WorldWideScience

Sample records for include chromotography biosensing

  1. Biosensing International Research and Development

    CERN Document Server

    Schultz, Jerome; Mrksich, Milan

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this book is to disseminate information on the worldwide status and trends in biosensing R&D to government decisionmakers and the research community. The contributors critically analyze and compare biosensing research in the United States with that being pursued in Japan, Europe and other major industrialized countries. Biosensing includes systems that incorporate a variety of means, including electrical, electronic, and photonic devices; biological materials (e.g., tissue, enzymes, nucleic acids, etc.); and chemical analysis to produce detectable signals for the monitoring or identification of biological phenomena. In a broader sense, the study of biosensing includes any approach to detection of biological elements and the associated software or computer identification technologies (e.g., imaging) that identify biological characteristics. Biosensing is finding a growing number of applications in a wide variety of areas, including biomedicine, food production and processing, and detection of b...

  2. NanoBiosensing Principles, Development and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Huangxian; Wang, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This book will cover the full scope of nanobiosensing, which combines the newest research results in the cross-disciplines of chemistry, biology, and materials science with biosensing and bioanalysis to develop novel detection principles, sensing mechanisms, and device engineering methods. It not only covers the important types of nanomaterials for biosensing applications, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofiber, quantum dots, fullerenes, fluorescent and biological molecules, etc., but also illustrates a wide range of sensing principles, including electrochemical detection, fluorescence, chemiluminesence, antibody-antigen interactions, and magnetic detection. The book details novel developments in the methodology and devices of biosensing and bioanalysis combined with nanoscience and nanotechnology, as well as their applications in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Furthermore, the reported works on the application and biofunction of nanoparticles have attracted extensive attention and interest, ...

  3. CDC BioSense: Tarrant County, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) and Biosense collaboration is an effort to visualize TCPH health data collected by Biosense using Google Fusion Table...

  4. Prospects of Nanobiomaterials for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra P. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress and development in biosensor development will inevitably focus upon the technology of the nanomaterials that offer promise to solve the biocompatibility and biofouling problems. The biosensors using smart nanomaterials have applications for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line and/or real-time detection of pesticides, antibiotics, pathogens, toxins, proteins, microbes, plants, animals, foods, soil, air, and water. Thus, biosensors are excellent analytical tools for pollution monitoring, by which implementation of legislative provisions to safeguard our biosphere could be made effectively plausible. The current trends and challenges with nanomaterials for various applications will have focus biosensor development and miniaturization. All these growing areas will have a remarkable influence on the development of new ultrasensitive biosensing devices to resolve the severe pollution problems in the future that not only challenges the human health but also affects adversely other various comforts to living entities. This review paper summarizes recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional biomolecules with different types of nanomaterials, including metallic nanoparticles, semiconductor nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, inorganic/organic hybrid, dendrimers, and carbon nanotubes/graphene.

  5. Interrogating Biosensing in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrill, Nick; Wong, Richmond; Howell, Noura

    2017-01-01

    This workshop seeks to expand our understanding and imaginations regarding the possible roles biosensors (sensors measuring humans) can-and should-play in everyday life. By applying a critical lens to issues of interpretation, representation, and experience around biosensing and biosensors, we ai...

  6. Microneedle arrays for biosensing and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Narayan, Roger; Miller, Philip

    2017-08-29

    Methods, structures, and systems are disclosed for biosensing and drug delivery techniques. In one aspect, a device for detecting an analyte and/or releasing a biochemical into a biological fluid can include an array of hollowed needles, in which each needle includes a protruded needle structure including an exterior wall forming a hollow interior and an opening at a terminal end of the protruded needle structure that exposes the hollow interior, and a probe inside the exterior wall to interact with one or more chemical or biological substances that come in contact with the probe via the opening to produce a probe sensing signal, and an array of wires that are coupled to probes of the array of hollowed needles, respectively, each wire being electrically conductive to transmit the probe sensing signal produced by a respective probe.

  7. Microneedle arrays for biosensing and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Narayan, Roger; Miller, Philip; Polsky, Ronen; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2017-08-22

    Methods, structures, and systems are disclosed for biosensing and drug delivery techniques. In one aspect, a^ device for detecting an analyte and/or releasing a biochemical into a biological fluid can include an array of hollowed needles, in which each needle includes a protruded needle structure including an exterior wall forming a hollow interior and an opening at a terminal end of the protruded needle structure that exposes the hollow interior, and a probe inside the exterior wall to interact with one or more chemical or biological substances that come in contact with the probe via the opening to produce a probe sensing signal, and an array of wires that are coupled to probes of the array of hollowed needles, respectively, each wire being electrically conductive to transmit the probe sensing signal produced by a respective probe.

  8. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro V. Baptista

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory.

  9. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo C. Righini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode (WGM microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed.

  11. Micro-incubator for bacterial biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Estine; Land, Kevin; Joubert, Trudi-Heleen

    2016-02-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli (E. coli ) is a commonly used indicator micro-organism to determine whether water is safe for human consumption.1 This paper discusses the design of a micro-incubator that can be applied to concentrate bacteria prior to environmental water quality screening tests. High sensitivity and rapid test time is essential and there is a great need for these tests to be implemented on-site without the use of a laboratory infrastructure. In the light of these requirements, a mobile micro-incubator was designed, manufactured and characterised. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) receptacle has been designed to house the 1-5 ml cell culture sample.2 A nano-silver printed electronics micro-heater has been designed to incubate the bacterial sample, with an array of temperature sensors implemented to accurately measure the sample temperature at various locations in the cell culture well. The micro-incubator limits the incubation temperature range to 37+/-3 °C in order to ensure near optimal growth of the bacteria at all times.3 The incubation time is adjustable between 30 minutes and 9 hours with a maximum rise time of 15 minutes to reach the set-point temperature. The surface area of the printed nano silver heating element is 500 mm2. Electrical and COMSOL Multiphysics simulations are included in order to give insight on micro-incubator temperature control. The design and characterization of this micro-incubator allows for further research in biosensing applications.

  12. Biosensing with optical fiber gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Baldini, Francesco; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Giannetti, Ambra

    2017-06-01

    Optical fiber gratings (OFGs), especially long-period gratings (LPGs) and etched or tilted fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), are playing an increasing role in the chemical and biochemical sensing based on the measurement of a surface refractive index (RI) change through a label-free configuration. In these devices, the electric field evanescent wave at the fiber/surrounding medium interface changes its optical properties (i.e. intensity and wavelength) as a result of the RI variation due to the interaction between a biological recognition layer deposited over the fiber and the analyte under investigation. The use of OFG-based technology platforms takes the advantages of optical fiber peculiarities, which are hardly offered by the other sensing systems, such as compactness, lightness, high compatibility with optoelectronic devices (both sources and detectors), and multiplexing and remote measurement capability as the signal is spectrally modulated. During the last decade, the growing request in practical applications pushed the technology behind the OFG-based sensors over its limits by means of the deposition of thin film overlays, nanocoatings, and nanostructures, in general. Here, we review efforts toward utilizing these nanomaterials as coatings for high-performance and low-detection limit devices. Moreover, we review the recent development in OFG-based biosensing and identify some of the key challenges for practical applications. While high-performance metrics are starting to be achieved experimentally, there are still open questions pertaining to an effective and reliable detection of small molecules, possibly up to single molecule, sensing in vivo and multi-target detection using OFG-based technology platforms.

  13. Biosensing with optical fiber gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiavaioli Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber gratings (OFGs, especially long-period gratings (LPGs and etched or tilted fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs, are playing an increasing role in the chemical and biochemical sensing based on the measurement of a surface refractive index (RI change through a label-free configuration. In these devices, the electric field evanescent wave at the fiber/surrounding medium interface changes its optical properties (i.e. intensity and wavelength as a result of the RI variation due to the interaction between a biological recognition layer deposited over the fiber and the analyte under investigation. The use of OFG-based technology platforms takes the advantages of optical fiber peculiarities, which are hardly offered by the other sensing systems, such as compactness, lightness, high compatibility with optoelectronic devices (both sources and detectors, and multiplexing and remote measurement capability as the signal is spectrally modulated. During the last decade, the growing request in practical applications pushed the technology behind the OFG-based sensors over its limits by means of the deposition of thin film overlays, nanocoatings, and nanostructures, in general. Here, we review efforts toward utilizing these nanomaterials as coatings for high-performance and low-detection limit devices. Moreover, we review the recent development in OFG-based biosensing and identify some of the key challenges for practical applications. While high-performance metrics are starting to be achieved experimentally, there are still open questions pertaining to an effective and reliable detection of small molecules, possibly up to single molecule, sensing in vivo and multi-target detection using OFG-based technology platforms.

  14. Plasmonic Nanomaterial-Based Optical Biosensing Platforms for Virus Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewook Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanomaterials (P-NM are receiving attention due to their excellent properties, which include surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR effects, plasmonic resonance energy transfer (PRET, and magneto optical (MO effects. To obtain such plasmonic properties, many nanomaterials have been developed, including metal nanoparticles (MNP, bimetallic nanoparticles (bMNP, MNP-decorated carbon nanotubes, (MNP-CNT, and MNP-modified graphene (MNP-GRP. These P-NMs may eventually be applied to optical biosensing systems due to their unique properties. Here, probe biomolecules, such as antibodies (Ab, probe DNA, and probe aptamers, were modified on the surface of plasmonic materials by chemical conjugation and thiol chemistry. The optical property change in the plasmonic nanomaterials was monitored based on the interaction between the probe biomolecules and target virus. After bioconjugation, several optical properties, including fluorescence, plasmonic absorbance, and diffraction angle, were changed to detect the target biomolecules. This review describes several P-NMs as potential candidates of optical sensing platforms and introduces various applications in the optical biosensing field.

  15. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Yongxiang; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-07-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  16. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  17. Biosensing Using Magnetic Particle Detection Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic particles are widely used as signal labels in a variety of biological sensing applications, such as molecular detection and related strategies that rely on ligand-receptor binding. In this review, we explore the fundamental concepts involved in designing magnetic particles for biosensing applications and the techniques used to detect them. First, we briefly describe the magnetic properties that are important for bio-sensing applications and highlight the associated key parameters (such as the starting materials, size, functionalization methods, and bio-conjugation strategies. Subsequently, we focus on magnetic sensing applications that utilize several types of magnetic detection techniques: spintronic sensors, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs, sensors based on the atomic magnetometer (AM, and others. From the studies reported, we note that the size of the MPs is one of the most important factors in choosing a sensing technique.

  18. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2016-06-06

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation.

  19. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  20. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang; Lentijo Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschö pe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation.

  1. Polymer-Graphene Nanocomposite Materials for Electrochemical Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Peter; Piwowarczyk, Magdalena; Fray, Mirosława El

    2016-07-01

    Biosensing is an important and rapidly developing field, with numerous potential applications in health care, food processing, and environmental control. Polymer-graphene nanocomposites aim to leverage the unique, attractive properties of graphene by combining them with those of a polymer matrix. Molecular imprinted polymers, in particular, offer the promise of artificial biorecognition elements. A variety of polymers, including intrinsically conducting polymers (polyaniline, polypyrrole), bio-based polymers (chitosan, polycatechols), and polycationic polymers (poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), polyethyleneimine), have been utilized as matrices for graphene-based nanofillers, yielding sensitive biosensors for various biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo SERS Biosensing for Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Joshua Moore

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For many disease states, positive outcomes are directly linked to early diagnosis, where therapeutic intervention would be most effective. Recently, trends in disease diagnosis have focused on the development of label-free sensing techniques that are sensitive to low analyte concentrations found in the physiological environment. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy that allows for label-free, highly sensitive, and selective detection of analytes through the amplification of localized electric fields on the surface of a plasmonic material when excited with monochromatic light. This results in enhancement of the Raman scattering signal, which allows for the detection of low concentration analytes, giving rise to the use of SERS as a diagnostic tool for disease. Here, we present a review of recent developments in the field of in vivo and in vitro SERS biosensing for a range of disease states including neurological disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and viral disease.

  3. Chemical Modification of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for Applications to Biosensors and Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svítková, Jana; Ignat, Teodora; Švorc, Ľubomír; Labuda, Ján; Barek, Jiří

    2016-05-03

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) is a prospective electrode material that possesses many exceptional properties including wide potential window, low noise, low and stable background current, chemical and mechanical stability, good biocompatibility, and last but not least exceptional resistance to passivation. These characteristics extend its usability in various areas of electrochemistry as evidenced by increasing number of published articles over the past two decades. The idea of chemically modifying BDD electrodes with molecular species attached to the surface for the purpose of creating a rational design has found promising applications in the past few years. BDD electrodes have appeared to be excellent substrate materials for various chemical modifications and subsequent application to biosensors and biosensing. Hence, this article presents modification strategies that have extended applications of BDD electrodes in electroanalytical chemistry. Different methods and steps of surface modification of this electrode material for biosensing and construction of biosensors are discussed.

  4. Functional Carbon Quantum Dots: A Versatile Platform for Chemosensing and Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2018-05-01

    Carbon quantum dot has emerged as a new promising fluorescent nanomaterial due to its excellent optical properties, outstanding biocompatibility and accessible fabrication methods, and has shown huge application perspective in a variety of areas, especially in chemosensing and biosensing applications. In this personal account, we give a brief overview of carbon quantum dots from its origin and preparation methods, present some advance on fluorescence origin of carbon quantum dots, and focus on development of chemosensors and biosensors based on functional carbon quantum dots. Comprehensive advances on functional carbon quantum dots as a versatile platform for sensing from our group are included and summarized as well as some typical examples from the other groups. The biosensing applications of functional carbon quantum dots are highlighted from selective assays of enzyme activity to fluorescent identification of cancer cells and bacteria. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Microcantilever-based platforms as biosensing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Lechuga, Laura M

    2010-05-01

    The fast and progressive growth of the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields forces the development of new and powerful sensing techniques for process optimization and detection of biomolecules at very low concentrations. During the last years, the simplest MEMS structures, i.e. microcantilevers, have become an emerging and promising technology for biosensing applications, due to their small size, fast response, high sensitivity and their compatible integration into "lab-on-a-chip" devices. This article provides an overview of some of the most interesting bio-detections carried out during the last 2-3 years with the microcantilever-based platforms, which highlight the continuous expansion of this kind of sensor in the medical diagnosis field, reaching limits of detection at the single molecule level.

  6. Ambient light-based optical biosensing platform with smartphone-embedded illumination sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Min; Han, Yong Duk; Chun, Hyeong Jin; Yoon, Hyun C

    2017-07-15

    We present a hand-held optical biosensing system utilizing a smartphone-embedded illumination sensor that is integrated with immunoblotting assay method. The smartphone-embedded illumination sensor is regarded as an alternative optical receiver that can replaces the conventional optical analysis apparatus because the illumination sensor can respond to the ambient light in a wide range of wavelengths, including visible and infrared. To demonstrate the biosensing applicability of our system employing the enzyme-mediated immunoblotting and accompanying light interference, various types of ambient light conditions including outdoor sunlight and indoor fluorescent were tested. For the immunoblotting assay, the biosensing channel generating insoluble precipitates as an end product of the enzymatic reaction is fabricated and mounted on the illumination sensor of the smartphone. The intensity of penetrating light arrives on the illumination sensor is inversely proportional to the amount of precipitates produced in the channel, and these changes are immediately analyzed and quantified via smartphone software. In this study, urinary C-terminal telopeptide fragment of type II collagen (uCTX-II), a biomarker of osteoarthritis diagnosis, was tested as a model analyte. The developed smartphone-based sensing system efficiently measured uCTX-II in the 0-5ng/mL concentration range with a high sensitivity and accuracy under various light conditions. These assay results show that the illumination sensor-based optical biosensor is suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent Advances in Bioprinting and Applications for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Dias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Future biosensing applications will require high performance, including real-time monitoring of physiological events, incorporation of biosensors into feedback-based devices, detection of toxins, and advanced diagnostics. Such functionality will necessitate biosensors with increased sensitivity, specificity, and throughput, as well as the ability to simultaneously detect multiple analytes. While these demands have yet to be fully realized, recent advances in biofabrication may allow sensors to achieve the high spatial sensitivity required, and bring us closer to achieving devices with these capabilities. To this end, we review recent advances in biofabrication techniques that may enable cutting-edge biosensors. In particular, we focus on bioprinting techniques (e.g., microcontact printing, inkjet printing, and laser direct-write that may prove pivotal to biosensor fabrication and scaling. Recent biosensors have employed these fabrication techniques with success, and further development may enable higher performance, including multiplexing multiple analytes or cell types within a single biosensor. We also review recent advances in 3D bioprinting, and explore their potential to create biosensors with live cells encapsulated in 3D microenvironments. Such advances in biofabrication will expand biosensor utility and availability, with impact realized in many interdisciplinary fields, as well as in the clinic.

  8. Plasmonic interferometers: From physics to biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xie

    Optical interferometry has a long history and wide range of applications. In recent years, plasmonic interferometer arouses great interest due to its compact size and enhanced light-matter interaction. They have demonstrated attractive applications in biomolecule sensing, optical modulation/switching, and material characterization, etc. In this work, we first propose a practical far-field method to extract the intrinsic phase dispersion, revealing important phase information during interactions among free-space light, nanostructure, and SPs. The proposed approach is confirmed by both simulation and experiment. Then we design novel plasmonic interferometer structure for sensitive optical sensing applications. To overcome two major limitations suffered by previously reported double-slit plasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (PMZI), two new schemes are proposed and investigated. (1) A PMZI based on end-fire coupling improves the SP coupling efficiency and enhance the interference contrast more than 50 times. (2) In another design, a multi-layered metal-insulator-metal PMZI releases the requirement for single-slit illumination, which enables sensitive, high-throughput sensing applications based on intensity modulation. We develop a sensitive, low-cost and high-throughput biosensing platform based on intensity modulation using ring-hole plasmonic interferometers. This biosensor is then integrated with cell-phone-based microscope, which is promising to develop a portable sensor for point-of-care diagnostics, epidemic disease control and food safety monitoring.

  9. Corrosion resistant metallic glasses for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasti, Ariane; Lopes, Ana Catarina; Lasheras, Andoni; Palomares, Verónica; Carrizo, Javier; Gutierrez, Jon; Barandiaran, J. Manuel

    2018-04-01

    We report the fabrication by melt spinning, the magnetic and magnetoelastic characterization and corrosion behaviour study (by potentiodynamic methods) of an Fe-based, Fe-Ni-Cr-Si-B metallic glass to be used as resonant platform for biological and chemical detection purposes. The same study has been performed in Fe-Co-Si-B (with excellent magnetoelastic properties) and Fe-Ni-B (with good corrosion properties due to the substitution of Co by Ni) composition amorphous alloys. The well-known, commercial metallic glass with high corrosion resistance Metglas 2826MB®(Fe40Ni38Mo4B18), widely used for such biological and chemical detection purposes, has been also fully characterized and used as reference. For our Fe-Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy, we have measured values of magnetization (1.22 T), magnetostriction (11.5 ppm) and ΔE effect (6.8 %) values, as well as corrosion potential (-0.25 V), current density (2.54 A/m2), and polarization resistance (56.22 Ω.cm2) that make this composition very promising for the desired biosensing applications. The obtained parameters from our exhaustive characterization are compared with the values obtained for the other different composition metallic glasses and discussed in terms of Ni and Cr content.

  10. Corrosion resistant metallic glasses for biosensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Sagasti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication by melt spinning, the magnetic and magnetoelastic characterization and corrosion behaviour study (by potentiodynamic methods of an Fe-based, Fe-Ni-Cr-Si-B metallic glass to be used as resonant platform for biological and chemical detection purposes. The same study has been performed in Fe-Co-Si-B (with excellent magnetoelastic properties and Fe-Ni-B (with good corrosion properties due to the substitution of Co by Ni composition amorphous alloys. The well-known, commercial metallic glass with high corrosion resistance Metglas 2826MB®(Fe40Ni38Mo4B18, widely used for such biological and chemical detection purposes, has been also fully characterized and used as reference. For our Fe-Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy, we have measured values of magnetization (1.22 T, magnetostriction (11.5 ppm and ΔE effect (6.8 % values, as well as corrosion potential (-0.25 V, current density (2.54 A/m2, and polarization resistance (56.22 Ω.cm2 that make this composition very promising for the desired biosensing applications. The obtained parameters from our exhaustive characterization are compared with the values obtained for the other different composition metallic glasses and discussed in terms of Ni and Cr content.

  11. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Zhao, Ye

    2013-12-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO{sub 2}) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity.

  12. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yibing; Zhao, Ye

    2013-01-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO 2 ) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity

  13. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lueke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  14. MEMS-based power generation techniques for implantable biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  15. Printed organo-functionalized graphene for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisitsoraat, A; Mensing, J Ph; Karuwan, C; Sriprachuabwong, C; Jaruwongrungsee, K; Phokharatkul, D; Daniels, T M; Liewhiran, C; Tuantranont, A

    2017-01-15

    Graphene is a highly promising material for biosensors due to its excellent physical and chemical properties which facilitate electron transfer between the active locales of enzymes or other biomaterials and a transducer surface. Printing technology has recently emerged as a low-cost and practical method for fabrication of flexible and disposable electronics devices. The combination of these technologies is promising for the production and commercialization of low cost sensors. In this review, recent developments in organo-functionalized graphene and printed biosensor technologies are comprehensively covered. Firstly, various methods for printing graphene-based fluids on different substrates are discussed. Secondly, different graphene-based ink materials and preparation methods are described. Lastly, biosensing performances of printed or printable graphene-based electrochemical and field effect transistor sensors for some important analytes are elaborated. The reported printed graphene based sensors exhibit promising properties with good reliability suitable for commercial applications. Among most reports, only a few printed graphene-based biosensors including screen-printed oxidase-functionalized graphene biosensor have been demonstrated. The technology is still at early stage but rapidly growing and will earn great attention in the near future due to increasing demand of low-cost and disposable biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Schottky-contact plasmonic dipole rectenna concept for biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavirad, Mohammad; Mousavi, Saba Siadat; Roy, Langis; Berini, Pierre

    2013-02-25

    Nanoantennas are key optical components for several applications including photodetection and biosensing. Here we present an array of metal nano-dipoles supporting surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) integrated into a silicon-based Schottky-contact photodetector. Incident photons coupled to the array excite SPPs on the Au nanowires of the antennas which decay by creating "hot" carriers in the metal. The hot carriers may then be injected over the potential barrier at the Au-Si interface resulting in a photocurrent. High responsivities of 100 mA/W and practical minimum detectable powers of -12 dBm should be achievable in the infra-red (1310 nm). The device was then investigated for use as a biosensor by computing its bulk and surface sensitivities. Sensitivities of ∼ 250 nm/RIU (bulk) and ∼ 8 nm/nm (surface) in water are predicted. We identify the mode propagating and resonating along the nanowires of the antennas, we apply a transmission line model to describe the performance of the antennas, and we extract two useful formulas to predict their bulk and surface sensitivities. We prove that the sensitivities of dipoles are much greater than those of similar monopoles and we show that this difference comes from the gap in dipole antennas where electric fields are strongly enhanced.

  17. Carbon Nanostructures for Tagging in Electrochemical Biosensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing demand for developing ultrasensitive electrochemical bioassays has led to the design of numerous signal amplification strategies. In this context, carbon-based nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be excellent tags for greatly amplifying the transduction of recognition events and simplifying the protocols used in electrochemical biosensing. This relevant role is due to the carbon-nanomaterials’ large surface area, excellent biological compatibility and ease functionalization and, in some cases, intrinsic electrochemistry. These carbon-based nanomaterials involve well-known carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene as well as the more recent use of other carbon nanoforms. This paper briefly discusses the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites for amplification through tagging in electrochemical biosensing platforms and provides an updated overview of some selected examples making use of labels involving carbon nanomaterials, acting both as carriers for signal elements and as electrochemical tracers, applied to the electrochemical biosensing of relevant (biomarkers.

  18. Cerium phosphate nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ling; Yang, Lige; Zhou, Bo; Cai, Chenxin

    2009-01-01

    Cerium phosphate (CeP) nanotubes have been synthesized and confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 1D nanomaterial has a monoclinic crystal structure with a mean width of 15-20 nm and a length up to several micrometers. The nanotubes have been employed as electrode substrates for immobilization and direct electrochemistry of heme proteins/enzymes with myoglobin (Mb) as a model. The electrochemical characteristics of the Mb-CeP/GC electrode were studied by voltammetry. After being immobilized on the nanotubes, Mb can keep its natural structure and undergo effective direct electron transfer reaction with a pair of well-defined redox peaks at -(367 ± 3) mV (pH 7.5). The apparent electron transfer rate constant is (9.1 ± 1.4) s-1. The electrode displays good features in the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2, and thus can be used as a biosensor for detecting the substrate with a low detection limit (0.5 ± 0.05 µM), a wide linear range (0.01-2 mM), high sensitivity (14.4 ± 1.2 µA mM-1), as well as good stability and reproducibility. CeP nanotubes can become a simple and effective biosensing platform for the integration of heme proteins/enzymes and electrodes, which can provide analytical access to a large group of enzymes for a wide range of bioelectrochemical applications.

  19. Cerium phosphate nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Ling; Yang Lige; Zhou Bo; Cai Chenxin

    2009-01-01

    Cerium phosphate (CeP) nanotubes have been synthesized and confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 1D nanomaterial has a monoclinic crystal structure with a mean width of 15-20 nm and a length up to several micrometers. The nanotubes have been employed as electrode substrates for immobilization and direct electrochemistry of heme proteins/enzymes with myoglobin (Mb) as a model. The electrochemical characteristics of the Mb-CeP/GC electrode were studied by voltammetry. After being immobilized on the nanotubes, Mb can keep its natural structure and undergo effective direct electron transfer reaction with a pair of well-defined redox peaks at -(367 ± 3) mV (pH 7.5). The apparent electron transfer rate constant is (9.1 ± 1.4) s -1 . The electrode displays good features in the electrocatalytic reduction of H 2 O 2 , and thus can be used as a biosensor for detecting the substrate with a low detection limit (0.5 ± 0.05 μM), a wide linear range (0.01-2 mM), high sensitivity (14.4 ± 1.2 μA mM -1 ), as well as good stability and reproducibility. CeP nanotubes can become a simple and effective biosensing platform for the integration of heme proteins/enzymes and electrodes, which can provide analytical access to a large group of enzymes for a wide range of bioelectrochemical applications.

  20. Microneedles for Transdermal Biosensing: Current Picture and Future Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrelli, Letizia; Marsilio Strambini, Lucanos; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2015-12-09

    A novel trend is rapidly emerging in the use of microneedles, which are a miniaturized replica of hypodermic needles with length-scales of hundreds of micrometers, aimed at the transdermal biosensing of analytes of clinical interest, e.g., glucose, biomarkers, and others. Transdermal biosensing via microneedles offers remarkable opportunities for moving biosensing technologies and biochips from research laboratories to real-field applications, and envisages easy-to-use point-of-care microdevices with pain-free, minimally invasive, and minimal-training features that are very attractive for both developed and emerging countries. In addition to this, microneedles for transdermal biosensing offer a unique possibility for the development of biochips provided with end-effectors for their interaction with the biological system under investigation. Direct and efficient collection of the biological sample to be analyzed will then become feasible in situ at the same length-scale of the other biochip components by minimally trained personnel and in a minimally invasive fashion. This would eliminate the need for blood extraction using hypodermic needles and reduce, in turn, related problems, such as patient infections, sample contaminations, analysis artifacts, etc. The aim here is to provide a thorough and critical analysis of state-of-the-art developments in this novel research trend, and to bridge the gap between microneedles and biosensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  2. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  3. SERS substrates for in-situ biosensing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Priyamvada; Quilis, Nestor; Jakub, Dostalek; Wolfgang, Knoll

    2017-06-01

    Abstract: Recent years have seen a rapid progress in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) which is attributed to the thriving field of plasmonics [1]. SERS is a susceptible technique that can address basic scientific questions and technological problems. In both cases, it is highly dependent upon the plasmonic substrate, where excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance enhances the vibrational scattering signal of the analyte molecules adsorbed on to the surface [2]. In this work, using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method we investigate the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures with tuned plasmonic resonances as a function of dielectric environment and geometric parameters. An optimized geometry will be discussed based on the plasmonic resonant position and the SERS intensity. These SERS substrates will be employed for the detection of changes in conformation caused by interactions between an aptamer and analyte molecules. This will be done by using a microfluidic channel designed within the configuration of the lab-on-a-chip concept based on the intensity changes of the SERS signal. More efficient and reproducible results are obtained for such a quantitative measurement of analytes at low concentration levels. We will also demonstrate that the plasmonic substrates fabricated by top down approach such as e-beam lithography (EBL) and laser interference lithography (LIL) are highly reproducible, robust and can result in high electric field enhancement. Our results demonstrate the potential to use SERS substrates for highly sensitive detection schemes opening up the window for a wide range of applications including biomedical diagnostics, forensic investigation etc. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), project NANOBIOSENSOR (I 2647). References: [1] J. N. Anker, W. P. Hall, O. Lyandres, N. C. Shah, J. Zhao and R. P. V. Duyne., " Biosensing with plasmonic nanosensors," Nature

  4. GaN heterostructures for biosensing and radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howgate, John D.

    2012-12-11

    In this thesis I show the results from our investigation of the interface between gallium nitride wide bandgap semiconductor heterostructures and (bio)molecular systems on their surfaces for biosensing, bioelectronics, and photoelectric applications, with a large emphasis on the processes arising from high energy ionizing irradiation, including heterostructure photoelectric gain mechanisms. Wide bandgap semiconductors, such as gallium nitride, have received increasing attention as potential components in advanced organic/inorganic hybrid systems. Working to further this topic, we determine a new semiconductor alignment required for low energy photo-induced charge transfer ionization of alkyl chains well below the energy normally required for molecular cleavage, show original results of the influence of binding methods on enzyme functionality in conjunction with a novel electrochemical and environmental control system and demonstrate new possibilities to significantly improve upon pH measurements through the use of high sensitivity devices. Furthermore, based on the extension of this work to support future studies of radiation effects on cell systems, we present a detailed characterization of new simultaneous chemical sensing and ionizing radiation dosimetry using single devices. We found that their pH sensitivity was retained during X-ray irradiation and that the fundamental characteristics can be used to separate the irradiation signal from the pH response without compromising operational stability. These data provide clear indications of the separate response mechanism tied to the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas channel. Here, we found new results exhibiting exceptionally high gains and independence of the well-known persistent photoconductivity for soft X-rays and high energy particles in the ultralow dose-rate regime. This material system provides the capability for high sensitivity and resolution real time monitoring, which is competitive with and

  5. GaN heterostructures for biosensing and radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howgate, John D.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis I show the results from our investigation of the interface between gallium nitride wide bandgap semiconductor heterostructures and (bio)molecular systems on their surfaces for biosensing, bioelectronics, and photoelectric applications, with a large emphasis on the processes arising from high energy ionizing irradiation, including heterostructure photoelectric gain mechanisms. Wide bandgap semiconductors, such as gallium nitride, have received increasing attention as potential components in advanced organic/inorganic hybrid systems. Working to further this topic, we determine a new semiconductor alignment required for low energy photo-induced charge transfer ionization of alkyl chains well below the energy normally required for molecular cleavage, show original results of the influence of binding methods on enzyme functionality in conjunction with a novel electrochemical and environmental control system and demonstrate new possibilities to significantly improve upon pH measurements through the use of high sensitivity devices. Furthermore, based on the extension of this work to support future studies of radiation effects on cell systems, we present a detailed characterization of new simultaneous chemical sensing and ionizing radiation dosimetry using single devices. We found that their pH sensitivity was retained during X-ray irradiation and that the fundamental characteristics can be used to separate the irradiation signal from the pH response without compromising operational stability. These data provide clear indications of the separate response mechanism tied to the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas channel. Here, we found new results exhibiting exceptionally high gains and independence of the well-known persistent photoconductivity for soft X-rays and high energy particles in the ultralow dose-rate regime. This material system provides the capability for high sensitivity and resolution real time monitoring, which is competitive with and

  6. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  7. Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus using chitosan quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2018-01-01

    Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using chitosan modified quantum dots (CTS@CdS QDs) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide is reported. The method is based on the intrinsic positive catalase activity of S. aureus. CTS@CdS quantum dots provide high dispersion in aqueous media with high fluorescence emission. Staphylococcus aureus causes a selective quenching of the fluorescence emission of CTS@CdS QDs in the presence of H2O2 compared to other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intrinsic enzymatic character of S. aureus (catalase positive) offers selective and fast biosensing. The present method is highly selective for positive catalase species and requires no expensive reagents such as antibodies, aptamers or microbeads. It could be extended for other species that are positive catalase.

  8. Nanostructure materials for biosensing and bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing Cheung

    In the first part of the thesis our work on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor will be presented. It will begin with understanding the working principle of SPR sensing technology and the basic concept of SPR biosensing. In SPR technology, there are different coupling schemes to excite surface plasmons such as prism coupler, grating coupler and waveguide coupler. Our setup will be based on the attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism coupling configuration. A gold sensing film is attached to one face of the prism. The samples are flowing over the gold surface and the light source is directed to the prism side. The reflected beam containing SPR information is collected and analyzed. SPR biosensors have become powerful tools in biological and chemical sensing application because of their capability of real-time monitoring and label-free sensing. Quantitative measurements such as the binding kinetics and the binding affinity between two biomolecules can be readily calculated from the SPR sensorgram. In our design, SPR phase will be monitored using photoelastic modulation (PEM) technique. The PEM is used to produce a modulation signal so that the phase quantity can be extracted by measuring the relative amplitudes of the harmonic signals. Since this system contains no moving component and only single beam and single detector are used, precise component alignment, which may be troublesome in making the setup compact and robust, can be eliminated. In order to demonstrate the operation of the proposed approach, two experiments were performed. The first one was to measure the refractive index change caused by varying the concentration of glycerin-water mixtures. The second one was to monitor the binding reactions between biotin and streptavidin--BSA complex at the sensor surface. Recently, the use of metallic nanoparticle on SPR platform has received great attention due to the capability of sensitivity enhancement. Although the mechanism of the enhancement is still

  9. Optimizing biosensing properties on undecylenic Acid-functionalized diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu Lin; Chong, Kwok Feng; May, Paul W; Chen, Zhi-Kuan; Loh, Kian Ping

    2007-05-08

    The optimization of biosensing efficiency on a diamond platform depends on the successful coupling of biomolecules on the surface, and also on effective signal transduction in the biorecognition events. In terms of biofunctionalization of diamond surfaces, surface electrochemical studies of diamond modified with undecylenic acid (UA), with and without headgroup protection, were performed. The direct photochemical coupling method employing UA was found to impart a higher density of carboxylic acid groups on the diamond surface compared to that using trifluoroethyl undecenoate (TFEU) as the protecting group during the coupling process. Non-faradic impedimetric DNA sensing revealed that lightly doped diamond gives better signal transduction sensitivity compared to highly doped diamond.

  10. Label-free and selective nonlinear fiber-optical biosensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Heuck, Mikkel; Agger, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that the inherent nonlinearity of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) may be used to achieve label-free selective biosensing, thereby eliminating the need for post-processing of the fiber. This first nonlinear biosensor utilizes a change in the modulational instability (MI) gain...... for optimizing the sensitivity. The nonlinear sensor shows a sensitivity of around 10.4nm/nm, defined as the shift in resonance wavelength per nm biolayer, which is a factor of 7.5 higher than the hitherto only demonstrated label-free MOF biosensor....

  11. Biosensing with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Coupling between Fluorophores and Nanocarbon Allotropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocarbon allotropes (NCAs, including zero-dimensional carbon dots (CDs, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs and two-dimensional graphene, exhibit exceptional material properties, such as unique electrical/thermal conductivity, biocompatibility and high quenching efficiency, that make them well suited for both electrical/electrochemical and optical sensors/biosensors alike. In particular, these material properties have been exploited to significantly enhance the transduction of biorecognition events in fluorescence-based biosensing involving Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET. This review analyzes current advances in sensors and biosensors that utilize graphene, CNTs or CDs as the platform in optical sensors and biosensors. Widely utilized synthesis/fabrication techniques, intrinsic material properties and current research examples of such nanocarbon, FRET-based sensors/biosensors are illustrated. The future outlook and challenges for the research field are also detailed.

  12. A review of biosensing techniques for detection of trace carcinogen contamination in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanming; Yu, Yue; Li, Zhiliang; Wu, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Carcinogen contaminations in the food chain, for example heavy metal ions, pesticides, acrylamide, and mycotoxins, have caused serious health problems. A major objective of food-safety research is the identification and prevention of exposure to these carcinogens, because of their impossible-to-reverse tumorigenic effects. However, carcinogen detection is difficult because of their trace-level presence in food. Thus, reliable and accurate separation and determination methods are essential to protect food safety and human health. This paper summarizes the state of the art in separation and determination methods for analyzing carcinogen contamination, especially the advances in biosensing methods. Furthermore, the application of promising technology including nanomaterials, imprinted polymers, and microdevices is detailed. Challenges and perspectives are also discussed.

  13. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles for biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Win, Khin Yin; Liu, Shuhua; Teng, Choon Peng; Zheng, Yuangang; Han, Ming-Yong

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the very recent progress of various functional inorganic nanomaterials is reviewed including their unique properties, surface functionalization strategies, and applications in biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics. The proper surface functionalization renders them with stability, biocompatibility and functionality in physiological environments, and further enables their targeted use in bioapplications after bioconjugation via selective and specific recognition. The surface-functionalized nanoprobes using the most actively studied nanoparticles (i.e., gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and magnetic nanoparticles) make them an excellent platform for a wide range of bioapplications. With more efforts in recent years, they have been widely developed as labeling probes to detect various biological species such as proteins, nucleic acids and ions, and extensively employed as imaging probes to guide therapeutics such as drug/gene delivery and photothermal/photodynamic therapy.

  14. Porous silicon platform for optical detection of functionalized magnetic particles biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Sohn, Honglae; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of porous materials are being exploited for a wide range of applications including optical biosensors, waveguides, gas sensors, micro capacitors, and solar cells. Here, we review the fast, easy and inexpensive electrochemical anodization based fabrication porous silicon (PSi) for optical biosensing using functionalized magnetic particles. Combining magnetically labeled biomolecules with PSi offers a rapid and one-step immunoassay and real-time detection by magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) functionalized with target molecules onto corresponding probe molecules immobilized inside nano-pores of PSi. We first give an introduction to electrochemical and chemical etching procedures used to fabricate a wide range of PSi structures. Next, we describe the basic properties of PSi and underlying optical scattering mechanisms that govern their unique optical properties. Finally, we give examples of our experiments that demonstrate the potential of combining PSi and magnetic beads for real-time point of care diagnostics.

  15. Recent Advances in Nanoparticle-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Biosensing, Molecular Imaging and Drug Release Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Tzu Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET may be regarded as a “smart” technology in the design of fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. Recently, a variety of nanoparticles that include quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, polymer, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and upconversion nanoparticles have been employed to modulate FRET. Researchers have developed a number of “visible” and “activatable” FRET probes sensitive to specific changes in the biological environment that are especially attractive from the biomedical point of view. This article reviews recent progress in bringing these nanoparticle-modulated energy transfer schemes to fruition for applications in biosensing, molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  16. Advances in sensing and biosensing of bisphenols: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanjai; Sinha, Ankita; Wu, Lingxia; Lu, Xianbo; Chen, Jiping; Jain, Rajeev

    2018-01-15

    Bisphenols (BPs) are well known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that cause adverse effects on the environment, biotic life and human health. BPs have been studied extensively because of an increasing concern for the safety of the environment and for human health. They are major raw materials for manufacturing polycarbonates, thermal papers and epoxy resins and are considered hazardous environmental contaminants. A vast array of sensors and biosensors have been developed for the sensitive screening of BPs based on carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, graphene and graphene oxide), quantum dots, metal and metal oxide nanocomposites, polymer nanocomposites, metal organic frameworks, ionic liquids and molecularly imprinted polymers. This review is devoted mainly to a variety of sensitive, selective and reliable sensing and biosensing methods for the detection of BPs using electrochemistry, fluorescence, colorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, luminescence, ELISAs, circular dichroism, resonance Rayleigh scattering and adsorption techniques in plastic products, food samples, food packaging, industrial wastes, pharmaceutical products, human body fluids and many other matrices. It summarizes the advances in sensing and biosensing methods for the detection of BPs since 2010. Furthermore, the article discusses challenges and future perspectives in the development of novel sensing methods for the detection of BP analogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional gold nanoparticles for optical affinity biosensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špringer, Tomáš; Chadtová Song, Xue; Ermini, Maria Laura; Lamačová, Josefína; Homola, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 409, č. 16 (2017), s. 4087-4097 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1101 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Gold nanoparticles * Cancer marker carcinoembryonic antigen * Surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: Medical laboratory technology (including laboratory samples analysis Impact factor: 3.431, year: 2016

  18. Microfabricated Reference Electrodes and their Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, there has been an increasing trend towards miniaturization of both biological and chemical sensors and their integration with miniaturized sample pre-processing and analysis systems. These miniaturized lab-on-chip devices have several functional advantages including low cost, their ability to analyze smaller samples, faster analysis time, suitability for automation, and increased reliability and repeatability. Electrical based sensing methods that transduce biological or chemical signals into the electrical domain are a dominant part of the lab-on-chip devices. A vital part of any electrochemical sensing system is the reference electrode, which is a probe that is capable of measuring the potential on the solution side of an electrochemical interface. Research on miniaturization of this crucial component and analysis of the parameters that affect its performance, stability and lifetime, is sparse. In this paper, we present the basic electrochemistry and thermodynamics of these reference electrodes and illustrate the uses of reference electrodes in electrochemical and biological measurements. Different electrochemical systems that are used as reference electrodes will be presented, and an overview of some contemporary advances in electrode miniaturization and their performance will be provided.

  19. Cascade DNA nanomachine and exponential amplification biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianguo; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Weiyu; Xu, Huo; Li, Hongling; Jia, Lee

    2015-11-15

    DNA is a versatile scaffold for the assembly of multifunctional nanostructures, and potential applications of various DNA nanodevices have been recently demonstrated for disease diagnosis and treatment. In the current study, a powerful cascade DNA nanomachine was developed that can execute the exponential amplification of p53 tumor suppressor gene. During the operation of the newly-proposed DNA nanomachine, dual-cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (dual-CNDP) was ingeniously introduced, where the target trigger is repeatedly used as the fuel molecule and the nicked fragments are dramatically accumulated. Moreover, each displaced nicked fragment is able to activate the another type of cyclical strand-displacement amplification, increasing exponentially the value of fluorescence intensity. Essentially, one target binding event can induce considerable number of subsequent reactions, and the nanodevice was called cascade DNA nanomachine. It can implement several functions, including recognition element, signaling probe, polymerization primer and template. Using the developed autonomous operation of DNA nanomachine, the p53 gene can be quantified in the wide concentration range from 0.05 to 150 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM. If taking into account the final volume of mixture, the detection limit is calculated as lower as 6.2 pM, achieving an desirable assay ability. More strikingly, the mutant gene can be easily distinguished from the wild-type one. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein is expected to promote the development and application of DNA nanomachine, showing great potential value in basic biology and medical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extending applicability of terahertz spectroscopy for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Ramakrishnan

    Terahertz (THz) vibrational resonance spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising technique for fingerprinting biological molecules. Absorption spectra in this frequency range (0.1-10 THz) reflect molecular internal vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds and/or non-bonded interactions, which are species specific. Of prime importance is improving detection sensitivity of molecules with low absorption characteristics in the THz gap. Also of importance is the characterization of biological molecules in the THz gap (10-25 cm-1) by physical parameters (refractive index and absorption coefficient) rather than sample dependent parameters (transmission, reflection) and extending spectroscopy to the low THz range where remote sensing is most viable. To address the sensitivity issue, it is shown that periodic arrays of rectangular slots with subwavelength width provide for local electromagnetic field enhancements due to edge effects in the low frequency range of interest, 10-25 cm-1 (300-750 GHz). Periodic structures of Au, doped Si and InSb were studied. InSb is confirmed to offer the highest results with the local power enhancements on the order of 1100 at frequency 14 cm -1. InSb and Si have large skin depths in the frequency range of interest and so the analysis of their structures was done through the Fourier expansion method of field diffracted from gratings. Au however has small skin depths at these frequencies compared to the thickness. Surface impedance boundary conditions were employed to model the Au structure, for which the Fourier expansion method was unsuitable owing to the huge magnitude of Au permittivity. The applications possibly include development of novel bio-sensors, with the strongly enhanced local electromagnetic fields leading to increased detection sensitivity, and monitoring biophysical processes such as DNA denaturation. Transmission and reflection data from parallel, independent experiments are utilized in the Interference

  1. Current trends in electrochemical sensing and biosensing of DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejcova, Ludmila; Richtera, Lukas; Hynek, David; Labuda, Jan; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-11-15

    DNA methylation plays an important role in physiological and pathological processes. Several genetic diseases and most malignancies tend to be associated with aberrant DNA methylation. Among other analytical methods, electrochemical approaches have been successfully employed for characterisation of DNA methylation patterns that are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of particular diseases. This article discusses current trends in the electrochemical sensing and biosensing of DNA methylation. Particularly, it provides an overview of applied electrode materials, electrode modifications and biorecognition elements applications with an emphasis on strategies that form the core DNA methylation detection approaches. The three main strategies as (i) bisulfite treatment, (ii) cleavage by restriction endonucleases, and (iii) immuno/affinity reaction were described in greater detail. Additionally, the availability of the reviewed platforms for early cancer diagnosis and the approval of methylation inhibitors for anticancer therapy were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro osteosarcoma biosensing using THz time domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Bradley S.; Liu, Haibo; Hay, Shelley; Findlay, David; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Abbott, Derek

    2004-03-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has a wide range of applications from semiconductor diagnostics to biosensing. Recent attention has focused on bio-applications and several groups have noted the ability of THz-TDS to differentiate basal cell carcinoma tissue from healthy dermal tissue ex vivo. The contrast mechanism is unclear but has been attributed to increased interstitial water in cancerous tissue. In this work we investigate the THz response of human osteosarcoma cells and normal human bone cells grown in culture to isolate the cells' responses from other effects. A classification algorithms based on a frequency selection by genetic algorithm is used to attempt to differentiate between the cell types based on the THz spectra. Encouraging preliminary results have been obtained.

  3. Nanostructured gold and platinum electrodes on silicon structures for biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogurtsov, V I; Sheehan, M M

    2005-01-01

    Gold and platinum metal electrodes on Si/SiO 2 having undergone anisotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch treatment are considered. This treatment etches at different rates and directions in the material resulting in creation of numerous pyramid shaped holes in the silicon substrate. This surface is used to make metal electrodes with increased electrode efficiency. The electrodes can serve as the sensors or as the sensor substrates (for surface polymer modification) and because both gold and platinum are inert they have applications for food safety biosensing. Wine, an economically significant food product, was chosen as a matrix, and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was selected as a method of investigation of electrode behaviour. Based on results of EIS, different complexity equivalent circuits were determined by applying fitting mean square root optimisation of sensor complex impedance measurements

  4. New Trends in Food Allergens Detection: Toward Biosensing Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Barroso, M Fátima; González-García, María Begoña; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2016-10-25

    Food allergens are a real threat to sensitized individuals. Although food labeling is crucial to provide information to consumers with food allergies, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins may result from undeclared allergenic substances by means of food adulteration, fraud or uncontrolled cross-contamination. Allergens detection in foodstuffs can be a very hard task, due to their presence usually in trace amounts, together with the natural interference of the matrix. Methods for allergens analysis can be mainly divided in two large groups: the immunological assays and the DNA-based ones. Mass spectrometry has also been used as a confirmatory tool. Recently, biosensors appeared as innovative, sensitive, selective, environmentally friendly, cheaper and fast techniques (especially when automated and/or miniaturized), able to effectively replace the classical methodologies. In this review, we present the advances in the field of food allergens detection toward the biosensing strategies and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of this technology.

