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Sample records for include calcite dolomite

  1. Carbonates in thrust faults: High temperature investigations into deformation processes in calcite-dolomite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, A.; Kennedy, L.; Misra, S.; Benson, P.

    2012-04-01

    shows that small dolomite grains (~50 μm) are characterized by well-defined grain boundaries and cleavage controlled fracture. There is evidence of the interruption of foliation development due to the presence of large-grained dolomite. Calcite grains are characterized by triple junction grain boundaries, providing evidence for recrystallization. Ongoing microstructural analyses (including: thin section analysis, EBSD, SEM, and Microprobe analysis) are being conducted to better constrain the deformation mechanisms and the degree of strain localization in these composites. Our experiments provide insights into the processes controlling rheology within bimodal calcite-dolomite systems, which can be used to improve models of the evolution of fold and thrust belt systems.

  2. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation between Coexisting Calcite and Dolomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J N

    1964-09-18

    The oxygen isotopic composition of calcite from carbonate rocks of the lower unit of the Flagstaff formation (Paleocene) exposed along the western margin of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, is about 7 per mil lower than that of coexisting dolomite, suggesting that isotopic equilibration of these two minerals can occur at relatively low temperatures. Unlike recent isotopic evidence presented by Degens and Epstein, the data do not preclude a primary chemical origin for the dolomite.

  3. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  4. Simple, simultaneous gravimetric determination of calcite and dolomite in calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literature pertaining to determination of calcite and dolomite is not modern and describes slow methods that require expensive specialized apparatus. The objective of this paper was to describe a new method that requires no specialized equipment. Linear regressions and correlation coefficients for...

  5. Clumped isotope thermometry of calcite and dolomite in a contact metamorphic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Max K.; Eiler, John M.; Nabelek, Peter I.

    2017-01-01

    Clumped isotope compositions of slowly-cooled calcite and dolomite marbles record apparent equilibrium temperatures of roughly 150-200 °C and 300-350 °C, respectively. Because clumped isotope compositions are sensitive to the details of T-t path within these intervals, measurements of the Δ47 values of coexisting calcite and dolomite can place new constraints on thermal history of low-grade metamorphic rocks over a large portion of the upper crust (from ∼5 to ∼15 km depth). We studied the clumped isotope geochemistry of coexisting calcite and dolomite in marbles from the Notch Peak contact metamorphic aureole, Utah. Here, flat-lying limestones were intruded by a pluton, producing a regular, zoned metamorphic aureole. Calcite Δ47 temperatures are uniform, 156 ± 12 °C (2σ s.e.), across rocks varying from high-grade marbles that exceeded 500 °C to nominally unmetamorphosed limestones >5 km from the intrusion. This result appears to require that the temperature far from the pluton was close to this value; an ambient temperature just 20 °C lower would not have permitted substantial re-equilibration, and should have preserved depositional or early diagenetic Δ47 values several km from the pluton. Combining this result with depth constraints from overlying strata suggests the country rock here had an average regional geotherm of 22.3-27.4 °C/km from the late Jurassic Period until at least the middle Paleogene Period. Dolomite Δ47 in all samples above the talc + tremolite-in isograd record apparent equilibrium temperatures of 328-12+13 °C (1σ s.e.), consistent with the apparent equilibrium blocking temperature we expect for cooling from peak metamorphic conditions. At greater distances, dolomite Δ47 records temperatures of peak (anchi)metamorphism or pre-metamorphic diagenetic conditions. The interface between these domains is the location of the 330 °C isotherm associated with intrusion. Multiple-phase clumped isotope measurements are complemented by

  6. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO 2 release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800 0 C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete

  7. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  8. Common Ion Effects In Zeoponic Substrates: Dissolution And Cation Exchange Variations Due to Additions of Calcite, Dolomite and Wollastonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, R. E.; Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    c1inoptilolite-rich tuff-hydroxyapatite mixture (zeoponic substrate) has the potential to serve as a synthetic soil-additive for plant growth. Essential plant macro-nutrients such as calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, ammonium and potassium are released into solution via dissolution of the hydroxyapatite and cation exchange on zeolite charged sites. Plant growth experiments resulting in low yield for wheat have been attributed to a Ca deficiency caused by a high degree of cation exchange by the zeolite. Batch-equilibration experiments were performed in order to determine if the Ca deficiency can be remedied by the addition of a second Ca-bearing, soluble, mineral such as calcite, dolomite or wollastonite. Variations in the amount of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite resulted in systematic changes in the concentrations of Ca and P. The addition of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite to the zeoponic substrate resulted in an exponential decrease in the phosphorous concentration in solution. The exponential rate of decay was greatest for calcite (5.60 wt. % -I), intermediate for wollastonite (2.85 wt.% -I) and least for dolomite (1.58 wt.% -I). Additions of the three minerals resulted in linear increases in the calcium concentration in solution. The rate of increase was greatest for calcite (3.64), intermediate for wollastonite (2.41) and least for dolomite (0.61). The observed changes in P and Ca concentration are consistent with the solubilities of calcite, dolomite and wollastonite and with changes expected from a common ion effect with Ca. Keywords: zeolite, zeoponics, common-ion effect, clinoptilolite, hydroxyapatite

  9. Shallow burial dolomitization of Mid-Cenozoic, cool-water, calcitic deep-shelf limestones, southern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James. N.P. (Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)); Bone, Y. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)); Kyser, T.K. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1991-03-01

    Oligocene to middle Miocene, deep-shelf, bryozoan-rich limestones across southern Australia are variably replaced by green to orange, Ca-rich, zoned, medium-crystalline, sucrosic dolomite. The degree of replacement varies from scattered rhombs in limestone to complete dolostones a few tens of meters in thickness and a few kilometers in lateral extent. Dolostone texture ranges from dense and well lithified to completely unlithified, resembling a loose sand of dolomite rhombs. Dolomitization is fabric specific; calcite and Mg-calcite bryozoans are either the last components to be replaced or are molds. The timing and locale of dolomitization are tightly constrained; Sr isotopes indicate a middle to late Miocene age while clasts of dolostone in overlying Pliocene limestones above a regional unconformity confirm a shallow-burial, pre-Pliocene origin. {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values support a marine source for the carbonate; the influence of meteoric fluids appears to have been negligible. Quaternary exposure has resulted in local dedolomitization and/or subaerial erosion, especially in the Murray basin. These rocks are excellent analogues for localized, lenticular dolostone bodies in calcite-rich Paleozoic platform carbonates.

  10. Efeitos da granulometria, formas e quantidades de materiais corretivos na acidez do solo Effect of particle size of calcitic and dolomitic limestone on soil neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermano Gargantini

    1974-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de estudar o efeito da granulometria e da quantidade de dois materiais corretivos da acidez do solo na produção de milho e trigo, bem como em propriedades químicas do solo. A parte experimental foi conduzida em casa de vegetação, em vasos de Mitscherlich, com amostra de Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro orto, coletada no município de Itapetininga. As culturas utilizadas para medir os efeitos dos calcários foram milho e, a seguir, trigo. Os resultados mostraram efeitos idênticos dos dois calcários na produção de massa seca, para as duas culturas. Os aumentos verificados foram grandes, e não foi observada diferença entre os dois materiais corretivos estudados, como também não foram obtidas diferenças de produções com as diversas granulo-metrias empregadas, para os dois calcários.Greenhouse experiments were carried out with wheat and corn with the purpose to study the effects of particle size of calcitic and dolomitic limestones in the neutralization of soil acidity and on crops growth. The results showed that calcitic and dolomitic limestones had the same effect on soil acidity. Particle size had little effect on yields but finer particles were more effective in the neutralization of soil acidity.

  11. Late-stage anhydrite-gypsum-siderite-dolomite-calcite assemblages record the transition from a deep to a shallow hydrothermal system in the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burisch, Mathias; Walter, Benjamin F.; Gerdes, Axel; Lanz, Maximilian; Markl, Gregor

    2018-02-01

    The majority of hydrothermal vein systems of economic interest occur at relatively shallow crustal levels, although many of them formed at significantly greater depths. Their present position is a consequence of uplift and erosion. Although, many aspects of their formation are well constrained, the temporal chemical evolution of such systems during uplift and erosion is still poorly understood. These vein minerals comprise calcite, dolomite-ankerite, siderite-magnesite, anhydrite and gypsum forming the last gangue assemblages in Jurassic and Tertiary sulphide-fluorite-quartz-barite veins of the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany. Mineral textures of samples from nine localities reveal that in these sequences, mineral precipitation follows a recurring pattern: early calcite is followed by anhydrite or gypsum, siderite and/or dolomite. This succession may repeat up to three times. In-situ (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb age dating of 15 carbonates from three subsequent generations of the late-stage vein assemblage yield robust ages between 20 and 0.6 Ma. Each mineral sequence forms in a distinctive period of about 2-5 Ma. These ages clearly relate these late-stage mineral phases to the youngest geological episode of the Schwarzwald, which is associated with the Cenozoic Rhine Graben rifting and basement uplift. Based on thermodynamic modelling, the formation of the observed mineral assemblages required an deeply sourced Mg-, Fe- and SO4-rich fluid (b), which was episodically mixed with a shallow crustal HCO3-rich fluid (a). As a consequence of fluid mixing, concentrations of Mg, Fe and SO4 temporarily increased and initiated the formation of the observed sulphate-carbonate mineral sequences. This discontinuous large-scale vertical fluid mixing was presumably directly related to episodes of active tectonics associated with the Cenozoic strike-slip regime of the Upper Rhine Graben. Analogously, episodic fluid mixing is a major key in the formation of older (Jurassic to early

  12. An Exercise on Calibration: DRIFTS Study of Binary Mixtures of Calcite and Dolomite with Partially Overlapping Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi Pezzolo, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most spectroscopic calibrations that are based on the study of well-separated features ascribable to the different components, this laboratory experience is especially designed to exploit spectral features that are nearly overlapping. The investigated system consists of a binary mixture of two commonly occurring minerals, calcite and…

  13. Differences in the rheological properties of calcitic and dolomitic lime slurries: influence of particle characteristics and practical implications in lime-based mortar manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizzi, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the rheological properties of lime suspensions is a useful means to evaluate the workability of lime mortars. In this work, we studied the flow behaviour of two industrial hydrated limes, one of calcitic and the other of dolomitic composition, by means of two types of rheometer with different geometry and setup mode. The obtained results were interpreted taking into account the differences in microstructure and surface properties of the suspended particles. Calcitic lime dry particles are formed by angular and polydisperse clusters and, once dispersed in water, they behave like thixotropic materials. On the other hand, the dolomitic lime is formed by nanoparticles and small round cluster and it shows a pronounced plastic behaviour in suspension. This fundamental difference between the two materials explains the traditional preference for dolomitic lime mortars for plastering and rendering applications.

    El estudio de las propiedades reológicas de suspensiones de cal es una herramienta muy útil para evaluar la trabajabilidad de morteros de cal. En este trabajo se ha estudiado el comportamiento en suspensión de dos cales hidratadas, de composición calcítica y dolomítica, mediante dos tipos de reómetros con geometría y modalidades distintas de medida. Los resultados obtenidos se han interpretado teniendo en cuenta las diferencias en la microestructura y las propiedades de superficie de las partículas en suspensión. Las partículas de cal calcítica están formadas por aglomerados angulares y polidispersos y, una vez dispersadas en agua, presentan un comportamiento tixotrópico. Por su parte, la cal dolomítica está formada por nanopartículas y pequeños agregados redondeados y muestra en suspensión un pronunciado comportamiento plástico. Esta importante diferencia entre las dos cales explica la preferencia tradicional de morteros de cal dolomítica para aplicaciones en revocos.

  14. Calcined dolomite, magnesite, and calcite for cleaning hot gas from a fluidized bed biomass gasifier with steam: Life and usefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J.; Aznar, M.P. [Univ. of Saragossa (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Corella, J. [Univ. Complutense of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Calcined dolomites, limestones, and magnesites are active and inexpensive solids for cleaning raw hot gas from biomass gasifiers with steam. The variations of their activities with time-on-stream are studied here. Simultaneous coke formation and coke elimination by steam gasification increases the life of these naturally occurring catalysts under some circumstances. The lives of these solids are studied at different temperatures (800--880 C), space times (0.08--0.32 kg of dolomite{center_dot}h/nm{sup 3}), particle diameters (1--4 mm), and types of solid. Not much deactivation was observed for tar concentration in the raw gas below 48 g/nm{sup 3}, particle diameters of less than 1.9 mm, temperatures above 800 C, and space times above 0.13 kg{center_dot}h/nm{sup 3}. The effectiveness of these calcined minerals is compared with that of an inert material (silica sand) and with a commercial steam reforming catalyst (R-67 from Haldor Topsoee).

  15. Thermal decomposition of natural dolomite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    SEM observation of the heat-treated samples at 950°C shows cluster of grains, indicating the structural transformation. Keywords. TGA–DTA; FTIR; X-ray diffraction; dolomite. 1. Introduction. Dolomite typically occurs as the major constituent of sedimentary formations in association with calcite. Thermal analysis might offer ...

  16. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  17. Geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1989-12-01

    The major goal of the carbonate research program at Stony Brook is to better understand the conditions and processes leading to regional diagenesis of carbonate rocks. Our research focuses on studies of ancient, massive dolostones, but we are also studying limestone diagenesis for its own importance, and as it relates to dolomitization. Our approach has been to carry out a very detailed petrographic and geochemical case study to the Mississippian Burlington-Keokuk Fms. of Iowa, Illinois and Missouri, and to develop this as a testing ground for new geochemical and modelling techniques, and for testing various models for regional dolomitization in epicontinental carbonates. The ideas and techniques developed in our Burlington-Keokuk studies are being expanded and applied to carbonate sequences of other ages (Devonian to Neogene), and other tectono-sedimentary settings. The emphasis of this report will be on new developments and results on the Burlington-Keokuk studies and on our diagenetic studies of other strata. Recent research on Burlington-Keokuk rocks include development and application of boron isotopes and the U--Th--Pb system to dolomite studies, investigations of porosity and permeability in the dolostones. Projects on other strata include dolomitization and limestones diagenesis of Devonian carbonates of Alberta and Western Australia, Miocene reefal carbonates of Spain, Neogene carbonates of Curacao and Bonaire, Waulsortian limestones of Ireland, modelling of trace elements and stable isotopes, and experimental growth of calcites to investigate crystallographic controls of trace element incorporation. 118 refs., 46 figs

  18. Effects of ancient porosity and permeability on formation of sedimentary dolomites: Devonian Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), south-central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.M.; Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    Petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that multiple dolomitization and dolomite stabilization events affected the Devonian Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) in south-central Montana. Several types of dolomite occur, defined by cathodoluminescence: nonzoned, dully luminescent subhedral-anhedral mosaics (most common), euhedral nonzoned and zoned dolomites, zoned dolomite cements, and irregularly luminescent dolomites (dully luminescent with irregularly luminescent regions). The irregularly luminescent fabrics probably represent partial replacement of early dolomite phases with later dolomite phases. Nonzoned, Ca-enriched, euhedral dolomites occur in calcite-cemented, coarse-grained limestone layers. These permeable layers probably were conduits for early meteoric waters, that occluded porosity in the limestones and prevented later dolomite stabilization. Irregularly luminescent dolomites are interpreted as intermediate fabrics in the dolomite stabilization process. Later calcite cements which occlude intercrystalline porosity prevented further dolomite replacement. Total recrystallization of remaining dolomites and formation of final dully luminescent mosaics occurred prior to brecciation and stylolitization.

  19. Mineralogy of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewards, T.; Williams, M.L.; Keil, K.

    1991-03-01

    This report characterizes the mineralogy of the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation based on studies of samples from cores of eight boreholes surrounding the WIPP repository. This investigation has three main goals: to obtain accurate modal compositions of all the samples selected; to investigate both the lateral and vertical variation of the mineralogy of the Culebra unit; and, to characterize water-bearing fracture surfaces in particular detail. The Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation is mineralogically and texturally heterogeneous, both vertically and horizontally. Although the predominant mineral is dolomite, important constituents of the formation are clay, quartz, gypsum, and calcite. Trace minerals include halite, phyllosilicates of metamorphic origin, feldspar, and pyrite. 24 refs., 90 figs., 27 tabs

  20. Controls on dolomitization of the Latemar platform (Dolomites, northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemyn, Carl; Swennen, Rudy; Casini, Giulio; Hunt, Dave W.

    2013-04-01

    The Anisian-Ladinian Latemar platform presents a spectacularly exposed outcrop analogue for carbonate reservoirs in close relation to fracture controlled igneous influence and dolomitization.Although the Latemar is one of the best studied carbonate platforms worldwide, reservoir characteristics of the dolomite units were not yet explored and dolomite distribution description was based on a limited (stratigraphic) portion of the platform outcrops (Carmichael, 2006-2008). This study extends the previous studies to the complete exposed interval in which dolomite bodies occur (including the less accessible Valsorda valley). LiDAR technology is used in order to overcome field accessibility limitations. Field observations and measurements are combined with LiDAR scanning and high resolution photography into a 3D digital outcrop model. Furthermore additional lithology information can be derived from the obtained 3D digital outcrop model, based on rock colour, at high resolution with high accuracy. The resulting dataset can be used for an objective mathematical description of the dolomite distribution. Additionally measured dolomite reservoir characteristic variation can be studied for the whole platform. The Latemar platform is crosscut by numerous sub-parallel mafic dikes, associated to the Predazzo intrusion complex (~238 Ma), located few kilometres to the south. The emplacement of the dikes comprises around 7% of the present day bulk rock volume. Surrounding the dikes contact metamorphism has locally caused impermeable marble aureoles with a thickness up to 1 meter. Approximately 26% of the bulk rock volume consists of replacive matrix dolomite. Large dolomite bodies (50 m wide, 100 m high) are bounded by dikes. Locally, the marble aureoles shielded the surrounding limestone from the dolomitizing fluid. Due to this aureole the dolomitization only occurred there where the 'protective' marble lithology was missing or crosscut by fractures. Inside the dikes and along the

  1. Influence of deformation on dolomite rim growth kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, Vanessa; Rybacki, Erik; Grafulha Morales, Luiz Fernando; Dresen, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Using a gas-deformation apparatus stacks of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals were deformed at T = 750° C and P = 400 MPa to examine the influence of stress and strain on magnesio-calcite and dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) growth kinetics. Triaxial compression and torsion tests performed at constant stresses between 7 and 38 MPa and test durations between 4 and 171 hours resulted in bulk strains of 0.03-0.2 and maximum shear strains of 0.8-5.6, respectively. The reaction rims consist of fine-grained (2-7 μm) dolomite with palisade-shaped grains growing into magnesite reactants and equiaxed granular dolomite grains next to calcite. In between dolomite and pure calcite, magnesio-calcite grains evolved with an average grain size of 20-40 μm. Grain boundaries tend to be straighter at high bulk strains and equilibrium angles at grain triple junctions are common within the magnesio-calcite layer. Transmission electron microscopy shows almost dislocation free palisades and increasing dislocation density within granular dolomite towards the magnesio-calcite boundary. Within magnesio-calcite grains, dislocations are concentrated at grain boundaries. Variation of time at fixed stress (˜17 MPa) yields a parabolic time dependence of dolomite rim width, indicating diffusion-controlled growth, similar to isostatic rim growth behavior. In contrast, the magnesio-calcite layer growth is enhanced compared to isostatic conditions. Triaxial compression at given time shows no significant change of dolomite rim thickness (11±2 μm) and width of magnesio-calcite layers (33±5 μm) with increasing stress. In torsion experiments, reaction layer thickness and grain size decrease from the center (low stress/strain) to the edge (high strain/stress) of samples. Chemical analysis shows nearly stoichiometric composition of dolomite palisades, but enhanced Ca content within granular grains, indicating local disequilibrium with magnesio-calcite, in particular for twisted

  2. Influence of stress and strain on dolomite rim growth: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2015-08-01

    Triaxial compression and torsion experiments were performed to investigate the influence of non-isostatic stress and strain on dolomite reaction rim growth using orientated natural calcite and magnesite single crystals at a temperature of 750 °C, 400 MPa confining pressure, stresses between 7 and 38 MPa, and test durations up to 171 h. Reaction products were composed of a polycrystalline magnesio-calcite layer, palisade-shaped dolomite, and granular dolomite grains. In all experiments, inelastic deformation was partitioned into calcite and reaction products, while magnesite remained undeformed. Calcite deformed by twinning and dislocation creep, where the activation of additional glide systems at high stress allowed high strain. Depending on grain size, magnesio-calcite deformed by diffusion creep and/or grain boundary sliding, twinning, and dislocation creep. Dolomite deformed mainly by diffusion creep, assisted by enhanced dislocation activity allowing Ca enrichment in the granular rim. A weak crystallographic preferred orientation of the reaction products was observed. In triaxial compression, dolomite rim growth was diffusion-controlled and showed no influence of axial stresses up to 38 MPa on the reaction kinetics. At high strain (>0.1), the magnesio-calcite layer is wider suggesting faster growth kinetics. This may be related to additional diffusion pathways provided by enhanced dislocation activity. At very high strain (>0.3-0.6), twisted samples showed a gradual decrease in layer thickness of dolomite and magnesio-calcite with increasing strain (-rate).

  3. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in the Culebra dolomite near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M.D.; Anderholm, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation, a thin (10 m) fractured dolomite aquifer, lies approximately 450 m above the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, USA. Salinities of water in the Culebra range roughly from 10,000 to 200,000 mg/L within the WIPP site. A proposed model for the post-Pleistocene hydrochemical evolution of the Culebra tentatively identifies the major sources and sinks for many of the groundwater solutes. Reaction-path simulations with the PHRQPITZ code suggest that the Culebra dolomite is a partial chemical equilibrium system whose composition is controlled by an irreversible process (dissolution of evaporites) and equilibrium with gypsum and calcite. Net geochemical reactions along postulated modern flow paths, calculated with the NETPATH code, include dissolution of halite, carbonate and evaporite salts, and ion exchange. R-mode principal component analysis revealed correlations among the concentrations of Si, Mg, pH, Li, and B that are consistent with several clay-water reactions. The results of the geochemical calculations and mineralogical data are consistent with the following hydrochemical model: 1. (1) solutes are added to the Culebra by dissolution of evaporite minerals 2. (2) the solubilities of gypsum and calcite increase as the salinity increases; these minerals dissolve as chemical equilibrium is maintained between them and the groundwater 3. (3) equilibrium is not maintained between the waters and dolomite; sufficient Mg is added to the waters by dissolution of accessory carnallite or polyhalite such that the degree of dolomite supersaturation increases with ionic strength 4. (4) clays within the fractures and rock matrix exert some control on the distribution of Li, B, Mg, and Si via sorption, ion exchange, and dissolution. ?? 1994.

