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Sample records for include counseling psychologists

  1. Introduction and Overview: Counseling Psychologists' Roles, Training, and Research Contributions to Large-Scale Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Sue C.; Leach, Mark M.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    Counseling psychologists have responded to many disasters, including the Haiti earthquake, the 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, and Hurricane Katrina. However, as a profession, their responses have been localized and nonsystematic. In this first of four articles in this contribution, "Counseling Psychology and Large-Scale Disasters,…

  2. Differential Perception of Counselling Psychologists' Duties to Oyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This descriptive survey study investigated the differences that exist in the perception of the relevance of counselling psychologists' duties to broadcasting corporation. The participants consisted of one hundred and two (54 males and 48 females) purposively selected staff of Oyo State Broadcasting Corporation.

  3. A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work : including an investigation of counselling psychologists' experience of the role of body in the therapeutic encounter

    OpenAIRE

    Kouloumbri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This portfolio was submitted to the University of Surrey for the completion of the Doctorate (PsychO) in Psychotherapeutic and Counselling Psychology. It is comprised of three dossiers which reflect the academic, clinical and research work undertaken as part of this degree. The academic dossier consists of three essays. The first essay presents Freud's dream interpretation theory and Jung's dream theory and elaborates on the features of each theory respectively. The second e...

  4. The Ever Evolving Identity of Counseling Psychologists: Musings of the Society of Counseling Psychology President

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding our identity as counseling psychologists has been an issue since the inception of our specialty in the 1940s and one that the authors of these two articles (Goodyear et al., 2008 [this issue]; Munley, Pate, & Duncan, 2008 [this issue]) tackle in new and different ways. In this response, this author (a) identifies additional reasons…

  5. Time Management, Passion, and Collaboration: A Qualitative Study of Highly Research Productive Counseling Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Bott, Elizabeth M.; Allan, Blake A.; Schlosser, Lewis Z.

    2013-01-01

    The present study interviewed 17 of the most research-productive counseling psychologists within APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Using Consensual Qualitative Research, seven domains emerged from the interviews: root of productivity, personality characteristics, productivity strategies, work environment, nonwork life, impact, and…

  6. Practicing what we know: Multicultural counseling competence among clinical psychology trainees and experienced multicultural psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Radhika; Saules, Karen; Young, Amy; Grey, Melissa J; Gillem, Angela R; Nabors, Nina A; Byrd, Michelle R; Jefferson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Multicultural (MC) competence is considered a necessary skill for clinical and counseling psychologists; however, there is little to no research on the assessment of demonstrated multicultural counseling competence (DMCCC) of clinical psychology graduate students. In this study, we developed a MC assessment instrument to assess DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students compared with MC-experienced psychologists. In addition, we assessed for differences between the endorsement of MC-appropriate strategies and actual use of these strategies in clinical practice, both by MC-experienced psychologists and clinical psychology students. Results revealed significant differences between the DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students and MC-experienced psychologists. Significant differences also emerged between endorsement of strategies as multiculturally appropriate and likelihood of actual use of these strategies. Findings suggest that future training and competence models should incorporate participants' ability to not only identify multiculturally appropriate strategies but also use these strategies in therapy.

  7. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  8. Voices of Early Career Psychologists in Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Keller, Briana K.; Mollen, Debra; Bledsoe, Meredith L.; Buhin, Larisa; Edwards, Lisa M.; Levy, Jacob J.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.; Yakushko, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of early career members of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP). Seventy early career psychologists completed a survey assessing the usefulness and climate of SCP, barriers to and facilitative factors for involvement in SCP, inclusiveness of SCP regarding cultural diversity and professional interests, degree…

  9. Cultural Influences on Nonverbal Behavior: An Annotated Bibliography for Counseling Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Laura

    This bibliography for counseling psychologists focuses on differences in nonverbal behavior as an aspect of cross cultural psychotherapy. The introductory section discusses the purpose, scope and limitations of the report. Different theories of emotion (dimensional versus typological) are also discussed and classifications of nonverbal behavior…

  10. E-Learning of Genetic Counseling and Basic Genetics for Psychologists in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnick, Renato; Correia-Neto, Jorge S.; Vilar, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the development of a learning process of genetic counseling and basic genetics using an e-learning model and its application to a group of psychologists in the state of Parana in southern Brazil. The aim was to analyze the impact on the increase of knowledge in the presented subjects and the possibility of applying this…

  11. Faculty Consultation: An Emerging Role for the Counseling Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Karen G.; Hurst, James C.

    1974-01-01

    Development by a university counseling center staff of a training procedure to help students interact productively in small groups to learn academic material is described. After refinement of the program (entitled Education Through Student Interaction), emphasis was placed on teaching faculty to train students by means of this procedure. (Author)

  12. The intersectionality framework and identity intersections in the Journal of Counseling Psychology and The Counseling Psychologist: A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Richard Q; Welch, Jamie C; Kaya, Aylin E; Yeung, Jeffrey G; Obana, Chynna; Sharma, Rajni; Vernay, Collin N; Yee, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    The framework of intersectionality is a powerful analytical tool for making sense of how interlocking systems of privilege and oppression are experienced by individuals and groups. Despite the long history of the concept, intersectionality has only recently gained attention in psychology. We conducted a content analysis to assess counseling psychology's engagement with an intersectional perspective. All articles published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology (n = 4,800) and The Counseling Psychologist (n = 1,915) from their first issues until July 2016 were reviewed to identify conceptual and empirical work focused on intersectionality. A total of 40 articles were identified and examined for themes. Limitations and future directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Irish clinical and counselling psychologists' experiences and views of mandatory personal therapy during training: A polarisation of ethical concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Aisling

    2018-01-30

    Although there have been some recent changes in Ireland, the practice of mandating personal therapy during training has traditionally differed between counselling and clinical psychologists. Irish psychologists (n = 258: 170 clinical, 88 counselling) took part in a survey study of experiences and views regarding this practice. Counselling psychologists reported higher rates of lifetime and current attendance at personal therapy compared to clinical psychologists, and nearly all had experienced mandated personal therapy compared to a minority of the clinical group. However, the clinical psychologists had a high rate of attendance at personal therapy compared to that reported for their British peers, indicating a high regard for personal therapy amongst Irish clinicians despite the absence of a training mandate. Five factors were found to be independent predictors of agreement with mandating personal therapy during training-lifetime experience of personal therapy, being a counselling psychologist, experience of mandated therapy, being more recently qualified, and longer attendance at personal therapy. Thematic analysis of the psychologists' open responses regarding mandated therapy indicated that the majority believed that personal therapy was an important part of ethical, effective practice, and valuable in enhancing self-awareness and learning from the client experience. Ethical concerns about a mandate were polarised between the two psychology specialisms, more counselling psychologists emphasising the dangers and questionable efficacy of psychologists practising psychotherapy without personal therapy experience, and more clinical psychologists questioning the efficacy and ethics of imposing a mandate on trainees. Recommendations are made regarding this issue for trainers of both specialisms. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Co-Creating the Society of Counseling Psychology with Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Katharine Hahn

    2012-01-01

    This reaction article values the Major Contribution as an opportunity to hear the voices of ECPs who do not feel included in the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP) and to engage in dialogue about the SCP as an organization. This response employs Gestalt theories of field and dialogue to understand how all members and affiliates of the SCP…

  15. Making the Road by Walking: Using Role-Play and Instructor Feedback to Teach Basic Counseling Skills to Singaporean Trainee Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Phey Ling; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra; Burgetova, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the experiential learning experiences of eight trainee educational psychologists (school psychologists in the United States) from Singapore who participated in three role-play sessions during a two-day Basic Counseling Skills Training Program. Data collected from transcriptions of video-recorded sessions, a focus group…

  16. The Interrelationship between the Society of Indian Psychologists and Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jacqueline S.; Carter, Paula M.; LaFromboise, Teresa D.; BigFoot, Dolores Subia

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the Society of Indian Psychologists (SIP) has grown from a small network of indigenous psychologists and students to a well-established network among the ethnic minority psychology organizations. SIP embraces both Western psychology and indigenous values of cooperation, group harmony, respect, generosity, careful…

  17. Ecologically Based, Culturally Concordant Responding Following Disasters: The Counseling Psychologist's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokane, Arnold R.; Inman, Arpana G.; Weatherford, Ryan D.; Davidson, Anju Kaduvettoor; Straw, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the existing theory, research, policy, and practice of disaster mental health and the role of counseling psychology in post-disaster and catastrophic situations, all from a social justice perspective. Specifically, we discuss the phases and stages, social ecology, and individual reactions to disasters. A case study is…

  18. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-10-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose. Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists. Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education. Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  19. Phenomenological Research Methods for Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    This article familiarizes counseling psychologists with qualitative research methods in psychology developed in the tradition of European phenomenology. A brief history includes some of Edmund Husserl's basic methods and concepts, the adoption of existential-phenomenology among psychologists, and the development and formalization of qualitative…

  20. Whatever Happened to Counseling in Counseling Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Michael J.; Berman, Margit; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Conoley, Collie W.; Duan, Changming; Whiston, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    A suspected decline in published counseling-related research in "The Counseling Psychologist" ("TCP") and the "Journal of Counseling Psychology" ("JCP") was investigated through content analyses of the two journals from 1979 to 2008. A marked decline in counseling-related research may signify a shift in emphasis away from counseling as the most…

  1. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologists are often confronted with counselling interventions in the workplace and thus it is vital that they are effectively prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose. Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists. Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education. Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  2. The Effect of Honduran Counseling Practices on the North American Counseling Profession: The Power of Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, James N.; Giordano, Francesca G.; Bokar, Laura; Klein, Jim; Sierra, Georgina Panting; Thume, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    A team of researchers consisting of counselor education professors and doctoral-level counseling students conducted interviews with Honduran mental health professionals, including counselors, psychologists, pastors, community developmental specialists, and psychiatrists. The purpose was to understand the counseling process and profession that…

  3. Counselling Psychology training in the United Kingdom for Greek students who completed their undergraduate training in Greece: themes when comparing the two different organisational settings

    OpenAIRE

    Filippopoulos, P.

    2009-01-01

    Counselling Psychology training is a very important aspect of the profession of counselling psychologists. In Europe there are countries that do not include such training in their educational system with the result that a lot of Psychology graduates must move to a different country in order to qualify as counselling psychologists. A number of students who completed their first degree in Greece have studied, and still are studying, counselling psychology at a doctoral level in the United Kingd...

  4. Forensic psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a review of different issues that a forensic psychologists encounter at work. Forensic assessment might be needed in civil law cases, administrative procedures and in criminal law cases. The paper focuses on referrals in criminal law cases regarding matters such as assessing competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility and violence risk assessment. Finally, the role of expert testimony on eyewitness memory, which is not used in practice in Slovenia yet, is presented.

  5. Counselling Communication Skills

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    This article overviews three extremely important skills within the training of a counselling psychologist environment: active listening, use of questions and silences. It is now a well-established and widely accepted concept that counselling plays a central role in the development of an individual. Counselling is a specialist ...

  6. The development of counselling psychology in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Allison; O'Callaghan, Dermot; O'Brien, Owen; Broderick, John; Long, Catherine; O'Grady, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the distinctive nature of the specialism of counselling psychology and outlines the development of the discipline in Ireland in the context of international developments and its recognition as a professional branch of applied psychology. Today, counselling psychologists are employed in varied clinical and non-clinical settings including health and mental health services (statutory, private and voluntary sector) along with education, forensic, justice, industry and private practices. Counselling psychologist is the primary professional identity of many practising psychologists in Ireland and the Psychological Society of Ireland's Division of Counselling Psychology is the main affiliation of at least 179 members. With its focus on facilitating personal and interpersonal functioning across the life span and its emphasis on the therapeutic process, the specialism continues to bridge the disciplines of psychology, counselling and psychotherapy. In this article, some of the challenges still faced by counselling psychology are explored as it navigates its way through the changing landscape of further development and evolution. PMID:26494940

  7. The Role of Counseling in an Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program: Counseling in a Work Oriented Setting (The Importance of Including Counseling Courses within the Curriculum of the Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program at the Community College Level).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Bruce

    This research had a two-fold purpose: (1) to assess the need for a labor studies program at the community college level; and (2) to consider the advisability of including within such a curriculum a cross-section of adult/family/worker-oriented counseling and guidance courses. The study employed a questionnaire completed by union delegates, which…

  8. Evolving Expectations for Personality Traits in Counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practising counselling psychologists are aware of the dynamics and stress that therapists experience; therefore, the effort expended on counselling psychologists in training that will succeed and be satisfied with their work is an important concern. Counselling professionals may increasingly recognize the role of personality ...

  9. 38 CFR 21.3102 - Required counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required counseling. 21.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3102 Required counseling. (a) Child. The VA counseling psychologist will provide counseling and assist in preparing the educational plan only if the eligible child or his or her...

  10. Stepwise intervention including 1-on-1 counseling is highly effective in increasing influenza vaccination among health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younghee; Kwon, Mihye; Song, Jeongmi

    2017-06-01

    The influenza vaccination rate among health care workers (HCWs) remains suboptimal. We attempted to increase vaccine uptake in HCWs by nonmandatory measures, including 1-on-1 counseling. In 2015 we used a stepwise approach including (1) text messaging on the last day of the vaccination period, (2) extending the vaccination period by 3 days, (3) education for the low uptake group, and (4) 1-on-1 counseling for unvaccinated HCWs after the 3 interventions. There were 1,433 HCWs included. By the end of the initial 3 days, the uptake rate was 80.0% (1,146/1,433). During an extension for a further 3 days, 33 additional HCWs received the vaccine. One month after starting the vaccination, 90.1% (1,291/1,433) of the HCWs were vaccinated, but this included only 76.1% (210/276) of the doctors (lowest among HCWs). After 3 educational presentations targeted at the unvaccinated doctors, no additional individuals were vaccinated in the following 2 weeks. After 1-on-1 counseling for unvaccinated HCWs, the overall vaccination rate increased to 94.7% (1,357/1,433) in 2015, higher than in the previous year (82.5%, P vaccinated, therefore achieving 92.4% (255/276) compliance, higher than the 56.5% in the previous year (152/269, P vaccination rates among HCWs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Letters to a Young Psychologist: An Invitation to Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Tania

    2012-01-01

    In this response to the major contribution, "Voices of Early Career Psychologists in the Society of Counseling Psychology," the past president of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP) expresses appreciation, describes aspects of her early career experience in light of the survey findings in the major contribution, offers reflections…

  12. Xq28 duplication including MECP2 in six unreported affected females: what can we learn for diagnosis and genetic counselling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Chehadeh, S; Touraine, R; Prieur, F; Reardon, W; Bienvenu, T; Chantot-Bastaraud, S; Doco-Fenzy, M; Landais, E; Philippe, C; Marle, N; Callier, P; Mosca-Boidron, A-L; Mugneret, F; Le Meur, N; Goldenberg, A; Guerrot, A-M; Chambon, P; Satre, V; Coutton, C; Jouk, P-S; Devillard, F; Dieterich, K; Afenjar, A; Burglen, L; Moutard, M-L; Addor, M-C; Lebon, S; Martinet, D; Alessandri, J-L; Doray, B; Miguet, M; Devys, D; Saugier-Veber, P; Drunat, S; Aral, B; Kremer, V; Rondeau, S; Tabet, A-C; Thevenon, J; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Perreton, N; Des Portes, V; Faivre, L

    2017-04-01

    Duplication of the Xq28 region, involving MECP2 (dupMECP2), has been primarily described in males with severe developmental delay, spasticity, epilepsy, stereotyped movements and recurrent infections. Carrier mothers are usually asymptomatic with an extremely skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) pattern. We report a series of six novel symptomatic females carrying a de novo interstitial dupMECP2, and review the 14 symptomatic females reported to date, with the aim to further delineate their phenotype and give clues for genetic counselling. One patient was adopted and among the other 19 patients, seven (37%) had inherited their duplication from their mother, including three mildly (XCI: 70/30, 63/37, 100/0 in blood and random in saliva), one moderately (XCI: random) and three severely (XCI: uninformative and 88/12) affected patients. After combining our data with data from the literature, we could not show a correlation between XCI in the blood or duplication size and the severity of the phenotype, or explain the presence of a phenotype in these females. These findings confirm that an abnormal phenotype, even severe, can be a rare event in females born to asymptomatic carrier mothers, making genetic counselling difficult in couples at risk in terms of prognosis, in particular in prenatal cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Counseling Psychology Licensure in Taiwan: Development, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-fei; Kwan, Kwong-Liem K.; Huang, Su-Fei

    2011-01-01

    The development and consequences of licensure for counseling psychologists in Taiwan are presented to promote cross-cultural awareness surrounding issues in the counseling psychology profession. The national licensure statute for counseling psychologists in Taiwan was established by the Taiwanese Legislature in 2001. While the licensing system…

  14. Shopping around for Theories for Counseling Psychology Practice: Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E.

    2012-01-01

    Three psychotherapy theories are summarized and critiqued for their applicability to counseling psychology. The lack of attention to psychodynamic and experiential theories in the special section and the lack of theorizing by counseling psychologists in general are lamented. A plea is made for encouraging counseling psychologists to construct more…

  15. Counseling Teachers: Using Video Feedback of Their Teaching Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Frances; Baker, Harry

    The suggestions offered in this manual illustrate some aspects of videotape counseling, some apportunities and problems in counseling teachers, and some typical problems involving classroom teaching, cooperating teachers, supervisors, etc. The manual is designed mainly for counseling psychologists and educational psychologists who work with…

  16. Declining Counseling Research in Counseling Psychology Journals: Is the Sky Falling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. note a rather precipitous decline over the past 30 years in the number and proportion of counseling-related research articles appearing in "Journal of Counseling Psychology" ("JCP") and "The Counseling Psychologist" ("TCP"). Certainly, counseling psychology as a field has changed over its 65-year history, and a great deal of that…

  17. Current Institutional Trends in Research Productivity in Counseling Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelman, Nathan M.; Uffelman, Rachel A.; Wagner, Kimberly S.; Diegelman, Sally A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated institutional publication activity in counseling psychology journals for the 10-year period from 1993 to 2002. Four journals reported by counseling psychology training directors as prime publication outlets for the field of counseling psychology were used: "Journal of Counseling Psychology," "The Counseling Psychologist,"…

  18. Danish psychologists as psychotherapists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Nielsen, Jan; Orlinsky, David

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists are by far the biggest group of professional psychotherapists in Denmark, and this article presents data from two samples of psychologist psychotherapists collected at an interval of 15 years. The subjects in both samples responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core...

  19. Examining the Internationalization of Counseling Psychology Scholarship: A Content Analysis of Two US Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Alex; Fang, Ke; Evans, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This content analysis examined internationally focused scholarship published from 1997 to 2009 in two counseling journals published in the United States (US), namely "The Counseling Psychologist" ("TCP") and the "Journal of Counseling Psychology" ("JCP"). Both demographic and content criteria, including…

  20. Counseling Psychology in Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, Judith A.; DeJoy, David M.

    1984-01-01

    Compares behavioral medicine and health psychology to establish counseling psychology's relationship with these approaches. Surveys three areas of training and application that the current research suggests will offer opportunities for meaningful participation by counseling psychologists. (JAC)

  1. What do Psychologists do?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 9. What do Psychologists do? - Two Examples from Research in Cognitive Psychology. Kamala V Mukunda. General Article Volume 3 Issue 9 September 1998 pp 35-44 ...

  2. Counselling Psychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country's socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country's mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country's health care and education systems.

  3. Counselling Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country’s socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country’s mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country’s health care and education systems. PMID:27867261

  4. Counselling Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, Colin

    2001-01-01

    Proposes that a discipline of "counseling studies" be considered as an extension of counseling and a contribution to social guidance. Suggests features of such a discipline, including: a focus on the individual person; interdisciplinarity; humanistic values; applied and theoretical dialectic; critical attitude; and dynamic nature.…

  5. Sport Psychology: An Emerging Domain in the Counseling Psychology Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Trent A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed counseling psychologists on their involvement in sport psychology research, training, and practice; their affiliation with sport psychology professional organizations; and their attitudes toward current professional sport psychology issues. Found that counseling psychologists were minimally involved, and had received little formal…

  6. 20 CFR 10.312 - What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of clinical psychologists? 10.312 Section 10.312 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... § 10.312 What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists? A clinical psychologist.... Therefore, a clinical psychologist may not serve as a physician for conditions that include a physical...

  7. [Advocating for the Inclusion of Psychologists in Family Health Teams in Ontario, Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Jean; Chomienne, Marie-Hélène; Gaboury, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article advocates in favor of increasing the accessibility of psychological services in primary health care by focusing more specifically on the relevance of including psychologists in family health teams in primary care in Ontario.Methods The authors present their advocacy from two levels of information: 1) the main results of a demonstration project funded by the Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF) in which psychologists were integrated into family practices; and 2) experiences and general observations drawn from the combined experiences of the authors from the last decade regarding the inclusion of psychologists in primary care.Results Main results from the demonstration project: 1) highly prevalent mental illnesses (anxiety & mood disorders) are amenable to psychological interventions; 2) psychologists and family physicians are natural and complementary allies in primary care; 3) the cost of integrating psychologists to provide psychological interventions can be off-set by a reduction in physicians' mental health billing. Main observations drawn from authors' combined experiences in primary care: 1) relatively few psychologists work in family health teams in Ontario; 2) most non-pharmacological mental health interventions in primary care involve generic counselling, problem solving, educational groups, and linking to community resources; 3) lack of understanding of the difference between evidence-based psychological treatments and generic counselling; 4) many multidisciplinary clinics unfortunately benefit from only one type of non-medical mental health professional as part of their team to see all cases, independent of the level of complexity on the patient's side, and independent of the level of expertise or supervised training on the provider side; 5) multidisciplinary teams in primary care need various mental health professionals to cover for a wide range of presenting problems and levels of complexity

  8. Positive psychology and the training of psychologists: Students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharina Guse

    2010-12-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the personal and professional impact of including positive psychology in the professional training of clinical and counselling psychologists. Motivation for the study: It is not known how students previously educated in a pathogenic paradigm experience the exposure to positive psychology, and resultant paradigm shift, as part of their professional training. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design was implemented. Data consisted of written documents submitted by the participants and was analyzed by means of thematic analysis. Main findings: Integrating positive psychology in the professional training curriculum was valuable and enriching on both a professional and personal level. The participants reported an experience of positive emotions and increased sense of self-understanding and psychological well-being. Professionally they experienced a sense of increased self-efficacy. Practical/managerial implications: Positive psychology should be considered as part of the basic training of psychologists since it may enhance the development of trainee psychologists’ professional self, enhance aspects of psychological well-being as well as prevent stress and burnout. Contribution/value-add: This is the first South African study to explore the impact of including positive psychology principles and interventions in professional training.

  9. New psychologist at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain, started work at CERN on 1 November. The psychologist’s office, formerly part of the Social Affairs Service in Human Resources, has now moved to the Medical Service (office 57-1-024). It is open every Tuesday and Thursday.   The new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain. Working in an organisation like CERN has numerous advantages. However, as in any professional setting, the work can sometimes bring stress, anxiety, overwork and so on. For this reason, a few years ago CERN brought in a psychologist for the staff. “As a psychologist, my role isn’t just to deal with known problems, but also to make assessments and, if possible, prevent difficult situations arising. Sometimes people realise that something is wrong, but they can’t say why. In such cases, I may be able to use a discussion to assess the nature of the problem and determine if further sessions are needed. If that is the case, I can either conduct the session...

  10. Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help with many specific issues, including: Communication problems Sexual difficulties Conflicts about child rearing or blended families Substance abuse Anger Infidelity Marriage counseling might also be helpful in cases ...

  11. Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to improve a troubled relationship. You can use marriage counseling to help with many specific issues, including: Communication problems Sexual difficulties Conflicts about child rearing or blended families Substance abuse Anger Infidelity ...

  12. Counseling Torture Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Shaun R.

    1988-01-01

    Addresses the psychological effects of torture (including solitary confinement) and the implications of torture for counseling and the counseling psychology profession. Discusses counseling issues related to diagnosis of torture victims, treatment, special considerations for counselors, use of testimony as counseling technique, and prognosis.…

  13. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients' pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach.

  14. HIV-1 incidence among people seeking voluntary counseling and testing centers, including pregnant women, in Pernambuco State, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Kledoaldo Oliveira de; Salustiano, Daniela Medeiros; Cavalcanti, Ana Maria Salustiano; Leal, Élcio de Souza; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos

    2015-06-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has displayed new characteristics over time, with an increase in heterosexual transmission and a decline in the male-to-female ratio in AIDS cases. HIV screening was offered to patients attending the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center in Paulista, Greater Metropolitan Recife, Pernambuco State, in Northeast Brazil, to determine HIV-1 incidence. BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA) was used to measure HIV-1 incidence, comparing it to the AxSYM avidity index method (Ax-AI). From 2006 to 2009, 14,014 individuals were tested, and only 18 pregnant women were diagnosed with HIV infection, resulting in 0.15% annual incidence (95%CI: 0-0.33), significantly lower than in men (1.03; 95%CI: 0.45-1.61) and non-pregnant women (0.50; 95%CI: 0.11-0.89). Despite the low HIV-1 incidence in pregnant women, the high rate of recent infection detected during prenatal care emphasizes the need to increase measures to prevent vertical transmission.

  15. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  16. Integrating Internationalization in Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Essel, Laura; Waehler, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Previous scholars have made specific suggestions regarding what counseling psychology training programs can do to help future psychologists become more cross-culturally aware. This article addresses the questions of whether and how U.S. counseling psychology training programs are currently employing these suggestions. Forty-seven American…

  17. Mental hygiene as a burnout prevention of counseling staff

    OpenAIRE

    Šípová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the issue of mental hygiene as a burnout prevention of counselling staff working in counselling for family, marriage and human relations. It is focused on psychologists and social workers. The first part deals with the issues related to the counselling and requirements for counselling staff, as well as the specifics and risks associated with the profession, and the clientele that comes to counselling. Furthermore, the thesis deals with the issues of burnout syndrome and ...

  18. On Today: Jane M. Healy, Educational Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNOS, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This interview with Jane Healy, an educational psychologist and author, discusses how computers can sometimes negatively affect children's minds. Topics include instructional design in software; the need for objective research; what children will need for success in the future, including critical thinking skills; technology implementation; and…

  19. Counseling Psychology and Professional School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a historical, political, and organizational analysis regarding counseling psychology's involvement in professional school counseling. Issues discussed include collaboration, curriculum and training, and professional identity, as well as the commonalities that bind counselor education/professional school counseling and…

  20. Board Certification in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Susan L.; Lichtenberg, James W.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Although specialty board certification by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) has been a valued standard for decades, the vast majority of counseling psychologists do not pursue board certification in the specialty. The present article provides a brief history of board certification in general and some historical information about…

  1. Neuropsychological Counseling in Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Explores integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology in hospital setting. Sees example of such interchange occurring in rehabilitation unit or hospital where psychologist has responsibilities for helping patients, families, and staff to understand implications of central nervous system dysfunction and to adapt to changes. Discusses…

  2. Great aspirations: the postwar American college counseling center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Tom

    2014-02-01

    In the decade after World War II, psychologists, eager to bring the benefits of counseling to larger numbers, convinced hundreds of American colleges and universities to establish counseling centers. Inspired by the educational-vocational counseling center founded by psychologists at the University of Minnesota in 1932, Carl R. Rogers's "client-centered" methods of personal adjustment counseling, and the 400-plus college counseling centers created by the Veterans Administration to provide the educational-vocational counseling benefit promised to returning World War II servicemen under the 1944 GI Bill, these counseling psychologists created a new place to practice where important currents in psychology, higher education, and federal policy converged and where they attempted to integrate educational-vocational counseling with personal adjustment counseling based on techniques from psychotherapy. By the mid-1960s, half of America's colleges and universities had established counseling centers, and more than 90% offered students educational, vocational, and psychological counseling services, a great achievement of the first generation of counseling psychologists.

  3. Counselling Communication Skills: Its Place In The Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article overviews three extremely important skills within the training of a counselling psychologist environment: active listening, use of questions and silences. It is now a well-established and widely accepted concept that counselling plays a central role in the development of an individual. Counselling is a specialist ...

  4. The State of Substance Abuse Treatment Training in Counseling and Counseling Psychology Programs: What Is and Is Not Happening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madson, Michael B.; Bethea, Angela R.; Daniel, Samantha; Necaise, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Professional counselors and counseling psychologists have much to offer in treating substance use disorders (SUDs). Yet, research consistently demonstrates that students are not receiving adequate training in SUDs. This study describes the current state of training counseling and counseling psychology students in SUDs. Results are consistent with…

  5. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leensen, Monique C J; Groeneveld, Iris F; Heide, Iris van der; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Berkel, Sietske van; Snoek, Aernout; Harten, Wim van; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2017-06-15

    To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to evaluate changes in work-related quality of life and physical outcomes. Longitudinal prospective intervention study using a one-group design. Two hospitals in the Netherlands. Of the eligible patients, 56% participated; 93 patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer receiving chemotherapy and on sick leave were included. Patients completed questionnaires on RTW, the importance of work, work ability (WAI), RTW self-efficacy, fatigue (MFI), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30) at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months follow-up. Before and after the exercise programme 1-repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) were assessed. Six months after the start of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme that combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme, 59% of the cancer patients returned to work, 86% at 12 months and 83% at 18 months. In addition, significant improvements (pfatigue levels were significantly reduced. After completing the exercise programme, 1RM muscle strength was significantly increased but there was no improvement in VO 2 peak level. RTW rates of cancer patients were high after completion of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme which combines occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme is likely to result in RTW, reduced fatigue and increased importance of work, work ability, and quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  7. Identifying School Psychologists' Intercultural Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyana, Olivia E.; Edwards, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are encouraged to analyze their intercultural sensitivity because they may be subject to personal attitudes and beliefs that pejoratively influence their work with students and clients who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). However, gaps remain in the literature regarding whether school psychologists are prepared…

  8. From new vistas to life lines: psychologists' satisfaction with supervision and confidence in supervising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Aisling; Errity, Darina

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to provide the first detailed survey of Irish psychologists' supervision practices as well as to identify what is related to satisfaction with supervisory support and to confidence in providing supervision. An online survey was distributed nationwide to Irish psychologists. Participants were mostly clinical and counselling psychologists. Three-quarters of the participants constituted 51% of the total population of Irish health service psychologists, the remainder working in various non-health service settings. The results showed that most Irish psychologists attend supervision but at a low frequency, typically once monthly. One-third were dissatisfied with their supervision, greater satisfaction being related to having more frequent clinical supervision and having external individual clinical supervision. Having a safe and trustworthy relationship with supervisors was a dominant issue, and two-thirds of psychologists wanted separation of their clinical and line management supervision. Although 70% were supervisors, only 40% were confident in their supervisory skills and just 16% had formal supervisor training. Independent predictors of supervisory confidence were experience as a psychologist, having formal supervisor training, experience as a supervisor and confidence as a therapist. A novel finding was that longer experience of personal therapy was related to greater confidence as a supervisor. This study indicates the need for access to more frequent clinical supervision to be facilitated for psychologists and for there to be clear separation of line management and clinical supervision. It is also essential that more resources are put into training supervisors. While most psychologists are engaged in supervision, frequency of attendance is low, with more satisfied psychologists having more frequent supervision. Most psychologists want separation of their clinical and line management supervision and have a preference for external supervision, safe

  9. La asesoría del psicopedagogo y la dirección del círculo infantil Psychological counseling and nursery school management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laritza Raquel del Risco López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers the impact of psychological counseling on improving nursery school management. By studying the actual practices of these professionals and institutions, constructing a theoretical framework, and exchanging with specialists, the authors attain to rethink, improve and update educational practice. The researchers make extensive use of theoretical methods for constructing a framework, observe psychologist performance at nursery schools, and conduct interviews and survey on related issues. The effectiveness of the proposal was assessed on the basis of experts’ criteria (nursery school professionals and psychologists. The findings include a description of psychological counseling in nursery schools viewing the process as a dynamic interchange of ideas and mutual professional support. Likewise, the highlights of the process of articulating psychologists and principal performances are given. ,

  10. Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling publishes articles directed to the common interest of counsellors, psychologists, educators and personnel workers in schools, colleges, universities, community agencies and government. Especially welcome are stimulating research study reports.

  11. The relationship between Counseling Psychology and Positive Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Vossler, Andreas; Steffen , Edith; Joseph, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to explore the relation between the professional specialty of counseling psychology and positive psychology. Following a brief historical overview of counseling psychology, we explore its theoretical convergence with positive psychology and examine how the ideas from positive psychology have been received by counseling psychologists. We argue that although counseling psychology has its roots in ideas that are consistent with positive psychology, the profession has d...