  5. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, Ariel; Kinnunen, Paivo; McNaughton, Brandon; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  6. Cylindrical optical resonators: fundamental properties and bio-sensing characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozeymeh, Foroogh; Razaghi, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, detailed theoretical analysis of cylindrical resonators is demonstrated. As illustrated, these kinds of resonators can be used as optical bio-sensing devices. The proposed structure is analyzed using an analytical method based on Lam's approximation. This method is systematic and has simplified the tedious process of whispering-gallery mode (WGM) wavelength analysis in optical cylindrical biosensors. By this method, analysis of higher radial orders of high angular momentum WGMs has been possible. Using closed-form analytical equations, resonance wavelengths of higher radial and angular order WGMs of TE and TM polarization waves are calculated. It is shown that high angular momentum WGMs are more appropriate for bio-sensing applications. Some of the calculations are done using a numerical non-linear Newton method. A perfect match of 99.84% between the analytical and the numerical methods has been achieved. In order to verify the validity of the calculations, Meep simulations based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method are performed. In this case, a match of 96.70% between the analytical and FDTD results has been obtained. The analytical predictions are in good agreement with other experimental work (99.99% match). These results validate the proposed analytical modelling for the fast design of optical cylindrical biosensors. It is shown that by extending the proposed two-layer resonator structure analyzing scheme, it is possible to study a three-layer cylindrical resonator structure as well. Moreover, by this method, fast sensitivity optimization in cylindrical resonator-based biosensors has been possible. Sensitivity of the WGM resonances is analyzed as a function of the structural parameters of the cylindrical resonators. Based on the results, fourth radial order WGMs, with a resonator radius of 50 μm, display the most bulk refractive index sensitivity of 41.50 (nm/RIU).

  7. Nanostructuring of biosensing electrodes with nanodiamonds for antibody immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Patel, Kush; Schexnider, Andrew; Banu, Shirin; Radadia, Adarsh D

    2014-02-25

    While chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is currently cost prohibitive for biosensor construction, in this paper, we show that sonication-assisted nanostructuring of biosensing electrodes with nanodiamonds (NDs) allows harnessing the hydrolytic stability of the diamond biofunctionalization chemistry for real-time continuous sensing, while improving the detector sensitivity and stability. We find that the higher surface coverages were important for improved bacterial capture and can be achieved through proper choice of solvent, ND concentration, and seeding time. A mixture of methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide provides the highest surface coverage (33.6 ± 3.4%) for the NDs with positive zeta-potential, compared to dilutions of dimethyl sulfoxide with acetone, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, or water. Through impedance spectroscopy of ND-seeded interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), we found that the ND seeds serve as electrically conductive islands only a few nanometers apart. Also we show that the seeded NDs are amply hydrogenated to be decorated with antibodies using the UV-alkene chemistry, and higher bacterial captures can be obtained compared to our previously reported work with diamond films. When sensing bacteria from 10(6) cfu/mL E. coli O157:H7, the resistance to charge transfer at the IDEs decreased by ∼ 38.8%, which is nearly 1.5 times better than that reported previously using redox probes. Further in the case of 10(8) cfu/mL E. coli O157:H7, the charge transfer resistance changed by ∼ 46%, which is similar to the magnitude of improvement reported using magnetic nanoparticle-based sample enrichment prior to impedance detection. Thus ND seeding allows impedance biosensing in low conductivity solutions with competitive sensitivity.

  8. An optical biosensing film for biochemical oxygen demand determination in seawater with an automatic flow sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lingling; Wang, Xudong; Guo, Guangmei; Wang, Xiaoru; Chen, Xi

    2007-09-01

    An on-line roboticized apparatus, including an optical biosensing film with an automatic flow sampling system, has been developed for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) determination of seawater. The sensing film employed in the apparatus consisted of an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) film embedded with tri(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) perchlorate. Three species of microorganism cultivated from seawater were immobilized in an ORMOSIL-polyvinyl alcohol matrix. Possible factors affecting BOD determination were studied, including sampling frequency, temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentration. Based on measurements of the linear fluctuant coefficients and the reproducibility of its response to seawater, the BOD apparatus showed the advantages of high veracity and short response time. Generally, the linear fluctuant coefficient (R2) in the BOD range 0.2-40 mg l-1 was 0.9945 when using a glucose/glutamate (GGA) BOD standard solution. A reproducible response for the BOD sensing film of within ±2.8% could be obtained in the 2 mg l-1 GGA solution. The BOD apparatus was applied to the BOD determination of seawater, and the values estimated by this biosensing apparatus correlated well with those determined by the conventional 5 day BOD (BOD5) test.

  9. Optical nano-biosensing interface via nucleic acid amplification strategy: construction and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2018-03-21

    Modern optical detection technology plays a critical role in current clinical detection due to its high sensitivity and accuracy. However, higher requirements such as extremely high detection sensitivity have been put forward due to the clinical needs for the early finding and diagnosing of malignant tumors which are significant for tumor therapy. The technology of isothermal amplification with nucleic acids opens up avenues for meeting this requirement. Recent reports have shown that a nucleic acid amplification-assisted modern optical sensing interface has achieved satisfactory sensitivity and accuracy, high speed and specificity. Compared with isothermal amplification technology designed to work completely in a solution system, solid biosensing interfaces demonstrated better performances in stability and sensitivity due to their ease of separation from the reaction mixture and the better signal transduction on these optical nano-biosensing interfaces. Also the flexibility and designability during the construction of these nano-biosensing interfaces provided a promising research topic for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer diseases. In this review, we describe the construction of the burgeoning number of optical nano-biosensing interfaces assisted by a nucleic acid amplification strategy, and provide insightful views on: (1) approaches to the smart fabrication of an optical nano-biosensing interface, (2) biosensing mechanisms via the nucleic acid amplification method, (3) the newest strategies and future perspectives.

  10. A polymeric liquid membrane electrode responsive to 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine oxidation for sensitive peroxidase/peroxidase mimetic-based potentiometric biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Yang, Yangang; Li, Long; Sun, Mingshuang; Yin, Haogen; Qin, Wei

    2014-05-06

    The oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) has great utility in bioanalysis such as peroxidase/peroxidase mimetic-based biosensing. In this paper, the behaviors of TMB oxidation intermediates/products in liquid/liquid biphasic systems have been investigated for the first time. The free radical, charge transfer complex, and diimine species generated by TMB oxidation are all positively charged under acidic and near-neutral conditions. Electron paramagnetic resonance and visible absorbance spectroscopy data demonstrate that these cationic species can be effectively transferred from an aqueous phase into a water-immiscible liquid phase functionalized by an appropriate cation exchanger. Accordingly, sensitive potential responses of TMB oxidation have been obtained on a cation exchanger-doped polymeric liquid membrane electrode under mildly acidic and near-neutral conditions. By using the membrane electrode responsive to TMB oxidations, two sensitive potentiometric biosensing schemes including the peroxidase-labeled sandwich immunoassay and G-quadruplex DNAzyme-based DNA hybridization assay have been developed. The obtained detection limits for the target antigen and DNA are 0.02 ng/mL and 0.1 nM, respectively. Coupled with other advantages such as low cost, high reliability, and ease of miniaturization and integration, the proposed polymeric liquid membrane electrode holds great promise as a facile and efficient transducer for TMB oxidation and related biosensing applications.

  11. Hybridization chain reaction: a versatile molecular tool for biosensing, bioimaging, and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sai; Yue, Shuzhen; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-07-17

    Developing powerful, simple and low-cost DNA amplification techniques is of great significance to bioanalysis and biomedical research. Thus far, many signal amplification strategies have been developed, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), rolling circle amplification (RCA), and DNA strand displacement amplification (SDA). In particular, hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a type of toehold-mediated strand displacement (TMSD) reaction, has attracted great interest because of its enzyme-free nature, isothermal conditions, simple protocols, and excellent amplification efficiency. In a typical HCR, an analyte initiates the cross-opening of two DNA hairpins, yielding nicked double helices that are analogous to alternating copolymers. As an efficient amplification platform, HCR has been utilized for the sensitive detection of a wide variety of analytes, including nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules, and cells. In recent years, more complicated sets of monomers have been designed to develop nonlinear HCR, such as branched HCR and even dendritic systems, achieving quadratic and exponential growth mechanisms. In addition, HCR has attracted enormous attention in the fields of bioimaging and biomedicine, including applications in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging, live cell imaging, and targeted drug delivery. In this review, we introduce the fundamentals of HCR and examine the visualization and analysis techniques for HCR products in detail. The most recent HCR developments in biosensing, bioimaging, and biomedicine are subsequently discussed with selected examples. Finally, the review provides insight into the challenges and future perspectives of HCR.

  12. Topographically Engineered Large Scale Nanostructures for Plasmonic Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Pradhan, Sangram K.; Santiago, Kevin C.; Rutherford, Gugu N.; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that a nanostructured metal thin film can achieve enhanced transmission efficiency and sharp resonances and use a large-scale and high-throughput nanofabrication technique for the plasmonic structures. The fabrication technique combines the features of nanoimprint and soft lithography to topographically construct metal thin films with nanoscale patterns. Metal nanogratings developed using this method show significantly enhanced optical transmission (up to a one-order-of-magnitude enhancement) and sharp resonances with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~15nm in the zero-order transmission using an incoherent white light source. These nanostructures are sensitive to the surrounding environment, and the resonance can shift as the refractive index changes. We derive an analytical method using a spatial Fourier transformation to understand the enhancement phenomenon and the sensing mechanism. The use of real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions in microfluidic cells integrated with these nanostructures is demonstrated to be effective for biosensing. The perpendicular transmission configuration and large-scale structures provide a feasible platform without sophisticated optical instrumentation to realize label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing.

  13. Trends in Flow-based Biosensing Systems for Pesticide Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Marty

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a survey on the state of the art of pesticide detection usingflow-based biosensing systems for sample screening. Although immunosensor systems havebeen proposed as powerful pesticide monitoring tools, this review is mainly focused onenzyme-based biosensors, as they are the most commonly employed when using a flowsystem. Among the different detection methods able to be integrated into flow-injectionanalysis (FIA systems, the electrochemical ones will be treated in more detail, due to theirhigh sensitivity, simple sample pretreatment, easy operational procedures and real-timedetection. During the last decade, new trends have been emerging in order to increase theenzyme stability, the sensitivity and selectivity of the measurements, and to lower thedetection limits. These approaches are based on (i the design of novel matrices for enzymeimmobilisation, (ii new manifold configurations of the FIA system, sometimes includingminiaturisation or lab-on-chip protocols thanks to micromachining technology, (iii the useof cholinesterase enzymes either from various commercial sources or genetically modifiedwith the aim of being more sensitive, (iv the incorporation of other highly specificenzymes, such as organophosphate hydrolase (OPH or parathion hydrolase (PH and (v thecombination of different electrochemical methods of detection. This article discusses thesenovel strategies and their advantages and limitations.

  14. Stable graphene oxide-gold nanoparticle platforms for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Sánchez, Dania; Villabona-Leal, Giovanny; Saucedo-Orozco, Izcoatl; Bracamonte, Victoria; Pérez, Elías; Bittencourt, Carla; Quintana, Mildred

    2018-01-17

    Graphene oxide-gold nanoparticle (AuNPs@GO) hybrids were fabricated in water dispersions of graphene oxide (GO) and Au precursor completely free of stabilizing agents by UV-light irradiation. Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) nucleation, growth, and stabilization mechanisms at the surface of GO are discussed on the basis of UV-Vis, Raman, IR, and X-Ray photo-spectroscopy studies. The analyses of AuNPs@GO hybrids by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric (TGA) and electrochemical tests show that they exhibit outstanding chemical, thermal and electrochemical stabilities. Thus, AuNPs@GO biosensing platforms were fabricated for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of crystal violet (CV), a SERS standard molecule, and in a different set of experiments, for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), a flavoprotein coenzyme that plays an important role in many oxidoreductase and reversible redox conversions in biochemical reactions. AuNPs@GO hybrids synthesized by using UV light irradiation show exceptional stability and high intensification of the Raman signals showing that they have high potential for use as biomedical probes for the detection, monitoring, and diagnosis of medical diseases.

  15. Chitosan: An undisputed bio-fabrication material for tissue engineering and bio-sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Anupriya; Kumar, Ashutosh; Priyadharshini, A; Oggu, Gopi Suresh; Bhatnagar, Ira; Srivastava, Ananya; Chandra, Pranjal

    2018-04-15

    Biopolymers have been serving the mankind in various ways since long. Over the last few years, these polymers have found great demand in various domains which includes bio medicine, tissue engineering, bio sensor fabrications etc. because of their excellent bio compatibility. In this context, chitosan has found global attention due to its environmentally benign nature, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of availability. In last one decade or so, extensive research in active biomaterials, like chitosan has led to the development of novel delivery systems for drugs, genes, and biomolecules; and regenerative medicine. Additionally, chitosan has also witnessed its usage in functionalization of biocompatible materials, nanoparticle (NP) synthesis, and immobilization of various bio-recognition elements (BREs) to form active bio-surfaces with great ease. Keeping these aspects in mind, we have written a comprehensive review which aims to acquaint its readers with the exceptional properties of chitosan and its usage in the domain of biomedicine, tissue engineering, and biosensor fabrication. Herein, we have briefly explained various aspects of direct utilization of chitosan and then presented vivid strategies towards formulation of chitosan based nanocomposites for biomedicine, tissue engineering, and biosensing applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Urea impedimetric biosensing using electrospun nanofibers modified with zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Fernanda L.; Sanfelice, Rafaela C.; Mercante, Luiza A.; Andre, Rafaela S.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Correa, Daniel. S.

    2018-06-01

    Reliable analytical techniques to evaluate dairy products, including milk, are of outmost importance to ensure food safety against contaminants. Among possible substances employed as adulterants in milk, urea raises deep concern due to its harmful effects to consumer's health. In the present study, a biosensing platform was developed to be applied in the electrochemical detection of urea. The sensing platform was fabricated using polymeric electrospun nanofibers of polyamide 6 (PA6) and polypyrrole (PPy) deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) electrodes, which were then modified with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO). This material showed excellent properties for the immobilization of urease enzyme, conferring the FTO/PA6/PPy/ZnO/urease electrode high sensitivity for urea detection within the concentration range between 0.1 and 250 mg dL-1 with a limit of detection of 0.011 mg dL-1. The results achieved evidence the potential of electrospun nanofibers-based electrodes for applications in biosensors aiming at dairy products analysis.

  17. Biosensing based on magnetically induced self-assembly of particles in magnetic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Takamura, Tsukasa; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2012-03-01

    Superparamagnetic beads and nonmagnetic beads of different sizes were assembled to form a "ring-structure" in a magnetorheological (MR) fluid solution by the application of external magnetic fields. For superparamagnetic beads and non-magnetic beads functionalized with probe and target molecules, respectively, the ring-structure was maintained even after removing the external magnetic field due to biomolecular bonding. Several experiments are described, including the formation process of ring-structures with and without molecular interactions, the accelerating effect of external magnetic fields, and the effect of biotin concentration on the structures of the rings. We define the small nonmagnetic particles as "petals" because the whole structure looks like a flower. The number of remnant ring petals was a function of the concentration of target molecules in the concentration range of 0.0768 ng/ml-3.8419 ng/ml which makes this protocol a promising method for biosensing. Not only was the formation process rapid, but the resulting two-dimensional colloidal system also offers a simple method for reducing reagent consumption and waste generation.

  18. Diamond nanoparticles as a way to improve electron transfer in sol–gel L-lactate biosensing platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briones, M.; Casero, E. [Departamento de Química Analítica y Análisis Instrumental, Facultad de Ciencias, c/Francisco Tomás y Valiente, No7, Campus de Excelencia de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vázquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), c/Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz No3, Campus de Excelencia de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pariente, F.; Lorenzo, E. [Departamento de Química Analítica y Análisis Instrumental, Facultad de Ciencias, c/Francisco Tomás y Valiente, No7, Campus de Excelencia de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Petit-Domínguez, M.D., E-mail: mdolores.petit@uam.es [Departamento de Química Analítica y Análisis Instrumental, Facultad de Ciencias, c/Francisco Tomás y Valiente, No7, Campus de Excelencia de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-02-18

    In the present work, we have included for the first time diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) in a sol–gel matrix derived from (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (MPTS) in order to improve electron transfer in a lactate oxidase (LOx) based electrochemical biosensing platform. Firstly, an exhaustive AFM study, including topographical, surface potential (KFM) and capacitance gradient (CG) measurements, of each step involved in the biosensing platform development was performed. The platform is based on gold electrodes (Au) modified with the sol–gel matrix (Au/MPTS) in which diamond nanoparticles (Au/MPTS/DNPs) and lactate oxidase (Au/MPTS/DNPs/LOx) have been included. For the sake of comparison, we have also characterized a gold electrode directly modified with DNPs (Au/DNPs). Secondly, the electrochemical behavior of a redox mediator (hydroxymethyl-ferrocene, HMF) was evaluated at the platforms mentioned above. The response of Au/MPTS/DNPs/LOx towards lactate was obtained. A linear concentration range from 0.053 mM to 1.6 mM, a sensitivity of 2.6 μA mM{sup −1} and a detection limit of 16 μM were obtained. These analytical properties are comparable to other biosensors, presenting also as advantages that DNPs are inexpensive, environment-friendly and easy-handled nanomaterials. Finally, the developed biosensor was applied for lactate determination in wine samples. - Highlights: • We have included for the first time diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) in a sol–gel matrix for developing lactate biosensors. • DNPs facilitate electron-transfer within the sol–gel network in electrochemical biosensors. • Lactate biosensors show good sensitivity, detection limit, reproducibility and stability.

  19. Mobile phone-based biosensing: An emerging "diagnostic and communication" technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-González, Daniel; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-06-15

    In this review we discuss recent developments on the use of mobile phones and similar devices for biosensing applications in which diagnostics and communications are coupled. Owing to the capabilities of mobile phones (their cameras, connectivity, portability, etc.) and to advances in biosensing, the coupling of these two technologies is enabling portable and user-friendly analytical devices. Any user can now perform quick, robust and easy (bio)assays anywhere and at any time. Among the most widely reported of such devices are paper-based platforms. Herein we provide an overview of a broad range of biosensing possibilities, from optical to electrochemical measurements; explore the various reported designs for adapters; and consider future opportunities for this technology in fields such as health diagnostics, safety & security, and environment monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A paper based graphene-nanocauliflower hybrid composite for point of care biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrs, S. L.; Sidhu, R.; Bhargava, M.; Kiernan-Lewis, J.; Schwalb, N.; Rong, Y.; Gomes, C.; Claussen, J.; Vanegas, D. C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene paper has diverse applications in printed circuit board electronics, bioassays, 3D cell culture, and biosensing. Although development of nanometal-graphene hybrid composites is commonplace in the sensing literature, to date there are only a few examples of nanometal-decorated graphene paper for use in biosensing. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the synthesis and application of Pt nano cauliflower-functionalized graphene paper for use in electrochemical biosensing of small molecules (glucose, acetone, methanol) or detection of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7). Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to show that graphene oxide deposited on nanocellulose crystals was partially reduced by both thermal and chemical treatment. Fractal platinum nanostructures were formed on the reduced graphene oxide paper, producing a conductive paper with an extremely high electroactive surface area, confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To show the broad applicability of the material, the platinum surface was functionalized with three different biomaterials: 1) glucose oxidase (via chitosan encapsulation); 2) a DNA aptamer (via covalent linking), or 3) a chemosensory protein (via his linking). We demonstrate the application of this device for point of care biosensing. The detection limit for both glucose (0.08 +/- 0.02 μM) and E. coli O157:H7 (1.3 +/- 0.1 CFU mL-1) were competitive with, or superior to, previously reported devices in the biosensing literature. The response time (6 sec for glucose and 10 min for E. coli) were also similar to silicon biochip and commercial electrode sensors. The results demonstrate that the nanocellulose-graphene-nanoplatinum material is an excellent paper-based platform for development of electrochemical biosensors targeting small molecules or whole cells for use in point of care biosensing.

  1. High-throughput automated system for statistical biosensing employing microcantilevers arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosco, Filippo; Chen, Ching H.; Hwu, En T.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a completely new and fully automated system for parallel microcantilever-based biosensing. Our platform is able to monitor simultaneously the change of resonance frequency (dynamic mode), of deflection (static mode), and of surface roughness of hundreds of cantilevers...... in a very short time over multiple biochemical reactions. We have proven that our system is capable to measure 900 independent microsensors in less than a second. Here, we report statistical biosensing results performed over a haptens-antibody assay, where complete characterization of the biochemical...

  2. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in

  3. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-12-19

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  4. Ferrocene-functionalized graphene electrode for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabti, Amal [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Université de Tunis El–Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie (LR99ES15), Campus universitaire de Tunis El–Manar, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C.; Baptista-Pires, Luis [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Raouafi, Noureddine, E-mail: n.raouafi@fst.rnu.tn [Université de Tunis El–Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie (LR99ES15), Campus universitaire de Tunis El–Manar, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Merkoçi, Arben, E-mail: arben.merkoci@icn2.cat [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-07-05

    A novel ferrocene-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based electrode is proposed. It was fabricated by the drop casting of ferrocene-functionalized graphene onto polyester substrate as the working electrode integrated within screen-printed reference and counter electrodes. The ferrocene-functionalized rGO has been fully characterized using FTIR, XPS, contact angle measurements, SEM and TEM microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The XPS and EDX analysis showed the presence of Fe element related to the introduced ferrocene groups, which is confirmed by a clear CV signal at ca. 0.25 V vs. Ag/AgCl (0.1 KCl). Mediated redox catalysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and bio-functionalization with glucose oxidase for glucose detection were achieved by the bioelectrode providing a proof for potential biosensing applications. - Graphical abstract: An easy-to-prepare standalone graphene electrode was obtained by the drop-casting ferrocene-functionalized rGO on PET polymer. This electrode can be used as an enzymeless electrochemical sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide or as an amperometric enzyme-based biosensor for sensitive glucose detection. - Highlights: • A novel ferrocene-functionalized reduced graphene oxide based electrode. • Ease of preparation by drop-casting of Fc-modified graphene and chitosan mixture. • Well-defined and exploitable ferrocene CV signal for sensing purposes. • Sensitive enzymeless detection of hydrogen peroxide at low potentials. • Enzymatic Sensitive detection of glucose on GOx-modified graphene electrode.

  5. Sol-gel encapsulation for controlled drug release and biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan

    The main focus of this dissertation is to investigate the use of sol-gel encapsulation of biomolecules for controlled drug release and biosensing. Controlled drug release has advantages over conventional therapies in that it maintains a constant, therapeutic drug level in the body for prolonged periods of time. The anti-hypertensive drug Captopril was encapsulated in sol-gel materials of various forms, such as silica xerogels and nanoparticles. The primary objective was to show that sol-gel silica materials are promising drug carriers for controlled release by releasing Captopril at a release rate that is within a therapeutic range. We were able to demonstrate desired release for over a week from Captopril-doped silica xerogels and overall release from Captopril-doped silica nanoparticles. As an aside, the antibiotic Vancomycin was also encapsulated in these porous silica nanoparticles and desired release was obtained for several days in-vitro. The second part of the dissertation focuses on immobilizing antibodies and proteins in sol-gel to detect various analytes, such as hormones and amino acids. Sol-gel competitive immunoassays on antibody-doped silica xerogels were used for hormone detection. Calibration for insulin and C-peptide in standard solutions was obtained in the nM range. In addition, NASA-Ames is also interested in developing a reagentless biosensor using bacterial periplasmic binding proteins (bPBPs) to detect specific biomarkers, such as amino acids and phosphate. These bPBPs were doubly labeled with two different fluorophores and encapsulated in silica xerogels. Ligand-binding experiments were performed on the bPBPs in solution and in sol-gel. Ligand-binding was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the two fluorophores on the bPBP. Titration data show that one bPBP has retained its ligand-binding properties in sol-gel.

  6. Ferrocene-functionalized graphene electrode for biosensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabti, Amal; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C.; Baptista-Pires, Luis; Raouafi, Noureddine; Merkoçi, Arben

    2016-01-01

    A novel ferrocene-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based electrode is proposed. It was fabricated by the drop casting of ferrocene-functionalized graphene onto polyester substrate as the working electrode integrated within screen-printed reference and counter electrodes. The ferrocene-functionalized rGO has been fully characterized using FTIR, XPS, contact angle measurements, SEM and TEM microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The XPS and EDX analysis showed the presence of Fe element related to the introduced ferrocene groups, which is confirmed by a clear CV signal at ca. 0.25 V vs. Ag/AgCl (0.1 KCl). Mediated redox catalysis of H_2O_2 and bio-functionalization with glucose oxidase for glucose detection were achieved by the bioelectrode providing a proof for potential biosensing applications. - Graphical abstract: An easy-to-prepare standalone graphene electrode was obtained by the drop-casting ferrocene-functionalized rGO on PET polymer. This electrode can be used as an enzymeless electrochemical sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide or as an amperometric enzyme-based biosensor for sensitive glucose detection. - Highlights: • A novel ferrocene-functionalized reduced graphene oxide based electrode. • Ease of preparation by drop-casting of Fc-modified graphene and chitosan mixture. • Well-defined and exploitable ferrocene CV signal for sensing purposes. • Sensitive enzymeless detection of hydrogen peroxide at low potentials. • Enzymatic Sensitive detection of glucose on GOx-modified graphene electrode.

  7. Plasma-treated polystyrene film that enhances binding efficiency for sensitive and label-free protein biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Bihong [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Shaopeng [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Lusheng [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Tyagi, Deependra [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquan Rd., 19(A), Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Jinsong, E-mail: jizhu88@gmail.com [National Center for NanoScience and Technology, No. 11 Beiyitiao, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • A simple and robust plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene film surface was developed for protein biosensing. • The surface was optimized by evaluating up to 120 types of fabrication parameters with high-throughput analytical methods. • The optimized surface showed a 620% improvement of the protein detection signal and 210% protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer surface. - Abstract: A plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene (PS) film surface was explored as a simple, robust, and low-cost surface chemistry solution for protein biosensing applications. This surface could dramatically improve the binding efficiency of the protein–protein interactions, which is defined as the binding signal per immobilized ligand. The PS-modified protein biosensor was readily fabricated by spin coating and plasma treatment. Various parameters for fabrication, including the concentration of the PS solution, rate of spin coating, and duration of plasma treatment, were systematically optimized based on the improvement of fluorescence signal yielded by the microfluidic network-aided fluorescence immunoassay. The performance of the label-free protein detection on the optimized surfaces was further evaluated by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). PS surfaces with optimal fabrication parameters exhibited up to an 620% enhancement of the protein binding response and approximately 210% of the protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA). The relationship between the fabrication parameters used and changes to the surface chemistry and the morphological properties were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was revealed that the morphological changes observed in the plasma-treated PS film were the dominant factor for the

  8. Influence of surface defects in ZnO thin films on its biosensing response characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highly c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering under varying processing pressure (20-50 mT) in a reactive gas mixture of argon and oxygen were studied for biosensing application. The as-deposited ZnO thin films were in a state of compressive stress having defects related to interstitial Zn and antisite oxygen. Glucose oxidase has been chosen as the model enzyme in the present study and was immobilized on the surface of ZnO thin films deposited on indium tin oxide coated Corning Glass substrate. The studies reveal a correlation between the biosensing characteristic and the presence of defects in the ZnO films. The ZnO films deposited under high pressure (50 mT) are found to be more sensitive for biosensing application due to availability of more surface area for effective immobilization of biomolecules and exhibits a suitable microenvironment with good electron transfer characteristic. The obtained results highlight the importance of desired microstate besides availability of suitable native defects in the ZnO thin film for exhibiting enhanced biosensing response.

  9. Bioengineering of Solution Processed Graphene for the Development of Ultrasensitive Flexible Biosensing Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halder, Arnab; Hemanth, Suhith; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2016-01-01

    Development of low-cost, flexible and ultrasensitive biosensing platforms for rapid detection of different human metabolites is of great importance for the healthcare, pharmaceuticals and biomedical diagnostics sectors. Synthesis of novel functionalized nanomaterials with high surface area is a key...

  10. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally vali...

  11. Protein biomarker enrichment by biomarker antibody complex elution for immunoassay biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabatté, G.S.; Feitsma, H.; Evers, T.H.; Prins, M.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    It is very challenging to perform sample enrichment for protein biomarkers because proteins can easily change conformation and denature. In this paper we demonstrate protein enrichment suited for high-sensitivity integrated immuno-biosensing. The method enhances the concentration of the biomarkers

  12. Influence of surface defects in ZnO thin films on its biosensing response characteristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Highly c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering under varying processing pressure (20-50 mT) in a reactive gas mixture of argon and oxygen were studied for biosensing application. The as-deposited ZnO thin films were in a state of compressive stress having defects related to interstitial Zn and antisite oxygen. Glucose oxidase has been chosen as the model enzyme in the present study and was immobilized on the surface of ZnO thin films deposited on indium tin oxide coated Corning Glass substrate. The studies reveal a correlation between the biosensing characteristic and the presence of defects in the ZnO films. The ZnO films deposited under high pressure (50 mT) are found to be more sensitive for biosensing application due to availability of more surface area for effective immobilization of biomolecules and exhibits a suitable microenvironment with good electron transfer characteristic. The obtained results highlight the importance of desired microstate besides availability of suitable native defects in the ZnO thin film for exhibiting enhanced biosensing response.

  13. Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide Microgel-Based Optical Devices for Sensing and Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molla R. Islam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Responsive polymer-based materials have found numerous applications due to their ease of synthesis and the variety of stimuli that they can be made responsive to. In this review, we highlight the group’s efforts utilizing thermoresponsive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide (pNIPAm microgel-based optical devices for various sensing and biosensing applications.

  14. IC Compatible Wafer Level Fabrication of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moh, T.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    In biosensing, nano-devices such as Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors (SiNW FETs) are promising components/sensors for ultra-high sensitive detection, especially when samples are low in concentration or a limited volume is available. Current processing of SiNW FETs often relies on expensive

  15. Considerations on Circuit Design and Data Acquisition of a Portable Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Chang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a circuit for an inexpensive portable biosensing system based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. This portable biosensing system designed for field use is characterized by a special structure which consists of a microfluidic cell incorporating a right angle prism functionalized with a biomolecular identification membrane, a laser line generator and a data acquisition circuit board. The data structure, data memory capacity and a line charge-coupled device (CCD array with a driving circuit for collecting the photoelectric signals are intensively focused on and the high performance analog-to-digital (A/D converter is comprehensively evaluated. The interface circuit and the photoelectric signal amplifier circuit are first studied to obtain the weak signals from the line CCD array in this experiment. Quantitative measurements for validating the sensitivity of the biosensing system were implemented using ethanol solutions of various concentrations indicated by volume fractions of 5%, 8%, 15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%, respectively, without a biomembrane immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor. The experiments demonstrated that it is possible to detect a change in the refractive index of an ethanol solution with a sensitivity of 4.99838 × 105 ΔRU/RI in terms of the changes in delta response unit with refractive index using this SPR biosensing system, whereby the theoretical limit of detection of 3.3537 × 10−5 refractive index unit (RIU and a high linearity at the correlation coefficient of 0.98065. The results obtained from a series of tests confirmed the practicality of this cost-effective portable SPR biosensing system.

  16. OLED Hybrid Integrated Polymer Microfluidic Biosensing for Point of Care Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Acharya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a microfluidic platform with external hybrid integration of an organic light emitting diode (OLED as an excitation source. This device can be used as a simple and cost effective biosensing element. The device is capable of rapid in-situ detection of biological elements such as sensing of interaction of antigen with fluorescent tagged antibody conjugates. These portable microfluidic systems have great potential for use an OLED in a single chip with very high accuracy and sensitivity for various point-of-care (POC diagnosis and lab on a chip (LOC applications, as the miniaturization of the biosensor is essential for handling smaller sample volumes in order to achieve high throughput. The biosensing element was successfully tested to detect anti-sheep IgG conjugates tagged to Alexafluor using a fluorescence based immunoassay method.

  17. Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2016-03-15

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices-conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones-underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones' ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones' resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Combined Cell Culture-Biosensing Platform Using Vertically Aligned Patterned Peptide Nanofibers for Cellular Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskin, Mehmet B.; Sasso, Luigi; Dimaki, Maria

    2013-01-01

    it possible to avoid a loss of sensitivity because of the diffusion of the sample. The obtained results showed that the peptide nanofibers were suitable as a cell culturing substrate for PC12 cells. The peptide nanofibers could be employed as an alternative biological material to increase the adherence......This Article presents the development of a combined cell culture–biosensing platform using vertically aligned self-assembled peptide nanofibers. Peptide nanofibers were patterned on a microchip containing gold microelectrodes to provide the cells with a 3D environment enabling them to grow...... and proliferate. Gold microelectrodes were functionalized with conductive polymers for the electrochemical detection of dopamine released from PC12 cells. The combined cell culture–biosensing platform assured a close proximity of the release site, the cells and the active surface of the sensor, thereby rendering...

  19. Electrochemical biosensing of galactose based on carbon materials: graphene versus multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkıran, Berna; Erden, Pınar Esra; Kılıç, Esma

    2016-06-01

    In this study, two enzyme electrodes based on graphene (GR), Co3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan (CS) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), Co3O4 nanoparticles, and CS, were fabricated as novel biosensing platforms for galactose determination, and their performances were compared. Galactose oxidase (GaOx) was immobilized onto the electrode surfaces by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Optimum working conditions of the biosensors were investigated and the analytical performance of the biosensors was compared with respect to detection limit, linearity, repeatability, and stability. The MWCNTs-based galactose biosensor provided about 1.6-fold higher sensitivity than its graphene counterpart. Moreover, the linear working range and detection limit of the MWCNTs-based galactose biosensor was superior to the graphene-modified biosensor. The successful application of the purposed biosensors for galactose biosensing in human serum samples was also investigated.

  20. Suitable combination of noble/ferromagnetic metal multilayers for enhanced magneto-plasmonic biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regatos, David; Sepúlveda, Borja; Fariña, David; Carrascosa, Laura G; Lechuga, Laura M

    2011-04-25

    We present a theoretical and experimental study on the biosensing sensitivity of Au/Co/Au multilayers as transducers of the magneto-optic surface-plasmon-resonance (MOSPR) sensor. We demonstrate that the sensing response of these magneto-plasmonic (MP) transducers is a trade-off between the optical absorption and the magneto-optical activity, observing that the MP multilayer with larger MO effect does not provide the best sensing response. We show that it is possible to design highly-sensitive MP transducers able to largely surpass the limit of detection of the conventional surface-plasmon-resonance (SPR) sensor. This was proved comparing the biosensing performance of both sensors for the label-free detection of short DNA chains hybridization. For this purpose, we used and tested a novel label-free biofunctionalization protocol based on polyelectrolytes, which increases the resistance of MP transducers in aqueous environments.

  1. Understanding the role of thiol and disulfide self-assembled DNA receptor monolayers for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Laura G; Martínez, Lidia; Huttel, Yves; Román, Elisa; Lechuga, Laura M

    2010-09-01

    A detailed study of the immobilization of three differently sulfur-modified DNA receptors for biosensing applications is presented. The three receptors are DNA-(CH)n-SH-, DNA-(CH)n-SS-(CH)n-DNA, and DNA-(CH)n-SS-DMTO. Nanomechanical and surface plasmon resonance biosensors and fluorescence and radiolabelling techniques were used for the experimental evaluation. The results highlight the critical role of sulfur linker type in DNA self-assembly, affecting the kinetic adsorption and spatial distribution of DNA chains within the monolayer and the extent of chemisorption and physisorption. A spacer (mercaptohexanol, MCH) is used to evaluate the relative efficiencies of chemisorption of the three receptors by analysing the extent to which MCH can remove physisorbed molecules from each type of monolayer. It is demonstrated that -SH derivatization is the most suitable for biosensing purposes as it results in densely packed monolayers with the lowest ratio of physisorbed probes.

  2. An Optical Biosensing Strategy Based on Selective Light Absorption and Wavelength Filtering from Chromogenic Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jin Chun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the time and space constraints in disease diagnosis via the biosensing approach, we developed a new signal-transducing strategy that can be applied to colorimetric optical biosensors. Our study is focused on implementation of a signal transduction technology that can directly translate the color intensity signals—that require complicated optical equipment for the analysis—into signals that can be easily counted with the naked eye. Based on the selective light absorption and wavelength-filtering principles, our new optical signaling transducer was built from a common computer monitor and a smartphone. In this signal transducer, the liquid crystal display (LCD panel of the computer monitor served as a light source and a signal guide generator. In addition, the smartphone was used as an optical receiver and signal display. As a biorecognition layer, a transparent and soft material-based biosensing channel was employed generating blue output via a target-specific bienzymatic chromogenic reaction. Using graphics editor software, we displayed the optical signal guide patterns containing multiple polygons (a triangle, circle, pentagon, heptagon, and 3/4 circle, each associated with a specified color ratio on the LCD monitor panel. During observation of signal guide patterns displayed on the LCD monitor panel using a smartphone camera via the target analyte-loaded biosensing channel as a color-filtering layer, the number of observed polygons changed according to the concentration of the target analyte via the spectral correlation between absorbance changes in a solution of the biosensing channel and color emission properties of each type of polygon. By simple counting of the changes in the number of polygons registered by the smartphone camera, we could efficiently measure the concentration of a target analyte in a sample without complicated and expensive optical instruments. In a demonstration test on glucose as a model analyte, we

  3. Highly sensitive biosensing based on interference from light scattering in capillary tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.S.; Larsen, N.B.; Latham, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Human IgG interactions with surface bound protein A are monitored label-free using microinterferometric backscatter detection. An electromagnetic wave-based model is developed and used to quantitatively describe the change in interference pattern as a consequence of the molecular interaction...... to other specific interacting layers, and simplicity of the optical sensor make this technique a powerful tool in biosensing. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  4. An Optical Biosensing Strategy Based on Selective Light Absorption and Wavelength Filtering from Chromogenic Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hyeong Jin; Han, Yong Duk; Park, Yoo Min; Kim, Ka Ram; Lee, Seok Jae; Yoon, Hyun C

    2018-03-06

    To overcome the time and space constraints in disease diagnosis via the biosensing approach, we developed a new signal-transducing strategy that can be applied to colorimetric optical biosensors. Our study is focused on implementation of a signal transduction technology that can directly translate the color intensity signals-that require complicated optical equipment for the analysis-into signals that can be easily counted with the naked eye. Based on the selective light absorption and wavelength-filtering principles, our new optical signaling transducer was built from a common computer monitor and a smartphone. In this signal transducer, the liquid crystal display (LCD) panel of the computer monitor served as a light source and a signal guide generator. In addition, the smartphone was used as an optical receiver and signal display. As a biorecognition layer, a transparent and soft material-based biosensing channel was employed generating blue output via a target-specific bienzymatic chromogenic reaction. Using graphics editor software, we displayed the optical signal guide patterns containing multiple polygons (a triangle, circle, pentagon, heptagon, and 3/4 circle, each associated with a specified color ratio) on the LCD monitor panel. During observation of signal guide patterns displayed on the LCD monitor panel using a smartphone camera via the target analyte-loaded biosensing channel as a color-filtering layer, the number of observed polygons changed according to the concentration of the target analyte via the spectral correlation between absorbance changes in a solution of the biosensing channel and color emission properties of each type of polygon. By simple counting of the changes in the number of polygons registered by the smartphone camera, we could efficiently measure the concentration of a target analyte in a sample without complicated and expensive optical instruments. In a demonstration test on glucose as a model analyte, we could easily measure the

  5. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip for biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jönsson, Alexander; Senkbeil, Silja

    2016-01-01

    The marriage of highly sensitive biosensor designs with the versatility in sample handling and fluidic manipulation offered by lab-on-a-chip systems promises to yield powerful tools for analytical and, in particular, diagnostic applications. The field where these two technologies meet is rapidly...... improvements to existing methods. Recent examples, showing a staggering variety of lab-on-a-chip systems for biosensing applications, are presented, tabularized for overview, and briefly discussed....

  6. Integrated Lateral Flow Device for Flow Control with Blood Separation and Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Betancur

    2017-12-01

    with the LFD. The developed LFD can be used as a flexible and versatile platform, and has the potential for detecting circulating biomarkers from whole blood. Sandwich-immunoassays can be performed directly on the LFD by patterning receptors for analytes on a desired substrate, and detections can be performed using a variety of sensing methods including nanoelectronic, colorimetric, or fluorescence sensors. The described bio-sensing technology presents an alternative for POC testing using small samples of human whole blood. It could benefit regions with limited access to healthcare, where delays in diagnosis can lead to quick deterioration of the quality of life and increase the morbidity and mortality.

  7. Electroactive and biocompatible functionalization of graphene for the development of biosensing platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halder, Arnab; Zhang, Minwei; Chi, Qijin

    2017-01-01

    the polymer matrix. The as-prepared functional composite is electrochemically active and enables to accommodate enzymes stably. For proof-of-concept studies, two crucial redox enzymes for biosensors (i.e. cholesterol oxidase and glucose oxidase) are targeted. The enzyme integrated and RGO supported biosensing...... hybrid systems show high stability, excellent selectivity, good reproducibility and fast sensing response. As measured, the detection limit of the biosensors for glucose and cholesterol is 5 µM and 0.5 µM (S/N=3), respectively. The linear response range of the biosensor is from 0.1 to 15.5 mM for glucose...... and from 2.5 to 25 µM for cholesterol. Furthermore, this biosensing platform shows good anti-interference ability and reasonable stability. The nanohybrid biosensing materials can be combined with screen-printed electrodes, which are successfully used for measuring the glucose and cholesterol level of real...

  8. Zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide composite thin film matrix for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Shibu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Arya, Sunil K. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, S.P. [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00680 (United States); Sreenivas, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Malhotra, B.D. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: vgupta@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2009-10-27

    Thin film of zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide (ZnO-KFCN) composite has been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated corning glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The composite thin film electrode has been exploited for amperometric biosensing in a mediator-free electrolyte. The composite matrix has the advantages of high iso-electric point of ZnO along with enhanced electron communication due to the presence of a redox species in the matrix itself. Glucose oxidase (GOx) has been chosen as the model enzyme for studying the application of the developed matrix to biosensing. The sensing response of the bio-electrode, GOx/ZnO-KFCN/ITO/glass, towards glucose was studied using cylic voltammetry (CV) and photometric assay. The bio-electrode exhibits good linearity from 2.78 mM to 11.11 mM glucose concentration. The low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (1.69 mM) indicates an enhanced affinity of the immobilized enzyme towards its substrate. A quassireversible system is obtained with the composite matrix. The results confirm promising application of the ZnO-KFCN composite matrix for amperometric biosensing applications in a mediator-less electrolyte that could lead to the realization of an integrated lab-on-chip device.

  9. Zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide composite thin film matrix for biosensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Shibu; Arya, Sunil K.; Singh, S.P.; Sreenivas, K.; Malhotra, B.D.; Gupta, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    Thin film of zinc oxide-potassium ferricyanide (ZnO-KFCN) composite has been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated corning glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The composite thin film electrode has been exploited for amperometric biosensing in a mediator-free electrolyte. The composite matrix has the advantages of high iso-electric point of ZnO along with enhanced electron communication due to the presence of a redox species in the matrix itself. Glucose oxidase (GOx) has been chosen as the model enzyme for studying the application of the developed matrix to biosensing. The sensing response of the bio-electrode, GOx/ZnO-KFCN/ITO/glass, towards glucose was studied using cylic voltammetry (CV) and photometric assay. The bio-electrode exhibits good linearity from 2.78 mM to 11.11 mM glucose concentration. The low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (1.69 mM) indicates an enhanced affinity of the immobilized enzyme towards its substrate. A quassireversible system is obtained with the composite matrix. The results confirm promising application of the ZnO-KFCN composite matrix for amperometric biosensing applications in a mediator-less electrolyte that could lead to the realization of an integrated lab-on-chip device.

  10. A Novel ZnO-Methylene Blue Nanocomposite Matrix for Biosensing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Saha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid matrix of zinc oxide-methylene blue (ZnO-MB has been successfully developed for biosensing application. The introduction of methylene blue into the ZnO thin film leads to reduction in the charge transfer resistance and suggests an increase in the electron transfer capacity of the composite. Glucose oxidase (GOx was chosen as the model enzyme and effectively immobilized on the surface of hybrid ZnO-MB nanocomposite matrix. Electrochemical measurements were employed to study biosensing response of the GOx/ZnO-MB/ITO bioelectrode as a function of glucose concentration. The low oxidation potential (−0.23 V of the hybrid bioelectrode, in a mediatorless electrolyte, makes it resistant against interference from other bio-molecules. The low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (2.65 mM indicates that immobilized GOx retains its enzymatic activity significantly on the surface of nanocomposite hybrid matrix that results in an enhanced affinity towards its substrate (glucose. The ZnO-MB nanocomposite hybrid matrix, exhibiting enhanced sensing response (0.2 μAmM−1cm−2 with long shelf-life (>10 weeks, has potential for the realization of an integrated biosensing device.

  11. Oxidative polymerization of 5-hydroxytryptamine to physically and chemically immobilize glucose oxidase for electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting; Liu, Zaichun; Li, Yunlong; Li, Yanqiu; Chao, Long; Chen, Chao; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Wu, Yuping

    2018-07-12

    Poly(5-hydroxytryptamine) (poly(5-HT)) is exploited as a new and efficient enzyme-immobilization matrix for amperometric and biofuel cell (BFC)-based biosensing. A GOx-poly(5-HT)-Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) bionanocomposite is prepared by Na 2 PdCl 4 -initiated oxidized polymerization of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in a neutral aqueous solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx), and this bionanocomposite and then chitosan (CS) are cast-coated on a Pd-plated Au electrode to yield a CS/GOx-poly(5-HT)-PdNPs/Pd plate /Au enzyme electrode. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance are employed for material characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, the amperometric response of the enzyme electrode is linear with glucose concentration from 2.0 μM to 6.66 mM with a sensitivity of 110 μA mM -1  cm -2 , a limit of detection of 0.2 μM, and excellent operation/storage stability in the first-generation biosensing mode. The sensitivity is larger than those of some conventional electrodes under identical conditions. The enzyme electrode also works well in the second-generation biosensing mode. By using the enzyme electrode as the anode for glucose oxidation and a Pd plate /Au electrode as the cathode for KMnO 4 reduction, a monopolar BFC is constructed as a self-powered biosensor, the current response of which is linear with glucose concentration from 50 μM to 34.5 mM. Experiments also show that poly(5-HT) is a physical and chemical dual-immobilization matrix of enzyme, since the abundant amino groups in poly(5-HT) can be used for chemical bonding of GOx. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural studies of the mechanism for biosensing antibiotics in a fluorescein-labeled β-lactamase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Kwok-Yin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-lactamase conjugated with environment-sensitive fluorescein molecule to residue 166 on the Ω-loop near its catalytic site is a highly effective biosensor for β-lactam antibiotics. Yet the molecular mechanism of such fluorescence-based biosensing is not well understood. Results Here we report the crystal structure of a Class A β-lactamase PenP from Bacillus licheniformis 749/C with fluorescein conjugated at residue 166 after E166C mutation, both in apo form (PenP-E166Cf and in covalent complex form with cefotaxime (PenP-E166Cf-cefotaxime, to illustrate its biosensing mechanism. In the apo structure the fluorescein molecule partially occupies the antibiotic binding site and is highly dynamic. In the PenP-E166Cf-cefatoxime complex structure the binding and subsequent acylation of cefotaxime to PenP displaces fluorescein from its original location to avoid steric clash. Such displacement causes the well-folded Ω-loop to become fully flexible and the conjugated fluorescein molecule to relocate to a more solvent exposed environment, hence enhancing its fluorescence emission. Furthermore, the fully flexible Ω-loop enables the narrow-spectrum PenP enzyme to bind cefotaxime in a mode that resembles the extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions Our structural studies indicate the biosensing mechanism of a fluorescein-labelled β-lactamase. Such findings confirm our previous proposal based on molecular modelling and provide useful information for the rational design of β-lactamase-based biosensor to detect the wide spectrum of β-lactam antibiotics. The observation of increased Ω-loop flexibility upon conjugation of fluorophore may have the potential to serve as a screening tool for novel β-lactamase inhibitors that target the Ω-loop and not the active site.