  4. Dolomitization and porosity development in the middle and upper Wabamun Group, southeast Peace River Arch, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saller, A.H. [Unocol Science and Technology, Brea, CA (United States); Yaremko, K. [Consultant, Calgary (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Dolomitization and fracturing are critical to porosity development in most Wabamun Group reservoirs in the southern part of the Peace River arch. Cores from Peoria, Normandville, and Eaglesham fields and adjacent areas were examined to determine the relationship between depositional facies, dolomitization, fracturing, and porosity. Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data indicate that most upper Wabamun dolomites are coincident with mound-like structural highs at the top of the Wabamun, with structural relief due largely to differential compaction between dolomite and adjacent limestone. When this depositional/diagenetic model for dolomitization was integrated into 3-D seismic interpretations, Canadian Occidental`s discovery rate in the Wabamun increased from approximately 25 to 80%. The early dolomite is facies, fabric, and mineralogy selective with some burrow fills and aragonitic mollusks being preferentially dolomitized in dolomitic limestones. Most fracturing occurred after early, replacive Dolornitization. Late dolomitization, karst-like dissolution and collapse apparently were localized near the margins of the early dolomites where adjacent limestones were dolomitized or dissolved. Dissolution of calcite in partially dolomitized limestones resulted in geopetal accumulations of dolomite rhombs (porous sucrosic dolomite) in some fractures and burrow fills. Hydrothermal fluids apparently moved updip through the underlying Winterburn and/or Leduc formations, and then upward through porous, early dolomites in the Wabamun, causing Dolomitization of adjacent limestones and karst-like dissolution. Stable oxygen isotope ratios of the dolomites are quite variable ({delta}{sup 18}O ranges from -2.0 to -11.4{per_thousand}, PDB), supporting multiple stages of dolomitization during progressive burial.

  5. Dolomitization and sedimentary cyclicity of the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian rocks in South Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallaste, Toivo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and composition of dolomitized rocks and stoichiometry of dolomite in southern Estonia in the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian were studied on the background of the facies, sedimentary cyclicity (nine shallowing-up cycles, and evolution of the palaeobasins. The composition of rocks and lattice parameters of dolomite were investigated using the X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, titration and gravimetric analyses, and porosity measurements. The formation of dolostones is directly determined by the cyclic evolution of palaeobasins. Dolomitized rocks belong to the shallow-water inner shelf or tidal/lagoonal facies belt of regressive phases of sedimentary cycles. Sediments of the deep shelf/transitional environment and transgressive phases are not dolomitized. The most stoichiometric is secondary replacive dolomite of Silurian and upper Ordovician dolostones, formed during the early diagenesis of normal-marine (saline shallow-shelf calcitic sediments. The content of insoluble residue does not affect the stoichiometry. The changes in lattice parameters are induced by the Ca/Mg ratio in the dolomite lattice. The dolomite of the dolostones contacting limestone or containing calcite has an expanded lattice. The primary (syngenetic dolostone of the lagoonal or tidal flat belt has also an expanded lattice. No dolomitizing effect of the waters of the Devonian palaeobasin on the underlying rocks was revealed. The whole data set of the studied dolostones is consistent with the marine water environment in the palaeobasin at the corresponding time and shows no sign of the inflow of external fluids. It suggests that the microbial model of dolomite formation may characterize the Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian in southern Estonia. The occurrence of dolostones between undolomitized rocks limits the time of dolomitization to the early diagenetic stage.

  6. Formation of fine crystalline dolomites in lacustrine carbonates of the Eocene Sikou Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qiang Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genesis of the fine crystalline dolomites that exhibit good to excellent reservoir properties in the upper fourth member of the Eocene Shahejie Formation (Es 4 s around the Sikou Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, is uncertain. This paper investigates the formation mechanisms of this fine crystalline dolomite using XRD, SEM, thin section analysis and geochemical data. The stratigraphy of the Sikou lacustrine carbonate is dominated by the repetition of metre-scale, high-frequency deposition cycles, and the amount of dolomite within a cycle increases upward from the cycle bottom. These dolomite crystals are 2–30 μm in length, subhedral to anhedral in shape and typically replace both grains and matrix. They also occur as rim cement and have thin lamellae within ooid cortices. Textural relations indicate that the dolomite predates equant sparry calcite cement and coarse calcite cement. The Sr concentrations of dolomites range from 900 to 1200 ppm. Dolomite δ18O values (−11.3 to −8.2 ‰ PDB are depleted relative to calcite mudstone (−8.3 to −5.4 ‰ PDB that precipitated from lake water, while δ13C values (0.06–1.74 ‰ PDB are within the normal range of calcite mudstone values (−2.13 to 1.99 ‰ PDB. High 87Sr/86Sr values (0.710210–0.710844 indicate that amounts of Ca2+ and Mg2+ have been derived from the chemical weathering of Palaeozoic carbonate bedrocks. The high strontium concentration indicates that hypersaline conditions were maintained during the formation of the dolomites and that the dolomites were formed by the replacement of precursor calcite or by direct precipitation.

  7. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, σ, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (≈ 2 -5 μm grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 μm diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 μm thick granular dolomite layer

  8. Intracrystalline deformation of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresser, J.H.P. de

    1991-01-01

    It is well established from observations on natural calcite tectonites that intracrystalline plastic mechanisms are important during the deformation of calcite rocks in nature. In this thesis, new data are presented on fundamental aspects of deformation behaviour of calcite under conditions where

  9. Review of Dolomite as Precursor of Geopolymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an environmentally friendly cementitious binder that does not require the existence of ordinary Portland cement (OPC. Geopolymer has many excellent advantages, including high early strength, low shrinkage, good thermal resistance and good chemical resistance. Previous commonly used materials include fly ash, clay and slag. The used of dolomite as precursor material in geopolymer field is still new and at the early stage of study. Only a few researchers have done studies on dolomite in geopolymer. Dolomite (CaMg(CO32 is abundant and generally inexpensive natural minerals. The possible use of these bulk calcium carbonate materials in improving the mechanical properties of geopolymers will therefore be of great interest. This paper summarizes some research outcomes on dolomite in geopolymer along with the potential of dolomite as geopolymer composites.

  10. Dolomitic lime containing hydraulic additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagzdina, S.; Sedmalis, U.; Bidermanis, L.; Liepins, J.; Grosvalds, I.

    1997-01-01

    To obtain qualitative dolomitic lime the optimum calcination temperature of dolomite containing about 9 % of clayey substances is 900 deg C. The mechanical strength of dolomitic lime containing 30 % of brick waste additive after 6-9 months of hardening is 1.4-1.5 times higher than that of samples without hydraulic additive, for calcium lime - 2.2-2.6 times higher. Generally the mechanical strength of dolomitic lime is higher than that one of calcium lime. It can be explained by the active role of MgO in the hydration and hardening processes of dolomitic lime. Xray diffraction phase analysis was performed by X-ray diffractometer DPON-3M with Cu-K α emission filter

  11. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  12. Effects of the dolomite from Irati formation as additive in a refractory clay used as raw material in Santa Gertrudes ceramic cluster (SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.H.O.; Gaspar Junior, L.A.; Moreno, M.M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of addition of carbonates in clays used as floor tiles have been intensively studied, but the focus usually is the pure calcite or calcitic limestone, which has nobler uses in industry, especially for cement production. However, in the important area known as Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Cluster, in Sao Paulo State, occurs mainly the dolomitic limestone, which is little studied as a potential additive which could be used in order to improve the properties of the floor tiles. This work aimed to check out the potentiality of dolomitic limestone as additive in ceramic products, especially floor tiles. Using as ingredients dolomitic limestones and refractory clay collected inside the area of the referred cluster, ceramic bodies were obtained with different dolomitic limestones contents incorporated to the refractory clay, and these ceramic bodies were mineralogically, chemically and physically analyzed. The conclusions are the dolomitic limestone can be particularly useful when incorporated to refractory clays, due to its fluxing properties. (author)

  13. Fluorite Mineralization Related to the Dolomitization:an Equilibrium Study of the Proterozoic Stratabound Carbonate Macaia-Ijaci Basin, Lavras,Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cecília Miano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratabound fluorite occurring as thin films in the concomitantlyderived dolomitic portions of the calcitic limestone of the ProterozoicCarandaí Formation in the Macaia-Ijaci Basin was supposedly formedby metasomatic reactions between the carbonate and HF- and Mg2+-rich brines, during metamorphism. Thirteen electron microprobeanalyses from the carbonate in a single petrographic thin section, allowedthe determination of the temperature of the carbonate formation in therange 180o-230oC, using the Mg-calcite solvus geothermometer. Fivekey mineral reactions in the system Mg-Ca-C-H-O-F plotted in diagramsin terms of either, CO2- and HF-fugacities or chemical potentials ofCO2 and HF yielding fluorite + dolomite from calcite + Mg2+, areproposed. Apparently the fluorite formation is related withdolomitization. Additional reaction involving fluorite was calculatedand inserted in the phase diagram, according to the existence of calcite-fluorite veinlets bordered by dolomite selvages, at the Casa de Pedraquarry.

  14. Geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1995-05-01

    The main goal of our research on dolomites has been to better understand the composition of the fluids and processes of the fluid-rock interaction responsible for the formation of massive dolostones occurring over regional scales within sedimentary sequences. Understanding the timing of dolomitization, the fluids responsible for the dolomitization and the timing of the development of porosity has major economic ramifications in that dolomites are major oil reservoirs often having better reservoir properties than associated limestones. Our approach has been to apply trace element, major element, petrographic, crystallographic, stable isotope and radiogenic isotope systems to test models for the origins of dolomites and to give information that may allow us to develop new models. Fluid compositions and processes are evaluated through the use of numerical models which we have developed showing the simultaneous evolution of the trace element and isotope systems during dolomitization. Our research has included the application of B, O, C, Sr, Nd and Pb isotope systematics and the trace elements Mn, Fe St, rare earth elements, Rb, Ba, U, Th, Pb, Zn, Na, Cl, F and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. Analyses are possible on individual cements or dolomite types using micro-sampling or microprobe techniques. The microprobe techniques used include synchrotron X-ray microprobe analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory or electron microprobe at Stony Brook. Lack of a modern analogue for ancient massive dolostones has limited the application of the uniformitarian concept to developing models for the ancient regional dolostones. In addition it has not been possible to synthesize dolomite in the laboratory under conditions similar to the sedimentary or diagenetic possible environments in which the dolomites must have formed.

  15. DOLOMITE AS AN ALTERNATIVE WEIGHTING AGENT IN DRILLING FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. BADRUL

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of experimental tests have been conducted to assess the suitability of using dolomite as an alternative weighting agent in drilling fluids. Currently, barite is widely used as weighting agent in drilling fluids slurry to ensure proper weights are achieved. However, barite contains toxic materials which make it unattractive from health and environment point of views. This is especially true when drilling operations are offshore, where most of the used drilling fluids will be dumped back into the sea. In this work, rheological properties of dolomite blend drilling fluids slurry were studied. Dolomite rocks were first crushed to produce dolomite powder, before being mixed with water and bentonite at various proportions. A total of 10 samples which contains various percentages of water, bentonite and dolomite were studied. For each sample, its rheological properties were determined. Such properties include density from mud balance, viscosity from viscometer, filtrate loss from API filter press and gel strength. The effect of aging on the properties of drilling fluids was also studied. From the study, it is concluded that Sample E, which consists of 70% dolomite by weight, produces the most stable drilling fluids. It is also observed that the amount of 336 g of dolomite in the sample shows the similar physical and rheological properties to that of the 480 g barite in the sample although the density for both samples is not same.

  16. New insights to the formation of modern dolomite in a terrestrial low-temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zünterl, Andrea; Baldermann, Andre; Boch, Ronny; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Although dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] is a rock-forming mineral in ancient carbonate platforms, its occurrence in modern-marine carbonate-depositing settings and in particular in terrestrial, low-temperature environments is scarce - an enigma that is referred to as the "dolomite problem". At present, it is generally accepted that microbial activity, bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction, high aqueous Mg/Ca ratios and anoxic conditions favour the nucleation and crystal growth of dolomite; albeit the precise reaction paths causing the formation of dolomite at low temperatures remain questionable. Here, we present a novel study about the environmental controls and reaction mechanisms leading to the formation of authigenic Mg-Ca carbonates in (active) fault zones of the Erzberg (Styria, Austria) - Europe's largest iron ore opencast mine. Our petrographic and mineralogical results revealed the presence of ˜2-20 cm thick laminated successions of embedded needle-shaped, radiating aragonite and blocky low-Mg calcite (a repetitive sequence also-called "erzbergite") and subsequently deposited (Ca-rich) non-stoichiometric dolomite, which is clogging former voids and unconsolidated sediment in the heavily deteriorated fault zone. First U-Th age determinations of the respective aragonite layers indicate its formation at ˜19,000-13,000 years BP, also suggesting a "young" age of the sedimentary dolomite. Based on the combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses we identified two types of matrix-replacing dolomite: type 1 dolomite is nearly stoichiometric (˜51 mol% CaCO3) and shows a high degree of cation ordering (0.4-0.6), whereas type 2 dolomite is characterized by Ca-excess (˜55 mol% CaCO3) and a low degree of ordering (types of dolomite grow on the extent of matrix minerals, such as detrital low-Mg calcite, ankerite, siderite, quartz, goethite, chlorite and illitic clay minerals, implying a low-temperature origin of the Ca-excess dolomite and its formation

  17. High surface area calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  18. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  19. DOLOMITE THERMAL-DECOMPOSITION MACROKINETIC MODELS FOR EVALUATION OF THE GASGENERATORS SORBENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing dolomite in the capacity of a sorbent for generator gas purification is of considerable interest nowadays, as it is the impurity of generator gas that causes the major problem for creating cheep and effective co-generator plants. Designing gas purification systems employs simple but physically adequate macrokinetic models of dolomite thermal decomposition.  The  paper  analyzes  peculiarities  of  several  contemporaneous  models  of  dolomite and calcite thermal decomposition and infers on reasonable practicality for creating compact engineering dolomite-decomposition macrokinetic models and universal techniques of these models parameter reconstruction for specific dolomite samples. Such technics can be founded on thermogravimetric data and standard approximation error minimizing algorithms.The author assumes that CO2  evacuation from the reaction zone within the particle may proceed by diffusion mechanism and/or by the Darcy filtration and indicates that functional dependence of the thermal-decomposition rate from the particle sizes and the temperature differs for the specified mechanisms. The paper formulates four macrokinetic models whose correspondence verification is grounded on the experimental data. The author concludes that further work in this direction should proceed with the dolomite samples investigation and selecting the best approximation model describing experimental data in wide range of temperatures, warming up rates and the particle sizes.

  20. Paleoenvironmental and paleohydrochemical conditions of dolomite formation within a saline wetland in arid northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Caroline C.; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Dogramaci, Shawan; Grierson, Pauline F.

    2018-04-01

    Groundwater dolocrete occurring within the Fortescue Marsh, a large inland wetland in the Pilbara region of northwest Australia, has been investigated to provide paleoenvironmental and paleohydrological records and further the understanding of low temperature dolomite formation in terrestrial settings over the Quaternary Period. Two major phases of groundwater dolocrete formation are apparent from the presence of two distinct units of dolocrete, based on differences in depth, δ18O values and mineral composition. Group 1 (G1) occurs at depth 20-65 m b.g.l. (below ground level) and contains stoichiometric dolomite with δ18O values of -4.02-0.71‰. Group 2 (G2) is shallower (0-23 m b.g.l.), occurring close to the current groundwater level, and contains Ca-rich dolomite ± secondary calcite with a comparatively lower range of δ18O values (-7.74 and -6.03‰). Modelled δ18O values of paleogroundwater from which older G1 dolomite precipitated indicated highly saline source water, which had similar stable oxygen isotope compositions to relatively old brine groundwater within the Marsh, developed under a different hydroclimatic regime. The higher δ18O values suggest highly evaporitic conditions occurred at the Marsh, which may have been a playa lake to saline mud flat environment. In contrast, G2 dolomite precipitated from comparatively fresher water, and modelled δ18O values suggested formation from mixing between inflowing fresher groundwater with saline-brine groundwater within the Marsh. The δ18O values of the calcite indicates formation from brackish to saline groundwater, which suggests this process may be associated with coeval gypsum dissolution. In contrast to the modern hydrology of the Marsh, which is surface water dependent and driven by a flood and drought regime, past conditions conducive to dolomite precipitation suggest a groundwater dependent system, where shallow groundwaters were influenced by intensive evaporation.

  1. Metal Sorption to Dolomite Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.; Kelly, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Potential human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) might release actinides into the Culebra Dolomite where sorption reactions will affect of radiotoxicity from the repository. Using a limited residence time reactor the authors have measured Ca, Mg, Nd adsorption/exchange as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. By the same approach, but using as input radioactive tracers, adsorption/exchange of Am, Pu, U, and Np on dolomite were measured as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. Metal adsorption is typically favored at high pH. Calcium and Mg adsorb in near-stoichiometric proportions except at high pH. Adsorption of Ca and Mg is diminished at high ionic strengths (e.g., 0.5M NaCl) pointing to association of Na + with the dolomite surface, and the possibility that Ca and Mg sorb as hydrated, outer-sphere complexes. Sulfate amplifies sorption of Ca and Mg, and possibly Nd as well. Exchange of Nd for surface Ca is favored at high pH, and when Ca levels are low. Exchange for Ca appears to control attachment of actinides to dolomite as well, and high levels of Ca 2+ in solution will decrease Kds. At the same time, to the extent that high P CO2 increase Ca 2+ levels, JK d s will decrease with CO 2 levels as well, but only if sorbing actinide-carbonate complexes are not observed to form (Am-carbonate complexes appear to sorb; Pu-complexes might sorb as well; U-carbonate complexation leads to desorption). This indirect CO 2 effect is observed primarily at, and above, neutral pH. High NaCl levels do not appear to affect to actinide K d s

  2. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battimelli, Giovanni; de Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  3. Simulation of Calcite Calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Коzhevnikov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling and experimental investigation results of heat transfer in the case of calcite calcinations in regenerative shaft furnaces are given in the paper. Influence of heating gas temperature, calcined material fragment size and desired final product output on the duration of calcite calcination has been studied. It has been shown that with the given percentage of final product output and permissible changes in heating gas temperature in the furnace it is the fraction size of the calcined material that greatly determines such parameter as a process duration.

  4. Hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in the Sinian Dengying Fm, central Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiang Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Sinian Dengying Fm is the focus of natural gas exploration in the central part of the Sichuan Basin (central Sichuan Basin in recent years. Especially, epigenic karstification and its resulted reservoir-seepage spaces have always been the focal points in researches. Based on the petrographic characteristics of drilling cuttings and core samples, and through experimental analysis by using trace elements, isotopes, and cathodoluminescence, the Dengying Fm dolomite was demonstrated to have matrix recrystallized dolomite (MRD, filled saddle dolomite (FSD (the mean homogenization temperature of inclusion: 178.5 °C, high concentrations of Fe & Mn, slightly positive 87Sr/86Sr value and hydrothermal minerals combination (including sphalerite, galena, pyrite, and quartz, etc.. Thus, it was proposed that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies (HDRF exist in the Dengying Fm dolomite, in other words, the dolomite reservoir is composed of hydrothermal dissolved pores, intercrystalline pores of hydrothermal origin, hydrothermal caverns and expanded fractures, and was formed due to the reworking of hydrothermal fluid on tight matrix dolomite. Identification marks are presented in terms of petrography and geochemistry so that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies can be effectively recognized and identified. It is concluded that the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in this area are preliminary controlled by deep and large basement faults and the strength of hydrothermal fluids.

  5. Hydrothermal dolomitization of the Bekhme formation (Upper Cretaceous), Zagros Basin, Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Record of oil migration and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurbeg, Howri; Morad, Daniel; Othman, Rushdy; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Al-Aasm, Ihsan; Kolo, Kamal; Spirov, Pavel; Proust, Jean Noel; Preat, Alain; Koyi, Hemin

    2016-07-01

    The common presence of oil seepages in dolostones is widespread in Cretaceous carbonate successions of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. This integrated field, petrographic, chemical, stable C, O and Sr isotopes, and fluid inclusion study aims to link dolomitization to the origin and geochemical evolution of fluids and oil migration in the Upper Cretaceous Bekhme carbonates. Flux of hot basinal (hydrothermal) brines, which is suggested to have occurred during the Zagros Orogeny, resulted in dolomitization and cementation of vugs and fractures by coarse-crystalline saddle dolomite, equant calcite and anhydrite. The saddle dolomite and host dolostones have similar stable isotopic composition and formed prior to oil migration from hot (81-115 °C) basinal NaCl-MgCl2-H2O brines with salinities of 18-22 wt.% NaCl eq. The equant calcite cement, which surrounds and hence postdates saddle dolomite, has precipitated during oil migration from cooler (60-110 °C) NaCl-CaCl2-H2O brines (14-18 wt.% NaCl eq). The yellowish fluorescence color of oil inclusions in the equant calcite indicates that the oil had API gravity of 15-25° composition, which is lighter than present-day oil in the reservoirs (API of 10-17°). This difference in oil composition is attributed to oil degradation by the flux of meteoric water, which is evidenced by the low δ13C values (- 8.5‰ to - 3.9‰ VPDB) as well as by nil salinity and low temperature in fluid inclusions of late columnar calcite cement. This study demonstrates that linking fluid flux history and related diagenesis to the tectonic evolution of the basin provides important clues to the timing of oil migration, degradation and reservoir evolution.

  6. Weathering of dolomite in industrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauri, K.L.; Tambe, S.S.; Caner-Saltik, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    To the exclusion of other major atmospheric pollutants, sulfur dioxide is mainly responsible for attack upon dolomite. This article characterizes Laurel Dolomite on the basis of composition, texture, and porosity; describes the mechanism of the SO 2 reaction with dolomite; and develops two equations for the prediction of the rate of decay of dolomite. Over a period of 120 yr nearly 3.57 mm surface reduction at protected areas and 0.915 mm surface reduction at unprotected surfaces of a building in Louisville was calculated. However, these values could not be verified because measurement of these quantities in the field cannot be made

  7. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Dolomite flotation of high magnesium phosphate ores using fatty acid soap collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhengxing

    The separation of dolomite from apatite has been recognized as one of the most difficult subjects in mineral processing due to the similarities in their physiochemical properties. In this study, selective surfactants were used with a fatty acid soap collector to improve the flotation performance of separating dolomite from high magnesium phosphate ores. Three surfactants, diethyl phthalate (DP), Tween-80 (TW) and derivative of sulfonate salt (DSS1) were used. Hallimond cell flotation was conducted using pure dolomite sample to determine the effects of various factors including dosages, particle size, Ca2+ ions and slimes on the dolomite flotation recovery. The results showed that the surfactants can significantly improve dolomite flotation performance by increasing collecting ability and tolerating the effect of calcium ions and slime contents. The stirrer-tank cell batch flotation tests were carried out using two natural high magnesium phosphate ore samples containing 3.3% and 1.5% MgO. The test results showed that the surfactant DP could improve dolomite flotation at low dosages, and DSS1 could enhance the separation of dolomite from phosphate by improving both collecting ability and flotation selectivity. When 10% of DSS1 was used with the fatty acid soap as collector, at least 10% more dolomite can be removed with less P2O5 loss. The effectiveness of the surfactant DSS1 in enhancing dolomite flotation was further demonstrated in modified packed column flotation with natural dolomitic phosphate ore sample. The addition of the surfactant DSS1 into fatty acid soap collector could improve its frothability and froth stability, and reduce the bubble size. It has been found that the dolomite flotation performance has a close relationship with the frothability and froth stability of the collector.

  9. Calcite Farming at Hollow Ridge Cave: Calibrating Net Rainfall and Cave Microclimate to Dripwater and Calcite Chemical Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, D. M.; Kilgore, B. P.; Froelich, P. N.