  12. Training the industrial and organisational psychologist as counsellor: Are we doing enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial and organisational (I-O psychologists are responsible for workplacecounselling. Workplace counselling requires specific skills and training for the I-O psychologist. Research purpose: The main aim of the study was to explore the role of training the I-Opsychologist as workplace counsellor. Motivation for the study: Studies show that the I-O psychologist does not feel adequatelyprepared for their role as workplace counsellor. It is important to explore which skills andtraining are needed to equip the I-O psychologist as counsellor. Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research design with convenience andsnowball sampling was used to identify I-O psychologists (n = 22 from different businesssectors in Gauteng and North-West. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gatherdata and content analysis was utilised to extract themes and sub-themes from the results. Main findings: The findings showed that the participants know about the process of counselling, but they did not feel adequately prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. From the findings, recommendations for the training of future I-O psychologists are made. Practical implications: This study adds to the knowledge about ensuring that the I-Opsychologist is equipped during their training for the workplace to address the counselling needs of employees in the workplace in South Africa. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes towards ensuring that the I-O psychologistis sufficiently prepared for their role as workplace counsellor by making knowledge available regarding the skills required by I-O psychologists to be applied in practice. Keywords: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologist; Counsellor; Skills and competencies; Qualitative research; Training

  13. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  14. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients : A prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C.J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Heide, Iris Van Der; Rejda, Tomas; Van Veldhoven, Peter L.J.; Berkel, Sietske Van; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Willem H.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  15. George Kelly: cognitive psychologist, humanistic psychologist, or something else entirely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjafield, John G

    2008-11-01

    George Kelly was regarded by some of his contemporaries as a cognitive psychologist and by others as a humanistic psychologist. Kelly himself resisted being rubricized. He did, however, name several people who had been influential in his life and work, one of whom was J.F. Herbart. A comparison of Herbart and Kelly reveals several similarities. Both shared a belief that psychology was fundamentally a mathematical discipline. Both eliminated distinctions usually taken for granted in psychology, such as emotion versus cognition. Reconstructing Kelly's relation to Herbart allows one to see more clearly why Kelly was such a unique figure in 20th century psychology.

  16. The In-House Psychologist: Do We Speak the Same Language? Short Report of a Qualitative Practice Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, Birgitte; De Lepeleire, Jan

    2013-01-02

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is gaining importance. Although general practices (GP's) have a comprehensive experience in collaboration with psychologists, research on this topic is scarce. In house referrals to a psychologist are assumed to lower the thresholds for patients and GP's. In this study it was investigated whether the GP's reasons to refer in were accordance with the treatment strategy of the residing psychologist. The study is performed in a retrospective, observational cross section design. The studied population were the residing psychologist and GP's. Both were asked to complete a questionnaire. Outcome measures where the referral reasons of the GP's and the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A total sample of 92 patients of 6 GP's was studied. Over 60% of the patients were referred for counseling but only in 25% of the cases this proposal was carried out by the psychologist. Overall, the referral reasons of the GP's were not in accordance with the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A close collaboration and communication between general practitioners and psychologists is both difficult and indispensable. This practice research demonstrated that the referral motives of the GP's usually do not correspond to the treatment policy of the psychologist. This observation is partly explained by a lack of understanding of the GP in the treatment strategies of the psychologists. Another part of the explanation is that there is a pre-selection of the GPs referrals rather influenced by patient characteristics than by pathology.

  17. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs SR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan R Childs,1,* Emma M Casely,2,* Bianca M Kuehler,1 Stephen Ward,1 Charlotte L Halmshaw,1 Sarah E Thomas,1 Ian D Goodall,1 Carsten Bantel1,3 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Anaesthetic Department, Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, 3Section of Anaesthetics, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize

  18. Counseling Psychology Trainees' Social Justice Interest and Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J.; Sendrowitz, Kerrin

    2011-01-01

    Scholars within the field of counseling psychology have for some time now articulated eloquent and compelling calls for attending to social justice in the social sciences. To date, counseling psychologists have been at the forefront of addressing social justice issues in research, practice, and professional development. The present study advances…

  19. What makes a competent psychologist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roe, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    In developing European standards for the psychological profession, 2 approaches to the definition of professional competence have been proposed. One focuses on the roles and functions psychologists should be able to perform (output model), the other on the educational curricula that should be

  20. Counselling students with depressive tendencies for better ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cognitive restructuring as a counseling strategy is expounded upon for adaptation by professional counsellors and psychologists. Emphasis is laid on teaching students self-monitoring in order to identify negative automatic thoughts that are fueling the depressive symptoms and to replace them with more adaptive thoughts, ...

  1. Online Counseling: A Need for Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The rejoinder responds to the four reactions by Jeffrey Barnett, Tai Chang, Delida Sanchez-Page, and Franz Caspar and Thomas Berger in the November 2005 issue of The Counseling Psychologist. In doing so, the authors emphasize the important need for further clarity regarding the effectiveness of online mental and behavioral health services in…

  2. Junior Enlisted Counseling Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-06

    LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) I JUNIOR ENLISTED COUNSELING...counseling, the leader and subordinate conduct a review to identify and discuss the subordinate’s strengths and weaknesses and create an individual...counseling should occur following the initial session (per AR 600-20). Army regulation only requires reviews to be conducted on a quarterly basis for junior

  3. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. 20 CFR 220.59 - Requesting examination by a specific physician, psychologist or institution-hearings officer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... physician, psychologist or institution-hearings officer hearing level. 220.59 Section 220.59 Employees... Consultative Examinations § 220.59 Requesting examination by a specific physician, psychologist or institution... examination by a particular physician, psychologist or institution. Some examples include the following: (a...

  5. Contemporary roles of the pediatric psychologist in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichler, Jessica C; Harris, Michael A; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Important stakeholders, including the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), recognize the need for psychologists to be an integral part of diabetes care. This review paper aims to provide a comprehensive examination of pediatric psychologists' roles in working with children and adolescents with diabetes, including during distinct phases of treatment (e.g., diagnosis, outpatient diabetes clinic visits, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient psychology visits) and with different modalities of psychological interventions (e.g., screening, individual, family, and group therapy). In addition, the role of the psychologist in diabetes care within various settings (e.g., private practice, academic medical centers, and community organizations) will be explored. Finally, this paper will outline other roles in which psychologists contribute to diabetes-specific efforts (e.g., translational research, program development in transition to adult care, advocacy for health care reform initiatives, health care billing/reimbursement, and alternative methods to psychosocial care delivery) as well as future directions for working with children and adolescents with diabetes. Pediatric psychologists have multiple professional roles in a wide variety of settings; however, there is more that can be done in the future to fully utilize pediatric psychologists in diabetes care for children and adolescents, such as embedding psychologists into integrated clinic visits where families receive comprehensive medical and psychological services to support overall health and well-being. Therefore, there is a need for increased advocacy to obtain even more pediatric psychology engagement in diabetes care to provide new clinical services and develop more translational research.

  6. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  7. Special Issue: Leisure Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlew, Larry D., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Special issue includes (1) "Introduction" (Burlew); (2) "Leisure Counseling (LC): A Call to Order" (Emerson); (3) "Integrating Leisure into Adult Career Counseling Process" (Pearson); (4) "Developmental Approach to LC Theory" (McDaniels); (5) "LC for the Elderly" (Clark); (6) "LC with AIDS…

  8. Psychologists and the Transition From Pediatrics to Adult Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Monaghan, Maureen C; Gilleland Marchak, Jordan; Driscoll, Kimberly A; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2015-11-01

    Guidelines for optimal transition call for multidisciplinary teams, including psychologists, to address youth and young adults' multifactorial needs. This study aimed to characterize psychologists' roles in and barriers to involvement in transition from pediatric to adult health care. Psychologists were invited via professional listservs to complete an online survey about practice settings, roles in transition programming, barriers to involvement, and funding sources. Participants also responded to open-ended questions about their experiences in transition programs. One hundred participants responded to the survey. Involvement in transition was reported at multiple levels from individual patient care to institutional transition programming, and 65% reported more than one level of involvement. Direct clinical care (88%), transition-related research (50%), and/or leadership (44%) involvement were reported, with 59% reporting more than one role. Respondents often described advocating for their involvement on transition teams. Various sources of funding were reported, yet, 23% reported no funding for their work. Barriers to work in transition were common and included health care systems issues such as poor coordination among providers or lack of a clear transition plan within the clinic/institution. Psychologists assume numerous roles in the transition of adolescents from pediatric to adult health care. With training in health care transition-related issues, psychologists are ideally positioned to partner with other health professionals to develop and implement transition programs in multidisciplinary settings, provided health care system barriers can be overcome. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Training Psychologists for Rural Practice: Exploring Opportunities and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Lin, Ching-Ching Claire; Morrissey, Joseph P; Ellis, Alan R; Fraher, Erin; Richman, Erica L; Thomas, Kathleen C; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2018-04-17

    To examine trends in the psychologist workforce and training opportunities, including factors that may influence the decision of clinical psychologists to practice in rural settings. We use a mixed-methods approach to examine the psychologist workforce nationally and in North Carolina (NC), including (1) an analysis of the location of programs awarding doctoral degrees; (2) an analysis of the practice, demographic, and educational characteristics of the psychologist workforce; and (3) interviews with directors of doctoral programs in clinical psychology to understand where current graduates are getting jobs and why they may or may not be choosing to practice in rural communities. Fewer than 1% of programs and institutions awarding doctoral degrees in psychology in the United States are located in rural areas. In NC, approximately 80% of practicing psychologists have out-of-state degrees and about 80% of recent NC graduates are not currently licensed in the state. This juxtaposition undermines the utility of adding more in-state degree programs. While expansion of training programs within rural areas could help alleviate the shortages of mental health providers, adding new degree-granting programs alone will not necessarily increase supply. We discuss complementary recruitment and retention strategies, including greater incentives for rural training and practice as well as training in emerging technologies that don't require providers to be physically located in underserved areas, such as telemedicine. Increasing the supply of psychologists practicing in rural areas will require a thoughtful, multipronged approach to training this critical part of the behavioral health workforce. © 2018 National Rural Health Association.

  10. Robert Zajonc: The Complete Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Kent C.

    2010-01-01

    This article joins with others in the same issue to celebrate the career of Robert B. Zajonc who was a broad, as well as deeply talented, psychologist. Beyond his well-known focus in social psychology, the work of Zajonc also involved, at one time or another, forays into nearly every other subfield of psychology. This article focuses specifically on his studies that extended into biopsychology, which deserve special highlighting in order to be recognized alongside his many major achievements in emotion and related social topics. The biopsychological focus is offered here in the hope that all his diverse contributions be savored together when celebrating the complete psychology of Robert Zajonc. PMID:22473376

  11. School Psychologists' Job Satisfaction: Ten Years Later

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, Travis G.

    2004-01-01

    School Psychologistsâ Job Satisfaction: Ten Years Later (ABSTRACT) This study was designed to replicate nationwide surveys completed in 1982 and 1992. The purpose was to examine and describe the levels of job satisfaction and the relationship between the variables in a national sample of school psychologists belonging to the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The sample for this study consisted of respondents who reported being full-time school practitioners. ...

  12. The changing duties of organizational psychologists in Slovenia in the past and in the present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Boštjančič

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As with other areas, the growth of occupational and organizational psychology is based on scientific research, variety of situational factors and trends, and needs that arise in the organizational environment. The aim of the study was to describe the tasks carried out by psychologists in organizations in the past (55 years long history of the field in Slovenia, and to compare these with the tasks that are currently performed. The results were compared with similar studies that had been conducted in Slovenia. The results reveal that the work carried out by psychologists in organizations is currently more diverse, but also more focused on specific forms of work, particularly those related to psychological assessment, counseling, and motivation. Their duties are now more likely to be conducted in an international environment and involve working directly with employees and leaders. Participants also gave recommendations to psychologists who work or want to work in the field of organizational psychology.

  13. Children and Natural Disasters: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda; Oehler-Stinnett, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide children are impacted by natural disasters, including hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, landslides and sandstorms, winter and severe storms, heat waves, volcanoes and tsunamis. School psychologists should understand natural disaster effects, such as economic loss, relocation and health concerns and mental health…

  14. Gesell: The First School Psychologist. Part II. Practice and Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    This article describes what is known of Arnold L. Gesell's position in Connecticut between 1914-1919, including conditions of employment and responsibilities. While some questions remain unanswered regarding Gesell's acquisition of the title "school psychologist," it is concluded that he was the first U.S. practitioner to hold that…

  15. Psychologist suicide: Incidence, impact, and suggestions for prevention, intervention, and postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Phillip M; Van Orden, Kimberly A; Bongar, Bruce; Bridgeman, Diane; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Hillbrand, Marc; Yufit, Robert I

    2011-06-01

    Psychologist practitioners are not immune to some mental health problems, including suicidality, for which they provide services. In the aftermath of two recent psychologist suicides, the American Psychological Association's Advisory Committee on Colleague Assistance (ACCA) initiated the formation of a conjoint ad hoc committee consisting of members from ACCA, the American Psychological Association (APA) Practice Directorate, and the Section on Clinical Emergencies and Crises (Section VII of APA's Division 12) to investigate the incidence of psychologist suicide and its impact on colleagues, students or interns, patients or clients, and the profession. The committee reviewed the extant empirical literature on suicide rates for psychologists, evaluated unpublished data on psychologist suicide provided by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), interviewed colleague survivors, reviewed published case reports of the impact of therapist suicides, and linked their findings to the literature on professional distress, impairment, and self-care. The committee concluded that there is evidence suggestive of an elevated risk of suicide for psychologists in past decades. It further concluded that there is a need for further research to confirm if there is a heightened risk of suicide for psychologists in the present day, and to determine factors that might contribute to such risk. Accounts from colleague-survivors suggest that the impact of a psychologist's suicide can affect many people including family, colleagues, students, and patients or clients. This article offers suggestions for possible preventive approaches, for intervention with potentially at-risk colleagues, and for postvention efforts in the wake of a colleague suicide.

  16. Genetic Counseling as an Educational Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, James M.; St. Pierre, Richard

    Historically genetic counseling programs have not included strong educational components or sound educational foundations. This paper deals with some of the drawbacks of current genetic counseling programs and the implications for education in the genetic counseling process. The author adopts a broad definition of genetic counseling which…

  17. [Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Isabelle; Cludy, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration. The collaboration between nurses and psychologists is relatively recent within healthcare institutes. Gaining maximum value from such a collaboration requires solid knowledge of the roles and the limits of each profession as well as a real desire to work together, for the benefit of the greater well-being of the patient and, indirectly, of the teams.

  18. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under

  19. The School Psychologist as a Chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weininger, Otto

    1971-01-01

    This paper reviews very briefly some of the comprehensive views of the functions of the school psychologists, presents some suggestions which have been made in recent years for the training of school psychological personnel, and discusses the complex interrelationships between the psychologist and all those people and variables which make up his…

  20. Educating School Psychologists for the Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conoley, Jane Close; Gutkin, Terry B.

    1986-01-01

    Two tasks are necessary for successful practice in school psychology: (1) to educate school psychologists to provide state-of-the-art psychological services; and (2) to teach psychologists to change their work environments to support comprehensive psychological services. Domains of knowledge, programmatic considerations, and practical guidelines…

  1. The in-house psychologist: do we speak the same language? Short report of a qualitative practice project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Schoenmakers

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary collaboration is gaining importance. Although general practices (GP’s have a comprehensive experience in collaboration with psychologists, research on this topic is scarce. In house referrals to a psychologist are assumed to lower the thresholds for patients and GP’s. In this study it was investigated whether the GP’s reasons to refer in were accordance with the treatment strategy of the residing psychologist. The study is performed in a retrospective, observational cross section design. The studied population were the residing psychologist and GP’s. Both were asked to complete a questionnaire. Outcome measures where the referral reasons of the GP’s and the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A total sample of 92 patients of 6 GP’s was studied. Over 60% of the patients were referred for counseling but only in 25% of the cases this proposal was carried out by the psychologist. Overall, the referral reasons of the GP’s were not in accordance with the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A close collaboration and communication between general practitioners and psychologists is both difficult and indispensable. This practice research demonstrated that the referral motives of the GP’s usually do not correspond to the treatment policy of the psychologist. This observation is partly explained by a lack of understanding of the GP in the treatment strategies of the psychologists. Another part of the explanation is that there is a pre-selection of the GPs referrals rather influenced by patient characteristics than by pathology.

  2. Functional roles and foundational characteristics of psychologists in integrated primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Justin M; McKay, Kevin M; Vogel, Mark E; Masters, Kevin S

    2012-03-01

    Psychologists are presented with unprecedented opportunities to integrate their work in primary care settings. Although some roles of psychologists in primary care overlap with those in traditional psychology practice settings, a number are distinct reflecting the uniqueness of the primary care culture. In this paper, we first describe the integrated primary care setting, with a focus on those settings that have components of patient centered medical home. We then describe functional roles and foundational characteristics of psychologists in integrated primary care. The description of functional roles emphasizes the diversity of roles performed. The foundational characteristics identified are those that we consider the 'primary care ethic,' or core characteristics of psychologists that serve as the basis for the various functional roles in integrated primary care. The 'primary care ethic' includes attitudes, values, knowledge, and abilities that are essential to the psychologist being a valued, effective, and productive primary care team member.

  3. Genetic counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a high risk of having babies with Tay-Sachs or Canavan's disease. African-Americans, who may risk ... yours to make. Images Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis References Simpson JL, Holzgreve W, Driscoll DA. Genetic ...

  4. The Strength-Based Counseling Model: A Paradigm Shift in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elsie J.

    2006-01-01

    Sometimes, it is difficult for a profession to move forward because its members interpret emerging conceptual models from the perspective of old frameworks. Each of the five reactants in this issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" interpreted the strength-based counseling model within their own self-adopted framework--Adlerian psychology, role…

  5. Empirical Reflections on Academic Training Programs in Counseling Psychology: Contexts and Commitments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Goodyear, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    The three main articles in the Major Contribution of the September issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" address academic training programs in counseling psychology, focusing on their institutional contexts and commitments. Each article examines one key issue, provides empirical data concerning this issue, and traces the practical implications of…

  6. Vocational Psychology: Using One of Counseling Psychology's Strengths to Foster Human Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitschek, Christine; Woodson, Shelley Janiczek

    2006-01-01

    At several points in the history of their field, counseling psychologists have emphasized that fostering human strengths is part of their mission. Vocational psychology is an area of counseling psychology that has focused consistently on human strengths. In keeping with the Major Contribution's theme, this article examines the following: (a)…

  7. Social work practice and sex counseling | Nitin | East African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sex counselors and Clinical Psychologist today need to understand the changing social environment and challenging role in making people accept normal sexual practices, abstaining from perversion and safe sexual rehabilitation by behavioral therapy and counseling for having happy marital life. Challenges in sex ...

  8. Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, and Counseling Ethics: Not an Abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urofsky, Robert I.; Engels, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, increased attention has been given to ethics in the preparation of counselors and psychologists. With that increase comes a number of voices calling for exposure to and integration of not only moral philosophy but other areas of philosophy to enhance understanding and provide a foundation for counseling practice. The…

  9. Person-centred counselling to ameliorate symptoms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cost of hiring registered psychologists is likely to be prohibitive, indicating the need for lesser trained professional or lay counsellors. Lay counselling services are already available for AIDS patients who receive antiretroviral therapy, where problems relating to mental health and treatment adherence are significant.

  10. Historical Antecedents: Counseling Psychology and the Fulbright Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a comprehensive, field-specific directory of counseling psychologists who have served as Fulbright scholars. First, the authors provide a brief history of the development and mission of the Fulbright program, followed by a review of prominent Fulbright grants. Next, they focus on the Fulbright Senior…

  11. Clinical psychologists' experiences of NHS organisational change

    OpenAIRE

    Colley, Rich; Eccles, Fiona; Hutton, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Organisational-change experiences of eight clinical psychologists working in the NHS were captured. Three themes revealed the challenges they experienced and how their knowledge and skills have helped them understand, cope with, and respond to change.

  12. Finding a Trans-Affirmative Provider: Challenges Faced by Trans and Gender Diverse Psychologists and Psychology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Lore M; Singh, Anneliese A

    2017-08-01

    This article explores some of the challenges faced by trans and gender diverse (TGD) individuals who not only are attempting to access trans-affirmative care, but who are also members of the very profession from which they are seeking services. The authors explore challenges related to finding supervision, accessing care for assessment services, and finding a provider for personal counseling. With each example, the authors unpack the challenges and also address the implications for training for all involved. Based on these challenges that TGD psychologists and trainees face in attempting to access care, the authors provide recommendations related to trans-affirmative training for psychologists. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. "Let's get in formation": On becoming a psychologist-activist in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Kevin L

    2017-12-01

    Throughout the history of the United States, there have been many social movements that have resulted in an array of historic societal outcomes-ranging from the end of racial segregation to women's voting rights to the legalization of same-sex marriages. Despite the positive outcomes derived from political activism, many psychologists have struggled with how to advocate for social justice while maintaining their professional responsibilities and ethical boundaries. The current article reviews the historical ways that psychologists have participated in political movements-from the use of psychological research in landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases to psychologist-led pushes for policy changes in psychology, medicine, and other mental health related fields. Next, a critical review provides some of the major controversies or dilemmas regarding psychology, social justice, and political participation-including (a) ethical concerns and professional boundaries, (b) the utility of political neutrality in psychology, (c) psychologists' balance and self-care, (d) psychologists' lack of advocacy training, and (e) beliefs concerning the role of social justice advocacy in psychology. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of the concept "psychologist-activist"-highlighting the many ways that psychologists across various subfields and institutions can combat oppression on individual, interpersonal, group, and institutional levels. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Leadership Perspectives on Integrating Psychologists into Specialty Care Clinics: An Evolving Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouljoud, Marwan; Ryan, Michael; Eshelman, Anne; Bryce, Kelly; Jesse, Michelle T

    2018-02-21

    Integration of health psychologists into specialty care is a shift in the tertiary care construct that addresses all aspects of a patient's presentation, including psychiatric/social history, psychological well-being, and behavioral contributions to the disease process, assuring both optimal health outcomes and cost-effectiveness in a financially challenging healthcare environment. In this paper, we discuss leadership perspectives (physician and psychologists) on the factors involved in integrating a health psychologist into a busy tertiary care environment. Ultimately, we hope that this information provides a primer on how to frame a proposal for an integrated health psychologist emphasizing the elements important to senior medical leadership and administration. First, we briefly discuss the current payer framework, providing support for integration emphasizing costs and other metrics. Second, we introduce organizational structure models and strategies for integration. Lastly, we will discuss the unique skillset psychologists possess, and additional skills necessary, to be effective in the changing landscape of healthcare. We think this information is important both for leaders attempting to integrate a health psychologist into specialty care and for the early career health psychologist embarking on his/her first senior staff position.

  15. The Characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamornphun Yurayat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study components of desired characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists. The sample consisted of 169 Thai clinical psychologists who have Thai clinical license and work on psychiatric in the hospital selected by simple random sampling technique. The research instrument was characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists questionnaires. Data were analyzed by means of second order confirmatory factor analysis using LISREL version 8.72. The results of the research revealed that desired characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists consisted of 3 components ; ability, personality and ethics. The characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists was congruent with the empirical data. The factor loadings of those three components were high at the .05 level, and they were found to be capable of measuring the characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists functioning factors.The results of second order confirmatory factor analysis of model in the characteristics of Thai Clinical Psychologists were found that model was fitted with empirical data. Ranging from the highest factor loading value to the lowest, they were from 0.30 to 1.09, respectively: personality, ethics and ability with factors loading of 1.09, 0.59, and 0.30 respectively. The construct validity of models was consistent with empirical data, with chi-square goodness of fit test at 56.65 ; p-value = 0.13497 ; Goodness of Fit Index (GFI = 0.94 ; Adjusted Goodness of Fit Index (AGFI = 0.91 ; Comparative fit index (CFI = 0.98 ; Root Mean Square Residual (RMR = 0.010, and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA = 0.037

  16. THE PATIENT-DOCTOR-PSYCHOLOGIST TRIANGLE IN A CASE Of SEVERE IMUNOSUPRESSION IN THE HIV INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciuc, Carmen; Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Badescu, Aida; Duceag, Letiţia Doina; Largu, Alexandra Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the last two years the Romanian adult population infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has increased due to sexual transmission, both heterosexual and homosexual. The case presented is that of a 33 year-old man, admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Iasi with acute respiratory failure and a confirmation of Kaposi's sarcoma. Tests later proved positive for HIV, the patient being included in the stage AIDS C3 (acute immunodeficiency syndrome). The respiratory failure was suspected to be caused by Pneumocystis carinii and cotrimoxazol therapy, oxygen therapy and anti-retroviral therapy were established. He was also referred to the oncology hospital for treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. The patient's adherence to therapy was influenced by a strong doctor-patient relationship, as well as by psychological counseling and support. Creating a functional doctor-patient-psychologist team is key throughout the HIV-positive patient's existence, for supporting long term adherence to therapy and acceptance of the diagnosis. This case highlights the need for a strong psychosocial compartment in every medical center that deals with HIV-infected individuals.

  17. Genetic Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Information is presented on a number of tests used in genetic counseling (e.g., genetic evaluation, chromosome evaluation, consideration of multifactorial conditions, prenatal testing, and chorionic villus sampling) which help parents with one disabled child make family planning decisions. (CB)

  18. Psychosocial care and the role of clinical psychologists in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sheng-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chun; Lin, I-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the works of clinical psychologists in palliative care in Taiwan. Clinical psychologists who were working or had experience in palliative care were recruited. A 2-stage qualitative method study was conducted, including semistructured interviews and a focus group. The following 4 main themes were identified: (1) the essential nature of the psychologists' care were caring and company; (2) the dynamic process included psychological assessment, intervention, and evaluation based on psychological knowledge; (3) they needed to modify their care using an integrative framework, by setting practical goals and using techniques with flexibility; and (4) they faced external and internal challenges in this field. Clinical psychologists have beneficial contributions but have to modify psychosocial care based on the patients' needs and clinical situations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Peer counselling versus role-playing: Two training methods of therapeutic skills in clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Rodríguez, José; Bados López, Arturo; Fusté Escolano, Adela; García-Grau, Eugeni; Saldaña García, Carmina; Balaguer Fort, Gemma; Lluch, Teresa; Arcos Pros, Mar

    2018-02-01

    Training programmes for clinical psychologists should include evidence-based teaching methods that enable trainees to learn therapeutic skills. Here we compared the perceived utility of role-playing vs. peer counselling. In peer counselling, one student recounts a personal experience to the other, who thus has the opportunity to act as the therapist in relation to a real situation. Given that sharing such personal experiences may provoke discomfort in students, we also examined this aspect. Trainees (n=202) were given both role-play and peer counselling activities as a way of practising empathy and active listening. After completing the skills training programme they completed a questionnaire to assess the extent to which each method had helped them to develop their self-awareness and to acquire these therapeutic skills. In general, peer counselling was considered more useful than role-playing for enhancing self-awareness and personal growth, as well as for learning these professional skills. Regarding the discomfort experienced by students, our data suggest that any initial reluctance to share personal experiences is outweighed by the personal and professional benefits obtained. Our results indicate that experiential learning involving emotionally charged situations is an effective way of teaching therapeutic skills to clinical and health psychology trainees.

  20. School Counseling in China Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Qiong, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used…

  1. Four Bad Habits of Modern Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, James; Barrett, Paul; Cota, Lisa; Felix, Crystal; Taylor, Zachery; Garner, Samantha; Medellin, Eliwid; Vest, Adam

    2017-08-14

    Four data sets from studies included in the Reproducibility Project were re-analyzed to demonstrate a number of flawed research practices (i.e., "bad habits") of modern psychology. Three of the four studies were successfully replicated, but re-analysis showed that in one study most of the participants responded in a manner inconsistent with the researchers' theoretical model. In the second study, the replicated effect was shown to be an experimental confound, and in the third study the replicated statistical effect was shown to be entirely trivial. The fourth study was an unsuccessful replication, yet re-analysis of the data showed that questioning the common assumptions of modern psychological measurement can lead to novel techniques of data analysis and potentially interesting findings missed by traditional methods of analysis. Considered together, these new analyses show that while it is true replication is a key feature of science, causal inference, modeling, and measurement are equally important and perhaps more fundamental to obtaining truly scientific knowledge of the natural world. It would therefore be prudent for psychologists to confront the limitations and flaws in their current analytical methods and research practices.

  2. Current and Future School Psychologists' Preparedness to Work with LGBT Students: Role of Education and Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Kelly, Jennifer; Goldstein, Thalia R.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess current and future school psychologists' attitudes toward and preparedness to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in schools. Two-hundred seventy-nine school psychologists (n = 162, 58%) and school psychology graduate students (n = 117, 42%) were included in the study.…

  3. The National Association of School Psychologists' Self-Assessment Tool for School Psychologists: Factor Structure and Relationship to the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Rossen, Eric; Charvat, Jeff; Meyer, Lauren; Tanner, Nick

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (2010a), often referred to as the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model, describes the comprehensive range of professional skills and competencies available from school psychologists across 10 domains. The…

  4. The Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior to Prevention Science in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, John L.; Netland, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of reasoned action and planned behavior (TRA/PB) is a model of behavior change that has been extensively studied in the health sciences but has had limited exposure in the counseling psychology literature. The model offers counseling psychologists a framework to conceptualize prevention research and practice. The model is important to…

  5. A Maslovian Counseling Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Stephen

    1979-01-01

    With Maslow's hierarchy as a basis, the model provides structure for setting goals in counseling cases and overall programs. Different kinds of client concerns are identified, and suggestions are made for using these 14 categories. The article includes specific suggestions for using the model in diagnosis, evaluation, counselor education, and…

  6. Identifying Role Diffusion in School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astramovich, Randall L.; Hoskins, Wendy J.; Gutierrez, Antonio P.; Bartlett, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    Role ambiguity in professional school counseling is an ongoing concern despite recent advances with comprehensive school counseling models. The study outlined in this article examined role diffusion as a possible factor contributing to ongoing role ambiguity in school counseling. Participants included 109 graduate students enrolled in a…

  7. Counselling--Alternative Approaches. Information Bank Working Paper No. 2476.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Jeannie

    This document looks at various types of counseling approaches and includes sections on Rogerian counseling, Gestalt therapy, and rational emotive therapy. The section on Rogerian counseling includes a discussion of the principles of counseling from Rogers'"Client Centered Therapy." Gestalt therapy is explained in more detail and a…

  8. 10 CFR 712.33 - Designated Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SOMD. (b) The Designated Psychologist must: (1) Hold a doctoral degree from a clinical psychology... license to practice clinical psychology in the state where HRP medical assessments occur; (4) Have met the... practice by any institution; (4) Being named a defendant in any criminal proceeding (felony or misdemeanor...

  9. The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddholm, Mats

    The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist The aim of this presentation is to illuminate and discuss some connections between the therapeutic profession and development of music pedagogic theory. A topic that initially emerged as a result of a sub-study in my PhD -project about professiona...

  10. Facilitating Relationships between Pediatricians and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jaime L.; Hughes, Cheyenne; Helwig, Jocelyn; Shapiro, Edward S.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatricians and other family healthcare providers are critical in working to address many behavioral, academic, and/or social difficulties children experience at home and school. Effective communication and collaboration between school psychologists and healthcare providers is essential to fully understand the child's problems and design…

  11. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple cases study was carried out with the application of two research instruments (questionnaire and interview to those psychologists who work in primary and secondary health care in Las Tunas municipality to diagnose their needs related to the management of bereavement. Qualitative methodology was used, based on the method of participatory action research, and workshops were designed as forms of educational intervention.Results: it was proved that psychologists have insufficient theoretical and methodological training in relation to care for the bereaved. Consequently, psychotherapeutic workshops were designed, offering the general methodology and procedures to be followed by the professional who assists the bereaved.Conclusions: psychotherapeutic workshops constitute a referential theoretical and practical model very useful for the preparation of psychologists to deal with bereavement.

  12. The Preparation of School Psychologists in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzichristou, Chryse; Polychroni, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the preparation of school psychologists in Greece. It discusses the social and cultural contexts that have influenced the evolution of the discipline of psychology, the beginning of training programs in school psychology, and the current status of school psychological services. The structure of the Graduate Program of School…

  13. Psychologists' Diagnostic Processes during a Diagnostic Interview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, M.; Beerthuis, R.J.; Pieters, J.M.; Witteman, C.L.M.; Swinkels, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    In mental health care, psychologists assess clients’ complaints, analyze underlying problems, and identify causes for these problems, to make treatment decisions. We present a study on psychologists’ diagnostic processes, in which a mixed-method approach was employed. We aimed to identify a common

  14. Psychologists' diagnostic processes during a diagnostic interview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, Marleen; Beerthuis, Vos R.J.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Witteman, C.L.M.; Witteman, Cilia L.M.; Swinkels, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    In mental health care, psychologists assess clients’ complaints, analyze underlying problems, and identify causes for these problems, to make treatment decisions. We present a study on psychologists’ diagnostic processes, in which a mixed-method approach was employed. We aimed to identify a common

  15. Selection for professional training as educational psychologists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I co-ordinate the MEd Psych programme of the Department of Educational Psychology, University of Stellenbosch. After the completion of this training programme as well as an internship of twelve months, candidates are qualified to register as educational psychologists at the Health Professions Council of South Africa.