  13. Emerging trends in biosensing using stripping voltammetric detection of metal-containing nanolabels – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios, E-mail: aeconomo@chem.uoa.gr

    2017-04-08

    Over the last years, nanomaterials have found many applications in the development of electrochemical biosensors. Among other functions, metal nanoparticles (NPs) and quantum dots (QDs) (semiconducting nanocrystals composed of metal salts) are increasingly being used as voltammetric labels in affinity biosensing. Labeling is based on the attachment of the label(s) on the target biomolecules or on a biorecognition reporting probe. After an appropriate specific affinity interaction between the target and the reporting probe, the metallic nanolabels are converted to the respective cations which are quantified by a voltammetric technique. The very use of metal-containing nanoprobes as labels provides a first amplification step since each nanoprobe can release a very significant number of detectable cations. When anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) (in which a preconcentration step precedes the actual voltammetric scan) is further employed as the detection format, ultra-sensitive bioassays can be developed. The present paper reviews the emerging trends in affinity biosensing using ASV detection of metal-containing nanolabels. It provides a critical discussion of recent developments in ASV transduction and electrodes, novel strategies for signal enhancement, approaches for multiplexed detection as well as fluidics, paper-based and lab-on-a-chip devices. - Highlights: • This paper reviews the use of ASV for affinity biosensing with metal-containing nanolabels. • Both metal nanoparticles and quantum dots applications are considered. • Transducers and new electrode materials are covered. • Signal enhancement and multiplexing strategies are discussed. • Sensor arrays, paper-based, fluidic and lab-on-chip applications are described.

  14. Advanced materials for improving biosensing performances of propagating and localized plasmonic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, M. G.; Colombelli, A.; Convertino, A.; Rella, S.; De Lorenzis, E.; Taurino, A.; Malitesta, C.; Rella, R.

    2015-05-01

    Among all transduction methodologies reported in the field of solid state optical chemical sensors, the attention has been focused onto the optical sensing characterization by using propagating and localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques. The research in this field is always oriented in the improvement of the sensing features in terms of sensitivity and limits of detection. To this purpose different strategies have been proposed to realize advanced materials for high sensitive plasmonic devices. In this work nanostructured silica nanowires decorated by gold nanoparticles and active magneto-plasmonic transductors are considered as new biosensing transductors useful to increase the performance of sensitive devices.

  15. Optical and Electric Multifunctional CMOS Image Sensors for On-Chip Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Sasagawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the concept, design, performance, and a functional demonstration of multifunctional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS image sensors dedicated to on-chip biosensing applications are described. We developed a sensor architecture that allows flexible configuration of a sensing pixel array consisting of optical and electric sensing pixels, and designed multifunctional CMOS image sensors that can sense light intensity and electric potential or apply a voltage to an on-chip measurement target. We describe the sensors’ architecture on the basis of the type of electric measurement or imaging functionalities.

  16. Novel graphene-oxide-coated SPR interfaces for biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V. S.; Stebunov, Yu V.; Yakubovsky, D. I.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon allotropes-based nanomaterials possess unique physical and chemical properties including high surface area, the possibility of pi-stacking interaction with a wide range of biological objects, rich availability of oxygen-containing functional groups in graphene-oxide (GO), and excellent...

  17. Polarization-induced local pore-wall functionalization for biosensing: from micropore to nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Pham, Pascale; Haguet, Vincent; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Leroy, Loïc; Roget, André; Descamps, Emeline; Bouchet, Aurélie; Buhot, Arnaud; Mailley, Pascal; Livache, Thierry

    2012-04-03

    The use of biological-probe-modified solid-state pores in biosensing is currently hindered by difficulties in pore-wall functionalization. The surface to be functionalized is small and difficult to target and is usually chemically similar to the bulk membrane. Herein, we demonstrate the contactless electrofunctionalization (CLEF) approach and its mechanism. This technique enables the one-step local functionalization of the single pore wall fabricated in a silica-covered silicon membrane. CLEF is induced by polarization of the pore membrane in an electric field and requires a sandwich-like composition and a conducting or semiconducting core for the pore membrane. The defects in the silica layer of the micropore wall enable the creation of an electric pathway through the silica layer, which allows electrochemical reactions to take place locally on the pore wall. The pore diameter is not a limiting factor for local wall modification using CLEF. Nanopores with a diameter of 200 nm fabricated in a silicon membrane and covered with native silica layer have been successfully functionalized with this method, and localized pore-wall modification was obtained. Furthermore, through proof-of-concept experiments using ODN-modified nanopores, we show that functionalized nanopores are suitable for translocation-based biosensing.

  18. Preparation, Modification, Characterization, and Biosensing Application of Nanoporous Gold Using Electrochemical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Jay K; Neupane, Dharmendra; Nepal, Bishal; Mikhaylov, Vasilii; Demchenko, Alexei V; Stine, Keith J

    2018-03-16

    Nanoporous gold (np-Au), because of its high surface area-to-volume ratio, excellent conductivity, chemical inertness, physical stability, biocompatibility, easily tunable pores, and plasmonic properties, has attracted much interested in the field of nanotechnology. It has promising applications in the fields of catalysis, bio/chemical sensing, drug delivery, biomolecules separation and purification, fuel cell development, surface-chemistry-driven actuation, and supercapacitor design. Many chemical and electrochemical procedures are known for the preparation of np-Au. Recently, researchers are focusing on easier and controlled ways to tune the pores and ligaments size of np-Au for its use in different applications. Electrochemical methods have good control over fine-tuning pore and ligament sizes. The np-Au electrodes that are prepared using electrochemical techniques are robust and are easier to handle for their use in electrochemical biosensing. Here, we review different electrochemical strategies for the preparation, post-modification, and characterization of np-Au along with the synergistic use of both electrochemistry and np-Au for applications in biosensing.

  19. Preparation, Modification, Characterization, and Biosensing Application of Nanoporous Gold Using Electrochemical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay K. Bhattarai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous gold (np-Au, because of its high surface area-to-volume ratio, excellent conductivity, chemical inertness, physical stability, biocompatibility, easily tunable pores, and plasmonic properties, has attracted much interested in the field of nanotechnology. It has promising applications in the fields of catalysis, bio/chemical sensing, drug delivery, biomolecules separation and purification, fuel cell development, surface-chemistry-driven actuation, and supercapacitor design. Many chemical and electrochemical procedures are known for the preparation of np-Au. Recently, researchers are focusing on easier and controlled ways to tune the pores and ligaments size of np-Au for its use in different applications. Electrochemical methods have good control over fine-tuning pore and ligament sizes. The np-Au electrodes that are prepared using electrochemical techniques are robust and are easier to handle for their use in electrochemical biosensing. Here, we review different electrochemical strategies for the preparation, post-modification, and characterization of np-Au along with the synergistic use of both electrochemistry and np-Au for applications in biosensing.

  20. Biosensing utilizing the motion of magnetic microparticles in a microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2010-10-23

    The study for the design of a compact and inexpensive biosensing device, which can be operated either by primary care personnel or by patients as opposed to skilled operators, is presented. The main parts of the proposed device are a microfluidic channel, permanent magnets and functionalized magnetic microparticles. The innovative aspect of the proposed biosensing method is that it utilizes the volumetric increase of magnetic microparticles when analyte binds to their surface. Their velocity decreases drastically when they are accelerated by an externally applied magnetic force within a microfluidic channel. This effect is utilized to detect the presence of analyte e.g. microbes. Analytical calculations showed that a decrease in velocity of approximately 23% can be achieved due to the volumetric change of a magnetic microparticle of View the MathML source1μm diameter when HIV virions of approximately View the MathML source0,135μm are bound to its surface and by keeping its magnetic properties the same. Preliminary experiments were carried out utilizing superparamagnetic microparticles coated with streptavidin and polystyrene microparticles coated with biotin.

  1. Investigation of molybdenum-crosslinker interfaces for affinity based electrochemical biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Shanmugam, Nandhinee Radha; Tanak, Ambalika Sanjeev; Jagannath, Badrinath; Prasad, Shalini

    2018-04-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated for implementation as an electrode material for affinity based biosensing towards devloping flexibe electronic biosensors. Treatment of the native oxide of molybdenum was investigated through two surface treatment strategies namely thiol and carbodiimide crosslinking methods. The binding interaction between cross-linker molecules and Mo electrode surface has been characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and optical microscopy. The efficacy of treatment of Mo with its native oxide using carbodiimide cross linking methodology was established. The carbodiimide cross-linking chemistry was found to possess better surface coverage and binding affinity with Molybdenum electrode surface when compared to thiol cross-linking chemistry.Electrochemical characterization of Mo electrode using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Cyclic Voltametry (CV) techniques was performed to evaluate the effect of ionic properties of solution buffer on the Mo electrode's performance. Affinity based biosensing of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) has been demonstrated on a flexible nanoporous polymeric substrate with detection threshold of 100 pg/ml in synthetic urine buffer medium. The biosensor has been evaluated to be developed as a dipstick based point of care device for detection of biomarkers in urine.

  2. Graphene Nanosheets/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Nanotubes Composite Materials for Electrochemical Biosensing Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tzu-Yen; Kung, Chung-Wei; Wang, Jen-Yuan; Lee, Min-Han; Chen, Lin-Chi; Chu, Chih-Wei; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel composite materials contain 2D rGO nanosheets and 1D PEDOT nanotubes. • 3D nanocomposite film effectively improved the sensitivity for analyte detection. • The rGO/PEDOT NTs film shows good catalytic activities toward hydrazine and H 2 O 2 . • The rGO/PEDOT NTs film also exhibits high selectivity from the interference test. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: In this study, we developed the novel composite materials containing reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes (PEDOT NTs) for electrochemical biosensing applications. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy suggested that the rGO nanosheets cover the substrate uniformly, and the PEDOT NTs act as a conducting bridge to connect the rGO sheets. By combining the two materials, it's expected to enhance the conductivity of the film and improve the surface coverage. We applied the rGO/PEDOT NTs composite for electrochemical detection of hydrazine and hydrogen peroxide; noticeable improvements in electrochemical activity and reactivity were observed compared to those of the pristine rGO and PEDOT NTs electrodes. This may be attributed to the better surface coverage of the rGO/PEDOT NTs modified electrode with superior conductivity. Furthermore, interference tests indicate that the rGO/PEDOT NTs composite film exhibits high selectivity toward the analyte. The rGO/PEDOT NTs composite thus provides a potential platform for biosensing applications

  3. FT-IR microspectroscopy characterization of supports for enzyme immobilization in biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portaccio, M.; Della Ventura, B.; Gabrovska, K.; Marinov, I.; Godjevargova, T.; Mita, D. G.; Lepore, M.

    2010-04-01

    The investigation of materials suitable for enzyme immobilization in biosensing applications has a widespread interest. There are many studies on physico-chemical properties of these materials at macroscopic level but few studies have been devoted to examine and correlate these properties at microscopic level. FT-IR spectroscopy with Micro-Attenuated Total Reflection (Micro-ATR) approach can be extremely useful for understanding a variety of aspects of materials which can be used for optimising immobilization procedures. Moreover, this experimental approach is particularly simple to use (no sample preparation is required) and minimally invasive. Using a Perkin Elmer Spectrum One FT-IR spectrometer equipped with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector and a micro-ATR element we investigated different materials used for immobilization procedures with various enzymes widely used for biosensing in environmental and clinical applications. In particular, composite membranes constituted by a chemically modified poly-acrylonitrile (PAN) membrane plus layers of tethered chitosan of different molecular weight have been examined. Also silica gel matrices without and with glucose oxidase have been investigated. Spectra have been analysed and the contribution of principal functional groups has been evidenced.

  4. Development of bacterial display peptides for use in biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Kogot, Joshua M.; Sellers, Michael S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Pennington, Joseph M.; Val-Addo, Irene; Adams, Bryn L.; Warner, Candice R.; Carney, James P.; Brown, Rebecca L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for the rapid production of reagent technology in response to biological threats. A synthetic library of peptide mutants built off a bacterial host offers a convenient means to link the peptide sequence, (i.e., identity of individual library members) with the desired molecular recognition traits, but also allows for a relatively simple protocol, amenable to automation. An improved understanding of the mechanisms of recognition and control of synthetic reagent isolation and evolution remain critical to success. In this paper, we describe our approach to development of peptide affinity reagents based on peptide bacterial display technology with improved control of binding interactions for stringent evolution of reagent candidates, and tailored performance capabilities. There are four key elements to the peptide affinity reagent program including: (1) the diverse bacterial library technology, (2) advanced reagent screening amenable to laboratory automation and control, (3) iterative characterization and feedback on both affinity and specificity of the molecular interactions, and (3) integrated multiscale computational prescreening of candidate peptide ligands including in silico prediction of improved binding performance. Specific results on peptides binders to Protective Antigen (PA) protein of Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) will be presented. Recent highlights of on cell vs. off-cell affinity behavior and correlation of the results with advanced docking simulations on the protein-peptide system(s) are included. The potential of this technology and approach to enable rapid development of a new affinity reagent with unprecedented speed (less than one week) would allow for rapid response to new and constantly emerging threats.

  5. Silicon nanomaterials platform for bioimaging, biosensing, and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; Fan, Chunhai; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-02-18

    Silicon nanomaterials are an important class of nanomaterials with great potential for technologies including energy, catalysis, and biotechnology, because of their many unique properties, including biocompatibility, abundance, and unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, among others. Silicon nanomaterials are known to have little or no toxicity due to favorable biocompatibility of silicon, which is an important precondition for biological and biomedical applications. In addition, huge surface-to-volume ratios of silicon nanomaterials are responsible for their unique optical, mechanical, or electronic properties, which offer exciting opportunities for design of high-performance silicon-based functional nanoprobes, nanosensors, and nanoagents for biological analysis and detection and disease treatment. Moreover, silicon is the second most abundant element (after oxygen) on earth, providing plentiful and inexpensive resources for large-scale and low-cost preparation of silicon nanomaterials for practical applications. Because of these attractive traits, and in parallel with a growing interest in their design and synthesis, silicon nanomaterials are extensively investigated for wide-ranging applications, including energy, catalysis, optoelectronics, and biology. Among them, bioapplications of silicon nanomaterials are of particular interest. In the past decade, scientists have made an extensive effort to construct a silicon nanomaterials platform for various biological and biomedical applications, such as biosensors, bioimaging, and cancer treatment, as new and powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, there are few review articles covering these important and promising achievements to promote the awareness of development of silicon nanobiotechnology. In this Account, we summarize recent representative works to highlight the recent developments of silicon functional nanomaterials for a new, powerful platform for biological and

  6. Exploring plasmonic nanoantenna arrays as a platform for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, the PROBE Lab at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has made significant developments in plasmonic nanoantenna technology by more closely exploring the rich parameter space associated with these structures including geometry and material composition, as well as the optical excitation conditions. Indeed, plasmonic nanoantennas are attractive for a variety of potential applications in nanotechnology, biology, and photonics due to their ability to tightly confine and strongly enhance optical fields. This talk will discuss our work with arrays of Au bowtie nanoantennas (BNAs) with an emphasis on how their field enhancement properties could be harnessed for particle manipulation and sensing. We also present our work with pillar-supported BNAs (p-BNAs) and discuss their potential for sensing applications, particularly when adapted for response in the near-IR. The talk will conclude with a brief discussion of some of the future work pursued by the PROBE lab, including adapting BNAs for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  7. Envirobiosens. New trends in bio-sensing for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, S. [Cranfield Biothechnology Centre, Cranfield University (United Kingdom); Cosnier, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, Lab. d' Electrochimie Organique et de Photochimie Redox, UMR CNRS 5630, 38 (France); Magner, E. [Limerick University, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Sciences (Ireland)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The development of useful sensor systems to monitor multiple pollutants is needed for many environmental applications like the pollution monitoring and processing. The advantages of chemical sensors, bio-sensors and bio-mimetic systems should be exploited to fill specific niche applications in environmental engineering. Sensors offer particular advantages as they can be used for rapid field assessment of pollution risks, including the effects of pollutant mixtures. This conference reviews the current state of the art for bio-sensors operating in the environment and in environmental processes to develop bio-sensors practical applications in the environmental technology. The papers are presented in three parts: enzymatic sensors for environmental monitoring; affinity sensors for environmental application; cell and tissue sensors for environmental analysis, future prospects. (A.L.B.)

  8. An Overview of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Biosensing Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zanzan; Zhu

    2017-01-01

    With the development of carbon nanomaterials in recent years, there has been an explosion of interests in using carbon nanotubes(CNTs) and graphene for developing new biosensors. It is believed that employing CNTs and graphene as sensor components can make sensors more reliable, accurate, and fast due to their remarkable properties. Depending on the types of target molecular, different strategies can be applied to design sensor device. This review article summarized the important progress in developing CNT-and graphene-based electrochemical biosensors, field-effect transistor biosensors, and optical biosensors. Although CNTs and graphene have led to some groundbreaking discoveries, challenges are still remained and the state-of-the-art sensors are far from a practical application. As a conclusion, future effort has to be made through an interdisciplinary platform, including materials science, biology, and electric engineering.

  9. An Overview of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Biosensing Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zanzan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    With the development of carbon nanomaterials in recent years, there has been an explosion of interests in using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene for developing new biosensors. It is believed that employing CNTs and graphene as sensor components can make sensors more reliable, accurate, and fast due to their remarkable properties. Depending on the types of target molecular, different strategies can be applied to design sensor device. This review article summarized the important progress in developing CNT- and graphene-based electrochemical biosensors, field-effect transistor biosensors, and optical biosensors. Although CNTs and graphene have led to some groundbreaking discoveries, challenges are still remained and the state-of-the-art sensors are far from a practical application. As a conclusion, future effort has to be made through an interdisciplinary platform, including materials science, biology, and electric engineering.

  10. Genotyping and Bio-Sensing Chemosensory Proteins in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxia Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Genotyping is the process of determining differences in the genetic make-up of an individual and comparing it to that of another individual. Focus on the family of chemosensory proteins (CSPs in insects reveals differences at the genomic level across various strains and biotypes, but none at the level of individuals, which could be extremely useful in the biotyping of insect pest species necessary for the agricultural, medical and veterinary industries. Proposed methods of genotyping CSPs include not only restriction enzymatic cleavage and amplification of cleaved polymorphic sequences, but also detection of retroposons in some specific regions of the insect chromosome. Design of biosensors using CSPs addresses tissue-specific RNA mutations in a particular subtype of the protein, which could be used as a marker of specific physiological conditions. Additionally, we refer to the binding properties of CSP proteins tuned to lipids and xenobiotic insecticides for the development of a new generation of biosensor chips, monitoring lipid blood concentration and chemical environmental pollution.

  11. Instrumentation in Developing Chlorophyll Fluorescence Biosensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus R. Millan-Almaraz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll fluorescence can be defined as the red and far-red light emitted by photosynthetic tissue when it is excited by a light source. This is an important phenomenon which permits investigators to obtain important information about the state of health of a photosynthetic sample. This article reviews the current state of the art knowledge regarding the design of new chlorophyll fluorescence sensing systems, providing appropriate information about processes, instrumentation and electronic devices. These types of systems and applications can be created to determine both comfort conditions and current problems within a given subject. The procedure to measure chlorophyll fluorescence is commonly split into two main parts; the first involves chlorophyll excitation, for which there are passive or active methods. The second part of the procedure is to closely measure the chlorophyll fluorescence response with specialized instrumentation systems. Such systems utilize several methods, each with different characteristics regarding to cost, resolution, ease of processing or portability. These methods for the most part include cameras, photodiodes and satellite images.

  12. Instrumentation in Developing Chlorophyll Fluorescence Biosensing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jaramillo, Arturo A.; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Contreras-Medina, Luis M.; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; de J. Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.; Millan-Almaraz, Jesus R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence can be defined as the red and far-red light emitted by photosynthetic tissue when it is excited by a light source. This is an important phenomenon which permits investigators to obtain important information about the state of health of a photosynthetic sample. This article reviews the current state of the art knowledge regarding the design of new chlorophyll fluorescence sensing systems, providing appropriate information about processes, instrumentation and electronic devices. These types of systems and applications can be created to determine both comfort conditions and current problems within a given subject. The procedure to measure chlorophyll fluorescence is commonly split into two main parts; the first involves chlorophyll excitation, for which there are passive or active methods. The second part of the procedure is to closely measure the chlorophyll fluorescence response with specialized instrumentation systems. Such systems utilize several methods, each with different characteristics regarding to cost, resolution, ease of processing or portability. These methods for the most part include cameras, photodiodes and satellite images. PMID:23112686

  13. Mechanical modulation method for ultrasensitive phase measurements in photonics biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patskovsky, S; Maisonneuve, M; Meunier, M; Kabashin, A V

    2008-12-22

    A novel polarimetry methodology for phase-sensitive measurements in single reflection geometry is proposed for applications in optical transduction-based biological sensing. The methodology uses altering step-like chopper-based mechanical phase modulation for orthogonal s- and p- polarizations of light reflected from the sensing interface and the extraction of phase information at different harmonics of the modulation. We show that even under a relatively simple experimental arrangement, the methodology provides the resolution of phase measurements as low as 0.007 deg. We also examine the proposed approach using Total Internal Reflection (TIR) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) geometries. For TIR geometry, the response appears to be strongly dependent on the prism material with the best values for high refractive index Si. The detection limit for Si-based TIR is estimated as 10(-5) in terms Refractive Index Units (RIU) change. SPR geometry offers much stronger phase response due to a much sharper phase characteristics. With the detection limit of 3.2*10(-7) RIU, the proposed methodology provides one of best sensitivities for phase-sensitive SPR devices. Advantages of the proposed method include high sensitivity, simplicity of experimental setup and noise immunity as a result of a high stability modulation.

  14. Biosensing Based on Nanoparticles for Food Allergens Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Nazaret Gómez-Arribas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is one of the major health threats for sensitized individuals all over the world and, over the years, the food industry has made significant efforts and investments to offer safe foods for allergic consumers. The analysis of the concentration of food allergen residues in processing equipment, in raw materials or in the final product, provides analytical information that can be used for risk assessment as well as to ensure that food-allergic consumers get accurate and useful information to make their food choices and purchasing decisions. The development of biosensors based on nanomaterials for applications in food analysis is a challenging area of growing interest in the last years. Research in this field requires the combined efforts of experts in very different areas including food chemistry, biotechnology or materials science. However, the outcome of such collaboration can be of significant impact on the food industry as well as for consumer’s safety. These nanobiosensing devices allow the rapid, selective, sensitive, cost-effective and, in some cases, in-field, online and real-time detection of a wide range of compounds, even in complex matrices. Moreover, they can also enable the design of novel allergen detection strategies. Herein we review the main advances in the use of nanoparticles for the development of biosensors and bioassays for allergen detection, in food samples, over the past few years. Research in this area is still in its infancy in comparison, for instance, to the application of nanobiosensors for clinical analysis. However, it will be of interest for the development of new technologies that reduce the gap between laboratory research and industrial applications.

  15. Colorimetric detection for paper-based biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, C.; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-02-01

    Research on affordable point-of-care health diagnostics is rapidly advancing1. Colorimetric biosensor applications are typically qualitative, but recently the focus has been shifted to quantitative measurements2,3. Although numerous qualitative point-of-care (POC) health diagnostic devices are available, the challenge exists of developing a quantitative colorimetric array reader system that complies with the ASSURED (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User-friendly, Rapid and Robust, Equipment-free, Deliverable to end-users) principles of the World Health Organization4. This paper presents a battery powered 8-bit tonal resolution colorimetric sensor circuit for paper microfluidic assays using low cost photo-detection circuitry and a low-power LED light source. A colorimetric 3×3-pixel array reader was developed for rural environments where resources and personnel are limited. The device sports an ultralow-power E-ink paper display. The colorimetric device includes integrated GPS functionality and EEPROM memory to log measurements with geo-tags for possible analysis of regional trends. The device competes with colour intensity measurement techniques using smartphone cameras, but proves to be a cheaper solution, compensating for the typical performance variations between cameras of different brands of smartphones. Inexpensive methods for quantifying bacterial assays have been shown using desktop scanners, which are not portable, and cameras, which suffer severely from changes in ambient light in different environments. Promising colorimetric detection results have been demonstrated using devices such as video cameras5, digital colour analysers6, flatbed scanners7 or custom portable readers8. The major drawback of most of these methods is the need for specialized instrumentation and for image analysis on a computer.

  16. Indium tin oxide with zwitterionic interfacial design for biosensing applications in complex matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Nadia T.; Alias, Yatimah; Khor, Sook Mei, E-mail: naomikhor@um.edu.my

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. • The resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of BSA–FITC and RBITC–Cyt c were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. • The antifouling interface allows detection of target analytes in highly complicated biological matrices. - Abstract: Biosensing interfaces consisting of linker molecules (COOH or NH{sub 2}) and charged, antifouling moieties ((-SO{sup 3−} and N{sup +}(Me){sub 3}) for biosensing applications were prepared for the first time by the in situ deposition of mixtures of aryl diazonium cations on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. A linker molecule is required for the attachment of biorecognition molecules (e.g., antibodies, enzymes, DNA chains, and aptamers) close to the transducer surface. The attached molecules improve the biosensing sensitivity and also provide a short response time for analyte detection. Thus, the incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. The reductive adsorption behavior and electrochemical measurement were studied for (1) an individual compound and (2) a mixture of antifouling zwitterionic molecules together with linker molecules [combination 1: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD); combination 2: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA)] of aryl diazonium cations grafted onto an ITO electrode. The mixture ratios of SP:TMAP:PPD and SP:TMAP:PABA that provided the greatest resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA–FITC) and cytochrome c labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC–Cyt c) were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). For the surface antifouling study

  17. Indium tin oxide with zwitterionic interfacial design for biosensing applications in complex matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, Nadia T.; Alias, Yatimah; Khor, Sook Mei

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. • The resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of BSA–FITC and RBITC–Cyt c were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. • The antifouling interface allows detection of target analytes in highly complicated biological matrices. - Abstract: Biosensing interfaces consisting of linker molecules (COOH or NH 2 ) and charged, antifouling moieties ((-SO 3− and N + (Me) 3 ) for biosensing applications were prepared for the first time by the in situ deposition of mixtures of aryl diazonium cations on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. A linker molecule is required for the attachment of biorecognition molecules (e.g., antibodies, enzymes, DNA chains, and aptamers) close to the transducer surface. The attached molecules improve the biosensing sensitivity and also provide a short response time for analyte detection. Thus, the incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. The reductive adsorption behavior and electrochemical measurement were studied for (1) an individual compound and (2) a mixture of antifouling zwitterionic molecules together with linker molecules [combination 1: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD); combination 2: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA)] of aryl diazonium cations grafted onto an ITO electrode. The mixture ratios of SP:TMAP:PPD and SP:TMAP:PABA that provided the greatest resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA–FITC) and cytochrome c labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC–Cyt c) were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). For the surface antifouling study, we used 2

  18. Indium tin oxide with zwitterionic interfacial design for biosensing applications in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Nadia T.; Alias, Yatimah; Khor, Sook Mei

    2015-01-01

    Biosensing interfaces consisting of linker molecules (COOH or NH2) and charged, antifouling moieties ((sbnd SO3- and N+(Me)3) for biosensing applications were prepared for the first time by the in situ deposition of mixtures of aryl diazonium cations on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. A linker molecule is required for the attachment of biorecognition molecules (e.g., antibodies, enzymes, DNA chains, and aptamers) close to the transducer surface. The attached molecules improve the biosensing sensitivity and also provide a short response time for analyte detection. Thus, the incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. The reductive adsorption behavior and electrochemical measurement were studied for (1) an individual compound and (2) a mixture of antifouling zwitterionic molecules together with linker molecules [combination 1: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD); combination 2: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA)] of aryl diazonium cations grafted onto an ITO electrode. The mixture ratios of SP:TMAP:PPD and SP:TMAP:PABA that provided the greatest resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA-FITC) and cytochrome c labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC-Cyt c) were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). For the surface antifouling study, we used 2-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethoxy]acetic acid (OEG) as a standard control because of its prominent antifouling properties. Surface compositions of combinations 1 and 2 were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to characterize the morphology of the grafted films to confirm the even distribution between linker and antifouling molecules grafted onto the ITO surfaces

  19. In Situ Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Gold Nanocomposites for Nanoelectronics and Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, an in situ chemical synthesis approach has been developed to prepare graphene–Au nanocomposites from chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO in aqueous media. UV–Vis absorption, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to demonstrate the successful attachment of Au nanoparticles to graphene sheets. Configured as field-effect transistors (FETs, the as-synthesized single-layered rGO-Au nanocomposites exhibit higher hole mobility and conductance when compared to the rGO sheets, promising its applications in nanoelectronics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the rGO-Au FETs are able to label-freely detect DNA hybridization with high sensitivity, indicating its potentials in nanoelectronic biosensing.

  20. Third generation biosensing matrix based on Fe-implanted ZnO thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2010-01-01

    Third generation biosensor based on Fe-implanted ZnO (Fe-ZnO) thin film has been demonstrated. Implantation of Fe in rf-sputtered ZnO thin film introduces redox center along with shallow donor level and thereby enhance its electron transfer property. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, has been immobilized on the surface of the matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the prepared bioelectrode, GOx/Fe-ZnO/ITO/Glass is sensitive to the glucose concentration with enhanced response of 0.326 μA mM -1 cm -2 and low Km of 2.76 mM. The results show promising application of Fe-implanted ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for third generation biosensing.

  1. Nitrite Biosensing via Selective Enzymes—A Long but Promising Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gabriela Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decades have witnessed a steady increase of the social and political awareness for the need of monitoring and controlling environmental and industrial processes. In the case of nitrite ion, due to its potential toxicity for human health, the European Union has recently implemented a number of rules to restrict its level in drinking waters and food products. Although several analytical protocols have been proposed for nitrite quantification, none of them enable a reliable and quick analysis of complex samples. An alternative approach relies on the construction of biosensing devices using stable enzymes, with both high activity and specificity for nitrite. In this paper we review the current state-of-the-art in the field of electrochemical and optical biosensors using nitrite reducing enzymes as biorecognition elements and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this emerging market.

  2. Development of a surface plasmon resonance and nanomechanical biosensing hybrid platform for multiparametric reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Fariña, David; Escuela, Alfonso M; Sendra, Jose Ramón; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hybrid platform that combines two well-known biosensing technologies based on quite different transducer principles: surface plasmon resonance and nanomechanical sensing. The new system allows the simultaneous and real-time detection of two independent parameters, refractive index change (Δn), and surface stress change (Δσ) when a biomolecular interaction takes place. Both parameters have a direct relation with the mass coverage of the sensor surface. The core of the platform is a common fluid cell, where the solution arrives to both sensor areas at the same time and under the same conditions (temperature, velocity, diffusion, etc.).The main objective of this integration is to achieve a better understanding of the physical behaviour of the transducers during sensing, increasing the information obtained in real time in one single experiment. The potential of the hybrid platform is demonstrated by the detection of DNA hybridization.

  3. Determination of γ-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water: application of a quantitative biosensing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Van der Meer, A. J. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative biosensing method has been developed for the determination of γ-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the related stable isotope (element) in the biosensor and the determination of the element in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters on accumulation levels: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Using water plants, the method is shown to be three to five orders of magnitude more sensitive than the direct analysis of water. (author)

  4. Determination of {gamma}-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water: application of a quantitative biosensing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolterbeek, H Th; Van der Meer, A. J. G. M. [Delft University of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    A quantitative biosensing method has been developed for the determination of {gamma}-rays emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the related stable isotope (element) in the biosensor and the determination of the element in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters on accumulation levels: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Using water plants, the method is shown to be three to five orders of magnitude more sensitive than the direct analysis of water. (author)

  5. Third generation biosensing matrix based on Fe-implanted ZnO thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2010-09-01

    Third generation biosensor based on Fe-implanted ZnO (Fe-ZnO) thin film has been demonstrated. Implantation of Fe in rf-sputtered ZnO thin film introduces redox center along with shallow donor level and thereby enhance its electron transfer property. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, has been immobilized on the surface of the matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the prepared bioelectrode, GOx/Fe-ZnO/ITO/Glass is sensitive to the glucose concentration with enhanced response of 0.326 μA mM-1 cm-2 and low Km of 2.76 mM. The results show promising application of Fe-implanted ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for third generation biosensing.

  6. Robust label-free biosensing using microdisk laser arrays with on-chip references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondimu, S F; Hippler, M; Hussal, C; Hofmann, A; Krämmer, S; Lahann, J; Kalt, H; Freude, W; Koos, C

    2018-02-05

    Whispering-gallery mode (WGM) microdisk lasers show great potential for highly sensitive label-free detection in large-scale sensor arrays. However, when used in practical applications under normal ambient conditions, these devices suffer from temperature fluctuations and photobleaching. Here we demonstrate that these challenges can be overcome by a novel referencing scheme that allows for simultaneous compensation of temperature drift and photobleaching. The technique relies on reference structures protected by locally dispensed passivation materials, and can be scaled to extended arrays of hundreds of devices. We prove the viability of the concept in a series of experiments, demonstrating robust and sensitive label-free detection over a wide range of constant or continuously varying temperatures. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first demonstration of biosensing in active WGM devices with simultaneous compensation of both photobleaching and temperature drift.

  7. Pulsed Biosensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Hernandez, G. M.; Vacík, Jiří; Alfonta, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2011), s. 1084-1087 ISSN 1530-437X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/11/1856 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Irradiated polymers Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.520, year: 2011

  8. Biosensing of matrix metalloproteinase activity with Cd-free quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, John Bryan

    Quantum dots (QDs) have become attractive in the biomedical field on account of their superior optical properties and stability, in comparison to traditional fluorophores. QDs also have properties which make them ideal for complex in vivo conditions. However, toxicity has been a chief concern in the eventual implementation of QDs for in vivo applications such as biosensing and tumor imaging. Commercially available QDs contain a notoriously noxious Cd component and therefore continuous research has gone into developing QDs without toxic heavy metals, generally Cd, that would still yield comparable performance in terms of their optical properties. Nonetheless, even in the case of Cd-free QDs, toxicity should be evaluated on a case by case basis, as other properties such as size, coating, stability, and charge can affect toxicity of nanomaterials as well, making it a very complex issue. With the high promise of QDs in the field of biomedical development as a motivation, this work strives to develop the efficient and repeatable synthesis of Cd-free QDs with high stability and luminescence, with proven low toxicity, and the ability to detect active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in a biosensing system, designed to identify direct biomarkers for pathological conditions, which in turn would enable early disease diagnosis and better treatment development. In this work, highly luminescent ZnSe:Mn/ZnS QDs have been synthesized, characterized, and modified with peptides with a bioconjugation procedure that utilized thiol-metal affinity. Experiments aiming at MMP detection were conducted using the peptide/QD conjugates. In addition, the ApoTox-Glo(TM) Triplex assay was utilized to evaluate cytotoxicity, and a safe concentration below 0.125 microM was identified for peptide-coated ZnSe:Mn/ZnS QDs in water. Finally, in contribution to developing an in vivo fiberoptic system for sensing MMP activity, the QDs were successfully tethered to silica and MMP detection was demonstrated

  9. Platinum nanoparticles functionalized nitrogen doped graphene platform for sensitive electrochemical glucose biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhanjun, E-mail: zjyang@yzu.edu.cn; Cao, Yue; Li, Juan; Jian, Zhiqin; Zhang, Yongcai; Hu, Xiaoya

    2015-04-29

    Highlights: • An efficient PtNPs@NG nanocomposite was prepared for the immobilization of enzyme. • A novel electrochemical glucose biosensor was constructed based on this PtNPs@NG. • The proposed glucose biosensor showed high sensitivity and low detection limit. • The PtNPs@NG composite provided a promising platform for biosensing applications. - Abstract: In this work, we reported an efficient platinum nanoparticles functionalized nitrogen doped graphene (PtNPs@NG) nanocomposite for devising novel electrochemical glucose biosensor for the first time. The fabricated PtNPs@NG and biosensor were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, static water contact angle, UV–vis spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectra and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. PtNPs@NG showed large surface area and excellent biocompatibility, and enhanced the direct electron transfer between enzyme molecules and electrode surface. The glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized on PtNPs@NG nanocomposite retained its bioactivity, and exhibited a surface controlled, quasi-reversible and fast electron transfer process. The constructed glucose biosensor showed wide linear range from 0.005 to 1.1 mM with high sensitivity of 20.31 mA M{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. The detection limit was calculated to be 0.002 mM at signal-to-noise of 3, which showed 20-fold decrease in comparison with single NG-based electrochemical biosensor for glucose. The proposed glucose biosensor also demonstrated excellent selectivity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability, and could be successfully applied in the detection of glucose in serum samples at the applied potential of −0.33 V. This research provided a promising biosensing platform for the development of excellent electrochemical biosensors.

  10. Platinum nanoparticles functionalized nitrogen doped graphene platform for sensitive electrochemical glucose biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhanjun; Cao, Yue; Li, Juan; Jian, Zhiqin; Zhang, Yongcai; Hu, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An efficient PtNPs@NG nanocomposite was prepared for the immobilization of enzyme. • A novel electrochemical glucose biosensor was constructed based on this PtNPs@NG. • The proposed glucose biosensor showed high sensitivity and low detection limit. • The PtNPs@NG composite provided a promising platform for biosensing applications. - Abstract: In this work, we reported an efficient platinum nanoparticles functionalized nitrogen doped graphene (PtNPs@NG) nanocomposite for devising novel electrochemical glucose biosensor for the first time. The fabricated PtNPs@NG and biosensor were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, static water contact angle, UV–vis spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectra and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. PtNPs@NG showed large surface area and excellent biocompatibility, and enhanced the direct electron transfer between enzyme molecules and electrode surface. The glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized on PtNPs@NG nanocomposite retained its bioactivity, and exhibited a surface controlled, quasi-reversible and fast electron transfer process. The constructed glucose biosensor showed wide linear range from 0.005 to 1.1 mM with high sensitivity of 20.31 mA M −1 cm −2 . The detection limit was calculated to be 0.002 mM at signal-to-noise of 3, which showed 20-fold decrease in comparison with single NG-based electrochemical biosensor for glucose. The proposed glucose biosensor also demonstrated excellent selectivity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability, and could be successfully applied in the detection of glucose in serum samples at the applied potential of −0.33 V. This research provided a promising biosensing platform for the development of excellent electrochemical biosensors

  11. Interconnecting wearable devices with nano-biosensing implants through optical wireless communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Pedram; Pandey, Honey; Jornet, Josep M.

    2018-02-01

    Major advancements in the fields of electronics, photonics and wireless communication have enabled the development of compact wearable devices, with applications in diverse domains such as fitness, wellness and medicine. In parallel, nanotechnology is enabling the development of miniature sensors that can detect events at the nanoscale with unprecedented accuracy. On this matter, in vivo implantable Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) nanosensors have been proposed to analyze circulating biomarkers in body fluids for the early diagnosis of a myriad of diseases, ranging from cardiovascular disorders to different types of cancer. In light of these results, in this paper, an architecture is proposed to bridge the gap between these two apparently disjoint paradigms, namely, the commercial wearable devices and the advanced nano-biosensing technologies. More specifically, this paper thoroughly assesses the feasibility of the wireless optical intercommunications of an SPR-based nanoplasmonic biochip -implanted subcutaneously in the wrist-, with a nanophotonic wearable smart band which is integrated by an array of nano-lasers and photon-detectors for distributed excitation and measurement of the nanoplasmonic biochip. This is done through a link budget analysis which captures the peculiarities of the intra-body optical channel at (sub) cellular level, the strength of the SPR nanosensor reflection, as well as the capabilities of the nanolasers (emission power, spectrum) and the nano photon-detectors (sensitivity and noise equivalent power). The proposed analysis guides the development of practical communication designs between the wearable devices and nano-biosensing implants, which paves the way through early-stage diagnosis of severe diseases.

  12. Nanomaterials-based enzyme electrochemical biosensors operating through inhibition for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-15

    In recent years great progress has been made in applying nanomaterials to design novel biosensors. Use of nanomaterials offers to biosensing platforms exceptional optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Nanomaterials can increase the surface of the transducing area of the sensors that in turn bring an increase in catalytic behaviors. They have large surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology and structure that also favor miniaturization, an interesting advantage when the sample volume is a critical issue. Biosensors have great potential for achieving detect-to-protect devices: devices that can be used in detections of pollutants and other treating compounds/analytes (drugs) protecting citizens' life. After a long term focused scientific and financial efforts/supports biosensors are expected now to fulfill their promise such as being able to perform sampling and analysis of complex samples with interest for clinical or environment fields. Among all types of biosensors, enzymatic biosensors, the most explored biosensing devices, have an interesting property, the inherent inhibition phenomena given the enzyme-substrate complex formation. The exploration of such phenomena is making remarkably important their application as research and applied tools in diagnostics. Different inhibition biosensor systems based on nanomaterials modification has been proposed and applied. The role of nanomaterials in inhibition-based biosensors for the analyses of different groups of drugs as well as contaminants such as pesticides, phenolic compounds and others, are discussed in this review. This deep analysis of inhibition-based biosensors that employ nanomaterials will serve researchers as a guideline for further improvements and approaching of these devices to real sample applications so as to reach society needs and such biosensor market demands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Shavanova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical. A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  14. Post-Synapse Model Cell for Synaptic Glutamate Receptor (GluR-Based Biosensing: Strategy and Engineering to Maximize Ligand-Gated Ion-Flux Achieving High Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Haruyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based biosensing is a “smart” way to obtain efficacy-information on the effect of applied chemical on cellular biological cascade. We have proposed an engineered post-synapse model cell-based biosensors to investigate the effects of chemicals on ionotropic glutamate receptor (GluR, which is a focus of attention as a molecular target for clinical neural drug discovery. The engineered model cell has several advantages over native cells, including improved ease of handling and better reproducibility in the application of cell-based biosensors. However, in general, cell-based biosensors often have low signal-to-noise (S/N ratios due to the low level of cellular responses. In order to obtain a higher S/N ratio in model cells, we have attempted to design a tactic model cell with elevated cellular response. We have revealed that the increase GluR expression level is not directly connected to the amplification of cellular responses because the saturation of surface expression of GluR, leading to a limit on the total ion influx. Furthermore, coexpression of GluR with a voltage-gated potassium channel increased Ca2+ ion influx beyond levels obtained with saturating amounts of GluR alone. The construction of model cells based on strategy of amplifying ion flux per individual receptors can be used to perform smart cell-based biosensing with an improved S/N ratio.

  15. Microstructured optical fiber-based luminescent biosensing: Is there any light at the end of the tunnel? - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidenko, Sergey A; Burmistrova, Natalia A; Shuvalov, Andrey A; Chibrova, Anastasiya A; Skibina, Yulia S; Goryacheva, Irina Y

    2018-08-17

    This review covers the current state of the art of luminescent biosensors based on various types of microstructured optical fiber. The unique optical and structural properties of this type of optical fiber make them one of the most promising integrated platforms for bioassays. The individual sections of this review are devoted to a) classification of microstructured optical fibers, b) microstructured optical fiber materials, c) aspects of biosensing based on the biomolecules incorporated into the microstructured optical fibers, and d) development of models for prediction of the efficiency of luminescent signal processing. The authors' views on current trends and limitations of microstructured optical fibers for biosensing as well as the most promising areas and technologies for application in analytical practice are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A DNA-based pattern classifier with in vitro learning and associative recall for genomic characterization and biosensing without explicit sequence knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Seok; Chen, Junghuei; Deaton, Russell; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Genetic material extracted from in situ microbial communities has high promise as an indicator of biological system status. However, the challenge is to access genomic information from all organisms at the population or community scale to monitor the biosystem's state. Hence, there is a need for a better diagnostic tool that provides a holistic view of a biosystem's genomic status. Here, we introduce an in vitro methodology for genomic pattern classification of biological samples that taps large amounts of genetic information from all genes present and uses that information to detect changes in genomic patterns and classify them. We developed a biosensing protocol, termed Biological Memory, that has in vitro computational capabilities to "learn" and "store" genomic sequence information directly from genomic samples without knowledge of their explicit sequences, and that discovers differences in vitro between previously unknown inputs and learned memory molecules. The Memory protocol was designed and optimized based upon (1) common in vitro recombinant DNA operations using 20-base random probes, including polymerization, nuclease digestion, and magnetic bead separation, to capture a snapshot of the genomic state of a biological sample as a DNA memory and (2) the thermal stability of DNA duplexes between new input and the memory to detect similarities and differences. For efficient read out, a microarray was used as an output method. When the microarray-based Memory protocol was implemented to test its capability and sensitivity using genomic DNA from two model bacterial strains, i.e., Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis, results indicate that the Memory protocol can "learn" input DNA, "recall" similar DNA, differentiate between dissimilar DNA, and detect relatively small concentration differences in samples. This study demonstrated not only the in vitro information processing capabilities of DNA, but also its promise as a genomic pattern classifier that could

  17. Improvement in glucose biosensing response of electrochemically grown polypyrrole nanotubes by incorporating crosslinked glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palod, Pragya Agar; Singh, Vipul

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel enzymatic glucose biosensor has been reported in which platinum coated alumina membranes (Anodisc™s) have been employed as templates for the growth of polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube arrays using electrochemical polymerization. The PPy nanotube arrays were grown on Anodisc™s of pore diameter 100 nm using potentiostatic electropolymerization. In order to optimize the polymerization time, immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) was first performed using physical adsorption followed by measuring its biosensing response which was examined amperometrically for increasing concentrations of glucose. In order to further improve the sensing performance of the biosensor fabricated for optimum polymerization duration, enzyme immobilization was carried out using cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Approximately six fold enhancement in the sensitivity was observed in the fabricated electrodes. The biosensors also showed a wide range of linear operation (0.2-13 mM), limit of detection of 50 μM glucose concentration, excellent selectivity for glucose, notable reliability for real sample detection and substantially improved shelf life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Sun, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high loading capacity. MIPs have been intensively employed in classical solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction. More recently, MIPs have been combined with magnetic bead extraction, which greatly simplifies sample handling procedures. Studies have consistently shown that MIPs can effectively minimize complex food matrix effects, and improve recoveries and detection limits. In addition to sample preparation, MIPs have also been viewed as promising alternatives to bio-receptors due to the inherent molecular recognition abilities and the high stability in harsh chemical and physical conditions. MIPs have been utilized as receptors in biosensing platforms such as electrochemical, optical and mass biosensors to detect various analytes in food. In this review, we will discuss the current state-of-the-art of MIP synthesis and applications in the context of food analysis. We will highlight the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Microfluidic Love-Wave Biosensing Device for PSA Detection Based on an Aptamer Beacon Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Shuangming; Cao, Kang; Wang, Pengjuan; Su, Yan; Zhu, Xinhua; Wan, Ying

    2015-06-11

    A label-free and selective aptamer beacon-based Love-wave biosensing device was developed for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. The device consists of the following parts: LiTaO3 substrate with SiO2 film as wave guide layer, two set of inter-digital transducers (IDT), gold film for immobilization of the biorecongniton layer and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. DNA aptamer, or "artificial antibody", was used as the specific biorecognition probe for PSA capture. Some nucleotides were added to the 3'-end of the aptamer to form a duplex with the 3'-end, turning the aptamer into an aptamer-beacon. Taking advantage of the selective target-induced assembly changes arising from the "aptamer beacon", highly selective and specific detection of PSA was achieved. Furthermore, PDMS microfluidic channels were designed and fabricated to realize automated quantitative sample injection. After optimization of the experimental conditions, the established device showed good performance for PSA detection between 10 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 10 ng/mL. The proposed sensor might be a promising alternative for point of care diagnostics.