    2012-04-01

    .1(1000/T) - 24.6 We analyzed anions, cations, and trace elements in dripwater, bedrock, and farmed calcite to examine the relationships between net rainfall, drip rates, drip water chemistry, and calcite chemistry. Dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios fall on coherent mixing lines between three geochemical endmembers: rainwater, dissolved dolomite, and dissolved limestone. Dripwater Sr/Ca vs. Mg/Ca ratios are also influenced by evaporative enrichment within the epikarst as a function of net rainfall amount [3]. Farmed calcite trace Cation/Ca ratios faithfully track short-term seasonal variations in dripwater chemistry for Na, Mg, Sr, Ba and U. However, speleothem calibrations are unique to each drip site regardless of proximity to one another, suggesting that individual speleothems are unlikely to be useful as a whole-cave hydrologic proxy. [1] Kowalczk, A. J., Froelich, P. N., 2010. Cave air ventilation and CO2 outgassing by radon-222 modeling: How fast do caves breathe? Earth & Planet. Sci. Lett. 289, 209-219. [2] Tremaine, D. M., Froelich, P. N., Wang, Y., 2011. Speleothem calcite farmed in situ: Modern calibration of δ18O and δ13C paleoclimate proxies in a continuously-monitored natural cave system. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 4929-4950. [3] Tremaine, D. M., Froelich, P. N., 2012. Speleothem trace element signatures: A modern hydrologic geochemical study of cave drip waters and farmed calcite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (submitted)

  10. Examining the interplay of climate and low amplitude sea-level change on the distribution and volume of massive dolomitization: Zebbag Formation, Cretaceous, Southern Tunisia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newport, Richard; Hollis, Cathy; Bodin, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    During the Cretaceous, a humid global climate, calcitic seas, high relative sea-level and low amplitude changes in relative sea-level largely prevented large-scale dolomitization in many carbonate successions. However, the well-exposed shallow-water carbonate sediments of the Upper Albian–Lower T...

  11. Experimental observation and numerical simulation of permeability changes in dolomite at CO2 sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    mineral, fluid, and aqueous species equations of state into its structure. Phase equilibria calculations indicate that fluids traveling away from the depressed temperature zone near the injection well may exsolve and precipitate up to 200 cc CO2, 1.45 cc dolomite, and 2.3 cc calcite, per kg, but we use the reactive transport simulator to place more realistic limits on these calculations. The simulations show that thermally-induced CO2 exsolution creates velocity gradients within the modeled domain, leading to increased velocities at lower pressure due to the increasingly gas-like density of CO2. Because dolomite precipitation kinetics strongly depend on temperature, modeled dolomite precipitation effectively concentrates within high temperature regions, while calcite precipitation is predicted to occur over a broader range. Additionally, because the molar volume of dolomite is almost double that of calcite, transporting a low temperature, dolomite-saturated fluid across a thermal gradient can lead to more substantial pore space clogging. We conclude that injecting cool CO2 into geothermally warm reservoirs may substantially alter formation porosity, permeability, and injectivity, and can result in favorable conditions for permanent storage of CO2 as a solid carbonate phase.

  12. Characteristics of a calcite "limestone"-marble from Macedonia, used as flux material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristova E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase characteristics of calcite "limestone"-marble from Banjany area village (near Skopje, Macedonia were examined by means of XRD, SEM microscope in polarizing and reflected lights, chemical, DT/TG-analyses. It was concluded as follows: - calcite (CaCO3 is a major mineral component (cca 80-90 % prevailing in the marble over the other minerals - dolomite is generally of minor importance (cca 10-20 % in the rock - quartz, micas graphite, pyrite represent typical accessories. As result of the mentioned phase characteristics, this raw materials was for a long time (more than 30 years used as flux in the iron and steel metallurgy in Macedonia.

  13. New insights to the formation of dolomite and magnesite through hydrothermal alteration of Ca-carbonates: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell-Duivestein, Isaac; Dietzel, Martin; Baldermann, Andre; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2017-04-01

    Advanced knowledge about the physicochemical conditions and reaction paths underlying Ca-Mg carbonate formation, such as dolomite and magnesite, during the advanced stage of diagenesis is a pre-requirement for the accurate interpretation of proxy signals established from carbonate-hosting sedimentary archives. In this study, hydrothermal precipitation experiments were performed in order to trace and quantify the evolution of elemental (Ca, Mg and Sr) and stable isotopic δ18O signatures during the (trans)formation of intermediate aragonite and low-Mg calcite to more stable dolomite and magnesite in the presence of Mg- and Na-chloride-rich brines. Therefore, 330 mg of inorganic CaCO3 seed material (aragonite or calcite) was reacted with 30 mL of an artificial brine solution, originally containing 0.2 M of MgCl2(aq) and 0.1 M or 0.05 M of NaHCO3, in Teflon-lined stainless steel autoclaves at temperatures of 150, 180 and 220˚ C over the course of 365 days. The evolution of reaction products and of the experimental solutions was monitored by ICP-OES, CRDS, FTIR, XRD, EMPA and SEM analyses as well as pH and alkalinity measurements. Based on the apparent solid-phase composition and reactive fluid chemistry the following sequence of mineral growth was established: aragonite and/or low-Mg calcite reacted with aqueous Mg2+ ions to form intermediate huntite, brucite and high-Mg calcite, subsequently altered to Ca-excess dolomite and Ca-rich magnesite and finally converted to nearly stoichiometric endmembers. A progressive evolution in the stoichiometry of dolomite (from 42 to 50 mol% MgCO3) and magnesite (from 80 to 98 mol% MgCO3) as well as the increase in the degree of cation order in dolomite (from 0.26 to 0.74) were observed during this reaction sequence, implying a kinetic drive towards the (thermodynamically stable) end members. The latter processes were also traced, by means of δ18O isotope exchange kinetics between fluid and precipitating solids in bulk (Δ = δ18

  14. The effect of dissolved magnesium on creep of calcite II: transition from diffusion creep to dislocation creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Renner, Jörg; Herwegh, Marco; Evans, Brian

    2009-03-01

    We extended a previous study on the influence of Mg solute impurity on diffusion creep in calcite to include deformation under a broader range of stress conditions and over a wider range of Mg contents. Synthetic marbles were produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) mixtures of calcite and dolomite powders for different intervals (2-30 h) at 850°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The HIP treatment resulted in high-magnesian calcite aggregates with Mg content ranging from 0.5 to 17 mol%. Both back-scattered electron images and chemical analysis suggested that the dolomite phase was completely dissolved, and that Mg distribution was homogeneous throughout the samples at the scale of about two micrometers. The grain size after HIP varied from 8 to 31 μm, increased with time at temperature, and decreased with increasing Mg content (>3.0 mol%). Grain size and time were consistent with a normal grain growth equation, with exponents from 2.4 to 4.7, for samples containing 0.5-17.0 mol% Mg, respectively. We deformed samples after HIP at the same confining pressure with differential stresses between 20 and 200 MPa using either constant strain rate or stepping intervals of loading at constant stresses in a Paterson gas-medium deformation apparatus. The deformation tests took place at between 700 and 800°C and at strain rates between 10-6 and 10-3 s-1. After deformation to strains of about 25%, a bimodal distribution of large protoblasts and small recrystallized neoblasts coexisted in some samples loaded at higher stresses. The deformation data indicated a transition in mechanism from diffusion creep to dislocation creep. At stresses below 40 MPa, the strength was directly proportional to grain size and decreased with increasing Mg content due to the reductions in grain size. At about 40 MPa, the sensitivity of log strain rate to log stress, ( n), became greater than 1 and eventually exceeded 3 for stresses above 80 MPa. At a given strain rate and temperature, the stress at

  15. Fabric Preserving and Fabric Destroying Dolomitization: A case of Seawater Dolomitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alham Jassim Al-Langawi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on field, petrographic and geochemical investigations of Hajar Supergroup autochthonous rocks: Ruus Al Jibal Group- Musandam Peninsula, and Akhdar Group- Jebel Akhdar, Oman and U.A.E., and para-autochthonous Maqam Formation-Sumeini Group-Jebel Sumeini-U.A.E.  Petrographic evidence indicates that the rocks were deposited in a shallow marine shelf environment, particularly tidal flat, lagoon, reef, back-reef and shoal environments that were part of the Arabian Platform during Permian and Triassic times. However, they are almost entirely dolomitized and the rocks show different petrographic features ranging from perfect preservation of original texture by mimetic dolomitization to complete obliteration and destruction of the original limestones giving rise to inequicrystalline and equicrystalline fabrics.  Dolomites analyzed by geochemical methods were categorized on the basis of textural variations; crystal size, shape and impurity or inclusion distribution within crystals, and whether these crystals are found as rock forming (replacive or cements. The dolomites display variations in stoichiometry, ordering and trace element concentrations indicating differences in dolomitizing fluid chemistry and recrystallization stages that prevailed through time. It indicates also that although dolomitization is pervasive, dolomites are petrographically and chemically immature. All the petrographic and geochemical evidence strongly indicates seawater and/or mixing zone dolomitization which may have been initiated soon after deposition of the host sediments.  Rocks showing preservation of allochems as well as the marine cements by mimetic dolomite crystals, suggest that dolomitization was early (at shallow depths with very active marine-water circulation and occurred in a relatively short time.  Evidence from crystalline dolomites indicates several crystallization events at shallow burial depths, under marine waters modified by increased

  16. Subsurface example of a dolomitized middle Guadalupian (Permian) reef from west Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    A middle Guadalupian organic buildup was cored in the North McElroy Unit (NMU No. 3713 well) in Upton County, W. Texas. Fusulinid control indicates the buildup is equivalent to the Goat Seep reef that crops out in the Guadalupe Mt. The organic buildup at North McElroy consists of boundstones and associated flank grainstones. The reef biota is dominated by ramose and encrusting bryozoans, numerous types of calcareous sponges, the problematic encrusting organism Tubiphytes, encrusting algae, crinoids, brachiopods, and trilobites. Among the more significant aspects of diagenesis are mechanical degradation and biologic degradation, leaching, gypsum-anhydrite transformations, cementation, replacement of all calcite by dolomite, cementation and replacement by baroque dolomite, fracturing, and replacement of carbonate by anhydrite. 17 references.

  17. Morphology Controls on Calcite Recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberling, Frank; Paulig, Leonie; Nie, Zhe; Schild, Dieter; Finck, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Environmental scientists and geoscientists working in different fields regard the reactivity of calcite and corresponding changes in its trace elemental- or isotopic composition from diametrically opposed points of view. As one extreme, calcite based environmental remediation strategies rely on the fast recrystallization of calcite and the concurrent uptake and immobilization of pollutants. Paleo-ecological investigations denote the other extreme, and rely on the invariability of calcite composition over geological periods of time. We use long-term radiotracer experiments to quantify recrystallization rates of seven types of calcite powder with diverse morphology and particle size distribution. On the one hand our results demonstrate the long-term metastability of calcite with equilibrated crystal surfaces even at isotopic dis-equilibrium. On the other hand, we document the extremely high reactivity and interfacial free energy of freshly ground, rough calcite. Our results indicate that bulk calcite recrystallization is an interfacial free energy driven Ostwald-ripening process, in which particle roughness effects dominate over the effect of crystal habitus and particle size. We confirm that the dynamic equilibrium exchange of crystal constituents between kink sites involves an activation barrier of about 25 kJ/mol. At room temperature the equilibrium exchange is limited to a near surface region and proceeds at a rate of (3.6 ± 1.4)·10 -13 mol/(m 2 ·s).

  18. Ferroan dolomites in Miocene sediments of the Xisha Islands and their genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Zhang, Weiwei; Wei, Kai; He, Qingkun; Jiang, Yunshui; Xu, Tingting; Jiang, Xuejun; Yan, Guijing; Song, Hongying; Wang, Jianghai

    2018-01-01

    Carbonate rocks are important reservoirs for global petroleum exploration. The largest oilfield in the South China Sea, Liuhua 11-1, is distributed in the massive carbonate reef area of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Mouth Basin. Previous studies showed that one 802.17-m-long core from well Xichen-1 in the South China Sea mainly consisted of white and light gray-white organic reefs. Recently, a Miocene whole core (161.9 m long) of well Xiyong-2, near well Xichen-1, was found to contain six layers of yellowish brown, light yellowish gray, iron black, or light yellowish gray-white organic reefs. Scanning electron microscope images of these layers reveal a typical ferroan dolomite rich in Fe (up to 29%), with the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, W, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Co. Systematic X-ray powder diffraction analysis yields a 1.9-6.1 match in phase ratio with ankerite, 5.4-26.9 with dolomite, and zero with calcite, which indicate that the samples can be classified as ferroan dolomite. The iron and heavy metals are inferred to be originated from multiple volcanic eruptions of Gaojianshi Island in the Dongdao Atoll during the middle-late Miocene. These elements were dissolved in seawater, likely as a sol, and carried to Yongxing Island in the Xuande Atoll by sea currents and tides enhanced by prevailing winds, and deposited as a part of the sedimentation process in the study area. The ferroan dolomite has Sr content of (125-285)×10-6, which is lower than the accepted Sr boundary value of dolomite. This finding suggests that dolomitization occurred during large-scale global glacial regression in the late Miocene. The isolated Xisha carbonate platform, exposed to air, underwent freshwater leaching and dolomitization induced by mixed water, and caused the extensive Fe-Mg exchange along the organic reef profile to form ankerite and ferroan dolomite. These results may help to understand paleoceanographic environmental changes in the South China Sea during the Miocene.

  19. Performance of Dolomite Calcination in a Bench-Scale Rotary Kiln

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulandari Winny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dolomite calcination is one of process steps to prepare calcined dolomite for raw materials in magnesium production. Calcination of dolomite involves heating the raw material at sufficient temperature in order to release the carbon dioxide from its carbonate minerals. This process is commonly conducted in a rotary kiln. There have been a number of calcination studies in a laboratory scale, but the study of dolomite calcination in a larger scale is very scarce. This research is aimed to study the performance of dolomite calcination in a bench-scale rotary kiln with 500 gram of feed. The effect of various parameters, including temperatures, feed rate, rotating frequency, and particle size were examined. The temperature of rotary kiln was varied between 700 and 1000 °C, while the particle size of dolomite was varied between 0.149 – 0.297 mm and up to 10 – 15 mm. The temperature distribution inside the rotary kiln was also measured. It is obtained that a conversion of 92% was attained at operation temperature of 1000 °C, which is at a higher temperature compared to the laboratory scale, where a conversion of 100% was obtained at 900 °C. This imply that the effect of heat transfer also plays important role in the calcination of dolomite especially at a larger scale.

  20. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovet, N; Yang, M; Javadi, M S; Stipp, S L S

    2015-02-07

    A clearer understanding of calcite interactions with organic molecules would contribute to a range of fields including harnessing the secrets of biomineralisation where organisms produce hard parts, increasing oil production from spent reservoirs, remediating contaminated soils and drinking water aquifers and improving manufacturing methods for industrial products such as pigments, soft abrasives, building materials and optical devices. Biomineralisation by some species of blue green algae produces beautifully elaborate platelets of calcite where the individual crystals are of nanometer scale. Controlling their growth requires complex polysaccharides. Polysaccharide activity depends on the functionality of OH groups, so to simplify the system in order to get closer to a molecular level understanding, we investigated the interaction of OH from a suite of alcohols with clean, freshly cleaved calcite surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided binding energies and revealed the extent of surface coverage. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supplemented with information about molecule ordering, orientation and packing density. The results show that all alcohols studied bond with the calcite surface through the OH group, with their carbon chains sticking away in a standing-up orientation. Alcohol molecules are closely packed and form a well-ordered monolayer on the surface.

  1. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew G.; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  2. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03 Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  3. Microbial Mg-carbonate Precipitation and Early Diagenetic Dolomite Crust Formation at Hypersaline Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Perri, E.; Vögeli, N.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary dolomite rocks are commonly considered to be primarily a replacement product of the calcium carbonate components comprising the original limestone, a process known as secondary replacement dolomitization. Although numerous dolomite formations in the geologic record are composed of fine-grained crystals of micritic dolomite, an alternative process, i.e., direct precipitation, is often excluded because of the absence of visible or geochemical indicators supporting primary precipitation. We present a study of a modern coastal hypersaline lagoon, Brejo do Espinho, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, which is located in a special climatic regime where a well-defined seasonal cycle of wet and dry conditions occur. The direct precipitation of modern high-Mg calcite and Ca-dolomite mud from the lagoonal waters under low-temperature hypersaline conditions is associated with the activity of microbial organisms living in this restricted environment. The mud undergoes an early diagenetic transformation into a 100% dolomite crust on the margins of the lagoon. The biomineralization process, characterized by the variations of the physico-chemical conditions in this environment during the annual hydrologic cycle, is integrated with isotopic analysis to define the early diagenetic processes responsible for the formation of both dolomitic mud and crust. The carbon isotope values indicate a contribution of respired organic carbon, which is greater for the crust (δ13C = -9.5‰ VPDB) than mud (δ13C = -1.2‰ VPDB). The oxygen isotope values reflect a moderate degree of evaporation during mud formation (δ18O = 1.1‰ VPDB), whereas it is greatly enhanced during early diagenetic crust formation (δ18O = 4.2‰ VPDB). The clumped isotope formation temperatures derived for the Brejo do Espinho mud is 34°C and 32°C for the crust. These temperatures are consistent with the upper range of measured values during the dry season when the lagoon experiences the most hypersaline

  4. Stabilization of early-formed dolomite: a tale of divergence from two Mississippian dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aasm, I. S.; Packard, J. J.

    2000-03-01

    Several large hydrocarbon accumulations in Alberta, Canada are hosted in dolomitized successions of stacked, thin sabkha-capped cycles of Visean age. Porosity is micro-intercrystalline and occurs in dolomitized restricted subtidal and intertidal muds that have their fine primary fabric preserved. Two such fields are here considered, that illustrate divergent and contrasting modes of dolomite stabilization despite initial similarities in facies and textures. The dolomite in the upper Debolt Formation of the Dunvegan Field (NW Alberta) forms planar-e or microsucrosic fabrics with crystals in the 1-20 μm range. The dolomite is non-ferroan, Ca-rich (average of 58 mol% CaCO 3), and poorly ordered. Its stable isotopic signatures range from -0.12 to +3.4‰ VPDB for δ18O (mean=+1.3‰) and +0.9 to +4.3‰ VPDB for δ13C (mean=+2.6‰). The average radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio for this dolomite is 0.7077. Both sets of values are consistent with dolomite precipitation from Mississippian marine or modified marine (evaporated) seawater. These parameters are strongly reminiscent of Holocene protodolomites and hence suggestive of a sabkha dolomitization process (shallow seepage reflux or evaporitive pumping). This dolomite with its high associated porosity (average of 15%, and up to 38%), relatively unaltered mineralogical and chemical signatures, both preserved despite 4 km of burial depth, suggests a very unique set of relatively non-reactive physico-chemical conditions during burial (likely a closed system). In contrast, the dolomite from the Mount Head Formation of the Shell Waterton Field (SW Alberta) has undergone measurable neomorphic alteration in several stages in deeper burial environments (open system). Such alteration has affected its crystal size (range rocks and basinal fluids during burial, and are in this respect representative of the norm for dolostones in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin.

  5. Coprecipitation of cadmium with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Osamu; Kumagai, Tetsu; Shigematsu, Tsunenobu; Matsui, Masakazu

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of cadmium between precipitates of calcite and saturated aqueous solution was measured at 25 0 C to understand the distribution of cadmium in the bivalves. Calcite was precipitated from calcium bicarbonate solution by the gradual release of carbon dioxide. The cadmium ions were coprecipitated in calcite, obeying the logarithmic distribution law. The apparent distribution coefficient was decreased as α, α'-dipyridyl increased, but the true distribution coefficient was found to be an almost constant value, 560. This value is fairly close to the ratio of solubility product constants K sub(calcite)/K sub(CdCO 3 ), 890. This suggests that the deviation of the present solid solution from ideality is not very large. (auth.)

  6. Evolution and the Calcite Eye Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Vernon L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcite is a uniaxial, birefringent crystal, which in its optically transparent form, has been used for animal eye lenses, the trilobite being one such animal. Because of the calcite birefringence there is a difficulty in using calcite as a lens. When the propagation direction of incoming light is not exactly on the c-axis, the mages blur. In this paper, calcite blurring is evaluated, and the non-blurring by a crystallin eye lens is compared to a calcite one.

  7. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  8. Use of multiple attributes decision-making Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS for Ghare-Gheshlagh calcite in determination of optimum geochemical sampling sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Rezaei Azizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Several valuable calcite deposits are located in Ghare-Gheshlagh, south basin of Urmia Lake, NW Iran. Ghare-Gheshlagh area is situated in the northern part of tectono-sedimentary unit, forming NW part of Tertiary Sanandaj-Sirjan geological belt (Stocklin and Nabavi, 1972. The predominant rock types of the area include light color limestones (Qom Formation and Quaternary alluviums and underlined dolomite in depth (Eftekharnejhad, 1973. The thickness of these units varies between 10 cm and 6 meters and up to some hundred meters in length. In the present study, the effect of geochemical parameters responsible for precipitating calcite from the carbonate aqueous fluids is interpreted by the TOPSIS method to find the most preferable sampling sites and geochemical data. Materials and Methods A total of 20 samples were taken from a NE-SW trending profile including 15 calcites of fresh surface outcrops (5 samples per each colored calcite units in order to determine the nature of the rocks. The mineral assemblages were analyzed by optical methods in combination with XRD powder diffraction analysis. Major elements were determined by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF, trace and rare earth elements were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS in Geological Survey of Iran. Results The abundances of trace elements were normalized to the continental crust values (Taylor and McLennan, 1981. The green calcite revealed enrichment in Rb and Sr, while green and white calcite were enriched in U. The U enrichment in the green calcite indicates the reduction condition of deposition. Incompatible elements such as Ba, Th, Nb and P depleted in all calcites. Varying the Sr/Ba value between 3.18 and 5.21% indicates the continental deposition environment and non-magmatic waters as well (Cheng et al., 2013. The Sr2+ content of calcites varies from 123 to 427 ppm, indicates suitable condition for calcite precipitation. Eu anomalies

  9. Can Mn–S redox cycling drive sedimentary dolomite formation? A hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, Daniel A.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; González-Arismendi, Gabriela; Gordon, Robert A.; Méndez, José A.; Gingras, Murray K.; Konhauser, Kurt O. (CLS); (UCV-Venezuela); (CNRS-UMR); (Alberta)

    2016-06-10

    The formation of dolomite in modern peritidal environments is linked to the degradation of buried microbial mats, with complexation of Ca and Mg by extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and alkalinity generation through organic carbon respiration facilitating the nucleation of dolomite precursors. In the past two decades, microbial sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methanotrophy have all been considered as potential drivers of the nucleation process, but it remains unclear why dolomite formation could not also occur in suboxic sediments where abundant alkalinity is produced by processes linked to Mn(IV) and/or Fe(III) reduction coupled with the diffusion and reoxidation of reduced sulfur species. Here we report the interstitial occurrence of spheroidal aggregates of nanometer-scale Ca-rich dolomite rhombohedra within suboxic sediments associated with remnant microbial mats that developed in the peritidal zone of the Archipelago Los Roques, Venezuela. Multiple analytical tools, including EPMA, ICP-MS, synchrotron-based XRF and XRD, and spatially resolved XANES microanalyses, show that the dolomite-cemented interval exhibits depleted bulk iron concentrations, but is interstitially enriched in Mn and elemental sulfur (S⁰). Manganese occurs in several oxidation states, indicating that the dolomite-cemented interval was the locus of complex biological redox transformations characterized by coupled Mn and S cycling. The tight correspondence between sedimentary Mn and MgCO₃ concentrations further hints at a direct role for Mn during dolomitization. While additional studies are required to confirm its relevance in natural settings, we propose a model by which coupled Mn–S redox cycling may promote alkalinity generation and thus dolomite formation in manner similar to, or even more efficiently, than bacterial sulfate reduction alone.