  16. Secondary trauma and ethical obligations for military psychologists: preserving compassion and competence in the crucible of combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W Brad; Bertschinger, Michael; Snell, Alicia K; Wilson, Amber

    2014-02-01

    Current ethical guidelines require psychologists to self-assess competence and take steps to limit or discontinue clinical work when they can no longer render competent care. Yet even in the best of circumstances, human beings--psychologists included--are not very good at evaluating their own performance. Moreover, when psychologists are deployed to combat zones and work constantly with severely traumatized and injured service members, evidence suggests that they become vulnerable to compassion fatigue and secondary trauma syndromes. In this article, we consider the unique threats to competence faced by military clinical psychologists. We conclude with several specific recommendations for deployed military clinical psychologists themselves and for the community leaders tasked with training and supervising them. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Neurosciences and adult health behaviors: recent findings and implications for counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L; Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-10-01

    The current review comprehensively examines recent advances in 2 innovative areas of neuroscience research on healthy adults regarding neuropsychosocial interactions on human cognition and behavior, as well as implications for counseling psychologists conducting research and in practice. Advances in how oxytocin influences prosocial behavior and the mitigation of social stress, and the influence of environmentally mediated gene expressions on the development of attachment disorders are surveyed and discussed in terms of how counseling psychologists might best integrate recent neuroscience research into a framework for therapeutic intervention. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive Assessment Practices: A Survey of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Dixon, Shauna G.

    2014-01-01

    The present article describes an exploratory study regarding the preferred cognitive assessment practices of current school psychologists. Three hundred and twenty-three school psychologists participated in the survey. The results suggest that the majority of school psychologists endorsed that they base their assessment practices on an underlying…

  19. National Association of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  20. 38 CFR 1.514a - Disclosure to private psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... psychologists. 1.514a Section 1.514a Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Disclosure to private psychologists. When a beneficiary elects to obtain therapy or analysis as a private patient from a private psychologist, such information in the medical record as may be pertinent may be...

  1. 42 CFR 410.71 - Clinical psychologist services and services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist services and services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist services. 410.71 Section 410.71 Public Health CENTERS FOR... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.71 Clinical psychologist services...

  2. [Work features of the psychologist in the primary health care centers of the public health care system in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharager Goldenberg, Judith; Molina Aguayo, María Loreto

    2007-09-01

    To define work characteristics of psychologists in public primary health care centers in Chile and the degree to which their functions conform to the standards set by the National Plan on Mental Health and Psychiatry (NPMHP). From December 2003 to November 2004, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted employing a questionnaire sent to a nonrandom sample of 486 professionals working in public primary care centers of Chile's 29 health districts. The total response rate was 34.4% (167 completed questionnaires). The questionnaire gathered general information and demographics; frequency, distribution, and type of activities performed; the mental health issues treated; personal perspectives on the efficiency of care, factors affecting interventions, and the quality of work conditions; and competence level regarding diagnosis and treatment strategies, as well as the educational background needed to fulfill the role of psychologist at the primary health care centers. Descriptive statistics with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the quantitative data. Content analysis techniques were applied to the responses to open-ended questions. Considerably more time is being devoted to individual consultations and interventions than to group and community promotion and prevention activities. Over 93% of the survey participants were satisfied with their work and valued their peers; however, more than half gave a negative rating to their work conditions and job security. The majority indicated that preparation for the role must include coursework on the health system, specifically the primary health care setting, and topics such as clinical and group psychology, public health policy, and primary health care management and specifics. Most critical to the work were a knowledge of diagnostic tools and classification systems, i.e., the International Classification of Diseases and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Contrary to NPMHP

  3. Freud: the first evolutionary psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCroy, D

    2000-04-01

    An evolutionary perspective on attachment theory and psychoanalytic theory brings these two fields together in interesting ways. Application of the evolutionary principle of parent-offspring conflict to attachment theory suggests that attachment styles represent context-sensitive, evolved (adaptive) behaviors. In addition, an emphasis on offspring counter-strategies to adult reproductive strategies leads to consideration of attachment styles as overt manifestations of psychodynamic mediating processes, including the defense mechanisms of repression and reaction formation.

  4. History's mysteries demystified: becoming a psychologist-historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Blount, Kelli; Rutherford, Alexandra; Baker, David; Johnson, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, psychologist-historian Robert Watson argued that the study of history was of particular salience to psychology. In this article we explore the relationship between psychology and history and argue that the psychologist-historian plays a vital role in the discipline of psychology. We provide a brief overview of the emergence of the history of psychology as a professional subdiscipline, describe who psychologist-historians are, explain why they are needed, and detail how to join their ranks. We argue that increasing historical sophistication among psychologists will have beneficial effects on research and teaching, and we invite all psychologists to participate in the making of psychology's history.

  5. Chronic headache: the role of the psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    The role of the psychologist in chronic headache needs to be tailored to the patient's presentation. For some patients, psychological issues need to be directly addressed (eg, psychiatric comorbidity, difficulties coping with headache, significant problems with sleep and/or stress, medication overuse, and history of abuse). Other situations (eg, patients' beliefs about their readiness to change ability to actively manage headaches, medication adherence, and managing triggers) involve behavioral/psychological principles even when there is no direct contact with a psychologist. This article reviews the literature on the importance of psychological issues in headache management and provides suggestions for how to address behavioral and cognitive factors and their potential for improved headache care.

  6. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  7. Professional Competency Profile of San Marcos psychologist

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana Manrique, Oswaldo; García A., Lupe; Sarria J., César; Morocho S., José; Herrera H., Edgar; Salazar C., Marina; Yanac R., Elisa; Sotelo L., Lidia; Sotelo L., Noemi

    2014-01-01

    Taking as reference the project Tuning, research inquires about the recognition of skills generic psychologist from his identification done by students for a fifth year of the period of intership or pre-professional practice and graduates, presenting the outcome of the five powers elected overwhelmingly, establishing their differentiation and relevance. Tomando como referencia el proyecto Tuning, la investigación indaga acerca del reconocimiento de las competencias genéricas del psicólogo ...

  8. Neuroscience research on aging and implications for counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen L; Díaz, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The advances in neuroscience have led to an increase in scientific understanding of the aging process, and counseling psychologists can benefit from familiarity with the research on the neuroscience of aging. In this article, we have focused on the cognitive neuroscience of aging, and we describe the progression of healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease, given its high prevalence rate among older adults (Alzheimer's Association, 2013). Common techniques used to study the cognitive neuroscience of aging are explained in regards to measuring age-related changes in the brain and the role of biomarkers in identifying cognitive decline related to Alzheimer's disease. Using this information and in collaboration with cognitive neuroscientists, it is our hope that counseling psychologists may further pursue research areas on aging as well as design appropriate interventions for older individuals who may be experiencing cognitive impairment. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Prescribing Privileges for Psychologists: A Public Service or Hazard?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E. Lakhan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The privilege to prescribe pharmacotherapeutics has been granted in limited areas to psychologists. The psychologist's role in society may be approaching a great evolution that can dramatically impact the state of mental healthcare and the discipline of psychiatry. Opponents argue drug company funding and cheaper non-PhD psychological professionals fuel the movement for prescription rights for PhD level psychologists. However, proponents claim that this right would equip psychologists with greater psychotherapeutic modalities and the capability of having richer doctor-patient relationships to diagnose and treat underserved populations. Nonetheless, the paucity of prescribing psychologist studies cannot allow the biopsychosocial community to make firm opinions, let alone a decision on this debate. This article reviews the history of clinical psychology and highlights the potential divergence into collaborative clinical and health psychologists and autonomous prescribing psychologists.

  10. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants’ estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes. PMID:28296929

  11. A multidisciplinary approach to clitoral reconstruction after female genital mutilation: the crucial role of counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schrijver, Lotte; Leye, Els; Merckx, Mireille

    2016-08-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is becoming more widely seen in the West, due to immigration and population movement. Health services are being confronted with the need to provide care for women with FGM. One of the more recent trends is the provision of clitoral reconstruction. It remains unclear, however, what constitutes good practice with regard to this type of surgery. Based on a keynote presentation about reconstructive clitoral surgery, we briefly discuss the possible consequences of FGM and the findings from recent publications on clitoral reconstruction. Recognising individual differences in women, we suggest a multidisciplinary counselling model to provide appropriate care for women requesting clitoral reconstruction. The literature shows that FGM influences physical, mental and sexual health. Clitoral reconstructive surgery can lead to an increase in sexual satisfaction and orgasm in some, but not all, women. A multidisciplinary approach would enable a more satisfactory and individually tailored approach to care. The multidisciplinary team should consist of a midwife, a gynaecological surgeon, a psychologist-psychotherapist, a sexologist and a social worker. Comprehensive health counselling should be the common thread in this model of care. Our proposed care pathway starts with taking a thorough history, followed by medical, psychological and sexological consultations. Women with FGM requesting clitoral reconstruction might primarily be looking to improve their sexual life, to recover their identity and to reduce pain. Surgery may not always be the right answer. Thorough counselling that includes medical, psychological and sexual advice is therefore necessary as part of a multidisciplinary approach.

  12. [The counseling of nursing decreases symptomatology and relapses in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Flores, Laura; Acuña-Rojas, Rosalinda; López-Medina, Leobardo; Meléndez-Mier, Guillermo

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is considered to be a public health problem, therefore it is essential to test health education strategies such as nursing counseling (NC) aimed at population groups such as children with allergic rhinitis and their tutors. This study aimed to measure the health benefits of children with this disease for a year. Longitudinal, randomized, comparative study with a sample of 100 pediatric patients of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with diagnosis of allergic rhinitis, with counseling (study group) and without counseling (control group). In both groups, an informed consent letter signed by both tutors was obtained, in addition to knowledge and assessment papers; the latter included a scale of symptomatology and Morisky Green (adherence to treatment). The children in the study group received intervention based on personalized education, didactic material, support of the multidisciplinary group if necessary (doctor, dermatologist and psychologist). The control group received usual care. In both groups, telephone follow-up was performed, which allowed the number of relapses to be identified in one year. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test (Mann-Whitney) was used to compare the results; the presence of relapses in the control group was statistically significant compared to the study group. It was found that the infant population that receives NC, has as a better benefit the control of the symptomatology and decrease of relapses per year. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  13. The Transracial Adoption Paradox: History, Research, and Counseling Implications of Cultural Socialization

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    The number of transracial adoptions in the United States, particularly international adoptions, is increasing annually. Counseling psychology as a profession, however, is a relatively silent voice in the research on and practice of transracial adoption. This article presents an overview of the history and research on transracial adoption to inform counseling psychologists of the set of racial and ethnic challenges and opportunities that transracial adoptive families face in everyday living. P...

  14. Behavioral Treatment for Headaches in Children: A Practical Guide for the Child Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benore, Ethan; Monnin, Kara

    2016-03-29

    Headache is a highly prevalent condition and is the leading cause for school absences. Despite the rich literature supporting behavioral treatments for headache, many child psychologists mistakenly perceive that they lack appropriate training to treat children with headache. Likewise, many physicians feel underprepared to refer the child for behavioral treatments. This article serves as a primer, providing tools for the general child psychologist or mental health provider by answering frequently asked questions. First, we provide a concise background on pathophysiology and medical care for headache. We then detail aspects of behavioral interventions for headache, including a case example. We included a limited list of up-to-date references most relevant to the child psychologist who does not treat headache on a regular basis to support further reading. By reviewing this primer, local mental health professionals can provide children with headache access to high-quality, evidence-based clinical care closer to home. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. A Thematic Inquiry into the Burnout Experience of Australian Solo-Practicing Clinical Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trent E. Hammond

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burnout is conceptualized as a syndrome that consists of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment. Despite the increased frequency and severity of burnout in the Western world, there is limited published research regarding the experiences of clinical psychologists who have had burnout. The present study examines clinical psychologists’ different experiences of burnout in Australia.Design and Methods: In the year 2015, six privately practicing and solo-employed clinical psychologists provided rich qualitative data by participating in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was the method used to analyze clinical psychologists’ natural accounts of their burnout experiences. Using NVivo, emerging themes were identified through coding ‘first order constructs’ and then axial code ‘second order constructs.’Findings: Clinical psychologists indicated that their roles are demanding and a diverse range of symptoms, including the enduring effects of burnout, mental stress, fatigue, decreased personal accomplishment, negative affect, depersonalization, reduced productivity and motivation, and insomnia. They identified precursors of burnout, including excessive workload and hours of work, life stresses, mismanaged workload, and transference. Clinical psychologists suggested that protective factors of burnout include knowledge and years worked in direct care, and trusting and long-term relationships. They indicated that the barriers to overcoming burnout include the fallacy that their clients’ expectations and needs are more important than their own, the financial cost of working in private practice, contemporary knowledge and inadequate education regarding self-care, and time constraints.Discussion and Conclusion: The findings presented in this study provide psychologists and other health professionals with an insight about the burnout experience and inform professionals of the mental

  16. A Thematic Inquiry into the Burnout Experience of Australian Solo-Practicing Clinical Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Trent E.; Crowther, Andrew; Drummond, Sally

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Burnout is conceptualized as a syndrome that consists of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment. Despite the increased frequency and severity of burnout in the Western world, there is limited published research regarding the experiences of clinical psychologists who have had burnout. The present study examines clinical psychologists’ different experiences of burnout in Australia. Design and Methods: In the year 2015, six privately practicing and solo-employed clinical psychologists provided rich qualitative data by participating in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was the method used to analyze clinical psychologists’ natural accounts of their burnout experiences. Using NVivo, emerging themes were identified through coding ‘first order constructs’ and then axial code ‘second order constructs.’ Findings: Clinical psychologists indicated that their roles are demanding and a diverse range of symptoms, including the enduring effects of burnout, mental stress, fatigue, decreased personal accomplishment, negative affect, depersonalization, reduced productivity and motivation, and insomnia. They identified precursors of burnout, including excessive workload and hours of work, life stresses, mismanaged workload, and transference. Clinical psychologists suggested that protective factors of burnout include knowledge and years worked in direct care, and trusting and long-term relationships. They indicated that the barriers to overcoming burnout include the fallacy that their clients’ expectations and needs are more important than their own, the financial cost of working in private practice, contemporary knowledge and inadequate education regarding self-care, and time constraints. Discussion and Conclusion: The findings presented in this study provide psychologists and other health professionals with an insight about the burnout experience and inform professionals of the mental shortcomings of

  17. Professional ethics in context: practising rural Canadian psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Judi L

    2012-12-01

    The complexities of professional ethics are best understood and interpreted within their sociohistorical context. This paper focuses on the experience of 20 rural psychologists from across Canada, a context rife with demographic and practice characteristics that may instigate ethical issues. Employing hermeneutic phenomenology, these qualitative research results are indicative of professional struggles that impacted the participants' experience of professional ethics and raised key questions about policy and practise. Concerns regarding competition highlight potential professional vulnerability, beget the idea of fostering general psychological practice, and question the role of professional bodies in addressing rural shortages. Dependency on government funding models and decisions highlights the benefits and medical cost-offset effect of psychological services' role in funded medical care. The controversial prescriptive authority debate for psychologists raises myriad concerns that are particularly salient to rural practitioners. These include changes to training and practice, with risks of psychopharmacology gaining prominence over behavioural health interventions. National inconsistencies in level of registration add to the growing shortage of practitioners. Finally, the results illuminate the need for advocacy to move beyond the literature and into public policy to increase public awareness, decrease the stigma of mental illness, and develop rural Canadian psychology. Although limited to this study, these results allowed for a fuller and more robust understanding of rural practice in consideration of professional ethics, which may inform policy, science, or ethical clinical practice.

  18. Teaching Statistics in APA-Accredited Doctoral Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A Syllabi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Anna S.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; Hook, Joshua; Erspamer, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Although statistical methods and research design are crucial areas of competency for psychologists, few studies explore how statistics are taught across doctoral programs in psychology in the United States. The present study examined 153 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology and aimed…

  19. Utilizing Action Research to Improve Counseling Education Course Work for Culturally Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sabina; McDonald, Deirdre; Mayorga, Mary G.

    2017-01-01

    This article informs counselor educators and psychologists on how to utilize action research to evaluate diverse students, course work, and to improve classroom instruction. A paucity exists in research investigating educational needs of diverse counseling students. The present action research study examined educational experiences of diverse…

  20. The Future of Counseling Psychology: Improving Quality of Life for Persons with Chronic Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalisz, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The literature review and focus group findings that compose the Major Contribution illustrate how counseling psychologists can integrate expertise from various subdisciplines (vocational psychology, health psychology, multicultural psychology) to effectively address the needs of those living with HIV. Given changes in the nature of health problems…

  1. Postpartum adolescents' contraceptive counselling preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sober, Stephanie; Shea, Judy A; Shaber, Allison G; Whittaker, Paul G; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2017-04-01

    The optimal approach for provision and timing of postpartum contraceptive counselling for adolescents has not been established. To reduce repeat pregnancies from current USA levels of nearly 20%, a better understanding is needed of postpartum adolescent females' preferences regarding contraceptive counselling and delivery. Semi-structured interviews with 30 USA postpartum teens (97% Black) explored pregnancy prevention and contraceptive counselling. Transcripts were independently coded by two researchers and inter-rater reliability calculated using Kappa coefficients. With a standard content analysis approach, common themes were identified, coded and summarized. Findings indicated pregnancy prevention was important - two thirds of subjects reported becoming pregnant 'too soon', almost all did not desire another child for at least 6 years and most indicated that pregnancy prevention was either 'very' or 'extremely' important right now. The subjects described doctors and their prenatal clinic as their most accurate sources of contraception information, but stated that doctors and parents were the most helpful sources. All were comfortable discussing contraception with providers and had a desire for shared decision making. While many had received written materials, most preferred in-person contraceptive counselling. Optimally, participants suggested that contraceptive counselling would be provided by a physician, begin antepartum and almost all preferred to leave the hospital with their chosen method of contraception. Pregnancy prevention is important for postpartum adolescents as most desired to delay future childbearing. In-person contraceptive counselling should begin in the antepartum period and include provision of contraception prior to discharge.

  2. Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in supporting their children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Mohangi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The characteristically disruptive conduct exhibited both at school and home by children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD appears to be particularly emotionally difficult for the children's mothers, who often turn to educational professionals for guidance. With a view to improving best practice in assistance to mothers and to promoting the tenets of inclusive education policy, the authors investigated the ways in which mothers experienced the support provided by educational psychologists. A qualitative interpretivist approach was adopted, with five purposefully selected mothers, whose children had previously been diagnosed with ADHD. Data was gathered from a focus group discussion and an individual interview. It emerged that mothers experienced parenting their children with ADHD as stressful, requiring continual reassurance and emotional support from educational psychologists. Having need of counselling for their families and academic help for their children, these mothers expected that educational psychologists should collaborate with educators and other role players, so as to enhance overall support to their children as learners. The findings pointed to the need for an effective inclusive school environment that forefront the role of educational psychologists in sharing knowledge and working collaboratively across the education system in South Africa.

  3. The role of the psychologist with disorders of consciousness in inpatient pediatric neurorehabilitation: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Sarah; Beaulieu, Cynthia; Sandbach, Karen; Colaiezzi, Angela; Balkan, Staci

    2017-08-01

    The psychologist in an inpatient pediatric neurorehabilitation setting provides a vital role in the assessment, treatment, and management of pediatric patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC). Competencies are drawn from several specialty areas of professional psychology, including rehabilitation psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, and pediatric psychology. This specialized knowledge forms the basis for tailoring assessment and treatment plans specific to the individual brain injury profile, with the goals of enhancing diagnosis, prognosis, and care transition decision. To describe the role of the psychologist in the differential diagnosis and treatment of pediatric patients with severe brain injury and DoC during inpatient rehabilitation. Research Method/Design: Three pediatric cases admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with suspected DoC illustrate the psychologist's role in diagnostics, case conceptualization, assessment design, and data collection based on patient-specific brain injury profiles. Customized data collection informs diagnostic decisions and treatment planning, with the goal of improved of care and resource utilization. The psychologist also provides ongoing psychoeducation, psychotherapy, and supportive interventions to the patient's family and caregivers to facilitate family adjustment to disability and promote long-term adaptation and adjustment. This case series illustrates the role of the psychologist in the use of individual brain injury profiles to coordinate assessment, diagnosis, and care for children with severe brain injury. Implications include the need for focused research to demonstrate the value-added role of the psychologist on the interdisciplinary team working in the neurorehabilitation of this complex patient population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The Role of School Counsellors and Psychologists in Supporting Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Damien W.; Bartholomaeus, Clare

    2015-01-01

    As growing numbers of transgender people--including students, parents, and educators--become visible within schools, so comes with this the requirement that schools ensure their full inclusion. This article suggests that school counsellors and psychologists have an important role to play in supporting transgender people within schools. As an…

  5. Current Issues in Mental Retardation: Psychologists' Regional In-Service Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Jerry A.; Grimes, Jeff

    Written for Iowa's school psychologists, the report examines current issues in mental retardation including the problem of definition, court actions affecting the schools, and trends in educational programming, evaluation, and diagnosis. Considered are reasons why mental retardation is difficult to define (such as the lack of an acceptable…

  6. Peer Tutoring in the Regular Classroom: A Guide for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehly, Stewart

    Written to accompany a videotape, the handbook is presented as a guide for school psychologists on peer tutoring in the regular classroom. A general overview of the peer tutoring process (including selecting and pairing students, supervising the process, and scheduling and feedback) is presented, followed by basic steps in developing a tutoring…

  7. Benefits of Required Counseling for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Holm, Jessica M.; Daly, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students experience mental health distress. The authors investigated the benefits of required counseling services at a training clinic for students enrolled in counseling courses. Results indicated that after receiving services, students ("N" = 55) reported decreases in overall problems, depressive symptoms, and anxiety…

  8. Patient Education through Pregnancy Counseling: A Preventive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Linda; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Gynecology Clinic, Wilce Health Center, Ohio State University, is putting into operation a comprehensive family planning service program that includes (1) patient education, (2) medical care, (3) pregnancy counseling, and (4) reproductive and sexuality counseling. (Author)

  9. Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edo Journal of Counselling, the official publication of Edo Chapter of Counselling Association of Nigeria publishes original well researched and well articulated papers/articles on all issues relating to counselling and psychology that use a variety of appropriate approaches to the conduct of theoretical, empirical and ...

  10. Creating the Conditions for Effective Work by Locum Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepins, Maureen; Cline, Tony

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a description of the organisational and professional context of locum work, identify challenges and opportunities for locum educational psychologists and for services where they are employed, and propose a protocol for use by educational psychologists (EPs) working in a locum capacity and for the services…

  11. The Role of a School Psychologist in Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Rieger, Brian

    2009-01-01

    School psychologists historically have received little training on topics such as mild traumatic brain injury or concussion, yet they could play a significant role in assessment, consultation, and intervention with students who have sustained a concussion. The purpose of this article is to educate school psychologists with regard to definition,…

  12. A School Psychologist's Self-Study Guide to Sport Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesyk, Jack J.

    2005-01-01

    School psychologists may find the field of sport psychology beneficial to them in extending their skills and effectiveness. As trained psychologists, they are likely to already have some of the knowledge and skills necessary for working in the area of sport psychology. However, without additional training, this may not be sufficient for ethical…

  13. Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in supporting their children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. ... an effective inclusive school environment that forefront the role of educational psychologists in sharing knowledge and working collaboratively across the education system in South Africa.

  14. The Research of the Personality Qualities of Future Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, V. I.; Salamatov, A. A.; Potapova, M. V.; Yakovleva, N. O.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors substantiate the existence of the personality qualities of future educational psychologists (PQFEP) that are, in fact, a sum of knowledge, skills, abilities, socially required qualities of personality allowing the psychologist to solve problems in all the fields of professional activities. A model of PQFEP predicts the…

  15. The Preparation of Educational Psychologists in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong

    2014-01-01

    Modeled after the British system, school psychologists in Hong Kong are called educational psychologists. Hong Kong is the first location in Asia to have a recognized specialty vocation in educational psychology and a program for their professional preparation. The first program in Hong Kong, established by the University of Hong Kong in 1981…

  16. School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school development through intersectoral collaboration. ... In the Western Cape, the context of this study, school psychologists are assigned to circuit teams, where they are expected to work collaboratively with other professionals to provide support to schools.

  17. Preparation of School/Educational Psychologists in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negovan, Valeria; Dinca, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the academic and professional training of educational/school psychologists in Romania. Their training mirrors the country's history, legal provisions, social qualities, and current professional status of psychologists and their specialization. Efforts to increase the quality of training for educational/school psychologists…

  18. School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2014-11-10

    Nov 10, 2014 ... The role of school psychologists has been debated and contested nationally and internationally for many decades, with an emphasis on the need for a paradigm shift in professional roles. Psychologists may be employed in the private sector, in non- governmental organisations, in higher education ...

  19. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  20. Educational Psychologists: The Early Search for an Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary society's expectations of educational psychology, and of a role for educational psychologists within these expectations, were major themes of, and subtexts to, many of the papers delivered at recent annual courses of the Association of Educational Psychologists (AEP). The distinctive contribution of educational psychology and a…

  1. The Role and Function of School Psychologists in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Office of Instructional Services.

    This publication describes the direct service activities of the school psychologist in Colorado. The role of the psychologist is an evaluatory one. He evaluates all aspects of a child's experiences and behaviors pertinent to an understanding of the child's school difficulties. He also serves as a consultant to other school personnel concerning…

  2. Psychologists in Academic Administration: A Call to Action and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaling, Karen B; Linton, John C

    2017-06-01

    Academic psychologists' backgrounds may prepare them for many aspects of academic administration such as: understanding and working with people; prioritizing others' needs and institutional needs; and managing projects and budgets, e.g., for research grants or training programs. Contemporary academic health centers also may provide opportunities for psychologists to serve in academic health administration. This article encourages psychologists to consider preparing for and seeking administrative and higher-level leadership roles. Six psychologists serving diverse administrative roles-from vice chairs in medical school departments to presidents of universities with academic health centers-reflected on: their paths to administration; their preparation for administrative roles; and the commonalities and differences between the work and skills sets of psychologist health service providers and the work and skill sets required for higher level administrative and leadership roles.

  3. Marriage Counselling in Multicultural Society, Nigerian Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper also discusses the problems facing the multicultural counselling which include cultural bias among counsellor, lack of knowledge among counsellors and interference of pastors and elders in the counselling profession. Some recommendations were made as follows; development of awareness of cultural values ...

  4. Rehabilitation Counseling and the Ex-Offender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, George W.

    1975-01-01

    In many respects ex-offenders can be seen as "socially disabled" persons, subject to the same treatment as other minority groups. Both counselors and clients must work to overcome barriers in the counseling relationship. Certain affirmative approaches are discussed, including self-help groups, peer counseling, and the use of paraprofessionals.…

  5. The highly anxious individual presenting for Huntington disease-predictive genetic testing: the psychiatrist's role in assessment and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines in the Huntington disease genetic counseling community have set a standard for the process of at-risk counseling, recommending the involvement of a multidisciplinary team, which includes a psychiatrist or psychologist. Though most studies have been largely reassuring regarding the psychologic consequences of predictive testing, there are individuals presenting to testing who really want something else other than the test results, who are being pressured by others to obtain results, or who remain deeply ambivalent about testing. Particularly concerning are those testing candidates who are highly anxious or depressed at the time of presentation. Balancing the ethical principles of autonomy with beneficence and nonmaleficence requires careful exploration of the motivations behind testing to ensure that all are fully informed of alternatives, and opportunities for further support are offered when needed. This chapter illustrates 13 areas of focus and inquiry in the psychiatric interview and gives some case examples to illustrate an approach to the psychiatric assessment and counseling of highly anxious individuals seeking genetic testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Counselling and Psychological Services for Clients at the Shelter Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Fonferová

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Problem: The paper is dealing with a psychological approach to the work with families and their children at a shelter home. It describes the circumstances and conditions for the work in the specific socio-therapeutic environment of the Horni Pocernice Shelter Home. The main research question - 'What are the options of psychological intervention and psychotherapeutic work with clients in the scope of services offered by the shelter home in Horni Pocernice'- works with the hypopaper that psychology and psychotherapy have their place within and next to social services. For clients who use services of this shelter home is this work essential and contributes to better understanding of their life situation and their social relations. Effectivity of psychological work in the environment of a shelter home is in a great deal connected to its acceptance, inner belief and understanding of its real possibilities by every single social worker. Lack of understanding, distorted expectations both on the side of social workers and psychologists complicate or even prevent psychotherapeutic work with clients for whom the requirements and demands of social workers are determining during their stay. Methods: This paper is based on the design of ethnographic field research. Empirical design of this research is defined by the premises of the shelter home and the time period from 2007 to 2012. Therapeutic possibilities of clients are examined from the position of psychologist and psychotherapist of this centre who offers his/her services once a week for about 5 to 7 hours. The research sample was being created during the collection of data in the examined period and its analysis when it was early established with respect to the research question that all available cases typical for full collection will be included (there were 646 clients in the examined period. Results: The answer to the main research question concerns two variables which are related to each other. The

  8. Psychologists experience of cognitive behaviour therapy in a developing country: a qualitative study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayub Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological therapies especially Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT are used widely in the West to help patients with psychiatric problems. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has an established evidence base for the treatment of different emotional disorders. In spite of these developments in the developed world, patients in most developing countries hardly benefit from non pharmacological interventions. Although a significant number of psychologists are trained in Pakistan each year, psychological interventions play only a minor role in treatment plans in Pakistan. We conducted interviews with psychologists in Pakistan, to explore their experiences and their views on "providing CBT in Pakistan". These interviews were conducted as part of a project whose focus was to try to develop culturally-sensitive CBT in Pakistan. Methods In depth semi structured interviews were conducted with 5 psychologists working in psychiatry departments in Lahore, Pakistan. Results All the psychologists reported that psychotherapies, including CBT, need adjustments for use in Pakistan, although they were not able to elicit on these in details. Four major themes were discovered, hurdles in therapy, therapy related issues, involvement of the family and modification in therapy. The biggest hurdles in therapy were described to be service and resource issues. Conclusions For CBT to be acceptable, accessible and effective in Non Western cultures numerous adjustments need to be made, taking into consideration; factors related to service structure and delivery, patient's knowledge and beliefs about health and the therapy itself. Interviews with the psychologists in these countries can give us insights which can guide development of therapy and manuals to support its delivery.

  9. Counseling in teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Dorthe Busk

    Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant-orientated pilotp......Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant......-orientated pilotproject about counseling in teacher education. The aim was to acquire knowledge about how students perceive counseling. This knowledge could help uncover potential areas of development for counselingpractice. In the pilotproject it is tested if the chosen method is suitable for bigger qualitative study...

  10. Reaction to the Special Issue on Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Maria Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    This reaction article comments on the Major Contribution "Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology." The content analysis of the published literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people of color from 1998 to 2007 provides much-needed information that will help psychologists set future research agendas and…

  11. Social Justice, White Racial Identity, and Multicultural Competency among White Master Level Trainees in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streufert, Sara Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, scholars have become more vocal regarding counselors and counseling psychologists' responsibilities to advance efforts for social change (Goodman et al., 2004; Speight & Vera, 2004; Vera & Speight, 2004). As a result, empirical investigations have started to evaluate variables that may contribute to trainees and mental…

  12. South African Hindu psychologists' perceptions of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayachee, Priyanka; Laher, Sumaya

    2014-04-01

    Conceptualisations of mental illness are not universally applicable, as culture shapes the expression, perceptions and treatment preferences thereof. By focusing on the perceptions of Hindu psychologists regarding mental illness, this study aimed to provide a deeper understanding of the impact that religious beliefs have on such conceptualisations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six Hindu psychologists around the Johannesburg area, South Africa. Responses were analysed using thematic content analysis. From the findings, it was evident that religion plays a critical role in the understanding and treatment of mental illness. Hindu beliefs around psychological disturbances were salient. Additionally, it was found that a tension existed between psychologists' awareness of the influential function of religion, particularly amongst collectivistic communities such as the Hindu community, and their occupational understandings and practices, which are deeply rooted in Western thought. Furthermore, it was suggested that the fear of stigma prevented Hindu clients from reaping the benefits of seeking help from culturally competent psychologists.

  13. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  14. Prospective teachers' perceptions of the school psychologist's role

    OpenAIRE

    Poulou, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Acknowledging the importance of teachers’ implicit theories for the determination of school psychologist’s role, this study aims to elicit prospective teachers’ personal theories for the role of school psychologist. By using metaphoric pictures, 59 pre-service teachers described their perceptions of the school psychologist’s role in relation to other members of the school community, the expectations of both teachers and the school psychologist in relation to the role of the ...

  15. Review of "Existential Counseling" by Dr. Kemp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alex H.

    1971-01-01

    The author directs his review of Kemp's Existential Counseling" toward a concern with the implication that existential therapy is a proposed successor to other forms of therapy including psychoanalysis. (Author/BY)

  16. Content Analysis of Acculturation Research in Counseling and Counseling Psychology: A 22-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eunju; Langrehr, Kimberly; Ong, Lee Za

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a 22-year (1988-2009) content analysis of quantitative empirical research that included acculturation and/or enculturation as a study variable(s). A total of 138 studies in 134 articles were systematically evaluated from 5 major American Psychological Association and American Counseling Association journals in counseling and…

  17. 20 CFR 30.402 - What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of clinical psychologists? 30.402 Section 30.402 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... rules for the services of clinical psychologists? A clinical psychologist may serve as a physician within the scope of his or her practice as defined by state law. Therefore, a clinical psychologist may...