  20. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-07-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short.

  1. Highly anisotropic black phosphorous-graphene hybrid architecture for ultrassensitive plasmonic biosensing: Theoretical insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yufeng; Yu, Xiantong; Ouyang, Qingling; Shao, Yonghong; Song, Jun; Qu, Junle; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2018-04-01

    This study proposed a novel highly anisotropic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor employing emerging 2D black phosphorus (BP) and graphene atomic layers. Light absorption and energy loss were well balanced by optimizing gold film thickness and number of BP layers to generate the strongest SPR excitation. The proposed SPR biosensor was designed by the phase-modulation approach and is more sensitive to biomolecule bindings, providing 3 orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than the red-shift in SPR angle. Our results show the optimized configuration was 48 nm Au film coated with 4-layer BP crystal to produce the sharpest phase variation (up to 89.8975°), and lowest minimum reflectivity (1.9119  ×  10-7). Detection sensitivity up to 7.4914  ×  104 degree/refractive index unit is almost 4.5 times enhanced compared to monolayer graphene-based SPR sensors with 48 nm Au film. The anisotropic BP layers act as a polarizer, so the proposed SPR biosensor would exhibit optically tunable detection sensitivity, making it a promising candidate for exploring highly anisotropic platforms in biosensing.

  2. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figus, Cristiana, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Quochi, Francesco, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Artizzu, Flavia, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Saba, Michele, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Marongiu, Daniela, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Cagliari, S.P. Km 0.7, I-09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (PV) (Italy); Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea [Plasmore S.r.l. -Via Grazia Deledda 4, I-21020 Ranco (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  3. Surface plasmon microscopy with low-cost metallic nanostructures for biosensing I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Nathan; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Otto, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    The field of plasmonics aims to manipulate light over dimensions smaller than the optical wavelength by exploiting surface plasmon resonances in metallic films. Typically, surface plasmons are excited by illuminating metallic nanostructures. For meaningful research in this exciting area, the fabrication of high-quality nanostructures is critical, and in an undergraduate setting, low-cost methods are desirable. Careful optical characterization of the metallic nanostructures is also required. Here, we present the use of novel, inexpensive nanofabrication techniques and the development of a customized surface plasmon microscopy setup for interdisciplinary undergraduate experiments in biosensing, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and surface plasmon imaging. A Bethel undergraduate student performs the nanofabrication in collaboration with the University of Minnesota. The rewards of mentoring undergraduate students in cooperation with a large research university are numerous, exposing them to a wide variety of opportunities. This research also interacts with upper-level, open-ended laboratory projects, summer research, a semester-long senior research experience, and will enable a large range of experiments into the future.

  4. Optimization of gold nanoring arrays for biosensing in the fiber-optic communication window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Sabarinathan, Jayshri; Li, Tingjie; Yang, Jun; Mittler, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    To improve the limit of detection in a nanoplasmonic sensor system, the optical performance of the metal nanostructures should be optimized according to the best spectral window of the measurement instrument. We propose that the spectral window from 1460 to 1610 nm can potentially provide ultrahigh instrumental resolution for biosensing. We optimized gold nanoring arrays such that the extinction peak position is inside the proposed window, the extinction peak is sharp enough to track the peak shift with high resolution and the figure of merit (sensitivity/linewidth) of the array is optimized at the same time. The peak-sharpening effect of the array caused by coherent interaction plays a central role in the optimization. The optimized array has a lattice constant in the range [1000 nm,1060 nm], a bulk index sensitivity of around 450 nm/RIU and a figure of merit larger than 4. It is an enabling sensor element for a near-infrared sensor chip with ultrahigh resolution. (paper)

  5. Single Mode SU8 Polymer Based Mach-Zehnder Interferometer for Bio-Sensing Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiragi, Indrajit; Kundu, Sushanta; Makkar, Roshan; Chalapathi, Krishnamurthy

    2011-10-01

    This paper explains the influence of different parameters to the sensitivity of an optical waveguide Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) for real time detection of biomolecules. The sensing principle is based on the interaction of evanescence field with the biomolecules that get immobilized on sensing arm. The sensitivity has been calculated by varying the sensing window length, wavelength and concentration of bio-analyte. The maximum attainable sensitivity for the preferred design is the order of 10-8 RIU at 840 nm wavelength with a sensing window length of 1cm. All the simulation work has been carried out with Opti-BPMCAD for the optimization of MZI device parameters. The SU8 polymers are used as a core and clad material to fabricate the waveguide. The refractive index of cladding layer is optimized by varying the curing temperature for a fixed time period and the achieved index difference between core and clad is Δn = 0.0151. The fabricated MZI device has been characterized with LASER beam profiler at 840 nm wavelength. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the different parameter to the sensitivity of a single mode optical waveguide Mach-Zehnder Interferometer for bio-sensing application.

  6. Immobilization of biomolecules on cysteamine-modified polyaniline film for highly sensitive biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qi; Xu, Baojian; Ye, Lin; Di, Zengfeng; Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Xue, Jian; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-03-01

    We present a new cysteamine (CS)-modified polyaniline (PANI) film for highly efficient immobilization of biomolecules in biosensing technology. This electrochemical deposited PANI film treated with CS and glutaraldehyde could be employed as an excellent substrate for biomolecules immobilization. The parameters of PANI growth were optimized to obtain suitable surface morphology of films for biomolecules combination with the help of electron and atomic force microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was utilized to illustrate the different electrochemical activities of each modified electrode. Due to the existence of sulfydryl group and amino group in CS, surface modification with CS was proven to reduce oxidized units on PANI film remarkably, as evidenced by both ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy characterizations. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to investigate the immobilization efficiency of biomolecules on the PANI film, comparative study using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) showed that BSA immobilized on CS-modified PANI could be increased by at least 20% than that without CS-modified PANI in BSA solution with the concentration of 0.1-1mg/mL. The CS-modified PANI film would be significant for the immobilization and detection of biomolecules and especially promising in the application of immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Fabrication of polyaniline/carboxymethyl cellulose/cellulose nanofibrous mats and their biosensing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jiapeng; Pang, Zengyuan; Yang, Jie; Huang, Fenglin; Cai, Yibing; Wei, Qufu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI nanorods have been grown onto the surface of CMC/cellulose nanofibers for the fabrication of biosensor substrate material. • The proposed laccase biosensor exhibited a low detection limit and high sensitivity in the detection of catechol. • Hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers are the promising material in the design of high-efficient biosensors. - Abstract: We report a facile approach to synthesizing and immobilizing polyaniline nanorods onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified cellulose nanofibers for their biosensing application. Firstly, the hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline on the CMC-modified cellulose nanofiber. Subsequently, the PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibrous mat modified with laccase (Lac) was used as biosensor substrate material for the detection of catechol. PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers with highly conductive and three dimensional nanostructure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, the Lac/PANI/CMC/cellulose/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited a fast response time (within 8 s), a linear response range from 0.497 μM to 2.27 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 0.374 μM (3σ). The developed biosensor also displayed good repeatability, reproducibility as well as selectivity. The results indicated that the composite mat has potential application in enzyme biosensors

  8. Plasmonic bio-sensing for the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Yin; Lambert, Neill; Shih, Yen-An; Liu, Meng-Han; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Nori, Franco

    2017-01-01

    We study theoretically the bio-sensing capabilities of metal nanowire surface plasmons. As a specific example, we couple the nanowire to specific sites (bacteriochlorophyll) of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic pigment protein complex. In this hybrid system, we find that when certain sites of the FMO complex are subject to either the suppression of inter-site transitions or are entirely disconnected from the complex, the resulting variations in the excitation transfer rates through the complex can be monitored through the corresponding changes in the scattering spectra of the incident nanowire surface plasmons. We also find that these changes can be further enhanced by changing the ratio of plasmon-site couplings. The change of the Fano lineshape in the scattering spectra further reveals that “site 5” in the FMO complex plays a distinct role from other sites. Our results provide a feasible way, using single photons, to detect mutation-induced, or bleaching-induced, local defects or modifications of the FMO complex, and allows access to both the local and global properties of the excitation transfer in such systems.

  9. OLED-based biosensing platform with ZnO nanoparticles for enzyme immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuankun; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2009-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED)-based sensing platforms are attractive for photoluminescence (PL)-based monitoring of a variety of analytes. Among the promising OLED attributes for sensing applications is the thin and flexible size and design of the OLED pixel array that is used for PL excitation. To generate a compact, fielddeployable sensor, other major sensor components, such as the sensing probe and the photodetector, in addition to the thin excitation source, should be compact. To this end, the OLED-based sensing platform was tested with composite thin biosensing films, where oxidase enzymes were immobilized on ZnO nanoparticles, rather than dissolved in solution, to generate a more compact device. The analytes tested, glucose, cholesterol, and lactate, were monitored by following their oxidation reactions in the presence of oxygen and their respective oxidase enzymes. During such reactions, oxygen is consumed and its residual concentration, which is determined by the initial concentration of the above-mentioned analytes, is monitored. The sensors utilized the oxygen-sensitive dye Pt octaethylporphyrin, embedded in polystyrene. The enzymes were sandwiched between two thin ZnO layers, an approach that was found to improve the stability of the sensing probes.

  10. Electronic desalting for controlling the ionic environment in droplet-based biosensing platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, Vikhram Vilasur [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Dak, Piyush; Alam, Muhammad A., E-mail: rbashir@illinois.edu, E-mail: alam@purdue.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Reddy, Bobby; Duarte-Guevara, Carlos; Zhong, Yu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Salm, Eric [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Fischer, Andrew [Abbott Laboratories, 1921 Hurd Drive, Dept. 8482 LC2 M/S 2-33, Irving, Texas 75038 (United States); Liu, Yi-Shao [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Hsinchu 300-78, Taiwan (China); Bashir, Rashid, E-mail: rbashir@illinois.edu, E-mail: alam@purdue.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-02-02

    The ability to control the ionic environment in saline waters and aqueous electrolytes is useful for desalination as well as electronic biosensing. We demonstrate a method of electronic desalting at micro-scale through on-chip micro electrodes. We show that, while desalting is limited in bulk solutions with unlimited availability of salts, significant desalting of ≥1 mM solutions can be achieved in sub-nanoliter volume droplets with diameters of ∼250 μm. Within these droplets, by using platinum-black microelectrodes and electrochemical surface treatments, we can enhance the electrode surface area to achieve >99% and 41% salt removal in 1 mM and 10 mM salt concentrations, respectively. Through self-consistent simulations and experimental measurements, we demonstrate that conventional double-layer theory over-predicts the desalting capacity and, hence, cannot be used to model systems that are mass limited or undergoing significant salt removal from the bulk. Our results will provide a better understanding of capacitive desalination, as well as a method for salt manipulation in high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic sensing platforms.

  11. Fabrication of polyaniline/carboxymethyl cellulose/cellulose nanofibrous mats and their biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiapeng, E-mail: firgexiao@sina.cn; Pang, Zengyuan, E-mail: pangzengyuan1212@163.com; Yang, Jie, E-mail: young1993@126.com; Huang, Fenglin, E-mail: flhuang@jiangnan.edu.cn; Cai, Yibing, E-mail: yibingcai@jiangnan.edu.cn; Wei, Qufu, E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI nanorods have been grown onto the surface of CMC/cellulose nanofibers for the fabrication of biosensor substrate material. • The proposed laccase biosensor exhibited a low detection limit and high sensitivity in the detection of catechol. • Hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers are the promising material in the design of high-efficient biosensors. - Abstract: We report a facile approach to synthesizing and immobilizing polyaniline nanorods onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified cellulose nanofibers for their biosensing application. Firstly, the hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline on the CMC-modified cellulose nanofiber. Subsequently, the PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibrous mat modified with laccase (Lac) was used as biosensor substrate material for the detection of catechol. PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers with highly conductive and three dimensional nanostructure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, the Lac/PANI/CMC/cellulose/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited a fast response time (within 8 s), a linear response range from 0.497 μM to 2.27 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 0.374 μM (3σ). The developed biosensor also displayed good repeatability, reproducibility as well as selectivity. The results indicated that the composite mat has potential application in enzyme biosensors.

  12. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-01-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short. (paper)

  13. Ultrasmooth metallic films with buried nanostructures for backside reflection-mode plasmonic biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, N.C.; Johnson, T.W.; Jose, J.; Otto, L.M. [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Biosensing, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Oh, S.H. [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Biosensing, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Department of Biophysics and Chemical Biology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    A new plasmonic device architecture based on ultrasmooth metallic surfaces with buried plasmonic nanostructures is presented. Using template-stripping techniques, ultrathin gold films with less than 5 Aa surface roughness are optically coupled to an arbitrary arrangement of buried metallic gratings, rings, and nanodots. As a prototypical example, linear plasmonic gratings buried under an ultrasmooth 20 nm thick gold surface for biosensing are presented. The optical illumination and collection are completely decoupled from the microfluidic delivery of liquid samples due to the backside, reflection-mode geometry. This allows for sensing with opaque or highly scattering liquids. With the buried nanostructure design, high sensitivity and decoupled backside (reflective) optical access are maintained, as with traditional prism-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. In addition, the benefits offered by nanoplasmonic sensors such as spectral tunability and high-resolution, wide-field SPR imaging with normal-incidence epi-illumination that is simple to construct and align are gained as well. Beyond sensing, the buried plasmonic nanostructures with ultrasmooth metallic surfaces can benefit nanophotonic waveguides, surface-enhanced spectroscopy, nanolithography, and optical trapping. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Synthesis and characterization of MgO nanocrystals for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongji [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communication Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Qiu, Guojun [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Cuiping; Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communication Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • MgO nanocrystals were prepared using DC arc plasma jet CVD method. • The growth time does not exceed 10 min in process of the synthesis. • The samples were found to consist of cubic MgO nanobelts and nanosheets. • Nanocrystals contain contacts, rough edges, vacancies, and doping defects. • The samples exhibited excellent electrochemical biosensing properties. - Abstract: MgO nanocrystals were prepared using a simple direct current arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition method. Magnesium nitrate was used as source material and Mo film was used as a substrate and catalyst. The high-temperature plasma produced ensured rapid synthesis of the MgO nanocrystals. The as-prepared nanocrystals were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence measurements. The as-synthesized samples were found to consist of cubic MgO nanobelts and nanosheets with large surface areas and low coordination oxide ions, and contained numerous contacts, rough edges, vacancies, and doping defects. The nanostructures exhibited excellent electrochemical sensing properties with high-sensing sensitivity toward ascorbic acid. Their high electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the effect of defects and the surface electron transfer ability of the one-dimensional MgO nanobelts.

  15. A fluorescent biosensing platform based on the polydopamine nanospheres intergrating with Exonuclease III-assisted target recycling amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Weibing; Wang, Xi; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiang; Li, Hui; Xu, Danke

    2015-09-15

    Rapid, cost-effective, sensitive and specific analysis of biomolecules is important in the modern healthcare system. Here, a fluorescent biosensing platform based on the polydopamine nanospheres (PDANS) intergrating with Exonuclease III (Exo III) was developed. Due to the interaction between the ssDNA and the PDANS, the fluorescence of 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) labelled in the probe would been quenched by PDANS through FRET. While, in the present of the target DNA, the probe DNA would hybridize with the target DNA to form the double-strand DNA complex. Thus, Exo III could catalyze the stepwise removal of mononucleotides from 3'-terminus in the probe DNA, releasing the target DNA. As the FAM was released from the probe DNA, the fluorescence would no longer been quenched, led to the signal on. As one target DNA molecule could undergo a number of cycles to trigger the degradation of abundant probe DNA, Exo III-assisted target recycling would led to the amplification of the signal. The detection limit for DNA was 5 pM, which was 20 times lower than that without Exo III. And the assay time was largely shortened due to the faster signal recovery kinetics. What is more, this target recycling strategy was also applied to conduct an aptamer-based biosensing platform. The fluorescence intensity was also enhanced for the assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). For the Exo III-assisted target recycling amplification, DNA and ATP were fast detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. This work provides opportunities to develop simple, rapid, economical, and sensitive biosensing platforms for biomedical diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to

  17. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell's nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer-micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand-receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA-nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free single

  18. Bio-sensing with butterfly wings: naturally occurring nano-structures for SERS-based malaria parasite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Natalie L; Sekine, Ryo; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann; Bambery, Keith R; Wood, Bayden R

    2015-09-07

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful tool with great potential to provide improved bio-sensing capabilities. The current 'gold-standard' method for diagnosis of malaria involves visual inspection of blood smears using light microscopy, which is time consuming and can prevent early diagnosis of the disease. We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate based on gold-coated butterfly wings, which enabled detection of malarial hemozoin pigment within lysed blood samples containing 0.005% and 0.0005% infected red blood cells.

  19. Visible light induced photoelectrochemical biosensing based on oxygen-sensitive quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wenjing; Bao Lei [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lei Jianping, E-mail: jpl@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tu Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ju Huangxian, E-mail: hxju@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-09-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The near-infrared QDs are synthesized in an aqueous solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QDs-based biosensor exhibits visible-light induced cathodic photocurrent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen dependency of the photocurrent is verified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photoelectrochemical strategy is established by coupling with enzymatic reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoelectrochemical sensor shows high upper detection limit, acceptable stability and accuracy. - Abstract: A visible light induced photoelectrochemical biosensing platform based on oxygen-sensitive near-infrared quantum dots (NIR QDs) was developed for detection of glucose. The NIR QDs were synthesized in an aqueous solution, and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared NIR QDs were employed to construct oxygen-sensitive photoelectrochemical biosensor on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode. The oxygen dependency of the photocurrent was investigated at as-prepared electrode, which demonstrated the signal of photocurrent is suppressed with the decreasing of oxygen. Coupling with the consumption of oxygen during enzymatic reaction, a photoelectrochemical strategy was proposed for the detection of substrate. Using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme, that is, GOx was covalently attached to the surface of CdTe QDs, the resulting biosensor showed the sensitive response to glucose. Under the irradiation of visible light of a wavelength at 505 nm, the proposed photoelectrochemical method could detect glucose ranging from 0.1 mM to 11 mM with a detection limit of 0.04 mM. The photoelectrochemical biosensor showed a good performance with high upper detection limit, acceptable stability and accuracy, providing an alternative method for monitoring biomolecules and extending the application of near-infrared QDs.

  20. An innate immune system-mimicking, real-time biosensing of infectious bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sung-Min; Jeon, Jin-Woo; Kim, Tae-Yong; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2015-09-07

    An animal cell-based biosensor was investigated to monitor bacterial contamination in an unattended manner by mimicking the innate immune response. The cells (RAW 264.7 cell line) were first attached onto the solid surfaces of a 96-well microtiter plate and co-incubated in the culture medium with a sample that might contain bacterial contaminants. As Toll-like receptors were present on the cell membrane surfaces, they acted as a sentinel by binding to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of any contaminant. Such biological recognition initiates signal transmission along various pathways to produce different proinflammatory mediators, one of which, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was measured using an immunosensor. To demonstrate automated bacterium monitoring, a capture antibody specific for TNF-α was immobilized on an optical fiber sensor tip and then used to measure complex formation in a label-free sensor system (e.g., Octet Red). The sensor response time depended significantly on the degree of agitation of the culture medium, controlling the biological recognition and further autocrine/paracrine signaling by cytokines. The response, particularly under non-agitated conditions, was also influenced by the medium volume, revealing a local gradient change of the cytokine concentration and also acidity, caused by bacterial growth near the bottom surfaces. A biosensor system retaining 50 μL medium and not employing agitation could be used for the early detection of bacterial contamination. This novel biosensing model was applied to the real-time monitoring of different bacteria, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. They (bacterial species, suggesting the concept of non-targeted bacterial real-time monitoring. This technique was further applied to real sample testing (e.g., with milk) to exemplify, for example, the food quality control process without using any additional sample pretreatment such as magnetic concentration.

  1. Preparation of graphene/nile blue nanocomposite: Application for oxygen reduction reaction and biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shervedani, Reza Karimi; Amini, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •New nanocomposite is synthesized by electrochemical polymerization of Nile blue and reduction of GO on GCE. •The nanocomposite is characterized by SEM, UV–vis and electrochemical methods. •High electrocatalytic activity was observed for O 2 reduction on GNs-NB nanocomposite. •GCE-GNs-NB poly was tested successfully for immobilization of GOx and detection of glucose. -- Abstract: Nile blue/graphene (NB-GNs) nanocomposite was synthesized for the first time via a green and effective one-step electrochemical method, allowing to reduce graphene oxide (GO) and NB on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) simultaneously and construct GCE-GNs-NB poly composite. The composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical results obtained in the absence of any redox probe, where NB was active, allowed to trace step-by-step addition of the NB-GNs nanocomposite onto the GCE electrode surface, supporting formation of the GCE-GNs-NB poly composite. The electrocatalytic activity of the as-prepared GCE-GNs-NB poly towards O 2 reduction was studied in neutral medium. The results revealed excellent electrocatalytic performance for two-electron reduction of oxygen, suggesting its potential application as metal-free electrocatalysts for O 2 reduction reaction. Application of the GCE-GNs-NB poly in electrochemical biosensing was demonstrated by immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of GCE-GNs-NB poly , and then, using it for sensing of glucose. The biosensor exhibited a linear response, from 0.2 to 2.0 mM glucose, with a low detection limit, 2.1 μM, and high sensitivity, 67.0 μA mM −1 cm −2 , obtained by cyclic voltammetry method. The proposed biosensor was successfully tested for determination of glucose in blood serum samples

  2. A novel approach for application of nylon membranes in the biosensing domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahmand, Elham; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Hosseini, Samira; Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana; Koole, Leo H.; Djordjevic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polymer coated nylon membranes as bioreceptor surfaces. • Carboxylated porous surface for protein immobilization. • High level of biosensing performance for dengue virus detection. - Abstract: In this paper we report the polymer-coated microporous nylon membranes and their application as platforms for protein immobilization and subsequent detection of the dengue virus (DV) in blood serum. Protein recognition experiments were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The polymers used for coatings were synthesized by free-radical polymerization reaction between methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA) in different concentrations. The MAA monomer has carefully been chosen to generate polymers with pendant carboxyl (–COOH) groups, which also exist on polymer surfaces. A high degree of control over surface-exposed –COOH groups has been achieved through variation of monomers concentration in polymerization reaction. The general aspect of this work relies on the dengue antibody (Ab) immobilization on surface –COOH groups via physical attachment or covalent immobilization. Prior to Ab immobilization and ELISA experiment, polymer-coated nylon samples were analyzed in detail for their physical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water-in-air contact angle (WCA) measurements. Membranes were further analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to establish the relationship between wettability, porosity, and surface roughness with chemical composition and concentration of –COOH groups on the coating's surface. Optimized coatings have shown high sensitivity towards dengue Ab molecules, revealing fundamental aspect of polymer–protein interfaces as a function of surface –COOH groups’ concentration.

  3. A novel approach for application of nylon membranes in the biosensing domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahmand, Elham; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Hosseini, Samira [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana [Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Koole, Leo H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Djordjevic, Ivan, E-mail: ivandjordjevich@hotmail.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polymer coated nylon membranes as bioreceptor surfaces. • Carboxylated porous surface for protein immobilization. • High level of biosensing performance for dengue virus detection. - Abstract: In this paper we report the polymer-coated microporous nylon membranes and their application as platforms for protein immobilization and subsequent detection of the dengue virus (DV) in blood serum. Protein recognition experiments were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The polymers used for coatings were synthesized by free-radical polymerization reaction between methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA) in different concentrations. The MAA monomer has carefully been chosen to generate polymers with pendant carboxyl (–COOH) groups, which also exist on polymer surfaces. A high degree of control over surface-exposed –COOH groups has been achieved through variation of monomers concentration in polymerization reaction. The general aspect of this work relies on the dengue antibody (Ab) immobilization on surface –COOH groups via physical attachment or covalent immobilization. Prior to Ab immobilization and ELISA experiment, polymer-coated nylon samples were analyzed in detail for their physical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water-in-air contact angle (WCA) measurements. Membranes were further analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to establish the relationship between wettability, porosity, and surface roughness with chemical composition and concentration of –COOH groups on the coating's surface. Optimized coatings have shown high sensitivity towards dengue Ab molecules, revealing fundamental aspect of polymer–protein interfaces as a function of surface –COOH groups’ concentration.

  4. Influence of aspect ratio and surface defect density on hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods towards amperometric glucose biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mayoorika; Pramila; Dixit, Tejendra; Prakash, Rajiv; Palani, I. A.; Singh, Vipul

    2017-11-01

    In this work, hydrothermally grown ZnO Nanorods Array (ZNA) has been synthesized over Platinum (Pt) coated glass substrate, for biosensing applications. In-situ addition of strong oxidizing agent viz KMnO4 during hydrothermal growth was found to have profound effect on the physical properties of ZNA. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was later immobilized over ZNA by means of physical adsorption process. Further influence of varying aspect ratio, enzyme loading and surface defects on amperometric glucose biosensor has been analyzed. Significant variation in biosensor performance was observed by varying the amount of KMnO4 addition during the growth. Moreover, investigations revealed that the suppression of surface defects and aspect ratio variation of the ZNA played key role towards the observed improvement in the biosensor performance, thereby significantly affecting the sensitivity and response time of the fabricated biosensor. Among different biosensors fabricated having varied aspect ratio and surface defect density of ZNA, the best electrode resulted into sensitivity and response time to be 18.7 mA cm-2 M-1 and <5 s respectively. The observed results revealed that apart from high aspect ratio nanostructures and the extent of enzyme loading, surface defect density also hold a key towards ZnO nanostructures based bio-sensing applications.

  5. Biosensing of glucose in flow injection analysis system based on glucose oxidase-quantum dot modified pencil graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Özlem; Kızılkaya, Bayram; Uysal, Hüseyin; Dilgin, Yusuf

    2016-01-15

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was proposed in flow injection analysis (FIA) system using glucose oxidase (GOD) and Quantum dot (ZnS-CdS) modified Pencil Graphite Electrode (PGE). After ZnS-CdS film was electrochemically deposited onto PGE surface, GOD was immobilized on the surface of ZnS-CdS/PGE through crosslinking with chitosan (CT). A pair of well-defined reversible redox peak of GOD was observed at GOD/CT/ZnS-CdS/PGE based on enzyme electrode by direct electron transfer between the protein and electrode. Further, obtained GOD/CT/ZnS-CdS/PGE offers a disposable, low cost, selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensing of glucose in FIA system based on the decrease of the electrocatalytic response of the reduced form of GOD to dissolved oxygen. Under optimum conditions (flow rate, 1.3mL min(-1); transmission tubing length, 10cm; injection volume, 100μL; and constant applied potential, -500mV vs. Ag/AgCl), the proposed method displayed a linear response to glucose in the range of 0.01-1.0mM with detection limit of 3.0µM. The results obtained from this study would provide the basis for further development of the biosensing using PGE based FIA systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A universal and label-free impedimetric biosensing platform for discrimination of single nucleotide substitutions in long nucleic acid strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dawn M; Martin, Christopher P; Armas, Stephanie M; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y

    2018-06-30

    We report a label-free universal biosensing platform for highly selective detection of long nucleic acid strands. The sensor consists of an electrode-immobilized universal stem-loop (USL) probe and two adaptor strands that form a 4J structure in the presence of a specific DNA/RNA analyte. The sensor was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using K 3 [Fe(CN) 6 ]/K 4 [Fe(CN) 6 ] redox couple in solution. An increase in charge transfer resistance (R CT ) was observed upon 4J structure formation, the value of which depends on the analyte length. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to further characterize the sensor and monitor the electrochemical reaction in conjunction with thickness measurements of the mixed DNA monolayer obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry. In addition, the electron transfer was calculated at the electrode/electrolyte interface using a rotating disk electrode. Limits of detection in the femtomolar range were achieved for nucleic acid targets of different lengths (22 nt, 60 nt, 200 nt). The sensor produced only a background signal in the presence of single base mismatched analytes, even in hundred times excess in concentration. This label-free and highly selective biosensing platform is versatile and can be used for universal detection of nucleic acids of varied lengths which could revolutionize point of care diagnostics for applications such as bacterial or cancer screening. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploiting pH-Regulated Dimer-Tetramer Transformation of Concanavalin A to Develop Colorimetric Biosensing of Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiahong; Yuan, Yuwei; Hu, Guixian; Wang, Xiangyun; Qi, Peipei; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xinquan; Fu, Yingchun; Li, Yanbin; Yang, Hua

    2017-05-03

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) aggregation-based colorimetric biosensing remains a challenge for bacteria due to their large size. Here we propose a novel colorimetric biosensor for rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) in milk samples based on pH-regulated transformation of dimer/tetramer of Concanavalin A (Con A) and the Con A-glycosyl recognition. Briefly, antibody-modified magnetic nanoparticles was used to capture and concentrate E. coli O157:H7 and then to label with Con A; pH adjusted to 5 was then applied to dissociate Con A tetramer to release dimer, which was collected and re-formed tetramer at pH of 7 to cause the aggregation of dextran-modified AuNPs. The interesting pH-dependent conformation-transformation behavior of Con A innovated the design of the release from the bacteria surface and then the reconstruction of Con A. Therefore, we realized the sensitive colorimetric biosensing of bacteria, which are much larger than AuNPs that is generally not suitable for this kind of method. The proposed biosensor exhibited a limit of detection down to 41 CFU/mL, short assay time (~95 min) and satisfactory specificity. The biosensor also worked well for the detection in milk sample, and may provide a universal concept for the design of colorimetric biosensors for bacteria and virus.

  8. Plasmonic nanoparticles-decorated diatomite biosilica: extending the horizon of on-chip chromatography and label-free biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xianming; Li, Erwen; Squire, Kenny; Liu, Ye; Wu, Bo; Cheng, Li-Jing; Wang, Alan X

    2017-11-01

    Diatomite consists of fossilized remains of ancient diatoms and is a type of naturally abundant photonic crystal biosilica with multiple unique physical and chemical functionalities. In this paper, we explored the fluidic properties of diatomite as the matrix for on-chip chromatography and, simultaneously, the photonic crystal effects to enhance the plasmonic resonances of metallic nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensing. The plasmonic nanoparticle-decorated diatomite biosilica provides a lab-on-a-chip capability to separate and detect small molecules from mixture samples with ultra-high detection sensitivity down to 1 ppm. We demonstrate the significant potential for biomedical applications by screening toxins in real biofluid, achieving simultaneous label-free biosensing of phenethylamine and miR21cDNA in human plasma with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time demonstration to detect target molecules from real biofluids by on-chip chromatography-SERS techniques. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Description of an Advantageous Optical Label-Free Biosensing Interferometric Read-Out Method to Measure Biological Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Holgado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report a new, simple, and reliable optical read-out detection method able to assess Rotavirus present in human sera as well as in the viral pollution sources. It is based on the interference of two interferometers used as biophotonic transducers. The method significantly improves the optical label-free biosensing response measuring both, the concentration of the AgR and its corresponding size. Two different immunoassays were carried out: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA, and the recognition by its antibody (anti-BSA; and Rotavirus (AgR and the recognition by its antibody (anti-AgR. In the cases studied, and using as model interferometer a simple Fabry-Perot transducer, we demonstrate a biosensing enhancement of two orders of magnitude in the Limit of Detection (LoD. In fact, this read-out optical method may have significant implications to enhance other optical label-free photonic transducers reported in the scientific literature.

  10. A Self-Powered Wearable Noninvasive Electronic-Skin for Perspiration Analysis Based on Piezo-Biosensing Unit Matrix of Enzyme/ZnO Nanoarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wuxiao; He, Haoxuan; Zhang, Linlin; Dong, Chuanyi; Zeng, Hui; Dai, Yitong; Xing, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Xue, Xinyu

    2017-09-06

    The emerging multifunctional flexible electronic-skin for establishing body-electric interaction can enable real-time monitoring of personal health status as a new personalized medicine technique. A key difficulty in the device design is the flexible power supply. Here a self-powered wearable noninvasive electronic-skin for perspiration analysis has been realized on the basis of a piezo-biosensing unit matrix of enzyme/ZnO nanoarrays. The electronic-skin can detect lactate, glucose, uric acid, and urea in the perspiration, and no outside electrical power supply or battery is used in the biosensing process. The piezoelectric impulse of the piezo-biosensing units serves as the power supply and the data biosensor. The working mechanism can be ascribed to the piezoelectric-enzymatic-reaction coupling effect of enzyme/ZnO nanowires. The electronic-skin can real-time/continuously monitor the physiological state of a runner through analyzing the perspiration on his skin. This approach can promote the development of a new-type of body electric and self-powered biosensing electronic-skin.

  11. Efficient protein immobilization on polyethersolfone electrospun nanofibrous membrane via covalent binding for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudifard, Matin [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soudi, Sara [Stem Cell Biology Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soleimani, Masoud [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Simzar [Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Elaheh [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vossoughi, Manouchehr, E-mail: vosoughi@sharif.edu [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun nanofibrous membrane based on ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling chemistry. To present the high performance of proposed biosensors, anti-staphylococcus enterotoxin B (anti-SEB) was used as a model to demonstrate the utility of our proposed system. Polymer solution of polyethersolfone was used to fabricate fine nanofibrous membrane. Moreover, industrial polyvinylidene fluoride membrane and conventional microtiter plate were also used to compare the efficiency of antibody immobilization. Scanning electron microscopy images were taken to study the morphology of the membranes. The surface activation of nanofibrous membrane was done with the help of O{sub 2} plasma. PES nanofibrous membrane with carboxyl functional groups for covalent attachment of antibodies were treated by EDC/NHS coupling agent. The quantity of antibody immobilization was measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was performed to confirm the covalent immobilization of antibody on membrane. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and invert fluorescence microscopy were used to analyze the antibody distribution pattern on solid surfaces. Results show that oxygen plasma treatment effectively increased the amount of antibody immobilization through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. It was found that the use of nanofibrous membrane causes the improved detection signal of ELISA based biosensors in comparison to the standard assay carried out in the 96-well microtiter plate. This method has the potential to improve the ELISA-based biosensor and we believe that this technique can be used in various biosensing methods. - Highlights: • Introduction of novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun

  12. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  13. Electrical double layer modulation of hybrid room temperature ionic liquid/aqueous buffer interface for enhanced sweat based biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Badrinath; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2018-08-03

    We have investigated the role of kosmotropic anionic moieties and chaotropic cationic moieties of room temperature hydrophilic ionic liquids in enhancing the biosensing performance of affinity based immunochemical biosensors in human sweat. Two ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM[BF 4 ]) and choline dihydrogen phosphate (Choline[DHP]) were investigated in this study with Choline[DHP] being more kosmotropic in nature having a more protein stabilizing effect based on the hofmeister series. Non-faradaic interfacial charge transfer has been employed as the mechanism for evaluating the formation and the biosensing of capture probe antibodies in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs)/aqueous human sweat interface. The charge of the ionic moieties were utilized to form compact electrical double layers around the antibodies for enhancing the stability of the antibody capture probes, which was evaluated through zeta potential measurements. The zeta potential measurements indicated stability of antibodies due to electrostatic repulsion of the RTIL charged moieties encompassing the antibodies, thus preventing any aggregation. Here, we report for the first time of non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy equivalent circuit model analysis for analyzing and interpreting affinity based biosensing at hybrid electrode/ionic liquid-aqueous sweat buffer interface guided by the choice of the ionic liquid. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cortisol two commonly occurring biomarkers in human sweat were evaluated using this method. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained using both ionic liquids for IL-6 was 0.2 pg mL -1 with cross-reactivity studies indicating better performance of IL-6 detection using Choline[DHP] and no response to cross-reactive molecule. The LOD of 0.1 ng/mL was achieved for cortisol and the cross-reactivity studies indicated that cortisol antibody in BMIM[BF 4 ] did not show any signal response to cross-reactive molecules

  14. Development of a surface plasmon resonance biosensing approach for the rapid detection of porcine circovirus type2 in sample solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Hu

    Full Text Available A sensitive and label-free analytical approach for the detection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 instead of PCV2 antibody in serum sample was systematically investigated in this research based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR with an establishment of special molecular identification membrane. The experimental device for constructing the biosensing analyzer is composed of an integrated biosensor, a home-made microfluidic module, and an electrical control circuit incorporated with a photoelectric converter. In order to detect the PCV2 using the surface plasmon resonance immunoassay, the mercaptopropionic acid has been used to bind the Au film in advance through the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. PCV2 antibodies were bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. For the purpose of evaluating the performance of this approach, the known concentrations of PCV2 Cap protein of 10 µg/mL, 7.5 µg/mL, 5 µg/mL, 2.5 µg/mL, 1 µg/mL, and 0.5 µg/mL were prepared by diluting with PBS successively and then the delta response units (ΔRUs were measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the ΔRUs gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of standard known concentrations of PCV2 Cap protein with the R-Squared value of 0.99625. The theoretical limit of detection was calculated to be 0.04 µg/mL for the surface plasmon resonance biosensing approach. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 81.0% to 89.3% was obtained. In contrast to the PCV2 detection kits, this surface plasmon resonance biosensing system was validated through linearity, precision and recovery, which demonstrated that the surface plasmon resonance immunoassay is reliable and robust. It was concluded that the detection method which is associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to determine the PCV2

  15. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  16. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  17. Optical Microbubble Resonators with High Refractive Index Inner Coating for Bio-Sensing Applications: An Analytical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barucci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators (WGMRs used as an optical transducer for biosensing represents the first and crucial step towards the optimization of the final device performance in terms of sensitivity and Limit of Detection (LoD. Here, we propose an analytical method for the design of an optical microbubble resonator (OMBR-based biosensor. In order to enhance the OMBR sensing performance, we consider a polymeric layer of high refractive index as an inner coating for the OMBR. The effect of this layer and other optical/geometrical parameters on the mode field distribution, sensitivity and LoD of the OMBR is assessed and discussed, both for transverse electric (TE and transverse magnetic (TM polarization. The obtained results do provide physical insights for the development of OMBR-based biosensor.

  18. Surface-enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance biosensing of avian influenza DNA hybridization using subwavelength metallic nanoarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Ae; Jang, Sung Min; Kim, Sung June [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Kyung Min [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyujung; Kim, Donghyun [Program of Nanomedical Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Kyungjae; Oh, Youngjin [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Guk [College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Shuler, Michael L, E-mail: kmbyun@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    We demonstrated enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing based on subwavelength gold nanoarrays built on a thin gold film. Arrays of nanogratings (1D) and nanoholes (2D) with a period of 200 nm were fabricated by electron-beam lithography and used for the detection of avian influenza DNA hybridization. Experimental results showed that both nanoarrays provided significant sensitivity improvement and, especially, 1D nanogratings exhibited higher SPR signal amplification compared with 2D nanohole arrays. The sensitivity enhancement is associated with changes in surface-limited reaction area and strong interactions between bound molecules and localized plasmon fields. Our approach is expected to improve both the sensitivity and sensing resolution and can be applicable to label-free detection of DNA without amplification by polymerase chain reaction.

  19. A comparative study of graphene-hydrogel hybrid bionanocomposites for biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrs, S L; Vanegas, D C; Rong, Y; Bhargava, M; Mechulan, N; Hendershot, P; Yamaguchi, H; Gomes, C; McLamore, E S

    2015-03-07

    Hydrogels have become increasingly popular as immobilization materials for cells, enzymes and proteins for biosensing applications. Enzymatic biosensors that utilize hydrogel as an encapsulant have shown improvements over other immobilization techniques such as cross linking and covalent bonding. However, to date there are no studies which directly compare multiple hydrogel-graphene nanocomposites using the same enzyme and test conditions. This study compares the performance of four different hydrogels used as protein encapsulants in a mediator-free biosensor based on graphene-nanometal-enzyme composites. Alcohol oxidase (AOx) was encapsulated in chitosan poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAM), silk fibroin or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) hydrogels, and then spin coated onto a nanoplatinum-graphene modified electrode. The transduction mechanism for the biosensor was based on AOx-catalyzed oxidation of methanol to produce hydrogen peroxide. To isolate the effect(s) of stimulus response on biosensor behavior, all experiments were conducted at 25 °C and pH 7.10. Electroactive surface area (ESA), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), sensitivity to methanol, response time, limit of detection, and shelf life were measured for each bionanocomposite. Chitosan and PNIPAAM had the highest sensitivity (0.46 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.1 μA mM(-1), respectively) and electroactive surface area (0.2 ± 0.06 and 0.2 ± 0.02 cm(2), respectively), as well as the fastest response time (4.3 ± 0.8 and 4.8 ± 1.1 s, respectively). Silk and CNC demonstrated lower sensitivity (0.09 ± 0.02 and 0.15 ± 0.03 μA mM(-1), respectively), lower electroactive surface area (0.12 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.03 cm(2), respectively), and longer response time (8.9 ± 2.1 and 6.3 ± 0.8 s, respectively). The high porosity of chitosan, PNIPAAM, and silk gels led to excellent transport, which was significantly better than CNC bionanocomposites. Electrochemical performance of CNC bionanocomposites were

  20. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  1. Polymeric bionanocomposite cast thin films with in situ laccase-catalyzed polymerization of dopamine for biosensing and biofuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yueming; Deng, Wenfang; Li, Yunyong; Huang, Zhao; Meng, Yue; Xie, Qingji; Ma, Ming; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2010-04-22

    We report here on the facile preparation of polymer-enzyme-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) cast films accompanying in situ laccase (Lac)-catalyzed polymerization for electrochemical biosensing and biofuel cell applications. Lac-catalyzed polymerization of dopamine (DA) as a new substrate was examined in detail by UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning electron microscopy. Casting the aqueous mixture of DA, Lac and MWCNTs on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) yielded a robust polydopamine (PDA)-Lac-MWCNTs/GCE that can sense hydroquinone with 643 microA mM(-1) cm(-2) sensitivity and 20-nM detection limit (S/N = 3). The DA substrate yielded the best biosensing performance, as compared with aniline, o-phenylenediamine, or o-aminophenol as the substrate for similar Lac-catalyzed polymerization. Casting the aqueous mixture of DA, glucose oxidase (GOx), Lac, and MWCNTs on a Pt electrode yielded a robust PDA-GOx-Lac-MWCNTs/Pt electrode that exhibits glucose-detection sensitivity of 68.6 microA mM(-1) cm(-2). In addition, 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS) was also coimmobilized to yield a PDA-Lac-MWCNTs-ABTS/GCE that can effectively catalyze the reduction of O(2), and it was successfully used as the biocathode of a membraneless glucose/O(2) biofuel cell (BFC) in pH 5.0 Britton-Robinson buffer. The proposed biomacromolecule-immobilization platform based on enzyme-catalyzed polymerization may be useful for preparing many other multifunctional polymeric bionanocomposites for wide applications.

  2. Comparison of gas chromotography, spectrophotometry and near infrared spectroscopy to quantify prussic acid potential in forages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ben M; Moore, Kenneth J; Fales, Steven L; Pedersen, Jeffery F

    2011-06-01

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] has been shown to contain the cyanogenic glycoside dhurrin, which is responsible for the disorder known as prussic acid poisoning in livestock. The current standard method for estimating hydrogen cyanide (HCN) uses spectrophotometry to measure the aglycone, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (p-HB), after hydrolysis. Errors may occur due to the inability of this method to solely estimate the absorbance of p-HB at a given wavelength. The objective of this study was to compare the use of gas chromatography (GC) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methods, along with a spectrophotometry method to estimate the potential for prussic acid (HCNp) of sorghum and sudangrasses over three stages maturities. It was shown that the GC produced higher HCNp estimates than the spectrophotometer for the grain sorghums, but lower concentrations for the sudangrass. Based on what is known about the analytical process of each method, the GC data is likely closer to the true HCNp concentrations of the forages. Both the GC and spectrophotometry methods yielded robust equations with the NIRS method; however, using GC as the calibration method resulted in more accurate and repeatable estimates. The HCNp values obtained from using the GC quantification method are believed to be closer to the actual values of the forage, and that use of this method will provide a more accurate and easily automated means of quantifying prussic acid. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Design and Experimental Verification of a 0.19 V 53 μW 65 nm CMOS Integrated Supply-Sensing Sensor With a Supply-Insensitive Temperature Sensor and an Inductive-Coupling Transmitter for a Self-Powered Bio-sensing System Using a Biofuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsuki; Ikeda, Kei; Ogawa, Yudai; Kai, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Nakazato, Kazuo; Niitsu, Kiichi

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present a self-powered bio-sensing system with the capability of proximity inductive-coupling communication for supply sensing and temperature monitoring. The proposed bio-sensing system includes a biofuel cell as a power source and a sensing frontend that is associated with the CMOS integrated supply-sensing sensor. The sensor consists of a digital-based gate leakage timer, a supply-insensitive time-domain temperature sensor, and a current-driven inductive-coupling transmitter and achieves low-voltage operation. The timer converts the output voltage from a biofuel cell to frequency. The temperature sensor provides a pulse width modulation (PWM) output that is not dependent on the supply voltage, and the associated inductive-coupling transmitter enables proximity communication. A test chip was fabricated in 65 nm CMOS technology and consumed 53 μW with a supply voltage of 190 mV. The low-voltage-friendly design satisfied the performance targets of each integrated sensor without any trimming. The chips allowed us to successfully demonstrate proximity communication with an asynchronous receiver, and the measurement results show the potential for self-powered operation using biofuel cells. The analysis and experimental verification of the system confirmed their robustness.