  10. Prospects for Effective Use of Dolomite in Concrete Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaganov Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses possibilities for creating sustainable concrete compositions from local dolomite raw materials. In the first part of the article, practical examples of the use of dolomite quarry by-products (siftings as a component of concrete mixes are summarized. The second part of article presents experimental study on obtaining caustic dolomite. This method allows obtaining the product with higher added value. Local dolomite raw materials are used and appropriate regimes of thermal treatment have been tested.

  11. Interactions between cadmium and calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weijden, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis is composed of five chapters, some of which have been published or have been accepted for publication. The contents in some of the chapters may therefore slightly overlap, also because the subjects are closely related. The first two chapters focus mostly on the sorption of Cd on calcite,

  12. Evaluation of Dolomite for Production of Semi-Stabilized Dolomite Refractory Bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Taie, M.; Abu-Hamatteh, Z

    2002-01-01

    This work was carried out to investigate the suitability of dolomite rocks for the manufacture of dolomite refractory bricks. Preliminary tests have been done to determine the physical properties, chemical and mineralogical constitutions of raw materials ( dolomite serpentine and white kaolin ) to find their suitability for production of dolomite refractories bricks. These tests also refer to the softening point and residual carbon after firing of binding materials. Following the five components system ( CaO, MgO, SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 ), ten refractory body mixtures were prepared with different amount of raw materials and firing at 1550 deg. The suitability of such mixtures for refractory bricks was ascertained by investigating the action of heat. Phase reaction and mineralogical changes that occurred in the fired mixture were studied by means of X-ray analysis. On the basis of physical properties chemical and mineralogical constitutions, two samples were selected for making semi-stable dolomite refractory bricks. Crushing, grinding and grain size distribution were carried out to prepare the clinker for making sample briquettes. Four different types of binders were used with the semi-stable dolomite sample. Standard samples have been prepared in the laboratory by using semi-dry pressing method. The molding pressure was 100 mN/M 2 . The samples were fired at 1450, 1500, 1550 and 1600 deg. The technological properties of selected samples were determined. The obtained results indicated that the investigated dolomite could be used as a source of raw material for the manufacture of semi-stable refractories, mainly required for steel and cement industries. ( Author's) 20 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Neutralization of sulfuric acid solutions by calcite dissolution and the application to anoxic limestone drain design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huminicki, Danielle M.C.; Rimstidt, J. Donald

    2008-01-01

    Batch reactor (BR) experiments were conducted to measure the effect of hydrodynamics and gypsum coatings on calcite neutralization rates. A factorial array of BR experiments measured the H + concentration change by calcite dissolution over a pH range of 1.5-3.5 and Na 2 SO 4 concentrations of 0-1 M. The rate of H + concentration change with time was determined by numerical differentiation of H + concentration versus time. Regression modeling showed that for uncoated calcite, rates are only significantly affected by pH, r=-10 -2.32 a H + 0.76 . Whereas, for calcite coated with gypsum only time had a significant effect on calcite dissolution rates, r = -10 -1.96 t -0.53 . Because transport-limited dissolution rates for uncoated calcite are a function of the pH and Reynolds number, a model was developed to express the effects of these two variables on the rate of H + consumption for a solution with a Darcy velocity, q, through a porous medium with a particle radius, r p , such that r ' =1.08x10 -3 q 0.31 r p -0.69 m H + 0.87 . This equation was integrated via a numerical model to simulate the performance of an idealized anoxic limestone drain (ALD). This model predicts the pH and alkalinity change along the length of an ALD. The model shows that the efficiency of an ALD is greater when the Darcy velocity is low and the particle radius is small. In addition, the growth of gypsum coatings causes the rate of H + neutralization to decline as the square root of time as they form and block the H + transport to the calcite surface. Supersaturation with respect to gypsum, leading to coating formation, can be avoided by diluting the ALD feed solution or by replacing limestone with dolomite

  14. Chemical composition and strength of dolomite geopolymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizat, E. A.; Al Bakri, A. M. M.; Liew, Y. M.; Heah, C. Y.

    2017-09-01

    The chemical composition of dolomite and the compressive strength of dolomite geopolymer composites were studied. The both composites prepared with mechanical mixer manufactured by with rotor speed of 350 rpm and curing in the oven for 24 hours at 80˚C. XRF analysis showThe dolomite raw materials contain fewer amounts of Si and Al but high Ca in its composition. Dolomite geopolymer composites with 20M of NaOH shows greater and optimum compressive strength compared to dolomite geopolymer with other NaOH molarity. This indicated better interaction of dolomite raw material and alkaline activator need high molarity of NaOH in order to increase the reactivity of dolomite.

  15. Separating dolomite from phosphate rock by reactive flotation: Fundamentals and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Midany, Ayman A.

    Florida is currently one of the largest phosphate producers in the world. Unfortunately, the phosphate industry in Florida is suffering from depletion of the phosphate-rich ore. Dolomite, however, is a major impurity in the ores. The presence of MgO, in dolomite, can cause several problems during production of phosphoric acid and final fertilizers. Efforts to solve the dolomite problem have been reported by several researchers throughout the world. Yet, only heavy media separation process has been applied commercially. However, the process was discontinued because of its low separation efficiency in terms of grade and recovery. In this study, we tested an innovative idea based on simple fact that dolomite, as a carbonate mineral, generates CO2 when exposed to a slightly acidic solution, capturing CO2 bubbles at dolomite particle surface can selectively float the dolomite and separate it from phosphate. Formation of such bubbles requires a surface-active agent(s) at solution/dolomite interface. Preliminary tests indicated that polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) could serve this function. This process is called the Reactive Flotation, RF. To develop this process and to scale it up for industrial use, we conducted fundamental and applied research studies. Among these studies were optimizing of RF process by investigating the factors affecting the process (including bench and pilot scale tests) using statistical experimental designs. It was found that the acid concentration, PVA concentration, and particle size are the main factors. The optimum conditions were determined and applied to usage in a gravity separation device, (i.e., a sluice). Using such a device, a concentrate contains 0.65% MgO with >94 MgO % removal can be achieved. In addition, fundamental studies revealed that the hydrogen bonding is the adsorption mechanism confirmed by adsorption isotherm of PVA on dolomite and phosphate, adhesion of PVA to dolomite surface (using contact angle and surface tension), Fourier

  16. Mass spectrometric examinations of Hungarian triassic dolomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitalis, Gy.; Kada I-ne

    1982-01-01

    A limited number of mass spectrometric investigations (viz.:57) of representative rock types were applied both in the research work of geology and the mining for the industry of building materials of Hungary. Tabulated results covering all rock types and all stratigraphic levels of the Hungarian Triassic are given. Sr, Mn, Ti and Cr trace elements had the highest occurrence and Zn, Y or Pb, Ba, V or Cu, depending on the genetical type of the rock studied, has relatively higher concentrations as well. The results of the examinations of Hungarian Triassic dolomites were discussed according to genetical types, all represented by a small level of trace elements. (Sz.J.)

  17. Investigation of the Properties of Locally Available Dolomite for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... for testing refractories were adopted and their properties compare favourably with most of those of standard dolomite currently in use in Europe, Asia and United Kingdom. These results make the Nigerian dolomite suitable for use as a basic refractory material especially in the machine tools and steel making industry.

  18. Dissolution Kinetics of Icel-Aydincik Dolomite in Hydrochloric Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    sium oxide (MgO) from dolomite, dissolution is distinguished ... magnesium oxide from magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solutions obtained by leaching of .... S. Afr. J. Chem., 2008, 61, 127–132,. . Table 1 Chemical analysis of the dolomite ore. Component: CaO. MgO. SiO2. Fe2O3. Al2O3.

  19. Cyclic, Early Diagenetic Dolomite Formation in Alkaline Lake Van

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, J.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Immenhauser, A.; Kwiecien, O.

    2017-12-01

    Modern dolomite-forming environments are commonly constrained to evaporitic marine or marginal marine settings such as lagoons and sabkhas. Beside microbial mediation, high temperatures and Mg2+ concentrations in solution are factors considered important in aiding dolomite formation. Accordingly, previous studies associate the presence of dolomite within deep sediments of alkaline Lake Van (Turkey) with periods of enhanced evaporation, low lake levels and high Mg/Ca ratio. We systematically studied dolomite within the sedimentary record of Lake Van by means of XRD, SEM and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) mass spectrometry. First, we considered the origin of the dolomite; next, we focused on the wider implication of its presence. SEM imaging documents large dolomite crystals interwoven with clay minerals and individual crystals with different crystallographic orientations grown together, indicating space-limited growth within the sediment. According to recent climatic reconstructions for the same sequence (ICDP PALEOVAN project), the water depth of the coring site - today at 350 m - unlikely fell below 200 m. Consequently, dolomite formed below a thick water column at constantly low temperatures (supported by heavy δ18O signature). Within this environment, variations in Mg/Ca ratio, pH and alkalinity, which are constantly high, have no effect on the episodic nature of dolomite precipitation. These observations call for a re-evaluation of the palaeoenvironments often invoked to interpret intervals rich in dolomite within ancient sedimentary sequences (e.g., periods of enhanced aridity and evaporation). Further, and in contrast to previous interpretations, our dolomite concentration data backed up by ICDP PALEOVAN reconstructions suggest that intervals rich in dolomite coincide with periods of high lake level and increased humidity. High dolomite concentrations (20 - 85 % relative carbonate content) occur cyclically within the last glacial period and coincide with

  20. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M. P.; Rodriguez-Blanco, J. D.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3- CO32- + H+, when HCO3- is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80-100 atoms) to represent the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from -6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 < pH < 6.35, where H2CO30 is the dominant dissolved species. When bicarbonate is adsorbed on calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution, 10.35. This means that adsorbed carbonate is stable even when the concentration of dissolved CO32- is several orders of magnitude lower. This has a significant effect on surface charge and thus the behaviour of the calcite surface. Our results help explain the potential determining behaviour of the carbonate species in calcite-water systems, particularly in the pH range where the bicarbonate species dominates in water and where the carbonate species dominates at the surface, i.e. when 7.5 < pH < 10.35. Our atomic scale data for the various calcite surface sites provide the needed input to improve and constrain surface complexation modelling and are especially useful for predicting behaviour in systems where experiments are difficult or impossible, such as at high temperature and pressure.

  1. Paleotransport of lanthanides and strontium recorded in calcite compositions from tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Chipera, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Secondary calcite occurs in both saturated and unsaturated hydrologic zones (SZ and UZ, respectively) in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. In the upper UZ, the major constituents of the calcite crystal structure (C, O) have surface origins. At greater depth there is a open-quotes barren zone,close quotes straddling the water table, where calcite is rare and mixing of surface and subsurface sources may occur. Deep in the SZ, distinctive Mn calcites reflect deep sources, including Ca released as analcime or albite formed and carbonates derived from underlying Paleozoic rocks. In the UZ and in the barren zone, above the deep Mn calcites, variations in calcite lanthanide chemistry can be used to distinguish rhyolitic from quartz-latitic sources. Lanthanide ratios and Sr contents of calcites record the chemical evolution of waters flowing through the UZ and upper SZ. Variations in calcite chemistry in the UZ and in the barren zone show that (1) Sr, which is readily exchanged with clays or zeolites, is essentially removed from some flowpaths that are in contact with these minerals and (2) traces of Mn oxides found in the tuffs have a significant effect of groundwater chemistry in the UZ and in the barren zone by removing almost all Ce from solution (evidenced by characteristic Ce depletions in calcite throughout this zone). Extreme Ce removal may be a result of Ce oxidation (Ce 3+ → Ce 4+ ) at the surfaces of some Mn oxides, particularly rancieite. Higher Sr contents and lack of Ce depletions in the deeper Mn calcites reflect different ages, origins, and transport systems. The calcite record of lanthanide and Sr transport in the UZ shows that minor minerals (clays and zeolites) and even trace minerals (Mn oxides) will affect the compositions of groundwaters that flow over distances greater than a few tens of meters. 43 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation Employing Environmental Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjo Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, five microbes were employed to precipitate calcite in cohesionless soils. Four microbes were selected from calcite-precipitating microbes isolated from calcareous sand and limestone cave soils, with Sporosarcina pasteurii ATCC 11859 (standard strain used as a control. Urease activities of the four microbes were higher than that of S. pasteurii. The microbes and urea–CaCl2 medium were injected at least four times into cohesionless soils of two different relative densities (60% and 80%, and the amount of calcite precipitation was measured. It was found that the relative density of cohesionless soils significantly affects the amount of calcite precipitation and that there is a weak correlation between urease activity and calcite precipitation.

  3. Nanotoxicity of dolomite mineral of commercial importance in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Govil; Khan, Mohd Imran; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ashquin, Mohd; Sultana, Sarwat; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2011-02-01

    The risk of occupational exposure to dolomite, an important mineral exists both in organized as well as unorganized sectors. Toxicological profiles of bulk dolomite are meagerly known in general and its nanotoxicity in particular. Effects of micro- and nano particles on cell viability, LDH leakage and markers of oxidative stress were observed. The study indicated that cytotoxicity of dolomite nanoparticles is significantly higher than the microparticles. The study thus suggests for the prescription of exposure limit for nanodolomite in the best interest of health of workers at risk of exposure under mining, milling and industrial environment.

  4. Calcite biomineralization in coccoliths: Evidence from atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Karen; Stipp, S.L.S.

    2002-01-01

    geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy......geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy...

  5. Important geosites and parks in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Dolomites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossing, L.; Forti, S.

    2016-10-01

    In the geological complexity of the south Tyrol, the Dolomites play a fundamental role, as they are now included in the UNESCO World Heritage (2009) because of their exceptional beauty and unique landscape, together with numerous scientific discoveries. The name of Dolomite comes from the famous mineral dolomite (double calcium magnesium carbonate) discovered by Déodat De Dolomieu in 1789. The dolomitic rocks constitute a large area of the Triassic mountains and many studies have contributed to the discovery of the fundamental stratotypes for the signature of the Permian/Triassic boundary. The steep walls of the Permian volcanic formations and the Sciliar Mountain have always been a great attraction for scientists from all over the world to study the open book of nature in the Dolomites. We will illustrate three sites: 1. The Bula Geotrail. A geological trail through one of the best-preserved sedimentary series in which we can observe one of the most important stratotypes to touch the Permian/Triassic boundary. 2. The Siusi-Alpe di Siusi Geological Trail. This trail starts just above the Permian/Triassic boundary and is characterized by some unique basaltic columnar formations and other significant outcrops of Lower and Medium Triassic. 3. The Bletterbach Geopark. In this sequence the stratotype, which represents the boundary, is a dark coloured continuous layer (organic matter) 5cm thick, and contains some paleobotanical evidence which is unique in the world. The preservation and added value of the natural and geological patrimony of a region through guided and documented trails are at the origin of a new kind of tourism: geotourism. The modern tourist is more and more interested and stimulated by getting to knowing nature in depth. The trails are the best instruments for scientific divulgation and education, allowing a better understanding of the landscape and stimulating new discoveries. (Author)

  6. Important geosites and parks in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Dolomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nossing, L.; Forti, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the geological complexity of the south Tyrol, the Dolomites play a fundamental role, as they are now included in the UNESCO World Heritage (2009) because of their exceptional beauty and unique landscape, together with numerous scientific discoveries. The name of Dolomite comes from the famous mineral dolomite (double calcium magnesium carbonate) discovered by Déodat De Dolomieu in 1789. The dolomitic rocks constitute a large area of the Triassic mountains and many studies have contributed to the discovery of the fundamental stratotypes for the signature of the Permian/Triassic boundary. The steep walls of the Permian volcanic formations and the Sciliar Mountain have always been a great attraction for scientists from all over the world to study the open book of nature in the Dolomites. We will illustrate three sites: 1. The Bula Geotrail. A geological trail through one of the best-preserved sedimentary series in which we can observe one of the most important stratotypes to touch the Permian/Triassic boundary. 2. The Siusi-Alpe di Siusi Geological Trail. This trail starts just above the Permian/Triassic boundary and is characterized by some unique basaltic columnar formations and other significant outcrops of Lower and Medium Triassic. 3. The Bletterbach Geopark. In this sequence the stratotype, which represents the boundary, is a dark coloured continuous layer (organic matter) 5cm thick, and contains some paleobotanical evidence which is unique in the world. The preservation and added value of the natural and geological patrimony of a region through guided and documented trails are at the origin of a new kind of tourism: geotourism. The modern tourist is more and more interested and stimulated by getting to knowing nature in depth. The trails are the best instruments for scientific divulgation and education, allowing a better understanding of the landscape and stimulating new discoveries. (Author)

  7. Mountain geomorphosites in Odle Group (Dolomites, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coratza, Paola; Ghinoi, Alessandro; Marchetti, Mauro; Soldati, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The area, considered in the present study, is located in the north-eastern sector of the Gardena valley, in the Odle Group, a popular destination of summer and winter tourism (more than 3000 m a.s.l.). The area has a strong hiking-tourism vocation thanks to its spectacular high-mountain landscape and a dense network of hiking tracks. The well-developed network of hiking paths and slopes for many different climbing skills offers a lot of possibilities for high-mountain excursions. Permanent dwelling-places are absent with the exceptions of a few tourist structures nearby opened during certain periods of the year. This area, as all Dolomites, which became UNESCO Word Heritage Site in 2009, represent landscape mosaics, which express the summation of landscape histories and processes offering an almost complete educational open-air laboratory due to the variety and complexity of phenomena and processes taking place during present climate conditions and during recent geological periods. These mountains, due to the aggregation of relict, recent and active landforms constitute an outstanding geoheritage, suitable for educational and tourist purposes. Landforms typical of past morphoclimatic conditions (inherited geomorphosites) share the stage with forms and processes active in the current morphoclimatic conditions (active geomorphosites); their spatial and geometrical relationships may be sufficient to trace a relative time-line of the geomorphological history of the area. Several glacial landforms testify for the presence and the activity of a glacial tongue hosted in the valley during the Lateglacial, mainly located in the northern sector of the area, where altitudes range from about 2000 m to about 2300 m a.s.l. Among these, worth of note are the well-preserved glacial cirques of Val dla Roa and those located at the southern margin of the Odle Group. Quite well preserved moraine ridges are present at a mean altitude of some 2000 m at the Alpe di Cisles as well as

  8. Calcite Biohybrids as Microenvironment for Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Vago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of composite 3D biomaterial that provides extracellular cues that govern the differentiation processes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been developed. In the present study, we evaluated the chondrogenecity of a biohybrid composed of a calcium carbonate scaffold in its calcite polymorph and hyaluronic acid (HA. The source of the calcite scaffolding is an exoskeleton of a sea barnacle Tetraclita rifotincta (T. rifotincta, Pilsbry (1916. The combination of a calcium carbonate-based bioactive scaffold with a natural polymeric hydrogel is designed to mimic the organic-mineral composite of developing bone by providing a fine-tuned microenvironment. The results indicate that the calcite-HA interface creates a suitable microenvironment for the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, and therefore, the biohybrid may provide a tool for tissue-engineered cartilage.

  9. Biogenic calcite particles from microalgae—Coccoliths as a potential raw material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairopoulou, Makrina Artemis; Vučak, Marijan; Posten, Clemens; Teipel, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic calcite (CaCO3) particles are found in a broad range of applications. The geometry of particles produced from limestone or precipitation are versatile but limited to basic shapes. The microalga Emiliania huxleyi produces micro‐structured calcite platelets, called coccoliths. This article presents the results of an application‐orientated study, which includes characteristic values also used in the calcite industry for particle evaluation. It is demonstrated that coccoliths are significantly different from all industrial particles produced so far. Coccoliths are porous particles, mainly consisted of calcium carbonate, with further elements such as Mg, Si, Sr, and Fe often embedded in their structure. Their structure is extremely sophisticated, while the overall particle morphology and particle size distribution are homogeneous. This study gives a first inside into the potential of these exceptional objects and may set further impulses for their utilization in specific calcite particle applications. PMID:28701909

  10. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2016-01-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3− CO32− + H+, when HCO3− is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80–100 atoms) to represent...... the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from −6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite...... even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 bicarbonate is adsorbed on calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution...

  11. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2016-11-01

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of {sup 14}C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  12. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14 C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO 3 ) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of 14 C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  13. Acidization of shales with calcite cemented fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Szymczak, Piotr; Jarosiński, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of cores drilled from shale formations reveals a relatively large number of calcite-cemented fractures. Usually such fractures are reactivated during fracking and can contribute considerably to the permeability of the resulting fracture network. However, calcite coating on their surfaces effectively excludes them from production. Dissolution of the calcite cement by acidic fluids is investigated numerically with focus on the evolution of fracture morphology. Available surface area, breakthrough time, and reactant penetration length are calculated. Natural fractures in cores from Pomeranian shale formation (northern Poland) were analyzed and classified. Representative fractures are relatively thin (0.1 mm), flat and completely sealed with calcite. Next, the morphology evolution of reactivated natural fractures treated with low-pH fluids has been simulated numerically under various operating conditions. Depth-averaged equations for fracture flow and reactant transport has been solved by finite-difference method coupled with sparse-matrix solver. Transport-limited dissolution has been considered, which corresponds to the treatment with strong acids, such as HCl. Calcite coating in reactivated natural fractures dissolves in a highly non-homogeneous manner - a positive feedback between fluid transport and calcite dissolution leads to the spontaneous formation of wormhole-like patterns, in which most of the flow is focused. The wormholes carry reactive fluids deeper inside the system, which dramatically increases the range of the treatment. Non-uniformity of the dissolution patterns provides a way of retaining the fracture permeability even in the absence of the proppant, since the less dissolved regions will act as supports to keep more dissolved regions open. Evolution of fracture morphology is shown to depend strongly on the thickness of calcite layer - the thicker the coating the more pronounced wormholes are observed. However the interaction between

  14. Diagenetic setting, dolomitization and reservoir characterization of Late Cretaceous Kawagarh Formation, Khanpur Dam section, Hazara, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqsood Ur Rahman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kawagarh Formation is well exposed in Hazara basin in different sections. Due to deep depositional settings, the Kawagarh Formation is least appealing to geologists to investigate it as a hydrocarbon reservoir. In the present study, the diagenetic settings of Kawagarh Formation were chronologically studied to interpret its diagenetic history and the effect of different diagenetic phases on the reservoir potential. The dolomitization is also studied in depth to use it as a key for its reservoir potential. Kawagarh Formation is sampled at Khanpur Dam Section for porosity analysis. The samples were taken from limestone and dolomite facies randomly. The dolomites are in the form of veins and well developed thick size beds. These dolomites are secondary in nature which is hosted by fractures and joints of limestone, which affect about 25% of limestone facies. At outcrop scale different types of dolomites are recognised on the basis of color and texture, yellowish fine-grained, brown blackish coarse-grained in the top portion and saddle dolomites. In petrographic study partial and complete dolomitization are observed. On the basis of crystal sizes and geometry different types of dolomites are recognized which are; (1 fine crystalline planar-euhedral dolomite, (2 medium crystalline planar-subhedral dolomite, (3 medium crystalline non-planar-anhedral dolomite, (4 coarse crystalline planar-subhedral dolomite, (5 coarse crystalline, non-planar-anhedral dolomite and (6 saddle dolomites (SD1. In petrographic study, high inclusions and disturbance are observed at the surfaces of dolomitic rhombs which indicate low Mg replacement or dedolomitization phenomena. On image J porosity analysis, the porosity is found of limestone and dolomitic samples. In limestone facies which is mostly, non-laminated mudstone has very low up to 2 to 3% in the form of vugs and fractures. In dolomitic facies, the porosity is ranging from 5% to 14%. In most of the dolomitic

  15. The effect of water on strain localization in calcite fault gouge sheared at seismic slip rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Marieke; Smith, Steven; Mitchell, Thomas; Hirose, Takehiro; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Strain localization during coseismic slip in fault gouges is a critical mechanical process that has implications for understanding frictional heating, the earthquake energy budget and the evolution of fault rock microstructure. To assess the nature of strain localization during shearing of calcite fault gouges, high-velocity (vmax = 1m /s) rotary-shear experiments at normal stresses of 3-20 MPa were conducted under room-dry and wet conditions on synthetic calcite gouges containing dolomite gouge strain markers. When sheared at 1 m/s, the room-dry gouges showed a prolonged strengthening phase prior to dynamic weakening, whereas the wet gouges weakened nearly instantaneously. Microstructural analysis revealed that a thin (PSS) developed after several centimeters of slip in both dry and wet gouges, and that strain localization at 1 m/s occurred progressively and rapidly. The strain accommodated in the bulk gouge layer did not change significantly with increasing displacement indicating that, once formed, the high-strain layer and PSS accommodated most of the displacement. Thus, a substantial strain gradient is present in the gouge layer. In water-dampened gouges, localization likely occurs during and after dynamic weakening. Our results suggest that natural fault zones in limestone are more prone to rapid dynamic weakening if water is present in the granular slipping zones.