  18. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or...) Of a type that the clinical psychologist or clinical social worker who furnishes the services is...

  19. Provision of mental health care within primary care in Peru: A qualitative study exploring the perspectives of psychologists, primary health care providers, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero, Victoria; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Toyama, Mauricio; Flórez Salcedo, Gustavo; Ipince, Alessandra; Araya, Ricardo; Miranda, J Jaime

    2018-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to understand the offer of mental health care at the primary care level, collecting the views of psychologists, primary health care providers (PHCPs), and patients, with a focus on health services in which patients attend regularly and who present a higher prevalence of mental disorders. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in antenatal care, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and chronic diseases services from six primary health care centers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with psychologists, PHCPs, and patients working in or attending the selected facilities.  Results: A total of 4 psychologists, 22 PHCPs, and 37 patients were interviewed. A high perceived need for mental health care was noted. PHCPs acknowledged the emotional impact physical health conditions have on their patients and mentioned that referral to psychologists was reserved only for serious problems. Their approach to emotional problems was providing emotional support (includes listening, talk about their patients' feelings, provide advice). PHCPs identified system-level barriers about the specialized mental health care, including a shortage of psychologists and an overwhelming demand, which results in brief consultations and lack in continuity of care. Psychologists focus their work on individual consultations; however, consultations were brief, did not follow a standardized model of care, and most patients attend only once. Psychologists also mentioned the lack of collaborative work among other healthcare providers. Despite these limitations, interviewed patients declared that they were willing to seek specialized care if advised and considered the psychologist's care provided as helpful; however, they recognized the stigmatization related to seeking mental health care. Conclusions: There is a perceived need of mental health care for primary care patients. To attend these needs, PHCPs provide emotional support and refer to psychology the most severe cases

  20. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  1. Counseling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Soo Yin; Neihart, Maureen F.

    2012-01-01

    Singapore, a tiny island nation, rose from 3rd- to 1st-world status in just 3 decades. Unlike in most developed countries, counseling in Singapore has a short history with faith-based beginnings and currently faces challenges to remain culturally relevant. The authors trace the development of Singapore's counseling services, provide an update…

  2. Counseling for Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley

    Counseling for empowerment is a complex and multifaceted process that requires, for some, a radical departure from the traditional conceptualization of the helper's role. The process of empowerment demands that professional helpers and their clients take an active, collaborative approach to identifying problems and goals. Drawing from counseling,…

  3. Beyond spaces of counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Mads; Nissen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The article articulates experiments with spatial constructions in two Danish social work agencies, basing on (a) a sketchy genealogical reconstruction of conceptualisations and uses of space in social work and counselling, (b) a search for theoretical resources to articulate new spaces, and (c...... spaces are forms of spatialisations which might be taken as prototypical in attempts to develop social work and counselling...

  4. Counseling Bisexual Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Elizabeth B.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief conceptual statement about bisexuality. Offers a review of existing research studies, and suggests issues to consider when counseling bisexual clients. Defines bisexuality and discusses prevalence studies, identity development, and implications for counseling. Claims that bisexuality challenges traditional rules about sexual…

  5. Structural component of readiness for professional orientation of studenst educational psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana S. Novikova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the status of a professional orientation in the activity structure of a modern educational psychologist thus specifying its essential characteristics, functions, constituent parts and structure; the article also describes the projection basics of the students’ preparation for a professional orientation in an interdisciplinary integration as well as the future educational psychologists’ preparation technique for a professional orientation that includes its goal-functional, logical-supporting, and instrumental characteristics.

  6. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs

  7. Sexual counseling and cardiovascular disease: practical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine E Steinke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cardiovascular disease and their partners expect health care providers to provide sexual counseling to assist them in maintaining sexual quality of life. Evidence suggests however, that there is a gap in integrating evidence into practice and that relatively few cardiac patients receive sexual counseling. This can result in negative psychological, physical, and quality of life outcomes for couples who may needlessly decide sexual activity is too risky and cease all sexual activity. Two scientific statements now exist that provide ample guidance to health care providers in discussing this important topic. Using a team approach that includes physicians, nurses, physical therapists, rehabilitation staff, and others is important to ensure that sexual counseling occurs throughout recovery. In addition, several trials using interventional approaches for sexual counseling provide insight into successful approaches for sexual counseling in practice. This article provides practical strategies and evidence-based approaches for assessment and sexual counseling for all cardiac patients and their partners, and specific counseling for those with ischemic conditions, heart failure, and implanted devices.

  8. The systematic application of ethical codes in the counseling of persons who are considering euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, T

    1996-01-01

    As health psychology develops, psychologists and counseling professionals are becoming progressively more involved with patients who have chronic terminal illnesses such as AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Consequently, they will be consulted increasingly by patients, caregivers, and lawyers in cases where euthanasia is being considered. There are numerous ethical dilemmas that could arise when counseling persons who are contemplating euthanasia. Professionals must consider carefully issues such as informed consent, bodily autonomy, respect for a person's dignity, patient welfare, as well as responsibility to society. The national psychological, social work, and medical associations of North America have each adopted a code of ethics. These codes may be used by counseling professionals to assist in the resolution of ethical dilemmas that may arise as a result of working with persons considering euthanasia. This paper discusses the relevance of these codes to the counseling of terminally ill patients.

  9. Use of Psychotropic Medications and Visits to Psychiatrists and Psychologists among Individuals with Nonsyndromic Oral Clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Hageman, Ida; Wehby, George L

    2017-01-01

    investigated redeemed prescriptions of psychotropic medication during 1996 to 2012 and visits to psychiatrists and psychologists during 1996 to 2011 among individuals born with nonsyndromic OC in Denmark between 1936 and 2009 and a comparison cohort of individuals without OC. This includes 8244 individuals...... with OC and 82,665 individuals without OC. RESULTS: The Cox regression analysis revealed 12% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7 to 16%) increased risk of using any psychotropic medication for individuals with OC. When examining by cleft type, higher risks for medication use were observed in individuals...... and no increased risk for visits to psychologists for either group. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that a small group of individuals with nonsyndromic OC, in particular those with palatal involvement, have greater risk of using psychotropic medications. However, elevated use was also observed among younger...

  10. Productivity of Educational Psychologists in Educational Psychology Journals, 1991-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith; Locke; Boisse; Gallagher; Krengel; Kuczek; McFarland; Rapoo; Wertheim

    1998-04-01

    The scholarly productivity of educational psychologists, indexed in terms of the number of papers published in professional journals in the field was the focus of this investigation. Five journals considered to be among the "core journals" in the field and, thus, those in which educational psychologists are likely to publish their scholarship were examined for the years 1991-1996. Both institutions (i.e., universities) and individuals were identified. The top-rated institution, in terms of educational psychology productivity, was the University of Maryland and the most prolific individual contributor to the journals was Herbert Marsh. The findings partially replicate several previous productivity studies in psychology and educational psychology. The most productive scholars in the field include both seasoned, established leaders in the discipline, as well as younger individuals who are making their mark. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. The trend toward more attractive and informative titles: American Psychologist 1946-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whissell, Cynthia

    2012-04-01

    Titles of journal articles serve to attract attention and inform potential readers. All titles from 65 volumes of American Psychologist (1946-2010, N = 12,313 titles) were studied in terms of their emotionality, style, and contents. Several trends noted for titles in different kinds of journals from psychology and other disciplines were present in American Psychologist (increasing title length, increasing use of punctuation marks, increasing employment of words with pleasant and arousing connotations, variations in the frequency of different content words). Longer titles allow authors to specify more information, and emotionally upbeat titles are more likely to attract reader attention. In an unexpected quadratic trend, titles became more abstract and the number of titles increased until about 1985, after which the trend was reversed and titles became more concrete as their numbers decreased. Predictors of this trend include societal variables and the journal's editorial policies.

  12. Surgical patient selection and counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelmann, Matt; Köhler, Tobias S.; Bailey, George C.; Miest, Tanner; Alom, Manaf

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of patient selection and counseling are ultimately to enhance successful outcomes. However, the definition for success is often narrowly defined in published literature (ability to complete surgery, complications, satisfaction) and fails to account for patient desires and expectations, temporal changes, natural history of underlying diseases, or independent validation. Factors associated with satisfaction and dissatisfaction are often surgery-specific, although correlation with pre-operative expectations, revisions, and complications are common with most procedures. The process of appropriate patient selection is determined by the integration of patient and surgeon factors, including psychological capacity to handle unsatisfactory results, baseline expectations, complexity of case, and surgeon volume and experience. Using this model, a high-risk scenario includes one in which a low-volume surgeon performs a complex case in a patient with limited psychological capacity and high expectations. In contrast, a high-volume surgeon performing a routine case in a male with low expectations and abundant psychiatric reserve is more likely to achieve a successful outcome. To further help identify patients who are at high risk for dissatisfaction, a previously published mnemonic is recommended: CURSED Patient (compulsive/obsessive, unrealistic, revision, surgeon shopping, entitled, denial, and psychiatric). Appropriate patient counseling includes setting appropriate expectations, reviewing the potential and anticipated risks of surgery, post-operative instruction to limit complications, and long-term follow-up. As thorough counseling is often a time-consuming endeavor, busy practices may elect to utilize various resources including educational materials, advanced practice providers, or group visits, among others. The consequences for poor patient selection and counseling may range from poor surgical outcomes and patient dissatisfaction to lawsuits, loss of

  13. Indigenous counseling: A needed area in school counseling in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous counselling has not been given attention in Nigeria's school counselling programme. This counselling gap was created by European colonialism, which succeeded in developing in the minds of the African that anything indigenous is local, unscientific and unorthodox. Indigenous counselling is one of the ...

  14. The Perception and Needs of Psychologists Toward Blended Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksman, Ies; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Spigt, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Blended care, meaning that online (Internet) components are used in combination with face-to-face contact, in mental health is increasingly encouraged, but research about the needs of psychologists is scarce. We assessed the perceptions, design, and barriers toward blended care among members of the Dutch Association of Psychologists through an e-mailed survey. Mean scores (SD) and answer percentages were calculated. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to investigate differences between users and nonusers and primary- and secondary care professionals. Generally, psychologists (63% response rate) had a positive perception toward blended care and they intended to use it in future (M = 3.71, SD = 1.19). Users of blended care and secondary care professionals were more positive toward blended care than nonusers and primary care professionals. Online psychoeducation, diary forms, and exercises for different therapeutic approaches and communication technology configurations were most welcomed. Still, quite some barriers were mentioned before professionals would use blended care. Psychologists had a positive perception toward blended care, as long as attention is paid to the perceived barriers. Results of this survey could be used in the development of online components that correspond to the needs of professionals. Reviewing the needs of psychologists, e-health components of different therapeutic approaches, apart from cognitive behavioral therapy, are welcomed. Future research is necessary to gain insight in the (cost) effectiveness of blended care for different types of patients (e.g., transdiagnostic interventions) and of different therapeutic approaches.

  15. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern John H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946–1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  16. Theories and Modules Applied in Islamic Counseling Practices in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Norazlina; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2017-04-01

    Some Malaysian scholars believe that the theoretical basis and models of intervention in Islamic counseling practices in Malaysia are deficient and not eminently identified. This study investigated and describes the nature of current Islamic counseling practices including the theories and modules of Islamic counseling that are been practiced in Malaysia. This qualitative research has employed data that mainly consist of texts gathered from literatures and semi-structured interviews of 18 informants. It employed grounded theory analysis, and the result shows that most of the practitioners had applied integrated conventional counseling theories with Islamic rituals, references, interventions and ethics. Some had also applied Islamic theories and modules formulated in Malaysia such as iCBT, al-Ghazali counseling theories, Cognitive ad-Deen, KBJ, Prophetic Counseling and Asma Allah al-Husna Counseling Therapy.

  17. Disability research in counseling psychology journals: a 20-year content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Lee, Sharon

    2012-07-01

    We conducted an exploratory content analysis of disability research in 5 major counseling psychology journals between 1990 and 2010. The goal was to review the counseling psychology literature to better understand the prevalence of disability research, identify research methods most often conducted, and elucidate the types of concerns most studied. We searched 5 journals (Journal of Counseling & Development, Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, and Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology) using keywords derived from disability terms defined by the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA). Articles were categorized by methodology and disability category examined. We found that disability research continues to comprise an extremely small amount (from less than 1% to 2.7%) of the counseling psychology literature, with the frequency of articles plateauing in recent years. The research design of articles published has changed, with an increased number of empirical articles and a decrease in literature reviews. We conclude by calling for increased empirical investigation of disability among journals specific to counseling psychology to recognize disability as an important aspect of diversity within the field.

  18. Genetic Counseling for Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnos, Kathleen S.

    1997-01-01

    This article addresses epidemiologic and demographic characteristics of hereditary hearing loss and genetic evaluation and counseling. It discusses who should have genetic counseling, the genetic counseling process, and effects of genetics technology on the genetic counseling process. A case study of a 2-year-old with severe sensorineural hearing…

  19. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth / For Parents / Prenatal Genetic Counseling What's in ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating family ...

  20. A new role for psychologists--hospital ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzierz, G J; Snodgrass, R W; DeLeon, P H

    1992-12-01

    Over the past decade psychology has begun to appreciate that it represents more than "merely mental health care" and has become increasingly involved in the generic health care arena. The participation of psychologists in Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs) is presented as a professional activity for which psychologists are particularly well suited. The clinical mission of HECs, the historical importance of ethical considerations to psychology, and the field's specific training and psycho-social expertise suggest valuable contributions that psychologists can make in this particular area. Further, as psychology actively increases its participation in HECs, other professional disciplines outside of the mental health field will systematically have the opportunity to become more familiar with psychology and its clinical and research expertise.

  1. Controlling Depersonalized Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Outlines Gestalt therapy techniques to increase active listening and counselor/client involvement in career counseling. Discusses awareness through dialog, role playing or "presentizing," and experiential "presentizing." Presents a sample dialog as illustration. (RC)

  2. Preconception and prenatal genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Adonis S

    2017-07-01

    Identifying individuals at risk of having children affected by genetic conditions or congenital anomalies allows counselling that aims to inform reproductive decisions. This process takes place either at the preconception or early prenatal stage, although more options are available if risks are identified before the pregnancy. Preconception counselling covers issues that can affect the health of the mother and baby including folic acid supplementation. Carrier screening for autosomal recessive diseases, such as beta thalassaemia, has resulted in a significantly reduced incidence in many countries. National organisations, however, advocate more in-depth research before such screening recommendations apply to the general population. Recently, advances in genomic technologies have made it possible to greatly expand the scope of genetic screening, with the aim of providing more comprehensive information to prospective parents. This is a complex field, and research should focus on how the technology can be put to best use in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A clinical psychologist in GP-Land: an evaluation of brief psychological interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dath, Sunil; Dong, Christine Yang; Stewart, Malcolm W; Sables, Eileen

    2014-03-28

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes and other impacts of brief therapy provided in a primary care setting by a clinical psychologist who was mainly employed in secondary mental health. The outcomes of 23 primary care patients referred to a clinical psychologist were evaluated using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the World Health Organisation Quality of Life (WHOQoL) scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A mixture of quantitative and qualitative data from patients and staff were analysed to identify other impacts of the intervention. Large improvements in BDI, GHQ, and WHOQOL scores were found, with strong changes consistent with the targets of the intervention. Patients reported primary-based clinical psychology input was more convenient and many engaged who had resisted referral to secondary mental health services. Other benefits to the service, including improved primary-secondary service integration, improved primary management of mental health difficulties, and improved liaison with mental health specialists, were reported by primary health staff. Brief psychological interventions by a visiting clinical psychologist in a general practice setting had substantial benefits for the patients and for the practice. This project indicates the value of integrated psychological input consistent with recent moves to better primary-secondary integration in mental health care.

  4. Practicing what we preach: Investigating the role of social support in sport psychologists well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eMcCormack

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Well-being and mental health of psychologists and their clients can be strongly linked to the psychologists’ experience of work. We know from general theories of occupational health psychology that certain work factors will have a greater impact on well-being than others. Work engagement is positively related with occupational health, while burnout and workaholic tendencies relate negatively. An individual’s resources can buffer against these negative effects. Specifically, the environmental resource of social support can impede the impact and instance of workaholism and has a positive influence on burnout. Social support is often encouraged by sport psychologists in protecting an athlete’s well-being. Drawing on theory and research from work and organisational, health and social psychology we explore the lived experiences of burnout and work engagement among applied sport psychologists, investigating their perceptions of how these experiences impact their well-being. Thirty participants from five countries were asked, using semi-structured interviews, to recall specific incidents when feelings of work engagement and burnout occurred. We examined the influence of social support and its impact on these incidents. Thematic analysis revealed that burnout is frequently experienced despite high levels of work engagement. Sources of social support differ between groups of high burnout versus low burnout, as does reference to the dimensions of work engagement. Avenues for future research including investigating the role of mindfulness and therapeutic lifestyle changes for practitioners are outlined.

  5. 38 CFR 21.3100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.3100.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3100 Counseling. (a) Purpose of counseling. The purpose of counseling is to...)) (b) Availability of counseling. Counseling assistance is available for— (1) Identifying and removing...

  6. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  7. Assessment of the Professional Competencies of Pedagogue-Psychologists on the Basis of the Professional Standard «Pedagogue-Psychologist (Educational Psychologist» as a Modern Tool for Human Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oltarzhevskaya L.E.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of monitoring the evaluation and self-assessment of the competencies of the pedagogue-psychologist according to the content of the labor functions of the professional standard "Pedagogue-psychologist (educational psychologist" are given. 340 pedagogues-psychologists participated in the monitoring, working in the City Center of Psychological and Educational Assistance. The toolkit consisted of: a self-assessment questionnaire of professional competencies, a test task for psychological knowledge, a colloquium based on a semi-structured interview with pedagogues-psychologists on their professional activities. Based on the results obtained, the psychology teachers working in the City Psychological and Pedagogical Center were divided into four groups, depending on the results of the interview and the fulfillment of the test task. In relation to psychologists who received low scores in the interview and poor test results, management decisions were proposed to develop their professional competence.

  8. Psychologists' right to prescribe – should prescribing privileges be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current changes in legislation regarding prescription rights increase the possibility of non-medical practitioners being authorised to presctibe medication. There has been ongoing debate about granting psychologists in South Africa a limited right to prescribe (RTP) psychotropic medication. The main reasons advanced for ...

  9. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  10. Mistaken Evaluation: The School Psychologist or the Case Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Given their pivotal position, school psychologists have understandable concerns about the possibility of becoming the target of the relatively frequent legal proceedings under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Indeed, the threat of litigation can contribute to a flight from the profession (Lange, 2011). Yet, an informal…

  11. School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2014-11-10

    Nov 10, 2014 ... This paper is focused on school psychologists' perceptions of the challenges that emerge when working with other sectors to facilitate school devel- opment ..... Babbie and Mouton (2004) stress the importance of grounding research in ..... hindrances to collaboration, thereby indicating the ways in which the ...

  12. Objective Structured Professional Assessments for Trainee Educational Psychologists: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmuir, Sandra; Atkinson, Cathy; Lang, Jane; Warhurst, Amy; Wright, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Objective Structured Professional Assessments (OSPAs) were developed and evaluated at three universities in the United Kingdom, to supplement supervisor assessments of trainee educational psychologists' placement practice. Participating second year students on three educational psychology doctoral programmes (n = 31) and tutors (n = 12) were…

  13. Antecedents of Intent to Change Careers among Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, Sally A.; Bernath, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the antecedents of intent to change careers among psychologists. Specifically, the research examined the importance of the following predictor variables: a multi-dimensional model of career commitment (career planning, career resilience, and career identity), job satisfaction, and conscientiousness. A…

  14. Increasing Medicaid Revenue Generation for Services by School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybza, Megan M.; Stokes, Trevor F.; Hayman, Marilee; Schatzberg, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    We examined a performance improvement package with components of feedback, goal setting, and prompting to generate additional revenue by improving the consistency of Medicaid billing submitted by 74 school psychologists serving 102 schools. A multiple baseline design across three service areas of a county school system demonstrated the…

  15. Problems and Prospects in Training Psychologists to Consult with Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotar, Dennis

    There are training dilemmas which are characteristic of medical settings. Clinical psychology students interning in a hospital setting are unfamiliar with the hospital culture, and the demands of patient care require a practical active approach. Experiences with training clinical psychologists to consult with pediatricians are reviewed. Disparate…

  16. Teaching Leadership: Most Any Psychologist Can Do It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a growing interest in college courses on leadership in a variety of academic disciplines. The study of leadership has a long history, much of it based on psychology. As a result, psychologists are well informed and quite capable of teaching leadership courses. In this article, I discuss core theories of leadership,…

  17. Leadership Theory for School Psychologists: Leading for Systems Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.; Preast, June L.; Kilpatrick, Kayla D.; Taylor, Crystal N.; Young, Helen; Aguilar, Lisa; Allen, Amanda; Copeland, Christa; Haider, Aqdas; Henry, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists are often seen as leaders in schools. They lead data teams, problem-solving teams, multidisciplinary evaluation teams, and crisis response teams. They are also perceived as leaders regarding intervention, multitiered systems of support, behavior support, collaboration, consultation, special education, assessment, and…

  18. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Stakeholder Engagement in Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) continues to be implemented in schools, it is important to consider how this initiative is perceived by the educational professionals involved in the implementation and effectiveness of the process. This study utilized a survey intended to investigate the perceptions of school psychologists regarding their…

  19. The role of a psychologist in management: discipline, practice and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychology as a profession has aided management discipline, practice and research in several ways. In the marketing sector, Consumers Psychologist has over the years maximize organizational profit by providing strategies for products and services branding, pricing, packaging, sales promotion and advertising. Industrial ...

  20. The Positive Experiences of Becoming a Psychologist: A Master's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since most research on the topic of experiences related to becoming a psychologist is conducted from a pathogenic paradigm, the study reported in this paper aimed to describe the journey of a clinical master's student from the perspective of positive psychology. A strengths-based paradigm allowed the researcher and the ...

  1. [The psychologist and the patient-carer dyad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard-Palacios, Judith

    2017-01-01

    At risk of physical and psychological burnout, carers form an integral part of the global care of the patient. The psychologist's expertise is valuable in the support of the patient- family carer dyad. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Global Migration: The Need for Culturally Competent School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Plotts, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Never before have more children lived away from their home countries. Given the unique social, emotional, and academic needs of children who have migrated, school psychologists must be well prepared to meet these growing demands. Consequently, school psychology training programs must invest in the preparation of culturally competent future school…

  3. Child Maltreatment Identification and Reporting Behavior of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Victoria L.; Zibulsky, Jamie; Viezel, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A majority of substantiated maltreatment reports are made by educators and thus, teacher knowledge of child maltreatment reporting mandates and reporting behavior has been a focus of research. The knowledge and behavior of school psychologists, however, has not received similar attention. This study investigated the child maltreatment reporting…

  4. Training, Degrees, and Credentials in the Hiring of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'donnell, Patrick S.; Dunlap, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    A national sample of 246 Directors of Pupil Personnel Services and Directors of Special Education were surveyed to assess the importance they place on training, degrees, and credentials in the hiring of school psychologists. High, but varying, levels of importance were found for the content knowledge and skill areas in the National Association of…

  5. Changing Conceptualization of the Role of Educational Psychologists in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Phey Ling; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra; Burgetova, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Psychology is a young discipline in Singapore. Hence, perceptions of the roles and responsibilities of an educational psychologist (EP) are still constantly being negotiated and redefined. This qualitative study examined how role negotiations and redefinitions could be actively facilitated through an experiential and intensive two-day Basic…

  6. Team Crisis: School Psychologists and Nurses Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Kevin P.; Osher, David; Maughan, Erin D.; Tuck, Christine; Patrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Schools are often the geographic and sociological center of a community. Given modern community emergencies and challenges, schools should make the most of this role and best allocate their resources to maximize the positive impact they have during difficult times. This article uses the vantage point of school psychologists and school nurses from…

  7. Post Advanced Technology Implementation Effects on School Psychologist Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Rana Dirice

    2017-01-01

    The technology acceptance model (TAM) has been widely used to assess technology adoption in business, education, and health care. The New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) launched a web-based Individualized Educational Program (IEP) system for school psychologists to use in conducting evaluations and reviews. This quantitative study…

  8. Child Psychopharmacology: How School Psychologists Can Contribute to Effective Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPaul, George J.; Carlson, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Psychopharmacological treatments have been used with increased frequency to treat a variety of internalizing and externalizing disorders in children. Given the potential impact that medication has on children's school performance, school psychologists should be involved in helping physicians and families make effective decisions by assisting with…

  9. Development of an Attitudes towards Complementary Therapies Scale for Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lee-Ann; White, Katherine M.

    2007-01-01

    This study designed and tested a scale to measure psychologists' attitudes towards complementary and alternative therapies. The scale, derived from existing measures for medical professionals, was tested on a sample of psychology students (N = 163) using an online survey. The data were factor analysed and three correlated subscales were…

  10. Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    South African Journal of Education, Volume 35, Number 1, February 2015. 1. Art. # 947, 9 ... hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to be particularly emotionally difficult for the children's mothers, who often turn to ... psychologist plays a valuable role in supporting educators as well as families in the school environment on.

  11. The Effective Education Professional: Politician, Psychologist, Philosopher, Professor, and Parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratter, Barbara I.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Claims crisis in education, in part, has been caused by the rigidity of the education professional to continue in a traditional role. Contends for the school to become more responsive to the psychosocial-educational needs of students, the education professional must expand the pedagogical role to the five Ps: politician, psychologist, philosopher,…

  12. The Educational Journey of a Latina Feminist Community Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This narrative describes how my educational journey led me to become a Latina feminist community psychologist. My experiences as a Central American woman living in the United States has made me deeply committed to feminist community values and the importance of social justice. Throughout the journey, I connect how immigration status, culture, and…

  13. Mini-Series on Psychologists in Non-Traditional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I., Ed.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Ten articles discuss school psychology (SP) outside the realm of public schools. Eight settings are described in which psychologists trained in SP function well--higher education, family medicine, pediatrics, neurology, residential and day treatment centers, private practice, community mental health centers, and business and industry. (SLD)

  14. Challenges for Educational Psychologists and Their Services: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobie, Ingeborg; Gemmell, Martin; Moran, Ellen; Randall, Leisa

    2002-01-01

    Following almost two years' field practice, substantial study and discussion a cohort of Educational Psychologists in Training (EPITs) (N=11) shared their perspectives about the current challenges for EPs. Data analysis suggested that the challenge for EPs and their services was to adopt an "ecological" or "systemic"…

  15. [Counseling at the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, M

    1989-11-01

    In the counselling of patients by the hospital social service, personal assistance and initiation of medical, vocational and social rehabilitation measures are intertwined. Counselling methods, scope, contents and goals are determined by the objective medical facts at hand as well as the subjective needs present in the individual case, and are limited by the structure of the hospital and its responsibility for acute care. Complementary to person- and problem-centered counselling with patients and their relatives as the nucleus of psychosocial coping with illness and disability, the hospital social service cooperates with the whole range of clinical professions involved in the individual case in reintegrating the patient, in particular with the physicians in charge of establishing the indication for rehabilitative measure, as well as with the entire range of rehabilitation carriers, with extra-clinical facilities and services within the health care/social protection system. Evaluation, which would be necessary in view of outcome control and increased effectiveness of the counselling services provided in the hospital, does not occur so far. (Case examples are given to illustrate hospital-based counselling work.)

  16. PENGEMBANGAN MODEL PEER COUNSELING SEBAGAI MEDIA PENGALAMAN PRAKTIK KONSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    muslikah muslikah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Practical experience is an important component of counselor education program. Through the experience student counseling practice, counselor candidate  given the experience to apply the skills and knowledge they acquired in the lecture. Peer Counseling in this research defined as the involvement of youth in peer groups to provide particular input for the development of personality and social of adolescents. Thus, peer counseling can be utilized in the process of lectures, so counselors candidate can be optimized to obtain practical experience supervised by a professional counselor. This research aims to develop a peer counseling model as an experience counseling practice media in basic skills counseling subject. The design used is research and development. Subjects were students of BK FIP UNNES. Data collected through in-depth interviews, questionnaires and  document studies. Data analysis technique used is  interactive model of Miles and Huberman. Results of the research is a model of peer counseling as an experience counseling practice media in basic skills of counseling subject include: (a rational, (b Definition, (c Interest, (d assuming, (e materials, (f the stages of peer counseling implementation, (g the evaluation and succes indicators, and function of group members, (h the phase of the service, (i the evaluation and follow-up. Based on  results expert validation obtained that the model is feasible and can be applied.

  17. Advocating for School Psychologists in Response to the APA's Proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Anastasia Kalamaros

    2009-01-01

    On March 6, 2009, the APA Model Licensure Act Task Force released its second draft of the policy document known as the proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists". This policy document serves as guidance to state legislatures for how they should set up their psychology licensing laws. The general expectations promoted in the model…

  18. Targeting Family Risk Factors in the Context of Treating Youth Depression: A Survey of Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Buckholdt, Kelly E.; Olsen, James P.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Davis, Genevieve L.; Gamble, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the practices and perceptions of psychologists related to targeting family risk factors when treating youth depression. Participants were practicing psychologists recruited through the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (N = 279). Psychologists completed a brief anonymous survey about addressing…

  19. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  20. Perceptions of School Psychologists Regarding Barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Heath; Little, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) models continue to be implemented, an important research question is how school psychologists are experiencing the transition to RTI practice. In order to better understand the experiences of school psychologists, interviews with seven practicing school psychologists regarding their perceptions of barriers and…

  1. 20 CFR 404.1617 - Reasonable efforts to obtain review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. 404.1617 Section 404.1617 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. (a) The State agency must determine if additional qualified psychiatrists and psychologists are needed to make the necessary reviews (see § 404.1615(d...

  2. 20 CFR 220.58 - Objections to the designated physician or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... psychologist. 220.58 Section 220.58 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE... designated physician or psychologist. A claimant or his or her representative may object to his or her being examined by a designated physician or psychologist. If there is a good reason for the objection, the Board...

  3. 20 CFR 416.1017 - Reasonable efforts to obtain review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. 416.1017 Section 416.1017 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. (a) The State agency must determine if additional qualified psychiatrists and psychologists are needed to make the necessary reviews (see § 416.1015(d...

  4. 42 CFR 414.62 - Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.62 Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services. The fee schedule for clinical psychologist services is set at 100 percent of the amount determined for corresponding...

  5. School Psychologists' Attitudes toward an Expanded Health Care Role: Psychopharmacology and Prescription Privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszyn, Tom; Carlson, Cindy I.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the relationship between psychopharmocological-related experiences and attitudes toward expanding roles for school psychologists. Profiles the results of a 1993 national survey of school psychologists who are members of the American Psychological Association regarding the appropriateness of expanding the school psychologists' role to drug…

  6. The Multiplier Effect: A Strategy for the Continuing Education of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Walter; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-two school psychologists participated in a year long institute designed to test the use of a multiplier effect in the continuing professional development of school psychologists in Michigan. Results indicated that 550 school psychologists attended two in-service meetings with generally favorable reactions. (Author)

  7. A Comparison of Special Education Teacher and Psychologist Scoring of the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glen G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Ten special education teachers and two school psychologists scored the Bender-Gestalt protocals of elementary school children using the Koppitz scoring system. The reported correlations between teachers and school psychologists compared favorably to correlations between school psychologists as well as to interrater reliabilities reported in the…

  8. The Ghosts of Counseling Psychology: Is Counseling Research Really Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. offer an interesting analysis on the publication rate of counseling-related research articles in counseling psychology's two major journals. In this reaction to their work, the author considers various aspects of their results and contemplates possible explanations for the decline of counseling-related publications. The author…

  9. Counseling Skills for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.; Kottler, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    By necessity, today's teachers do much more than deliver instruction. In the classroom, on the playground, or even in the parking lot, teachers are often called upon to respond quickly and appropriately to students' social and emotional needs, drawing from instinct more than anything else. In this second edition of "Counseling Skills for…

  10. Counseling Abused Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    This guide on counseling abused children was written to help counselors meet the needs of children and adolescents and to provide ways of working with the child's family. Chapter 1 presents an overview of child maltreatment by identifying types of maltreatment (neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, and emotional abuse or neglect)…

  11. "Counseling" in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, J.