  4. An amperometric enzyme electrode and its biofuel cell based on a glucose oxidase-poly(3-anilineboronic acid)-Pd nanoparticles bionanocomposite for glucose biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingen; Ma, Yixuan; Zhang, Pei; Chao, Long; Huang, Ting; Xie, Qingji; Chen, Chao; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-06-01

    A new amperometric enzyme electrode and its biofuel cell were fabricated based on a glucose oxidase (GOx)-poly(3-anilineboronic acid) (PABA)-Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) bionanocomposite for biosensing of glucose. Briefly, Pd was electroplated on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-modified Au electrode, and the GOx-PABA-PdNPs bionanocomposite was prepared on the Pd(plate)/MWCNTs/Au electrode through the chemical oxidation of a GOx-3-anilineboronic acid adduct by Na2PdCl4, followed by electrode-modification with an outer-layer chitosan (CS) film. The thus-prepared CS/GOx-PABA-PdNPs/Pd(plate)/MWCNTs/Au electrode exhibited a linear amperometric response to glucose concentration from 2.0 μM to 4.5 mM with a sensitivity of 160 μA/mM/cm(2), sub-μM detection limit, and excellent operation/storage stability in the first-generation biosensing mode, as well as excellent analytical performance in the second-generation biosensing mode. The good recoveries of glucose obtained from spiked urine samples revealed the application potential of our amperometric enzyme electrode. In addition, a glucose/O2 biofuel cell was constructed using this enzyme electrode as the anode and a Pt/MWCNTs/Au electrode as the cathode, and this biofuel cell as a self-powered biosensing device showed a linear voltage response to glucose concentration from 100 μM to 13.5 mM with a sensitivity of 43.5 mV/mM/cm(2) and excellent operation/storage stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rational design of carboxyl groups perpendicularly attached to a graphene sheet: a platform for enhanced biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Alessandra; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-03

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based materials offer great potential for biofunctionalization with applications ranging from biosensing to drug delivery. Such biofunctionalization utilizes specific functional groups, typically a carboxyl moiety, as anchoring points for biomolecule. However, due to the fact that the exact chemical structure of GO is still largely unknown and poorly defined (it was postulated to consist of various oxygen-containing groups, such as epoxy, hydroxyl, carboxyl, carbonyl, and peroxy in varying ratios), it is challenging to fabricate highly biofunctionalized GO surfaces. The predominant anchoring sites (i.e., carboxyl groups) are mainly present as terminal groups on the edges of GO sheets and thus account for only a fraction of the oxygen-containing groups on GO. Herein, we suggest a direct solution to the long-standing problem of limited abundance of carboxyl groups on GO; GO was first reduced to graphene and consequently modified with only carboxyl groups grafted perpendicularly to its surface by a rational synthesis using free-radical addition of isobutyronitrile with subsequent hydrolysis. Such grafted graphene oxide can contain a high amount of carboxyl groups for consequent biofunctionalization, at which the extent of grafting is limited only by the number of carbon atoms in the graphene plane; in contrast, the abundance of carboxyl groups on "classical" GO is limited by the amount of terminal carbon atoms. Such a graphene platform embedded with perpendicularly grafted carboxyl groups was characterized in detail by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and its application was exemplified with single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. It was found that the removal of oxygen functionalities after the chemical reduction enhanced the electron-transfer rate of the graphene. More importantly, the introduction of carboxyl groups promoted a more efficient immobilization of DNA probes on the

  6. A sensitive and quantitative biosensing method for the determination of {gamma}-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolterbeek, H.Th.; Meer, A.J.G.M. van der [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.

    1996-11-01

    A quantitative and sensitive biosensing method has been developed for the determination of {gamma}-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the element in the biosensor and the determination of the element level in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Measurements were performed with floating water plants (Azolla filiculoides Lamk., Spirodela polyrhiza/Lemna sp.) and the fully submerged water plant Ceratophyllum demersum L., which were sampled from ditch water. Concentrations of elements and radionuclides were determined in both water and biosensor plants, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), ICP-MS, and {gamma}-ray spectrometry, respectively. For the latter, both 1 litre samples (Marinelli-geometry) and 1 cm{sup 3} samples (well-type detectors) were applied in measurements. (author).

  7. Bioelectrocatalytic and biosensing properties of horseradish peroxidase covalently immobilized on (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane-modified titanate nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovic, David; Gajovic, Andreja; Ivekovic, Damir

    2011-01-01

    Titanate nanotubes (TiNT) surface modified with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane were employed as a support for covalent immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by using 1,4-benzoquinone as a coupling agent. Composite film-electrodes consisting of HRP-modified TiNT embedded into the porous carbon powder/Nafion matrix were fabricated and their applicability in direct bioelectrocatalytic reduction of H 2 O 2 and H 2 O 2 biosensing were investigated. An efficient direct electron transfer between the immobilized HRP molecules and the electrode was observed in the presence of H 2 O 2 at potentials lower than 600 mV (vs. Hg/Hg 2 Cl 2 /3.5 M KCl). For the HRP-TiNT-modified electrodes polarized at 0 mV, a linear dependence of the bioelectrocatalytic current on the concentration of H 2 O 2 was observed up to the concentration of H 2 O 2 equal to 10 μM, with the sensitivity of (1.10 ± 0.01) AM -1 cm -2 and the detection limit of 35 nM.

  8. A novel liquid-filled microstructured polymer optical fiber as bio-sensing platform for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkune, Mikel; Arrospide, Eneko; Berganza, Amaia; Bikandi, Iñaki; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Durana, Gaizka; Zubia, Joseba

    2018-02-01

    One approach to overcome the poor efficiency of the Raman scattering as a sensing platform is to use microstructured optical fibers. In this type of fibers with a longitudinal holey structure, light interacts with the target sample, which is confined in the core, giving rise to a light intensity increase of the obtained Raman spectra due to the large interaction distances and the guidance of the scattered light. In this work, we present an ad-hoc fabricated liquid-core microstructured polymer optical fiber (LC-mPOF) as a bio-sensing platform for Raman Spectroscopy. Arising from an initial simulation stage, we create the desired preform using the drilling technique and afterwards the LC-mPOF is drawn in our fiber drawing tower. The guiding mechanism of the light through the solution has a major importance, being a key factor to obtain appreciable enhancements in Raman scattering. In this case, in order to optimize the Raman scattering signal of dissolved glucose (target molecule), we have filled the core with an aqueous solution of the target molecule, enabling in this way the modified total internal reflection mechanism. Experimental Raman measurements are performed and results are discussed.

  9. A sensitive and quantitative biosensing method for the determination of γ-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolterbeek, H.Th.; Meer, A.J.G.M. van der

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative and sensitive biosensing method has been developed for the determination of γ-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the element in the biosensor and the determination of the element level in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Measurements were performed with floating water plants (Azolla filiculoides Lamk., Spirodela polyrhiza/Lemna sp.) and the fully submerged water plant Ceratophyllum demersum L., which were sampled from ditch water. Concentrations of elements and radionuclides were determined in both water and biosensor plants, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), ICP-MS, and γ-ray spectrometry, respectively. For the latter, both 1 litre samples (Marinelli-geometry) and 1 cm 3 samples (well-type detectors) were applied in measurements. (author)

  10. pH sensing characteristics and biosensing application of solution-gated reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Il-Yung; Kim, Duck-Jin; Jung, Jin-Heak; Yoon, Ok Ja; Thanh, Tien Nguyen; Quang, Trung Tran; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2013-07-15

    Solution-gated reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors (R-GO FETs) were investigated for pH sensing and biochemical sensing applications. A channel of a networked R-GO film formed by self-assembly was incorporated as a sensing layer into a solution-gated FET structure for pH sensing and the detection of acetylcholine (Ach), which is a neurotransmitter in the nerve system, through enzymatic reactions. The fabricated R-GO FET was sensitive to protons (H(+)) with a pH sensitivity of 29 mV/pH in terms of the shift of the charge neutrality point (CNP), which is attributed to changes in the surface potential caused by the interaction of protons with OH surface functional groups present on the R-GO surface. The R-GO FET immobilized with acetylcholinesterase (AchE) was used to detect Ach in the concentration range of 0.1-10mM by sensing protons generated during the enzymatic reactions. The results indicate that R-GO FETs provide the capability to detect protons, demonstrating their applicability as a biosensing device for enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gold/silver/gold trilayer films on nanostructured polycarbonate substrates for direct and label-free nanoplasmonic biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Estévez, M-Carmen; Vázquez-García, Marc; Berenguel-Alonso, Miguel; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; Lechuga, Laura M

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasmooth gold/silver/gold trilayer nanostructured plasmonic sensors were obtained using commercial Blu-ray optical discs as nanoslits-based flexible polymer substrates. A thin gold film was used as an adhesion and nucleation layer to improve the chemical stability and reduce the surface roughness of the overlying silver film, without increasing ohmic plasmon losses. The structures were physically and optically characterized and compared with nanostructures of single gold layer. Ultrasmooth and chemically stable trilayer nanostructures with a surface roughness <0.5 nm were obtained following a simple and reproducible fabrication process. They showed a figure of merit (FOM) value up to 69.2 RIU -1 which is significantly higher (more than 95%) than the gold monolayer counterpart. Their potential for biosensing was demonstrated by employing the trilayer sensor for the direct and refractometric (label-free) detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker in undiluted urine achieving a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the pM order. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Self-assembled NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes sponge for enhanced glucose biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingchun; Zhao, Minggang, E-mail: zhaomg@ouc.edu.cn; Chen, Jing; Fan, Sisi; Liang, Jingjing; Ding, Longjiang; Chen, Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Self-assembled NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CNTs sponge was prepared by ice-templating method. • The mechanism of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} modified CNTs relied on π-π interactions and static cling. • The porous structure made for GO{sub x} load, electrons transport and reactants diffusion. • Double catalysis and enhanced glucose sensing were achieved with elements Ni and Fe. - Abstract: In this work, self-assembled NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) sponge was prepared by ice-templating method. The device synergized the advantageous features of both the 3D porous nanostructure and the catalytic properties of CNTs with GOx and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The porous network construction of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CNTs sheets offered enlarged specific surface for GOx immobilization and opened channels for facilitating the electrons transport and reactants diffusion. With the help of the abnormal-valence elements Ni and Fe, double catalysis has happened and the enhanced glucose biosensing performance has been achieved. The fabricated glucose biosensor exhibited two large linear ranges (0–3.0 and 3.2–12.4 mM) and distinct sensitivities (84.1 and 24.6 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}).

  13. Surface stress sensor based on MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometer with high wavelength selectivity for label-free biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hizawa, Takeshi; Misawa, Nobuo; Taki, Miki; Sawada, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a surface stress sensor based on a microelectromechanical Fabry-Perot interferometer with high wavelength selectivity by using Au half-mirrors, for highly sensitive label-free biosensing. When the target molecule is adsorbed by the antigen-antibody reaction onto a movable membrane with a thin Au film, which acts as an upper mirror of the optical interferometer, the amount of deflection of the movable membrane deflected by the change in surface stress can be detected with high sensitivity. To improve the signal at the small membrane deflection region of this biosensor resulting in detection of low concentration molecules, by integrating 50 nm-thick Au half-mirrors, the wavelength selectivity of the optical interferometer has been successfully improved 6.6 times. Furthermore, the peak shift in the reflection spectrum due to the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) antigen with a concentration of 10 ng ml-l by the antigen-antibody reaction was spectroscopically measured on the fabricated optical interferometer, and the deflection amount of the movable membrane after 10 min treatment was 2.4 times larger than that of nonspecific adsorption with the avidin molecules. This result indicated that the proposed sensor can be used for selective detection of low-concentration target antigen molecules.

  14. Hollow mesoporous CuCo2O4 microspheres derived from metal organic framework: A novel functional materials for simultaneous H2O2 biosensing and glucose biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shiqiang; Gu, Shuqing; Ding, Yaping; Zhang, Jiangjiang; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Zongqian

    2018-02-01

    Hollow mesoporous CuCo 2 O 4 (meso-CuCo 2 O 4 ) microspheres were successfully synthesized by decomposing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as the template. The as-prepared CuCo 2 O 4 microspheres were first simultaneously used for H 2 O 2 biosensing and glucose biofuel cell (GFC) as the enzyme mimic. The resulting of meso-CuCo 2 O 4 displayed not only excellent catalytic performances to H 2 O 2 including a super-fast response time (within 2s), a super-high sensitivity (654.23 μA mM -1 cm -2 ) and a super-low detection limit (3nM at S/N = 3) on the sensor, but also great values in GFC as anode material with an open circuit voltage of 0.85V, a maximum power density of 0.33 mWcm -2 and a limiting current density of 1.27 mAcm -2 , respectively. The preeminent catalytic abilities to H 2 O 2 and glucose may be attributed to the surpassing intrinsic catalytic activity of CuCo 2 O 4 and large specific area of mesoporous structure. These significant findings deriving from this work not only provided a novel exploration for the fabrication of hollow spherical mesoporous bimetallic oxides, but also promoted the development of the supersensitive detection of H 2 O 2 and non-enzymatic biofuel cell. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Design, characterization and applications of new ionic liquid matrices for multifunctional analysis of biomolecules: A novel strategy for pathogenic bacteria biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Khan, M Shahnawaz; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Design and characterize novel UV absorbed-ionic liquid matrices series. • Apply the new series for different analytes. • Introduce a novel methodology for pathogenic bacteria biosensing. • Tabulate the physical parameters of the new series. - Abstract: The design, preparation and performance for novel UV-light absorbing (room-temperature) ionic liquid matrices (UV-RTILMs) for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) were reported. A series of UV-RTILMs was prepared by ultrasonication of equimolar of acid (mefenamic acid) and bases (aniline (ANI), pyridine (Pyr), dimethyl aniline (DMANI) and 2-methyl picoline (2-P)). The UV-RTILMs have not only significant absorbance at the desired wavelength (337 nm of the N 2 Laser), but also have available protons that can easily undergo proton transfer reactions to ionize the target molecules. The novel UV-RTILMs have the ability to ionize different and wide classes of compounds such as drugs, carbohydrate, and amino acids. The new UV-RTILMs series have been successfully and selectively applied for biosensing the lysates of pathogenic bacteria in the presence of the cell macromolecules. A new strategy for biosensing pathogens was presented via sensing the pathogens lysate in the cell suspension. The new materials can effectively detect the bacterial toxins without separation or any pretreatment. They offered excellent ionization of labile oligosaccharides with protonated peaks. They could significantly enhance the analyte signals, produce homogeneous spotting, reducing spot-to-spot variation, excellent vacuum stability, higher ion peak intensity, and wide application possibility. The physical parameters such as molar refractivity, molar volume, parachor, surface tension, density and polarizability were calculated and tabulated. The new UV-RTILMs could offer excellent reproducibility and great repeatability and they are promising matrices for wide applications on MALDI-MS

  16. Design, characterization and applications of new ionic liquid matrices for multifunctional analysis of biomolecules: A novel strategy for pathogenic bacteria biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Assuit University, Assuit, 71515 (Egypt); Khan, M Shahnawaz [Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hui-Fen, E-mail: hwu@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 800, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Design and characterize novel UV absorbed-ionic liquid matrices series. • Apply the new series for different analytes. • Introduce a novel methodology for pathogenic bacteria biosensing. • Tabulate the physical parameters of the new series. - Abstract: The design, preparation and performance for novel UV-light absorbing (room-temperature) ionic liquid matrices (UV-RTILMs) for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) were reported. A series of UV-RTILMs was prepared by ultrasonication of equimolar of acid (mefenamic acid) and bases (aniline (ANI), pyridine (Pyr), dimethyl aniline (DMANI) and 2-methyl picoline (2-P)). The UV-RTILMs have not only significant absorbance at the desired wavelength (337 nm of the N{sub 2} Laser), but also have available protons that can easily undergo proton transfer reactions to ionize the target molecules. The novel UV-RTILMs have the ability to ionize different and wide classes of compounds such as drugs, carbohydrate, and amino acids. The new UV-RTILMs series have been successfully and selectively applied for biosensing the lysates of pathogenic bacteria in the presence of the cell macromolecules. A new strategy for biosensing pathogens was presented via sensing the pathogens lysate in the cell suspension. The new materials can effectively detect the bacterial toxins without separation or any pretreatment. They offered excellent ionization of labile oligosaccharides with protonated peaks. They could significantly enhance the analyte signals, produce homogeneous spotting, reducing spot-to-spot variation, excellent vacuum stability, higher ion peak intensity, and wide application possibility. The physical parameters such as molar refractivity, molar volume, parachor, surface tension, density and polarizability were calculated and tabulated. The new UV-RTILMs could offer excellent reproducibility and great repeatability and they are promising matrices for wide applications on MALDI-MS.

  17. New Evidence for the Mechanism of Action of a Type-2 Diabetes Drug Using a Magnetic Bead-Based Automated Biosensing Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Nur-E-Habiba; Rena, Graham

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of action (MOA) of the first line type-2 diabetes drug metformin remains unclear despite its widespread usage. However, recent evidence suggests that the mitochondrial copper (Cu)-binding action of metformin may contribute toward the drug's MOA. Here, we present a novel biosensing...... of metformin's blood-glucose lowering action. In this assay, cysteine-functionalized magnetic beadswere agglutinated in the presence of Cu due to cysteine's Cu-chelation property. Addition of clinically relevant doses of metformin resulted in disaggregation of Cu-bridged bead-clusters, whereas the effect...

  18. Fc-specific biotinylation of antibody using an engineered photoactivatable Z-Biotin and its biosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Ming; Bao, Ru-Meng; Yu, Chang-Mei; Lv, Yan-Na; Zhang, Wei-Fen; Tang, Jin-Bao

    2017-01-01

    The development of a site-specific and covalent attachment methodology is crucial for antibody-biotin conjugates to preserve the antigen-binding ability of antibodies and yield homogeneous products. In this study, an engineered photoactivatable Z-domain variant [an UV-active amino acid benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) was genetically incorporated into the Z-domain] carrying one biotin molecule (Z Bpa -Biotin) was prepared by employing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA and Avitag/BirA techniques. The site-specific and covalent attachment of IgG-biotin conjugates, viz. photo-biotinylated IgG, was successfully achieved after UV exposure by combining the inherent Fc-binding capability of the Z-domain with the formation of covalent bond by the photo-crosslinker. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis assay showed that more than 90% of IgGs conjugated with Z Bpa -Biotin molecules suffered 3 h UV irradiation. Further pepsin digestion analysis confirmed that the Z Bpa -Biotin was conjugated to the Fc fragment of IgG without interference. We took the tumor biomarker carcinoembryoic antigen (CEA) as model to evaluate the detection efficiency of the site-specific photo-biotinylated IgG in biosensing application using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The photo-biotinylated IgG coated surface gave a limit of detection (LOD) of 2 ng mL -1 , is 5-fold lower than that of the randomly NHS-biotinylated IgG (10 ng mL -1 ). Given that the (strept)avidin-biotin complex is extensively used in immunoassays, the proposed method for biotinylated IgG provides a powerful approach to further expand related applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Associating biosensing properties with the morphological structure of multilayers containing carbon nanotubes on field-effect devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Jose R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Baecker, Matthias; Poghossian, Arshak; Schoening, Michael J. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    The control of molecular architecture provided by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has led to enhanced biosensors, in which advantageous features of distinct materials can be combined. Full optimization of biosensing performance, however, is only reached if the film morphology is suitable for the principle of detection of a specific biosensor. In this paper, we report a detailed morphology analysis of LbL films made with alternating layers of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, which were then covered with a layer of penicillinase (PEN). An optimized performance to detect penicillin G was obtained with 6-bilayer SWNT/PAMAM LbL films deposited on p-Si-SiO{sub 2}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} chips, used in biosensors based on a capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) and a light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) structure, respectively. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the LbL films were porous, with a large surface area due to interconnection of SWNT into PAMAM layers. This morphology was instrumental for the adsorption of a larger quantity of PEN, with the resulting LbL film being highly stable. The experiments to detect penicillin were performed with constant-capacitance (ConCap) and constant-current (CC) measurements for EIS and LAPS sensors, respectively, which revealed an enhanced detection signal and sensitivity of ca. 100 mV/decade for the field-effect sensors modified with the PAMAM/SWNT LbL film. It is concluded that controlling film morphology is essential for an enhanced performance of biosensors, not only in terms of sensitivity but also stability and response time. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Amplification of biological targets via on-chip culture for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Carson, Bryan; Finley, Melissa; Arndt, William

    2018-01-02

    The present invention, in part, relates to methods and apparatuses for on-chip amplification and/or detection of various targets, including biological targets and any amplifiable targets. In some examples, the microculture apparatus includes a single-use, normally-closed fluidic valve that is initially maintained in the closed position by a valve element bonded to an adhesive coating. The valve is opened using a magnetic force. The valve element includes a magnetic material or metal. Such apparatuses and methods are useful for in-field or real-time detection of targets, especially in limited resource settings.

  1. Low-Cost Label-Free Biosensing Bimetallic Cellulose Strip with SILAR-Synthesized Silver Core-Gold Shell Nanoparticle Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wansun; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk; Lee, Anbok; Choi, Samjin

    2017-06-20

    We introduce a label-free biosensing cellulose strip sensor with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-encoded bimetallic core@shell nanoparticles. Bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of a synthesis of core Ag nanoparticles (AgNP) and a synthesis of shell gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were fabricated on a cellulose substrate by two-stage successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. The bimetallic nanoparticle-enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects were theoretically verified by computational calculations with finite element models of optimized bimetallic nanoparticles interacting with an incident laser source. Well-dispersed raspberry-like bimetallic nanoparticles with highly polycrystalline structure were confirmed through X-ray and electron analyses despite ionic reaction synthesis. The stability against silver oxidation and high sensitivity with superior SERS enhancement factor (EF) of the low-cost SERS-encoded cellulose strip, which achieved 3.98 × 10 8 SERS-EF, 6.1%-RSD reproducibility, and <10%-degraded sustainability, implicated the possibility of practical applications in high analytical screening methods, such as single-molecule detection. The remarkable sensitivity and selectivity of this bimetallic biosensing strip in determining aquatic toxicities for prohibited drugs, such as aniline, sodium azide, and malachite green, as well as monitoring the breast cancer progression for urine, confirmed its potential as a low-cost label-free point-of-care test chip for the early diagnosis of human diseases.

  2. Reusable split-aptamer-based biosensor for rapid detection of cocaine in serum by using an all-fiber evanescent wave optical biosensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunfei; Long, Feng; Gu, Chunmei; Wang, Cheng; Han, Shitong; He, Miao

    2016-08-24

    A rapid, facile, and sensitive assay of cocaine in biological fluids is important to prevent illegal abuse of drugs. A two-step structure-switching aptasensor has been developed for cocaine detection based on evanescent wave optical biosensing platform. In the proposed biosensing platform, two tailored aptamer probes were used to construct the molecular structure switching. In the existence of cocaine, two fragments of cocaine aptamer formed a three-way junction quickly, and the fluorophore group of one fragment was effectively quenched by the quencher group of the other one. The tail of the three-way junction hybridized with the cDNA sequences immobilized on the optical fiber biosensor. Fluorescence was excited by evanescent wave, and the fluorescence signal was proportional to cocaine concentration. Cocaine was detected in 450 s (300 s for incubation and 150 s for detection and regeneration) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 165.2 nM. The proposed aptasensor was evaluated in human serum samples, and it exhibited good recovery, precision, and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gold Nanoparticles Assembly on Silicon and Gold Surfaces: Mechanism, Stability and Efficiency in Diclofenac Biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Haddada , Maroua; Hübner , Maria; Casale , Sandra; Knopp , Dietmar; Niessner , Reinhard; Salmain , Michele; Boujday , Souhir

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We investigated the assembly of Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on Gold and Silicon sensors with two final objectives: (i) understanding the factors governing the interaction and (ii) building up a nanostructured piezoelectric immunosensor for diclofenac, a small-sized pharmaceutical pollutant. Different surface chemistries were devised to achieve AuNPs assembly on planar substrates. These surface chemistries included amines to immobilize AuNPs via electrostatic interaction...

  4. Fc-specific biotinylation of antibody using an engineered photoactivatable Z–Biotin and its biosensing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hong-Ming; Bao, Ru-Meng; Yu, Chang-Mei; Lv, Yan-Na; Zhang, Wei-Fen; Tang, Jin-Bao

    2017-01-01

    The development of a site-specific and covalent attachment methodology is crucial for antibody–biotin conjugates to preserve the antigen-binding ability of antibodies and yield homogeneous products. In this study, an engineered photoactivatable Z-domain variant [an UV-active amino acid benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) was genetically incorporated into the Z-domain] carrying one biotin molecule (Z_B_p_a–Biotin) was prepared by employing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA and Avitag/BirA techniques. The site-specific and covalent attachment of IgG–biotin conjugates, viz. photo-biotinylated IgG, was successfully achieved after UV exposure by combining the inherent Fc-binding capability of the Z-domain with the formation of covalent bond by the photo-crosslinker. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis assay showed that more than 90% of IgGs conjugated with Z_B_p_a–Biotin molecules suffered 3 h UV irradiation. Further pepsin digestion analysis confirmed that the Z_B_p_a–Biotin was conjugated to the Fc fragment of IgG without interference. We took the tumor biomarker carcinoembryoic antigen (CEA) as model to evaluate the detection efficiency of the site-specific photo-biotinylated IgG in biosensing application using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The photo-biotinylated IgG coated surface gave a limit of detection (LOD) of 2 ng mL"-"1, is 5-fold lower than that of the randomly NHS-biotinylated IgG (10 ng mL"-"1). Given that the (strept)avidin–biotin complex is extensively used in immunoassays, the proposed method for biotinylated IgG provides a powerful approach to further expand related applications. - Highlights: • A photoactivable Z_B_p_a–Biotin was fabricated by aaRS/tRNA and Avitag/BirA techniques. • A approach for Fc-specific photo-biotinylated IgG via Z_B_p_a–Biotin was proposed. • The photo-biotinylated IgG was used to fabricate an immunosensor for detecting CEA. • It gave a LOD of 2 ng mL"-"1 CEA

  5. Fc-specific biotinylation of antibody using an engineered photoactivatable Z–Biotin and its biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hong-Ming; Bao, Ru-Meng; Yu, Chang-Mei; Lv, Yan-Na; Zhang, Wei-Fen; Tang, Jin-Bao, E-mail: tangjb@wfmc.edu.cn

    2017-01-01

    The development of a site-specific and covalent attachment methodology is crucial for antibody–biotin conjugates to preserve the antigen-binding ability of antibodies and yield homogeneous products. In this study, an engineered photoactivatable Z-domain variant [an UV-active amino acid benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) was genetically incorporated into the Z-domain] carrying one biotin molecule (Z{sub Bpa}–Biotin) was prepared by employing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA and Avitag/BirA techniques. The site-specific and covalent attachment of IgG–biotin conjugates, viz. photo-biotinylated IgG, was successfully achieved after UV exposure by combining the inherent Fc-binding capability of the Z-domain with the formation of covalent bond by the photo-crosslinker. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis assay showed that more than 90% of IgGs conjugated with Z{sub Bpa}–Biotin molecules suffered 3 h UV irradiation. Further pepsin digestion analysis confirmed that the Z{sub Bpa}–Biotin was conjugated to the Fc fragment of IgG without interference. We took the tumor biomarker carcinoembryoic antigen (CEA) as model to evaluate the detection efficiency of the site-specific photo-biotinylated IgG in biosensing application using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The photo-biotinylated IgG coated surface gave a limit of detection (LOD) of 2 ng mL{sup -1}, is 5-fold lower than that of the randomly NHS-biotinylated IgG (10 ng mL{sup -1}). Given that the (strept)avidin–biotin complex is extensively used in immunoassays, the proposed method for biotinylated IgG provides a powerful approach to further expand related applications. - Highlights: • A photoactivable Z{sub Bpa}–Biotin was fabricated by aaRS/tRNA and Avitag/BirA techniques. • A approach for Fc-specific photo-biotinylated IgG via Z{sub Bpa}–Biotin was proposed. • The photo-biotinylated IgG was used to fabricate an immunosensor for detecting CEA. • It gave a LOD

  6. Gold Nanoparticles Like A Matrix For Covalent Immobilization Of Cholesterol Oxidase – Application For Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnarowska R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for various areas of material science as well as nanotechnology, electronics and medicine. The interest in this material is provided due to its unique optical, electronic and molecular-recognition properties. This paper presents results of preparation, characterization and biofunctionalization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles have been conjugated with the cholesterol oxidase enzyme in order to prepare the active element for biosensors. Cholesterol oxidase is one of the most important analytical enzyme, used for cholesterol assay in clinical diagnostics, and there is still a necessity in improvement of existing analytical techniques, including bio-nanotechnological approaches based on modern nanosystems. The prepared bio-nanosystem was characterized by the enzyme activity test. Obtained results showed a stable binding of the enzyme with nanoparticles and preserved the bioactivity approves which gives possibility to use the prepared bio-nanosystems for analytical purposes.

  7. Nanoscale surface modification for enhanced biosensing a journey toward better glucose monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guigen

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of electrochemical-based biosensors and their crucial components. Practical examples are given throughout the text to illustrate how the performance of electrochemical-based biosensors can be improved by nanoscale surface modification and how an optimal design can be achieved. All essential aspects of biosensors are considered, including electrode functionalization, efficiency of the mass transport of reactive species, and long term durability and functionality of the sensor. This book also: ·       Explains how the performance of an electrochemical-based biosensor can be improved by nanoscale surface modification ·       Gives readers the tools to evaluate and improve the performance of a biosensor with a multidisciplinary approach that considers electrical, electrostatic, electrochemical, chemical, and biochemical events ·       Links the performance of a sensor to the various governing physical and chemical principles so readers can fully unders...

  8. Bio-sensing applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles: Advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbgoo, Fahimeh; Ramezani, Mohammad; Darroudi, Majid

    2017-10-15

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) contain several properties such as catalytic activity, fluorescent quencher and electrochemical, high surface area, and oxygen transfer ability, which have attracted considerable attention in developing high-sensitive biosensors. CNPs can be used as a whole sensor or a part of recognition or transducer element. However, reports have shown that applying these nanoparticles in sensor design could remarkably enhance detection sensitivity. CNP's outstanding properties in biosensors which go from high catalytic activity and surface area to oxygen transfer and fluorescent quenching capabilities are also highlighted. Herein, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of CNPs-based biosensors that function through various detection modes including colorimetric, electrochemistry, and chemoluminescent regarding the detection of small organic chemicals, metal ions and biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Functionalized Solid Electrodes for Electrochemical Biosensing of Purine Nucleobases and Their Analogues: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vimal Kumar; Jelen, Frantisek; Trnkova, Libuse

    2015-01-01

    Interest in electrochemical analysis of purine nucleobases and few other important purine derivatives has been growing rapidly. Over the period of the past decade, the design of electrochemical biosensors has been focused on achieving high sensitivity and efficiency. The range of existing electrochemical methods with carbon electrode displays the highest rate in the development of biosensors. Moreover, modification of electrode surfaces based on nanomaterials is frequently used due to their extraordinary conductivity and surface to volume ratio. Different strategies for modifying electrode surfaces facilitate electron transport between the electrode surface and biomolecules, including DNA, oligonucleotides and their components. This review aims to summarize recent developments in the electrochemical analysis of purine derivatives, as well as discuss different applications. PMID:25594595

  10. Toward Wireless Health Monitoring via an Analog Signal Compression-Based Biosensing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyuan; Sadhu, Vidyasagar; Le, Tuan; Pompili, Dario; Javanmard, Mehdi

    2018-06-01

    Wireless all-analog biosensor design for the concurrent microfluidic and physiological signal monitoring is presented in this paper. The key component is an all-analog circuit capable of compressing two analog sources into one analog signal by the analog joint source-channel coding (AJSCC). Two circuit designs are discussed, including the stacked-voltage-controlled voltage source (VCVS) design with the fixed number of levels, and an improved design, which supports a flexible number of AJSCC levels. Experimental results are presented on the wireless biosensor prototype, composed of printed circuit board realizations of the stacked-VCVS design. Furthermore, circuit simulation and wireless link simulation results are presented on the improved design. Results indicate that the proposed wireless biosensor is well suited for sensing two biological signals simultaneously with high accuracy, and can be applied to a wide variety of low-power and low-cost wireless continuous health monitoring applications.

  11. Biosensing with Paper-Based Miniaturized Printed Electrodes-A Modern Trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Célia M; Monteiro, Tiago; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2016-09-28

    From the bench-mark work on microfluidics from the Whitesides's group in 2007, paper technology has experienced significant growth, particularly regarding applications in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. Besides the structural properties supporting microfluidics, other advantageous features of paper materials, including their versatility, disposability and low cost, show off the great potential for the development of advanced and eco-friendly analytical tools. Consequently, paper was quickly employed in the field of electrochemical sensors, being an ideal material for producing custom, tailored and miniaturized devices. Stencil-, inkjet-, or screen-printing are the preferential techniques for electrode manufacturing. Not surprisingly, we witnessed a rapid increase in the number of publications on paper based screen-printed sensors at the turn of the past decade. Among the sensing strategies, various biosensors, coupling electrochemical detectors with biomolecules, have been proposed. This work provides a critical review and a discussion on the future progress of paper technology in the context of miniaturized printed electrochemical biosensors.

  12. Functionalized Solid Electrodes for Electrochemical Biosensing of Purine Nucleobases and Their Analogues: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal Kumar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in electrochemical analysis of purine nucleobases and few other important purine derivatives has been growing rapidly. Over the period of the past decade, the design of electrochemical biosensors has been focused on achieving high sensitivity and efficiency. The range of existing electrochemical methods with carbon electrode displays the highest rate in the development of biosensors. Moreover, modification of electrode surfaces based on nanomaterials is frequently used due to their extraordinary conductivity and surface to volume ratio. Different strategies for modifying electrode surfaces facilitate electron transport between the electrode surface and biomolecules, including DNA, oligonucleotides and their components. This review aims to summarize recent developments in the electrochemical analysis of purine derivatives, as well as discuss different applications.

  13. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2016-05-10

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Computational analysis of integrated biosensing and shear flow in a microfluidic vascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeremy F.; Young, Edmond W. K.; Simmons, Craig A.

    2017-11-01

    Fluid flow and flow-induced shear stress are critical components of the vascular microenvironment commonly studied using microfluidic cell culture models. Microfluidic vascular models mimicking the physiological microenvironment also offer great potential for incorporating on-chip biomolecular detection. In spite of this potential, however, there are few examples of such functionality. Detection of biomolecules released by cells under flow-induced shear stress is a significant challenge due to severe sample dilution caused by the fluid flow used to generate the shear stress, frequently to the extent where the analyte is no longer detectable. In this work, we developed a computational model of a vascular microfluidic cell culture model that integrates physiological shear flow and on-chip monitoring of cell-secreted factors. Applicable to multilayer device configurations, the computational model was applied to a bilayer configuration, which has been used in numerous cell culture applications including vascular models. Guidelines were established that allow cells to be subjected to a wide range of physiological shear stress while ensuring optimal rapid transport of analyte to the biosensor surface and minimized biosensor response times. These guidelines therefore enable the development of microfluidic vascular models that integrate cell-secreted factor detection while addressing flow constraints imposed by physiological shear stress. Ultimately, this work will result in the addition of valuable functionality to microfluidic cell culture models that further fulfill their potential as labs-on-chips.

  15. Graphene versus Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Electrochemical Glucose Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond Lam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available : A simple procedure was developed for the fabrication of electrochemical glucose biosensors using glucose oxidase (GOx, with graphene or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Graphene and MWCNTs were dispersed in 0.25% 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES and drop cast on 1% KOH-pre-treated glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs. The EDC (1-ethyl-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide-activated GOx was then bound covalently on the graphene- or MWCNT-modified GCE. Both the graphene- and MWCNT-based biosensors detected the entire pathophysiological range of blood glucose in humans, 1.4–27.9 mM. However, the direct electron transfer (DET between GOx and the modified GCE’s surface was only observed for the MWCNT-based biosensor. The MWCNT-based glucose biosensor also provided over a four-fold higher current signal than its graphene counterpart. Several interfering substances, including drug metabolites, provoked negligible interference at pathological levels for both the MWCNT- and graphene-based biosensors. However, the former was more prone to interfering substances and drug metabolites at extremely pathological concentrations than its graphene counterpart.

  16. Graphene versus Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Electrochemical Glucose Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dan; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Dykas, Michal Marcin; Saha, Surajit; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Lam, Edmond; Luong, John H T; Sheu, Fwu-Shan

    2013-03-14

    : A simple procedure was developed for the fabrication of electrochemical glucose biosensors using glucose oxidase (GOx), with graphene or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Graphene and MWCNTs were dispersed in 0.25% 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and drop cast on 1% KOH-pre-treated glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs). The EDC (1-ethyl-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide)-activated GOx was then bound covalently on the graphene- or MWCNT-modified GCE. Both the graphene- and MWCNT-based biosensors detected the entire pathophysiological range of blood glucose in humans, 1.4-27.9 mM. However, the direct electron transfer (DET) between GOx and the modified GCE's surface was only observed for the MWCNT-based biosensor. The MWCNT-based glucose biosensor also provided over a four-fold higher current signal than its graphene counterpart. Several interfering substances, including drug metabolites, provoked negligible interference at pathological levels for both the MWCNT- and graphene-based biosensors. However, the former was more prone to interfering substances and drug metabolites at extremely pathological concentrations than its graphene counterpart.

  17. Biosensing with Paper-Based Miniaturized Printed Electrodes–A Modern Trend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Célia M.; Monteiro, Tiago; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    From the bench-mark work on microfluidics from the Whitesides’s group in 2007, paper technology has experienced significant growth, particularly regarding applications in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. Besides the structural properties supporting microfluidics, other advantageous features of paper materials, including their versatility, disposability and low cost, show off the great potential for the development of advanced and eco-friendly analytical tools. Consequently, paper was quickly employed in the field of electrochemical sensors, being an ideal material for producing custom, tailored and miniaturized devices. Stencil-, inkjet-, or screen-printing are the preferential techniques for electrode manufacturing. Not surprisingly, we witnessed a rapid increase in the number of publications on paper based screen-printed sensors at the turn of the past decade. Among the sensing strategies, various biosensors, coupling electrochemical detectors with biomolecules, have been proposed. This work provides a critical review and a discussion on the future progress of paper technology in the context of miniaturized printed electrochemical biosensors. PMID:27690119

  18. Amplified biosensing using the horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme as an electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelossof, Gilad; Tel-Vered, Ran; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2010-06-01

    The hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme is assembled on Au electrodes. It reveals bioelectrocatalytic properties and electrocatalyzes the reduction of H(2)O(2). The bioelectrocatalytic functions of the hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme are used to develop electrochemical sensors that follow the activity of glucose oxidase and biosensors for the detection of DNA or low-molecular-weight substrates (adenosine monophosphate, AMP). Hairpin nucleic structures that include the G-quadruplex sequence in a caged configuration and the nucleic acid sequence complementary to the analyte DNA, or the aptamer sequence for AMP, are immobilized on Au-electrode surfaces. In the presence of the DNA analyte, or AMP, the hairpin structures are opened, and the hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme structures are generated on the electrode surfaces. The bioelectrocatalytic cathodic currents generated by the functionalized electrodes, upon the electrochemical reduction of H(2)O(2), provide a quantitative measure for the detection of the target analytes. The DNA target was analyzed with a detection limit of 1 x 10(-12) M, while the detection limit for analyzing AMP was 1 x 10(-6) M. Methods to regenerate the sensing surfaces are presented.

  19. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Schlü cker, Sebastian; Wenger, Jé rô me; Regmi, Raju; Rigneault, Hervé ; Calafiore, Giuseppe; West, Melanie; Cabrini, Stefano; Fleischer, Monika; van Hulst, Niek F; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Pucci, Annemarie; Cojoc, Dan; Hauser, Charlotte; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. An integrated control and readout circuit for implantable multi-target electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreishizadeh, Sara S; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; Carrara, Sandro; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We describe an integrated biosensor capable of sensing multiple molecular targets using both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). In particular, we present our custom IC to realize voltage control and current readout of the biosensors. A mixed-signal circuit block generates sub-Hertz triangular waveform for the biosensors by means of a direct-digital-synthesizer to control CV. A current to pulse-width converter is realized to output the data for CA measurement. The IC is fabricated in 0.18 μm technology. It consumes 220 μW from 1.8 V supply voltage, making it suitable for remotely-powered applications. Electrical measurements show excellent linearity in sub- μA current range. Electrochemical measurements including CA measurements of glucose and lactate and CV measurements of the anti-cancer drug Etoposide have been acquired with the fabricated IC and compared with a commercial equipment. The results obtained with the fabricated IC are in good agreement with those of the commercial equipment for both CV and CA measurements.

  1. Biosensing with Paper-Based Miniaturized Printed Electrodes–A Modern Trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia M. Silveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available From the bench-mark work on microfluidics from the Whitesides’s group in 2007, paper technology has experienced significant growth, particularly regarding applications in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. Besides the structural properties supporting microfluidics, other advantageous features of paper materials, including their versatility, disposability and low cost, show off the great potential for the development of advanced and eco-friendly analytical tools. Consequently, paper was quickly employed in the field of electrochemical sensors, being an ideal material for producing custom, tailored and miniaturized devices. Stencil-, inkjet-, or screen-printing are the preferential techniques for electrode manufacturing. Not surprisingly, we witnessed a rapid increase in the number of publications on paper based screen-printed sensors at the turn of the past decade. Among the sensing strategies, various biosensors, coupling electrochemical detectors with biomolecules, have been proposed. This work provides a critical review and a discussion on the future progress of paper technology in the context of miniaturized printed electrochemical biosensors.

  2. Recent Developments in Optical Detection Technologies in Lab-on-a-Chip Devices for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Miguel Matos Pires

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of microfluidics has yet to develop practical devices that provide real clinical value. One of the main reasons for this is the difficulty in realizing low-cost, sensitive, reproducible, and portable analyte detection microfluidic systems. Previous research has addressed two main approaches for the detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices: (a study of the compatibility of conventional instrumentation with microfluidic structures, and (b integration of innovative sensors contained within the microfluidic system. Despite the recent advances in electrochemical and mechanical based sensors, their drawbacks pose important challenges to their application in disposable microfluidic devices. Instead, optical detection remains an attractive solution for lab-on-a-chip devices, because of the ubiquity of the optical methods in the laboratory. Besides, robust and cost-effective devices for use in the field can be realized by integrating proper optical detection technologies on chips. This review examines the recent developments in detection technologies applied to microfluidic biosensors, especially addressing several optical methods, including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, absorbance and surface plasmon resonance.

  3. Titania nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles for electrochemiluminescent biosensing of glycosylated hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qun [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong, 226019 (China); Tang, Shan [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Fang, Chen [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Second Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Tu, Yi-Feng, E-mail: tuyf@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China)

    2016-09-14

    A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) biosensor with high performance has been constructed in this work. Here the fructosyl amino acid oxidase was immobilized onto a pre-functionalized indium tin oxide glass with titania nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles. The property of nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electromicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. Under the optimum conditions, fructosyl valine was detected by this biosensor. It exhibited a linear detection range from 4.0 × 10{sup −9} M to 7.2 × 10{sup −7} M, and a limit of detection for 3.8 × 10{sup −9} M at the signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Thus the HbA1c level in whole blood samples of healthy individuals or diabetic patients were evaluated with designed biosensor after pre-treatment of hydrolysis. The results of our detection were closely consistent with that of the standard method. At the same time, our biosensor has some advantages including high sensitivity, disposable usage and low cost, which implies its great promising application in point-of-care testing of HbA1c. - Highlights: • The enhanced electrochemiluminescence of luminol by AuNPs/TiNTs. • An ECL biosensor for HbA1c assay with ultra-high sensitivity. • A promising disposable device for diabetic diagnosis and treatment even for POCT. • The excellent regression of detected results with gold-standard method.

  4. Titania nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles for electrochemiluminescent biosensing of glycosylated hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Qun; Tang, Shan; Fang, Chen; Tu, Yi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) biosensor with high performance has been constructed in this work. Here the fructosyl amino acid oxidase was immobilized onto a pre-functionalized indium tin oxide glass with titania nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles. The property of nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electromicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. Under the optimum conditions, fructosyl valine was detected by this biosensor. It exhibited a linear detection range from 4.0 × 10"−"9 M to 7.2 × 10"−"7 M, and a limit of detection for 3.8 × 10"−"9 M at the signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Thus the HbA1c level in whole blood samples of healthy individuals or diabetic patients were evaluated with designed biosensor after pre-treatment of hydrolysis. The results of our detection were closely consistent with that of the standard method. At the same time, our biosensor has some advantages including high sensitivity, disposable usage and low cost, which implies its great promising application in point-of-care testing of HbA1c. - Highlights: • The enhanced electrochemiluminescence of luminol by AuNPs/TiNTs. • An ECL biosensor for HbA1c assay with ultra-high sensitivity. • A promising disposable device for diabetic diagnosis and treatment even for POCT. • The excellent regression of detected results with gold-standard method.

  5. Alginate copper oxide nano-biocomposite as a novel material for amperometric glucose biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buk, Vuslat; Emregul, Emel; Emregul, Kaan Cebesoy

    2017-01-01

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on alginate-CuO nano-biocomposite and glucose oxidase (GOD) film was developed and characterized. The properties of the alginate-CuO-GOD film were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Amperometric measurements were employed to characterize the analytical performance of the biosensor. Several parameters including amount of alginate, concentration of GOD and cross-linkers, amount of CuO nanoparticles, and effect of pH were studied and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed alginate-CuO-GOD biosensor was shown to have two linear ranges; from 0.04 mM to 3 mM (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 and the sensitivity of 30.443 μA mM −1 cm −2 ) and from 4 mM to 35 mM (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 and the sensitivity of 7.205 μA mM −1 cm −2 ). The overall detection limit was estimated to be 1.6 μM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) and the K m value of 2.82 mM. The biosensor exhibited rather good performance with long-term stability (remainder of activity is 78% after 15 days) and significant specificity for glucose when compared to possible interfering molecules such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen. - Highlights: • An amperometric biosensor was constructed by using Alginate-CuO nano-biocomposite complexed with Glucose Oxidase • Glucose Oxidase immobilized to the surface via cross-linking. • Alginate-CuO film was characterized by SEM and FTIR. • The biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance to glucose with a wide linear range and high sensitivity.

  6. Alginate copper oxide nano-biocomposite as a novel material for amperometric glucose biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buk, Vuslat [Ankara University, Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Tandoğan, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Emregul, Emel, E-mail: eemregul@yahoo.com [Ankara University, Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Tandoğan, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Emregul, Kaan Cebesoy [Ankara University, Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Tandoğan, Ankara 06100 (Turkey)

    2017-05-01

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on alginate-CuO nano-biocomposite and glucose oxidase (GOD) film was developed and characterized. The properties of the alginate-CuO-GOD film were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Amperometric measurements were employed to characterize the analytical performance of the biosensor. Several parameters including amount of alginate, concentration of GOD and cross-linkers, amount of CuO nanoparticles, and effect of pH were studied and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed alginate-CuO-GOD biosensor was shown to have two linear ranges; from 0.04 mM to 3 mM (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 and the sensitivity of 30.443 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}) and from 4 mM to 35 mM (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 and the sensitivity of 7.205 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}). The overall detection limit was estimated to be 1.6 μM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) and the K{sub m} value of 2.82 mM. The biosensor exhibited rather good performance with long-term stability (remainder of activity is 78% after 15 days) and significant specificity for glucose when compared to possible interfering molecules such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen. - Highlights: • An amperometric biosensor was constructed by using Alginate-CuO nano-biocomposite complexed with Glucose Oxidase • Glucose Oxidase immobilized to the surface via cross-linking. • Alginate-CuO film was characterized by SEM and FTIR. • The biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance to glucose with a wide linear range and high sensitivity.