  16. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  17. Surface Complexation Modeling of Calcite Zeta Potential Measurement in Mixed Brines for Carbonate Wettability Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Zeng, Y.; Biswal, S. L.; Hirasaki, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    We presents zeta potential measurements and surface complexation modeling (SCM) of synthetic calcite in various conditions. The systematic zeta potential measurement and the proposed SCM provide insight into the role of four potential determining cations (Mg2+, SO42- , Ca2+ and CO32-) and CO2 partial pressure in calcite surface charge formation and facilitate the revealing of calcite wettability alteration induced by brines with designed ionic composition ("smart water"). Brines with varying potential determining ions (PDI) concentration in two different CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) are investigated in experiments. Then, a double layer SCM is developed to model the zeta potential measurements. Moreover, we propose a definition for contribution of charged surface species and quantitatively analyze the variation of charged species contribution when changing brine composition. After showing our model can accurately predict calcite zeta potential in brines containing mixed PDIs, we apply it to predict zeta potential in ultra-low and pressurized CO2 environments for potential applications in carbonate enhanced oil recovery including miscible CO2 flooding and CO2 sequestration in carbonate reservoirs. Model prediction reveals that pure calcite surface will be positively charged in all investigated brines in pressurized CO2 environment (>1atm). Moreover, the sensitivity of calcite zeta potential to CO2 partial pressure in the various brine is found to be in the sequence of Na2CO3 > Na2SO4 > NaCl > MgCl2 > CaCl2 (Ionic strength=0.1M).

  18. Peace River Arch Wabamun dolomite, tectonic or subaerial karst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workum, R.H

    1991-03-01

    Porous dolomite hydrocarbon reservoirs occur locally within the Upper Devonian Wabamun Group on the Peace River Arch in northern Alberta. Previous researchers have suggested that this dolomitization and reservoir creation is fault-controlled. An alternative hypothesis is presented in which, after deposition and lithification of the Wabamun Group rocks over the Arch, the upper Wabamun above the Arch is exposed due to a drop in sea level and subjected to development of subaerial karst features. These could be partly localized by underlying features such as basement faulting. Renewed transgression was accompanied by drowning of the karst system and dolomitization, and was followed by deposition of the Exshaw shale and the lower part of the Banff Formation. The pre-existing solution-induced cavity system was infilled by the overlying deposits. In the upper Paleozoic, basement controlled block faulting accompanied subsidence and sedimentation. Increased burial during the Mesozoic led to hydrocarbon generation from the Exshaw source rocks and migration into the contiguous dolomitized Wabamun reservoirs. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Enrichment of dolomite ore via reaction with sea-bitterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estefan, S.F.; Awadalla, F.T.

    1983-03-01

    Preparation of high-quality refractory magnesia was practiced through reacting caustic-calcined dolomite with desulphated sea-bittern, at a properly controlled pH value, for different time intervals and at varying temperatures. The produced magnesia assaying 96,7% MgO was of high grade and capable of supplanting imported magnesite ores needed for refractory and metallurgical purposes.

  20. Mechanisms of metasomatism in the calcite-pitchblende system: 2. Replacement of pitchblende by calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymkov, Yu.M.

    1996-01-01

    The principal mechanisms of the nasturan replacement by calcite -intrametasomatism, frontal metasomatism, dispersive metasomatism, and transformative metasomatism - are discussed in terms of G.L. Pospelov's (1973) concept. The main chemical condition required by the process is an oxidized environment, in which the tetravalent uranium of pitchblende or transitional reduced phases (coffinite) oxidizes to yield readily soluble uranyl compounds. The latter are replaced by calcite

  1. Sealing process with calcite in the Nojima active fault zone revealed from isotope analysis of calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Takashi; Tsukahara, Hiroaki; Morikiyo, Toshiro

    2003-01-01

    The Nojima fault appeared on the surface in the northern part of Awaji Island, central Japan as a result of the Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake (1995, M=7.2). Active fault drilling was performed by the Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI), Kyoto University, and core samples were retrieved from 1410 to 1710 m, which were composed of intact and fractured granodiorites. We obtained calcite samples and gas samples from the vein in marginal fracture and non-fracture zones. We analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite and carbon dioxide to investigate the characteristic isotope ratios of fluids in the active fault zone, to estimate the origins of fluids, and to determine the sealing process of fractures. The analyzed values of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite were -10.3 to -7.2 per mille, 18 to 23 per mille, respectively, and carbon isotope ratios of CO 2 were -21 to -17 per mille. If carbon isotope ratios of calcite were at equilibrium with those of CO 2 , the precipitation temperature of calcite is calculated to be 30 to 50 deg C. This temperature is consistent with the present temperature of the depth where drilling cores were retrieved. Oxygen isotope ratios of H 2 O that, precipitated calcite were calculated to be -1.8 to -5.5 per mille. These values indicate calcite were precipitated from mixed fluids of sea water and meteoric water. Therefore, the marginal fracture zone of the Nojima fault was sealed with calcite, which was generated from mixing of sea water and meteoric water in situ. (author)

  2. Fault and conduit controlled burial dolomitization of the Devonian west-central Alberta deep Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.G. [BP America, Houston, TX (United States); Mountjoy, E.W. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2005-06-01

    A semi-regional comparison of dolomites from 3 stratigraphic horizons were studied to better understand the geometry of dolomite bodies and the link between dolomites at different stratigraphic horizons. The timing, mechanisms and geochemistry of pervasive dolomites of the west-central Alberta deep basin were clarified along with the distribution and mechanisms of dolomitization in deep gas reservoirs. This study contributes to more efficient hydrocarbon exploration in the deep basin of western Alberta where pervasive dolomite occurs in the Devonian reservoirs in the Swan Hills, Leduc and Wabamun formations. This study showed that pervasive dolomite in the Swan Hills Formation is restricted to zones of primary porosity and permeability near the buildup margins that decrease quickly towards the interior of the buildups. Two petrographic types of dolomite exist in the study area. Type 1 is a fine crystalline planar dolomite, while type 2 is a more pervasive medium to coarse crystalline dolomite. The wide spread of oxygen isotope values for the two types of dolomites was discussed with reference to how these values were influenced by depositional history. The estimated temperatures of type 2 dolomite ranges from 45 to 75 degrees C, which is equivalent to burial depths of 700 to 1500 m. It was suggested that fault-controlled conduits may have controlled local and restricted dolomite occurrences in the Swan Hills and the middle Wabamun Formation as evidenced by seismic data, log marker correlations and fractured dolomite. It was also suggested that porous Leduc dolomites may have been connected via the underlying dolomitized part of the Lower Leduc platform. This formed a basin-wide channel system through which basin fluids flowed up along vertical faults and laterally updip until they reached a stratigraphically controlled conduit during early basin filling in the late Devonian to Carboniferous Orogeny or early Tertiary Orogeny. 52 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs.

  3. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: Comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, M.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of ???10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head - and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  4. Ground-water flow modeling of the Culebra dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Cauffman, T.L.; Pickens, J.F. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The study has produced an estimation of the transmissivity and Darcy-velocity distributions in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The results of this study are intended to support Sandia National Laboratories performance-assessment calculations. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT II was employed for the numerical modeling, using a variable-fluid-density and single-porosity formulation. The spatial scale of the model, 21.3 km by 30.6 km, was chosen to allow simulation of regional-scale pumping tests conducted at the H-3 and H-11 hydropads and the WIPP-13 borehole, which are located south, southeast, and northwest, respectively, of the center of the WIPP site. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the controlled area defined by the WIPP-site boundaries. The work performed in this study consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra in two stages: steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution (i.e., of the hydraulic conditions before excavation of the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981) and superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic response to excavation of the four WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 144 refs., 98 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. The role of silicate surfaces on calcite precipitation kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illuminate how calcite precipitation depends on the identity and structure of the growth substrate. Calcite was precipitated at 25°C from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of seeds of either calcite or one of six silicate materials: augite, enstatite...

  6. High-Magnesian Calcite Mesocrystals : A Coordination Chemistry Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenders, Jos J. M.; Dey, Archan; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Spielmann, Jan; Hendrix, Marco M. R. M.; de With, Gijsbertus; Meldrum, Fiona C.; Harder, Sjoerd; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    While biogenic calcites frequently contain appreciable levels of magnesium, the pathways leading to such high concentrations remain unclear. The production of high-magnesian calcites in vitro is highly challenging, because Mg-free aragonite, rather than calcite, is the favored product in the

  7. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Nehrke, G.; Gustafsson, J.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth

  8. Processes and controlling factors of polygenetic dolomite formation in the Transdanubian Range, Hungary: a synopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, János; Hips, Kinga; Budai, Tamás; Győri, Orsolya; Lukoczki, Georgina; Kele, Sándor; Demény, Attila; Poros, Zsófia

    2017-04-01

    In the Transdanubian Range (Hungary), dolostone and dolomitic limestone appear in a number of sedimentary successions formed from the Late Permian to the Late Triassic in various depositional settings and under various diagenetic conditions, whereas only a negligible amount of dolomite was detected in the post-Triassic formations. Seven dolomite-bearing units representing ramp, small and large carbonate platforms, and intraplatform basin settings are presented in this synopsis. In most cases, multi-stage and polygenetic dolomitization was inferred. The main mass of the dolostones was formed via near-surface diagenetic processes, which were commonly preceded by the formation of synsedimentary dolomite. Accordingly, surficial conditions that prevailed during sediment deposition controlled the dolomite-forming processes and thus the lateral extension and the time span of dolomitization. The area of episodic subaerial exposure was a critical controlling factor of the lateral extension of the near-surface dolomite genesis, whereas its temporal extension was mostly governed by climate. Burial diagenesis usually resulted in only moderate dolomitization, either in connection with compactional fluid flow or via thermal convection. The Triassic fault zones provided conduits for fluid flow that led to both replacive dolomitization and dolomite cement precipitation. In the Late Triassic extensional basins, synsedimentary fault-controlled dolomitization of basinal deposits was reconstructed.

  9. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  10. Magnesian calcite sorbent for carbon dioxide capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabry, J.C.; Mondal, K. [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Magnesian calcite with controlled properties was synthesized for the removal of carbon dioxide. The results from characterization, reactivity and CO{sub 2} capture capacity for different synthesis conditions are reported. The magnesian calcite samples (CaCO{sub 3}:MgCO{sub 3}) were synthesized by the coprecipitation of specific amounts of commercially available CaO and MgO by carbon dioxide. Characterization was done with BET, SEM/EDS, particle size analysis and XRD. The capacity was measured using TGA cycles at 800 {sup o}C and compared for different preparation conditions. The effects of CaO, MgO and surfactant loading on the physical properties and carbonation activity were studied to determine the optimal synthesis condition. A long-term carbonation-calcination cycling test was conducted on the optimal sample. It was observed that the sample maintained its capacity to 86% of its original uptake even after 50 cycles.

  11. Anomalous inelastic neutron scattering from calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, M.T.; Harris, M.J.; Winkler, B.; Hagen, M.E.; Keele Univ.; Powell, B.M.; Steigenberger, U.

    1992-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on calcite (CaCO 3 ) in its low temperature phase have revealed the existence of an unusual column of inelastic scattering at the wavevector corresponding to the F point of the high temperature Brillouin zone. At the same wavevector there is also a transverse acoustic soft mode and the column of scattering ranges in energy from zero up to the soft mode. The intensity of the anomalous scattering increases rapidly with temperature, and is consistent with an Arrhenius relation of the form exp(-T * /T), where T * = 1035 K. We speculate that this scattering arises from thermal fluctuations of the calcite structure into a different ordered structure, which is related to an ordering instability at the F point. Evidence for this possibility has also been obtained from lattice energy calculations. (author)

  12. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovet, Nicolas Emile; Yang, Mingjun; Javadi, Meshkat Sadat

    2015-01-01

    . Controlling their growth requires complex polysaccharides. Polysaccharide activity depends on the functionality of OH groups, so to simplify the system in order to get closer to a molecular level understanding, we investigated the interaction of OH from a suite of alcohols with clean, freshly cleaved calcite...... surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided binding energies and revealed the extent of surface coverage. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supplemented with information about molecule ordering, orientation and packing density. The results show that all alcohols studied bond...... with the calcite surface through the OH group, with their carbon chains sticking away in a standing-up orientation. Alcohol molecules are closely packed and form a well-ordered monolayer on the surface....

  13. Utilization of porous dolomite pellets for the catalytic decomposition of acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yelian; Xue, Jun; Xia, Fajun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, NO. 5 Xinmofan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi [The Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate Key Laboratory of CAS, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Catalytic decomposition of tar is a novel technology to clean the gas produced by biomass gasification. The purpose of the present research work was to develop strong and porous pellets of dolomite catalyst for tar decomposition. Porous dolomite pellets of 3 mm in diameter and 4 mm in height were prepared with dolomite, carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and clay. The mechanical strength, the pore rate and the catalytic effect of porous dolomite pellets on decomposition of acetic acid were investigated. When the clay/dolomite mass ratio was 0.4 and the CMC/dolomite mass ratio was 0.2, the porous dolomite pellets had a mechanical strength of 15 N and a pore rate of 0.75 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. The pore size had approximately a normal distribution in the range of 0.06-200 {mu}m. Under the condition of gas residence time at 7.5 s and bed temperature at 800 C, 99.7 wt% of acetic acid was decomposed over the porous dolomite pellets, but only 36.5 wt% of acetic acid was decomposed with natural dolomite particles. It was indicated that the porous dolomite pellets were much more effective than the natural dolomite particles for catalyzing the decomposition of tar to gas. (author)

  14. Effects of CO2 fine bubble injection on reactive crystallization of dolomite from concentrated brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yuko; Wada, Yoshinari; Hiaki, Toshihiko; Onoe, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Masakazu

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we used the minute gas-liquid interfaces around CO2 fine bubbles as new reaction fields where the crystal nucleation proceeds dominantly and developed a crystallization technique to synthesize dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) with the desired crystal quality. CaMg(CO3)2 has a crystal structure derived from calcite by ordered replacement of the Ca2+ in calcite by Mg2+. To improve the functionality of the crystal for better utilization of the CaMg(CO3)2, an effective method for an approach to a Mg/Ca ratio of 1.0 and downsizing is indispensable in the crystallization process. In the vicinity of the minute gas-liquid interfaces, the accumulation of Ca2+ and Mg2+ is caused by the negative electric charge on the fine bubbles surface; thus, CaMg(CO3)2 fine particles with a high Mg/Ca ratio can be expected to crystallize. At a reaction temperature (Tr) of 298 K and CO2 flow rate (FCO2) of 11.9 mmol/(L min), CO2 bubbles with an average bubble diameter (dbbl) of 40-2000 μm were continuously supplied to 300 mL of the concentrated brine coming from salt manufacture discharge and CaMg(CO3)2 crystallized within a reaction time of 120 min. Fine bubbles with dbbl of 40 μm were generated using a self-supporting bubble generator by increasing the impeller shear rate under reduced pressure. For comparison, the bubbles with dbbl of 300 or 2000 μm were obtained using a dispersing-type generator. Moreover, FCO2 and Tr were varied as operating parameters during the reactive crystallization supplying CO2 fine bubbles. Consequently, CO2 fine bubble injection is effective for the high-yield crystallization of CaMg(CO3)2 with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1.0 and downsizing of CaMg(CO3)2 particles owing to the acceleration of crystal nucleation caused by the local increase in the supersaturation at the minute gas-liquid interfaces.

  15. FORMATION OF CALCITE AND SILICA FROM PERCOLATION IN A HYDROLOGICALLY UNSATURATED SETTING, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paces, J.B.; Whelan, J.F.; Peterman, Z.E.; Marshall, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Geological, mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic evidence from coatings of calcite and silica on open fractures and lithophysal cavities within welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain indicate an origin from meteoric water percolating through a thick (500 to 700 m) unsaturated zone (UZ) rather than from pulses of ascending ground water. Geologic evidence for a UZ setting includes the presence of coatings in only a small percentage of cavities, the restriction of coatings to fracture footwalls and cavity floors, and an absence of mineral high-water marks indicative of water ponding. Systematic mineral sequences (early calcite, followed by chalcedony with minor quartz and fluorite, and finally calcite with intercalated opal forming the bulk of the coatings) indicate progressive changes in UZ conditions through time, rather than repeated saturation by flooding. Percolation under the influence of gravity also results in mineral textures that vary between steeply dipping sites (thinner coatings of blocky calcite) and shallowly dipping sites (thicker coatings of coarse, commonly bladed calcite, with globules and sheets of opal). Micrometer-scale growth banding in both calcite and opal reflects slow average growth rates (scale of mm/m.y.) over millions of years rather than only a few rapidly deposited growth episodes. Isotopic compositions of C, O, Sr, and U from calcite and opal indicate a percolation-modified meteoric water source, and collectively refute a deeper ground-water source. Chemical and isotopic variations in coatings also indicate long-term evolution of water compositions. Although some compositional changes are related to shifts in climate, growth rates in the deeper UZ are buffered from large changes in meteoric input. Coatings most likely formed from films of water flowing down connected fracture pathways. Mineral precipitation is consistent with water vapor and carbon dioxide loss from films at very slow rates. Data collectively indicate that mineral coatings

  16. Dolomitization of Quaternary reef limestones, Aitutaki, Cook Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Gray, S.C.; Richmond, B.M.; White, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    The primary reef framework is considered to have been deposited during several highstands of sea level. Following partial to local recrystallization of the limestone, a signle episode of dolomitization occurred. Both tidal and thermal pumping drove large quantities of seawater through the porous rocks and perhaps maintained a wide mixing zone. However, the isotopic, geochemical and petrographic data do not clearly indicate the extent of seawater mixing. -from Authors

  17. Microbial dolomite crusts from the carbonate platform off western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Krumbein, W.E.; Krajewski, K.P.; Schneider, R.J.

    and Animals (Eds B.S.C. Leadbeater and R. Riding], pp. 54 72. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Krumbein, W.E. and Cohen, Y. (1977) Primary production, mat formation and lithification: contribution of oxygenic and facultative anoxygenic cyanobacteria. In..., 2002) or its production in a mixing zone of marine and meteoric waters (Badiozamani, 1973; Humphery & Quinn, 1990; Humphery & Radjef, 1991; Humphrey, 2000). These models, however, do not convincingly explain how dolomite precipi tation has overcome...

  18. Effect of SO2 Dry Deposition on Porous Dolomitic Limestones

    OpenAIRE

    Olaru, Mihaela; Aflori, Magdalena; Simionescu, Bogdana; Doroftei, Florica; Stratulat, Lacramioara

    2010-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the assessment of the relative resistance of a monumental dolomitic limestone (Laspra – Spain) used as building material in stone monuments and submitted to artificial ageing by SO2 dry deposition in the presence of humidity. To investigate the protection efficiency of different polymeric coatings, three commercially available siloxane-based oligomers (Lotexan-N, Silres BS 290 and Tegosivin HL 100) and a newly synthesized hybrid nanocomposite with silsesqui...

  19. Terpenoids of Linaria alpina (L.) Mill. from Dolomites, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, A; Serafini, M; Nicoletti, M; Bianco, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the first phytochemical analysis of Linaria alpina (L.) Mill., collected in Dolomites (Italy), a species characteristic of mountain environment. Besides aucubin (4), which is rare in the subgenus Antirrhineae of Plantaginaceae, mainly acidic compounds were found, i.e. oleanolic acid (1), ursolic acid (2) maslinic acid (3) and shikimic acid (5). The pentacyclic triterpenes of L. alpina resulted in relatively high content, whereas flavonoids resulted in low content.

  20. Diagenetic modification of Knox evaporative-dolomite geochemistry by middle Ordovician paleoaquifer/burial fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanez, I.P.; Read, J.F.

    1986-05-01

    Early Ordovician upper Knox cyclic carbonates (100,000-year periods) were deposited on a ramp in a semiarid setting. Inner ramp facies are completely dolomitized, whereas only cycle caps on the outer ramp are dolomite. Laminite caps on leading edges of prograding flats were dolomitized by evaporative, storm-recharged marine waters that precipitated CoCO/sub 3/ and minor amounts of CaSO/sub 4/. Subtidal facies beneath interiors of supratidal flats (up to 200 km wide)were dolomitized by shallow subsurface brines as the flats prograded. Inner ramp areas existed as supretidal flats for as long as 100,000 years, hence only there are sequences completely dolomitized. Tidal-flat dolomites consist of euhedral to subhedral fabric preservation mosaics (crystals 5-50 ..mu..m, and up to 300 ..mu..m in replaced pelletal layers). Dolomitized subtidal sediments are composed of 20-200 ..mu..m dolomite crystals. Most of the early dolomites are fabric retentive initially, becoming more fabric destructive with increasing exposure to dolomitizing fluids. Fe values are up to 2000 ppm, and Mn values are up to 500 ppm. delta/sup 18/O values show strong geographic control, with samples depleted (up to - 7 per thousand) relative to pristine evaporative dolomites derived from concentrated Ordovician seawater. Burial dolomites are enriched in Fe (up to 14,000 ppm) and depleted in delta/sup 18/O, suggesting precipitation from basinal brines at elevated temperatures. Geochemical data suggest that evaporative dolomites have undergone modification by isotopically lighter fluids. Alteration most likely occurred within a Middle Ordovician meteoric aquifer system or less likely by later Paleozoic basinal brines. Regional geologic data for Knox Group carbonates throughout the eastern US are vital in constraining dolomitization models.