    1976-01-01

    The need to counsel patients with genetic ophthalmological problems is stressed in the article. Assessment of autosomal dominance or autosomal recessitivity in an individual is explained and sex-linked heredity is traced. Practical examples of genetic abnormalities, such as pigmentary retinopathy and chorodineremia, are discussed. (PHR)

  12. The Counseling & Guidance Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Counseling and guidance services are vital in any school curriculum. Counselors may themselves be dealing with students of diverse abilities and handicaps. Counselors may have to work with students affected by drug addiction, fetal alcohol syndrome, homelessness, poverty, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and divorce. Students may present…

  13. Counseling in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remley, Theodore P.; Bacchini, Eugenio; Krieg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The counseling profession in Italy is in an early stage of development. No university preparation programs exist, and counselors are not employed in schools. Counselors maintain private practices, work in agencies, and are employed by the government. Counselors receive their preparation in Italy from professional associations in programs that…

  14. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  15. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  16. Enhancing the Evidence for Behavioral Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Carmela; Klesges, Lisa M.; Resnicow, Ken; Stone, Amy; Davidson, Karina W.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) clinical guidelines at present rarely assign the highest grade recommendation to behavioral counseling interventions for chronic disease prevention or risk reduction because of concerns about the certainty and quality of the evidence base. As a result, the broad integration of behavioral counseling interventions in primary care remains elusive. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel perspectives on how to generate the highest-quality and -certainty evidence for primary care–focused behavioral counseling interventions. As members of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM)—a multidisciplinary scientific organization committed to improving population health through behavior change—we review the USPSTF mandate and current recommendations for behavioral counseling interventions, and provide a perspective for the future that calls for concerted and coordinated efforts among SBM, USPSTF, and other organizations invested in the rapid and wider uptake of beneficial, feasible, and referable primary care–focused behavioral counseling interventions. This perspective highlights five areas for further development, including: (1) behavioral counseling–focused practice-based research networks; (2) promotion of USPSTF evidence standards and the increased use of pragmatic RCT design; (3) quality control and improvement procedures for behavioral counseling training; (4) systematic research on effective primary care–based collaborative care models; and (5) methodologic innovations that capitalize on disruptive technologies and healthcare transformation. Collective efforts to improve the health of all Americans in the 21st century and beyond must ensure that effective, feasible, and referable behavioral counseling interventions are embedded in modern primary care practice. PMID:26296553

  17. [A proposal for reforming psychologists' training in France and in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, J-P

    2009-02-01

    In France, as in the European Union, the number of psychologists continues to increase and constitutes by far the most important source of professionals in this field. The requests for services of psychologists in many various domains have also increased in an unprecedented way over a number of years. In spite of this development, which should continue to increase considerably, the initial training of psychologists remains uneven and disparate and often remote from, even unsuitable to, the legitimate expectations of users. It is therefore important to reform this training by extending, updating, homogenising and adapting it to current knowledge and needs, and by marking it by a single and specific degree: that of a doctorate. This new eight-year doctoral curriculum would be at the same time more complete and simpler than the European Diploma in Psychology model (EuroPsy), for instance. This latter is a very complicated and insufficient subject and would not completely resolve the great problems of psychologists' training and the competences they need to gain in order to access professional practise, research and teaching. This extension of the psychologists' training would make it possible to integrate new data concerning traditional fields of psychology and data concerning new fields of application of psychology and should obviously include the essential training for psychotherapies referred to the great theoretical and practical models, since their interest is clinically acknowledged (psychoanalysis and psychoanalytical therapies, cognitive and behavioural therapies, systemic therapies, therapies for individuals, couples, families, groups...). This polyreferred training would make it possible to go from a culture still too often axed on orientation and deficiencies of the therapist, to a culture of indication, opening and competence, focused on the patient's interest. Teaching of psychophysiology and neurosciences should be updated and harmonised by taking into

  18. Spiritual and Sexual Identity: Exploring Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients' Perspectives of Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kristopher M; Buser, Juleen K; Luke, Melissa; Buser, Trevor J

    2016-06-01

    Although religious and spiritual issues have emerged as areas of focus in counseling, very few scholars have explored the meaning and experiences of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) clients who addressed their sexual and religious/spiritual identities in counseling. Using consensual qualitative research (CQR; Hill, 2012), the current study explores the perspectives of 12 LGB persons who sought counseling that involved religious/spiritual concerns. Four themes in participant interviews are identified, including (a) self-acceptance, (b) goals of counseling, (c) identification with counselor, and (d) counseling environment and relationship. Implications of findings for the counseling field are discussed.

  19. Why isn't everyone an evolutionary psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Despite a widespread acceptance that the brain that underpins human psychology is the result of biological evolution, very few psychologists in any way incorporate an evolutionary perspective in their research or practice. There have been many attempts to convince mainstream psychology of the importance of such a perspective, mostly from those who identify with "Evolutionary Psychology," and there has certainly been progress in that direction, but the core of psychology remains essentially unevolutionary. Here I explore a number of potential reasons for mainstream psychology continuing to ignore or resist an evolutionary approach, and suggest some ways in which those of us interested in seeing an increase in the proportion of psychologists adopting an evolutionary perspective might need to modify our tactics to increase our chances of success.

  20. Why isn't everyone an evolutionary psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Despite a widespread acceptance that the brain that underpins human psychology is the result of biological evolution, very few psychologists in any way incorporate an evolutionary perspective in their research or practice. There have been many attempts to convince mainstream psychology of the importance of such a perspective, mostly from those who identify with “Evolutionary Psychology,” and there has certainly been progress in that direction, but the core of psychology remains essentially unevolutionary. Here I explore a number of potential reasons for mainstream psychology continuing to ignore or resist an evolutionary approach, and suggest some ways in which those of us interested in seeing an increase in the proportion of psychologists adopting an evolutionary perspective might need to modify our tactics to increase our chances of success. PMID:25221531

  1. 38 CFR 21.5100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.5100.... Chapter 32 Counseling § 21.5100 Counseling. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is: (1) To assist in... of counseling. Counseling assistance in available for— (1) Identifying and removing reasons for...

  2. Counselling and Well-Being: On the Road to Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Maria Eduarda

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the rationale and some guiding principles for the realm of counselling in the fostering of well-being. After some brief observations of a theoretical nature, the principles analysed are: the revitalisation of counselling; the reflection on the concept of dialogue, including the notion of context; the perspective of…

  3. Examining Internationalization in U.S. Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Erica J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Aegisdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather more information about the process of internationalization in U.S. counseling psychology programs. Participants included 26 training directors and 83 doctoral students, representing 32 of the 63 APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Results suggested that the presence of international training…

  4. [Instances where sex counseling is needed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, G

    1980-11-01

    Sex counseling is needed because those people with sexual problems tend to magnify the problems and dwell on them at the cost of all the other important activities of day to day living. The topics covered in sex counseling include impotence (62.5%), premature ejaculation (11.7%), ejaculation dysfunction (13.0%) in case of male, and frigidity (19.1%), sexual aversion/fear (23.0%), and functional disorders of sexual organs (22.4%) in case of female. Frigidity and vaginismus as well as most male problems are within the scope of sex counseling and therapy, but many of the female complaints are psychological and they require marriage counseling. Sexual awareness is both inherited and acquired. 6 weeks after fertilization the presence or absence of Y chromosome already begins to influence both structural and functional development of fetus, and its influence continues throughout our lives. Free creative expression of sexual awareness is bound to clash with social conventions, and that conflict causes stress in some individuals and maturity in others. Positive handling of sexuality promises enriched lives, and sex counseling contributes toward that goal.

  5. Presymptomatic ALS genetic counseling and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislaw, Christine; Reyes, Eliana; Hussain, Sumaira; Cooley, Anne; Fernandez, Maria Catalina; Dauphin, Danielle D.; Michon, Sara-Claude; Andersen, Peter M.; Wuu, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable advances in our understanding of the genetic contributions to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have sparked discussion and debate about whether clinical genetic testing should routinely be offered to patients with ALS. A related, but distinct, question is whether presymptomatic genetic testing should be offered to family members who may be at risk for developing ALS. Existing guidelines for presymptomatic counseling and testing are mostly based on small number of individuals, clinical judgment, and experience from other neurodegenerative disorders. Over the course of the last 8 years, we have provided testing and 317 genetic counseling sessions (including predecision, pretest, posttest, and ad hoc counseling) to 161 first-degree family members participating in the Pre-Symptomatic Familial ALS Study (Pre-fALS), as well as testing and 75 posttest counseling sessions to 63 individuals with familial ALS. Based on this experience, and the real-world challenges we have had to overcome in the process, we recommend an updated set of guidelines for providing presymptomatic genetic counseling and testing to people at high genetic risk for developing ALS. These recommendations are especially timely and relevant given the growing interest in studying presymptomatic ALS. PMID:27194384

  6. Evaluation of the FOCUS (Feedback on Counseling Using Simulation) Instrument for Assessment of Client-Centered Nutrition Counseling Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Beverly W.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop an instrument to assess client-centered counseling behaviors (skills) of student-counselors in a standardized patient (SP) exercise. Methods: Descriptive study of the accuracy and utility of a newly developed counseling evaluation instrument. Study participants included 11 female student-counselors at a Midwestern…

  7. [Career counselling and choice of speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillevang, G.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences. The cou......Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences....... The counsellor must be aware that the trainees' subjective opinions about the specialties may not be in line with the actual conditions. Hence, career counselling should provide factual knowledge about the specialties including information on the working conditions and defining characteristics of the specialties...

  8. Counseling for medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, V

    2000-08-01

    Counseling and education are correlated with women's satisfaction with all abortion care. They often assume a larger role in medical abortion because the patient is a more active participant in the abortion process. This article aims to enhance the practitioner's expertise in providing the information and care necessary for women considering early abortion with medical regimens. It offers general counseling guidelines and several likely clinical scenarios regarding the decision-making process, the screening of patients, and the initial and follow-up visits. Through effective communication, practitioners can provide the information and support that patients need to complete the abortion process safely and can help to strengthen women's confidence in managing their reproductive health experiences.

  9. What Is a Bilingual School Psychologist? A National Survey of the Credentialing Bodies of School Psychologists: Implications for the Assessment of Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the credentialing practices for bilingual school psychologists in the United States. Credentialing agencies of school psychologists, mostly State Departments of Education, across the 50 states and the District of Columbia were contacted via telephone by trained graduate student research assistants. Only two of the…

  10. Mixed Methods Research Designs in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, William E.; Creswell, John W.; Clark, Vicki L. Plano; Petska, Kelly S.; Creswell, David J.

    2005-01-01

    With the increased popularity of qualitative research, researchers in counseling psychology are expanding their methodologies to include mixed methods designs. These designs involve the collection, analysis, and integration of quantitative and qualitative data in a single or multiphase study. This article presents an overview of mixed methods…

  11. Gay Couple Counseling: Proceedings of a Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ralph; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This is a report of a conference on gay couple counseling for members of the helping professions. Discussion topics included (1) Therapists' Panel on Female Couples, (2) Therapists' Panel on Male Couples; (3) Panel of Male Couples and (4) Panel of Female Couples. The conference was held in May, 1974 in New York and was sponsored by The Homosexual…

  12. 8 CFR 1240.2 - Service counsel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Removal Proceedings § 1240.2... disposition by the immigration judge. The duties of the Service counsel include, but are not limited to, the...

  13. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…

  14. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S.…

  15. Discourse Analysis in Career Counseling and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Graham B.; Bakker, Terri M.

    2010-01-01

    Discourse analysis can be used to understand and interpret culturally and socially produced meanings regarding work and to outline how specific rules and conventions can configure meaning production of work in context. The implications of some core concepts in discourse analysis pertinent to career counseling are explored, including discourse,…

  16. Effectiveness of psychological interventions delivered by non-psychologists on low back pain and disability: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Geoff P

    2017-11-01

    Psychological treatments delivered by non-psychologists have been proposed as a way to increase access to care to address important psychological barriers to recovery in people with low back pain (LBP). This review aimed to synthesize randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assess the effectiveness of psychological interventions delivered by non-psychologists in reducing pain intensity and disability in adults with LBP, compared with usual care. A systematic review without meta-analysis was carried out. Randomized controlled trials including adult patients with all types of musculoskeletal LBP were eligible. Interventions included those based on psychological principles and delivered by non-psychologists. The primary outcomes of interest were self-reported pain intensity and disability. Information sources included Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Registrar for Controlled Trials. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used for the evaluation of internal validity. There were 1,101 records identified, 159 were assessed for eligibility, 16 were critically appraised, and 11 studies were included. Mild to moderate risk of bias was present in the included studies, with personnel and patient blinding, treatment fidelity, and attrition being the most common sources of bias. Considerable heterogeneity existed for patient population, intervention components, and comparison groups. Although most studies demonstrated statistical and clinical improvements in pain and disability, few were statistically superior to the comparison group. Consistent with the broader psychological literature, psychological interventions delivered by non-psychologists have modest effects on low back pain and disability. Additional high quality research is needed to understand what patients are likely to respond to psychological interventions, the appropriate dose to achieve the desired outcome, the amount of training required to implement psychological

  17. Prenatal counselling for congenital anomalies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marokakis, Sarah; Kasparian, Nadine A; Kennedy, Sean E

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies may arouse fear, anxiety and distress in parents, and counselling may assist parents to cope with the diagnosis. This systematic review aimed to (1) synthesise the evidence on the impact of non-genetic, prenatal counselling after fetal diagnosis of a congenital anomaly on parental knowledge and psychological adjustment and (2) identify parents' preferences for the timing and format of counselling. Five electronic databases were systematically searched to identify studies assessing prenatal counselling provided to parents after prenatal diagnosis of one or more structural congenital anomalies. Data were extracted using predefined data forms, according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines, and synthesised. Twenty four articles were included for review; most articles reported results of retrospective surveys and the quality of included studies was variable. Only three studies assessed parental anxiety, and each reported a significant decrease in anxiety following prenatal counselling. Parents expressed a preference for counselling on all aspects of their baby's anomaly as soon as possible after prenatal diagnosis, and desired written, visual and web-based information resources, and support group contacts. Although prenatal counselling reduced parental anxiety, further research is needed to adequately assess the impact of prenatal counselling on other psychological outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. 38 CFR 21.376 - Travel expenses for initial evaluation and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... initial evaluation and counseling. 21.376 Section 21.376 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Travel expenses for initial evaluation and counseling. When VA asks a disabled veteran to report to a designated place for an initial evaluation, reevaluation or counseling (including personal or vocational...

  19. The emergence and evolution of HIV counselling in Zambia: a 25-year history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simbaya, J.; Moyer, E.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related counselling practices have evolved since emerging in Zambia in 1987. Whereas, initially, the goal of HIV counselling was to provide psychological support to the dying and their families, as knowledge about HIV grew, counselling objectives expanded to include behavioural change,

  20. In-school HIV&AIDS counselling services in Botswana: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Descriptive statistical analysis revealed a broad range of HIV&AIDS-related counselling services including life-skills education, care and support education and stigma reduction counselling. Teachers perceived a greater need for training in HIV&AIDS counselling skills and also in the use of information technology to support ...

  1. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  2. Mental Health Counseling in the Islamic Republic of Iran: A Marriage of Religion, Science, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priester, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the state of mental health counseling in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Topics that are addressed include training of clinicians, theoretical developments in Islamic-based theories of psychology, and issues related to the practice of counseling. Counseling issues in the Islamic Republic of Iran are influenced by its unique…

  3. An "Afterthought": Counseling Trainees' Multicultural Competence within the Spiritual/Religious Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaldi-Dopman, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Although spiritual/religious identity development is included within multicultural training on the theoretical level, significant gaps exist in counseling trainees' practical preparation for spiritual/religious competence. This grounded theory study explores counseling trainees' multicultural counseling competence within the…

  4. Why Should We All Be Cultural Psychologists? Lessons from the Study of Social Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    I call the attention of psychologists to the pivotal role of cultural psychology in extending and enriching research programs. I argue that it is not enough to simply acknowledge the importance of culture, and urge psychologists to practice cultural psychology in their research. I deconstruct five assumptions about cultural psychology that seriously undermine its contribution to the building of a true psychological science, including that cultural psychology 1) is only about finding group differences; 2) does not care about group similarities; 3) only concerns group-level analysis; 4) is irrelevant to basic psychological processes; and 5) is only to confirm the generalizability of theories. I discuss how cultural psychology can provide unique insights into psychological processes and further equip researchers with additional tools to understand human behavior. Drawing lessons from the 20 years of cultural research that my colleagues and I have done on the development of social cognition, including autobiographical memory, future thinking, self, and emotion knowledge, I demonstrate that incorporating cultural psychology into a research program is not only necessary but also feasible. PMID:27694456

  5. [The emphases and basic procedures of genetic counseling in psychotherapeutic model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhi; Zhong, Nanbert

    2006-11-01

    The emphases and basic procedures of genetic counseling are all different with those in old models. In the psychotherapeutic model, genetic counseling will not only focus on counselees' genetic disorders and birth defects, but also their psychological problems. "Client-centered therapy" termed by Carl Rogers plays an important role in genetic counseling process. The basic procedures of psychotherapeutic model of genetic counseling include 7 steps: initial contact, introduction, agendas, inquiry of family history, presenting information, closing the session and follow-up.

  6. Unto the third generation: evidence for strong familial aggregation of physicians, psychologists, and psychotherapists among first-year medical and psychology students in a nationwide Austrian cohort census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ulrich S; Berger, Nina; Arendasy, Martin E; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Himmelbauer, Monika; Hutzler, Florian; Kraft, Hans-Georg; Oettl, Karl; Papousek, Ilona; Vitouch, Oliver; Voracek, Martin

    2017-05-03

    aggregation of physicians, psychologists, and psychotherapists is high among medical and psychology undergraduates in Austria. Discussed are implications of these findings (e.g., gender equity, feminization of the medical field, ideas for curricular implementation and student counselling), study limitations, and avenues for future research.

  7. Misconception p value among Chilean and Italian academic psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The p value misconceptions are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals’ decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italians, 30 Chileans, questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with original research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed.

  8. The role of the psychologist in social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinderman, Peter

    2014-06-01

    On 1 September 1967, the Nobel Prize-winning civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a speech entitled 'The role of the behavioral scientist in the civil rights movement' to the American Psychological Association (APA, 1999; King, 1968). With eloquence and passion, Martin Luther King championed the civil rights struggle and spoke to the interests of his audience. He stressed how behavioural scientists could and should support the civil rights movement. King's eloquent and passionate speech is still relevant today - explaining how psychologists and other mental health professionals could help address today's pressing social issues. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Current assessment practice, personality measurement, and rorschach usage by psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musewicz, John; Marczyk, Geoffrey; Knauss, Linda; York, David

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we investigated current personality assessment practice and attitudes toward Rorschach (Exner, 2003) usage by 215 psychologists. We administered an Internet survey to members of the Society for Personality Assessment (SPA) and the American Psychological Association. Results were similar to those of past surveys, but the importance of using tests with strong psychometric properties was greater in this study. The majority of respondents reported using the Rorschach and supporting efforts to standardize and psychometrically validate the test. However, SPA members agreed more strongly than non-SPA members that the Rorschach is an effective test. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  10. Divorce: Using Psychologists' Skills for Transformation and Conflict Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    The litigious divorce process often leaves children with parents who are at "war" and have little ability to coparent effectively. This article discusses some of the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes designed to lessen conflict both before and after divorce. It also addresses the important work of psychologists serving in the roles of child therapists and reunification clinicians doing the difficult work of helping to heal fractured child-parent relationships. Ethical challenges are addressed and future directions for applied research are suggested. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The role of the organisational psychologist in disasters and emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Guillén, César

    2011-04-01

    Interventions in extreme situations, such as natural or technological disasters, terrorist attacks or emergencies in general, take place in settings of great uncertainty and are always accompanied by extraordinary circumstances. For this reason, there are various processes related to implementing intervention protocols that must be carefully examined, including an evaluation of work scenarios, personnel selection, within-group relationships in work teams, decision-making processes, or certain peculiarities of burnout among emergency personnel. In the view of this author, an ad hoc review of the role of the organisational psychologist can highlight interesting analysis and performance possibilities that could make work in emergency and disasters contexts more effective. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of the organisational psychologist pre-and post-disaster. Furthermore, it supports the idea that professional profiles must be designed that take into account specific knowledge and skills, as well as certain aptitudes and values. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  12. The diagnosis of psychopathy: Why psychiatrists and psychologists need to know ethical doctrines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alečković-Nikolić Mila S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the problem of the nature of the most difficult nosologic psychopathological diagnosis - psychopathy in all its features, the neurological and psychological, the social and the political. The paper also analyzes the analogy: the character of the society vis-à vis the character of the individual. In the second part, this work develops the concept of psychopathy as a general 'picture of the world,' a period of time and the community, with special reference to the harsh financial Darwinism and the Serbian society today (2014. The conclusion of the paper is that it is impossible to diagnose any disease as psychopathy if the psychiatric and psychological analysis does not include an analysis of sociologists, pedagogues, and especially psychologists of morality and ethicists. Finally, the attitude of the author is that every psychiatrist and psychologist who meet with psychopathy and judge it absolutely needs to know the most important ethical doctrine (deontology and utilitarianism, their opposition, as well as their consequences.

  13. 38 CFR 21.7100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7100... Bill-Active Duty) Counseling § 21.7100 Counseling. A veteran or servicemember may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is (1) To...

  14. Counseling by epileptologists affects contraceptive choices of women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinera, Alyssa R; Gavvala, Jay; Bellinski, Irena; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Macken, Micheal P; Narechania, Aditi; Templer, Jessica; VanHaerents, Stephen; Schuele, Stephan U; Gerard, Elizabeth E

    2016-12-01

    There are several important interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraception that need to be carefully considered by women with epilepsy (WWE) and their practitioners. Many AEDs induce hepatic enzymes and decrease the efficacy of hormonal contraception. In addition, estrogen-containing hormonal contraception can increase the metabolism of lamotrigine, the most commonly prescribed AED in women of childbearing age. The intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective form of reversible contraception without AED drug interactions that is considered by many to be the contraceptive of choice for WWE. Women with epilepsy not planning pregnancy require effective contraceptive counseling that should include discussion of an IUD. There are no guidelines, however, on who should deliver these recommendations. The objective of this study was to explore the hypothesis that contraceptive counseling by a neurologist can influence the contraceptive choices of WWE. In particular, we explored the relationship between contraceptive counseling in the epilepsy clinic and the likelihood that patients would obtain an IUD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of female patients age 18-45 seen at our institution for an initial visit between 2010 and 2014 to ascertain the type of contraceptive counseling each patient received as well as AED use and contraceptive methods. Patients who were pregnant or planning pregnancy at the first visit were excluded from further analyses as were patients with surgical sterilization. We also examined a subgroup of 95 patients with at least 4 follow-up visits to evaluate the efficacy of epileptologists' counseling. Specifically, we looked at the likelihood a patient obtained an IUD based on the type of counseling she had received. Fisher exact tests assessed associations between counseling type and whether patients had obtained an IUD. Three hundred and ninety-seven women met criteria for inclusion. Only 35% of female patients

  15. Burnout, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and proactive coping among lithuanian school psychologists

    OpenAIRE

    Mackonienė, Renata; Norvilė, Natalija

    2012-01-01

    Burnout occurs in occupations, such as psychologists, where a significant proportion of time is spent in close involvement with other people. This article focuses on examining the prevalence of burnout, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and proactive coping and identifying the correlates of burnout among Lithuanian school psychologists. A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from school psychologists using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnai...

  16. Can we risk recovery? A grounded theory of clinical psychologists' perceptions of risk and recovery-oriented mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Anna; Brown, Dora; Hayward, Mark

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to explore the views of clinical psychologists towards the concepts of 'risk' and 'recovery' and to set those views against the context of mental health services. An exploratory, social constructionist grounded theory methodology was adopted. Eleven clinical psychologists working in adult mental health services each participated in one individual semistructured interview. The clinical psychologists studied were aware of the emergence of recovery-oriented approaches, but felt unable to incorporate them in practice because of perceptions of being bound by both their own limitations and those of their circumstances, including issues of risk, thus giving rise to dilemmas in professional practice. Narrow definitions of risk as equated to danger dominated over broader conceptualizations of risk with positive consequences. The existing culture of mental health services was seen as emphasizing the need to avoid harmful consequences of taking risks, which in turn was seen to limit innovations in implementing recovery-oriented approaches. Participants' ability to work in a recovery-oriented manner seemed to be limited by the way in which services perceived and responded to risk. Participants did not discuss risks arising from stigma, social exclusion, racism, sexism, or iatrogenic effects of psychiatric treatment. Narrow conceptualizations of risk as related to harm and danger seen in this study contribute to a sense of needing to be risk averse. However, the implications for practice included ideas about what might increase the possibilities for adopting recovery approaches across disciplines. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Psychological counselling in problematic diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, F. J.; Skinner, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    -destructive behaviour and interpersonal/family conflicts. A literature search was undertaken using MedLine and PsychInfo, including studies published in English peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2001, reporting on the effects of psychological interventions in the areas mentioned. Case studies were excluded from......Background: In past decades clinicians have increasingly recognized the importance of psychological support for people with diabetes and their families, and many have recommended integrating psychological counselling into routine diabetes care. It is therefore important to consider whether...... psychological interventions in diabetes are effective in improving clinical outcomes. Methods: This review was limited to the literature reporting on the treatment of five common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management: depression, eating disorders, anxiety/stress, self...

  18. Psychological counselling in problematic diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, F. J.; Skinner, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    Background: In past decades clinicians have increasingly recognized the importance of psychological support for people with diabetes and their families, and many have recommended integrating psychological counselling into routine diabetes care. It is therefore important to consider whether...... psychological interventions in diabetes are effective in improving clinical outcomes. Methods: This review was limited to the literature reporting on the treatment of five common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management: depression, eating disorders, anxiety/stress, self......-destructive behaviour and interpersonal/family conflicts. A literature search was undertaken using MedLine and PsychInfo, including studies published in English peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2001, reporting on the effects of psychological interventions in the areas mentioned. Case studies were excluded from...

  19. Addiction Counseling Accreditation: CACREP's Role in Solidifying the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Culbreth, Jack R.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs' (CACREP) role in furthering the specialty of addiction counseling. After sharing a brief history and the role of counselor certification and licensure, the authors share the process whereby CACREP developed the first set of…

  20. 45 CFR 2555.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 2555.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  1. 34 CFR 106.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  2. 32 CFR 196.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 196.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  3. 45 CFR 618.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 618.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  4. Understanding and Counseling Gay Men: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaer, James

    1987-01-01

    Reviews current concepts and research concerning homosexuality with emphasis on understanding gay men and their relationship behaviors. Presents counseling considerations from a developmental perspective, and includes a case example. (Author/KS)

  5. Breastfeeding counsel against cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prameela Kannan Kutty

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer potential by breastfeeding is not fully tapped in the light of the present knowledge of the subject. Literature indicates that breastmilk has anticancer action but may underestimate its full capacity. The protective spectrum within breastmilk hints on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of it as an anticancer tool. Exclusive breastfeeding could confer protection from carcinogenesis with a greater impact than realised. A literature review was conducted using four electronic databases. Selected areas were extracted after thorough perusal of the articles. The uninitiated would take exclusive breastfeeding seriously if actively counselled as an anticancer tool. Advice on details of the breastfeeding process and holistic information on breastfeeding may endow a greater impact among the skeptics. Counselling the breastfeeding mother on information sometimes not imparted, such as on maternal nutrition, details of the process of breastfeeding, benefits of direct breastfeeding versus milk expression and her psychosocial well being may make a difference in optimising anticancer action that exists in breastmilk. Additionally, its anticancer potential provides a platform to universally improve physical and psychosocial well being of women who breastfeed. Statistics of protection by breastfeeding in some maternal and childhood cancers are evident. “Bio-geno-immuno-nutrition” of breastmilk may shield the mother and infant from carcinogenesis in more ways than appreciated. The molecular basis of mother-to-infant signals and their “energies” need to be researched. Breastfeeding as a modifiable behaviour provides cost effective nutrition with potential for both cancer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy.

  6. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: successful systematic implementation of a group approach to genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Patrick R; Di Maria, Marina; Dorling, Leila; Jouinot, Anne; Poli, Antoine; Villebasse, Sophie; Le Mentec, Marine; Claret, Béatrice; Boinon, Diane; Caron, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The increase in referrals to cancer genetics clinics, partially associated with the "Angelina Jolie effect", presents a challenge to existing services, many are already running at full capacity. More efficient ways to deliver genetic counselling are therefore urgently needed. We now systematically offer group instead of standard individual counselling to patients with suspected Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Group sessions last 30 min. The first twenty consist of a presentation by the genetic counsellor, the next ten of a discussion involving a cancer geneticist and a psychologist. A short individual consultation ensues, where personal and family issues are addressed and consent obtained. Blood is drawn afterwards. Satisfaction and knowledge are evaluated. We report data for the Oct-2014-Aug-2015 period. 210 patients attended group counselling, up to eight simultaneously. We always fitted them within a 4-h time frame. Mean satisfaction score was 41/43. Knowledge scores increased from 3.1/6 to 4.9/6 post-counselling (p value counselling, we have withstood increases in referrals without compromising care. The "Angelina Jolie effect" and rapid developments in personalized medicine threaten to overwhelm cancer genetics clinics. In this context, our innovative approach should ensure that all patients have access to approved services.

  7. Student Counselling at Utrecht University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The enormous increase in the number of students at Dutch universities in the sixties and seventies made it impossible for professors to deal with the many different questions students confronted them with. New professionals, student counsellors/psychologists and student advisers entered the

  8. Parent Education and Elementary Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Jackie; Lamb, Wesley A.

    This monograph serves as an overview of theory and technique for parent training, most specifically through the implementation of programs led by the elementary school counselor and the school psychologist. This document explores the history, basic assumptions, goals, training procedures, training of trainers, and references and resources from a…

  9. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M. [=Marja; Mochtar, M. H.; de Melker, A. A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counselling at the time that

  10. Counseling in Turkey: An Evolving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Guneri, Oya Yerin

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of counseling and addresses the current issues and future trends of counseling in Turkey. Special emphasis is placed on the factors that impede the development of school counseling as a discipline.

  11. Motivational Interviewing and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. C.; McMahon, B. T.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores commonalities between rehabilitation counseling and the counseling approach known as motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported, clientcentered, directive counseling approach designed to promote client motivation and reduce motivational conflicts and barriers to change. The underpinnings…

  12. Abortion Counseling and the School Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jack A.; Moffett, Catherine F.

    1974-01-01

    Abortion counseling is now legally within the purview of the school counselor. It is therefore essential that counselors determine their role in abortion counseling, the kind of training necessary, and whether professional organizations should develop counseling guidelines. (RP)

  13. Counseling customers: emerging roles for genetic counselors in the direct-to-consumer genetic testing market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anna; Kelly, Susan E; Wyatt, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Individuals now have access to an increasing number of internet resources offering personal genomics services. As the direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTC GT) industry expands, critics have called for pre- and post-test genetic counseling to be included with the product. Several genetic testing companies offer genetic counseling. There has been no examination to date of this service provision, whether it meets critics' concerns and implications it may have for the genetic counseling profession. Considering the increasing relevance of genetics in healthcare, the complexity of genetic information provided by DTC GT, the mediating role of the internet in counseling, and potential conflicts of interest, this is a topic which deserves further attention. In this paper we offer a discourse analysis of ways in which genetic counseling is represented on DTC GT websites, blogs and other online material. This analysis identified four types of genetic counseling represented on the websites: the integrated counseling product; discretionary counseling; independent counseling; and product advice. Genetic counselors are represented as having the following roles: genetics educator; mediator; lifestyle advisor; risk interpreter; and entrepreneur. We conclude that genetic counseling as represented on DTC GT websites demonstrates shifting professional roles and forms of expertise in genetic counseling. Genetic counselors are also playing an important part in how the genetic testing market is taking shape. Our analysis offers important and timely insights into recent developments in the genetic counseling profession, which have relevance for practitioners, researchers and policy makers concerned with the evolving field of personal genomics.

  14. A comparison of walk-in counselling and the wait list model for delivering counselling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalker, Carol A; Riemer, Manuel; Cait, Cheryl-Anne; Horton, Susan; Booton, Jocelyn; Josling, Leslie; Bedggood, Joanna; Zaczek, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    Walk-in counselling has been used to reduce wait times but there are few controlled studies to compare outcomes between walk-in and the traditional model of service delivery. To compare change in psychological distress by clients receiving services from two models of service delivery, a walk-in counselling model and a traditional counselling model involving a wait list. Mixed-methods sequential explanatory design including quantitative comparison of groups with one pre-test and two follow-ups, and qualitative analysis of interviews with a sub-sample. Five-hundred and twenty-four participants ≥16 years were recruited from two Family Counselling Agencies; the General Health Questionnaire-12 assessed change in psychological distress. Hierarchical linear modelling revealed clients of the walk-in model improved faster and were less distressed at the four-week follow-up compared to the traditional service delivery model. Ten weeks later, both groups had improved and were similar. Participants receiving instrumental services prior to baseline improved more slowly. The qualitative data confirmed participants highly valued the accessibility of the walk-in model, and were frustrated by the lengthy waits associated with the traditional model. This study improves methodologically on previous studies of walk-in counselling, an approach to service delivery not conducive to randomized controlled trials.

  15. Adlerian Counseling for Parent Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Fred P.

    The helping professions must aid parents in understanding their children and in providing parents with methods to improve family relationships. Adlerian counseling is presented as one potentially useful method of reaching this goal. The basic principles and democratic philosophy of Adlerian counseling are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the…

  16. Group Counseling for Navy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchum, Nancy Taylor

    1991-01-01

    Conducted six-session group counseling program for Navy children (n=22) enrolled in public schools whose fathers were on deployment. Pretest and posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory suggest that participation in the group counseling unit positively affected self-esteem of Navy children whose fathers were on deployment. Found…

  17. Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Journal Home > Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 6 of 6 Items. 2011 ...