  7. Detection of pneumonia using free-text radiology reports in the BioSense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Armenak; Benoit, Stephen; Ma, Haobo; English, Roseanne; Elkin, Peter; Tokars, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Near real-time disease detection using electronic data sources is a public health priority. Detecting pneumonia is particularly important because it is the manifesting disease of several bioterrorism agents as well as a complication of influenza, including avian and novel H1N1 strains. Text radiology reports are available earlier than physician diagnoses and so could be integral to rapid detection of pneumonia. We performed a pilot study to determine which keywords present in text radiology reports are most highly associated with pneumonia diagnosis. Electronic radiology text reports from 11 hospitals from February 1, 2006 through December 31, 2007 were used. We created a computerized algorithm that searched for selected keywords ("airspace disease", "consolidation", "density", "infiltrate", "opacity", and "pneumonia"), differentiated between clinical history and radiographic findings, and accounted for negations and double negations; this algorithm was tested on a sample of 350 radiology reports. We used the algorithm to study 189,246 chest radiographs, searching for the keywords and determining their association with a final International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis of pneumonia. Performance of the search algorithm in finding keywords, and association of the keywords with a pneumonia diagnosis. In the sample of 350 radiographs, the search algorithm was highly successful in identifying the selected keywords (sensitivity 98.5%, specificity 100%). Analysis of the 189,246 radiographs showed that the keyword "pneumonia" was the strongest predictor of an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio 11.8) while "density" was the weakest (adjusted odds ratio 1.5). In general, the most highly associated keyword present in the report, regardless of whether a less highly associated keyword was also present, was the best predictor of a diagnosis of pneumonia. Empirical methods may assist in finding radiology

  8. MISENS DEVICE AS A NEW AUTOMATED BIOSENSING PLATFORM BASED ON REAL-TIME ELECTROCHEMICAL PROFILING (REP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yıldız uludağ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In various fields like health, environmental control, food security and military defense; there is an increasing demand for on-site detection, fast identification and urgent response which brings the necessity to employ laboratory detection procedures on standalone automatic devices. In response to that TUBITAK BILGEM’s Bioelectronic Devices and Systems Group has been developing portable and fully automated biosensor devices using optical and electrochemical biosensor detection techniques. Here we describe a new integrated and fully automated lab-on-a-chip based biosensor device ‘MiSens’. The key features of the MiSens include a new electrode array, an integrated microfluidic system and real-time amperometric measurements during the flow of enzyme substrate. While simple protocols can be controlled from the LCD display on the device, other main device control procedures can be run wireless by a tablet/PC using the MiCont™ software developed by the team. For the device, a new plug and play type sensor chip docking station has been designed that with one move it enables the formation of a ~ 7-10 µl capacity flow cell on the electrode array with the necessary microfluidic and electronic connections. The MiSens device has been developed by our multi-disciplinary team by integrating and automatising the earlier developed sensing platform REP™ (Real-time Electrochemical Profiling. The performance of the MiSens device has been tested using cyclic voltammetry and amperometry tests and the results were compared with an of the shelf potantiostat.

  9. III-Nitride Membranes for Thermal Bio-Sensing and Solar Hydrogen Generation

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami Tarek Mahmoud

    2017-09-01

    III-nitride nanostructures have generated tremendous scientific and technological interests in studying and engineering their low dimensional physics phenomena. Among these, 2D planar, free standing III-nitride nanomembranes are unrivalled in their scalability for high yield manufacture and can be mechanically manipulated. Due to the increase in their surface to volume ratio and the manifestation of quantum phenomena, these nanomembranes acquire unique physical properties. Furthermore, III-nitride membranes are chemically stable and biocompatible. Finally, nanomembranes are highly flexible and can follow curvilinear surfaces present in biological systems. However, being free-standing, requires especially new techniques for handling nanometers or micrometers thick membrane devices. Furthermore, effectively transferring these membrane devices to other substrates is not a direct process which requires the use of photoresists, solvents and/or elastomers. Finally, as the membranes are transferred, they need to be properly attached for subsequent device fabrications, which often includes spin coating and rinsing steps. These engineering complications have impeded the development of novel devices based on III-nitride membranes. In this thesis, we demonstrate the versatility of III-nitride membranes where we develop a thermal bio-sensor nanomembrane and solar energy photo-anode membrane. First, we present a novel preparation technique of nanomembranes with new characteristics; having no threading dislocation cores. We then perform optical characterization to reveal changes in their defect densities compared to the bulk crystal. We also study their mechanical properties where we successfully modulate their bandgap emission by 55 meV through various external compressive and tensile strain fields. Furthermore, we characterize the effect of phonon-boundary scattering on their thermal properties where we report a reduction of thermal conductivity from 130 to 9 W/mK. We employ

  10. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Shi, Hanchang; Long, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  11. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China); Shi, Hanchang [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Long, Feng, E-mail: longf04@ruc.edu.cn [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-28

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  12. Photonics-on-a-chip: recent advances in integrated waveguides as enabling detection elements for real-world, lab-on-a-chip biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Adam L; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-01-21

    By leveraging advances in semiconductor microfabrication technologies, chip-integrated optical biosensors are poised to make an impact as scalable and multiplexable bioanalytical measurement tools for lab-on-a-chip applications. In particular, waveguide-based optical sensing technology appears to be exceptionally amenable to chip integration and miniaturization, and, as a result, the recent literature is replete with examples of chip-integrated waveguide sensing platforms developed to address a wide range of contemporary analytical challenges. As an overview of the most recent advances within this dynamic field, this review highlights work from the last 2-3 years in the areas of grating-coupled, interferometric, photonic crystal, and microresonator waveguide sensors. With a focus towards device integration, particular emphasis is placed on demonstrations of biosensing using these technologies within microfluidically controlled environments. In addition, examples of multiplexed detection and sensing within complex matrices--important features for real-world applicability--are given special attention.

  13. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  14. Advances in Biosensing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Taneja

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A fractal analysis is presented for the binding and dissociation (if applicable kinetics of analyte-receptor reactions occurring on biosensor surfaces. The applications of the biosensors have appeared in the recent literature. The examples provided together provide the reader with a perspective of the advances in biosensors that are being used to detect analytes of interest. This should also stimulate interest in applying biosensors to other areas of application. The fractal analysis limits the evaluation of the rate constants for binding and dissociation (if applicable for the analyte-receptor reactions occurring in biosensor surfaces. The fractal dimension provides a quantitative measure of the degree of heterogeneity on the biosensor surface. Predictive relations are presented that relate the binding co-efficient with the degree of heterogeneity or the fractal dimension on the biosensor surface

  15. Novel urchin-like In2O3–chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase and biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhanjun; Huang Xiaochun; Zhang Rongcai; Li Juan; Xu Qin; Hu Xiaoya

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The urchin-like In 2 O 3 –CS film is proposed for the immobilization of protein. ► The direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase and biosensing was studied. ► The constructed glucose biosensor shows excellent performances. ► This matrix provides a new and efficient approach for the direct electrochemistry. - Abstract: A novel urchin-like In 2 O 3 –chitosan modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is for the first time prepared. The direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized on the surface of modified GCE and biosensing are studied. The urchin-like In 2 O 3 nanostructure-based matrix has large specific surface area and provides a favorable and biocompatible microenvironment for promoting the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrode surface. The properties of different modified electrode are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. The constructed glucose biosensor shows wide linear range (5.0 × 10 −6 to 1.3 × 10 −3 M), low detection limit (1.9 × 10 −6 M), a Michaelis–Menten constant of 0.37 mM. The proposed biosensor has good sensitivity, excellent selectivity, good reproducibility and stability. This urchin-like In 2 O 3 –chitosan matrix provides a new approach and efficient matrix for the direct electrochemistry of proteins and developing novel types of biosensors.

  16. Design, characterization and applications of new ionic liquid matrices for multifunctional analysis of biomolecules: a novel strategy for pathogenic bacteria biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Khan, M Shahnawaz; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-05-01

    The design, preparation and performance for novel UV-light absorbing (room-temperature) ionic liquid matrices (UV-RTILMs) for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) were reported. A series of UV-RTILMs was prepared by ultrasonication of equimolar of acid (mefenamic acid) and bases (aniline (ANI), pyridine (Pyr), dimethyl aniline (DMANI) and 2-methyl picoline (2-P)). The UV-RTILMs have not only significant absorbance at the desired wavelength (337 nm of the N2 Laser), but also have available protons that can easily undergo proton transfer reactions to ionize the target molecules. The novel UV-RTILMs have the ability to ionize different and wide classes of compounds such as drugs, carbohydrate, and amino acids. The new UV-RTILMs series have been successfully and selectively applied for biosensing the lysates of pathogenic bacteria in the presence of the cell macromolecules. A new strategy for biosensing pathogens was presented via sensing the pathogens lysate in the cell suspension. The new materials can effectively detect the bacterial toxins without separation or any pretreatment. They offered excellent ionization of labile oligosaccharides with protonated peaks. They could significantly enhance the analyte signals, produce homogeneous spotting, reducing spot-to-spot variation, excellent vacuum stability, higher ion peak intensity, and wide application possibility. The physical parameters such as molar refractivity, molar volume, parachor, surface tension, density and polarizability were calculated and tabulated. The new UV-RTILMs could offer excellent reproducibility and great repeatability and they are promising matrices for wide applications on MALDI-MS. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Exploiting multi-function Metal-Organic Framework nanocomposite Ag@Zn-TSA as highly efficient immobilization matrixes for sensitive electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Dandan; Suo, Gaochao; Wei, Wenbo; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-08-31

    A novel multi-function Metal-Organic Framework composite Ag@Zn-TSA (zinc thiosalicylate, Zn(C7H4O2S), Zn-TSA) was synthesized as highly efficient immobilization matrixes of myoglobin (Mb)/glucose oxidase (GOx) for electrochemical biosensing. The electrochemical biosensors based on Ag@Zn-TSA composite and ionic liquid (IL) modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) were fabricated successfully. Furthermore, the properties of the sensors were discussed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and amperometric current-time curve, respectively. The results showed the proposed biosensors had wide linear response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the range of 0.3-20,000 μM, to nitrite (NO2(-)) for 1.3 μM-1660 μM and 2262 μM-1,33,000 μM, to glucose for 2.0-1022 μM, with a low detection limit of 0.08 μM for H2O2, 0.5 μM for NO2(-), 0.8 μM for glucose. The values of the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks) for Mb and GOx were estimated as 2.05 s(-1) and 2.45 s(-1), respectively. Thus, Ag@Zn-TSA was a kind of ideal material as highly efficient immobilization matrixes for sensitive electrochemical biosensing. In addition, this work indicated that MOF nanocomposite had a great potential for constructing wide range of sensing interface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A lanthanide complex with dual biosensing properties: CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) and BIRDS (biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts) with europium DOTA-tetraglycinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Daniel; Kiefer, Garry E; Rothman, Douglas L; Sherry, A Dean; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2011-12-01

    Responsive contrast agents (RCAs) composed of lanthanide(III) ion (Ln3R) complexes with a variety of1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTA4S) derivatives have shown great potential as molecular imaging agents for MR. A variety of LnDOTA–tetraamide complexes have been demonstrated as RCAs for molecular imaging using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). The CEST method detects proton exchange between bulk water and any exchangeable sites on the ligand itself or an inner sphere of bound water that is shifted by a paramagnetic Ln3R ion bound in the core of the macrocycle. It has also been shown that molecular imaging is possible when the RCA itself is observed (i.e. not its effect on bulk water) using a method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS). The BIRDS method utilizes redundant information stored in the nonexchangeable proton resonances emanating from the paramagnetic RCA for ambient factors such as temperature and/or pH.Thus, CEST and BIRDS rely on exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons, respectively, for biosensing. We posited that it would be feasible to combine these two biosensing features into the same RCA (i.e. dual CEST and BIRDS properties). A complex between europium(III) ion (Eu3R) and DOTA–tetraglycinate [DOTA–(gly)S4] was used to demonstrate that its CEST characteristics are preserved, while its BIRDS properties are also detectable. The in vitro temperature sensitivity of EuDOTA–(gly)S4 was used to show that qualitative MR contrast with CEST can be calibrated using quantitative MR mapping with BIRDS, thereby enabling quantitative molecular imaging at high spatial resolution.

  19. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  20. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area......The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of the test sample by movement of the probe relative to the surface of the test sample into the specific orientation.; The probe may further comprise a contact detector (14) extending from the supporting body arranged so as to contact the surface of the test sample prior to any one of the plurality...

  1. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  2. Quantitative chromatography in the analysis of labelled compounds 1. Quantitative paper chromotography of amino acids by A spot comparison technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.F.; Farag, A.N.; El-Gharbawy, A.A.

    1974-01-01

    For the determination of the specific activity of labelled compounds separated by paper sheet chromatography, it was found essential to perfect the quantitative aspect of the paper chromatographic technique. Actually, so far paper chromatography has been used as a separation tool mainly and its use in quantification of the separated materials is by far less studied. In the present work, the quantitative analysis of amino acids by paper sheet chromatography has been carried out by methods, depending on the use of the relative spot area values for correcting the experimental data obtained. The results obtained were good and reproducible. The main advantage of the proposed technique is its extreme simplicity. No complicated equipment of procedures are necessary

  3. Comparison of the Use of Gas Chromotography, Spectrophotometry, and Near Infrared Spectropscopy to Quantify Prussic Acid Potential in Forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] has been shown to contain the cyanogenic glycoside dhurrin, which is responsible for the disorder known as prussic acid poisoning in livestock. The current standard method for estimating HCN uses spectrophotometery to measure the aglycone of the dhurrin, p-hydro...

  4. Exploiting multi-function Metal-Organic Framework nanocomposite Ag@Zn-TSA as highly efficient immobilization matrixes for sensitive electrochemical biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Sheying, E-mail: dongsyy@126.com [College of Sciences, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, 710055 (China); Zhang, Dandan; Suo, Gaochao; Wei, Wenbo [College of Sciences, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, 710055 (China); Huang, Tinglin [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, 710055 (China)

    2016-08-31

    A novel multi-function Metal-Organic Framework composite Ag@Zn-TSA (zinc thiosalicylate, Zn(C{sub 7}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}S), Zn-TSA) was synthesized as highly efficient immobilization matrixes of myoglobin (Mb)/glucose oxidase (GOx) for electrochemical biosensing. The electrochemical biosensors based on Ag@Zn-TSA composite and ionic liquid (IL) modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) were fabricated successfully. Furthermore, the properties of the sensors were discussed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and amperometric current-time curve, respectively. The results showed the proposed biosensors had wide linear response to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the range of 0.3–20,000 μM, to nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup −}) for 1.3 μM–1660 μM and 2262 μM–1,33,000 μM, to glucose for 2.0–1022 μM, with a low detection limit of 0.08 μM for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 0.5 μM for NO{sub 2}{sup −}, 0.8 μM for glucose. The values of the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) for Mb and GOx were estimated as 2.05 s{sup −1} and 2.45 s{sup −1}, respectively. Thus, Ag@Zn-TSA was a kind of ideal material as highly efficient immobilization matrixes for sensitive electrochemical biosensing. In addition, this work indicated that MOF nanocomposite had a great potential for constructing wide range of sensing interface. - Highlights: • Novel Ag@Zn-TSA was used as highly efficient immobilization matrixes of Mb/glucose. • We exploited multi-function MOFs for a wide range of electrocatalytic sensing interface. • The proposed biosensors had an excellent catalytic effect on the small molecule (NO{sub 2}{sup −}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, glucose).

  5. AgNPs-3D nanostructure enhanced electrochemiluminescence of CdSe quantum dot coupled with strand displacement amplification for sensitive biosensing of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Meng; Jie, Guifen; Tan, Lu; Niu, Shuyan

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy using Ag nanoparticles-3D (AgNPs-3D) nanostructure enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) coupled with strand displacement amplification (SDA) for sensitive biosensing of DNA was successfully designed. The prepared CdSe QDs with intense ECL were assembled on the poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites modified electrode, then gold nanoparticles (NPs) as the quenching probe was conjugated to the QDs, ECL signal was efficiently quenched. The target DNA induced cycling SDA and generated a large number of DNA s1. The released DNA s1 could open the hairpin DNA with quenching probe. So the presence of low levels of target DNA can potentially result in a significant enhancement of ECL signal. Furthermore, large number of AgNPs were then in situ reduced in the 3D DNA skeleton on the electrode, which dramaticlly enhanced ECL signal of QDs owing to the excellent electrical conductivity, and the much amplified ECL signal change has a quantitative relation with the target DNA. So by combining the AgNPs-3D nanostructure and cycling SDA to achieve greatly amplified detection of DNA, the promising ECL strategy could provide a highly sensitive platform for various biomolecules and has a good prospect for clinical diagnosis in the future. - Graphical abstract: A novel strategy using AgNPs-3D nanostructure enhanced electrochemiluminescence of CdSe quantum dot coupled with DNA strand displacement amplification for sensitive biosensing of DNA was successfully designed, the proposed biosensor can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward nucleic acid detection in complex samples with an easy and rapid way. - Highlights: • AgNPs-3D nanostructure for enhancing ECL signal of CdSe QDs was successfully designed. • A new dual amplification strategy for detection of DNA by using AgNPs-3D nanostructure coupled with SDA was developed. • It is for the first time AgNPs-3D nanostructure

  6. Exploiting multi-function Metal-Organic Framework nanocomposite Ag@Zn-TSA as highly efficient immobilization matrixes for sensitive electrochemical biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Dandan; Suo, Gaochao; Wei, Wenbo; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-01-01

    A novel multi-function Metal-Organic Framework composite Ag@Zn-TSA (zinc thiosalicylate, Zn(C_7H_4O_2S), Zn-TSA) was synthesized as highly efficient immobilization matrixes of myoglobin (Mb)/glucose oxidase (GOx) for electrochemical biosensing. The electrochemical biosensors based on Ag@Zn-TSA composite and ionic liquid (IL) modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) were fabricated successfully. Furthermore, the properties of the sensors were discussed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and amperometric current-time curve, respectively. The results showed the proposed biosensors had wide linear response to hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) in the range of 0.3–20,000 μM, to nitrite (NO_2"−) for 1.3 μM–1660 μM and 2262 μM–1,33,000 μM, to glucose for 2.0–1022 μM, with a low detection limit of 0.08 μM for H_2O_2, 0.5 μM for NO_2"−, 0.8 μM for glucose. The values of the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k_s) for Mb and GOx were estimated as 2.05 s"−"1 and 2.45 s"−"1, respectively. Thus, Ag@Zn-TSA was a kind of ideal material as highly efficient immobilization matrixes for sensitive electrochemical biosensing. In addition, this work indicated that MOF nanocomposite had a great potential for constructing wide range of sensing interface. - Highlights: • Novel Ag@Zn-TSA was used as highly efficient immobilization matrixes of Mb/glucose. • We exploited multi-function MOFs for a wide range of electrocatalytic sensing interface. • The proposed biosensors had an excellent catalytic effect on the small molecule (NO_2"−, H_2O_2, glucose).

  7. Direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase and biosensing for glucose based on PDDA-capped gold nanoparticle modified graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Zuanguang; He, Sijing; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Xinchun; Yao, Meicun

    2014-02-15

    In this work, poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized graphene (G)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposites were fabricated. Based on the electrostatic attraction, the G/MWCNTs hybrid material can be decorated with AuNPs uniformly and densely. The new hierarchical nanostructure can provide a larger surface area and a more favorable microenvironment for electron transfer. The AuNPs/G/MWCNTs nanocomposite was used as a novel immobilization platform for glucose oxidase (GOD). Direct electron transfer (DET) was achieved between GOD and the electrode. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to characterize the electrochemical biosensor. The glucose biosensor fabricated based on GOD electrode modified with AuNPs/G/MWCNTs demonstrated satisfactory analytical performance with high sensitivity (29.72mAM(-1)cm(-2)) and low limit of detection (4.8 µM). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ΚS) and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of GOD were calculated to be 11.18s(-1) and 2.09 mM, respectively. With satisfactory selectivity, reproducibility, and stability, the nanostructure we proposed offered an alternative for electrode fabricating and glucose biosensing. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor structures functionalised with a polyelectrolyte/enzyme multilayer: New strategy for enhanced field-effect biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouzar, Maryam H.; Poghossian, Arshak; Schoening, Michael J. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Siqueira, Jose R. Jr.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N. Jr. [Physics Institute of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Moritz, Werner [Institute of Chemistry, Humboldt University Berlin (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A novel strategy for enhanced field-effect biosensing using capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structures functionalised with pH-responsive weak polyelectrolyte/enzyme or dendrimer/enzyme multilayers is presented. The feasibility of the proposed approach is exemplarily demonstrated by realising a penicillin biosensor based on a capacitive p-Si-SiO{sub 2} EIS structure functionalised with a poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH)/penicillinase and a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer/penicillinase multilayer. The developed sensors response to changes in both the local pH value near the gate surface and the charge of macromolecules induced via enzymatic reaction, resulting in a higher sensitivity. For comparison, an EIS penicillin biosensor with adsorptively immobilised penicillinase has been also studied. The highest penicillin sensitivity of 100 mV/dec has been observed for the EIS sensor functionalised with the PAH/penicillinase multilayer. The lower and upper detection limit was around 20 {mu}M and 10 mM, respectively. In addition, an incorporation of enzymes in a multilayer prepared by layer-by-layer technique provides a larger amount of immobilised enzymes per sensor area, reduces enzyme leaching effects and thus, enhances the biosensor lifetime (the loss of penicillin sensitivity after 2 months was 10-12%). (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Ultrahigh sensitivity made simple: nanoplasmonic label-free biosensing with an extremely low limit-of-detection for bacterial and cancer diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Svedendahl, M; Kaell, M; Gunnarsson, L; Dmitriev, A, E-mail: alexd@chalmers.s [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2009-10-28

    We present a simple and robust scheme for biosensing with an ultralow limit-of-detection down to several pg cm{sup -2} (or several tens of attomoles cm{sup -2}) based on optical label-free biodetection with localized surface plasmon resonances. The scheme utilizes cost-effective optical components and comprises a white light source, a properly functionalized sensor surface enclosed in a simple fluidics chip, and a spectral analyzer. The sensor surface is produced by a bottom-up nanofabrication technique with hole mask colloidal lithography. Despite its simplicity, the method is able to reliably detect protein-protein binding events at low picomolar and femtomolar concentrations, which is exemplified by the label-free detection of the extracellular adherence protein (EAP) found on the outer surface of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), which is believed to be a prostate cancer marker. These experiments pave the way towards an ultra-sensitive yet compact biodetection platform for point-of-care diagnostics applications.

  10. Sensitive optical bio-sensing of p-type WSe2 hybridized with fluorescent dye attached DNA by doping and de-doping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Jun Young; Jo, Seong Gi; Seo, Changwon; Kim, Jeongyong; Joo, Jinsoo

    2017-10-01

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS2, WSe2 and WS2, are exciting two-dimensional (2D) materials because they possess tunable optical and electrical properties that depend on the number of layers. In this study, the nanoscale photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of the p-type WSe2 monolayer, and WSe2 layers hybridized with the fluorescent dye Cy3 attached to probe-DNA (Cy3/p-DNA), have been investigated as a function of the concentration of Cy3/DNA by using high-resolution laser confocal microscopy. With increasing concentration of Cy3/p-DNA, the measured PL intensity decreases and its peak is red-shifted, suggesting that the WSe2 layer has been p-type doped with Cy3/p-DNA. Then, the PL intensity of the WSe2/Cy3/p-DNA hybrid system increases and the peak is blue-shifted through hybridization with relatively small amounts of target-DNA (t-DNA) (50-100 nM). This effect originates from charge and energy transfer from the Cy3/DNA to the WSe2. For t-DNA detection, our systems using p-type WSe2 have the merit in terms of the increase of PL intensity. The p-type WSe2 monolayers can be a promising nanoscale 2D material for sensitive optical bio-sensing based on the doping and de-doping responses to biomaterials.

  11. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of zirconium dioxide nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide composite as high performance electrochemical sensing and biosensing platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teymourian, Hazhir; Salimi, Abdollah; Firoozi, Somayeh; Korani, Aazam; Soltanian, Saied

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One pot hydrothermal synthesis used for preparing of ZrO 2 NPs reduced graphene oxide. • Electrocatalytic activity of ZrO 2 /rGO improved in compared to ZrO 2 based C- materials. • ZrO 2 NPs/rGO modified GCE was used for electrocatalytic reduction of O 2 and H 2 O 2 . • ZrO 2 NPs/rGO/GCE shows excellent ability to simultaneous detection of AA,UA and DP. • With immobilization of GOX onto ZrO 2 NPs/rGO a sensitive glucose biosensor fabricated. - Abstract: We report on the synthesis of zirconium dioxide-reduced graphene oxide composite (ZrO 2 -rGO) and its application as a novel architecture for electrochemical sensing and biosensing purposes. ZrO 2 -rGO hybrid is synthesized through a simple one-step hydrothermal route, where the reduction of GO and the in-situ generation of ZrO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) occurred simultaneously. Characterization of the resultant hybrid material using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy clearly indicated the homogeneous dispersion of ZrO 2 NPs with particle sizes of ∼5 nm on rGO sheets. The potential application of ZrO 2 -rGO modified glassy carbon electrode (ZrO 2 -rGO/GC) for electroanalytical purposes was demonstrated by using several important electroactive compounds as representative examples (i.e., O 2 , hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), glucose, ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA)). Electrochemical control experiments by using different composites of ZrO 2 /graphite, ZrO 2 /Active Carbon and ZrO 2 electrodeposited on activated GC electrode revealed that the ZrO 2 -rGO composite possessed superior electrocatalytic activitiy towards the catalytic reduction of O 2 and H 2 O 2 at more reduced overpotentials. The linear range of H 2 O 2 concentration was from 0.10 to 1340 μM with the detection limit of 20 nM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, via immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme onto the

  12. Gold nanoparticle/nickel oxide/poly(pyrrole-N-propionic acid hybrid multilayer film: Electrochemical study and its application in biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karazehir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the fabrication of Indium Tin Oxide /gold nanoparticles/nickel oxide/poly(Pyrrole-N-propionic acid (ITO/GNPs/NiO/poly(PPA multilayered film, and its modification with Tyrosinase (Ty. The ITO/GNPs/NiO/poly(PPA electrode was fabricated by sequential electrochemical assembly onto ITO substrate which electrochemical deposition provides a facile, inexpensive technique for synthesis of multilayered film within the adherent morphology with controllable film thickness. Cyclic voltammetry (CV, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR, scanning electron microcopy (SEM, and atomic force microcopy (AFM were used to characterize the film assembly processes. The properties of a semiconductor/electrolyte interface were investigated based on the Mott–Schottky (M-S approach for the modified electrodes, with the flat band potential (EFB according to the potential intercept and the carrier density (ND according to the linear slopes. The ND and EFB of ITO/GNPs/NiO/poly(PPA were obtained as 2.48·1021 cm–3 and 0.26 V, respectively. Tyrosinase was immobilized using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The bioelectrode was characterized by FTIR-ATR, SEM, AFM, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. A Randles equivalent circuit was introduced for modeling the performance of impedimetric biosensing for the detection of the dopamine (DP and the interface of bioelectrode/electrolyte. The EIS of the ITO/GNPs/NiO/poly(PPA-Ty exhibited significant changes in the charge transfer resistance (RCT value toward the detection of dopamine over a linear range of 80 µM to 0.2 mM with a limit of detection (LOD of 5.46 µM.

  13. Field-effect sensors - from pH sensing to biosensing: sensitivity enhancement using streptavidin-biotin as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Benjamin M; Sun, Kai; Zeimpekis, Ioannis; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Green, Nicolas G

    2017-11-06

    Field-Effect Transistor sensors (FET-sensors) have been receiving increasing attention for biomolecular sensing over the last two decades due to their potential for ultra-high sensitivity sensing, label-free operation, cost reduction and miniaturisation. Whilst the commercial application of FET-sensors in pH sensing has been realised, their commercial application in biomolecular sensing (termed BioFETs) is hindered by poor understanding of how to optimise device design for highly reproducible operation and high sensitivity. In part, these problems stem from the highly interdisciplinary nature of the problems encountered in this field, in which knowledge of biomolecular-binding kinetics, surface chemistry, electrical double layer physics and electrical engineering is required. In this work, a quantitative analysis and critical review has been performed comparing literature FET-sensor data for pH-sensing with data for sensing of biomolecular streptavidin binding to surface-bound biotin systems. The aim is to provide the first systematic, quantitative comparison of BioFET results for a single biomolecular analyte, specifically streptavidin, which is the most commonly used model protein in biosensing experiments, and often used as an initial proof-of-concept for new biosensor designs. This novel quantitative and comparative analysis of the surface potential behaviour of a range of devices demonstrated a strong contrast between the trends observed in pH-sensing and those in biomolecule-sensing. Potential explanations are discussed in detail and surface-chemistry optimisation is shown to be a vital component in sensitivity-enhancement. Factors which can influence the response, yet which have not always been fully appreciated, are explored and practical suggestions are provided on how to improve experimental design.

  14. Comparative study of ZnO nanorods and thin films for chemical and biosensing applications and the development of ZnO nanorods based potentiometric strontium ion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khun, K.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Chey, C. O.; Lu, Jun.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the comparative study of ZnO nanorods and ZnO thin films were performed regarding the chemical and biosensing properties and also ZnO nanorods based strontium ion sensor is proposed. ZnO nanorods were grown on gold coated glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth method and the ZnO thin films were deposited by electro deposition technique. ZnO nanorods and thin films were characterised by field emission electron microscopy [FESEM] and X-ray diffraction [XRD] techniques and this study has shown that the grown nanostructures are highly dense, uniform and exhibited good crystal quality. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy [TEM] was used to investigate the quality of ZnO thin film and we observed that ZnO thin film was comprised of nano clusters. ZnO nanorods and thin films were functionalised with selective strontium ionophore salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone [ST] membrane, galactose oxidase, and lactate oxidase for the detection of strontium ion, galactose and L-lactic acid, respectively. The electrochemical response of both ZnO nanorods and thin films sensor devices was measured by using the potentiometric method. The strontium ion sensor has exhibited good characteristics with a sensitivity of 28.65 ± 0.52 mV/decade, for a wide range of concentrations from 1.00 × 10-6 to 5.00 × 10-2 M, selectivity, reproducibility, stability and fast response time of 10.00 s. The proposed strontium ion sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of strontium ion versus ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid [EDTA]. This comparative study has shown that ZnO nanorods possessed better performance with high sensitivity and low limit of detection due to high surface area to volume ratio as compared to the flat surface of ZnO thin films.

  15. A self-powered biosensing device with an integrated hybrid biofuel cell for intermittent monitoring of analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdecka, Dominika; Draminska, Sylwia; Janusek, Dariusz; Krysinski, Paweł; Bilewicz, Renata

    2018-04-15

    In this work, we propose an integrated self-powered sensing system, driven by a hybrid biofuel cell (HBFC) with carbon paper discs coated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The sensing system has a biocathode made from laccase or bilirubin oxidase, and the anode is made from a zinc plate. The system includes a dedicated custom-built electronic control unit for the detection of oxygen and catechol analytes, which are central to medical and environmental applications. Both the HBFC and sensors, operate in a mediatorless direct electron transfer mode. The measured characteristics of the HBFC with externally applied resistance included the power-time dependencies under flow cell conditions, the sensors performance (evaluated by cyclic voltammetry), and chronoamperometry. The HBFC is integrated with analytical devices and operating in a pulse mode form long-run monitoring experiments. The HBFC generated sufficient power for wireless data transmission to a local computer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intact mammalian cell function on semi-conductor nanowire arrays: new perspectives for cell-based biosensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Sørensen, Claus Birger

    2011-01-01

    . A selection of critical cell functions and pathways are shown not to be impaired, including cell adhesion, membrane integrity, intracellular enzyme activity, DNA uptake, cytosolic and membrane protein expression, and the neuronal maturation pathway. The results demonstrate the low invasiveness of InAs NW......Nanowires (NWs) are attracting more and more interest due to their potential cellular applications, such as delivery of compounds or sensing platforms. Arrays of vertical indium-arsenide (InAs) NWs are interfaced with human embryonic kidney cells and rat embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons...

  17. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as an effective peroxidase mimetic and its application in visual biosensing of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jianxin [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); College of Resources and Environment, Yuxi Normal University, Yunnan 653100 (China); Cao, Haiyan; Jiang, Huan; Chen, Yujin [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Shi, Wenbing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing 408003 (China); Zheng, Huzhi [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Huang, Yuming, E-mail: yuminghuang2000@yahoo.com [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2013-09-24

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •The well-dispersed Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on rGO surfaces were successfully synthesized. •The as-obtained Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites exhibit an effective peroxidase-like activity. •They can catalyze the oxidation of TMB by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce an intensified blue reaction. •The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO-based colorimetric and visual biosensing of glucose was developed. -- Abstract: The well-dispersed Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces were successfully prepared by in situ controlled nucleation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on GO sheets and subsequent in situ reduction of GO by low temperature hydrothermal reaction in ethanol media. The as-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra. It was found that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were successfully decorated and well dispersed on the surface of rGO sheet without agglomeration. We discovered that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and catalase-like activity, and could catalytically oxidize 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to produce a intensified colour reaction. Results of electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments demonstrated that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites showed catalytic ability to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition into ·OH radicals. On this basis, a simple and selective method for glucose detection was developed by coupling the oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase (GOx). As low as 1 × 10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} glucose could be detected with a linear range from 1 × 10{sup −6} to 1 × 10{sup −4} mol L{sup −1}. The visual detection of glucose can be realized easily through the observable color change from colorless to blue by the naked

  18. Electrochemistry and biosensing reactivity of heme proteins adsorbed on the structure-tailored mesoporous Nb2O5 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xin; Tian Bozhi; Zhang Song; Kong Jilie; Zhao Dongyuan; Liu Baohong

    2004-01-01

    The highly ordered mesoporous niobium oxides fabricated by self-adjusted synthesis have been used as immobilization matrices of heme proteins including Cytochrome c (Cyt C) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for their large surface areas, narrow pore size distributions and good biocompatibility. The assembling process was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, amperometry and potential step chronoamperometry in details. Niobium oxide matrices with different structural features were templated with the surfactants and the selectivity of these hosts to specific protein characteristics was determined. It was observed that proteins could be readily assembled onto the mesoporous films with detectable retention of bioactivity. The Nb 2 O 5 matrix with a tailored pore size and counterpoised surface charge to that of hemes allowed for a maximum adsorption capacity of biomolecules. The adsorbed redox molecules exhibited direct electrochemical behavior and gave a pair of well-defined quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks, indicating that the mesoporous niobium oxide matrix could effectively promote the direct electron transfer between the protein redox site adsorbed and the electrode surface. The midpoint redox potentials of adsorbed Cyt-c and HRP were 14 and -122 mV versus SCE, respectively. Furthermore, the immobilized HRP onto Nb 2 O 5 derived electrode presented good bioactivity and thus was fabricated as an amperometric biosensor for the response of hydrogen peroxide in the range from 0.1 μM to 0.1 mM

  19. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service; however, maintenance therapy itself is not covered as part of these services. (c) Occupational... increase respiratory function, such as graded activity services; these services include physiologic... rehabilitation plan of treatment, including physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, speech...

  20. Phosphorylcholine functionalized dendrimers for the formation of highly stable and reactive gold nanoparticles and their glucose conjugation for biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Lan; Lv Liping; Xu Jianping; Ji Jian

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylcholine (PC)-functionalized poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared and used as both reducing and stabilizing agents for synthesis of highly stable and reactive gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Biomimetic PC-functionalized PAMAM dendrimers-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au DSNPs) were formed by simply mixing the PC modified amine-terminated fifth-generation PAMAM dendrimers (G5-PC) with AuCl 4 − ions by controlling the pH, no additional reducing agents or other stabilizers were needed. The obtained Au DSNPs were shown to be spherical, with particle diameters ranging from 5 to 12 nm, the sizes and growth kinetics of Au DSNPs could be tuned by changing the pH and the initial molar ratio of dendrimers to gold as indicated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–Vis data. The prepared Au DSNPs showed excellent stability including: (1) stable at wide pH (7–13) values; (2) stable at high salt concentrations up to 2 M NaCl; (3) non-specific protein adsorption resistance. More importantly, surface functionalization could be performed by introducing desired functional groups onto the remained reactive amine groups. This was exemplified by the glucose conjugation. The glucose conjugated Au DSNPs showed bio-specific interaction with Concanavalin A (Con A), which induced aggregation of the Au NPs. Colorimetric detection of Con A based on the plasmon resonance of the glucose conjugated Au DSNPs was realized. A limit of detection (LOD) for Con A was 0.6 μM, based on a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3. These findings demonstrated that the PC modified Au DSNPs could potentially serve as a versatile nano-platform for the biomedical applications.

  1. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  2. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  3. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  4. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  5. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V.; Novoselova, Iu.P.; Schupletsova, V.V.; Andrade, R.; Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S.; Safronov, A.P.; Yurova, K.A.; Kulesh, N.A.; Dzyuman, A.N.; Khlusov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  6. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina@we.lc.ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco BCMaterials UPV-EHU, Leioa, 48940 Spain (Spain); Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Novoselova, Iu.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Schupletsova, V.V. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Andrade, R. [SGIker, ServiciosGenerales de Investigación, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, 48080 Spain (Spain); Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Division, RAS, Ekaterinburg, 620016 (Russian Federation); Yurova, K.A. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Kulesh, N.A. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A.N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Khlusov, I.A. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  7. Molecular biosensing for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge in today’s societies is that life expectancy and the prevalence of chronic conditions are increasing. This puts pressure on the healthcare system and raises a demand for easy to use and cost-effective medical technologies in order to manage chronic conditions outside large

  8. Structural properties and sensing performance of high-k Nd2TiO5 thin layer-based electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor for pH detection and urea biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tung-Ming; Lin, Jian-Chi; Wu, Min-Hsien; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2009-05-15

    For high sensitive pH sensing, an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) device with Nd(2)TiO(5) thin layers fabricated on Si substrates by means of reactive sputtering and the subsequent post-deposition annealing (PDA) treatment was proposed. In this work, the effect of thermal annealing (600, 700, 800, and 900 degrees C) on the structural characteristics of Nd(2)TiO(5) thin layer was investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The observed structural properties were then correlated with the resulting pH sensing performances. For enzymatic field-effect-transistors-based urea biosensing, a hybrid configuration of the proposed Nd(2)TiO(5) thin layer with urease-immobilized alginate film attached was established. Within the experimental conditions investigated, the EIS device with the Nd(2)TiO(5) thin layer annealed at 800 degrees C exhibited a higher pH detection sensitivity of 57.2 mV/pH, a lower hysteresis voltage of 2.33 mV, and a lower drift rate of 1.80 mV/h compared to those at other annealing temperatures. These results are attributed to the formation of a thinner low-k interfacial layer at the oxide/Si interface and the higher surface roughness occurred at this annealing temperature. Furthermore, the presented urea biosensor was also proved to be able to detect urea with good linearity (R(2)=0.99) and reasonable sensitivity of 9.52 mV/mM in the urea concentration range of 3-40 mM. As a whole, the present work has provided some fundamental data for the use of Nd(2)TiO(5) thin layer for EIS-based pH detection and the extended application for biosensing.

  9. Highly stable piezo-immunoglobulin-biosensing of a SiO2/ZnO nanogenerator as a self-powered/active biosensor arising from the field effect influenced piezoelectric screening effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yayu; Fu, Yongming; Wang, Penglei; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2015-02-07

    Highly stable piezo-immunoglobulin-biosensing has been realized from a SiO2/ZnO nanowire (NW) nanogenerator (NG) as a self-powered/active biosensor. The piezoelectric output generated by the SiO2/ZnO NW NG can act not only as a power source for driving the device, but also as a sensing signal for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG). The stability of the device is very high, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranges from 1.20% to 4.20%. The limit of detection (LOD) of IgG on the device can reach 5.7 ng mL(-1). The response of the device is in a linear relationship with IgG concentration. The biosensing performance of SiO2/ZnO NWs is much higher than that of bare ZnO NWs. A SiO2 layer uniformly coated on the surface of the ZnO NW acts as the gate insulation layer, which increases mechanical robustness and protects it from the electrical leakages and short circuits. The IgG biomolecules modified on the surface of the SiO2/ZnO NW act as a gate potential, and the field effect can influence the surface electron density of ZnO NWs, which varies the screening effect of free-carriers on the piezoelectric output. The present results demonstrate a feasible approach for a highly stable self-powered/active biosensor.

  10. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  11. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand......Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  12. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  13. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  14. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  15. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  16. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... vehicular manslaughter, driving under the influence of drugs or liquor, and hit and run), when unaccompanied by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records...

  17. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  18. Extending flood damage assessment methodology to include ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal and sustainable flood plain management, including flood control, can only be achieved when the impacts of flood control measures are considered for both the man-made and natural environments, and the sociological aspects are fully considered. Until now, methods/models developed to determine the influences ...

  19. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  20. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  1. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  2. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  3. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement is described for nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux. The reactor shielding includes means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron

  4. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository

  5. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  6. [Renal patient's diet: Can fish be included?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro González, M I; Maafs Rodríguez, A G; Galindo Gómez, C

    2012-01-01

    Medical and nutritional treatment for renal disease, now a major public health issue, is highly complicated. Nutritional therapy must seek to retard renal dysfunction, maintain an optimal nutritional status and prevent the development of underlying pathologies. To analyze ten fish species to identify those that, because of their low phosphorus content, high biological value protein and elevated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, could be included in renal patient's diet. The following fish species (Litte tunny, Red drum, Spotted eagleray, Escolar, Swordfish, Big-scale pomfret, Cortez flounder, Largemouth blackbass, Periche mojarra, Florida Pompano) were analyzed according to the AOAC and Keller techniques to determine their protein, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, vitamins D(3) and E, and n-3 EPA+DHA content. These results were used to calculate relations between nutrients. The protein in the analyzed species ranged from 16.5 g/100 g of fillet (Largemouth black bass) to 27.2 g/100 g (Red drum); the lowest phosphorus value was 28.6 mg/100 g (Periche mojarra) and the highest 216.3 mg/100 g (Spotted eagle ray). 80% of the fish presented > 100 mg EPA + DHA in 100 g of fillet. By its Phosphorus/gProtein ratio, Escolar and Swordfish could not be included in the renal diet; Little tunny, Escolar, Big-scale pomfret, Largemouth black-bass, Periche mojarra and Florida Pompano presented a lower Phosphorus/EPA + DHA ratio. Florida pompano is the most recommended specie for renal patients, due to its optimal nutrient relations. However, all analyzed species, except Escolar and Swordfish, could be included in renal diets.

  7. MOS modeling hierarchy including radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.R.; Turfler, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A hierarchy of modeling procedures has been developed for MOS transistors, circuit blocks, and integrated circuits which include the effects of total dose radiation and photocurrent response. The models were developed for use with the SCEPTRE circuit analysis program, but the techniques are suitable for other modern computer aided analysis programs. The modeling hierarchy permits the designer or analyst to select the level of modeling complexity consistent with circuit size, parametric information, and accuracy requirements. Improvements have been made in the implementation of important second order effects in the transistor MOS model, in the definition of MOS building block models, and in the development of composite terminal models for MOS integrated circuits

  8. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.; Buttner, Ulrich; Yi, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  9. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  10. Energy principle with included boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Earlier comments by the author on the limitations of the classical form of the extended energy principle are supported by a complementary analysis on the potential energy change arising from free-boundary displacements of a magnetically confined plasma. In the final formulation of the extended principle, restricted displacements, satisfying pressure continuity by means of plasma volume currents in a thin boundary layer, are replaced by unrestricted (arbitrary) displacements which can give rise to induced surface currents. It is found that these currents contribute to the change in potential energy, and that their contribution is not taken into account by such a formulation. A general expression is further given for surface currents induced by arbitrary displacements. The expression is used to reformulate the energy principle for the class of displacements which satisfy all necessary boundary conditions, including that of the pressure balance. This makes a minimization procedure of the potential energy possible, for the class of all physically relevant test functions which include the constraints imposed by the boundary conditions. Such a procedure is also consistent with a corresponding variational calculus. (Author)

  11. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  12. Addressing Stillbirth in India Must Include Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa; Montgomery, Susanne; Ganesh, Gayatri; Kaur, Harinder Pal; Singh, Ratan

    2017-07-01

    Millennium Development Goal 4, to reduce child mortality, can only be achieved by reducing stillbirths globally. A confluence of medical and sociocultural factors contribute to the high stillbirth rates in India. The psychosocial aftermath of stillbirth is a well-documented public health problem, though less is known of the experience for men, particularly outside of the Western context. Therefore, men's perceptions and knowledge regarding reproductive health, as well as maternal-child health are important. Key informant interviews (n = 5) were analyzed and 28 structured interviews were conducted using a survey based on qualitative themes. Qualitative themes included men's dual burden and right to medical and reproductive decision making power. Wives were discouraged from expressing grief and pushed to conceive again. If not successful, particularly if a son was not conceived, a second wife was considered a solution. Quantitative data revealed that men with a history of stillbirths had greater anxiety and depression, perceived less social support, but had more egalitarian views towards women than men without stillbirth experience. At the same time fathers of stillbirths were more likely to be emotionally or physically abusive. Predictors of mental health, attitudes towards women, and perceived support are discussed. Patriarchal societal values, son preference, deficient women's autonomy, and sex-selective abortion perpetuate the risk for future poor infant outcomes, including stillbirth, and compounds the already higher risk of stillbirth for males. Grief interventions should explore and take into account men's perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors towards reproductive decision making.

  13. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-05-17

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  14. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  15. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  16. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Allan, G L; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S J; Day, J P [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  17. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  18. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  19. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepares participants to develop test and measurement, da...

  20. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" trainings have been recently changed to include, respectively, an introduction and an expert training on the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to develop expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepare...

  1. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  2. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  3. Should Broca's area include Brodmann area 47?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain organization of speech production has been a principal goal of neuroscience. Historically, brain speech production has been associated with so-called Broca’s area (Brodmann area –BA- 44 and 45), however, modern neuroimaging developments suggest speech production is associated with networks rather than with areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of BA47 ( pars orbitalis) in relation to language . A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the language network in which BA47 is involved. The Brainmap database was used. Twenty papers corresponding to 29 experimental conditions with a total of 373 subjects were included. Our results suggest that BA47 participates in a “frontal language production system” (or extended Broca’s system). The BA47  connectivity found is also concordant with a minor role in language semantics. BA47 plays a central role in the language production system.

  4. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... in a short period of time. However, there are scarce data regarding its validity, reproducibility, and responsiveness to change, making interpretation and comparison of studies difficult. In particular, there are limited data describing standardized scanning methodology and standardized definitions of US...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  5. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  6. Including climate change in energy investment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ybema, J.R.; Boonekamp, P.G.M.; Smit, J.T.J.

    1995-08-01

    To properly take climate change into account in the analysis of energy investment decisions, it is required to apply decision analysis methods that are capable of considering the specific characteristics of climate change (large uncertainties, long term horizon). Such decision analysis methods do exist. They can explicitly include evolving uncertainties, multi-stage decisions, cumulative effects and risk averse attitudes. Various methods are considered in this report and two of these methods have been selected: hedging calculations and sensitivity analysis. These methods are applied to illustrative examples, and its limitations are discussed. The examples are (1a) space heating and hot water for new houses from a private investor perspective and (1b) as example (1a) but from a government perspective, (2) electricity production with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (ICGCC) with or without CO 2 removal, and (3) national energy strategy to hedge for climate change. 9 figs., 21 tabs., 42 refs., 1 appendix

  7. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  8. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  9. Zγ production at NNLO including anomalous couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John M.; Neumann, Tobias; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD calculation of the processes pp → l + l -γ and pp\\to ν \\overline{ν}γ that we have implemented in MCFM. Our calculation includes QCD corrections at NNLO both for the Standard Model (SM) and additionally in the presence of Zγγ and ZZγ anomalous couplings. We compare our implementation, obtained using the jettiness slicing approach, with a previous SM calculation and find broad agreement. Focusing on the sensitivity of our results to the slicing parameter, we show that using our setup we are able to compute NNLO cross sections with numerical uncertainties of about 0.1%, which is small compared to residual scale uncertainties of a few percent. We study potential improvements using two different jettiness definitions and the inclusion of power corrections. At √{s}=13 TeV we present phenomenological results and consider Zγ as a background to H → Zγ production. We find that, with typical cuts, the inclusion of NNLO corrections represents a small effect and loosens the extraction of limits on anomalous couplings by about 10%.