  1. Hydrothermal Dolomites in the Early Albian (Cretaceous Platform Carbonates (NW Spain: Nature and Origin of Dolomites and Dolomitising Fluids Dolomies hydrothermales présentes dans les carbonates de la plate-forme albienne précoce (Crétacé; NO de l’Espagne : nature et origine des dolomies et des fluides dolomitisants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M.M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the temporal and lateral variation in petrographic and geochemical signatures of fault-related dolomite bodies in the Ranero and El-Moro areas (Karrantza valley, Cantabrian mountains; NW Spain. These dolomite bodies are hosted in Albian carbonates, which were deposited in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin as a result of an intense rift-related subsidence with associated faulting along various orientations. Fluid circulations generated replacive and cement dolomites, paragenetically followed by various calcite cements. Petrography, mineralogical and geochemical investigations (XRD, ICP, XRF, stable and Sr isotopes helped in distinguishing hydrothermal stages. Two major dolomite facies were observed according to their Fe-content. Early dolomites are ferroan and replace limestone more significantly than the later, non ferroan dolomites. Dolomites are generally stoichiometric (49.76 to 51.59 M% CaCO3 and exhibit a broad range of depleted δ18O values (–18.7 to –10.5‰ V-PDB, which may indicate multiphase dolomitisation and/or different degrees of recrystallisation. Decreasing δ18O values correlate with decreasing Fe content in dolomites. In the Ranero area, dolomites show less slightly depleted δ13C values (–0.15 to +2.13‰ V-PDB relative to the host limestone δ13C signature, while these values are substantially more depleted in El-Moro area (down to –2.18‰ V-PDB. Hydrothermal calcites predating dolomitisation show less depleted δ18O values (–14.15 to –12.1‰ V-PDB than postdolomitisation calcite (–18.1‰ V-PDB. Sr isotope data suggest that the fluids interacted with siliciclastic lithologies (sandstone, shale. The dolomite fabric is variably altered through dedolomitisation and cataclastic deformation. Dolomitisation occurred in at least two main episodes. A first episode of pervasive ferroan dolomitisation probably resulted from compactional dewatering of basinal fluids from the nearby Basque trough and

  2. Gallium isotope fractionation during Ga adsorption on calcite and goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Chen, JiuBin; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino; Birck, Jean-Louis; Liu, Yujie; Schott, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Gallium (Ga) isotopic fractionation during its adsorption on calcite and goethite was investigated at 20 °C as a function of the solution pH, Ga aqueous concentration and speciation, and the solid to solution ratio. In all experiments Ga was found to be enriched in light isotopes at the solid surface with isotope fractionation △71Gasolid-solution up to -1.27‰ and -0.89‰ for calcite and goethite, respectively. Comparison of Ga isotopic data of this study with predictions for 'closed system' equilibrium and 'Rayleigh fractionation' models indicates that the experimental data are consistent with a 'closed system' equilibrium exchange between the fluid and the solid. The results of this study can be interpreted based on Ga aqueous speciation and the structure of Ga complexes formed at the solid surfaces. For calcite, Ga isotope fractionation is mainly triggered by increased Ga coordination and Ga-O bond length, which vary respectively from 4 and 1.84 Å in Ga(OH)4- to 6 and 1.94 Å in the >Ca-O-GaOH(OH2)4+ surface complex. For goethite, despite the formation of Ga hexa-coordinated >FeOGa(OH)20 surface complexes (Ga-O distances of 1.96-1.98 Å) both at acid and alkaline pH, a similar extent of isotope fractionation was found at acid and alkaline pH, suggesting that Ga(OH)4- is preferentially adsorbed on goethite for all investigated pH conditions. In addition, the observed decrease of Ga isotope fractionation magnitude observed with increasing Ga surface coverage for both calcite and goethite is likely related to the formation of Ga surface polymers and/or hydroxides with reduced Ga-O distances. This first study of Ga isotope fractionation during solid-fluid interactions suggests that the adsorption of Ga by oxides, carbonates or clay minerals could yield significant Ga isotope fractionation between secondary minerals and surficial fluids including seawater. Ga isotopes thus should help to better characterize the surficial biogeochemical cycles of gallium and its

  3. Pore Structure Characterization of Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite from Pore Network Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire-Gormaly Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in deep underground saline aquifers holds significant promise for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions (CO2. However, challenges remain in predicting the long term migration of injected CO2. Addressing these challenges requires an understanding of pore-scale transport of CO2 within existing brine-filled geological reservoirs. Studies on the transport of fluids through geological porous media have predominantly focused on oil-bearing formations such as sandstone. However, few studies have considered pore-scale transport within limestone and other carbonate formations, which are found in potential storage sites. In this work, high-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (microCT was used to obtain pore-scale structural information of two model carbonates: Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite. A modified watershed algorithm was applied to extract pore network from the reconstructed microCT volumetric images of rock samples and compile a list of pore-scale characteristics from the extracted networks. These include statistical distributions of pore size and radius, pore-pore separation, throat radius, and network coordination. Finally, invasion percolation algorithms were applied to determine saturation-pressure curves for the rock samples. The statistical distributions were comparable to literature values for the Indiana Limestone. This served as validation for the network extraction approach for Pink Dolomite, which has not been considered previously. Based on the connectivity and the pore-pore separation, formations such as Pink Dolomite may present suitable storage sites for carbon storage. The pore structural distributions and saturation curves obtained in this study can be used to inform core- and reservoir-scale modeling and experimental studies of sequestration feasibility.

  4. Fracture calcites at Olkiluoto. Evidence from quaternary infills for palaeohydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehoer, S.; Kaerki, A.; Taikina-aho, O.; Karhu, J.; Loefman, J.; Pitkaenen, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.

    2002-02-01

    Recently formed secondary minerals, predominantly calcite, occur in varying amounts as fracture infills, and the calcite types, their chemical compositions and isotope ratios reflect the compositions and physicochemical factors of the groundwater system in which they were formed. Fluid inclusions trapped in calcites give direct evidence of trapping temperatures and past salinities and of the chemical compositions of the palaeo fluids. A wide range of mineralogical and geochemical examinations were carried out within the EQUIP project to examine features of this kind. The fracture calcites at the Olkiluoto site are of various origins and represent several textural types. The exact number of calcite-producing events is unknown, but the duration of the period that was appropriate for the precipitation of low temperature calcite is estimated to have exceeded 1000 Ma. Thus the number of genetically related calcite units is assumed to be considerable. This study was focused on the petrogenesis of calcites crystallized in fractures of high water conductivity during the latest stages of geological evolution. The majority of these late stage calcites form physically homogeneous, scaly layers, and in a few cases thin layers composed of idiomorphic crystals. Chemically these are almost stoichiometric calcites (CaCO 3 ). The MnO content may exceed 1%, while the amounts of other elements present are minor, although the trace element concentrations, particularly those of large ionic trace elements, can be used as distinguishing features for the recognition of individual precipitates representing different calcite generations. Evidence from fluid inclusions, or more correctly from the absence of these in the late stage calcites, can be interpreted as an indication of slow rates of crystallization under cool conditions. Many chemical variables, e.g. oxygen isotope ratios, demonstrate an equilibrium between the latest calcites and water similar to the present groundwater. Older

  5. Fracture calcites at Olkiluoto. Evidence from quaternary infills for palaeohydrogeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehoer, S.; Kaerki, A.; Taikina-aho, O. [Kivitieto Oy (Finland); Karhu, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Loefman, J. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Pitkaenen, P. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [TUKES, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    Recently formed secondary minerals, predominantly calcite, occur in varying amounts as fracture infills, and the calcite types, their chemical compositions and isotope ratios reflect the compositions and physicochemical factors of the groundwater system in which they were formed. Fluid inclusions trapped in calcites give direct evidence of trapping temperatures and past salinities and of the chemical compositions of the palaeo fluids. A wide range of mineralogical and geochemical examinations were carried out within the EQUIP project to examine features of this kind. The fracture calcites at the Olkiluoto site are of various origins and represent several textural types. The exact number of calcite-producing events is unknown, but the duration of the period that was appropriate for the precipitation of low temperature calcite is estimated to have exceeded 1000 Ma. Thus the number of genetically related calcite units is assumed to be considerable. This study was focused on the petrogenesis of calcites crystallized in fractures of high water conductivity during the latest stages of geological evolution. The majority of these late stage calcites form physically homogeneous, scaly layers, and in a few cases thin layers composed of idiomorphic crystals. Chemically these are almost stoichiometric calcites (CaCO{sub 3}). The MnO content may exceed 1%, while the amounts of other elements present are minor, although the trace element concentrations, particularly those of large ionic trace elements, can be used as distinguishing features for the recognition of individual precipitates representing different calcite generations. Evidence from fluid inclusions, or more correctly from the absence of these in the late stage calcites, can be interpreted as an indication of slow rates of crystallization under cool conditions. Many chemical variables, e.g. oxygen isotope ratios, demonstrate an equilibrium between the latest calcites and water similar to the present groundwater. Older

  6. The Ranero Hydrothermal Dolomites (Albian, Karrantza Valley, Northwest Spain: Implications on Conceptual Dolomite Models Les dolomies hydrothermales de Ranero (Albien, vallée de la Karrantza, nord-ouest de l’Espagne : conséquences sur les modèles génétiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader F.H.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Field characteristics, petrographic and geochemical signatures, as well as some petrophysical aspects of fault-related dolomite bodies in the Ranero area (Karrantza Valley, NW Spain are presented in this paper. These dolomite bodies are hosted by Albian slope to platform carbonates, which were deposited in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin. Replacive and void-filling dolomite phases – postdating palaeo- and hypogene karstification – are interpreted to have originated from hydrothermal fluid pulses, and are spatially related with faults and fractures. Hydrothermal calcite cements pre- and postdate dolomitization. Mineralogical and geochemical investigations (XRD, ICP-MS/OES, XRF, stable and Sr isotopes helped in distinguishing various dolomite and calcite phases. Dolomite phases can be grouped into ferroan (early and non-ferroan (late. Dolomites are generally stoichiometric and exhibit a broad range of depleted δ18O values (–18.7 to –10.5‰ V-PDB, which advocate for multiphase dolomitization and/or recrystallization at relatively high temperatures (150-200°C. The observation that bed-parallel stylolites pre- and post-date dolomites suggests that dolomitization occurred during the Late Albian regional tectonic activity and related fluid expulsions. Based on carbonate chemistry, authigenic silicate chemistry and replacement relationships, two contrasting types of dolomitizing fluids are inferred. Both arguably may have initiated as sulphatedominated brines and/or basin compactional fluids, but they seemingly undergo sulphate reduction in contact with host rocks of contrasting compositions (Fe-rich silicate vs Fe-poor carbonate thus evolving either to acidic and ferroan (limestone replacive or to neutral, Fe-poor and sulfidic (Fe-dolomite replacive. Fluid drives are not well constrained by our data, but both fluid types are focused along major faults that cross cut the platform edge and are associated with diapir tectonics. Les modalités de

  7. Examination of TL and optical absorption in calcite's mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabikoglu, I.; Can, N.

    2009-01-01

    Calcite which is a form of crystalline of the calcium carbonate composes parent material of chalk stone (limestone) and marble. Calcite which presents in various colors also in our country consists of yellow, blue, transparent and green colors. In this study, green calcite mineral which is taken from the region of Ayvalik, was examined of its thermoluminescence (TL) and optical absorption features in different doses. It has been obtained a large TL peak in 179 degree C and absorption peak in 550 mm.

  8. Origin of calcite in the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Kortelainen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwaters of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex in southern Finland are characterized by high pH values ranging up to 9.5. These values are significantly higher than those observed in silicate-rich shallow groundwater formations in crystalline bedrock areas. TheVirttaankangas sediments were discovered to contain small amounts of fine grained, dispersed calcite, which has a high tendency to increase the pH of local groundwaters. The primary goal of this study was to determine the mode of occurrence of calcite and to identifyits sources. The mineralogy of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex was studied using material from 21 sediment drill cores. Fine-grained calcite is present in trace amounts (<< 1.4 % in the glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine depositional units of the Virttaankangas complex. The topmost littoral sands were practically devoid of calcite. The isotope records of carbon and oxygen, the angular morphology of the grains and the uniform dispersion of calcite in the complex suggest a clastic origin for calcite, with no evidence for in-situ precipitation. In order to constrain the source of calcite, the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in five calcite samples was compared to the isotopic data from five carbonate rock erratics and eight crystalline bedrock samples from the region. Based on carbon and oxygen isotope ratios and chemical compositions, the dispersed calcite grains of the Virttaankangas complex appear to have been derived from the Mesoproterozoic Satakunta Formation, some 30 km NW from the Virttaankangas area. In sandstone, calcite is predominantly present as diagenetic cement in grain interspaces, concretions and interlayers. The source of detrital calcite was unexpected, as prior to this study the Satakunta sandstone hasnot been known to contain calcite.

  9. An investigation of the heterogeneous nucleation of calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, W.A.; Tutton, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation kinetics of calcite from dilute calcium bicarbonate solutions onto pyrex glass seeds is investigated by using a modified form of the Davies and Jones equation. The rate constant is evaluated from experiments using calcite seeds and it is demonstrated that the growth rate does not increase in proportion to the increase in surface area accompanying precipitation. The number of heteronucleated particles is estimated by assuming a constant density of growth sites on the different calcite surfaces. A comparison is made between the specific surface areas of calcite obtained by the calcium-45 isotopic exchange method and other values. (orig.)

  10. Atom-resolved AFM imaging of calcite nanoparticles in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hirotake; Kimura, Kenjiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An advanced frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM) was applied for imaging particles. ► Atom-resolved topography of nano-sized particles of calcite was observed in water. ► Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of calcite. ► A promising ability of FM-AFM was demonstrated in imaging nano-sized particles. - Abstract: The atom-resolved topography of calcite nanoparticles was observed in water using a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope. Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of crystalline calcite

  11. Characterization and activity of different dolomites for hot gas cleaning in biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orio, A.; Corella, J.; Narvaez, I. [University `Complutense` of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work is to identify if the type, origin or composition of the calcined dolomite has some influence on its activity for tar elimination in a hot flue gas coming from a biomass gasifier, bubbling fluidized bed type. For this purpose four different dolomites from four different quarries and companies have been studied. Chemical analysis, adsorption isotherms, surface and pore size distributions both with nitrogen and by mercury porosimetry etc.... have been made for three different samples of each dolomite. Activity tests for fresh tar destruction have been simultaneously carried out for each type of calcined dolomite in a fixed bed of 6 cm i.d. The tar elimination activity of the dolomite and the product distribution from it do not seem to depend much on the composition or type of the dolomite used. (author)

  12. Experimental observations of dolomite dissolution in geologic carbon sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Tutolo, B. M.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    One sequestration scenario proposed to reduce CO2 emissions involves injecting CO2 into saline formations or hydrocarbon reservoirs, where dolomite frequently occurs. To better understand fluid-mineral interactions in these sequestration settings, we have conducted a series of single-pass, flow-through experiments on dolomite core samples with CO2-bearing brine. An important component of the experimental design was to maintain the fabric of the rock so as to more accurately simulate fluid flow in natural dolomite-bearing systems. Seven experiments were conducted at 100°C and a pore-fluid pressure of 150 bars with a fluid containing 1 molal NaCl and 0.6 molal dissolved CO2. Flow rates ranged from 0.01 to 1 ml/min. Each experiment was terminated before dissolution breakthrough, but permeability increased by approximately an order of magnitude for all experiments. In general, Ca and Mg concentrations were initially high, but then decreased with reaction progress. We hypothesize that time-dependent changes in fluid chemistry reflect reduction in reactive surface area. Fluid chemistry also indicates preferential removal of Ba, Mn, and Sr with respect to Ca and Mg. In the extreme case, 70% of the Ba was removed from one core, while only 3% of the Ca, Mg, or the entire core mass was removed by dissolution. Ongoing work is focused on identifying elemental distributions throughout the rock to better understand the dissolution process. With fluid chemistry and BET surface area, we model dissolution rate as a function of core length using reactive transport simulations and compare our whole rock, far from equilibrium dissolution rates with analogous data reported in the literature. Finally, X-ray computed tomography images enable reconstructions of dissolution patterns, and they are being used to explore the effect of pore space heterogeneity on flow path development. Geologic carbon sequestration in dolomite will produce significant dissolution at the brine/CO2 interface

  13. Dolomite Formation within Microbial Mats in the Sabkha of Abu Dhabi (UAE) and Associated Microsedimentary Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontognali, T. R.; Vasconcelos, C.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The link between microbial activity and dolomite formation has been evaluated in the coastal sabkha of Abu Dhabi (UAE). This modern dolomite-forming environment is frequently cited as the type analogue for the interpretation of many ancient evaporitic sequences. The investigation of sabkha sediments along a transect from intertidal to supratidal zones revealed a close association between microbial mats and dolomite. Authigenic dolomite occurs within surface and buried microbial mats, which are comprised of exopolymeric substances (EPS). Dolomite forms as a direct consequence of mineral nucleation and growth within microbially produced EPS. The cation-binding effect of the EPS molecules influences the composition of the precipitate. The early stage of this process is characterized by the complexation of an amorphous Mg-Si precipitate, which promotes dolomite development. Mineral formation within EPS appears to be enhanced by evaporation with consequent supersaturation of the pore waters with respect to dolomite. Partial EPS degradation during diagenesis may also provide an additional source of cations. However, the specific mineral-template property of EPS, rather than an increase in cation concentrations, is the key factor for dolomite formation in the studied area of the sabkha. Indeed, within the modern microbial mat located at the surface, dolomite precipitates from pore waters whose composition is very close to seawater. In the supratidal zone, pore water analysis and stable isotope values did not reveal any linkage between dolomite formation and microbial excretion and/or consumption of metabolites along the sediment profiles. This is in contrast with current models, in which dolomite formation is mainly linked to microbial increase of pH and alkalinity or consumption of dissolved SO4 in pore-waters. The EPS of the microbial mats is characterized by an alveolar microfabric, which can be mineralized during early diagenesis, preserving fossil imprints of the

  14. Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Dolomite with Implications for the Earth's Deep Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze. The fate of these carbonates in subduction zones is not well understood. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down into two carbonates at 2-7 GPa, which may further decompose to oxides and CO2-bearing fluid. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize dolomite I to high pressures, allowing the transformation to dolomite II at 17 GPa and subsequently to dolomite III at 35 GPa [1][2]. Such phases may be a principal host for deeply subducted carbon. The structure and equation of state of these high-pressure phases is debated and the effect of varying concentrations of iron is unknown, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Here we compare calculated dolomite structures to experimentally observed phases. Using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), a monoclinic phase with space group 5 ("dolomite sg5") was found for pure end-member dolomite. Dolomite sg5 has a lower energy than reported dolomite structures and an equation of state that resembles that of dolomite III. It is possible that dolomite sg5 is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. Due to the complex energy landscape for candidate high-pressure dolomite structures, it is likely that several competing polymorphs exist. Determining the behavior of high-pressure Ca-Mg-Fe(-Mn) dolomite phases in subduction environments is critical for our understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and supercell calculations with Fe substitution are in progress. [1] Mao, Z., Armentrout, M., Rainey, E., Manning, C. E., Dera, P., Prakapenka, V. B., and Kavner, A

  15. Relationship between karstification and burial dolomitization in Permian platform carbonates (Lower Khuff - Oman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Julia; Vandeginste, Veerle; John, Cédric M.

    2016-08-01

    Large breccia fabrics associated with karst constitute an important structure in massive limestone successions. The dimensions and shapes of breccia structures are controlled by the initial fracture pattern of the limestone and preferential pathways of the karstifying fluids, but subsequently breccia fabrics can also govern the migration of later fluids. Therefore, breccias are highly relevant features to capture for reservoir characterisation. Outcrop analogues for Lower Khuff units in the Middle East present in the Central Oman Mountains reveal brecciated fabrics up to 10s of metres in diameter. These brecciated units are closely associated with dolomite bodies of late diagenetic origin. Based on an integrated set of data, the breccias are interpreted as collapsed karst cavities either formed by meteoric or hypogenic fluids. The exact origin of the fluids could not be constrained due to an overprint by later dolomitizing fluids. Based on the composition of the clasts and matrix in the breccias, two dolomitization events are interpreted to have affected the succession, one prior to (early diagenetic [ED] dolomite) and one after brecciation (late diagenetic [DT2] dolomite). Dolomite of shallow burial origin (ED dolomite) was only observed as clasts within breccia and is much more frequent than late diagenetic (medium to deep burial) dolomite clasts. Thus, the timing of the brecciation and collapse is assumed to postdate shallow burial early diagenetic dolomitization. Late diagenetic replacive dolomite (DT2 dolomite) forms 90% of the matrix in the breccia fabrics with the exception of a small area that was not affected by dolomitization, but is rarely present as clasts. Stable isotope measurements [δ18O: - 2.5‰ to - 6‰ VPDB and δ13C: 2.9‰ to 4.8‰ VPDB] suggest a burial origin for the late diagenetic dolomite potentially with the participation of hydrothermal fluids. The dolomitized matrix indicates a migration of late dolomitizing fluids subsequent to or

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Malaysian Dolomites as a Tar Cracking Catalyst in Biomass Gasification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. A. Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three types of local Malaysian dolomites were characterized to investigate their suitability for use as tar-cracking catalysts in the biomass gasification process. The dolomites were calcined to examine the effect of the calcination process on dolomite’s catalytic activity and properties. The modifications undergone by dolomites consequent to thermal treatment were investigated using various analytical methods. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses indicated that the dolomites underwent two stages of decomposition during the calcination process. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectra analyses showed that thermal treatment of dolomite played a significant role in the disappearance of the CaMg(CO32 phase, producing the MgO-CaO form of dolomite. The scanning electron microscopy microphotographs of dolomite indicated that the morphological properties were profoundly affected by the calcination process, which led to the formation of a highly porous surface with small spherical particles. In addition, the calcination of dolomite led to the elimination of carbon dioxide and increases in the values of the specific surface area and average pore diameter, as indicated by surface area analysis. The results showed that calcined Malaysian dolomites have great potential to be applied as tar-cracking catalysts in the biomass gasification process based on their favorable physical properties.

  17. High salinity facilitates dolomite precipitation mediated by Haloferax volcanii DS52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Wang, Hongmei; Yao, Yanchen; Duan, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Although most modern dolomites occur in hypersaline environments, the effects of elevated salinity on the microbial mediation of dolomite precipitation have not been fully evaluated. Here we report results of dolomite precipitation in association with a batch culture of Haloferax volcanii DS52, a halophilic archaeon, under various salinities (from 120‰ to 360‰) and the impact of salinity on microbe-mediated dolomite formation. The mineral phases, morphology and atomic arrangement of the precipitates were analyzed by XRD, SEM and TEM, respectively. The amount of amino acids on the archaeal cell surface was quantified by HPLC/MS. The XRD analysis indicated that disordered dolomite formed successfully with the facilitation of cells harvested from cultures with relatively high salinities (200‰ and 280‰) but was not observed in association with cells harvested from cultures with lower salinity (120‰) or the lysates of cells harvested from extremely high salinity (360‰). The TEM analysis demonstrated that the crystals from cultures with a salinity of 200‰ closely matched that of dolomite. Importantly, we found that more carboxyl groups were presented on the cell surface under high salinity conditions to resist the high osmotic pressure, which may result in the subsequent promotion of dolomite formation. Our finding suggests a link between variations in the hydro-chemical conditions and the formation of dolomite via microbial metabolic activity and enhances our understanding about the mechanism of microbially mediated dolomite formation under high salinity conditions.

