1989 to 2003. Twelve patients had fatal asthma during this period, including eight who were dead on arrival in the emergency room (ER and three who died within 1 hour of admission to the ER. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the clinical presentations during the fatal attack: (1 rapid (< 3 hours decompensation in four patients; (2 gradual development of respiratory failure over several days in two patients; and (3 acute deterioration after unstable asthma lasting several days in six patients. All patients in groups 1 and 2 had reported previous near-fatal attacks. The proportion of young patients was highest in group 3, with half of them (3/6 younger than 35 years of age. Only one patient in group 3 had had a previous near-fatal attack. Five of the seven patients, with previous near-fatal attacks, had a pattern of decompensation during their fatal attack that was similar to their previous attacks. In conclusion, nearly all patients with fatal asthma in this study died outside of the hospital or within 1 hour after admission to the ER. Patients had patterns of decompensation during the fatal attack that were similar to those of their previous attacks. Early detection of warning signs, early admission to the ER, adequate treatment, and extremely close observation of patients, especially within 1 hour after ER arrival, may prevent or decrease the incidence of fatal asthmatic attack.

  3. FEATURES OF MICROFINANCING IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina B. Makarova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Small business is the basis for the development of the modern economy of Russia. In modern conditions, small enterprises can be credited in various credit institutions, the most significant and popular among which are banks and microfinance organizations. The volume of the microfinance market is many times smaller than the banking one, although the number of registered microfinance organizations exceeds the number of banking credit institutions by more than 3 times. Microfinance institutions are actively developing, although in recent years, due to the economic and political situation, there has been a slowdown in their growth rates. To date, microfinance organizations are becoming a more significant element of the financial infrastructure that supports and stimulates the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises, which in turn serves as an effective tool for combating poverty and improving the living standards of the country’s population. Microfinance in the narrow interpretation is understood only as the provision of small monetary loans (loans, and in a broader context, “microfinance” includes, in addition to direct lending, operations to attract savings, payments, insurance, leasing and a number of other financial services. This article is devoted to the specifics of microfinance in Russia. On the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the domestic microfinance system with the systems of a developed and a developing country, namely, the USA and India, the features of providing microfinance services for small and medium businesses, as well as for nonprotected sections of the population, are revealed. The analysis of foreign experience is very important for Russia since the mechanisms of microfinance in this country are only being formed.

  4. EC6 safety enhancement - including impact of Fukushima lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.; Zemdegs, R.; Boyle, S.; Soulard, M., E-mail: stephen.yu@candu.com [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    The Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6) is the new Generation III CANDU reactor design that meets the most up to date regulatory requirements and customer expectations. EC6 builds on the proven high performance design inch as the Qinshan CANDU 6 units and has made improvements to safety and operational performance, and has incorporated extensive operational feedback including Fukushima. The Fukushima Dai-ichi March 11, 2011 event has demonstrated the importance of defence-in-depth considerations for beyond-design basis events, including severe accidents. The EC6 design is based on the defence-in-depth principles and provides further design features that address the lessons learned from Fukushima. (author)

  5. Organization Features and School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Lois Major

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the odds of school organization features predicting schools meeting district or state performance goals. The school organization features were organizational complexity, shared decision making, and leadership behavior. The dependent variable was school performance, operationally defined as a principalâ s yes response or no response to the question, â did your school meet district or state performance goals.â The independent variables representing...

  6. Enhanced feature integration in musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Christian; Højlund, Andreas; Møller, Cecilie

    the classical oddball control paradigm which used identical sounds. This novel finding supports the dependent processing hypothesis suggesting that musicians recruit overlapping neural resources facilitating more holistic representations of domain-relevant stimuli. These specialised refinements in predictive......Distinguishing and integrating features of sensory input is essential to human survival and no less paramount in music perception and cognition. Yet, little is known about training-induced plasticity of neural mechanisms for auditory feature integration. This study aimed to contrast the two...

  7. Saliency image of feature building for image quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xinuo; Sun, Jiyin; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    The purpose and method of image quality assessment are quite different for automatic target recognition (ATR) and traditional application. Local invariant feature detectors, mainly including corner detectors, blob detectors and region detectors etc., are widely applied for ATR. A saliency model of feature was proposed to evaluate feasibility of ATR in this paper. The first step consisted of computing the first-order derivatives on horizontal orientation and vertical orientation, and computing DoG maps in different scales respectively. Next, saliency images of feature were built based auto-correlation matrix in different scale. Then, saliency images of feature of different scales amalgamated. Experiment were performed on a large test set, including infrared images and optical images, and the result showed that the salient regions computed by this model were consistent with real feature regions computed by mostly local invariant feature extraction algorithms.

  8. De novo 14q24.2q24.3 microdeletion including IFT43 is associated with intellectual disability, skeletal anomalies, cardiac anomalies, and myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokman, Marijn F; Oud, Machteld M; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Slaats, Gisela G; Nicolaou, Nayia; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Nijman, Isaac J; Roepman, Ronald; Giles, Rachel H; Arts, Heleen H; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2016-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old girl with mild intellectual disability, skeletal anomalies, congenital heart defect, myopia, and facial dysmorphisms including an extra incisor, cup-shaped ears, and a preauricular skin tag. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis identified a de novo 4.5-Mb microdeletion on chromosome 14q24.2q24.3. The deleted region and phenotype partially overlap with previously reported patients. Here, we provide an overview of the literature on 14q24 microdeletions and further delineate the associated phenotype. We performed exome sequencing to examine other causes for the phenotype and queried genes present in the 14q24.2q24.3 microdeletion that are associated with recessive disease for variants in the non-deleted allele. The deleted region contains 65 protein-coding genes, including the ciliary gene IFT43. Although Sanger and exome sequencing did not identify variants in the second IFT43 allele or in other IFT complex A-protein-encoding genes, immunocytochemistry showed increased accumulation of IFT-B proteins at the ciliary tip in patient-derived fibroblasts compared to control cells, demonstrating defective retrograde ciliary transport. This could suggest a ciliary defect in the pathogenesis of this disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave....