  10. Alternating phase focussing including space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, W.H.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal stability can be obtained in a non-relativistic drift tube accelerator by traversing each gap as the rf accelerating field rises. However, the rising accelerating field leads to a transverse defocusing force which is usually overcome by magnetic focussing inside the drift tubes. The radio frequency quadrupole is one way of providing simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing without the use of magnets. One can also avoid the use of magnets by traversing alternate gaps between drift tubes as the field is rising and falling, thus providing an alternation of focussing and defocusing forces in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The stable longitudinal phase space area is quite small, but recent efforts suggest that alternating phase focussing (APF) may permit low velocity acceleration of currents in the 100-300 ma range. This paper presents a study of the parameter space and a test of crude analytic predictions by adapting the code PARMILA, which includes space charge, to APF. 6 refs., 3 figs

  11. Probabilistic production simulation including CHP plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.V.; Palsson, H.; Ravn, H.F.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic production simulation method is presented for an energy system containing combined heat and power plants. The method permits incorporation of stochastic failures (forced outages) of the plants and is well suited for analysis of the dimensioning of the system, that is, for finding the appropriate types and capacities of production plants in relation to expansion planning. The method is in the tradition of similar approaches for the analysis of power systems, based on the load duration curve. The present method extends on this by considering a two-dimensional load duration curve where the two dimensions represent heat and power. The method permits the analysis of a combined heat and power system which includes all the basic relevant types of plants, viz., condensing plants, back pressure plants, extraction plants and heat plants. The focus of the method is on the situation where the heat side has priority. This implies that on the power side there may be imbalances between demand and production. The method permits quantification of the expected power overflow, the expected unserviced power demand, and the expected unserviced heat demand. It is shown that a discretization method as well as double Fourier series may be applied in algorithms based on the method. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 21 refs.

  12. Langevin simulations of QCD, including fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    We encounter critical slow down in updating when xi/a -> infinite and in matrix inversion (needed to include fermions) when msub(q)a -> 0. A simulation that purports to solve QCD numerically will encounter these limits, so to face the challenge in the title of this workshop, we must cure the disease of critical slow down. Physically, this critical slow down is due to the reluctance of changes at short distances to propagate to large distances. Numerically, the stability of an algorithm at short wavelengths requires a (moderately) small step size; critical slow down occurs when the effective long wavelength step size becomes tiny. The remedy for this disease is an algorithm that propagates signals quickly throughout the system; i.e. one whose effective step size is not reduced for the long wavelength conponents of the fields. (Here the effective ''step size'' is essentially an inverse decorrelation time.) To do so one must resolve various wavelengths of the system and modify the dynamics (in CPU time) of the simulation so that all modes evolve at roughly the same rate. This can be achieved by introducing Fourier transforms. I show how to implement Fourier acceleration for Langevin updating and for conjugate gradient matrix inversion. The crucial feature of these algorithms that lends them to Fourier acceleration is that they update the lattice globally; hence the Fourier transforms are computed once per sweep rather than once per hit. (orig./HSI)

  13. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  14. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  15. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  16. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  17. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  18. Electrolyte solutions including a phosphoranimine compound, and energy storage devices including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaehn, John R.; Dufek, Eric J.; Rollins, Harry W.; Harrup, Mason K.; Gering, Kevin L.

    2017-09-12

    An electrolyte solution comprising at least one phosphoranimine compound and a metal salt. The at least one phosphoranimine compound comprises a compound of the chemical structure ##STR00001## where X is an organosilyl group or a tert-butyl group and each of R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 is independently selected from the group consisting of an alkyl group, an aryl group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. An energy storage device including the electrolyte solution is also disclosed.

  19. Layer-by-Layer-Assembled AuNPs-Decorated First-Generation Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer with Reduced Graphene Oxide Core as Highly Sensitive Biosensing Platform with Controllable 3D Nanoarchitecture for Rapid Voltammetric Analysis of Ultratrace DNA Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Kumarasamy; Camarada, María Belén; Dharuman, Venkataraman; Rajesh, Rajendiran; Venkatesan, Rengarajan; Ju, Huangxian; Maniraj, Mahalingam; Rai, Abhishek; Barman, Sudipta Roy; Wen, Yangping

    2018-06-12

    The structure and electrochemical properties of layer-by-layer-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-decorated first-generation (G1) poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PD) with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) core as a highly sensitive and label-free biosensing platform with a controllable three-dimensional (3D) nanoarchitecture for the rapid voltammetric analysis of DNA hybridization at ultratrace levels were characterized. Mercaptopropinoic acid (MPA) was self-assembled onto Au substrate, then GG1PD formed by the covalent functionalization between the amino terminals of G1PD and carboxyl terminals of rGO was covalently linked onto MPA, and finally AuNPs were decorated onto GG1PD by strong physicochemical interaction between AuNPs and -OH of rGO in GG1PD, which was characterized through different techniques and confirmed by computational calculation. This 3D controllable thin-film electrode was optimized and evaluated using [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3-/4- as the redox probe and employed to covalently immobilize thiol-functionalized single-stranded DNA as biorecognition element to form the DNA nanobiosensor, which achieved fast, ultrasensitive, and high-selective differential pulse voltammetric analysis of DNA hybridization in a linear range from 1 × 10 -6 to 1 × 10 -13 g m -1 with a low detection limit of 9.07 × 10 -14 g m -1 . This work will open a new pathway for the controllable 3D nanoarchitecture of the layer-by-layer-assembled metal nanoparticles-functionalized lower-generation PD with two-dimensional layered nanomaterials as cores that can be employed as ultrasensitive and label-free nanobiodevices for the fast diagnosis of specific genome diseases in the field of biomedicine.

  20. Graphene oxide reinforced core-shell structured Ag@Cu2O with tunable hierarchical morphologies and their morphology-dependent electrocatalytic properties for bio-sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Tian; Wang, Zhikai; Shi, Zhaoxia; Zheng, Dongyun; Sun, Junyong; Liu, Yanming

    2018-07-30

    In this study, a facile solution approach was developed for the synthesis of a series of core-shell structured Ag@Cu 2 O nanocrystals of various shapes including triangles, spheres, and cubes with well-defined stable heterojunctions. The electrooxidation of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA), guanine (G), and adenine (A) using these hybrids revealed morphology-dependent sensing properties, with activities and accumulation ability following the order, triangular Ag@Cu 2 O > spherical Ag@Cu 2 O > cubic Ag@Cu 2 O. Further, we constructed a novel graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet-reinforced triangular Ag@Cu 2 O ternary hetero-nanostructure. Such a hybrid with a three-dimensional interconnected hierarchical architecture is suitable for catalysis, since it not only leads to improved interfacial electron transfer, but also readily exposes the highly catalytic Ag@Cu 2 O to the reactants. Therefore, more enhanced electrochemical activities were observed for the oxidation of DA, UA, G, and A. This study provides an efficient way to synthesize morphology-controlled Ag@Cu 2 O heterogeneous catalysts for the fabrication of potential biosensors, and also opens up attractive avenues in the design of multifunctional ternary noble metal-semiconductor-carbon hybrids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel non-invasive electrochemical biosensing device for in situ determination of the alcohol content in blood by monitoring ethanol in sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamella, M; Campuzano, S; Manso, J; González de Rivera, G; López-Colino, F; Reviejo, A J; Pingarrón, J M

    2014-01-02

    A non-invasive, passive and simple to use skin surface based sensing device for determining the blood's ethanol content (BAC) by monitoring transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) is designed and developed. The proposed prototype is based on bienzyme amperometric composite biosensors that are sensitive to the variation of ethanol concentration. The prototype correlates, through previous calibration set-up, the amperometric signal generated from ethanol in sweat with its content in blood in a short period of time. The characteristics of this sensor device permit determination of the ethanol concentration in isolated and in continuous form, giving information of the BAC of a subject either in a given moment or its evolution during long periods of time (8h). Moreover, as the measurements are performed in a biological fluid, the evaluated individual is not able to alter the result of the analysis. The maximum limit of ethanol in blood allowed by legislation is included within the linear range of the device (0.0005-0.6 g L(-1)). Moreover, the device shows higher sensitivity than the breathalyzers marketed at the moment, allowing the monitoring of the ethanol content in blood to be obtained just 5 min after ingestion of the alcoholic drink. The comparison of the obtained results using the proposed device in the analysis of 40 volunteers with those provided by the gas chromatographic reference method for determination of BAC pointed out that there were no significant differences between both methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dictionary of scientific units including dimensionless numbers and scales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jerrard, H.G; McNeill, D.B

    1992-01-01

    .... The text includes the most recently accepted values of all units. Several disciplines, which have in the past employed few scientific principles and the dictionary has been extended to include examples of these.

  3. Should Relational Aggression Be Included in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Coyne, Claire; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether relational aggression should be included in DSM-V disruptive behavior disorders. The results conclude that some additional information is gathered from assessing relational aggression but not enough to be included in DSM-V.

  4. Partially ionized plasmas including the third symposium on uranium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, M. [ed.

    1976-09-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 28 papers on electrically generated plasmas, fission generated plasmas, nuclear pumped lasers, gaseous fuel reactor research, and applications. Five papers have been previously abstracted and included in ERA.

  5. 48 CFR 536.213-371 - Bids that include options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bids that include options... Contracting for Construction 536.213-371 Bids that include options. (a) Subject to the limitations in paragraph (c) of this section, you may include options in contracts if it is in the Government's interest...

  6. 29 CFR 780.616 - Operations included in raising livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations included in raising livestock. 780.616 Section... Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption Requirements for Exemption § 780.616 Operations included in raising livestock. Raising livestock includes such...

  7. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bureau

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (biosensors.

  8. Aptamer-Modified Magnetic Beads in Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Thomas; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic beads (MBs) are versatile tools for the purification, detection, and quantitative analysis of analytes from complex matrices. The superparamagnetic property of magnetic beads qualifies them for various analytical applications. To provide specificity, MBs can be decorated with ligands like aptamers, antibodies and peptides. In this context, aptamers are emerging as particular promising ligands due to a number of advantages. Most importantly, the chemical synthesis of aptamers enables straightforward and controlled chemical modification with linker molecules and dyes. Moreover, aptamers facilitate novel sensing strategies based on their oligonucleotide nature that cannot be realized with conventional peptide-based ligands. Due to these benefits, the combination of aptamers and MBs was already used in various analytical applications which are summarized in this article. PMID:29601533

  9. Ultrasensitive, Ultradense Nanoelectronic Biosensing with Nanoparticle Probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirkin, Chad A; Ratner, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A robust and effective model for determining the presence or absence of an analyte in a DPN-assembled gold nanoparticle/DNA conjugate structure in the limit of single molecule binding was developed...

  10. Self-Powered Electrochemical Lactate Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Baingane

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the development and characterization of a self-powered electrochemical lactate biosensor for real-time monitoring of lactic acid. The bioanode and biocathode were modified with D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH and bilirubin oxidase (BOD, respectively, to facilitate the oxidation and reduction of lactic acid and molecular oxygen. The bioelectrodes were arranged in a parallel configuration to construct the biofuel cell. This biofuel cell’s current–voltage characteristic was analyzed in the presence of various lactic acid concentrations over a range of 1–25 mM. An open circuit voltage of 395.3 mV and a short circuit current density of 418.8 µA/cm² were obtained when operating in 25 mM lactic acid. Additionally, a 10 pF capacitor was integrated via a charge pump circuit to the biofuel cell to realize the self-powered lactate biosensor with a footprint of 1.4 cm × 2 cm. The charge pump enabled the boosting of the biofuel cell voltage in bursts of 1.2–1.8 V via the capacitor. By observing the burst frequency of a 10 pF capacitor, the exact concentration of lactic acid was deduced. As a self-powered lactate sensor, a linear dynamic range of 1–100 mM lactic acid was observed under physiologic conditions (37 °C, pH 7.4 and the sensor exhibited an excellent sensitivity of 125.88 Hz/mM-cm2. This electrochemical lactate biosensor has the potential to be used for the real-time monitoring of lactic acid level in biological fluids.

  11. Threading DNA through nanopores for biosensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyta, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This review outlines the recent achievements in the field of nanopore research. Nanopores are typically used in single-molecule experiments and are believed to have a high potential to realize an ultra-fast and very cheap genome sequencer. Here, the various types of nanopore materials, ranging from biological to 2D nanopores are discussed together with their advantages and disadvantages. These nanopores can utilize different protocols to read out the DNA nucleobases. Although, the first nanopore devices have reached the market, many still have issues which do not allow a full realization of a nanopore sequencer able to sequence the human genome in about a day. Ways to control the DNA, its dynamics and speed as the biomolecule translocates the nanopore in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the reading-out process are examined in this review. Finally, the advantages, as well as the drawbacks in distinguishing the DNA nucleotides, i.e., the genetic information, are presented in view of their importance in the field of nanopore sequencing. (topical review)

  12. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolzinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction. Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than just an enhanced surface area.

  13. Nuclear track-based biosensing: an overview

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fink, Dietmar; Hernandez, G. M.; Arellano, H. G.; Vacík, Jiří; Havránek, Vladimír; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Kiv, A.; Alfonta, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 171, 1-2 (2016), s. 173-185 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : swift heavy ions * polymers * irradiation * ion tracks * etching * nanopores * enzymes * biosensors * biotechnology Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  14. Schottky-contact plasmonic rectenna for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavirad, Mohammad; Siadat Mousavi, Saba; Roy, Langis; Berini, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    We propose a plasmonic gold nanodipole array on silicon, forming a Schottky contact thereon, and covered by water. The behavior of this array under normal excitation has been extensively investigated. Trends have been found and confirmed by identification of the mode propagating in nanodipoles and its properties. This device can be used to detect infrared radiation below the bandgap energy of the substrate via internal photoelectric effect (IPE). Also we estimate its responsivity and detection limit. Finally, we assess the potential of the structure for bulk and surface (bio) chemical sensing. Based on modal results an analytical model has been proposed to estimate the sensitivity of the device. Results show a good agreement between numerical and analytical interpretations.

  15. Nanomaterials for electrochemical sensing and biosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Nanomaterial-Based ElectrodesCarbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors, Martin Pumera, National Institute for Materials Science, JapanElectrochemistry on Single Carbon Nanotube, Pat Collier, Caltech, USATheory of Voltammetry at Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Richard G. Compton, Oxford University, UKMetal Oxide Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Frank Marken, University of Bath, UKSemiconductor Quantum Dots for Electrochemical Bioanalysis, Eugenii Katz, Clarkson University, USAN

  16. Micro-incubator for bacterial biosensing applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Clasen, E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a commonly used indicator micro-organism to determine whether water is safe for human consumption. This paper discusses the design of a micro-incubator that can be applied to concentrate bacteria prior...

  17. Responsive Polydiacetylene Vesicles for Biosensing Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Lebègue

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Polydiacetylene (PDA inserted in films or in vesicles has received increasing attention due to its property to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition along with a change from non-fluorescent to fluorescent upon application of various stimuli. In this review paper, the principle for the detection of various microorganisms (bacteria, directly detected or detected through the emitted toxins or through their DNA, and viruses and of antibacterial and antiviral peptides based on these responsive PDA vesicles are detailed. The analytical performances obtained, when vesicles are in suspension or immobilized, are given and compared to those of the responsive vesicles mainly based on the vesicle encapsulation method. Many future challenges are then discussed.

  18. Negative Refractive Index Metasurfaces for Enhanced Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review some metasurfaces with negative values of effective refractive index, as scaffolds for a new generation of surface plasmon polariton-based biological or chemical sensors. The electromagnetic properties of a metasurface may be tuned by its full immersion into analyte, or by the adsorption of a thin layer on it, both of which change its properties as a plasmonic guide. We consider various simple forms of plasmonic crystals suitable for this purpose. We start with the basic case of a freestanding, electromagnetically symmetrical plasmonic slab and analyze different ultrathin, multilayer structures, to finally consider some two-dimensional “wallpaper” geometries like split ring resonator arrays and fishnet structures. A part of the text is dedicated to the possibility of multifunctionalization where a metasurface structure is simultaneously utilized both for sensing and for selectivity enhancement. Finally we give an overview of surface-bound intrinsic electromagnetic noise phenomena that limits the ultimate performance of a metasurfaces sensor.

  19. Polymeric Cantilever Arrays for Biosensing Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.; Johansson, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    We report the fabrication of arrays of polymeric cantilevers for biochemistry applications. The cantilevers are fabricated in the polymer SU-8. The use of a polymer as the component material for the cantilevers provides the sensors with very high sensitivity due to convenient mechanical material...... properties. The fabrication process is based on spin coating of the photosensitive polymer and near-ultraviolet exposure. The method allows obtaining well-controlled and uniform mechanical properties of the cantilevers. The elastic constant of the cantilevers was measured, and their dynamic response...

  20. Rapid molecular biosensing for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge in today’s societies is that life expectancy and the prevalence of chronic conditions are increasing. This puts pressure on the healthcare system and raises a demand for easy to use and cost-effective medical technologies in order to manage chronic conditions outside large

  1. Masterclass : magnetic particles in motion for biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aging population and increases in chronic diseases put high pressure on the healthcare system and drive a need for easy to use and cost-effective medical technologies. In-vitro diagnostics (IVD) plays a large role in delivering healthcare and within the IVD market, decentralized diagnostic

  2. Hierarchical antifouling brushes for biosensing applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de los Santos Pereira, Andres; Riedel, Tomáš; Brynda, Eduard; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 202, 31 October (2014), s. 1313-1321 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/1702; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : hierarchically structured brushes * affinity biosensors * fouling Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.097, year: 2014

  3. Giant Magnetoimpedance for Biosensing in Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fal-Miyar, Vanesa; Kumar, Arun; Mohapatra, Shyam; Shirley, Shawna; Frey, Natalie A.; Barandiarán, José M.; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.

    2008-06-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) non-specific superparamagnetic nanoparticles of 30 nm size are introduced into human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells by intracellular uptake. The nanoparticles are magnetised by two superimposed magnetic fields, an externally applied DC field and an AC field generated by the high-frequency current flowing through Co64.5Fe2.5Cr3Si15B15 amorphous ribbons. The resulted fringe fields from the nanoparticles are detected via the magnetoimpedance change in the ribbons covered and uncovered by thin gold layer. The gold covering is considered an improvement due to its biocompatibility and because it avoids the biocorrosion process on the ribbon. The MI responses in both cases are clearly dependent on the presence of the magnetic nanoparticles inside the cells and on the value of the external field.

  4. Zinc oxide nanostructures for electrochemical cortisol biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Tracy, Kathryn; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report on fabrication of a label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical cortisol immunosensors using one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two dimensional nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) as immobilizing matrix. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures (NSs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selective area diffraction (SAED) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) which showed that both ZnO-NRs and ZnO-NFs are single crystalline and oriented in [0001] direction. Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) are used as primary capture antibodies to detect cortisol using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increase in cortisol concentration and exhibits a sensitivity of 3.078 KΩ. M-1 for ZnO-NRs and 540 Ω. M -1 for ZnO-NFs. The developed ZnO-NSs based immunosensor is capable of detecting cortisol at 1 pM. The observed sensing parameters are in physiological range. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat to detect cortisol at point-of-care.

  5. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, D.; Zabel, T.; Hürlimann, T.

    2009-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine...

  6. 76 FR 61741 - Bmc Software, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers From COMSYS ITS Including Remote Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,540] Bmc Software, Inc... November 23, 2010, applicable to workers of BMC Software, Inc., including on-site leased workers from... BMC Software, inc., including on-site leased workers from Comsys ITS, and including remote workers...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1013-1 - Property included in inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Property included in inventory. 1.1013-1 Section... inventory. The basis of property required to be included in inventory is the last inventory value of such property in the hands of the taxpayer. The requirements with respect to the valuation of an inventory are...

  8. 31 CFR 103.51 - Dollars as including foreign currency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS General Provisions § 103.51 Dollars as including foreign currency. Wherever in this part an amount is stated in dollars, it shall be deemed to mean... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dollars as including foreign currency...

  9. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  10. 7 CFR 1437.303 - Aquaculture, including ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. 1437.303... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.303 Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. (a... human consumption as determined by CCC. (2) Fish raised as feed for other fish that are consumed by...

  11. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  12. A framework for including family health spillovers in economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Al-Janabi (Hareth); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); J. Coast (Joanna)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHealth care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these health spillovers? should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health

  13. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  14. Electric drive systems including smoothing capacitor cooling devices and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Zhou, Feng

    2017-02-28

    An electric drive system includes a smoothing capacitor including at least one terminal, a bus bar electrically coupled to the at least one terminal, a thermoelectric device including a first side and a second side positioned opposite the first side, where the first side is thermally coupled to at least one of the at least one terminal and the bus bar, and a cooling element thermally coupled to the second side of the thermoelectric device, where the cooling element dissipates heat from the thermoelectric device.

  15. Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets in Your Meal Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes nutrition: Including sweets in your meal plan Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods, but sweets aren't necessarily ... your meal plan. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods. But you can eat ...

  16. Initiation devices, initiation systems including initiation devices and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Condit, Reston A.; Rasmussen, Nikki; Wallace, Ronald S.

    2018-04-10

    Initiation devices may include at least one substrate, an initiation element positioned on a first side of the at least one substrate, and a spark gap electrically coupled to the initiation element and positioned on a second side of the at least one substrate. Initiation devices may include a plurality of substrates where at least one substrate of the plurality of substrates is electrically connected to at least one adjacent substrate of the plurality of substrates with at least one via extending through the at least one substrate. Initiation systems may include such initiation devices. Methods of igniting energetic materials include passing a current through a spark gap formed on at least one substrate of the initiation device, passing the current through at least one via formed through the at least one substrate, and passing the current through an explosive bridge wire of the initiation device.

  17. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... Percent of visits to office-based physicians with COPD indicated on the medical record: 3.2% Source: ...

  18. Including estimates of the future in today's financial statements

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Barth

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains why the question is how, not if, today's financial statements should include estimates of the future. Including such estimates is not new, but their use is increasing. This increase results primarily because standard setters believe asset and liability measures that reflect current economic conditions and up-to-date expectations of the future will result in more useful information for making economic decisions, which is the objective of financial reporting. This is why sta...

  19. 75 FR 16513 - B&C Corporation, JR Engineering Division, Including B&C Distribution Center, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Engineering Division, Including B&C Distribution Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From B&C Services... occurred during the relevant time period at the B&C Distribution Center, Inc. of the B&C Corporation, JR Engineering Division, Barberton, Ohio. The B&C Distribution Center provides distribution and logistical...

  20. [Origin of sennosides in health teas including Malva leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, T; Kishi, M; Sekita, S; Satake, M

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify whether sennosides are contained in the leaf of Malva verticillata L., and then to clarify the source of sennosides in health teas including malva leaves. The identification and determination of sennosides were performed with thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. The leaf of Malva verticillata L. did not contain sennosides A or B and could be easily distinguished from senna leaf. Our previous report showed that sennosides are contained in weight-reducing herbal teas including malva leaves, and that senna leaf is a herbal component in some teas. Furthermore, in 10 samples of health tea including malva leaves that were bought last year, the smallest amount of sennosides was 6.1 mg/bag, and all health teas including malva leaves contained the leaf and midrib of senna. We suggest that sennosides A and B are not contained in the leaf of Malva verticillata L., and that the sennosides in health teas including malva leaves are not derived from malva leaf but from senna leaf.

  1. Classical mechanics including an introduction to the theory of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Hentschke, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    This textbook teaches classical mechanics as one of the foundations of physics. It describes the mechanical stability and motion in physical systems ranging from the molecular to the galactic scale. Aside from the standard topics of mechanics in the physics curriculum, this book includes an introduction to the theory of elasticity and its use in selected modern engineering applications, e.g. dynamic mechanical analysis of viscoelastic materials. The text also covers many aspects of numerical mechanics, ranging from the solution of ordinary differential equations, including molecular dynamics simulation of many particle systems, to the finite element method. Attendant Mathematica programs or parts thereof are provided in conjunction with selected examples. Numerous links allow the reader to connect to related subjects and research topics. Among others this includes statistical mechanics (separate chapter), quantum mechanics, space flight, galactic dynamics, friction, and vibration spectroscopy. An introductory...

  2. Internet addiction neuroscientific approaches and therapeutical implications including smartphone addiction

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this successful book provides further and in-depth insight into theoretical models dealing with Internet addiction, as well as includes new therapeutical approaches. The editors also broach the emerging topic of smartphone addiction. This book combines a scholarly introduction with state-of-the-art research in the characterization of Internet addiction. It is intended for a broad audience including scientists, students and practitioners. The first part of the book contains an introduction to Internet addiction and their pathogenesis. The second part of the book is dedicated to an in-depth review of neuroscientific findings which cover studies using a variety of biological techniques including brain imaging and molecular genetics. The third part of the book focuses on therapeutic interventions for Internet addiction. The fourth part of the present book is an extension to the first edition and deals with a new emerging potential disorder related to Internet addiction – smartphone addicti...

  3. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  4. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  5. Meta-structure and tunable optical device including the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghoon; Papadakis, Georgia Theano; Atwater, Harry

    2017-12-26

    A meta-structure and a tunable optical device including the same are provided. The meta-structure includes a plurality of metal layers spaced apart from one another, an active layer spaced apart from the plurality of metal layers and having a carrier concentration that is tuned according to an electric signal applied to the active layer and the plurality of metal layers, and a plurality of dielectric layers spaced apart from one another and each having one surface contacting a metal layer among the plurality of metal layers and another surface contacting the active layer.

  6. EC6 safety enhancement - including impact of Fukushima lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.; Zemdegs, R.; Boyle, S.; Soulard, M., E-mail: stephen.yu@candu.com [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    The Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6) is the new Generation III CANDU reactor design that meets the most up to date regulatory requirements and customer expectations. EC6 builds on the proven high performance design inch as the Qinshan CANDU 6 units and has made improvements to safety and operational performance, and has incorporated extensive operational feedback including Fukushima. The Fukushima Dai-ichi March 11, 2011 event has demonstrated the importance of defence-in-depth considerations for beyond-design basis events, including severe accidents. The EC6 design is based on the defence-in-depth principles and provides further design features that address the lessons learned from Fukushima. (author)

  7. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  8. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  9. Calculation of Permeability inside the Basket including one Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Hwan; Bang, Kyung Sik; Lee, Ju an; Choi, Woo Seok [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In general, the porous media model and the effective thermal conductivity were used to simply the fuel assembly. The methods of calculating permeability were compared considering the flow inside a basket which includes a nuclear fuel. Detailed fuel assembly was a computational modeling and the flow characteristics were investigated. The flow inside the basket which included a fuel assembly is analyzed by CFD. As the height of the fuel assembly increases, the pressure drop linearly increased. The inertia resistance could be neglected. Three methods to calculate the permeability were compared. The permeability by the friction factor is 50% less than the permeability by wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  10. 36 CFR 1254.94 - What must my request include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... includes the following elements: (1) Record group number or agency of origin or, for donated historical... volume in number of pages or cubic feet. (b) The estimated amount of time (work-days) that the microfilm... who would require training (see § 1254.108(b)). (c) The number and a description of the equipment that...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1013 - Included-excluded rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... least one-half of your time in the pay period is in covered work. If you spend most of your time in a... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Included-excluded rule. 404.1013 Section 404.1013 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY...

  12. Including Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane; SueSee, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    Many physical education curriculum frameworks include statements about the inclusion of critical inquiry processes and the development of creativity and problem-solving skills. The learning environment created by physical education can encourage or limit the application and development of the learners' cognitive resources for critical and creative…

  13. Modelling a linear PM motor including magnetic saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder, H.; Slootweg, J.G.; Compter, J.C.; Hoeijmakers, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of linear permanent-magnet (PM) actuators increases in a wide variety of applications because of the high force density, robustness and accuracy. The paper describes the modelling of a linear PM motor applied in, for example, wafer steppers, including magnetic saturation. This is important

  14. Sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, in the Netherlands in 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MG van Veen; FDH Koedijk; IVF van der Broek; ELM Op de Coul; IM de Boer; AI van Sighem; MAB van der Sande; soa-centra; Stichting HIV Monitoring; EPI/Cib

    2007-01-01

    The nationally covered low threshold STI centres offering STI care targeted at high risk groups, provide surveillance data to monitor national trends in STI, including HIV. In 2006, chlamydia remained the most commonly diagnosed bacterial STI in the Netherlands in the STI centres, in spite of

  15. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... impacts of the proposal and the alternatives in comparative form, thus sharply defining the issues and... action so that reviewers may evaluate their comparative merits. (c) Include reasonable alternatives not... identify such alternative in the final statement unless another law prohibits the expression of such a...

  16. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (including nominee partnerships). An assignment of a security registered in the name of or assigned to a... appropriate for winding up partnership affairs. In those cases where assignments by or in behalf of all... dissolution. Upon voluntary dissolution, for any jurisdiction where a general partner may not act in winding...

  17. 10 CFR 905.11 - What must an IRP include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., energy conservation and efficiency, cogeneration and district heating and cooling applications, and..., consumer preferences, environmental impacts, demand or energy impacts, implementation issues, revenue... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must an IRP include? 905.11 Section 905.11 Energy...

  18. Smart Antenna Skins, including Conformal Array, MMICs and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, F.L.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    Low-cost technologies are presented for future space-borne and airborne SAR systems. These technologies include state-of-the art highly integrated circuits to miniaturise front-end, solutions to lower-cost interconnection technologies, new beamforming aspects and new architectures. The MMICs address

  19. LTRACK: Beam-transport calculation including wakefield effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    LTRACK is a first-order beam-transport code that includes wakefield effects up to quadrupole modes. This paper will introduce the readers to this computer code by describing the history, the method of calculations, and a brief summary of the input/output information. Future plans for the code will also be described

  20. Towards a general framework for including noise impacts in LCA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cucurachi, Stefano; Heijungs, Reinout; Ohlau, Katrin

    Purpose Several damages have been associated with the exposure of human beings to noise. These include auditory effects, i.e., hearing impairment, but also non-auditory physiological ones such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease, or psychological ones such as annoyance, depression, sleep

  1. 30 CFR 250.1007 - What to include in applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... features and other pertinent data including area, lease, and block designations; water depths; route...) submitted for a pipeline right-of-way shall bear a signed certificate upon its face by the engineer who made... additional design precautions you took to enable the pipeline to withstand the effects of water currents...

  2. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  3. Synthetic pulse radar including a microprocessor based controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.C.; Rubin, L.A.; Still, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to pulse radar detection of targets in extended media, including natural phenomena such as oil, coal and ore deposits within the earth. In particular, this invention relates to a pulse radar system employing a synthetic pulse formed from a fourier spectrum of frequencies generated and detected by a digitally controlled transmitter and receiver circuits

  4. Methodological challenges when doing research that includes ethnic minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Anne-Le; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin

    2016-01-01

    minorities are included. Method: A thorough literature search yielded 21 articles obtained from the scientific databases PubMed, Cinahl, Web of Science and PsychInfo. Analysis followed Arksey and O’Malley’s framework for scoping reviews, applying content analysis. Results: The results showed methodological...

  5. Including patients’ perspectives in patient information leaflets: A polyocular approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Butler, Antoinette Mary

    2013-01-01

    Existing research reveals that patients’ perspectives are missing from mandatory patient information leaflets (PILs). At the same time, there is overwhelming consensus that they should be included in this genre, and a corresponding need for potential approaches to tackle this problem. This paper ...

  6. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  7. A Guide to Running a Recycling Project. [Includes Recycling Handbook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Recycling Information and Organizing Network, Portland.

    This guide, designed for both students and adults, is intended for individuals who feel they might be interested in establishing a recycling depot. The guide includes such pertinent information as deciding how to set up a depot, markets and transportation, preparation of materials, where to place the depot and when to operate it, publicity and…

  8. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....403 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.403 What do protective services include? Protective services provided to a child, family or elderly person will be documented in...

  9. Unsteady panel method for complex configurations including wake modeling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, Lourens H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available implementations of the DLM are however not very versatile in terms of geometries that can be modeled. The ZONA6 code offers a versatile surface panel body model including a separated wake model, but uses a pressure panel method for lifting surfaces. This paper...

  10. Interviewing Objects: Including Educational Technologies as Qualitative Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Thompson, Terrie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article argues the importance of including significant technologies-in-use as key qualitative research participants when studying today's digitally enhanced learning environments. We gather a set of eight heuristics to assist qualitative researchers in "interviewing" technologies-in-use (or other relevant objects), drawing on concrete…

  11. Towards ligand docking including explicit interface water molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Lemmon

    Full Text Available Small molecule docking predicts the interaction of a small molecule ligand with a protein at atomic-detail accuracy including position and conformation the ligand but also conformational changes of the protein upon ligand binding. While successful in the majority of cases, docking algorithms including RosettaLigand fail in some cases to predict the correct protein/ligand complex structure. In this study we show that simultaneous docking of explicit interface water molecules greatly improves Rosetta's ability to distinguish correct from incorrect ligand poses. This result holds true for both protein-centric water docking wherein waters are located relative to the protein binding site and ligand-centric water docking wherein waters move with the ligand during docking. Protein-centric docking is used to model 99 HIV-1 protease/protease inhibitor structures. We find protease inhibitor placement improving at a ratio of 9:1 when one critical interface water molecule is included in the docking simulation. Ligand-centric docking is applied to 341 structures from the CSAR benchmark of diverse protein/ligand complexes [1]. Across this diverse dataset we see up to 56% recovery of failed docking studies, when waters are included in the docking simulation.

  12. 25 CFR 20.308 - What does earned income include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... self-employment, total profit from a business enterprise (i.e., gross receipts less expenses incurred in producing the goods or services). Business expenses do not include depreciation, personal business and entertainment expenses, personal transportation, capital equipment purchases, or principal...

  13. Visual Impairments, "Including Blindness." NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #13

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Vision is one of the five senses. Being able to see gives tremendous access to learning about the world around--people's faces and the subtleties of expression, what different things look like and how big they are, and the physical environments, including approaching hazards. When a child has a visual impairment, it is cause for immediate…

  14. Truck Drivers And Risk Of STDs Including HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal R.K

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: Whether long distance truck drivers are at a higher risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV? Objectives: i To study the degree of knowledge of HIV and AIDS among long- distance truck drivers. ii Assess their sexual behaviour including condom use. iii Explore their prevailing social influences and substance abuse patterns. iv Explore their treatment seeking bahaviour as regards STDs. v Deduce their risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV. Study Design: Cross- sectional interview. Setting: Transport Nagar, Indore (M.P Participants: 210 senior drivers (First drivers and 210 junior drivers (Second drivers. Study Variables: Extra-Marital sexual intercourse, condom usage, past and present history of STDs, treatment and counseling, substance abuse, social â€" cultural milieu. Outcome Variables: Risk of contraction of STDs. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis. Results: 94% of the drivers were totally ignorant about AIDS. 82.9% and 43.8 % of the senior and junior drivers had a history of extra- marital sex and of these only 2 regularly used condoms. 13.8% and 3.3 % of the senior and junior drivers had a past or present history suggestive of STD infection. Alcohol and Opium were regularly used by them. Conclusion: The studied drivers are at a high risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV.

  15. Including Students with Severe Disabilities in General Education Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Lech; Alper, Sandra

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents five systematic phases for bringing about successful regular education inclusion of students with severe disabilities. Phases include develop networks within the community, assess school and community resources, review strategies for integration, install strategies that lead to integration, and develop a system of feedback and…

  16. Simple suggestions for including vertical physics in oil spill models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Asaro, Eric; University of Washington, Seatle, WA

    2001-01-01

    Current models of oil spills include no vertical physics. They neglect the effect of vertical water motions on the transport and concentration of floating oil. Some simple ways to introduce vertical physics are suggested here. The major suggestion is to routinely measure the density stratification of the upper ocean during oil spills in order to develop a database on the effect of stratification. (Author)

  17. 27 CFR 53.181 - Further manufacture included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Further manufacture... Further manufacture included. (a) In general. The payment of tax imposed by chapter 32 of the Code on the... of any use in further manufacture, or sale as part of a second manufactured article, described in...

  18. Energy storage device including a redox-enhanced electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Galen; Evanko, Brian; Parker, Nicholas; Vonlanthen, David; Auston, David; Boettcher, Shannon; Chun, Sang-Eun; Ji, Xiulei; Wang, Bao; Wang, Xingfeng; Chandrabose, Raghu Subash

    2017-08-08

    An electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) energy storage device is provided that includes at least two electrodes and a redox-enhanced electrolyte including two redox couples such that there is a different one of the redox couples for each of the electrodes. When charged, the charge is stored in Faradaic reactions with the at least two redox couples in the electrolyte and in a double-layer capacitance of a porous carbon material that comprises at least one of the electrodes, and a self-discharge of the energy storage device is mitigated by at least one of electrostatic attraction, adsorption, physisorption, and chemisorption of a redox couple onto the porous carbon material.

  19. Progressive IRP Models for Power Resources Including EPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of optimizing regional power supply and demand, the paper makes effective planning scheduling of supply and demand side resources including energy efficiency power plant (EPP, to achieve the target of benefit, cost, and environmental constraints. In order to highlight the characteristics of different supply and demand resources in economic, environmental, and carbon constraints, three planning models with progressive constraints are constructed. Results of three models by the same example show that the best solutions to different models are different. The planning model including EPP has obvious advantages considering pollutant and carbon emission constraints, which confirms the advantages of low cost and emissions of EPP. The construction of progressive IRP models for power resources considering EPP has a certain reference value for guiding the planning and layout of EPP within other power resources and achieving cost and environmental objectives.

  20. 3D integrated HYDRA simulations of hohlraums including fill tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J.; Hammel, B. A.; Macphee, A. G.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Kerbel, G. D.; Sepke, S.; Patel, M. V.

    2017-10-01

    Measurements of fill tube perturbations from hydro growth radiography (HGR) experiments on the National Ignition Facility show spoke perturbations in the ablator radiating from the base of the tube. These correspond to the shadow of the 10 μm diameter glass fill tube cast by hot spots at early time. We present 3D integrated HYDRA simulations of these experiments which include the fill tube. Meshing techniques are described which were employed to resolve the fill tube structure and associated perturbations in the simulations. We examine the extent to which the specific illumination geometry necessary to accommodate a backlighter in the HGR experiment contributes to the spoke pattern. Simulations presented include high resolution calculations run on the Trinity machine operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES) partnership. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Management of radioactive waste from reprocessing including disposal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on a hypothetical scenario including a reactor park of 20 GWe consisting of Pressurised-Water-Reactors with a resulting annual production of 600 tonnes of heavy metal of spent fuel, all aspects of management of resulting wastes are studied. Waste streams from reprocessing include gaseous and liquid effluents, and a number of solid conditioned waste types. Disposal of waste is supposed to be performed either in a near-surface engineered repository, as long as the content of alpha-emitting radionuclides is low enough, and in a deep geological granite formation. After having estimated quantities, cost and radiological consequences, the sensitivity of results to modification in reactor park size, burn-up and the introduction of mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) is evaluated

  2. Improving the strength of amalgams by including steel fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Calvin T. [Hendrix College, Conway, AR 72032 (United States); Van Hoose, James R. [Siemens, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); McGill, Preston B. [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM20, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Grugel, Richard N., E-mail: richard.n.grugel@nasa.gov [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM30, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A room temperature liquid Ga-In alloy was successfully substituted for mercury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physically sound amalgams with included steel fibers can be made. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small volume fraction inclusion of fibers increased strength by {approx}20%. - Abstract: Mercury amalgams, due to their material properties, are widely and successfully used in dental practice. They are, however, also well recognized as having poor tensile strength. With the possibility of expanding amalgam applications it is demonstrated that tensile strength can be increased some 20% by including a small amount of steel fibers. Furthermore, it is shown that mercury can be replaced with a room temperature liquid gallium-indium alloy. Processing, microstructures, and mechanical test results of these novel amalgams are presented and discussed in view of means to further improve their properties.

  3. Microfluidic System Simulation Including the Electro-Viscous Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eileen; Chen, C. P.; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a practical approach using a general purpose lumped-parameter computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels including electro-viscous effects due to the existence of electrical double layer (EDL). In this study, an empirical formulation for calculating an effective viscosity of ionic solutions based on dimensional analysis is described to account for surface charge and bulk fluid conductivity, which give rise to electro-viscous effect in microfluidics network. Two dimensional slit micro flow data was used to determine the model coefficients. Geometry effect is then included through a Poiseuille number correlation in GFSSP. The bi-power model was used to calculate flow distribution of isotropically etched straight channel and T-junction microflows involving ionic solutions. Performance of the proposed model is assessed against experimental test data.

  4. Including investment risk in large-scale power market models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard; Meibom, P.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term energy market models can be used to examine investments in production technologies, however, with market liberalisation it is crucial that such models include investment risks and investor behaviour. This paper analyses how the effect of investment risk on production technology selection...... can be included in large-scale partial equilibrium models of the power market. The analyses are divided into a part about risk measures appropriate for power market investors and a more technical part about the combination of a risk-adjustment model and a partial-equilibrium model. To illustrate...... the analyses quantitatively, a framework based on an iterative interaction between the equilibrium model and a separate risk-adjustment module was constructed. To illustrate the features of the proposed modelling approach we examined how uncertainty in demand and variable costs affects the optimal choice...

  5. Suddenly included: cultural differences in experiencing re-inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfundmair, Michaela; Graupmann, Verena; Du, Hongfei; Frey, Dieter; Aydin, Nilüfer

    2015-03-01

    In the current research, we examined whether re-inclusion (i.e. the change from a previous state of exclusion to a new state of inclusion) was perceived differently by people with individualistic and collectivistic cultural backgrounds. Individualists (German and Austrian participants) but not collectivists (Chinese participants) experienced re-inclusion differently than continued inclusion: While collectivistic participants did not differentiate between both kinds of inclusion, individualistic participants showed reduced fulfilment of their psychological needs under re-inclusion compared to continued inclusion. The results moreover revealed that only participants from individualistic cultures expressed more feelings of exclusion when re-included than when continually included. These exclusionary feelings partially mediated the relationship between the different states of inclusion and basic need fulfilment. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  6. MODEL OF THE TOKAMAK EDGE DENSITY PEDESTAL INCLUDING DIFFUSIVE NEUTRALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURRELL, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Several previous analytic models of the tokamak edge density pedestal have been based on diffusive transport of plasma plus free-streaming of neutrals. This latter neutral model includes only the effect of ionization and neglects charge exchange. The present work models the edge density pedestal using diffusive transport for both the plasma and the neutrals. In contrast to the free-streaming model, a diffusion model for the neutrals includes the effect of both charge exchange and ionization and is valid when charge exchange is the dominant interaction. Surprisingly, the functional forms for the electron and neutral density profiles from the present calculation are identical to the results of the previous analytic models. There are some differences in the detailed definition of various parameters in the solution. For experimentally relevant cases where ionization and charge exchange rate are comparable, both models predict approximately the same width for the edge density pedestal

  7. Positron scattering by atomic hydrogen including positronium formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, K.; Burke, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Positron scattering by atomic hydrogen including positronium formation has been formulated using the R-matrix method and a general computer code written. Partial wave elastic and ground state positronium formation cross sections have been calculated for L ≤ 6 using a six-state approximation which includes the ground state and the 2s and 2p pseudostates of both hydrogen and positronium. The elastic scattering results obtained are in good agreement with those derived from a highly accurate calculation based upon the intermediate energy R-matrix approach. As in a previous coupled-channel static calculation, resonance effects are observed at intermediate energies in the S-wave positronium formation cross section. However, in the present results, the dominant resonance arises in the P-wave cross sections at an energy of 2.73 Ryd and with a width of 0.19 Ryd. (author)

  8. XFEL OSCILLATOR SIMULATION INCLUDING ANGLE-DEPENDENT CRYSTAL REFLECTIVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawley, William; Lindberg, Ryan; Kim, K.-J.; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    The oscillator package within the GINGER FEL simulation code has now been extended to include angle-dependent reflectivity properties of Bragg crystals. Previously, the package was modified to include frequencydependent reflectivity in order to model x-ray FEL oscillators from start-up from shot noise through to saturation. We present a summary of the algorithms used for modeling the crystal reflectivity and radiation propagation outside the undulator, discussing various numerical issues relevant to the domain of high Fresnel number and efficient Hankel transforms. We give some sample XFEL-O simulation results obtained with the angle-dependent reflectivity model, with particular attention directed to the longitudinal and transverse coherence of the radiation output.

  9. QCD Reggeon field theory for every day: Pomeron loops included

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Kovner, Alex; Peressutti, Javier; Lublinsky, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We derive the evolution equation for hadronic scattering amplitude at high energy. Our derivation includes the nonlinear effects of finite partonic density in the hadronic wave function as well as the effect of multiple scatterings for scattering on dense hadronic target. It thus includes Pomeron loops. It is based on the evolution of the hadronic wave function derived in /cite{foam}. The kernel of the evolution equation defines the second quantized Hamiltonian of the QCD Reggeon Field Theory, H RFT beyond the limits considered so far. The two previously known limits of the evolution: dilute target (JIMWLK limit) and dilute projectile (KLWMIJ limit) are recovered directly from our final result. The Hamiltonian H RFT is applicable for the evolution of scattering amplitude for arbitrarily dense hadronic projectiles/targets - from 'dipole-dipole' to 'nucleus-nucleus' scattering processes.

  10. The Physics of Semiconductors An Introduction Including Devices and Nanophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Grundmann, Marius

    2006-01-01

    The Physics of Semiconductors provides material for a comprehensive upper-level-undergrauate and graduate course on the subject, guiding readers to the point where they can choose a special topic and begin supervised research. The textbook provides a balance between essential aspects of solid-state and semiconductor physics, on the one hand, and the principles of various semiconductor devices and their applications in electronic and photonic devices, on the other. It highlights many practical aspects of semiconductors such as alloys, strain, heterostructures, nanostructures, that are necessary in modern semiconductor research but typically omitted in textbooks. For the interested reader some additional advanced topics are included, such as Bragg mirrors, resonators, polarized and magnetic semiconductors are included. Also supplied are explicit formulas for many results, to support better understanding. The Physics of Semiconductors requires little or no prior knowledge of solid-state physics and evolved from ...

  11. Smart Farming: Including Rights Holders for Responsible Agricultural Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Bronson

    2018-01-01

    This article draws on the literature of responsible innovation to suggest concrete processes for including rights holders in the “smart” agricultural revolution. It first draws upon historical agricultural research in Canada to highlight how productivist values drove seed innovations with particular consequences for the distribution of power in the food system. Next, the article uses document analysis to suggest that a similar value framework is motivating public investment in smart farming i...

  12. Aggregated Demand Modelling Including Distributed Generation, Storage and Demand Response

    OpenAIRE

    Marzooghi, Hesamoddin; Hill, David J.; Verbic, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    It is anticipated that penetration of renewable energy sources (RESs) in power systems will increase further in the next decades mainly due to environmental issues. In the long term of several decades, which we refer to in terms of the future grid (FG), balancing between supply and demand will become dependent on demand actions including demand response (DR) and energy storage. So far, FG feasibility studies have not considered these new demand-side developments for modelling future demand. I...