  18. Defense Mechanisms in Group Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    Presents considerations and strategies for conceptualizing, recognizing, and modifying defense mechanisms through the group counseling process. Provides awareness of defense mechanisms in planning for and implementation of group counseling, describes interaction patterns for identifying defenses among group participants, and clarifies modification…

  19. Discussing end-of-life care issues with terminally ill patients and their relatives: comparisons among physicians, nurses and psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasevoli, Mario; Giantin, Valter; Voci, Alberto; Valentini, Elisabetta; Zurlo, Anna; Maggi, Stefania; Siviero, Paola; Orrù, Graziella; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Pegoraro, Renzo; Manzato, Enzo

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the end-of-life topics most frequently discussed by Italian physicians, nurses and psychologists with terminally ill patients and their relatives. Findings were compared with the levels of communication reported by physicians in other countries involved in the EURELD research project, in Europe and elsewhere. An ad hoc questionnaire was prepared to measure levels of communication and administered to 716 professionals (181 physicians, 454 nurses and 81 psychologists) employed in geriatric hospital wards, hospices and nursing homes, or registered with professional associations in the Veneto and Trentino Alto-Adige regions of north-east Italy. Statistical analyses (frequency analysis, multivariate logistic regression) were conducted on data from questionnaires returned by standard mail or email. Communication levels vary for the various end-of-life issues which physicians, nurses and psychologists are required to discuss and the individuals with whom they deal. Italian physicians are more communicative with relatives than with patients, whereas psychologists tend to discuss these problems more with patients than with members of their families. Nurses behave in much the same way with both patients and relatives. By comparison with their colleagues elsewhere in Europe, Italian physicians reveal more evident differences in their willingness to discuss end-of-life issues, depending on whether they are communicating with patients or relatives. Having received bio-ethical training helps physicians communicate with their patients. Communicating is a fundamental part of providing care for terminally ill patients and support for their families. The patient care process involves several kinds of professionals, who are all increasingly called upon to be prepared to discuss the end of a patient's life, and to develop a therapeutic relationship which includes communicating without evading any of the aspects (and problems) relating to this

  20. A Training Course for Psychologists: Learning to Assess (Alleged) Sexual Abuse Among Victims and Perpetrators Who Have Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embregts, Petri J C M; Heestermans, Marianne; van den Bogaard, Kim J H M

    2017-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk of being a victim of sexual abuse and may also be more predisposed to perpetrating sexual abuse. Although the prevalence of sexual abuse among people with ID is difficult to determine, it is clear that there are serious consequences for both victims and perpetrators, and professional support is needed. Psychologists play an important role in the assessment of sexual abuse in both victims and perpetrators and require specific knowledge and skills to execute the assessments. We therefore developed a training course for psychologists aimed at increasing their (applied) knowledge of sexual abuse and the related assessment process in people with ID. In a five-day training course, sessions focusing on theories about diagnostic models were combined with sessions focusing on the assessment of sexual abuse of victims and perpetrators. The effectiveness of the training course was determined in terms of (applied) knowledge via the administration of a study-specific questionnaire including a hypothetical case vignette before, immediately after, and six months after completion of the course. The results show that the knowledge of the psychologists related to sexual abuse and the assessment process for sexual abuse increased significantly, and remained above pre-test level at six-month follow-up. These results are promising, but more research is needed to see if the increased (applied) knowledge in turn leads to application in practice and better care for both victims and perpetrators.

  1. Evaluation of the FOCUS (Feedback on Counseling Using Simulation) instrument for assessment of client-centered nutrition counseling behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Beverly W; Smith, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    To develop an instrument to assess client-centered counseling behaviors (skills) of student-counselors in a standardized patient (SP) exercise. Descriptive study of the accuracy and utility of a newly developed counseling evaluation instrument. Study participants included 11 female student-counselors at a Midwestern university-10 Caucasian, 1 African-American-for the simulated counseling sessions, in which the Feedback on Counseling Using Simulation (FOCUS) instrument was applied in 2 SP scenarios (cardiovascular disease and diabetes). FOCUS ratings of student-counselors by 4 SPs during 22 sessions were compared with ratings from a 3-member panel of experts who independently viewed the 22 videotaped sessions. Quantitative analysis of instrument validity included inter-rater reliability by computing generalizability coefficients, Pearson correlations, and Spearman rank-order correlations. FOCUS criteria encompassed relevant dimensions of nutrition counseling based in a client-centered perspective. The critical points of information gathering and counseling behaviors showed internal consistency overall and good inter-rater reliability with the cardiovascular disease scenario. For both scenarios, pooled ratings of 3 experts agreed with ratings carried out by SPs. Initial findings suggest that the FOCUS instrument with client-centered criteria may enhance evaluation of counseling skills in SP exercises, meriting further study with larger groups.

  2. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  3. School Psychologists' Views on Challenges in Facilitating School Development through Intersectoral Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolla, Nadeen; Lazarus, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    The role of school psychologists has been debated and contested nationally and internationally for many decades, with an emphasis on the need for a paradigm shift in professional roles. Psychologists may be employed in the private sector, in nongovernmental organisations, in higher education institutions, and by the state. Those employed by the…

  4. Achieving and Maintaining Change in Urban Schools: The Role of The School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Bradley; Serbonich, Nadine

    2018-01-01

    School psychologists in Baltimore (MD) City Public Schools are engaged in efforts to expand their professional roles from a traditional to a more comprehensive model. In Baltimore, school psychologists had been in the traditional role as a special education-specific gatekeeper and service provider. Starting in 2013, a group of school…

  5. [The role of the psychologist with a death in neonatal and paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsan, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Marie-Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The psychologist within a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit intervenes in accordance with the condition of the patient and those at whom their services are aimed. The psychological practice in this particular context comprises certain specificities. As the child nears the end of life the psychologist must find his place within the unit and adapt his care to the needs expressed.

  6. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Priorities for Dealing with the Dropout Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egyed, Carla J.; McIntosh, David E.; Bull, Kay S.

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 444 nationally certified school psychologists were surveyed to determine which causes of dropping out should be national priorities. The five factors that emerged are criminal/victimization, different from peer group, school conflict, dysfunctional family/lack of support, and family responsibilities. School psychologists perceived…

  7. Mental health treatment provided by primary care psychologists in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Kamsma, H.; van der Niet, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The study examined outcomes of clients treated by primary care psychologists in 2010 in the Netherlands. Methods: Data for 55,067 clients treated by 613 primary care psychologists were analyzed for three outcomes: regular conclusion of treatment, improvement of >10 points on the Global

  8. Sexual Health Education: Social and Scientific Perspectives and How School Psychologists Can Be Involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Ashley A.; Perfect, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' (NASP) official stand on sexual education is that it should be taught in schools to help young people make healthy decisions regarding sex throughout their lives. Accordingly, school psychologists have a responsibility to use their expertise to facilitate these programs. Without a comprehensive…

  9. Considerations for School Psychologists Working with Arab American Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N.

    2011-01-01

    There are an estimated three million Arab Americans in the United States, with 25% of the population under the age of 18. Given this significant population, it is likely that some school psychologists come across children from Arab backgrounds during their career. Many school psychologists, however, may not be aware of the unique cultural…

  10. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  11. Job Satisfaction among Practicing School Psychologists: The Impact of SLD Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented high levels of job satisfaction among school psychologists. Given that school psychologists spend much of their time in special education decision making and identifying students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), it is important to understand how assessment practices relate to job satisfaction. This study surveyed…

  12. Culturally Diverse Beliefs Concerning Dying, Death, and Bereavement: A School Psychologist's Intervention Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    School psychologists need to employ a multicultural perspective in the areas of death, dying, and bereavement. To develop multicultural sensitivity and competency requires setting aside one's personal beliefs in an attempt to adopt another's perspective. Consequently, school psychologists first need to explore their own attitudes about death and…

  13. The Association of Black Psychologists: An Organization Dedicated to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasi, Ezemenari M.; Speight, Suzette L.; Rowe, Daryl M.; Clark, Le Ondra; Turner-Essel, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) was founded on September 2, 1968, in San Francisco, California, in response to the American Psychological Association's failure to address the mental health needs of the Black community. This revolutionary idea was borne out of the efforts of Black early career psychologists and student activists from…

  14. Medical Diagnostic Consultation concerning Mental Retardation: An Analogue Study of School Psychologists' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer; Balles, John; Gorin, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Recent research of relevance to school psychologists suggests that the cause, or etiology, of mental retardation can be established by medical diagnosticians in approximately one-half of cases. In the current study, 109 practicing school psychologists considered a hypothetical case of an elementary student with mental retardation and indicated…

  15. Psychologist in a pocket: towards depression screening on mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, Jó Ágila; Ramos, Roann; Ix, Tim; Ferrer-Cheng, Paula Glenda; Wehrle, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Depression is the most prevalent clinical disorder and one of the main causes of disability. This makes early detection of depressive symptoms critical in its prevention and management. This paper presents and discusses the development of Psychologist in a Pocket (PiaP), a mental mHealth application for Android which screens and monitors for these symptoms, and-given the explicit permission of the user-alerts a trusted contact such as the mental health professional or a close friend, if it detects symptoms. All text inputted electronically-such as short message services, emails, social network posts-is analyzed based on keywords related to depression based on DSM-5 and ICD criteria as well as Beck's Cognitive Theory of Depression and the Self-Focus Model. Data evaluation and collection happen in the background, on-device, without requiring any user involvement. Currently, the application is in an early prototype phase entering initial clinical validation.

  16. A Psychodynamic Psychologist in Community Psychiatry: 14 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Roquette

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically review the role of a psychodynamic psychologist integrated in a community outpatient clinic of a Psychiatric Department. It describes the characteristics of a psychodynamic intervention that is complementary to the psychiatric approach while sharing a common goal –the suffering patient – and enhancing the knowledge and understanding of several domains like psychopathology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and integration. Furthermore it describes how the use of Psychological Assessment led to the formulation of specific individual psychotherapies, spanning 14 years of clinical practice. The paper concludes with some considerations regarding the integration of Psychodynamic Psychology in a multidisciplinary mental health team, addressing issues such as the boundaries between technical characteristics, the appropriateness of language to other disciplines and psychodynamic implications of the different features of this clinical setting.

  17. Toward Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating LGBT Cultural Competence for Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S.; Andres Bedoya, C.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    A central part of providing evidence-based practice is appropriate cultural competence to facilitate psychological assessment and intervention with diverse clients. At a minimum, cultural competence with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people involves adequate scientific and supervised practical training, with increasing depth and complexity across training levels. In order to further this goal, we offer 28 recommendations of minimum standards moving toward ideal training for LGBT-specific cultural competence. We review and synthesize the relevant literature to achieve and assess competence across the various levels of training (doctoral, internship, post-doctoral, and beyond) in order to guide the field towards best practices. These recommendations are aligned with educational and practice guidelines set forth by the field and informed by other allied professions in order to provide a roadmap for programs, faculty, and trainees in improving the training of psychologists to work with LGBT individuals. PMID:26279609

  18. Do obstetrical providers counsel women about postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessie, Sybil G.; Hacker, Michele R.; Dodge, Laura E.; Elkadry, Eman A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess prenatal counseling practices of obstetrical providers related to postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction at centers with integrated urogynecology services. Study Design A cross-sectional survey was distributed to obstetrical providers through urogynecology colleagues. The survey included questions about level of training as well as counseling practices related to common postpartum pelvic floor symptoms. All statistical tests were two sided, and P values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results One hundred ninety-two surveys were received; 19 respondents did not perform their own prenatal counseling and were excluded. Among the remaining 173 respondents, 94 (56.3%) of those who answered the question reported never discussing postpartum urinary incontinence, and 73.7% reported never discussing postpartum fecal incontinence during prenatal counseling. Obstetrics and gynecology residents were significantly less likely than attending physicians to report discussing various pelvic floor dysfunction topics in prenatal counseling. Among those who reported not counseling women regarding pelvic floor dysfunction, the most common reason cited was lack of time (39.9%) followed by lack of sufficient information (30.1%). Conclusion Prenatal counseling of pelvic floor dysfunction risk is lacking at all levels of obstetrical training. Limitations of time and information are the obstacles most often cited by providers. PMID:26126305

  19. The Embedded Counseling Model: An Application to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Francis

    2017-01-01

    Prior research has suggested that dental students experience high rates of stress, anxiety, and mood concerns, which have been linked to poor academic performance, health concerns, and substance abuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an embedded counseling office at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics in its first three academic semesters. Data were gathered from students attending appointments, and two inventories were used to monitor students' counseling progress and gather psychological outcomes data: the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). In the three semesters, 55 students attended 251 counseling appointments, with an average of 4.5 appointments per student. Their presenting psychological concerns included academic concerns, time management, test anxiety, study skills, low self-esteem, self-care, interpersonal conflicts, anxiety, depression, stress management, sexual concerns, substance abuse, eating/body image concerns, work-life balance, and financial issues. The CCAPS-34 data showed that, at initial clinical assessment, students experienced moderate levels of depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, academic distress, and overall psychological distress; 45 (82%) showed clinically significant symptoms on at least one CCAPS-34 subscale. The ORS data further showed that the students entered counseling experiencing high levels of psychological distress. A positive relationship was found between number of counseling appointments and increased overall functioning. These results suggest that an embedded counseling office can help dental schools meet the needs of their students.

  20. The role of the psychologist in the preparation of young children for radiotherapy: short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokun, J; Klikovac, T; Vujic, D; Nikitovic, M

    2011-01-01

    Psychooncology is now recognized as an important part of the holistic approach to therapy of very young cancer patients. When the psychologist is included in a multidisciplinary team, his/her duty is to prepare the child for several procedures he/she is scheduled for. If the very young child has to be treated by radiotherapy, adequate preparation of the child before the start of radiotherapy may enable the child to undergo the whole procedure without sedation or repeated anesthesia. Such practice has started in Serbia in 2002, at the Department of Pediatric Oncology of the Institute for Radiology and Oncology of Serbia, Belgrade. In this article, we discuss the model we currently use, and we present how this approach has been successfully applied in a 5-year-old girl treated by radiotherapy.

  1. The value of crime scene and site visitation by forensic psychologists and psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandie, Kris; Meloy, J Reid

    2013-05-01

    Site visits and crime scene visitation by forensic psychologists and psychiatrists may enhance the accuracy and credibility of their forensic work in criminal, civil, and other important contexts. This ethically sound technique of after-the-fact data collection and verification offers numerous potential benefits to the forensic mental health professional: clarifying the subject's actions, assessing the reliability of witness reports, identifying contextual determinants of behavior, and more fully illuminating subject motivation and decision-making. Limitations and suggested guidelines for conducting site visits are offered. Guidelines include preplanning, arranging for an informed guide to accompany and narrate the visit, and conducting the site visit prior to forensic examinations. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. A new approach for psychological consultation: the psychologist at the chemist's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Enrico; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Lozza, Edoardo; Bosio, Claudio Albino

    2012-07-03

    The prevalence of mental illness and psychological suffering is greater than the availability of primary care services in Europe and, in particular, in Italy. The main barriers that hinder the access to these services are economic, the lack of proximity of services and some prejudices that may promote stigma and shame.A new mental health service, named "Psychologist in the Neighbourhood" was created to intercept unexpressed needs for psychological assistance. The service allows everyone to ask for free psychological consultation, consisting of no more than four meetings with a psychologist, in certain chemists' shops around the city of Milan. This article aims to present the service specific features of this initiative and the results of a pilot study. Information gathered on all users included socio-demographic data, the reasons why they approached this specific service, how they learnt about it, the main presented problem and, for a random sub-group, the level of psychological well-being (as measured by the PGWBI). Socio-demographic data were compared with previously collected information about general users of psychological services. The outcome of the intervention was assessed by the clinicians. During the two-year project a total of 1,775 people accessed the service. Compared to traditional users of psychological services, the participants in this service were characterized by a higher presence of females, unemployed and retired people. The main factors encouraging access were proximity and the fact that the service was free of charge. Many of the users were redirected to more specific services, while for about a third of the sample the consultation cycle was sufficient to resolve the presented problem. The interest and participation of the population was high and this initiative intercepted an unexpressed requirement for psychological support. Free access and home proximity, were the main reasons for accessing this specific service. Subjects were mostly re

  3. Clinical psychologists' views of intensive interaction as an intervention in learning disability services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth; Firth, Graham; Leeming, Catherine; Sharma, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    the beneficial outcomes of Intensive Interaction. The participants were found to differ in how they explained the approach and typically used everyday 'non-psychological' language or individual concepts/terms rather than clearly or extensively referencing particular theoretical models. The participants appeared to differ in the range of clients who they thought might benefit from Intensive Interaction. An Intensive Interaction Special Interest Group, which includes clinical psychologists, should be set up to instigate psychologically informed theory development and research with the broader aims of fostering greater understanding and adoption of Intensive Interaction within services for people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities and/or autism. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Nondirective counseling interventions with schizophrenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwood, J B

    1993-12-01

    Counseling interventions with paranoid schizophrenics can be daunting. While chemical, directive, and behavioral controls often are considered important, nondirective counseling techniques used by the therapeutic staff may help schizophrenic patients explore their thoughts and feelings. Several nondirective concepts pioneered by Carl Rogers are examined. These methods, which represent basic concepts of the person-centered approach, are empathy, unconditional positive regard, and congruence. A brief illustration of an interaction with a patient diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic is presented to suggest the effectiveness of Rogerian counseling.

  5. Behavior Change Counseling Curricula for Medical Trainees: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E.; Carney, Patricia A.; Chang, Anna; Satterfield, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Unhealthy behaviors contribute to half of U.S. deaths. However, physicians lack sufficient skill in counseling patients to change behaviors. Characterizing effective published curricular interventions for behavior-change counseling for medical trainees would inform educators toward improved training. Method The authors conducted a systematic literature search of studies published 1965–2011 evaluating curricula on behavior change counseling for medical trainees. Included studies described: (1) behavior change counseling, (2) teaching interventions for medical trainees, and (3) assessment of interventions. The authors extracted eligible articles, rated outcomes for learners and patients using Kirkpatrick’s hierarchy, and determined study quality. Results Of 2,788 identified citations, 109 met inclusion criteria. Most studies were performed in the United States (98), 93 at a single institution, and 81 in primary care settings. Curricular topics for counseling included smoking (67 studies), nutrition (30), alcohol/drug use (26), and exercise (22). Although most studies did not include theoretical frameworks, 39 used the Transtheoretical Model of Change. Sixty-two studies involved eight or fewer hours of curricular time, and 51 spanned four or fewer weeks. The studies with highest-level outcomes and quality employed multiple curricular techniques and included practice of counseling techniques in either simulated or actual clinical settings. Conclusions Existing literature suggests that trainees learn behavior change counseling through active, realistic practice and implementation of reminder and feedback systems within actual clinical practice settings. Multi-institutional medical education research on methods of teaching behavior-change counseling that influence patients’ health outcomes are needed to ensure trainees’ clinical competence and improve patient care. PMID:22622220

  6. Logotherapy Counseling to Improve Acceptance of Broken Home Child

    OpenAIRE

    Erlangga, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to increase the enrollment of children of a broken home that life has meaning. Subjects are 100 children in Demak whose families experiencing divorce. Research themes include three things: individual counseling, engineering logotherapy, reception, and a child of a broken home. Data obtained based on interviews, observation, and psychological scale showed that of the 100 children of a broken home has a low acceptance that individual counseling with logotherapy techniques were c...

  7. Prenatal Diagnosis and Genetic Counseling for Mosaic Trisomy 13

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2010-01-01

    Counseling parents of a fetus with trisomy 13 mosaicism remains difficult because of the phenotypic variability associated with the condition; some patients exhibit the typical phenotype of complete trisomy 13 with neonatal death, while others have few dysmorphic features and prolonged survival. This article provides a comprehensive review of the prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for mosaic trisomy 13, including confined placental mosaicism 13, mosaic trisomy 13 diagnosed at amniocent...

  8. Prenatal Diagnosis and Genetic Counseling for Mosaic Trisomy 13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Counseling parents of a fetus with trisomy 13 mosaicism remains difficult because of the phenotypic variability associated with the condition; some patients exhibit the typical phenotype of complete trisomy 13 with neonatal death, while others have few dysmorphic features and prolonged survival. This article provides a comprehensive review of the prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for mosaic trisomy 13, including confined placental mosaicism 13, mosaic trisomy 13 diagnosed at amniocentesis, and phylloid hypomelanosis in association with mosaic trisomy 13.

  9. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large travelling distances, generally showing positive patient outcomes. We think online counsellingincluding the use of supportive tools that are also available during in-person counselling – of presymptomatic patients in their homes can also be feasible and valuable for patients in relatively small regions. We performed a single-centre pilot study of online genetic counselling for 57 patients who were presymptomatic cardiogenetic (n=17), presymptomatic oncogenetic (n=34) and prenatal (3 couples). One-third of presymptomatic patients we approached consented to online counselling. Patient evaluations of practical aspects, satisfaction and psychological outcomes were assessed and compared with a matched control group. Patients managed to fulfil the preparations, were significantly more satisfied with their counsellor and counselling session than controls and were satisfied with the online counselling more than they expected to be beforehand. Psychological outcomes (decreased anxiety and increased control) did not differ with control patients. Technical problems occurred in almost half of online sessions. Nonetheless, online counselling in patients' homes proved to be feasible and was appreciated by a substantial part of presymptomatic patients at our genetics centre in the Netherlands. Based on these outcomes, we conclude online counselling can be a valuable addition to existing counselling options in regular patient care. PMID:26173963

  10. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large travelling distances, generally showing positive patient outcomes. We think online counselling--including the use of supportive tools that are also available during in-person counseling--of presymptomatic patients in their homes can also be feasible and valuable for patients in relatively small regions. We performed a single-centre pilot study of online genetic counselling for 57 patients who were presymptomatic cardiogenetic (n=17), presymptomatic oncogenetic (n=34) and prenatal (3 couples). One-third of presymptomatic patients we approached consented to online counselling. Patient evaluations of practical aspects, satisfaction and psychological outcomes were assessed and compared with a matched control group. Patients managed to fulfil the preparations, were significantly more satisfied with their counsellor and counselling session than controls and were satisfied with the online counselling more than they expected to be beforehand. Psychological outcomes (decreased anxiety and increased control) did not differ with control patients. Technical problems occurred in almost half of online sessions. Nonetheless, online counselling in patients' homes proved to be feasible and was appreciated by a substantial part of presymptomatic patients at our genetics centre in the Netherlands. Based on these outcomes, we conclude online counselling can be a valuable addition to existing counselling options in regular patient care.

  11. 38 CFR 21.9580 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.9580...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9580 Counseling. An individual may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. VA will apply the provisions of...

  12. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling shall be provided to sentenced inmates in contract community treatment...

  13. 38 CFR 21.100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.100... Counseling § 21.100 Counseling. (a) General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under Chapter 31 shall be provided professional counseling services by Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR...

  14. 38 CFR 21.7600 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7600...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Counseling § 21.7600 Counseling. A reservist may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during...

  15. 38 CFR 21.6100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.6100... Recipients Counseling § 21.6100 Counseling. General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under this temporary program shall be provided professional counseling services by the Vocational...

  16. 38 CFR 21.8100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.8100... Vietnam Veterans-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Counseling § 21.8100 Counseling. An eligible child requesting or receiving services and assistance under this subpart will receive professional counseling by VR...

  17. 24 CFR 214.300 - Counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or a HUD roster of counselors, designed to meet a special housing counseling need, may be permitted... HOUSING COUNSELING PROGRAM Program Administration § 214.300 Counseling services. (a) Basic requirements... educational sessions must also offer individual counseling on the same topics covered in the group educational...

  18. Physical activity counseling in medical school education: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Marie L.; Kennedy, Mary A.; Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite a large evidence base to demonstrate the health benefits of regular physical activity (PA), few physicians incorporate PA counseling into office visits. Inadequate medical training has been cited as a cause for this. This review describes curricular components and assesses the effectiveness of programs that have reported outcomes of PA counseling education in medical schools. Methods The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and ERIC databases for articles published in English from 2000 through 2012 that met PICOS inclusion criteria of medical school programs with PA counseling skill development and evaluation of outcomes. An initial search yielded 1944 citations, and 11 studies representing 10 unique programs met criteria for this review. These studies were described and analyzed for study quality. Strength of evidence for six measured outcomes shared by multiple studies was also evaluated, that is, students’ awareness of benefits of PA, change in students’ attitudes toward PA, change in personal PA behaviors, improvements in PA counseling knowledge and skills, self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling, and change in attitude toward PA counseling. Results Considerable heterogeneity of teaching methods, duration, and placement within the curriculum was noted. Weak research designs limited an optimal evaluation of effectiveness, that is, few provided pre-/post-intervention assessments, and/or included control comparisons, or met criteria for intervention transparency and control for risk of bias. The programs with the most evidence of improvement indicated positive changes in students’ attitudes toward PA, their PA counseling knowledge and skills, and their self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling. These programs were most likely to follow previous recommendations to include experiential learning, theoretically based frameworks, and students’ personal PA behaviors. Conclusions Current results provide some support for

  19. Physical activity counseling in medical school education: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L. Dacey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite a large evidence base to demonstrate the health benefits of regular physical activity (PA, few physicians incorporate PA counseling into office visits. Inadequate medical training has been cited as a cause for this. This review describes curricular components and assesses the effectiveness of programs that have reported outcomes of PA counseling education in medical schools. Methods: The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and ERIC databases for articles published in English from 2000 through 2012 that met PICOS inclusion criteria of medical school programs with PA counseling skill development and evaluation of outcomes. An initial search yielded 1944 citations, and 11 studies representing 10 unique programs met criteria for this review. These studies were described and analyzed for study quality. Strength of evidence for six measured outcomes shared by multiple studies was also evaluated, that is, students’ awareness of benefits of PA, change in students’ attitudes toward PA, change in personal PA behaviors, improvements in PA counseling knowledge and skills, self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling, and change in attitude toward PA counseling. Results: Considerable heterogeneity of teaching methods, duration, and placement within the curriculum was noted. Weak research designs limited an optimal evaluation of effectiveness, that is, few provided pre-/post-intervention assessments, and/or included control comparisons, or met criteria for intervention transparency and control for risk of bias. The programs with the most evidence of improvement indicated positive changes in students’ attitudes toward PA, their PA counseling knowledge and skills, and their self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling. These programs were most likely to follow previous recommendations to include experiential learning, theoretically based frameworks, and students’ personal PA behaviors. Conclusions: Current results provide

  20. Physical activity counseling in medical school education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Marie L; Kennedy, Mary A; Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M

    2014-01-01

    Despite a large evidence base to demonstrate the health benefits of regular physical activity (PA), few physicians incorporate PA counseling into office visits. Inadequate medical training has been cited as a cause for this. This review describes curricular components and assesses the effectiveness of programs that have reported outcomes of PA counseling education in medical schools. The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and ERIC databases for articles published in English from 2000 through 2012 that met PICOS inclusion criteria of medical school programs with PA counseling skill development and evaluation of outcomes. An initial search yielded 1944 citations, and 11 studies representing 10 unique programs met criteria for this review. These studies were described and analyzed for study quality. Strength of evidence for six measured outcomes shared by multiple studies was also evaluated, that is, students' awareness of benefits of PA, change in students' attitudes toward PA, change in personal PA behaviors, improvements in PA counseling knowledge and skills, self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling, and change in attitude toward PA counseling. Considerable heterogeneity of teaching methods, duration, and placement within the curriculum was noted. Weak research designs limited an optimal evaluation of effectiveness, that is, few provided pre-/post-intervention assessments, and/or included control comparisons, or met criteria for intervention transparency and control for risk of bias. The programs with the most evidence of improvement indicated positive changes in students' attitudes toward PA, their PA counseling knowledge and skills, and their self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling. These programs were most likely to follow previous recommendations to include experiential learning, theoretically based frameworks, and students' personal PA behaviors. Current results provide some support for previous recommendations, and current initiatives

  1. Psychological Aspects of Career Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbishley, M. Anne; Yost, Elizabeth B.

    1989-01-01

    Because career decision making affects all aspects of a person's life, career counseling must take into account client expectations, psychological characteristics and personality traits, nonverbal cues, and psychological variables affecting the counselor-client relationship. (SK)

  2. HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD sponsors housing counseling agencies throughout the country that can provide advice on buying a home, renting, defaults, foreclosures, and credit issues. This...

  3. Between coaching and social counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Vrana

    2012-03-01

    The basic difference between coaching and social counselling lies in a different interpretation of the client' starting situation. Social counselling understands the client' starting situation as problematic and attempts to normalize it, while coaching understands it as normal and attempts to develop it. The key similarity of the two approaches is encour- agement of the clients' own initiative. Coaching needs to be investigated within the field of developmental conceptions, since its focus on results supports, unintentionally, the dominant developmental paradigm. Focusing on solutions in coaching is questionable also within an organization, where its interests may channel the course of clients' search for their own solutions. The counselling doctrine of coaching can gain valuable insights by a reassessment of the concepts of development and normality, a domain in which it is likely to encounter social counselling.

  4. Career Counseling with Unemployed Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, N. E.

    1983-01-01

    Based on the view that unemployment can cause both community and individual problems, describes a model counseling intervention designed to counteract the negative trends associated with unemployment. Presents facilitative, confrontive, conceptual, prescriptive, and catalytic interventions. (RC)

  5. Genetic Counseling in Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, George R.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of counseling is dealt with mainly in the context of severe hearing impairment, since moderate forms are often due to illness or other nongenetic factors and do not constitute a grave handicap. (DLS)

  6. Genetic Counseling in Military Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    mother allegedly mistreated for preeclampsia at Tripler Army Medical Center could maintain an action for medical malpractice nothwithstanding Feres.1 2...perinatologists at most military hospitals perform genetic counseling. Due to their primary responsibilities fo management of high risk pregnancies

  7. The importance of legal counsel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Fisher

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available At each stage of the resettlement process, the presence of counsel – legal advocates – can help refugees to present their complete cases efficiently and avoid unnecessary rejections. This provides benefits to decision makers as well.

  8. Counseling Services for Women in Marriage Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frischa Meivilona Yendi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is a bond between the outer and inner man as a husband who has not aged 25 years and women 21 years old wife is not with the purpose of achieving happiness. Marriage and family counseling is a profession that will be developed in Indonesia. Counseling emphasizes on changes contained in the family system. Stages counseling, theory and dynamics as well as the use of counseling skills in marriage and family counseling has similarities with individual counseling and group counseling.

  9. Can language acquisition be facilitated in cochlear implanted children? Comparison of cognitive and behavioral psychologists' viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshizadeh, Leila; Vameghi, Roshanak; Yadegari, Fariba; Sajedi, Firoozeh; Hashemi, Seyed Basir

    2016-11-08

    To study how language acquisition can be facilitated for cochlear implanted children based on cognitive and behavioral psychology viewpoints? To accomplish this objective, literature related to behaviorist and cognitive psychology prospects about language acquisition were studied and some relevant books as well as Medline, Cochrane Library, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge and Scopus databases were searched. Among 25 articles that were selected, only 11 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Based on the inclusion criteria, review articles, expert opinion studies, non-experimental and experimental studies that clearly focused on behavioral and cognitive factors affecting language acquisition in children were selected. Finally, the selected articles were appraised according to guidelines of appraisal of medical studies. Due to the importance of the cochlear implanted child's language performance, the comparison of behaviorist and cognitive psychology points of view in child language acquisition was done. Since each theoretical basis, has its own positive effects on language, and since the two are not in opposition to one another, it can be said that a set of behavioral and cognitive factors might facilitate the process of language acquisition in children. Behavioral psychologists believe that repetition, as well as immediate reinforcement of child's language behavior help him easily acquire the language during a language intervention program, while cognitive psychologists emphasize on the relationship between information processing, memory improvement through repetitively using words along with "associated" pictures and objects, motor development and language acquisition. It is recommended to use a combined approach based on both theoretical frameworks while planning a language intervention program.

  10. Primary care physician smoking screening and counseling for patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kevin E; Hersh, Adam L; Nkoy, Flory L; Maselli, Judy H; Srivastava, Raj; Cabana, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Evidence-based guidelines recommend smoking cessation treatment, including screening and counseling, for all smokers, including those with chronic diseases exacerbated by smoking. Physician treatment improves smoking cessation. Little data describes smoking treatment guideline uptake for patients with chronic cardiopulmonary smoking-sensitive diseases. Describe U.S. primary care physician (PCP) smoking cessation treatment during patient visits for chronic cardiopulmonary smoking-sensitive diseases. The National (Hospital) Ambulatory Medical Care Survey captured PCP visits. We examined smoking screening and counseling time trends for smokers with chronic diseases. Multivariable logistic regression assessed factors associated with smoking counseling for smokers with chronic smoking-sensitive diseases. From 2001-2009 smoking screening and counseling for smokers with chronic smoking-sensitive cardiopulmonary diseases were unchanged. Among smokers with chronic smoking-sensitive diseases, 50%-72% received no counseling. Smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (odds ratio (OR)=6.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.85-8.83) and peripheral vascular disease (OR=4.50, 95% CI 1.72-11.75) were more likely to receive smoking counseling at chronic/preventive care visits, compared with patients without smoking-sensitive diseases. Other factors associated with increased smoking counseling included non-private insurance, preventive and longer visits, and an established PCP. Asthma and cardiovascular disease showed no association with counseling. Smoking cessation counseling remains infrequent for smokers with chronic smoking-sensitive cardiopulmonary diseases. New strategies are needed to encourage smoking cessation counseling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 10 CFR 1042.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  12. 13 CFR 113.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 113.425 Section 113.425 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... Activities Prohibited § 113.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  13. 24 CFR 3.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 3.425 Section 3.425 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Activities Prohibited § 3.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  14. 6 CFR 17.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  15. 38 CFR 23.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 23.425 Section 23.425 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Activities Prohibited § 23.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  16. 49 CFR 25.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  17. 45 CFR 86.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  18. 22 CFR 229.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  19. 18 CFR 1317.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1317.425 Section 1317.425 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... Activities Prohibited § 1317.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  20. 14 CFR 1253.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1253.425 Section 1253.425 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... § 1253.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall...