  18. Cesium migration through solid cores of magenta dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, A.W.; Dosch, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Column-flow experiments have been conducted on Magenta dolomite rock taken from a potential site for radioactive waste disposal (WIPP). The results indicate qualitative agreement with results from batch sorption coefficient (K/sub d/) measurements. In one experiment deionized water pre-equilibrated with crushed rock containing 0.1 μCi/Ml 137 Cs flowed through a column with an average velocity of 1.1 cm/day for 18 months. The 137 Cs penetrated approximately 0.4 cm into the column indicating a sorption coefficient of about 100 ml/g. Batch sorption experiments gave a value of 650 ml/g. When the water was changed to a pre-equilibrating groundwater and the Cs concentration was increased, both column and batch experiments gave values for the sorption coefficient of approximately 19 ml/g. Transmission electron microscopy results showed the Magenta samples to be primarily composed of dolomite and calcium sulfate and that a minor montmorillonite clay phase may control the retention of Cs on these rocks

  19. Organic geochemistry and stable isotope composition of New Zealand carbonate concretions and calcite fracture fills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, M.J.; Nelson, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonate concretion bodies, representing a number of morphological types, and associated calcite fracture fills, mainly from New Zealand, have been studied both organically and inorganically. Extracted organic material is dominated by a complex polymeric dark brown highly polar fraction with a subordinate less polar and lighter coloured lipid fraction. The relative proportion of the two fractions is the principal control on the colour of fracture fill calcites. Concretions are classified mainly by reference to their carbonate stable carbon and oxygen isotope and cation composition. Typical subspherical calcitic septarian concretions, such as those in the Paleocene Moeraki and the Eocene Rotowaro Siltstones, contain carbon derived mainly by bacterial sulfate reduction in marine strata during early diagenesis. Other concretions, including a septarian calcitic type from the Northland Allochthon, have a later diagenetic origin. Siderite concretions, abundant in the nonmarine Waikato Coal Measures, are typically dominated by methanogenic carbon, whereas paramoudra-like structures from the Taranaki Miocene have the most extreme carbon isotope compositions, probably resulting from methane formation or oxidation in fluid escape conduits. Lipids from concretion bodies and most fracture fill calcites contain significant concentrations of fatty acids. Concretion bodies dominated by bimodally distributed n-fatty acids with strong even-over-odd preference, in which long chain n-acids are of terrestrial origin, have very low hydrocarbon biomarker maturities. Concretion bodies that lack long chain n-acids often have higher apparent biomarker maturity and prominent alpha-omega diacids. Such diacids are abundant in fracture fill calcites at Rotowaro, especially where calcite infills the septaria of a siderite concretion in the non-marine Waikato Coal Measures, and support the view that fluid transport resulted in carbonate entrapment of the fracture-hosted acids. Diacids also

  20. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  1. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 and 70 deg by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected medium-width filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  2. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Z.; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Calcite–water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity.

  3. An experimental study of dolomite dissolution kinetics at conditions relevant to CO2 geological storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baritantonaki, Angeliki; Bolourinejad, Panteha; Herber, Rien

    The kinetics of dolomite dissolution have been experimentally investigated under subsurface conditions characteristic of the Rotliegend gas fields in the NE of The Netherlands. Experiments were performed in closed, stirred, batch reactors at far from equilibrium conditions, with dolomite powders of

  4. Order–disorder–reorder process in thermally treated dolomite samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zucchini, Azzurra; Comodi, Paola; Katerinopoulou, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] heated to 1,200oC at 3 GPa was made to study the order–disorder–reorder process. The order/disorder transition is inferred to start below 1,100oC, and complete disorder is attained at approximately 1,200o......C. Twinned crystals characterized by high internal order were found in samples annealed over 1,100oC, and their fraction was found to increase with temperature. Evidences of twinning domains combined with probable remaining disordered portions of the structure imply that reordering processes occur during...... the quench. Twin domains are hereby proposed as a witness to thermally induced intra-layer-type cation disordering....

  5. Geometry of calcite cemented zones in shallow marine sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walderhaug, O.; Prestholm, E.; Oexnevad, I.E.I.

    1995-12-31

    In offshore oil production, tightly cemented calcite zones often form impermeable barriers to fluid flow an so adversely affect reservoir performance. Based on recent breakthroughs in the theory of the formation of calcite cemented zones, the project discussed in this paper was concerned with (1) Performing outcrop studies in order to increase the existing database on the geometry of calcite cemented zones, (2) Extending and refining methods of predicting the geometry of cored calcite cemented zones, and (3) Applying and illustrating the use of these methods by studying calcite cementation in shallow marine reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian shelf. The paper presents results from field work and applies these results and the criteria for recognizing geometrical forms of calcite cementation in cores to the Ula Formation of the Ula Field and the Rannoch Formation of the Gullfax Field. The results from the core and outcrop studies are integrated in a tentative identification key for cored calcite cemented zones. The work is part of PROFIT (Program for Research On Field oriented Improved recovery Technology), a research project conducted by RF - Rogaland Research in 1991-1994. 32 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Uranyl incorporation into calcite and aragonite: XAFS and luminescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, R.J.; Nugent, M.; Lamble, G.M.; Tait, C.D.; Morris, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray absorption, luminescence, and Raman spectroscopic studies of U(VI)-containing calcite and aragonite show that the UO 2 2+ ion, the dominant and mobile form of dissolved uranium in near-surface waters, has a disordered and apparently less stable coordination environment when incorporated into calcite in comparison to aragonite, both common polymorphs of CaCO 3 . Their findings suggest that calcite, a widely distributed authigenic mineral in soils and near-surface sediments and a principal weathering product of concrete-based containment structures, is not likely to be a suitable host for the long-term sequestration of U(VI). The more stable coordination provided by aragonite suggests that its long-term retention should be favored in this phase, until it inverts to calcite. Consequently, future remobilization of U(VI) coprecipitated with calcium carbonate minerals should not be ruled out in assessments of contaminated sites. Their observation of a similar equatorial coordination of UO 2 2+ in aragonite and the dominant aqueous species [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- ] but a different coordination in calcite indicates that a change in UO 2 2+ coordination is required for its incorporation into calcite. This may explain the observed preferential uptake of U(VI) by aragonite relative to calcite

  7. Impact of trace metals on the water structure at the calcite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, Mariette; Di Tommaso, Devis; De Leeuw, Nora

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate minerals play an important role in regulating the chemistry of aquatic environments, including the oceans, aquifers, hydrothermal systems, soils and sediments. Through mineral surface processes such as dissolution, precipitation and sorption, carbonate minerals affect the biogeochemical cycles of not only the constituent elements of carbonates, such as Ca, Mg, Fe and C, but also H, P and trace elements. Surface charging of the calcite mineral-water interface, and its reactivity towards foreign ions can be quantified using a surface structural model that includes, among others, the water structure at the interface (i.e. hydrogen bridging) [1,2] in accordance with the CD-MUSIC formalism [3]. Here we will show the impact of foreign metals such as Mg and Sr on the water structure around different surface sites present in etch pits and on growth terraces at the calcite (10-14) surface. We have performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of metal-doped calcite surfaces, using different interatomic water potentials. Results show that the local environment around the structurally distinct sites differs depending on metal presence, suggesting that metal substitutions in calcite affect its reactivity. The information obtained in this study will help in improving existing macroscopic surface model for the reactivity of calcite [2] and give more general insight in mineral surface reactivity in relation to crystal composition. [1] Wolthers, Charlet, & Van Cappellen (2008). Am. J. Sci., 308, 905-941. [2] Wolthers, Di Tommaso, Du, & de Leeuw (2012). Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 15145-15157. [3] Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996) J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508.

  8. Strontium Incorporation into Calcite Generated by Bacterial Ureolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiko Fujita; George D. Redden; Jani C. Ingram; Marnie M. Cortez; Robert W. Smith

    2004-01-01

    Strontium incorporation into calcite generated by bacterial ureolysis was investigated as part of an assessment of a proposed remediation approach for 90Sr contamination in groundwater. Urea hydrolysis produces ammonium and carbonate and elevates pH, resulting in the promotion of calcium carbonate precipitation. Urea hydrolysis by the bacterium Bacillus pasteurii in a medium designed to mimic the chemistry of the Snake River Plain Aquifer in Idaho resulted in a pH rise from 7.5 to 9.1. Measured average distribution coefficients (DEX) for Sr in the calcite produced by ureolysis (0.5) were up to an order of magnitude higher than values reported in the literature for natural and synthetic calcites (0.02-0.4). They were also higher than values for calcite produced abiotically by ammonium carbonate addition (0.3). The precipitation of calcite in these experiments was verified by X-ray diffraction. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) depth profiling (up to 350 nm) suggested that the Sr was not merely sorbed on the surface, but was present at depth within the particles. X-ray absorption near edge spectra showed that Sr was present in the calcite samples as a solid solution. The extent of Sr incorporation appeared to be driven primarily by the overall rate of calcite precipitation, where faster precipitation was associated with greater Sr uptake into the solid. The presence of bacterial surfaces as potential nucleation sites in the ammonium carbonate precipitation treatment did not enhance overall precipitation or the Sr distribution coefficient. Because bacterial ureolysis can generate high rates of calcite precipitation, the application of this approach is promising for remediation of 90Sr contamination in environments where calcite is stable over the long term

  9. Effects of surface orientation, fluid chemistry and mechanical polishing on the variability of dolomite dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Voltolini, Marco; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies of carbonate surface reactivity have underscored the fundamental variability of dissolution rates and the heterogeneous distribution of the reaction over the mineral surface due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surface energy. Dolomite dissolution rates relative to different cleavage planes (r-planes) and surfaces cut approximately perpendicular to the c-axis (c-planes) were studied at 50 °C as a function of pH (3.4 ≤ pH ≤ 9.0) and solution composition by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with the aim of providing an estimate of the intrinsic rate variation of dolomite single crystals and describing the surface reaction distribution and the rate controlling mechanisms. Surface normal retreat rates measured under acidic conditions increased linearly with time and were not visibly affected by the parallel increase of surface roughness. Mean total dissolution rates of r-planes decreased by over 200 times from pH 3.4 to pH 9.0 and CO32--rich solutions, whereas corresponding rate variations spanned over 3 orders of magnitude when also c-plane rate distributions were included in the analysis. At acid to near neutral pH, c-planes dissolved ∼ three times faster than the adjoining r-planes but slower at basic pH and high total carbon concentration, displaying a distinctive morphologic evolution in these two regimes. The comparison of polished and unpolished crystals showed that polished cleavage planes dissolved about three times faster than the unpolished counterpart at near neutral to basic conditions, whereas no significant difference in reactivity was observed at pH < 5. Although experimental data and observations indicate a tendency of dolomite faces to reach a low-energy topography over the course of the reaction, the evolution of the entire crystal morphology depends also on the reactivity of edge and corner regions, whose contribution to measured rates is not generally taken into account by laboratory

  10. Review of aragonite and calcite crystal morphogenesis in thermal spring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Aragonite and calcite crystals are the fundamental building blocks of calcareous thermal spring deposits. The diverse array of crystal morphologies found in these deposits, which includes monocrystals, mesocrystals, skeletal crystals, dendrites, and spherulites, are commonly precipitated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. Such crystals form through both abiotic and biotic processes. Many crystals develop through non-classical crystal growth models that involve the arrangement of nanocrystals in a precisely controlled crystallographic register. Calcite crystal morphogenesis has commonly been linked to a ;driving force;, which is a conceptual measure of the distance of the growth conditions from equilibrium conditions. Essentially, this scheme indicates that increasing levels of supersaturation and various other parameters that produce a progressive change from monocrystals and mesocrystals to skeletal crystals to crystallographic and non-crystallographic dendrites, to dumbbells, to spherulites. Despite the vast amount of information available from laboratory experiments and natural spring systems, the precise factors that control the driving force are open to debate. The fact that calcite crystal morphogenesis is still poorly understood is largely a reflection of the complexity of the factors that influence aragonite and calcite precipitation. Available information indicates that variations in calcite crystal morphogenesis can be attributed to physical and chemical parameters of the parent water, the presence of impurities, the addition of organic or inorganic additives to the water, the rate of crystal growth, and/or the presence of microbes and their associated biofilms. The problems in trying to relate crystal morphogenesis to specific environmental parameters arise because it is generally impossible to disentangle the controlling factor(s) from the vast array of potential parameters that may act alone or in unison with each other.

  11. Controlling the size and morphology of precipitated calcite particles by the selection of solvent composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2017-11-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate is used as an additive in the manufacture of many products. Particles with specific characteristics can be obtained by the selection of precipitation conditions, including temperature and the composition of solvent. In this work, calcium carbonate particles were obtained in the reaction of calcium hydroxide with carbon dioxide at 65 °C. Initial Ca(OH)2 suspensions were prepared in pure water and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol or glycerol of the concentration range up to 20% (vol.). The course of reaction was monitored by conductivity measurements. Precipitated solids were analyzed by FTIR, XRD, SEM and the particles size distribution was determined by a laser diffraction method. The adsorption of ethylene glycol or glycerol on the surface of scalenohedral and rhombohedral calcite was testes by a normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The addition of organic solvents changed the viscosity of reaction mixtures, the rate of carbon dioxide absorption and the solubility of inorganic components and therefore influence calcium carbonate precipitation conditions. All synthesized calcium carbonate products were in a calcite form. Scalenohedral calcite crystals were produced when water was a liquid phase, whereas addition of organic solvents resulted in the formation of rhombo-scalenohedral particles. The increase in organic compounds concentration resulted in the decrease of mean particles size from 2.4 μm to 1.7 μm in ethylene glycol solutions and to 1.4 μm in glycerol solutions. On the basis of adsorption tests, it was confirm that calcite surface interact stronger with glycerol than ethylene glycol. The interaction between scalenohedral calcite and used organic additives was higher in comparison to the pure rhombohedral form applied as a stationary phase.

  12. Biocementation of Concrete Pavements Using Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Hoon; Jo, Yoon-Soo; Park, Chang-Seon; Kang, Chang-Ho; So, Jae-Seong

    2017-07-28

    In this study, the feasibility of introducing calcite-forming bacteria into concrete pavements to improve their mechanical performance was investigated. Lysinibacillus sphaericus WJ-8, which was isolated in a previous study and is capable of exhibiting high urease activity and calcite production, was used. When analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction, WJ-8 showed a significant amount of calcite precipitation. The compressive strength of cement mortar mixed with WJ-8 cells and nutrient medium (urea with calcium lactate) increased by 10% compared with that of the controls. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the increase in strength was due to the calcite formed by the WJ-8 cells.

  13. Optimasi Dosis Pupuk Dolomit pada Tanaman Kelapa Sawit (Elaeis Guineensis Jacq. Belum Menghasilkan Umur Satu Tahun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Sudradjat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kelapa sawit merupakan komoditi perkebunan utama karena sebagai sumber devisa negara dan menyediakan lapangan kerja. Indonesia adalah negara produsen terbesar kelapa sawit di dunia dengan luas areal mencapai 10.1 juta hektar. Peningkatan produktivitas dicapai dengan intensifikasi antara lain dengan melakukan rasionalisasi pemupkan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan dosis optimum pupuk dolomit pada tanaman kelapa sawit belum menghasilkan umur satu tahun. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di Kebun Pendidikan dan Penelitian Kelapa Sawit IPB-Cargill, Jonggol, Bogor dari bulan Maret 2013 sampai Maret 2014. Rancangan yang digunakan adalah Faktorial Tunggal,  dosis pupuk dolomit,  yang disusun dalam lingkungan Acak Kelompok dengan tiga ulangan. Dosis pupuk dolomit yang diuji  terdiri atas 0, 200, 400, dan 600 g tanaman-1 tahun-1. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pupuk dolomit meningkatkan secara nyata terhadap peubah tinggi tanaman, diameter batang, jumlah daun, dan kandungan khlorofil daun, namun tidak berpengaruh terhadap kandungan Mg dalam jaringan daun. Berdasarkan tanggap peubah tinggi tanaman, dosis optimum pupuk dolomit untuk tanaman kelapa sawit pada umur satu tahun adalah 306.4 g dolomit tanaman-1tahun -1. Kata kunci: dolomit, dosis optimum, kelapa sawit, respons fisiologi, respons morfologi.

  14. Reaction Sintering of Mexican Dolomite – Zircon Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Galicia, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work has been conducted aiming to develop additional phase [Ca3SiO5, Ca2SiO4 and/or Ca3Mg(SiO42]-bonded magnesia refractory materials via reaction sintering of dolomite-zircon mixtures, employing a Mexican dolomite containing an excess of 3 wt% of CaCO3. The study was based on phase equilibrium data extracted from the quaternary system CaO – MgO – SiO2 – ZrO2, to put it more precisely, base on the projection from the MgO-apex of the liquidus surface of the primary crystallization volume of MgO onto the opposite face of the above mentioned quaternary system. The refractory materials designed within this system were obtained by attrition milling, followed by cold isostatic pressing and high temperature reaction sintering. All initial and produced materials were characterized by ICP-AES, XRF, XRD, SEM-EDX, DTA and TG analyses. The results obtained indicated that reaction sintering of dolomite-zircon mixtures is an interesting route to produce MgO-CaZrO3-additional phase refractory materials.

    El propósito de este trabajo ha sido obtener materiales refractarios de magnesia, aglomerados con una fase adicional [Ca3SiO5, Ca2SiO4 y/o Ca3Mg(SiO42], mediante la sinterización reactiva de mezclas de dolomita-circón, empleando para ello una dolomita mexicana que contiene un exceso de 3% en peso de CaCO3. El estudio se basa en la información relativa al equilibrio de fases del sistema CaO – MgO – SiO2 – ZrO2. En concreto se usa la proyección, desde el vértice del MgO, de la superficie de liquidus del volumen de cristalización primaria de este, hacia la cara opuesta de sistema cuaternario. Los materiales refractarios diseñados se han obtenido por molienda de atrición, seguida de un prensado isostático en frío y sinterización reactiva a alta temperatura. Todos los materiales, iniciales y finales, han sido caracterizados mediante ICPAES, FRX, DRX, MEB-EDX, ATD y TG. Los resultados obtenidos indican que la sinterizaci

  15. Adsorption of polar aromatic hydrocarbons on synthetic calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Grøn, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The wettability of hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. A model system of synthetic call cite, cyclohexane and the three probe molecules: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine, have been...... of magnitude of Delta G degrees for the adsorption process implies the formation of a strong bond between the calcite surface and the adsorbate molecules. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  16. Hydrothermal dolomitization of basinal deposits controlled by a synsedimentary fault system in Triassic extensional setting, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hips, Kinga; Haas, János; Győri, Orsolya

    2016-06-01

    Dolomitization of relatively thick carbonate successions occurs via an effective fluid circulation mechanism, since the replacement process requires a large amount of Mg-rich fluid interacting with the CaCO3 precursor. In the western end of the Neotethys, fault-controlled extensional basins developed during the Late Triassic spreading stage. In the Buda Hills and Danube-East blocks, distinct parts of silica and organic matter-rich slope and basinal deposits are dolomitized. Petrographic, geochemical, and fluid inclusion data distinguished two dolomite types: (1) finely to medium crystalline and (2) medium to coarsely crystalline. They commonly co-occur and show a gradual transition. Both exhibit breccia fabric under microscope. Dolomite texture reveals that the breccia fabric is not inherited from the precursor carbonates but was formed during the dolomitization process and under the influence of repeated seismic shocks. Dolomitization within the slope and basinal succession as well as within the breccia zones of the underlying basement block is interpreted as being related to fluid originated from the detachment zone and channelled along synsedimentary normal faults. The proposed conceptual model of dolomitization suggests that pervasive dolomitization occurred not only within and near the fault zones. Permeable beds have channelled the fluid towards the basin centre where the fluid was capable of partial dolomitization. The fluid inclusion data, compared with vitrinite reflectance and maturation data of organic matter, suggest that the ascending fluid was likely hydrothermal which cooled down via mixing with marine-derived pore fluid. Thermal gradient is considered as a potential driving force for fluid flow.

  17. Ecological indices of manufacture of Portland cement clinker and production of the dolomite clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnichenko Varvara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the production of dolomite clinker in comparison with that of Portland cement is environmentally appropriate. When calcining dolomite for cementitious binder, the pollution of the atmosphere by carbon dioxide is reduced due to its isolation during decarbonization reactions of calcium carbonates. Reducing fuel consumption for clinker burning provides less carbon dioxide emissions from combustion products. Reducing the firing temperature creates obstacles to the formation of nitrogen oxides. The production of binders from dolomite in comparison with the production of Portland cement helps to protect the environment from contamination

  18. Calcites from Ocean Crust Basalts: Reliable Proxy Archives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Florian; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Calcite cements in ocean crust basalts of the deep sea form from mixtures of cold seawater and warm hydrothermal fluids (about 0-70°C). These low temperature alteration (LTA) calcites have recently gained new interest as proxy recorders of seawater composition (Refs. 1-5). Recent LTA calcite reconstructions of the Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca evolution in ocean waters point to considerably lower Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios during the Cretaceous and Paleogene than in the modern ocean. However, diagenetic alteration in contact with the basalt host rock may change the composition of the LTA calcites. For testing the reliability of LTA calcite records of seawater composition multi-proxy approaches are applied: oxygen isotopes indicate precipitation temperatures, strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) and trace elements indicate influences from hydrothermal fluids. Additional information about the influence of basement rocks on LTA calcite composition can be derived from analyses of stable calcium and strontium isotopes (44/40Ca, 88/86Sr). We find low 44/40Ca values for DSDP and ODP sites where the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of LTA calcites indicate basement influence. On the other hand, for some sites the 87Sr/86Sr values inidicate precipitation from pristine seawater, while low 44/40Ca values indicate basement influence. All of these sites are either older than 50 Myr or show calcite precipitation temperatures >50°C. Sites that are younger than 25 Myr and had formation temperatures 50°C significantly higher 88/86Sr values were observed. The calcium isotope results indicate basement influence on LTA calcite composition at temperatures >10°C. Radiogenic strontium isotopes, in contrast, can be used as unequivocal basement influence indicators only at temperatures above 30°C. Below about 20°C 87Sr/86Sr ratios are no reliable indicators of basement influence. All LTA calcites of sites older than 50 Myr formed (or recrystallized) at temperatures >15°C. Low 44/40Ca values indicate that

  19. Dolomitization in the diagenetic history of the Štramberg limestones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lintnerová, O.; Knietl, M.; Reháková, D.; Skupien, P.; Vašíček, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 3/1 (2008), s. 191-192 ISSN 0138-0974 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Štramberk Limestone * dolomitization * dedolomitization Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  20. Using enteric pathogens to assess sources of fecal contamination in the Silurian Dolomite Aquifer: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Maureen A; Borchardt, Mark A.; Spencer, Susan K.; Hunt, Randall J.; Owens, David

    2018-01-01

    The fractured Silurian dolomite aquifer is an important, but vulnerable, source of drinking water in northeast Wisconsin (Sherrill in Geology and ground water in Door County, Wisconsin, with emphasis on contamination potential in the Silurian dolomite, 1978; Bradbury and Muldoon in Hydrogeology and groundwater monitoring of fractured dolomite in the Upper Door Priority Watershed, Door County, Wisconsin, 1992; Muldoon and Bradbury in Assessing seasonal variations in recharge and water quality in the Silurian aquifer in areas with thicker soil cover. p 45, 2010). Areas underlain by the Silurian dolomite aquifer are extremely vulnerable to groundwater contamination from various land-use activities, especially the disposal of human wastewater and dairy manure. Currently there is no consensus as to which source of wastewater generates the greater impact to the aquifer.