  13. Stochastic modelling of two-phase flows including phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.; Minier, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic modelling has already been developed and applied for single-phase flows and incompressible two-phase flows. In this article, we propose an extension of this modelling approach to two-phase flows including phase change (e.g. for steam-water flows). Two aspects are emphasised: a stochastic model accounting for phase transition and a modelling constraint which arises from volume conservation. To illustrate the whole approach, some remarks are eventually proposed for two-fluid models. (authors)

  14. Production, control and utilization of radioisotopes including radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1985-05-01

    From April 29th to May 5th, 1984 27 participants from 21 developing countries stayed within an IAEA Study Tour ('Production, Control and Utilization of Radioisotopes including Radiopharmaceuticals') in the GDR. In the CINR, Rossendorf the reactor, the cyclotron, the technological centre as well as the animal test laboratory were visited. The participants were made familiar by 10 papers with the development, production and control of radiopharmaceuticals in the CINR, Rossendorf. (author)

  15. Reliability evaluation of containments including soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1985-12-01

    Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability assessment of containment structures are examined. The probability-based method for reliability evaluation of nuclear structures developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is extended to include soil-structure interaction effects. In this method, reliability of structures is expressed in terms of limit state probabilities. Furthermore, random vibration theory is utilized to calculate limit state probabilities under random seismic loads. Earthquake ground motion is modeled by a segment of a zero-mean, stationary, filtered Gaussian white noise random process, represented by its power spectrum. All possible seismic hazards at a site, represented by a hazard curve, are also included in the analysis. The soil-foundation system is represented by a rigid surface foundation on an elastic halfspace. Random and other uncertainties in the strength properties of the structure, in the stiffness and internal damping of the soil, are also included in the analysis. Finally, a realistic reinforced concrete containment is analyzed to demonstrate the application of the method. For this containment, the soil-structure interaction effects on; (1) limit state probabilities, (2) structural fragility curves, (3) floor response spectra with probabilistic content, and (4) correlation coefficients for total acceleration response at specified structural locations, are examined in detail. 25 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs

  16. Electrolytes including fluorinated solvents for use in electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Konstantin; Yip, Ka Ki; Lin, Tzu-Yuan

    2015-07-07

    Provided are electrochemical cells and electrolytes used to build such cells. The electrolytes include ion-supplying salts and fluorinated solvents capable of maintaining single phase solutions with the salts at between about -30.degree. C. to about 80.degree. C. The fluorinated solvents, such as fluorinated carbonates, fluorinated esters, and fluorinated esters, are less flammable than their non-fluorinated counterparts and increase safety characteristics of cells containing these solvents. The amount of fluorinated solvents in electrolytes may be between about 30% and 80% by weight not accounting weight of the salts. Fluorinated salts, such as fluoroalkyl-substituted LiPF.sub.6, fluoroalkyl-substituted LiBF.sub.4 salts, linear and cyclic imide salts as well as methide salts including fluorinated alkyl groups, may be used due to their solubility in the fluorinated solvents. In some embodiments, the electrolyte may also include a flame retardant, such as a phosphazene or, more specifically, a cyclic phosphazene and/or one or more ionic liquids.

  17. A Framework for Including Family Health Spillovers in Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; van Exel, Job; Brouwer, Werner; Coast, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Health care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these "health spillovers" should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health spillovers in economic evaluation. We focus on extra-welfarist economic evaluations where the objective is to maximize health benefits from a health care budget (the "health care perspective"). Our framework involves adapting the conventional cost-effectiveness decision rule to include 2 multiplier effects to internalize the spillover effects. These multiplier effects express the ratio of total health effects (for patients and their family networks) to patient health effects. One multiplier effect is specified for health benefit generated from providing a new intervention, one for health benefit displaced by funding this intervention. We show that using multiplier effects to internalize health spillovers could change the optimal funding decisions and generate additional health benefits to society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. The COG database: an updated version includes eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverdlov Alexander V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple, essentially complete genome sequences of prokaryotes and eukaryotes spurred both the demand and the opportunity for the construction of an evolutionary classification of genes from these genomes. Such a classification system based on orthologous relationships between genes appears to be a natural framework for comparative genomics and should facilitate both functional annotation of genomes and large-scale evolutionary studies. Results We describe here a major update of the previously developed system for delineation of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs from the sequenced genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes and the construction of clusters of predicted orthologs for 7 eukaryotic genomes, which we named KOGs after eukaryotic orthologous groups. The COG collection currently consists of 138,458 proteins, which form 4873 COGs and comprise 75% of the 185,505 (predicted proteins encoded in 66 genomes of unicellular organisms. The eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs include proteins from 7 eukaryotic genomes: three animals (the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens, one plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, two fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the intracellular microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi. The current KOG set consists of 4852 clusters of orthologs, which include 59,838 proteins, or ~54% of the analyzed eukaryotic 110,655 gene products. Compared to the coverage of the prokaryotic genomes with COGs, a considerably smaller fraction of eukaryotic genes could be included into the KOGs; addition of new eukaryotic genomes is expected to result in substantial increase in the coverage of eukaryotic genomes with KOGs. Examination of the phyletic patterns of KOGs reveals a conserved core represented in all analyzed species and consisting of ~20% of the KOG set. This conserved portion of the

  19. Global anthropogenic emissions of particulate matter including black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimont, Zbigniew; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Heyes, Chris; Purohit, Pallav; Cofala, Janusz; Rafaj, Peter; Borken-Kleefeld, Jens; Schöpp, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of historical (1990-2010) global anthropogenic particulate matter (PM) emissions including the consistent and harmonized calculation of mass-based size distribution (PM1, PM2. 5, PM10), as well as primary carbonaceous aerosols including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC). The estimates were developed with the integrated assessment model GAINS, where source- and region-specific technology characteristics are explicitly included. This assessment includes a number of previously unaccounted or often misallocated emission sources, i.e. kerosene lamps, gas flaring, diesel generators, refuse burning; some of them were reported in the past for selected regions or in the context of a particular pollutant or sector but not included as part of a total estimate. Spatially, emissions were calculated for 172 source regions (as well as international shipping), presented for 25 global regions, and allocated to 0.5° × 0.5° longitude-latitude grids. No independent estimates of emissions from forest fires and savannah burning are provided and neither windblown dust nor unpaved roads emissions are included. We estimate that global emissions of PM have not changed significantly between 1990 and 2010, showing a strong decoupling from the global increase in energy consumption and, consequently, CO2 emissions, but there are significantly different regional trends, with a particularly strong increase in East Asia and Africa and a strong decline in Europe, North America, and the Pacific region. This in turn resulted in important changes in the spatial pattern of PM burden, e.g. European, North American, and Pacific contributions to global emissions dropped from nearly 30 % in 1990 to well below 15 % in 2010, while Asia's contribution grew from just over 50 % to nearly two-thirds of the global total in 2010. For all PM species considered, Asian sources represented over 60 % of the global anthropogenic total, and residential combustion

  20. Global anthropogenic emissions of particulate matter including black carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Klimont

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of historical (1990–2010 global anthropogenic particulate matter (PM emissions including the consistent and harmonized calculation of mass-based size distribution (PM1, PM2. 5, PM10, as well as primary carbonaceous aerosols including black carbon (BC and organic carbon (OC. The estimates were developed with the integrated assessment model GAINS, where source- and region-specific technology characteristics are explicitly included. This assessment includes a number of previously unaccounted or often misallocated emission sources, i.e. kerosene lamps, gas flaring, diesel generators, refuse burning; some of them were reported in the past for selected regions or in the context of a particular pollutant or sector but not included as part of a total estimate. Spatially, emissions were calculated for 172 source regions (as well as international shipping, presented for 25 global regions, and allocated to 0.5°  ×  0.5° longitude–latitude grids. No independent estimates of emissions from forest fires and savannah burning are provided and neither windblown dust nor unpaved roads emissions are included. We estimate that global emissions of PM have not changed significantly between 1990 and 2010, showing a strong decoupling from the global increase in energy consumption and, consequently, CO2 emissions, but there are significantly different regional trends, with a particularly strong increase in East Asia and Africa and a strong decline in Europe, North America, and the Pacific region. This in turn resulted in important changes in the spatial pattern of PM burden, e.g. European, North American, and Pacific contributions to global emissions dropped from nearly 30 % in 1990 to well below 15 % in 2010, while Asia's contribution grew from just over 50 % to nearly two-thirds of the global total in 2010. For all PM species considered, Asian sources represented over 60 % of the global

  1. Phenotypes in defined genotypes including siblings with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Eva; Ponjavic, Vesna; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J; Andréasson, Sten

    2011-06-01

    To characterize visual function in defined genotypes including siblings with Usher syndrome. Thirteen patients with phenotypically different subtypes of Usher syndrome, including 3 families with affected siblings, were selected. Genetic analysis and ophthalmological examinations including visual fields, full-field electroretinography (ERG), multifocal electroretinography (mf ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were assessed. The patients' degree of visual handicap was evaluated by a questionnaire (ADL). Twelve of thirteen patients were genotyped as Usher 1B, 1D, 1F, 2A, 2C or 3A. In 12 of 13 patients examined with ERG the 30 Hz flickering light response revealed remaining cone function. In 3 of the patients with Usher type 1 mf ERG demonstrated a specific pattern, with a sharp distinction between the area with reduced function and the central area with remaining macular function and normal peak time. OCT demonstrated loss of foveal depression with distortion of the foveal architecture in the macula in all patients. The foveal thickness ranged from 159 to 384 µm and was not correlated to retinal function. Three siblings shared the same mutation for Usher 2C but in contrast to previous reports regarding this genotype, 1 of them diverged in phenotype with substantially normal visual fields, almost normal OCT and mf ERG findings, and only moderately reduced rod and cone function according to ERG. Evaluation of visual function comprising both the severity of the rod cone degeneration and the function in the macular region confirm phenotypical heterogeneity within siblings and between different genotypes of Usher syndrome.

  2. Developing HYDMN code to include the transient of MNSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Barhoum, M.

    2000-11-01

    A description of the programs added to HYDMN code (a code for thermal-hydraulic steady state of MNSR) to include the transient of the same MNSR is presented. The code asks the initial conditions for the power (in k W) and the cold initial core inlet temperature (in degrees centigrade). A time-dependent study of the coolant inlet and outlet temperature, its speed, pool and tank temperatures is done for MNSR in general and for the Syrian MNSR in particular. The study solves the differential equations taken from reference (1) by using some numerical methods found in reference (3). The code becomes this way independent of any external information source. (Author)

  3. Modification of SKYSHINE-III to include cask array shadowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, N.E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Pfeifer, H.J. [NAC International, Norcross, GA (United States); Napolitano, D.G. [NISYS Corporation, Duluth, GA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The NAC International version of SKYSHINE-III has been expanded to represent the radiation emissions from ISFSI (Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations) dry storage casks using surface source descriptions. In addition, this modification includes a shadow shielding algorithm of the casks in the array. The resultant code is a flexible design tool which can be used to rapidly assess the impact of various cask loadings and arrangements. An example of its use in calculating dose rates for a 10x8 cask array is presented. (author)

  4. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  5. Endoscopic Management of Vascular Sinonasal Tumors, Including Angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyderman, Carl H; Pant, Harshita

    2016-06-01

    The greatest challenge in the surgical treatment of angiofibromas is dealing with the hypervascularity of these tumors. Staging systems that take into account the vascularity of the tumor may be more prognostic. A variety of treatment strategies are used to deal with the vascularity of angiofibromas, including preoperative embolization, segmentation of the tumor into vascular territories, use of hemostatic tools, and staging of surgery. Even large angiofibromas with intracranial extension and residual vascularity can be successfully managed by a skull base team using endoscopic techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Solution of neutron slowing down equation including multiple inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wakil, S.A.; Saad, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    The present work is devoted the presentation of an analytical method for the calculation of elastically and inelastically slowed down neutrons in an infinite non absorbing homogeneous medium. On the basis of the Central limit theory (CLT) and the integral transform technique the slowing down equation including inelastic scattering in terms of the Green function of elastic scattering is solved. The Green function is decomposed according to the number of collisions. A formula for the flux at any lethargy O (u) after any number of collisions is derived. An equation for the asymptotic flux is also obtained

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  8. Smart Farming: Including Rights Holders for Responsible Agricultural Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Bronson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on the literature of responsible innovation to suggest concrete processes for including rights holders in the “smart” agricultural revolution. It first draws upon historical agricultural research in Canada to highlight how productivist values drove seed innovations with particular consequences for the distribution of power in the food system. Next, the article uses document analysis to suggest that a similar value framework is motivating public investment in smart farming innovations. The article is of interest to smart farming’s decision makers (from farmers to governance actors and a broader audience – anyone interested in engendering equity through innovation-led societal transitions.

  9. Clinton administration budget includes mixed bag for science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    The $1,766 trillion federal budget proposal that the Clinton Administration rolled out on February 1—which promises to protect Social Security and Medicare and work within mandated budget caps—generally provides favorable news for federally funded science research and development.Within the 17% ($592 billion) of the federal budget earmarked for discretionary spending, the Administration's budget proposal increases funding for nondefense research and development for the seventh year in a row. This includes increased funding for a number of science accounts and money for a series of new science initiatives.

  10. TOOLS TO INCLUDE BLIND STUDENTS IN SCHOOL BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pietzschke Abate

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the design of data collection instruments that include the opinions of blind students, in accordance with the principles of Universal Design (UD. The aim of this study is to understand the importance of adapting data collection instruments for the inclusion of disabled persons in field research in Architecture and Design, among other fields. The data collection instruments developed were a play interview with a tactile map and a 3D survey with the use of tactile models. These instruments sought to assess the school environment experienced by blind students. The study involved students from the early years of a school for the blind who had not yet mastered the Braille system. The participation of these students was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, designers, educators, and psychologists lent support to the study. The results showed that the data collection instruments adapted to blind students were successful in making the group of authors examine questions regarding UD. An analysis of the participatory phase showed that the limitations resulting from blindness determine the specificities in the adaptation and implementation process of the instruments in schools. Practical recommendations for future studies related to instruments in the UD thematic are presented. This approach is in line with the global trend of including disabled persons in society based on these users’ opinions concerning what was designed by architects and designers.

  11. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable.

  12. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer, Including Occupational Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Weiderpass

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge on the etiology of breast cancer has advanced substantially in recent years, and several etiological factors are now firmly established. However, very few new discoveries have been made in relation to occupational risk factors. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has evaluated over 900 different exposures or agents to-date to determine whether they are carcinogenic to humans. These evaluations are published as a series of Monographs (www.iarc.fr. For breast cancer the following substances have been classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1: alcoholic beverages, exposure to diethylstilbestrol, estrogen-progestogen contraceptives, estrogen-progestogen hormone replacement therapy and exposure to X-radiation and gamma-radiation (in special populations such as atomic bomb survivors, medical patients, and in-utero exposure. Ethylene oxide is also classified as a Group 1 carcinogen, although the evidence for carcinogenicity in epidemiologic studies, and specifically for the human breast, is limited. The classification “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A includes estrogen hormone replacement therapy, tobacco smoking, and shift work involving circadian disruption, including work as a flight attendant. If the association between shift work and breast cancer, the most common female cancer, is confirmed, shift work could become the leading cause of occupational cancer in women.

  13. Proposal to Include Electrical Energy in the Industrial Return Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    At its 108th session on the 20 June 1997, the Council approved the Report of the Finance Committee Working Group on the Review of CERN Purchasing Policy and Procedures. Among other topics, the report recommended the inclusion of utility supplies in the calculation of the return statistics as soon as the relevant markets were deregulated, without reaching a consensus on the exact method of calculation. At its 296th meeting on the 18 June 2003, the Finance Committee approved a proposal to award a contract for the supply of electrical energy (CERN/FC/4693). The purpose of the proposal in this document is to clarify the way electrical energy will be included in future calculations of the return statistics. The Finance Committee is invited: 1. to agree that the full cost to CERN of electrical energy (excluding the cost of transport) be included in the Industrial Service return statistics; 2. to recommend that the Council approves the corresponding amendment to the Financial Rules set out in section 2 of this docum...

  14. Exclusive queueing model including the choice of service windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    In a queueing system involving multiple service windows, choice behavior is a significant concern. This paper incorporates the choice of service windows into a queueing model with a floor represented by discrete cells. We contrived a logit-based choice algorithm for agents considering the numbers of agents and the distances to all service windows. Simulations were conducted with various parameters of agent choice preference for these two elements and for different floor configurations, including the floor length and the number of service windows. We investigated the model from the viewpoint of transit times and entrance block rates. The influences of the parameters on these factors were surveyed in detail and we determined that there are optimum floor lengths that minimize the transit times. In addition, we observed that the transit times were determined almost entirely by the entrance block rates. The results of the presented model are relevant to understanding queueing systems including the choice of service windows and can be employed to optimize facility design and floor management.

  15. Impact of a pain protocol including hypnosis in major burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Mette M; Davadant, Maryse; Marin, Christian; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Pinget, Christophe; Maravic, Philippe; Koch, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Chiolero, René L

    2010-08-01

    Pain is a major issue after burns even when large doses of opioids are prescribed. The study focused on the impact of a pain protocol using hypnosis on pain intensity, anxiety, clinical course, and costs. All patients admitted to the ICU, aged >18 years, with an ICU stay >24h, accepting to try hypnosis, and treated according to standardized pain protocol were included. Pain was scaled on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (mean of daily multiple recordings), and basal and procedural opioid doses were recorded. Clinical outcome and economical data were retrieved from hospital charts and information system, respectively. Treated patients were matched with controls for sex, age, and the burned surface area. Forty patients were admitted from 2006 to 2007: 17 met exclusion criteria, leaving 23 patients, who were matched with 23 historical controls. Altogether patients were 36+/-14 years old and burned 27+/-15%BSA. The first hypnosis session was performed after a median of 9 days. The protocol resulted in the early delivery of higher opioid doses/24h (ppatient. A pain protocol including hypnosis reduced pain intensity, improved opioid efficiency, reduced anxiety, improved wound outcome while reducing costs. The protocol guided use of opioids improved patient care without side effects, while hypnosis had significant psychological benefits.

  16. Study on 'Tannix' an absorbent for heavy metals including uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yasuo

    1997-01-01

    To treat radioactive wastes including uranium and transuranic elements such as plutonium, americium etc., development of an absorbent which can be used to absorb and isolate these elements without producing secondary wastes after treatment was attempted. And an absorbent has been successfully developed by polymerizing tannin, a natural product. It is known that tannin binds heavy metals including uranium resulting to produce their precipitates. There are some reports suggesting its absorption ability for uranium. However, tannin has not been used to isolate a heavy metal from a solution because it is soluble in water. Here, insolubilization of tannin was attempted and a manufacturing method for a gelatinized insoluble tannin named as ''Tannix'' was established. Wattle tannin extracted from Mimosa pudica produced in Africa was dissolved in an alkaline solution and gelatinized by heating after the addition of formalin. Thus obtained insoluble tannin was used after crushing and sieving. This product, ''Tannix'' was able to absorb more than 99% of uranium in the waste. And the absorbed Tannin could be degraded by incineration even at a low temperature, leaving only uranium, but not producing any secondary product. (M.N.)

  17. Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Bahcall, J N; Peña-Garay, C; Bahcall, John N; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 4) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favore...

  18. Numerical optimization of conical flow waveriders including detailed viscous effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowcutt, Kevin G.; Anderson, John D., Jr.; Capriotti, Diego

    1987-01-01

    A family of optimized hypersonic waveriders is generated and studied wherein detailed viscous effects are included within the optimization process itself. This is in contrast to previous optimized waverider work, wherein purely inviscid flow is used to obtain the waverider shapes. For the present waveriders, the undersurface is a streamsurface of an inviscid conical flowfield, the upper surface is a streamsurface of the inviscid flow over a tapered cylinder (calculated by the axisymmetric method of characteristics), and the viscous effects are treated by integral solutions of the boundary layer equations. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow is included within the viscous calculations. The optimization is carried out using a nonlinear simplex method. The resulting family of viscous hypersonic waveriders yields predicted high values of lift/drag, high enough to break the L/D barrier based on experience with other hypersonic configurations. Moreover, the numerical optimization process for the viscous waveriders results in distinctly different shapes compared to previous work with inviscid-designed waveriders. Also, the fine details of the viscous solution, such as how the shear stress is distributed over the surface, and the location of transition, are crucial to the details of the resulting waverider geometry. Finally, the moment coefficient variations and heat transfer distributions associated with the viscous optimized waveriders are studied.

  19. Control rod calibration including the rod coupling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, R.; Nelson, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In a reactor containing more than one control rod, which includes all reactors licensed in the United States, there will be a 'coupling' or 'shadowing' of control rod flux at the location of a control rod as a result of the flux depression caused by another control rod. It was decided to investigate this phenomenon further, and eventually to put calibration table data or formulae in a small computer in the control room, so once could insert the positions of the three control rods and receive the excess reactivity without referring to separate tables. For this to be accomplished, a 'three control- rod reactivity function' would be used which would include the flux coupling between the rods. The function is design and measured data was fitted into it to determine the calibration constants. The input data for fitting the trial functions consisted of 254 data points, each consisting of the position of the reg, shim, and transient rods, and the total excess reactivity. (About 200 of these points were 'critical balance points', that is the rod positions for which reactor was critical, and the remainder were determined by positive period measurements.) Although this may be unrealistic from a physical viewpoint, the function derived gave a very accurate recalculation of the input data, and thus would faithfully give the excess reactivity for any possible combination of the locations of the three control rods. The next step, incorporation of the three-rod function into the minicomputer, will be pursued in the summer and fall of 1984

  20. Study on `Tannix` an absorbent for heavy metals including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Yasuo [Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    To treat radioactive wastes including uranium and transuranic elements such as plutonium, americium etc., development of an absorbent which can be used to absorb and isolate these elements without producing secondary wastes after treatment was attempted. And an absorbent has been successfully developed by polymerizing tannin, a natural product. It is known that tannin binds heavy metals including uranium resulting to produce their precipitates. There are some reports suggesting its absorption ability for uranium. However, tannin has not been used to isolate a heavy metal from a solution because it is soluble in water. Here, insolubilization of tannin was attempted and a manufacturing method for a gelatinized insoluble tannin named as ``Tannix`` was established. Wattle tannin extracted from Mimosa pudica produced in Africa was dissolved in an alkaline solution and gelatinized by heating after the addition of formalin. Thus obtained insoluble tannin was used after crushing and sieving. This product, ``Tannix`` was able to absorb more than 99% of uranium in the waste. And the absorbed Tannin could be degraded by incineration even at a low temperature, leaving only uranium, but not producing any secondary product. (M.N.)

  1. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  2. The Diversification Benefits of Including Carbon Assets in Financial Portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinpeng Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon allowances traded in the EU-Emission Trading Scheme (EU-ETS were initially designed as an economic motivation for efficiently curbing greenhouse as emissions, but now it mimics quite a few characteristics of financial assets, and have now been used as a candidate product in building financial portfolios. In this study, we examine the time-varying correlations between carbon allowance prices with other financial indices, during the third phase of EU-ETS. The results show that, at the beginning of this period, carbon price was still strongly corrected with other financial indices. However, this connection was weakened over time. Given the relative independence of carbon assets from other financial assets, we argue for the diversification benefits of including carbon assets in financial portfolios, and building such portfolios, respectively, with the traditional global minimum variance (GMV strategy, the mean-variance-OGARCH (MV-OGARCH strategy, and the dynamic conditional correlation (DCC strategy. It is shown that the portfolio built with the MV-OGARCH strategy far out-performs the others and that including carbon assets in financial portfolios does help reduce investment risks.

  3. Nonlinear equilibrium in Tokamaks including convective terms and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2003-01-01

    MHD equilibrium in tokamaks becomes very complex, when the non-linear convective term and viscosity are included in the momentum equation. In order to simplify the analysis, each new term has been separated in type gradient terms and vorticity depending terms. For the special case in which the vorticity vanishes, an extended Grad-Shafranov type equation can be obtained. However now the magnetic surface is not isobars or current surfaces as in the usual Grad-Shafranov treatment. The non-linear convective terms introduces gradient of Bernoulli type kinetic terms . Montgomery and other authors have shown the importance of the viscosity terms in tokamaks [1,2], here the treatment is carried out for the equilibrium condition, including generalized tokamaks coordinates recently described [3], which simplify the equilibrium analysis. Calculation of the new isobar surfaces is difficult and some computation have been carried out elsewhere for some particular cases [3]. Here, our analysis is extended discussing how the toroidal current density, plasma pressure and toroidal field are modified across the midplane because of the new terms (convective and viscous). New calculations and computations are also presented. (Author)

  4. Free vibration of elastically supported thin cylinders including gyroscopic effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    1998-10-29

    Full Text Available [ The equations D[R[ 747723 JSV 106:2 "Issue# MS 1560 VIBRATION OF THIN CYLINDERS 442 required for this procedure\\ including the gyroscopic terms\\ are included in Appendix A[ The displacement functions can then be written as follows] W"x# C0 cosh a0xa C1 sinh a0... xa C2 cos g1xa C3 sin g1xa epx:a0C4 cos qxa C5 sin qxa 1 e px:a0C6 cos qxa C7 sin qxa 1 "6a# V"x# A0C0 cosh a0xa A0C1 sinh a0xa A2C2 cos g1xa A2C3 sin g1xa epx:a$"A4C4 A5C5# cos qxa "A4C5 A5C4# sin qxa % e px:a$"A4C6 A5C7# cos...

  5. Aerodynamic analysis of the Darrieus rotor including secondary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.; Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.

    1983-10-01

    An aerodynamic analysis is made of two variants of the two-actuator-disk theory for modeling the Darrieus wind turbine. The double-multiple-streamtube model with constant and variable interference factors, including secondary effects, is examined for a Darrieus rotor. The influence of the secondary effects, namely, the blade geometry and profile type, the rotating tower, and the presence of struts and aerodynamic spoilers, is relatively significant, especially at high tip-speed ratios. Variation of the induced velocity as a function of the azimuthal angle allows a more accurate calculation of the aerodynamic loads on the downwind zone of the rotor with respect to the assumed constant interference factors. The theoretical results were compared with available experimental data for the Magdalen Islands wind turbine and Sandia-type machines (straight-line/circular-arc shape).

  6. Simulations of tokamak disruptions including self-consistent temperature evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of tokamaks have been carried out, including self-consistent temperature evolution with a highly anisotropic thermal conductivity. The simulations extend over the transport time-scale and address the question of how disruptive current profiles arise at low-q or high-density operation. Sharply defined disruptive events are triggered by the m/n=2/1 resistive tearing mode, which is mainly affected by local current gradients near the q=2 surface. If the global current gradient between q=2 and q=1 is sufficiently steep, the m=2 mode starts a shock which accelerates towards the q=1 surface, leaving stochastic fields, a flattened temperature profile and turbulent plasma behind it. For slightly weaker global current gradients, a shock may form, but it will dissipate before reaching q=1 and may lead to repetitive minidisruptions which flatten the temperature profile in a region inside the q=2 surface. (author)

  7. Two-dimensional analysis of motion artifacts, including flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litt, A.M.; Brody, A.S.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of motion on magnetic resonance images have been theoretically analyzed for the case of a point-like object in simple harmonic motion and for other one-dimensional trajectories. The authors of this paper extend this analysis to a generalized two-dimensional magnetization with an arbitrary motion trajectory. The authors provide specific solutions for the clinically relevant cases of the cross-sections of cylindrical objects in the body, such as the aorta, which has a roughly one-dimensional, simple harmonic motion during respiration. By extending the solution to include inhomogeneous magnetizations, the authors present a model which allows the effects of motion artifacts and flow artifacts to be analyzed simultaneously

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine including regenerator dead volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puech, Pascal; Tishkova, Victoria [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, CNRS, CEMES, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-15

    This paper provides a theoretical investigation on the thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine with linear and sinusoidal variations of the volume. The regenerator in a Stirling engine is an internal heat exchanger allowing to reach high efficiency. We used an isothermal model to analyse the net work and the heat stored in the regenerator during a complete cycle. We show that the engine efficiency with perfect regeneration doesn't depend on the regenerator dead volume but this dead volume strongly amplifies the imperfect regeneration effect. An analytical expression to estimate the improvement due to the regenerator has been proposed including the combined effects of dead volume and imperfect regeneration. This could be used at the very preliminary stage of the engine design process. (author)

  9. A Case for Including Transactions in OpenMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, M; Bihari, B L; de Supinski, B R; Wu, P; Michael, M; Liu, Y; Chen, W

    2010-01-25

    Transactional Memory (TM) has received significant attention recently as a mechanism to reduce the complexity of shared memory programming. We explore the potential of TM to improve OpenMP applications. We combine a software TM (STM) system to support transactions with an OpenMP implementation to start thread teams and provide task and loop-level parallelization. We apply this system to two application scenarios that reflect realistic TM use cases. Our results with this system demonstrate that even with the relatively high overheads of STM, transactions can outperform OpenMP critical sections by 10%. Overall, our study demonstrates that extending OpenMP to include transactions would ease programming effort while allowing improved performance.

  10. Update on antiplatelet agents, including MATCH, CHARISMA, and ESPRIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliut, Maryna; Jamieson, Dara G

    2008-02-01

    Despite recent advances in the acute treatment of stroke, prevention and risk factor modification remain the mainstays of management for patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. The majority of noncardioembolic ischemic strokes are atherothrombotic, presumed to be associated with the activation and aggregation of platelets. Antiplatelet medications have been shown to be effective in the secondary prevention of stroke of presumed arterial origin, both as monotherapy and in combination. Among combination of antiplatelet agents, aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole has demonstrated statistically significant additive benefit over monotherapy with each agent. Clopidogrel plus aspirin does not prevent recurrent ischemic stroke over each component individually, and the combination increases the risk of hemorrhagic side effects. This article reviews the most recent studies on antiplatelet medications, including the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel or extended-release dipyridamole, and discusses some of the controversies that still exist with the use of antiplatelet agents.

  11. Mathematics of flexible risers including pressure and internal flow affects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyed, F.B. (John Brown Engineers and Constructors Ltd., London (GB)); Patel, M.H. (University Coll., London (GB). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Derivations are presented for calculation of pressure and internal flow induced forces on flexible risers and other curved pipes using a mathematically rigorous approach. Approximate and exact methods are presented for calculation of pressure forces on straight and curved pipes in two dimensions. The mathematical identity of these equations with those for effective tension is illustrated. The force arising from the flow of an internal fluid of constant density is then calculated and combined with those for pressure forces in derivation of the catenary equations including pressure and internal flow terms. It is shown that internal flow contributes a new term to the expression for effective tension. These governing equations are then reduced for the specific cases of simple catenary, steep-S, lazy-S, steep-wave and lazy-wave risers. In each case, the solution method has been presented and the governing equilibrium and geometric compatability conditions cited. (author).

  12. Property transfer assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most environmental assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures and affect single family, multifamily, and commercial properties. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for protection from long term legal liabilities in the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more banks and state governments following this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and environmental assessments to protect the parties involved from any long term legal liabilities

  13. Environmental site assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most site assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more lenders and state governments likely to follow this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and site assessment to protect the parties involved from any legal liabilities

  14. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  15. Unification of all elementary-particle forces including gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazawa, Hidezumi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Akama, Keiichi.

    1978-07-01

    A unified model of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type for all elementary-particle forces including gravity is reviewed in some detail. Starting with a nonlinear fermion Lagrangian of the Heisenberg type and imposing the massless conditions of Bjorken on vector auxiliary fields, on effective Lagrangian is constructed, which combines the unified SU (2) x U (1) gauge theory of Weinberg and Salam for the weak and electromagnetic interactions of leptons and quarks and the Yang-Mills gauge theory of color SU (3) for the strong interaction of quarks. The photon, the weak vector bosons, and the physical Higgs scalar appear as collective excitations of lepton-antilepton or quark-antiquark pairs while the color-octet gluons appear as those of quark-antiquark pairs. The most important results of this unified model are presented. The Weinberg angle and the gluon coupling constant are determined, and the masses of the weak vector bosons are predicted. (Yoshimori, M.)

  16. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  17. Loan Products Included in the Offer of Commercial Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Dedu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A bank loan is the main form of economical credit. It is for corporate activities – for medium and big companies and for retail activities – for small companies and individuals. The conditions for credit mainly depend on the quality of customers, it means their ability to perform a profitable activity and to be able to pay back the credits. For reasons which are mainly connected to marketing, bank practice has developed a large range of credit names, trying to emphasize some of the parts of the products or to take profit of some competition advantages in relation with customers’ products. We are trying to include the offer of bank loans in a typology which takes into account the law, the bank field rules and the main technical features of the offered products.

  18. The Photoconversion of Phytochrome Includes an Unproductive Shunt Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, David; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Michael, Norbert; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2018-03-05

    Phytochromes are modular bimodal photoswitches that control gene expression for morphogenetic processes in plants. These functions are triggered by photoinduced conversions between the inactive and active states of the photosensory module, denoted as Pr and Pfr, respectively. In the present time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic study of bacterial representatives of this photoreceptor family, we demonstrate that these phototransformations do not represent linear processes but include a branching reaction back to the initial state, prior to (de)activation of the output module. Thus, only a fraction of the photoreceptors undergoing the phototransformations can initiate the downstream signaling process, consistent with phytochrome's function as a sensor for more durable changes of light conditions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...... for symmetric and asymmetric multi-species electrolytes and is not limited to a range of surface potentials. Numerical simulations are presented, for the case of a CaCO3 electrolyte solution in contact with a surface with rate-controlled protonation/deprotonation reactions. The surface charge and potential...... are determined by the surface reactions, and therefore they depends on the bulk solution composition and concentration...

  20. PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF CEMENT PASTE INCLUDING RECYCLED CONCRETE POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Topič

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The disposal and further recycling of concrete is being investigated worldwide, because the issue of complete recycling has not yet been fully resolved. A fundamental difficulty faced by researchers is the reuse of the recycled concrete fines which are very small (< 1 mm. Currently, full recycling of such waste fine fractions is highly energy intensive and resulting in production of CO2. Because of this, the only recycling methods that can be considered as sustainable and environmentally friendly are those which involve recycled concrete powder (RCP in its raw form. This article investigates the performance of RCP with the grain size < 0.25 mm as a potential binder replacement, and also as a microfiller in cement-based composites. Here, the RCP properties are assessed, including how mechanical properties and the microstructure are influenced by increasing the amount of the RCP in a cement paste (≤ 25 wt%.

  1. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  2. Relativistic bound state approach to fundamental forces including gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsch H.P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To describe the structure of particle bound states of nature, a relativistic bound state formalism is presented, which requires a Lagrangian including scalar coupling of two boson fields. The underlying mechanisms are quite complex and require an interplay of overlapping boson fields and fermion-antifermion production. This gives rise to two potentials, a boson-exchange potential and one identified with the long sought confinement potential in hadrons. With minimal requirements, two elementary massless fermions (quantons - with and without charge - and one gauge boson, hadrons and leptons but also atoms and gravitational systems are described by bound states with electric and magnetic coupling between the charges and spins of quantons. No need is found for colour, Higgs-coupling and supersymmetry.

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...... for displacement of the turbine system are obtained and the modal frequencies of the combined turbine-foundation system are estimated. Simulations are presented for the MDOF turbine structure subjected to wind loading for different soil stiffness conditions. Steady state and turbulent wind loading, developed using...

  4. Double-photoionization of helium including quadrupole radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ludlow, J A [AUBURN UNIV; Lee, Teck - Ghee [AUBURN UNIV; Pindzola, M S [AUBURN UNIV; Robicheaux, F [AUBURN UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling calculations are carried out for the double photoionization of helium including both dipole and quadrupole radiation effects. At a photon energy of 800 eV, accessible at CUlTent synchrotron light sources, the quadrupole interaction contributes around 6% to the total integral double photoionization cross section. The pure quadrupole single energy differential cross section shows a local maxima at equal energy sharing, as opposed to the minimum found in the pure dipole single energy differential cross section. The sum of the pure dipole and pure quadrupole single energy differentials is insensitive to non-dipole effects at 800 eV. However, the triple differential cross section at equal energy sharing of the two ejected electrons shows strong non-dipole effects due to the quadrupole interaction that may be experimentally observable.

  5. Extensions of MAD Version 8 to Include Beam Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe modifications to MAD version 8.23 to include linear accelerator cavities and beam acceleration. An additional energy variable has been added which is modified as the beam passes through LCAV elements (linear accelerator cavities) and can be used as a constraint in matching commands. The calculation of the beta functions and phase advance is consistent with that in other codes that treat acceleration such as TRANSPORT or DIMAD. These modifications allow this version of MAD to be used for the design and modeling of linacs and the authors present examples from the Next Linear Collider design as well as a muon acceleration complex. The code is available from CERN or SLAC

  6. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  7. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  8. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  9. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  10. Dispersion in thermal plasma including arbitrary degeneracy and quantum recoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Melrose, D.B.

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal response function for a thermal electron gas was calculated including two quantum effects exactly, degeneracy and the quantum recoil. The Fermi-Dirac distribution was expanded in powers of a parameter that is small in the non-degenerate limit and the response function was evaluated in terms of the conventional plasma dispersion function to arbitrary order in this parameter. The infinite sum was performed in terms of poly logarithms in the long-wavelength and quasi-static limits, giving results that apply for arbitrary degeneracy. The results were applied to the dispersion relations for Langmuir waves and to screening, reproducing known results in the non-degenerate and completely degenerate limits], and generalizing them to arbitrary degeneracy. The occupation number for the completely degenerate limit is shown. The importance of the results regarding to semiconductor plasmas were highlighted. (orig./A.B.)

  11. The physics of semiconductors an introduction including nanophysics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grundmann, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The 3rd edition of this successful textbook contains ample material for a comprehensive upper-level undergraduate or beginning graduate course, guiding readers to the point where they can choose a special topic and begin supervised research. The textbook provides a balance between essential aspects of solid-state and semiconductor physics, on the one hand, and the principles of various semiconductor devices and their applications in electronic and photonic devices, on the other. It highlights many practical aspects of semiconductors such as alloys, strain, heterostructures, nanostructures, that are necessary in modern semiconductor research but typically omitted in textbooks. Coverage also includes additional advanced topics, such as Bragg mirrors, resonators, polarized and magnetic semiconductors, nanowires, quantum dots, multi-junction solar cells, thin film transistors, carbon-based nanostructures and transparent conductive oxides. The text derives explicit formulas for many results to support better under...

  12. Optimage central organised image quality control including statistics and reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnen, A.; Schilz, C.; Shannoun, F.; Schreiner, A.; Hermen, J.; Moll, C.

    2008-01-01

    Quality control of medical imaging systems is performed using dedicated phantoms. As the imaging systems are more and more digital, adequate image processing methods might help to save evaluation time and to receive objective results. The developed software package OPTIMAGE is focusing on this with a central approach: On one hand, OPTIMAGE provides a framework, which includes functions like database integration, DICOM data sources, multilingual user interface and image processing functionality. On the other hand, the test methods are implemented using modules which are able to process the images automatically for the common imaging systems. The integration of statistics and reporting into this environment is paramount: This is the only way to provide these functions in an interactive, user-friendly way. These features enable the users to discover degradation in performance quickly and document performed measurements easily. (authors)

  13. One-dimensional central-force problem, including radiation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasher, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Two equal masses of equal charge magnitude (either attractive or repulsive) are held a certain distance apart for their entire past history. AT t = 0 one of them is either started from rest or given an initial velocity toward or away from the other charge. When the Dirac radiation-reaction force is included in the force equation, our Taylor-series numerical calculations lead to two types of nonphysical results for both the attractive and repulsive cases. In the attractive case, the moving charge either stops and moves back out to infinity, or violates energy conservation as it nears collision with the fixed charge. For the repulsive charges, the moving particle either eventually approaches and collides with the fixed one, or violates energy conservation as it goes out to infinity. These results lead us to conclude that the Lorentz-Dirac equation is not valid for the one-dimensional central-force problem

  14. PASCAL for engineers: A course including OMEGASOFT PASCAL for microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tausch, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    These are the notes of a PASCAL course for controls engineers at CERN. The course starts with 'Standard Pascal' and includes OMEGASOFT Pascal, a powerful extension of Pascal towards real-time and systems applications. It demonstrates how a language such as Pascal, with adequate extensions for systems programming and embedded microprocessor-driven systems, can substantially increase the productivity of programmers and the reliability of their products. Also enhanced will be the legibility of the programs and their maintainability, since programming in Pascal automatically leads to autodocumentation. Simple examples show how OMEGASOFT-PASCAL can be used for efficient programming of embedded systems for real-time data acquisition and control using the MC6809 microprocessor. (orig.)

  15. Strategies for replacement of obsolete equipment - including reverse engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    The presentation shall detail the challenges facing nuclear power plants with the replacement of obsolete equipment and the strategies used to overcome those challenges. The presentation will outline the common equipment types which are either obsolete or are becoming obsolete, with a focus on safety related components. The four options of the obsolete equipment replacement philosophy will be presented with replacement examples from each of the options shown for discussion purposes. Detailed examples from each of the four obsolete equipment replacement options of: commercially available equivalent component; modification of a commercial available component; reverse engineering of the original component; and finally, design changes using a new component, shall be presented to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each option. The presentation will include the technical challenges, cost and schedule concerns for each of the four options. Emphasis will be placed on the technological challenges associated with replacing old and obsolete equipment. The following is a bullet list of the challenges which will be discussed: Missing, misleading or no information on the original component; Acquiring information from the original equipment manufacturer and the plant; Using a sample component for the replacement evaluation and or reverse engineering; and Reverse engineering old equipment with newly available discrete components. The presentation will include the equivalency documentation using the EPRI guidelines when replacing an original component with a different yet form, fit and functional equivalent component. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the replacement of the obsolete component with a form, fit and functional equivalent component vs. the replacement of the original component with a new component with today's technology. (author)

  16. Including all voices in international data-sharing governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Jane; Terry, Sharon F; Juengst, Eric; Coy, Sarah; Harris, Jennifer R; Chalmers, Don; Dove, Edward S; Budin-Ljøsne, Isabelle; Adebamowo, Clement; Ogbe, Emilomo; Bezuidenhout, Louise; Morrison, Michael; Minion, Joel T; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Minari, Jusaku; Teare, Harriet; Isasi, Rosario; Kato, Kazuto; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Marshall, Patricia; Koenig, Barbara; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne

    2018-03-07

    Governments, funding bodies, institutions, and publishers have developed a number of strategies to encourage researchers to facilitate access to datasets. The rationale behind this approach is that this will bring a number of benefits and enable advances in healthcare and medicine by allowing the maximum returns from the investment in research, as well as reducing waste and promoting transparency. As this approach gains momentum, these data-sharing practices have implications for many kinds of research as they become standard practice across the world. The governance frameworks that have been developed to support biomedical research are not well equipped to deal with the complexities of international data sharing. This system is nationally based and is dependent upon expert committees for oversight and compliance, which has often led to piece-meal decision-making. This system tends to perpetuate inequalities by obscuring the contributions and the important role of different data providers along the data stream, whether they be low- or middle-income country researchers, patients, research participants, groups, or communities. As research and data-sharing activities are largely publicly funded, there is a strong moral argument for including the people who provide the data in decision-making and to develop governance systems for their continued participation. We recommend that governance of science becomes more transparent, representative, and responsive to the voices of many constituencies by conducting public consultations about data-sharing addressing issues of access and use; including all data providers in decision-making about the use and sharing of data along the whole of the data stream; and using digital technologies to encourage accessibility, transparency, and accountability. We anticipate that this approach could enhance the legitimacy of the research process, generate insights that may otherwise be overlooked or ignored, and help to bring valuable

  17. Terrorism cover in France for property damage including nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislas, A.

    2004-01-01

    The obligation to include terrorism cover in all Property Damage policies issued on the French Market is ruled by an Act of 1986 and introduced under Section R 126-2 of the French Code of Insurance. This section stipulates that Property Damage policies must provide cover for damage resulting from acts of terrorism, with the same deductible and the same limit than that of the other damage covered in the policy. Soon after the dramatic events of September 11, 2001 in the United States and although reinsurers worldwide restricted their offer of capacities, French insurers recognized that they had to maintain this global cover for the benefit of their insurers. After difficult discussions between insurers, reinsurers, brokers, risk managers and representatives of the State, the creation of a new Pool, backed with a State guarantee, was decided in less than three months. Effective January 1, 2002 and called Gestion d'Assurance et de Reassurance des Risques Attentats et Actes de Terrorisme (GAREAT), the Pool offers a multiple layers stop-loss cover for Property Damage only, i.e. excluding TPL policies. Considering that nuclear risks should be treated in the same way as other industrial risks, it was decided that they would be covered by GAREAT as well. In the meantime, by a Decree of December 28, 2001 modifying Section R 126-2, a special provision, aiming at reducing the limit and thus the price of this cover, was introduced in the Code. The purpose of this paper is to expose the present situation applying through GAREAT and, after two years of operation to discuss future developments, including other sources of capacity for the coverage of acts of terrorism in nuclear risks insurance.(author)

  18. Internet interventions for chronic pain including headache: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Buhrman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health problem and behavioral based treatments have been shown to be effective. However, the availability of these kinds of treatments is scarce and internet-based treatments have been shown to be promising in this area. The objective of the present systematic review is to evaluate internet-based interventions for persons with chronic pain. The specific aims are to do an updated review with a broad inclusion of different chronic pain diagnoses and to assess disability and pain and also measures of catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. A systematic search identified 891 studies and 22 trials were selected as eligible for review. Two of the selected trials included children/youth and five included individuals with chronic headache and/or migraine. The most frequently measured domain reflected in the primary outcomes was interference/disability, followed by catastrophizing. Result across the studies showed a number of beneficial effects. Twelve trials reported significant effects on disability/interference outcomes and pain intensity. Positive effects were also found on psychological variable such as catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. Several studies (n = 12 were assessed to have an unclear level of risk bias. The attrition levels ranged from 4% to 54% where the headache trials had the highest drop-out levels. However, findings suggest that internet-based treatments based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT are efficacious measured with different outcome variables. Results are in line with trials in clinical settings. Meta-analytic statistics were calculated for interference/disability, pain intensity, catastrophizing and mood ratings. Results showed that the effect size for interference/disability was Hedge's g = −0.39, for pain intensity Hedge's g = −0.33, for catastrophizing Hedge's g = −0.49 and for mood variables (depression Hedge's g = −0.26.

  19. Strategies for replacement of obsolete equipment, including reverse engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    The presentation shall detail the challenges facing nuclear power plants with the replacement of obsolete equipment and the strategies used to overcome those challenges. The presentation will outline the common equipment types which are either obsolete or are becoming obsolete, with a focus on safety related components. The four options of the obsolete equipment replacement philosophy will be presented with replacement examples from each of the options shown for discussion purposes. Detailed examples from each of the four obsolete equipment replacement options of, (1) commercially available equivalent component, (2) modification of a commercial available component, (3) reverse engineering of the original component and finally (4) design changes using a new component, shall be presented to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each option. The presentation will include the technical challenges, cost and schedule concerns for each of the four options. Emphasis will be placed on the technological challenges associated with replacing old and obsolete equipment. The following is a bullet list of the challenges which will be discussed: 1) Missing, misleading or no information on the original component. 2) Acquiring information from the original equipment manufacturer and the plant. 3) Using a sample component for the replacement evaluation and or reverse engineering. 4) Reverse engineering old equipment with newly available discrete components. The presentation will include the equivalency documentation using the EPRI guidelines when replacing an original component with a different yet form, fit and functional equivalent component. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the replacement of the obsolete component with a form, fit and functional equivalent component vs. the replacement of the original component with a new component with today's technology. (author)

  20. Including a learner with physical disabilities: stressful for teachers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Eloff

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Learners with physical disabilities have been entering mainstream schools for some years now. Whereas early research on inclusive education necessitated a strong focus on the needs of the learners, there has also been a recent interest in the role of the teachers in inclusive education. By adopting constructivism as the paradigm for inquiry a study was undertaken to establish the stress factors for teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability in their mainstream classes. The rationale for the study is threefold: i Learners with physical disabilities are entering mainstream schools increasingly, ii it is often assumed that inclusive education is too stressful for teachers to cope with, and iii related research has shown that increased contact with individuals with disabilities has a positive effect on attitudes towards individuals with disabilities. In accordance with the dialectical methodology of constructivism, the Teacher Stress and Coping Questionnaire and in-depth interviews were utilised to establish the stress factors and the extent of the stress factors that may be present. The aim of the constructivist inquiry process is to promote understanding and reconstruction. In this article the quantitative results indicate overall low or non-existent levels of stress in teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability, and the results therefore contribute to our understanding of this situation. The qualitative results reconstruct the meanings that these teachers attach to the inclusion of a learner with a physical disability and reveal some albeit limited concerns about the communication processes between parents and teachers and a perceived lack of pre-service training.