  1. 22 CFR 146.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  2. 7 CFR 15a.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Education Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  3. 29 CFR 36.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 36... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of...

  4. 10 CFR 5.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  5. 31 CFR 28.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 28.425 Section 28.425 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the....425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not...

  6. Between coaching and social counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Toni Vrana

    2012-01-01

    Coaching appears to be another modern counselling approach, practiced initially in the business world. It can to be analyzed through a comparison with social counselling. The roots of coaching go back to Ancient Greece.. Plato used to propagate the art of aksing questions by recording the Socratic dialogue. Today coaching is in substance related to mentoring, tutoring and coaching in sport. The core of the activity - according to different coaching definitions - is discovering the hidden pote...

  7. [Counseling in dermatology and cosmetology at pharmacies in Ouagadougou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamba, Pascal; Sieba, Ibrahim; Faye, Ousmane; Traoré-Barro, Fatou; Traoré, Adama

    2007-01-01

    In Burkina Faso as in other underdeveloped countries, access to health care in general and dermatology care in particular remains difficult. This situation puts pharmacies on the front line for providing counselling. We undertook a cross-sectional descriptive study of the pharmacies of Ouagadougou from October 1, 2002, through April 1, 2003. Our objective was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatological and cosmetic counselling. The study included 75.5% of all pharmacies and 150 service providers. Prevalence of dermatology counseling was considered moderate, as was the availability and use of dermatology products. Service providers did not know most of the common dermatology disorders and offered inappropriate advice and products. This study shows the gap between the need for counselling from pharmacies and its satisfaction. It also underlines the necessity of reorganization in this domain.

  8. 20 CFR 220.61 - Informing the examining physician or psychologist of examination scheduling, report content and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... psychologist of examination scheduling, report content and signature requirements. 220.61 Section 220.61... DISABILITY Consultative Examinations § 220.61 Informing the examining physician or psychologist of examination scheduling, report content and signature requirements. Consulting physicians or psychologists will...

  9. 42 CFR 405.2452 - Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychologist and clinical social worker services. 405.2452 Section 405.2452 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2452 Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a clinical psychologist's or...

  10. Dispensing errors and counseling quality in 100 pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Elizabeth A; Barker, Kenneth N; Berger, Bruce A; Lloyd, Kimberly Braxton; Brackett, Patrick D

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the dispensing accuracy and counseling provided in community chain pharmacies. Cross-sectional study. Community chain pharmacies in large metropolitan areas of Florida, Georgia, New Jersey, and New York. Community chain pharmacies and trained shoppers. Trained shoppers presented a new prescription order for one of five study drugs to each randomly selected pharmacy, and all encounters with pharmacy staff were recorded on video by ABC News 20/20 staff using hidden cameras. Dispensing errors on prescriptions for selected medications were the indicator of prescription dispensing accuracy. Frequency of verbal counseling and information categories discussed or included in written information were used to assess the quality of counseling. Of 100 prescriptions dispensed, 22 had one or more deviation from the physician's written order, for a 22% dispensing error rate. Three of the errors were judged to be potentially harmful when dispensed to a typical patient requiring these therapies. A total of 43 shoppers (43%) received verbal counseling, including 16 cases in which the shopper prompted counseling. All shoppers received written information with their prescription, covering an average of 90% of the required topics. Some 68% of the warfarin shoppers purchased aspirin without the pharmacist verbally warning about taking the drugs simultaneously. The dispensing error rate of more than one in five prescriptions is similar to the rate found in a similar study conducted 14 years ago, but counseling frequency has decreased significantly during the period.

  11. Training Pediatric Residents to Provide Smoking Cessation Counseling to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Collins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the effectiveness of a smoking cessation educational program on pediatric residents' counseling. Residents were randomly selected to receive the intervention. Residents who were trained were compared to untrained residents. Self-reported surveys and patient chart reviews were used. Measures included changes in self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of residents, and differences in chart documentation and caretaker-reported physician counseling behaviors. The intervention was multidimensional including a didactic presentation, a problem-solving session, clinic reminders, and provision of patient education materials. Results showed that residents who were trained were more likely to ask about tobacco use in their patients' households. They were also more likely to advise caretakers to cut down on or to quit smoking, to help set a quit date, and to follow up on the advice given at a subsequent visit. Trained residents were more likely to record a history of passive tobacco exposure in the medical record. These residents also reported improved confidence in their counseling skills and documented that they had done such counseling more often than did untrained residents. Caretakers of pediatric patients who smoke seen by intervention residents were more likely to report that they had received tobacco counseling. Following this intervention, pediatric residents significantly improved their behaviors, attitudes, and confidence in providing smoking cessation counseling to parents of their pediatric patients.

  12. School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school development through intersectoral collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeen Moolla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of school psychologists has been debated and contested nationally and internationally for many decades, with an emphasis on the need for a paradigm shift in professional roles. Psychologists may be employed in the private sector, in nongovernmental organisations, in higher education institutions, and by the state. Those employed by the state within the Department of Basic Education are referred to as school psychologists, and are tasked with providing psychological services to public schools. In the Western Cape, the context of this study, school psychologists are assigned to circuit teams, where they are expected to work collaboratively with other professionals to provide support to schools. This paper is focused on school psychologists' perceptions of the challenges that emerge when working with other sectors to facilitate school development. Eight focus group discussions were conducted with 47 school psychologists. The data collected resulted in the generation of five categories of challenges facing school psychologists when they collaborate with other sectors to facilitate school development. These were: diverse discourses and worldviews; roles and boundaries; personal and interpersonal factors; training needs; and organisational challenges. This research contributes towards the deepening of school psychology practice, and to providing important insights towards the enhancement of intersectoral collaboration and school development as aspects of the provision of support to schools in South Africa.

  13. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in the study. The results show some problematic issues such as: record keeping, exceptions of confidentiality, access to personal data, the content of informed consent, incompetence, copying of literature and diagnostic instruments – even not standardised ones, psychology students as subjects in psychological research, and lack of information on ethical aspects of students' practical work. Psychologists and students reported inadequate knowledge of professional ethics and suggested various kinds of ethical education. Institutions mostly enable psychologists to work within the Code of ethics. There are, however, conflicts regarding access to data and professional autonomy. Psychologists report conflicts between law and ethics, incorrect reports in media and lack of control over professional ethics. In the case of ethical violation psychologists do less than they should. They emphasise the problem of incompetence. The frequency and seriousness of certain violation were estimated. Ways of verifying knowledge, stimulating ethical conduct and taking different measures in the case of violations were suggested. The state of affairs in different working environments of psychologists was also described. Results show that psychologist who have worked in the field for a shorter period answer more frequently contrary to the Code of Ethics. Students' knowledge of ethics is mostly very satisfactory. The study emphasises the ethical aspects of psychological practice in Slovenia. It

  14. Where is psychology going? Structural fault lines revealed by psychologists' use of Kuhn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver-Linn, Erin

    2003-04-01

    Psychologists' appropriation of language and ideas from Thomas Kuhn's (1962, 1970b) The Structure of Scientific Revolutions reveals deep and contradictory concerns about truth, science, and the progress of the field. The author argues that psychologists, uncomfortably straddling natural and social science traditions, reference Structure for 2 reasons largely overlooked: first, because it presents an intermediate, naturalistic position in the war between relativist and rationalist views of scientific truth, and second, because it presents a psychologized model of scientific change. The author suggests that the history of this mutual influence--psychologists being influenced by Kuhn and vice versa--may usefully inform current practices of psychological science.

  15. Good practice guidelines for clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, Fionna; Bennett, Emily; Cropper, Jenny; Edwards, Lindsey; Emond, Alice; Gamble, Caroline; Kentish, Rosie; Samuel, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    There are relatively few clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant centres in the UK and in this respect we lag behind other countries such as the USA and The Netherlands. In an effort to promote the added value our profession can offer teams, the clinical psychologists working in paediatric CI centres have put together good practice guidelines. This article outlines the rationale for putting together the guidelines, highlights the unique contribution clinical psychologists can offer, outlines the evidence base for psychological input in this clinical population, and offers a fictional case study for illustration.

  16. Implementing the Five-A Model of Technical Refinement: Key Roles of the Sport Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Howie J; Collins, Dave

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the significant contribution provided by sport psychologists within applied coaching environments. However, this rarely considers their skills/knowledge being applied when refining athletes' already learned and well-established motor skills. Therefore, this article focuses on how a sport psychologist might assist a coach and athlete to implement long-term permanent and pressure proof refinements. It highlights key contributions at each stage of the Five-A model-designed to deliver these important outcomes-providing both psychomotor and psychosocial input to the support delivery. By employing these recommendations, sport psychologists can make multiple positive contributions to completion of this challenging task.

  17. Jung as psychologist of religion and Jung as philosopher of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    Is it possible to be both a psychologist and a philosopher? Is it possible for a psychologist, or more generally a social scientist, to use social scientific findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, is it possible for a social scientist to use social scientific findings to determine the existence of God? Did Jung profess to be only a psychologist or also a philosopher? If he professed to be both, did he enlist his psychological findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, did he enlist his psychological findings to determine the existence of God?

  18. Incest and parental contact: a psychologist' s personal case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A psychologist's husband molested their young daughter. Consulting psychologists purported that research indicated it would be developmentally advantageous for their daughter to continue a relationship with the father following the marital separation. The consulting psychologists did not reference the literature, prompting the mother to conduct a literature review herself. The available literature recommending that a child continue the paternal relationship cites research on children of divorce, not research on the treatment of child sex abuse victims. The scant child sex abuse research that addresses contact with the abusing parent actually indicates more harm than benefit occurs to the child.

  19. [Deficits in medical counseling in olfactory dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, B R; Nisius, A; Fruth, K; Mann, W J; Muttray, A

    2012-05-01

    Olfactory dysfunctions are common with a prevalence of up to 20% in the population. An impaired sense of smell can lead to specific dangers, therefore, counseling and warning of hazardous situations to raise patient awareness is an important medical function. In this study 105 patients presenting to the University of Mainz Medical Centre with dysosmia were evaluated using a questionnaire. For quantification of the olfactory dysfunction a standardized olfactory test (Sniffin' Sticks) was used. Of the patients 46% were hyposmic and 40% were functionally anosmic. The median duration of the olfactory impairment was 10 months and the main causes of dysosmia were upper respiratory tract infections and idiopathic disorders. More than 90% of the patients consulted an otorhinolaryngologist and 60% a general practitioner before presenting to the University of Mainz Medical Center. More than two thirds of the patients conducted a professional activity, 95% of patients reported that they had not received any medical counseling and 6% of the subjects were forced to discontinue their profession because of olfactory dysfunction. In patients with olfactory dysfunctions appropriate diagnostics, including olfactometry should be performed. Furthermore, correct medical counseling concerning necessary additional arrangements (e.g. installation of smoke or gas detectors, precautions while cooking or for hygiene) has to be performed. For patients in a profession an analysis of the hazards at work is crucial.

  20. Current practice for genetic counselling by nurses: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jennieffer A; Tsai, Lily P; Welch, Anthony; Faradz, Sultana M H; Lane-Krebs, Katrina; Howie, Virginia; Hillman, Wendy

    2018-02-20

    To examine current practice of genetic counselling by nurses. Recent debate argues that genetic counselling is a specialist advanced practice role, whilst others argue it is the role of all nurses. Current evidence is required to determine if genetic counselling could be included in all nurses' scope of practice. Integrative literature review. A search of electronic databases (CINHAL, Medline, PubMed, Scopus), and reference lists published between January 2012 and March 2017, was undertaken. Studies were critically appraised for methodological quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Data from each study were extracted and categorized according to their primary findings. The inclusion criteria were met in 10 studies. Main findings were identified: role of genetic counselling, current knowledge, need for further education, and client satisfaction with nurse genetic counsellors. This paper concludes that some nurses do engage in genetic counselling, but how they engage is not consistent, nor is there consensus about what should be the scope of practice. Further investigation into credentialing, role recognition support and education for nurse genetic counselling are strongly recommended. As nurses are widely available, nurses can make a significant contribution to supporting those affected by genetic problems. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of Family Planning Counselling in North Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okour, Abdulhakeem M; Saadeh, Rami A; Zaqoul, Mona

    2017-11-01

    Counselling plays a key role in enhancing reproductive services, providing contraception-related information and supporting long-term family planning for women of childbearing age. This study aimed to evaluate family planning counselling sessions in selected governmental and private clinics in northern Jordan. This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and June 2016 in Irbid, Jordan. A total of 200 women attending two private clinics affiliated with the Jordanian Association for Family Planning and Protection (JAFPP) and six governmental clinics were invited to participate in the study. Counselling sessions were attended by an independent observer and evaluated with regards to their compliance with the standard Greet, Ask, Tell, Help, Explain, Return (GATHER) framework. A total of 198 women participated in the study (response rate: 99.0%), including 80 women (40.4%) from JAFPP clinics and 118 (59.6%) from governmental clinics. In total, 42.9% of the counselling sessions were deemed adequate, with providers applying 80% or more of the GATHER framework, while 26.8% of the sessions were deemed semi-adequate and 30.3% were considered inadequate. Counselling services provided in the governmental clinics were significantly less adequate than those provided in JAFPP clinics ( P family planning centres in Jordan needs to be improved to ensure that women receive the highest possible level of care. Healthcare policymakers should therefore focus on developing and supporting effective family planning counselling services in northern Jordan.

  2. Contraceptive counselling of women seeking abortion - a qualitative interview study of health professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilander, Helena; Salomonsson, Birgitta; Thor, Johan; Brynhildsen, Jan; Alehagen, Siw

    2017-02-01

    A substantial proportion of women who undergo an abortion continue afterwards without switching to more effective contraceptive use. Many subsequently have repeat unintended pregnancies. This study, therefore, aimed to identify and describe health professionalś experiences of providing contraceptive counselling to women seeking an abortion. We interviewed 21 health professionals (HPs), involved in contraceptive counselling of women seeking abortion at three differently sized hospitals in Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using conventional qualitative content analysis. Three clusters were identified: 'Complex counselling', 'Elements of counselling' and 'Finding a method'. HPs often experienced consultations including contraceptive counselling at the time of an abortion as complex, covering both pregnancy termination and contraceptive counselling. Women with vulnerabilities placed even greater demands on the HPs providing counselling. The HPs varied in their approaches when providing contraceptive counselling but also in their knowledge about certain contraception methods. HPs described challenges in finding out if women had found an effective method and in the practicalities of arranging intrauterine device (IUD) insertion post-abortion, when a woman asked for this method. HPs found it challenging to provide contraceptive counselling at the time of an abortion and to arrange access to IUDs post-abortion. There is a need to improve their counselling, their skills and their knowledge to prevent repeat unintended pregnancies.

  3. Defining Our Clinical Practice: The Identification of Genetic Counseling Outcomes Utilizing the Reciprocal Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlinger-Grosse, Krista; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Cohen, Stephanie; LeRoy, Bonnie S; MacFarlane, Ian M; Zierhut, Heather

    2016-04-01

    The need for evidence-based medicine, including comparative effectiveness studies and patient-centered outcomes research, has become a major healthcare focus. To date, a comprehensive list of genetic counseling outcomes, as espoused by genetic counselors, has not been established and thus, identification of outcomes unique to genetic counseling services has become a priority for the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC). The purpose of this study was to take a critical first step at identifying a more comprehensive list of genetic counseling outcomes. This paper describes the results of a focus group study using the Reciprocal-Engagement Model (REM) as a framework to characterize patient-centered outcomes of genetic counseling clinical practice. Five focus groups were conducted with 27 peer nominated participants who were clinical genetic counselors, genetic counseling program directors, and/or outcomes researchers in genetic counseling. Members of each focus group were asked to identify genetic counseling outcomes for four to five of the 17 goals of the REM. A theory-driven, thematic analysis of focus group data yielded 194 genetic counseling outcomes across the 17 goals. Participants noted some concerns about how genetic counseling outcomes will be measured and evaluated given varying stakeholders and the long-term nature of genetic concerns. The present results provide a list of outcomes for use in future genetic counseling outcomes research and for empirically-supported clinical interventions.

  4. Uptake of BRCA1/2 Genetic Testing in a Randomized Trial of Telephone Counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Butrick, Morgan; Kelly, Scott; Peshkin, Beth N.; Luta, George; Nusbaum, Rachel; Hooker, Gillian W.; Graves, Kristi; Feeley, Lisa; Isaacs, Claudine; B.Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Jandorf, Lina; DeMarco, Tiffani; Wood, Marie; McKinnon, Wendy; Garber, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As genetic counseling and testing become more fully-integrated into clinical care, alternative delivery models are increasingly prominent. This study examines predictors of genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer among high-risk women in a randomized trial of in-person vs. telephone-based genetic counseling. Methods Methods include multivariable logistic regression and interaction analyses. Results Of the 669 participants, 600 completed counseling and 523 received test re...

  5. Guidance and Counseling in Nigerian Secondary Schools: The Role of ICT

    OpenAIRE

    Oye N. D.; Obi M. C.; Mohd T. N.; Bernice, A.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of guidance and counseling programme in secondary schools, include bringing to the students an increased understanding of the educational, vocational and social information needed to make wise choices. In our society there are many influencing forces responsible for the gradual recognition of formal guidance to young people in various educational levels. This review paper focuses on the role of ICT on guidance and counseling in secondary schools. Counseling is a form of educati...

  6. Testing a model of research intention among U.K. clinical psychologists: a logistic regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Gemma; Holttum, Sue; Hayward, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Previous research highlights barriers to clinical psychologists conducting research, but has rarely examined U.K. clinical psychologists. The study investigated U.K. clinical psychologists' self-reported research output and tested part of a theoretical model of factors influencing their intention to conduct research. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,300 U.K. clinical psychologists. Three hundred and seventy-four questionnaires were returned (29% response-rate). This study replicated in a U.K. sample the finding that the modal number of publications was zero, highlighted in a number of U.K. and U.S. studies. Research intention was bimodally distributed, and logistic regression classified 78% of cases successfully. Outcome expectations, perceived behavioral control and normative beliefs mediated between research training environment and intention. Further research should explore how research is negotiated in clinical roles, and this issue should be incorporated into prequalification training. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pediatric Psychologists' Collaboration in a National Pediatric Obesity Initiative: A Case Study in Interprofessional Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Wendy L; Shaffer, Laura A; Testa, Elizabeth Getzoff

    2018-02-21

    Health Care reform calls for collaborative team-based care; psychologists must therefore strengthen their competencies for work in interprofessional clinical care settings. Toward that end, a group of psychologists participated with physicians, dieticians, physical activity specialists, nurses, and others in a national interprofessional workgroup focused on pediatric obesity. The interprofessional group was designed to identify areas in need of national advocacy, key assessment and treatment concerns, and gaps in internal policies and procedures in children's hospitals. This article provides a case report of psychologists' roles and experience in this workgroup, and focuses on factors that underlie successful collaboration among diverse health professionals, as well as potential barriers to success. The participating psychologists developed a working model for collaboration with other disciplines. Additionally, they formed a Psychology Subcommittee to identify and address discipline-specific issues regarding collaborative practice in pediatric psychology. Lessons learned in this interprofessional collaborative undertaking have relevance for future collaborative endeavors.

  8. Description of the psychologist's activities in the Goiania radiological accident in Brazil. Preliminary essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Moreira, Manoel Messias da.

    1989-08-01

    The psychologist's activities concerning the assistance given to the victims and the general population in the Goiania accident are described. These activities are reported in several documents listed in the present one. 8 refs

  9. [The role of the psychologist in the intensive care unit with patients and their relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, François

    2012-06-01

    The ICU stay is a potential source of psychological trauma for patients but also for their relatives. The presence of a psychologist can help overcome these difficulties. The nursingteam should be alerted to the identification of symptoms of distress.

  10. Assessing competencies of trainee sport psychologists: An examination of the 'Structured Case Presentation' assessment method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutter, R.I.; Pijpers, J.R.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is virtually no literature on how to assess competencies of applied sport psychologists. We assessed casework of applied sport psychology students and compared written case report assessment (WCRA) with structured case presentation assessment (SCPA) on reliability and acceptability

  11. Psychologists and detainee interrogations: key decisions, opportunities lost, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    After the 9-11 terrorist attacks, U.S. psychologists faced hard choices about what roles, if any, were appropriate for psychologists in the detainee interrogations conducted in settings such as the Bagram Airbase, the Abu Ghraib Prison, and the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camps. The American Psychological Association (APA) sparked intense controversy with its policies and public statements. This article reviews APA decisions, documents, and public statements in this area, in the context of major criticisms and responses to those criticisms. The review focuses on key issues: how the APA created and reported policies in the areas of ethics and national security; transparency; psychologists' professional identities; psychologists' qualifications; ethical-legal conflicts; policies opposing torture; interpretations of avoiding harm; and effective interrogations. It suggests lessons learned, missed opportunities, and questions in need of a fresh approach. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved

  12. Change to reform: new curriculum guidelines for the training of psychologists in San Marcos

    OpenAIRE

    García A., Lupe; Orellana M., Oswaldo; Aliaga T., Jaime; Elizalde B., Roger; Perea R., José Luis

    2014-01-01

    It exposes the conclusions and recommendations of the Curricular Seminary 2006, that concludes in the curricular reform for formation of psychologist in Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. The event was carried out in the months of May, June, July and August, oriented under orientacin of vision and mission raised by one Comision Transitory. The raised vision had the following content, «to obtain a curricular system for the university professional formation of the psychologist, who viabi...

  13. [What role can the psychologist have in patient education in nephrology? An out-center example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, Laëtitia; Untas, Aurélie; Aguirrezabal, Maïder; Larroumet, Nicole; Rascle, Nicole; Chauveau, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    This article presents the experience of a psychologist in the development of a multidisciplinary and collective Therapeutic Patient Education program for dialysis patients in out-center (self-dialysis). The role of the psychologist is situated at different levels: construction of the program, animation and co-animation of interventions and evaluation of the program. Copyright © 2013 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The introduction of new or advanced technology: The role of the industrial psychologist

    OpenAIRE

    T. H. Veldsman

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role that the industrial psychologist must and can play in the introduction of new or advanced technology. In the article attention is given to three topics: firstly, the rationale behind the industrial psychologist's contribution which finds its foundation in the discrepancy which usually arises between the expected and actual performance of a technology after its introduction; secondly a suggested methodology to assist the industrial psychologi...

  15. Making multiple 'online counsellings' through policy and practice: an evidence-making intervention approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Michael; Dilkes-Frayne, Ella; Carter, Adrian; Kokanovic, Renata; Manning, Victoria; Rodda, Simone N; Lubman, Dan I

    2018-03-01

    Online counselling services for a range of health conditions have proliferated in recent years. However, there is ambiguity and tension around their role and function. It is often unclear whether online counselling services are intended to provide only a brief intervention, the provision of information or referral, or constitute an alternative to face-to-face treatment. In line with recent analyses of alcohol and other drug (AOD) policy and interventions that draw on a critical social science perspective, we take an evidence-making intervention approach to examine how online counselling in the AOD field is made in policy and through processes of local implementation. In this article, we analyse how online AOD counselling interventions and knowledges are enacted in Australia's AOD policy, and compare these enactments with an analysis of information about Australia's national online AOD counselling service, Counselling Online, and transcripts of counselling sessions with clients of Counselling Online. We suggest that while the policy enacts online counselling as a brief intervention targeting AOD use, and as an avenue to facilitate referral to face-to-face treatment services, in its implementation in practice online counselling is enacted in more varied ways. These include online counselling as attempting to attend to AOD use and interconnected psychosocial concerns, as a potential form of treatment in its own right, and as supplementing face-to-face AOD treatment services. Rather than viewing online counselling as a singular and stable intervention object, we suggest that multiple 'online counsellings' emerge in practice through local implementation practices and knowledges. We argue that the frictions that arise between policy and practice enactments need to be considered by policy makers, funders, clinicians and researchers as they affect how the concerns of those targeted by the intervention are attended to. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ethical issues in genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Papp, Zoltan

    2017-08-01

    Genetics has made great progress in the past decades, and prenatal diagnosis, predictive genetic testing, and genetic counseling have drawn the limelight of public attention. Because the subject of genetic counseling is of crucial consequence for both the short and long term, its ethical aspects are paramount. The question is whether mankind is mature enough to use this extraordinary knowledge in the right way for the benefit of the society. In the center of ethical questions is the comprehensiveness of information provided to the couples or patients and counseling them about results and making informed educated decisions. In addition, it is crucial how sensitive personal information is treated and whether and how it should be made public. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A psychologist-led educational intervention results in a sustained reduction in neonatal intensive care unit infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rostenberghe, Hans; Short, Jacki; Ramli, Noraida; Geok, Tan Beng; Subramaniam, Sivasangari; Che Yaakob, Che Anuar; Othman, Azizah; Ibrahim, Nor Rosidah; Ho, Jacqueline; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Hasan, Habsah

    2014-01-01

    Even though in the corporate world psychological science has been widely used, the formal use of evidence-based psychology in important areas of clinical medicine has been scanty at best. It was the aim of this study to determine the efficacy of a psychologist-led 2-week nurse educator training on the infection rate in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In 2007, six senior neonatal nurses underwent a training course focusing on the retrieval of evidence and knowledge of psychological principles that would allow them to share the evidence in such a way that evidence is effectively brought into practice. The course was led by a psychologist. The nurses created and delivered their own teaching modules, all focused on infection control. The rates of bacteremia, 2 years prior to intervention were analyzed and compared with the rate following the intervention for 3 years. The immediate output of the course included three teaching modules: hand washing, sterile procedures, and general measures to control infection. These modules were subsequently administered to the NICU nurses in regular structured continuous nursing education sessions. The psychological techniques taught in the course were applied. Bacteremia in the NICU significantly decreased in the year of the course and the subsequent years when compared to previous years (from more than 17 in 2005 and 2006 to less than 10 per 100 admissions to the NICU in 2008 and 2009). This study suggests that a psychologist-led course, followed by a structured CNE can lead to a sustainable reduction in infection rates in a NICU.

  18. Training for Leadership Roles in Academic Medicine: Opportunities for Psychologists in the AAMC LEAD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPaglia, Donna; Thompson, Britta; Hafler, Janet; Chauvin, Sheila

    2017-06-01

    Psychologists' roles within academic medicine have expanded well beyond research and scholarship. They are active as providers of patient care, medical education, and clinical supervision. Although the number of psychologists in academic health centers continues to grow, they represent a small portion of total medical school faculties. However, with the movement toward collaborative care models, emphasis on interprofessional teams, and increased emphasis on psychological science topics in medical curricula, psychologists are well-positioned to make further contributions. Another path through which psychologists can further increase their contributions and value within academic health centers is to aspire to leadership roles. This article describes the first author's reflections on her experiences in a two-year, cohort-based, educational leadership development certificate program in academic medicine. The cohort was comprised largely of physicians and basic scientists, and a small number of non-physician participants of which the first author was the only clinical psychologist. The insights gained from this experience provide recommendations for psychologists interested in leadership opportunities in academic medicine.

  19. Educational counselling for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Bizovičar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The role and mission of older people’s education are changing in today’s productivity- oriented, aging society, the learning society. Older people can be active only if they can join a social group and get involved in new, challenging activities. The Third-Age University of Ljubljana provides education and learning facilities and offers counseling services, developed within the Ljubljana Urban Region Lifelong Learning Project. Counseling for education and learning enables the elderly to get involved in various activities to put into practice the principles of lifelong learning and active aging.

  20. Counseling as an Art: The Creative Arts in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    In this book counseling approaches with a variety of populations are examined using these creative arts: music; dance/movement; imagery; visual arts; literature; drama; and play and humor. It is noted that all of these arts are process-oriented, emotionally sensitive, socially directed, and awareness-focused. Chapter 1 discusses the history,…

  1. Marriage Counseling: A Christian Approach to Counseling Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Everett L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Describes approach to marriage counseling based on cognitive behavioral therapy and structural and strategic marital therapies aimed at Christian couples. Uses shared Christian values between counselor and clients to promote increased marital commitment, marital satisfaction, and personal spiritual growth. Maintains marital satisfaction might be…

  2. Motivational Counseling: Implications for Counseling Male Juvenile Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samir H.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Glover, Michelle Muenzenmeyer

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) often appear unmotivated to change, which thus necessitates a therapeutic approach that matches "resistant" client characteristics. In this article, the authors review common traits of JSOs, introduce motivational counseling as an effective treatment modality, and offer a case illustration. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  3. Perceptions of Clients and Counseling Professionals regarding Spirituality in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Clutter, Stacy M.; Pritchett, Elaine M.; Demmitt, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although current research indicates that psychotherapeutic change both affects and is affected by spiritual concerns, relatively little is known about the degree to which spirituality is used as an intervention in counseling and how it is perceived by clients and mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions…

  4. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  5. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  6. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Behavioral Counseling ...

  7. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... person with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  8. Physician counseling of young adults with rapid weight gain: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Jason

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of weight gain is highest during young adulthood. Our study aims to describe weight gain patterns among young adults and to evaluate physician recognition of and counseling for rapid weight gain. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients ages 18-35 at an academic internal medicine clinic between 2004-2008. We conducted chart reviews to determine weight change over time, whether weight gain greater than 3 lbs/year was documented, whether counseling was provided, and whether patients became overweight. We categorized weight gain documentation by location on the problem list, encounter diagnosis, or note text. We categorized counseling as weight-specific or general diet and exercise counseling. We used Chi-square tests to evaluate the relationship between weight change over time and the following variables: gender, diagnosis of weight gain, and counseling for weight gain. Fisher's Exact test was used to test for an association between diagnosis and counseling category. Results The study included 365 patients. Weight gain was greater than 3 lbs/year for 24% (90/365 of patients, of whom 56 (15% gained 3-5.9 lbs/year, and 34 (9% gained more than 6 lbs/year. Among patients gaining more than 3 lbs/year, physicians documented weight gain as a problem in only 10% (9/90. Of the 9 patients for whom weight gain was documented, physicians provided weight-specific counseling in three, and general diet and exercise counseling in four. Of the 81 individuals with no documented diagnosis of weight gain, 63% had no documented counseling, but 34% received general diet and exercise counseling. Among patients with over 180 days of follow-up, 8% (10/126 became overweight. Conclusions Physicians infrequently recognize or counsel for weight gain among young adult patients. Improving identification of patients with rapid weight gain can provide an opportunity for tailored weight-related counseling.

  9. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Bester

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement , and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual’s set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one’s occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect that it is likely that their dominant career anchor would be service orientation. If this is the case, psychologists with service as their dominant career anchor are supposed to have greater job satisfaction and job involvement compared to those with different career anchors. However, according to literature, this assumption is not necessarily correct. The primary goals of the current study were to determine whether in fact service is the dominant career anchor of psychologists in the Free State and whether there are significant differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement between psychologists with and without service as their dominant career anchor. A third goal was to determine whether psychologists with different dominant career anchors differ significantly from one another regarding job satisfaction and job involvement. Questionnaires measuring career orientations, job satisfaction and job involvement were sent to 165 of the 171 registered psychologists in the Free State region. Only 75 psychologists (45,5% responded which exceeded the traditional return rate of 20 to 30%. Due to the small sample of respondents, a nonparametric statistical test, namely the Mann Whitney U test was conducted to determine possible differences. An analysis of the data showed that 21 respondents had entrepreneurship as their dominant career orientation while 12 fell in the technical/functional, 12 in the challenging, 9 in the service and 8 in the autonomy

  10. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, C L; Mouton, T

    2006-08-01

    In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual's set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one's occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect that it is likely that their dominant career anchor would be service orientation. If this is the case, psychologists with service as their dominant career anchor are supposed to have greater job satisfaction and job involvement compared to those with different career anchors. However, according to literature, this assumption is not necessarily correct. The primary goals of the current study were to determine whether in fact service is the dominant career anchor of psychologists in the Free State and whether there are significant differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement between psychologists with and without service as their dominant career anchor. A third goal was to determine whether psychologists with different dominant career anchors differ significantly from one another regarding job satisfaction and job involvement. Questionnaires measuring career orientations, job satisfaction and job involvement were sent to 165 of the 171 registered psychologists in the Free State region. Only 75 psychologists (45,5%) responded which exceeded the traditional return rate of 20 to 30%. Due to the small sample of respondents, a nonparametric statistical test, namely the Mann Whitney U test was conducted to determine possible differences. An analysis of the data showed that 21 respondents had entrepreneurship as their dominant career orientation while 12 fell in the technical/functional, 12 in the challenging, 9 in the service and 8 in the autonomy categories of dominant

  11. Sources of Referral in Student Financial Counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Shinae Choi; Suzanne Bartholomae; Clinton G. Gudmunson; Jonathan Fox

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates sources of referral to financial counseling and varied declines in financial stress across the financial counseling process. College students came to counseling most often through self-referral. Younger students and women were more likely to respond to institutional referrals. There were two clearly discernable periods of decline in financial stress, smaller interim declines occurring after requesting appointments and larger declines that occurred in counseling sessions. ...