  10. Elementary epistemological features of machine intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Horvat, Marko

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of machine intelligence (MI) is useful for defining a common platform in both theoretical and applied artificial intelligence (AI). The goal of this paper is to set canonical definitions that can assist pragmatic research in both strong and weak AI. Described epistemological features of machine intelligence include relationship between intelligent behavior, intelligent and unintelligent machine characteristics, observable and unobservable entities and classification of in...

  11. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re-evaluated...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave....

  12. Symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder among people presenting for cosmetic dental treatment: a comparative study of cosmetic dental patients and a general population sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Parvaneh, H.; Ilik, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives:  To determine appearance concerns of patients presenting for cosmetic treatment. Methods:  This cross-sectional comparative study included consecutive patients of six different cosmetic clinics (n = 170), and a sample of the general population (n = 878). A study-specific self-report

  13. Subsurface structures of buried features in the lunar Procellarum region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenrui; Heki, Kosuke

    2017-07-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission unraveled numbers of features showing strong gravity anomalies without prominent topographic signatures in the lunar Procellarum region. These features, located in different geologic units, are considered to have complex subsurface structures reflecting different evolution processes. By using the GRAIL level-1 data, we estimated the free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies in several selected regions including such intriguing features. With the three-dimensional inversion technique, we recovered subsurface density structures in these regions.

  14. Demonstration of IGCC features - plant integration and syngas combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, F.; Huth, M.; Karg, J.; Schiffers, U. [Siemens AG Power Generation (KWU), Erlanger/Muelheim (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Siemens is involved in three IGCC plants in Europe that are currently in operation. Against the background of the Puertollano and Buggenum plants, some of the specific new features of fully integrated IGCC power plants are discussed, including: requirements and design features of the gas turbine syngas supply system; gas turbine operating experience with air extraction for the air separation unit from the gas turbine air compressor; and design requirements and operational features of the combustion system. 7 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The urban features of informal settlements in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Alzamil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains the urban features of three informal settlements in Jakarta: A. Kampung Bandan; B. Kampung Luar Batang; And C. Kampung Muara Baru. The data describes the urban features of physical structures, infrastructures, and public services. These data include maps showing locations of these settlements, photography of urban status, and examples of urban fabric. The data are obtained from the statistical records and field surveys of three settlements cases. Keywords: Informal settlements, Physical, Features, Urban, Kampung, Jakarta, Indonesia

  16. The MECP2 variant c.925C>T (p.Arg309Trp) causes intellectual disability in both males and females without classic features of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönewolf-Greulich, B; Tejada, M-I; Stephens, K; Hadzsiev, K; Gauthier, J; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Pfundt, R; Ravn, K; Maortua, H; Gener, B; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Piton, A; Rouleau, G; Clayton-Smith, J; Kleefstra, T; Bisgaard, A-M; Tümer, Z

    2016-06-01

    Missense MECP2 variants can have various phenotypic effects ranging from a normal phenotype to typical Rett syndrome (RTT). In females, the phenotype can also be influenced by the X-inactivation pattern. In this study, we present detailed clinical descriptions of six patients with a rare base-pair substitution affecting Arg309 at the C-terminal end of the transcriptional repression domain (TRD). All patients have intellectual disability and present with some RTT features, but they do not fulfill the clinical criteria for typical or atypical RTT. Most of the patients also have mild facial dysmorphism. Intriguingly, the mother of an affected male patient is an asymptomatic carrier of this variant. It is therefore likely that the p.(Arg309Trp) variation does not necessarily lead to male lethality, and it results in a wide range of clinical features in females, probably influenced by different X-inactivation patterns in target tissues. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service; however, maintenance therapy itself is not covered as part of these services. (c) Occupational... increase respiratory function, such as graded activity services; these services include physiologic... rehabilitation plan of treatment, including physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, speech...

  18. Selective Audiovisual Semantic Integration Enabled by Feature-Selective Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Huang, Biao; Yu, Tianyou; Wu, Wei; Li, Peijun; Fang, Fang; Sun, Pei

    2016-01-13

    An audiovisual object may contain multiple semantic features, such as the gender and emotional features of the speaker. Feature-selective attention and audiovisual semantic integration are two brain functions involved in the recognition of audiovisual objects. Humans often selectively attend to one or several features while ignoring the other features of an audiovisual object. Meanwhile, the human brain integrates semantic information from the visual and auditory modalities. However, how these two brain functions correlate with each other remains to be elucidated. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we explored the neural mechanism by which feature-selective attention modulates audiovisual semantic integration. During the fMRI experiment, the subjects were presented with visual-only, auditory-only, or audiovisual dynamical facial stimuli and performed several feature-selective attention tasks. Our results revealed that a distribution of areas, including heteromodal areas and brain areas encoding attended features, may be involved in audiovisual semantic integration. Through feature-selective attention, the human brain may selectively integrate audiovisual semantic information from attended features by enhancing functional connectivity and thus regulating information flows from heteromodal areas to brain areas encoding the attended features.

  19. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  20. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,