  12. Psychology/Counseling: a universal competency in athletic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, J L; Perna, F M

    2000-10-01

    To present the rationale that certified athletic trainers (ATCs) may require structured educational training in the psychological aspects of athletic injury. We searched MEDLINE, Psych Lit, Psyc- INFO, First Search, and SPORT Discus databases for the years 1990 through 1999 under the search terms "psychological distress," "depression," "athletic injury," and "rehabilitation adherence." Psychological factors are significant predictors of athletic injury. Athletic injury is accompanied by significant psychological distress, which has been shown to impair rehabilitation compliance and possibly physical recovery. Although "counseling" and knowledge of psychological aspects of injury are required National Athletic Trainers' Association competencies, extant data suggest that athletic trainers may lack training in this competency. Evidence suggests that (1) psychological distress is prospectively associated with the incidence of athletic injury, and prolonged psychological distress, specifically depression, may occur after athletic injury; (2) psychological factors may also either hinder or facilitate rehabilitation adherence, compliance, and recovery; (3) psychological distress may persist even after physical recovery has been completed; (4) psychosocial factors related to injury occurrence and injury recovery may be overlooked by ATCs, but knowledge of these factors and appropriate use of referral sources may enhance the effectiveness of ATCs; and (5) ATCs may benefit from structured educational experiences specific to the National Athletic Trainers' Association psychology/counseling competency. With 75% of a national survey of ATCs indicating that they do not have access to a sport psychologist, it would be advantageous for ATCs to gain adequate training in the recognition, evaluation, and treatment of psychological factors associated with athletic injury. The literature also suggests that structured educational training with respect to psychological aspects of

  13. Patients’ general satisfaction with telephone counseling by pharmacists and effects on satisfaction with information and beliefs about medicines: results from a cluster randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, M.J.; Geffen, E.C.G. van; Heerdink, E.R.; Dijk, L. van; Bouvy, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assess effects of pharmacists’ counseling by telephone on patients’ satisfaction with counseling, satisfaction with information and beliefs about medicines for newly prescribed medicines. Methods: A cluster randomized trial in Dutch community pharmacies. Patients ≥18 years were included

  14. Patients' general satisfaction with telephone counseling by pharmacists and effects on satisfaction with information and beliefs about medicines : Results from a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, Marcel Jan; Van Geffen, Erica C G; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Van Dijk, Liset; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Assess effects of pharmacists' counseling by telephone on patients' satisfaction with counseling, satisfaction with information and beliefs about medicines for newly prescribed medicines. Methods: A cluster randomized trial in Dutch community pharmacies. Patients ≥18 years were included when

  15. 36 CFR 1211.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1211.425 Section 1211.425 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1211.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling...

  16. Counseling Ethics Education Experience: An Interpretive Case Study of the First Year Master's Level Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Noor Syamilah

    2013-01-01

    Counseling ethics competency is an important part of counselor identity development as required by the counseling profession training standards, and counseling ethics education is one major component of knowledge acquisition in counseling profession. Counselor educators and counselor education training programs have a core responsibility to…

  17. Using Meditation in Addiction Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark E.; DeLorenzi, Leigh de Armas; Cunningham, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Meditation has been studied as a way of reducing stress in counseling clients since the 1960s. Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and new wave behavior therapies incorporate meditation techniques in their programs. This article identifies meditation's curative factors and limitations when using meditation in addiction settings.

  18. Counseling Psychology's Wide New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takooshian, Harold

    2003-01-01

    Is it truly important to "internationalize" counseling psychology? If so, how can we best do this? This reaction to Leong and Ponterotto (2003) documents four general points about international psychology today--its origins, growth, ethnocentrism, and diversity--and relates these to their bold and comprehensive proposal to…

  19. Language Matters in Counselling Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Billy

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a personal view of some issues around therapeutic conversations involving difference and minority experience. Language, discourse and mother-tongue are explored from different theoretical standpoints and considered alongside concepts of difference, otherness and the unvoiced. Intercultural counselling offers a framework for…

  20. College Student Depression: Counseling Billy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    A substantial portion of the college student population experiences affective disorders. This case study presents the conceptualization, course of treatment, and outcomes for a male college student presenting for counseling with depression. A review of Adlerian, cognitive-behavioral, and Gestalt techniques is provided. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Counseling Intervention in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri-Vlach, Nancy F.; Moracco, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Recounts the history of cancer treatment to illustrate the long-standing tradition of a holistic approach to the investigation and treatment of cancer, discusses the growing emphasis on holistic cancer treatment and the importance of counseling in such treatment. (Author)

  2. INTRODUCING OVER THE COUNTER COUNSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bakić-Mirić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A pharmacist in today’s world has a great responsibility – to help and educate patients about diverse ways for effective self-treatment. Whereas self-care is becoming increasingly popular among patients today the availability of over-the-counter medications makes it possible for patients to treat numerous conditions on their own but still under the supervision of a healthcare provider. During the pharmacist-patient encounter, the pharmacist’s obligation is to evaluate the patient’s medical condition, provide proper advice and counsel the patient on the proper course of treatment to be taken. Also by employing effective over the counter (OTC counseling as the most proper means in a pharmacist/patient communication process and, accordingly, rapport building in the OTC area, the pharmacist needs to demonstrate high energy, enthusiasm, respect, empathy, know-how of sensitive intercultural issues alongside personal appearance, body language, eye contact that all together make his/her personal “signature”. Accordingly, apart from patient education, the primary objective of OTC counseling becomes to educate pharmacists on basic principles used in assisting patients in the selection of over-the-counter (OTC products, provide examples of proper communication techniques for effective patient counseling concerning the OTC products (i.e. dosage, administration technique, storage, food and beverage interaction, monitoring etc where the pharmacist plays the key role in helping patients maximize their pharmaceutical care.

  3. Family Assessment and Genetic Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Pat; And Others

    Presented are two papers from a panel discussion on prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling with families. D. Blackston (director of the Developmental Evaluation Clinic, Decatur, Georgia) points out that a concise family history, pregnancy and birth data, developmental history, careful physical examination, and appropriate laboratory studies are…

  4. New Careers in Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Easy

    1976-01-01

    A graduate program at Sarah Lawrence College is designed to bridge the gap between the medical community with its advanced knowledge of genetics and couples facing hereditary diseases or handicaps. The aim is to train these middle-level professionals to counsel couples. (LBH)

  5. Educational Psychologist Training for Special and Developmental Teaching as Professional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilushkina O.P.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of designing the educational module "Special and Developmental Teaching" of School Psychology Master’s program. The modular-sized program includes practical training and research activity in each module in a networking, it complies with Federal State Educational Standard and professional teaching and educational psychology standarts. Practice-oriented education Master’s training model based on the activity and competence approaches is productive. We have shown the advantages of networking and the need to divert more resources towards practical training and to include research activity in particular module. It is necessary to teach educational psychologists not only to "know", but also to "knows how", to have professional thinking and metasubject competencies, to have the capacity for reflection, i. e. to operate in an uncertain environment for new schemes on the basis of the scientific method. It is important that the modular principle design allows adding training subjects from one of educational program to other and so developing new programs.

  6. Guiding the Family: Practical Counseling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Bernice Bronia; McAbee, Harold V.

    This book, intended as a text for therapists and counselors in family counseling, is based on principles of Adlerian psychology. The first chapter examines Adlerian theory and family counseling. Basic principles of individual psychology are applied to family counseling, and the goals of children with disturbing behavior are discussed. Reasons why…

  7. Counseling in Switzerland: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roslyn; Henning, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    The authors review counseling in Switzerland and compare it with counseling in the United States. They evaluate the role of professional associations and programs and argue that the evolution of counseling is situated within the history and economic, social, and political systems of Switzerland. Findings suggest that Swiss counselors are ready to…

  8. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1997-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1997. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. The following articles are contained in issue 1:…

  9. A Framework for Chaos Theory Career Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2010-01-01

    Theory in career development counselling provides a map that counsellors can use to understand and structure the career counselling process. It also provides a means to communicate this understanding and structuring to their clients as part of the counselling intervention. The chaos theory of careers draws attention to the complexity,…

  10. 28 CFR 551.113 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 551.113 Section 551.113... Pretrial Inmates § 551.113 Counseling. (a) When consistent with institution security and good order, pretrial inmates may be allowed the opportunity to receive counseling services with convicted inmates. (b...

  11. 24 CFR 206.41 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling. 206.41 Section 206.41... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.41 Counseling. (a) List... receive counseling. (b) Information to be provided. A counselor must discuss with the mortgagor: (1) The...

  12. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  13. Understanding Philosophical Counseling | Sivil | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    philosophical counseling by exploring its points of convergence to and deviation from its complimentary parts – philosophy and counseling. The practical and applied orientation of philosophical counseling seems worlds apart from what many consider to exemplify philosophy – theoretical, intellectual and abstract concern ...

  14. Senior Legal Counsel | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Legal Counsel works with, and provides legal and strategic advice to, staff throughout the Centre, at all levels. The Legal Counsel assists the Corporate Secretary and General Counsel in advising, and providing support to, Centre management and the Board of Governors on corporate governance matters.

  15. Psychological counselling and indigenous African knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological counselling relates to basic humanity and universal values such as the regard for human dignity, healthy socialisation, and emotional health. Counselling individuals who experience emotional or relational problems is a function of the helping and health care professions. Effective counselling should provide ...

  16. 249 Marriage Counselling in Multicultural Society, Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... The researcher sees Multicultural Counselling as a helping relationship, which involves two or more ... pastors and elders in the counselling profession. Some recommendations were made as ... Multicultural counselling is a helping relationship which involves two or more persons with different culture, ...

  17. Globalization and Counseling: Professional Issues for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorelle, Sonya; Byrd, Rebekah; Crockett, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Scholars have examined globalization for many years in terms of its impact on individuals, but it remains a concept not often discussed in the counseling literature. As counseling transforms from a Western-based practice to a global phenomenon, it is important to understand professional counseling within an international and multicultural context.…

  18. Student-to-Student Counseling. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Roland A.

    The success of a student-to-student counseling Program which involves counseling of students by peers is attributed to greater acceptance of peer counselors by students because they 'speak the same language' and share the same problems. Counseling is conducted informally through telephone calls, in cafeterias and in classrooms. The student…

  19. Infusing Counseling Skills in Test Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an instructional model based on Neurolinguistic Programming that links counseling student course work in measurement and test interpretation with counseling techniques and theory. A process incorporating Neurolinguistic Programming patterns is outlined for teaching graduate students the counseling skills helpful in test interpretation.…

  20. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology is concerned with the psychological, social, behavioural, medical, paediatric and ethical aspects of the applied field of clinical and counselling psychology. The journal publishes contributions of research, clinical, counselling and theoretical interest. Contributions ...

  1. Biblical counselling regarding inner change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Campbell-Lane

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of inner change is not only the ultimate goal of counselling; it is also a central concept of the gospel. Biblical counselling entails a Scriptural understanding of the nature of change and aims at helping the counsellee change his/her inner life under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Change is the essence of the process of sanctification, entailing “putting off” (laying off sinful ways of life, renewing the mind, and ”putting on” (“clothing” oneself with godly ways of life (Eph. 4:22 ff.; Col. 3:8 ff.; Rom. 12:1-2. Although believers have a new identity in Christ, they still suffer from the effect of sin and have to grow in sanctification. Often the believer has not been instructed about changing previous irrational and unbiblical beliefs, behaviour, and habits, and he/she thus still integrates these negative results of sin into his/her new life. Unless old patterns are replaced with new ones, the counsellee can revert to sinful habits, unbiblical beliefs and behavioural patterns. A pastoral counsellor thus needs to teach the counsellee that God has made provision for him/her to change. A worldly anthropology-psychology is entirely opposed to the Biblical doctrines of sin and sanctification. Effective Biblical counselling depends on a Biblical anthropology and world view. A Biblical counsellor should promote holiness and a lifestyle in accordance with Biblical guidelines, thus shaping the counsellee to the likeness of Jesus Christ. When a Biblical counsellor ministers the Word of God in a life-transforming way, then God himself changes the counsellee from the inside out. A counsellor may not ignore sin and its effect as it will limit the effectiveness of counselling in facilitating lasting change in the life of a counsellee. It is important that a Biblical counseller understands the nature of change and is equipped with knowledge about, and the character of change.

  2. The family physician and the psychologist in the office together: a response to fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Luigi; Pirrotta, Enzo; Ingravalle, Veronica; Fayella, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    It is well known that motives for consulting the family physician, though expressed as physical symptoms, often derive from problems needing a holistic, psychosocial approach. Progressive differentiation between medicine and psychology makes co-operation through referral to the psychologist by the physician quite problematic, in terms of both which patients are referred and the modalities of referral. Acceptance of psychological referral may, in any case, be difficult, due to the social stigma that still surrounds mental distress.The authors report a possible solution in an experiment implemented by the postgraduate Health Psychology School of the Rome University 'Sapienza', entailing joint, direct co-operation between a family physician and a psychologist through the psychologist's presence in the doctor's office during consultations. This allowed direct access to a psychologist in the absence of any filter and without the need for a formal request on the patient's part and a biopsychosocial approach to distress. In a small number of cases, more formal consultation with the psychologist was proposed. Cases were always discussed between the two professionals. To date, the experiment has involved nine psychologists and seven physicians over a period of nine years. It appears to be entirely feasible, though requiring a period of adaptation between the two professionals. Patients have welcomed the presence of the psychologist and, as expected, take a broader approach in reporting their distress.An illustrative case is presented, in which finding the meaning of a symptom avoided unnecessary and costly investigations, and facilitated the patient in taking a new direction in his life.

  3. Perceptions of weight management counseling among gynecologic cancer survivors: opportunities for enhancing survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleta, Alexandra K; Neff, Robert; McCann, Georgia A; O'Malley, David M; Carpenter, Kristen M

    2017-05-01

    Oncology practice guidelines recommend incorporating weight management efforts throughout survivorship care; however, some oncologists raise concerns about implementing weight management counseling without damaging patient-provider relationships. This study explores cancer survivors' receptivity to weight management counseling and examines whether views of counseling effectiveness are associated with individual characteristics including health-related perceptions or psychological distress. Patients presenting to a NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center gynecologic oncology ambulatory clinic were asked to complete a survey assessing health and weight history, health perceptions, psychological distress, provider preferences, and weight management counseling perceptions. Two hundred forty-four gynecologic cancer patients (38% endometrial, 37% ovarian, 16% cervical, 8% other) completed surveys. Mean participant BMI was 31.6 (SD = 9.6); 69% were overweight/obese. Most survivors (≥85%) agreed that oncologists should discuss healthy eating, exercise, and weight loss; only 14% reported receiving weight management counseling from their oncologist. 79% reported being more likely to attempt weight loss if counseled by a physician; 59% reported counseling would not be offensive. Regression results indicated that viewing weight management counseling as effective was associated with fewer depressive symptoms and greater enjoyment of physical activity, while viewing counseling unfavorably was associated with a history of attempting multiple weight loss strategies and an overall view of healthy behaviors as less beneficial (ps gynecologic cancer survivors want weight management counseling from oncologists and believe counseling is effective rather than deleterious, yet obesity remains inadequately addressed. Results from this study highlight important topics to be incorporated into weight management counseling.

  4. Feminist Group Counseling with South Asian Women Who Have Survived Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Hays, Danica G.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how to use a feminist approach in group counseling with South Asian women who have survived intimate partner violence (IPV). South Asian culture, including gender-role expectations and attitudes about family violence, is discussed. A case study detailing a feminist counseling group conducted with this population is presented.…

  5. A Historical Review and Contemporary Reassessment of Free Will Concepts in Psychological Humanism and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Duffy; Ratheal, Juli D'Ann

    2010-01-01

    The authors review the history of the concept of freedom in humanistic counseling theory and present a contemporary rationale for including certain negative implications of existential indeterminate free will in the theoretical foundations of the profession. Implications for counseling and a table of definitions that clarifies unique constructs…

  6. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs' compliance with the Five A's Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  7. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/objective: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs’ compliance with the Five A’s Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  8. Impact of Counseling on Repeated Unplanned Pregnancy and Contraceptive Behavior in Low SES Abortion Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnhill, Michael S.; And Others

    High numbers of repeat abortions at a medical school clinic prompted clinic personnel to develop an experimental fertility control counseling program. Counseling objectives included the following: (1) to engender rapport and trust; (2) to assess the patient's past contraceptive use and psychosocial history; (3) to improve patient's knowledge of…

  9. A comparative study of job satisfaction among nurses, psychologists/psychotherapists and social workers working in Quebec mental health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    This study identified multiple socio-professional and team effectiveness variables, based on the Input-Mediator-Output-Input (IMOI) model, and tested their associations with job satisfaction for three categories of mental health professionals (nurses, psychologists/psychotherapists, and social workers). Job satisfaction was assessed with the Job Satisfaction Survey. Independent variables were classified into four categories: 1) Socio-professional Characteristics; 2) Team Attributes; 3) Team Processes; and 4) Team Emergent States. Variables were entered successively, by category, into a hierarchical regression model. Team Processes contributed the greatest number of variables to job satisfaction among all professional groups, including team support which was the only significant variable common to all three types of professionals. Greater involvement in the decision-making process, and lower levels of team conflict (Team Processes) were associated with job satisfaction among nurses and social workers. Lower seniority on team (Socio-professional Characteristics), and team collaboration (Team Processes) were associated with job satisfaction among nurses, as was belief in the advantages of interdisciplinary collaboration (Team Emergent States) among psychologists. Knowledge sharing (Team Processes) and affective commitment to the team (Team Emergent States) were associated with job satisfaction among social workers. Results suggest the need for mental health decision-makers and team managers to offer adequate support to mental health professionals, to involve nurses and social workers in the decision-making process, and implement procedures and mechanisms favourable to the prevention or resolution of team conflict with a view toward increasing job satisfaction among mental health professionals.

  10. Innovations in healthcare delivery and policy: Implications for the role of the psychologist in preventing and treating diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Marrero, David

    2016-10-01

    Although the biomedical model has dominated U.S. health care for more than a century, it has failed to adequately address current U.S. health care challenges, including the treatment and prevention of chronic disease; the epidemic rise in diabetes is one important example. In response, newer models of health care have been developed that address patients' mental and physical health concerns by multidisciplinary care teams that place the patient and family in the center of shared decision making. These new models of care offer many important opportunities for psychologists to play a larger role in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. However, for psychology's role to be fully realized, both external and internal challenges must be addressed. This will require psychologists to become more interdisciplinary, more familiar with the larger health care culture, more willing to expand their skill sets, and more collaborative with other health disciplines both from a patient-care and a larger advocacy perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Guiding change: provider voices in youth pre-abortion counselling in urban Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Helen Kim Hong; Martin, Philip; Chinh, Nguyen Quoc; Cong, Duong Dinh

    2010-08-01

    Pre-abortion counselling has a role in promoting safe sex practices and in preventing repeated unplanned pregnancies and repeated abortions among abortion-seeking women. Such counselling is essential in Vietnam, especially given the common use of abortion. Arguably, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, the delivery of pre-abortion counselling is more urgent for young women, who have historically been ignored by State reproductive health initiatives and are increasingly exposed to transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), unplanned pregnancies and abortion. This paper charts urban Vietnamese service providers' discourses in pre-abortion counselling specific for reducing risks of additional unwanted pregnancies, repeat abortion and STI/HIV transmission among young Vietnamese women. Thirteen providers working in counselling delivery, management and programme-planning at the Reproductive Health Care Centre of Ho Chi Minh City participated in this study. Through qualitative interviews, this paper elicits a range of provider attitudes, considerations and approaches in pre-abortion counselling and presents these discourses using participant anecdotes. Demonstrated among participant responses were five key pre-abortion counselling phases for promoting effective family planning among young women. Topics covered in these counselling phases included abortion complications, post-abortion fertility return, contraception, behaviour change and STI/HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health basics (SRH). The service provider discourses gleaned from this study are foundational for further research and development of best practice guidelines in pre-abortion counselling.

  12. [A survey of willingness about genetic counseling and tests in patients of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Qiu, L; Wu, M

    2017-11-21

    Objective: To analyze patients' tendency towards genetics counseling and tests based on a prospective cohort study on hereditary ovarian cancer. Methods: From February 2017 to June 2017, among 220 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer in Peking Union Medical College Hospital, we collected epidemiological, pathological and tendency towards genetics counseling and tests via medical records and questionnaire.All patients would get education about hereditary ovarian cancer by pamphlets and WeChat.If they would receive further counseling, a face to face interview and tests will be given. Results: Among all 220 patients, 10 (4.5%) denied further counseling.For 210 patients receiving genetic counseling, 170 (81%) accepted genetic tests.In multivariate analysis, risk factors relevant to acceptance of genetic tests included: being charged by physicians of gynecologic oncology for diagnosis and treatment, receiving counseling in genetic counseling clinics, and having family history of breast cancer.For patients denying genetic tests, there were many subjective reasons, among which, "still not understanding genetic tests" (25%) and "unable bear following expensive targeting medicine" . Conclusions: High proportion patients of epithelial ovarian cancer would accept genetic counseling and tests.Genetic counseling clinics for gynecologic oncology would further improve genetic tests for patients.

  13. Unmet counselling need amongst women accessing an induced abortion service in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, Graeme; Crankshaw, Tamaryn L; Mould, Sean; Ramklass, Serela S

    2016-11-01

    Provision of objective, evidence-based counselling in the context of induced abortion services is considered global good practise. However, there is limited understanding over the counselling needs of women accessing abortion services, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to explore the content and quality of pre-abortion counselling amongst women accessing an abortion service in South Africa as well as client experience of the counselling process. Perceptions of nurse counsellors were also sought. This was a mixed methods study conducted at a Choice of Termination of Pregnancy clinic based at a district level hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Sixty women requesting an abortion were interviewed via a semi-structured questionnaire. In-depth interviews were conducted with four nurses who provided pre-abortion counselling at the clinic. Interviews were coded for emergent themes and categories. Clinic nurses had widely variable counselling training and experience, ranging from less than 2 months to 8 years, but all clients reported that they had been treated with respect at their counselling session. The group-based counselling format and biomedical and health promotion content did not accommodate clients' differential counselling needs, which included requests for support from women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). There was limited provider awareness of client's additional counselling needs. Abortion counselling services should be tailored to clients' differential counselling needs. Group-based counselling followed by optional one-on-one counselling sessions is one possible strategy to address unmet client need in South Africa. Provision of abortion provider training in IPV is recommended as well as establishment of referral pathways for women experiencing IPV. Paying attention to the differential counselling needs of women seeking an abortion should be a key component to the provision of abortion services. In this way, abortion

  14. Contraceptive counseling in reproductive-aged women treated for breast cancer at a tertiary care institution: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Sara L; Lerma, Klaira; Shaw, Kate A

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to assess the frequency of documented contraceptive and fertility preservation counseling for women treated for breast cancer. We conducted a chart analysis of female breast cancer patients (n=211) ages 18-45 years receiving chemotherapy treatment at Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center from 2010 to 2014. Primary outcomes of contraceptive counseling and fertility preservation counseling documentation were assessed for frequency. Secondary outcomes included pregnancy testing, contraception use and pregnancy during treatment. Among the total sample (n=211), sexual activity was documented in 24% of patients (n=51). Fifty-one percent (n=108) of patients received pregnancy testing prior to initiation of treatment. Past contraception use was documented in 74% of patients (n=156) and current contraception use in 25% (n=53). Twenty-six percent of patients received fertility preservation counseling alone (n=54), 10% received contraceptive counseling alone (n=22), and 12% received both types of counseling (n=25). Patients were three times more likely to receive contraceptive counseling if using contraception at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 3.1, confidence interval (CI) 1.1-9.1, p=.04], and older women were significantly less likely to receive counseling (OR 0.2, CI 0.1-1.0, p=.04). Two patients became pregnant and had an abortion during treatment (1%), and neither patient was using contraception nor received contraceptive or fertility preservation counseling. Documentation of fertility preservation counseling occurs more frequently than contraceptive counseling, but both occur suboptimally. Lack of documentation does not allow us to conclude that counseling did not occur, but it suggests the need to improve documentation and increase awareness of contraceptive needs and counseling. Women undergoing breast cancer treatment do not consistently receive counseling on contraception or fertility preservation as a part of their care. Efforts are needed to ensure

  15. Barriers and Facilitators to BRCA Genetic Counseling Among At-Risk Latinas in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussner, Katarina M.; Jandorf, Lina; Thompson, Hayley S.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite underuse of genetic services for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer risk among Latinas (including counseling and testing for BRCA mutations), there is little known about the barriers and facilitators to BRCA genetic counseling among this group. It is imperative to first understand factors that may impede Latinas seeking BRCA genetic counseling, as it is considered a prerequisite to testing. Methods Quantitative telephone interviews (N=120) were conducted with at-risk Latinas in New York City to investigate interest, barriers and beliefs about BRCA genetic counseling. Statistical analyses examined predictors of intention to undergo BRCA genetic counseling. Results Despite moderate levels of awareness, Latinas held largely positive beliefs, attitudes and knowledge about BRCA genetic counseling. Perceived barriers included logistic concerns (e.g., where to go, cost/health insurance coverage), emotional concerns (e.g., fear, distress) and competing life concerns (e.g, too many other things to worry about, too busy taking care of children or family members). Multivariate results showed that the strongest predictor of intention to undergo BRCA genetic counseling was competing life concerns; Latinas with more competing life concerns were less likely to intend to undergo BRCA genetic counseling (p=0.0002). Other significant predictors of intention included perceived risk of carrying a BRCA mutation (p=0.01) and referral by their physician (p=0.02). Conclusion Educational efforts to promote BRCA genetic counseling among at-risk Latinas and increase referrals by their physicians should incorporate discussion of perceived barriers to counseling, such as competing life concerns that Latinas may need to overcome in order to seek genetic counseling. PMID:22987526

  16. Preoperative counseling and expectation management for inflatable penile prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Gopal L; Figler, Bradley D; Coward, Robert M

    2017-11-01

    The inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) is the gold standard surgical treatment for medical refractory erectile dysfunction (ED). While the modern IPP has enjoyed high satisfaction rates as a product of its continued innovation, reliability, and performance, patient dissatisfaction can still occur. IPP implantation restores physiologic function with cosmetic and psychological consequences, both of which place inherent emphasis on preoperative counseling and expectation management. This review aims to highlight the complex nature of such counseling and provide practitioners with a roadmap to navigate the landscape. Preoperative counseling begins with appropriate patient selection and identification of those patients who are at risk for dissatisfaction as a result of personality characteristics. The informed consent provides a natural framework to discuss the host of complications and risks that are associated with surgery, including infection, device malfunction, damage to nearby structures, and device erosion. Device selection is a nuanced process that merges patient preference with clinical factors and consideration. We address device selection through a description of cylinder construction, pump design, and reservoir placement in the context of preoperative counseling. Lastly, we draw attention to expectation management with a specific focus on possible post-operative changes to penile length and sensation as well as partner involvement. The modern IPP provides excellent results with high patient and partner satisfaction. Ultimately, satisfaction is dependent on multiple factors, but providing accurate, realistic counseling and expectation management prepares patients for the best possible outcomes.

  17. [Diet counseling through "Shoku-dietary Coaching"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Naoko

    2005-11-01

    "Shoku-dietary Coaching" is a skill under development by Kageyama, who applies "coaching," widely used in the business field, to diet counseling. This counseling aims at improving conventional "nutritional guidance-type diet counseling" and promoting self-motivation so that healthy clients eagerly improve their own health, and clients with obesity or lifestyle-related diseases can learn self-control. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, the basis for the differentiation between healthy and unhealthy conditions is not only the parameters measured by medical devices. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, attention is directed to clients' assessment of their own lifestyle, dietary goals they have, and actions they will take to achieve them. To increase the health level of clients, we are developing techniques to enhance their motivation by showing sympathy with and support for their dietary behavior and health awareness. In addition, we give guidance through both theory and the practice of such things as having three meals a day at regular hours, knowing the kinds and daily amounts of foods appropriate for each client, and clarifying the percentages of seasonings necessary for cooking. The habit of having meals at regular hours alleviates stress, promotes communication with people sitting at the same table, and increases the health level of both the client and the others. These are important elements in the theory of Shoku-dietary Coaching. Putting the above into practice should not be limited to clients, but should include the clinic staff so as to deepen their own understanding and communication. Enhanced communication reinforces team medical care in the clinic. Communication skills which involve respect for others, continuous motivation of individuals, and achievement of purposes that may even require a long time may be useful for all people.

  18. Genetic Counselors' Experiences and Interest in Telegenetics and Remote Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, Heather A; MacFarlane, Ian M; Ahmed, Zahra; Davies, Jill

    2018-04-01

    In 2009, the National Society of Genetic Counselors Service (NSGC) Delivery Model Task Force defined genetic counseling service delivery models including telephone (genetic counseling provided remotely by telephone) and telegenetics (counseling provided remotely using videoconferencing). Little is known about the experience of genetic counselors practicing telemedicine in the USA. We sought to evaluate perceived satisfaction, advantages, disadvantages, and barriers to the practice and implementation of telegenetics by practicing genetic counselors. A 21-question online survey was distributed via the NSGC's member directory. Descriptive statistics and a thematic analysis were used to analyze data. A total of 344 surveys were completed of which 235 (68.3%) respondents had delivered genetic counseling via telemedicine and 109 (36.6%) had not. Overall genetic counseling providers who had provided telegenetics were satisfied or very satisfied with their position (91%) and those who were not performing telegenetics were at least slightly interested in a telehealth position (92%).The most common appealing reasons for working in or wanting to work in telemedicine included an innovative approach to healthcare delivery, aspects of remote positions such as the ability to work from home, and flexibility of hours. Unappealing characteristics of telemedicine included the inability to see nonverbals, limited psychosocial counseling, and limited social interaction with colleague that is associated with remote positions. Barriers to implementation of telegenetics were noted by 53% of respondents with the largest barrier being billing and reimbursement. The results of this work suggest that telegenetics service organizations could consider increasing social interactions, attempting to use the preferred method of care (video) to increase ability to see nonverbals, offering flexible work hours, and allowing time to address psychosocial issues as they arise in consultations.

  19. [Future psychologists' attitudes toward lesbians raising children together in the situation of child focused intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wycisk, Jowita; Kleka, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of paper was to explore the attitudes of Polish psychology students towards lesbian mothers whose children undergo psychological intervention, in an imaginary situation of providing professional support to the child. The authors found 3 types of psychologist behaviour: contact omission (withdrawal from the intervention, mother's partner exclusion), apparent appreciation of mother's partner and authentic appreciation of mother's partner (with women comparable participation). The authors explored an interaction between these attitudes and the support for gay and lesbian rights, the origin of the child (from a previous heterosexual relationship or present, homosexual one) and demographic variables. 97 students of psychology were examined at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, using the custom survey. Respondents were most likely to include mother's partner to intervention, and the least - to avoid contact. Based on cluster analysis we found three types of attitude: unconditional acceptance, conditional acceptance, dependent on whether the child was born due in heterosexual or lesbian relationship and avoidance / rejection. The attitude of participants was associated with the declared support for gay rights, there was no correlation with gender and age. Due to the significant level of social prejudice against gays and lesbians in Poland, the issue of homosexual parenting and social functioning of gay and lesbians' children should become an area of research and scientific debate. There is a necessity ofthe introduction of this issue to the curricula of higher education and the implementation of formal, systematic training on sexual diversity for the professionals supporting families.

  20. Community reactions to disaster: An emerging role for the school psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article will describe ways in which communities react to severe crises, both on a local and on a national level. Based on experiences in Israel over the past twenty years, including recent traumatic events such as the assassination of prime minister Yitzhak Rabin and the terrorist suicide bombings, and on an intervention in Buenos Aires, Argentina, after the bombing of the Jewish Community Centre in July 1994, a model is presented to describe different stages of reaction. The importance of the creation and development of community prevention and intervention programs is stressed. Emphasis is placed on the role of the schools and the school psychologists in developing and implementing such programs, and on their critical role in dealing immediately with crisis situations and their aftermaths. The prevention program emphasizes the fostering of inner strengths and resources in children and teachers (‘inoculation’, and makes provision for dealing with emotional support for the professionals in charge of helping the community in times of crisis. Finally, a model for the future development of the profession of school psychology into a broader community service is proposed.