  1. Role of Fungi in the Biomineralization of Calcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Bindschedler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the field of microbial biomineralization, much of the scientific attention is focused on processes carried out by prokaryotes, in particular bacteria, even though fungi are also known to be involved in biogeochemical cycles in numerous ways. They are traditionally recognized as key players in organic matter recycling, as nutrient suppliers via mineral weathering, as well as large producers of organic acids such as oxalic acid for instance, an activity leading to the genesis of various metal complexes such as metal-oxalate. Their implications in the transformation of various mineral and metallic compounds has been widely acknowledged during the last decade, however, currently, their contribution to the genesis of a common biomineral, calcite, needs to be more thoroughly documented. Calcite is observed in many ecosystems and plays an essential role in the biogeochemical cycles of both carbon (C and calcium (Ca. It may be physicochemical or biogenic in origin and numerous organisms have been recognized to control or induce its biomineralization. While fungi have often been suspected of being involved in this process in terrestrial environments, only scarce information supports this hypothesis in natural settings. As a result, calcite biomineralization by microbes is still largely attributed to bacteria at present. However, in some terrestrial environments there are particular calcitic habits that have been described as being fungal in origin. In addition to this, several studies dealing with axenic cultures of fungi have demonstrated the ability of fungi to produce calcite. Examples of fungal biomineralization range from induced to organomineralization processes. More examples of calcite biomineralization related to direct fungal activity, or at least to their presence, have been described within the last decade. However, the peculiar mechanisms leading to calcite biomineralization by fungi remain incompletely understood and more research is

  2. Influence of water on clumped-isotope bond reordering kinetics in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Dana C.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Stolper, Daniel A.

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen self-diffusion in calcite and many other minerals is considerably faster under wet conditions relative to dry conditions. Here we investigate whether this "water effect" also holds true for solid-state isotope exchange reactions that alter the abundance of carbonate groups with multiple rare isotopes ('clumped' isotope groups) via the process of solid-state bond reordering. We present clumped-isotope reordering rates for optical calcite heated under wet, high-pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only modest increases in reordering rates under such conditions compared with rates for the same material reacted in dry CO2 under low-pressure conditions. Activation energies under wet, high-pressure conditions are indistinguishable from those for dry, low-pressure conditions, while rate constants are resolvably higher (up to ∼3 times) for wet, high-pressure relative to dry, low-pressure conditions in most of our interpretations of experimental results. This contrasts with the water effect for oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, which is associated with lower activation energies, and diffusion coefficients that are ≥103 times higher compared with dry (pure CO2) conditions in the temperature range of this study (385-450 °C). The water effect for clumped-isotopes leads to calculated apparent equilibrium temperatures ("blocking temperatures") for typical geological cooling rates that are only a few degrees higher than those for dry conditions, while O self-diffusion blocking temperatures in calcite grains are ∼150-200 °C lower in wet conditions compared with dry conditions. Since clumped-isotope reordering is a distributed process that occurs throughout the mineral volume, our clumped-isotope results support the suggestion of Labotka et al. (2011) that the water effect in calcite does not involve major changes in bulk (volume) diffusivity, but rather is primarily a surface phenomenon that facilitates oxygen exchange between the calcite surface and external

  3. PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL IN A VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLAND USING DOLOMITE POWDER AND CHIPPINGS AS FILTER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gražina Žibienė

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different kinds of natural and artificial filter media are able to retain phosphorus in the constructed wetlands. Due to the fact that the constructed wetland needs huge amounts of the filter media, it is very important to find locally available material which distinguishes itself by its ability to retain phosphorus. The materials found in Lithuania were considered and dolomite was chosen. Two dolomite fractions, dolomite powder (1–2 mm and dolomite chippings (2–5 mm, and sand media were used in the laboratory- scale installed for the comparative experiments. The laboratory-scale with dolomite as the filter media was on average by 21% more efficient in total phosphorus removal in comparison with the sand media. Based on the laboratory research pilot–scale vertical flow constructed wetland of 160 m2 was installed and planted with reed Phragmites australis. The dolomite chippings as filter media were chosen in order to avoid the danger of the clogging of constructed wetland. Efficiency of total phosphorus removal in the pilot-scale vertical flow constructed wetland was on average 95.7%, phosphates removal – 94.8% within one year.

  4. Mud cracks and dedolomitization in the Wittenoom Dolomite, Hamersley Group, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J.S.; Schreiber, J.F.; Sonett, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    Several impure dolomitic limestone beds in an outcrop of the latest Archean Wittenoom Dolomite (Hamersley Group, Western Australia) are polygonally cracked. The cracks appear to be sub-aerial desiccation features, suggesting that the known area of shallow water and locally emergent conditions extended from the far eastern part of the basin (the Carawine Dolomite) over 270 km farther west. This finding places shallow- water or emergent conditions either (1) near the middle of what Trendall (1983) defined as the probable original limits of the Hamersley Basin (Trendall's 'Pilbara Egg') or (2) near the southern edge of what Morris (1993) thought to be a broad carbonate platform which fed a deeper water sequence to the south. In any case, the Hamersley Basin in the area of Bee Gorge and eastward to the Carawine Dolomite may have been a carbonate mudflat in part with restricted circulation of sea water. The Carawine Dolomite and the Wittenoom Dolomite near Bee Gorge may have been affected by carbonate buildups along a shelf edge. Regardless of whether shallow water was widespread or local in the Hamersley basin, shallow water verging on emergence is supported by evidence of diagenetic dedolomitization under conditions of low atmospheric and hydrospheric P(O2) and precipitation of strontianite in the mud-cracked sample. Evidence of shallow water at Bee Gorge is consistent with Trendall's broad evaporite-basin model and with Morris' barred-platform model for the origin of Hamersley carbonates and banded iron-formations.

  5. Performance of different dolomites on hot raw gas cleaning from biomass gasification with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orio, A.; Corella, J.; Narvaez, I. [Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-09-01

    Calcined dolomites (CaO-MgO) from four different quarries have been tested for the upgrading of the hot raw gas from a fluidized bed gasifier of biomass with air. These calcined dolomites have big macropores (900--4,000 {angstrom}) and low (3.8--12 m{sup 2}/g) BET surface areas. They have been tested in a fixed bed of 6 cm i.d. downstream from the air-blown biomass gasifier. The change in gas composition (contents in H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, {hor_ellipsis}), tar content, gas heating value, etc., has been studied in different temperatures (780--920 C) as well as space-times for the gas in the bed (0.03--0.10 kg{center_dot}h/m{sup 3}) and the type of dolomite. Increasing the equivalence ratio used in the gasifier and decreasing the H/C ratio of the gas increases the refractoriness of the tars to be eliminated by the calcined dolomite. Activation energies (100 {+-} 20 kJ/mol) and preexponential factors for the overall tar elimination reaction have been calculated for the different dolomites under realistic conditions. The activity of the dolomite for tar elimination can increase by 20% on increasing its pore diameter or its Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. Comparison of results with similar ones obtained in biomass gasification with steam is also presented.

  6. Biomass gasification: Produced gas upgrading by in-bed use of dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares, A.; Aznar, M.P.; Caballero, M.A.; Gil, J.; Frances, E. [Univ. of Saragossa (Spain). Chemical and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Corella, J. [Univ. Complutense of Madrid (Spain). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01

    When some calcined dolomite (OCa{center_dot}OMg) is used in the bed of a biomass gasifier of fluidized bed type the raw gas produced is cleaner than when only silica sand is used in it as fluidizing medium. In-bed dolomite changes the product distribution at the gasifier exit because of in-situ catalytic reactions promoted by the calcined dolomite. Gasifying with steam-O{sub 2} mixtures causes the tar content in the exit gas to decrease from 12 to 2--3 g tar/m{sup 3}{sub n}, the H{sub 2} content to increase from 25--28 to 43 vol%, and the CO content to decrease from 45 to 27 vol% when the gas and char yields, heating value of the gas, and other main variables also undergo important changes because of the in-bed dolomite. The experimental work here reported is carried out at small pilot plant scale in a 15 cm i.d. atmospheric and bubbling fluidized bed gasifier fed by 10 kg biomass/h. Dolomite is continuously fed to the gasifier, mixed with the biomass in percentages of 2--3 wt% of the total mass flow fed. A 10 wt% of calcined dolomite in the gasifier bed is enough to significantly improve the product distribution and gas quality.

  7. Hydrochemical controls on aragonite versus calcite precipitation in cave dripwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carlos; Lozano, Rafael P.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the paleoclimatic relevance of primary calcite to aragonite transitions in stalagmites, the relative role of fluid Mg/Ca ratio, supersaturation and CO32- concentration in controlling such transitions is still incompletely understood. Accordingly, we have monitored the hydrochemistry of 50 drips and 8 pools that are currently precipitating calcite and/or aragonite in El Soplao and Torca Ancha Caves (N. Spain), investigating the mineralogy and geochemistry of the CaCO3 precipitates on the corresponding natural speleothem surfaces. The data reveal that, apart from possible substrate effects, dripwater Mg/Ca is the only obvious control on CaCO3 polymorphism in the studied stalagmites and pools, where calcite- and aragonite-precipitating dripwaters are separated by an initial (i.e. at stalactite tips) Mg/Ca threshold at ≈1.1 mol/mol. Within the analyzed ranges of pH (8.2-8.6), CO32- concentration (1-6 mg/L), supersaturation (SIaragonite: 0.08-1.08; SIcalcite: 0.23-1.24), drip rate (0.2-81 drops/min) and dissolved Zn (6-90 μg/L), we observe no unequivocal influence of these parameters on CaCO3 mineralogy. Despite the almost complete overlapping supersaturations of calcite- and aragonite-precipitating waters, the latter are on average less supersaturated because the waters having Mg/Ca above ∼1.1 have mostly achieved such high ratios by previously precipitating calcite. Both calcite and aragonite precipitated at or near oxygen isotopic equilibrium, and Mg incorporation into calcite was consistent with literature-based predictions, indicating that in the studied cases CaCO3 precipitation was not significantly influenced by strong kinetic effects. In the studied cases, the calcites that precipitate at ∼11 °C from dripwaters with initial Mg/Ca approaching ∼1.1 incorporate ∼5 mol% MgCO3, close to the published value above which calcite solubility exceeds aragonite solubility, suggesting that aragonite precipitation in high-relative-humidity caves is

  8. Cyclic calcination/carbonation looping of dolomite modified with acetic acid for CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying-jie; Zhao, Chang-sui; Duan, Lun-bo; Liang, Cai; Li, Qing-zhao; Zhou, Wu; Chen, Hui-chao [Key Laboratory of Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The dolomite modified with acetic acid solution was proposed as a CO{sub 2} sorbent for calcination/carbonation cycles. The carbonation conversions for modified and original dolomites in a twin fixed-bed reactor system with increasing the numbers of cycles were investigated. The carbonation temperature in the range of 630 C-700 C is beneficial to the carbonation reaction of modified dolomite. The carbonation conversion for modified dolomite is significantly higher than that for original sorbent at the same reaction conditions with increasing numbers of reaction cycles. The modified dolomite exhibits a carbonation conversion of 0.6 after 20 cycles, while the unmodified sorbent shows a conversion of 0.26 at the same reaction conditions, which is calcined at 920 C and carbonated at 650 C. At the high calcination temperature over 920 C modified dolomite can maintain much higher conversion than unmodified sorbent. The mean grain size of CaO derived from modified dolomite is smaller than that from original sorbent with increasing numbers of reaction cycles. The calcined modified dolomite possesses greater surface area and pore volume than calcined original sorbent during the multiple cycles. The pore volume and pore area distributions for calcined modified dolomite are also superior to those for calcined unmodified sorbent during the looping cycle. The modified dolomite is proved as a new and promising type of regenerable CO{sub 2} sorbent for industrial applications. (author)

  9. Surface tension alteration on calcite, induced by ion substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi; Andersson, Martin Peter; Bechgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of water and organic molecules with mineral surfaces controls many processes in nature and industry. The thermodynamic property, surface tension, is usually determined from the contact angle between phases, but how does one understand the concept of surface tension at the nanoscale...... preferentially as ion pairs at solution-calcite interfaces. Mg2+ incorporation weakens organic molecule adhesion while strengthening water adsorption so Mg2+ substitution renders calcite more water wet. When Mg2+ replaces 10% of surface Ca2+, the contact angle changes dramatically, by 40 to 70, converting...

  10. Diagenetic alteration in low-Mg calcite from macrofossils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Korte, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    microscopy) and chemical (trace element abundances, isotopic ratios) screening techniques used to assess the alteration degree of low-Mg calcite macrofossils and summarize the findings on diagenetic trends observed for elemental and isotopic systems in such materials. For a robust evaluation...... of the preservation state of biogenic calcite, it is advisable to combine a set of complementary techniques. Absolute limiting values of element and isotope ratios for discarding diagenetically altered materials cannot be universally applied, but should rather be evaluated on a case to case basis. The evaluation can...

  11. Geochemical study of calcite veins in the Silurian and Devonian of the Barrandian Basin (Czech Republic): evidence for widespread post-Variscan fluid flow in the central part of the Bohemian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchy, V.; Heijlen, W.; Sykorova, I.; Muchez, Ph; Dobes, P.; Hladikova, J.; Jackova, I.; Safanda, J.; Zeman, A.

    2000-03-01

    Carbonate fracture cements in limestones have been investigated by fluid inclusion and stable isotope analysis to provide insight into fluid evolution and deformation conditions of the Barrandian Basin (Silurian-Devonian) of the Czech Republic. The fractures strike generally north-south and appear to postdate major Variscan deformation. The most common fracture cement is calcite that is locally accompanied by quartz, natural bitumen, dolomite, Mn-oxides and fluorite. Three successive generations of fracture-filling calcite cements are distinguished based on their petrographical and geochemical characteristics. The oldest calcite cements (Stage 1) are moderate to dull brown cathodoluminescent, Fe-rich and exhibit intense cleavage, subgrain development and other features characteristic of tectonic deformation. Less tectonically deformed, variable luminescent Fe-poor calcite corresponds to a paragenetically younger Stage 2 cement. First melting temperatures, Te, of two-phase aqueous inclusions in Stages 1 and 2 calcites are often around -20°C, suggesting that precipitation of the cements occurred from H 2O-NaCl fluids. The melting temperature, Tm, has values between 0 and -5.8°C, corresponding to a low salinity between 0 and 8.9 eq. wt% NaCl. Homogenization temperatures, Th, from calcite cements are interpreted to indicate precipitation at about 70°C or less. No distinction could be made between the calcite of Stages 1 and 2 based on their fluid inclusion characteristics. In some Stage 2 cements, inclusions of highly saline (up to 23 eq. wt% NaCl) brines appear to coexist with low-salinity inclusions. The low salinity fluid possibly contains Na-, K-, Mg- and Ca-chlorides. The high salinity fluid has a H 2O-NaCl-CaCl 2 composition. Blue-to-yellow-green fluorescing hydrocarbon inclusions composed of medium to higher API gravity oils are also identified in some Stages 1 and 2 calcite cements. Stage 1 and 2 calcites have δ18O values between -13.2‰ and -7.2‰ PDB

  12. Structures of dolomite at ultrahigh pressure and their influence on the deep carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Marco; Crichton, Wilson A; Hanfland, Michael; Gemmi, Mauro; Müller, Harald; Kupenko, Ilya; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-08-21

    Carbon-bearing solids, fluids, and melts in the Earth's deep interior may play an important role in the long-term carbon cycle. Here we apply synchrotron X-ray single crystal micro-diffraction techniques to identify and characterize the high-pressure polymorphs of dolomite. Dolomite-II, observed above 17 GPa, is triclinic, and its structure is topologically related to CaCO(3)-II. It transforms above 35 GPa to dolomite-III, also triclinic, which features carbon in [3 + 1] coordination at the highest pressures investigated (60 GPa). The structure is therefore representative of an intermediate between the low-pressure carbonates and the predicted ultra-high pressure carbonates, with carbon in tetrahedral coordination. Dolomite-III does not decompose up to the melting point (2,600 K at 43 GPa) and its thermodynamic stability demonstrates that this complex phase can transport carbon to depths of at least up to 1,700 km. Dolomite-III, therefore, is a likely occurring phase in areas containing recycled crustal slabs, which are more oxidized and Ca-enriched than the primitive lower mantle. Indeed, these phases may play an important role as carbon carriers in the whole mantle carbon cycling. As such, they are expected to participate in the fundamental petrological processes which, through carbon-bearing fluids and carbonate melts, will return carbon back to the Earth's surface.

  13. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of phosphate on dolomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, S; Gürses, A; Ejder, M; Açikyildiz, M

    2004-09-15

    The adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution on dolomite was investigated at 20 and 40 degrees C in terms of pseudo-second-order mechanism for chemical adsorption as well as an intraparticle diffusion mechanism process. Adsorption was changed with increased contact time, initial phosphate concentration, temperature, solution pH. A pseudo-second-order model and intraparticle diffusion model have been developed to predict the rate constants of adsorption and equilibrium capacities. The activation energy of adsorption can be evaluated using the pseudo-second-order rate constants. The adsorption of phosphate onto dolomite are an exothermically activated process. A relatively low activation energy and a model highly fitting to intraparticle diffusion suggest that the adsorption of phosphate by dolomite may involve not only physical but also chemisorption. This was likely due to its combined control of chemisorption and intraparticle diffusion. However, for phosphate/dolomite system chemical reaction is important and significant in the rate-controlling step, and for the adsorption of phosphate onto dolomite the pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provides the best correlation of the experimental data.

  14. Copper incorporation in foraminiferal calcite: results from culturing experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooijer, L.J. de; Reichart, G.-J.; Dueñas Bohórquez, A.D.B.; Wolthers, M.; Ernst, S.R.; Mason, P.R.D.; Zwaan, G.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A partition coefficient for copper (DCu) in foraminiferal calcite has been determined by culturing individuals of two benthic species under controlled laboratory conditions. The partition coefficient of a trace element (TE) is an emperically determined relation between the TE/Ca ratio in seawater

  15. Molecular ordering of ethanol at the calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasarín, I. S.; Yang, M.; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2012-01-01

    for constructing accurate predictive models for natural systems. Previous investigations of the activity of coccolith-associated polysaccharides (CAP) on calcite, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [ Henriksen, K., Young, J. R., Bown, P. R., and Stipp, S. L. S.Palentology 2004, 43 (Part 3), 725...

  16. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas azotoformans for induced calcite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Nonakaran, Siamak; Pazhouhandeh, Maghsoud; Keyvani, Abdullah; Abdollahipour, Fatemeh Zahra; Shirzad, Akbar

    2015-12-01

    Biomineralization is a process by which living organisms produce minerals. The extracellular production of these biominerals by microbes has potential for various bioengineering applications. For example, crack remediation and improvement of durability of concrete is an important goal for engineers and biomineral-producing microbes could be a useful tool in achieving this goal. Here we report the isolation, biochemical characterization and molecular identification of Pseudomonas azotoformans, a microbe that produces calcite and which potentially be used to repair cracks in concrete structures. Initially, 38 bacterial isolates were isolated from soil and cements. As a first test, the isolates were screened using a urease assay followed by biochemical tests for the rate of urea hydrolysis, calcite production and the insolubility of calcite. Molecular amplification and sequencing of a 16S rRNA fragment of selected isolates permitted us to identify P. azotoformans as a good candidate for preparation of biotechnological concrete. This species was isolated from soil and the results show that among the tested isolates it had the highest rate of urea hydrolysis, produced the highest amount of calcite, which, furthermore was the most adhesive and insoluble. This species is thus of interest as an agent with the potential ability to repair cracks in concrete.

  17. Radiation-induced paramagnetic species in natural calcite speleothems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, A.M.; Poupeau, G.

    1989-01-01

    The ESR natural spectrum of humic-free speleothem calcite single crytals in the region of g = 2.0000 is a composite of lines from 4 radiogenic species, in addition to Mn ++ lines. Laboratory irradiation causes appearrance of three more species. Use of isotropic F species (g = 2.0003) for dating is possible if specific cautions are followed. (author) [pt

  18. Removal of trace elements from landfill leachate by calcite precipitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ettler, V.; Zelená, O.; Mihaljevič, M.; Šebek, O.; Strnad, L.; Coufal, P.; Bezdička, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 88, 1-3 (2006), s. 28-31 ISSN 0375-6742 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB3111402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : landfill leachate * calcite * scavenging Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.922, year: 2006

  19. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrandt, S E; Hofmann, S; Jordan, N; Barkleit, A; Schmidt, M

    2016-09-13

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu(3+) occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na(+). These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site.

  20. Multi-proxy geochemical evidence for primary aragonite precipitation in a tropical-shelf 'calcite sea' during the Hirnantian glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, Sara R.; Holmden, Chris

    2017-06-01

    A positive excursion in sedimentary δ26Mg values (2-3‰) is recorded in a mud dominated carbonate succession spanning the Hirnantian glaciation event in a tropical-shelf sea in Nevada. The increase is coincident with lithofacies and biofacies indicators of sea-level change, and previously reported changes in sedimentary δ13C and δ44/40Ca values in the same section. The synchronousness of the isotopic changes is inconsistent with differences in the oceanic residence times of Mg (13 Myr), Ca (0.5-1 Myr), and C (0.1 Myr), indicating that the isotopic trends cannot be attributed to perturbations in the oceanic cycling of these elements. Instead, a mixing analysis (δ26Mg vs. Ca/Mg) reveals that the stratigraphic shift in sedimentary δ26Mg values is an artifact of changing dolomite abundance in the carbonate succession, which increases by an average of ∼12 mol% during the glaciation. The mixing analysis also uncovers stratigraphic changes in end-member limestone δ26Mg values that are tentatively attributed to variations in aragonite abundance. The aragonite, which inverted to calcite during diagenesis, accumulated during the glacio-eustatically controlled sea-level lowstand in the study setting. Although this interpretation is vulnerable to diagenetic effects that are difficult to evaluate, it is strengthened by shifts to lower δ44/40Ca values and higher δ13C values in the same section. Experiments show that aragonite can precipitate in seawater with the chemistry of a 'calcite sea' at temperatures above 20-23 °C. Considering the warm climates of the early Paleozoic, temperatures above this range were likely common in low latitudes. This study shows that the isotopes of Mg, Ca, and C have the potential to fingerprint aragonite that has inverted to calcite in the rock record. It is important recognize carbonate successions where this has occurred so as to avoid misinterpreting facies-dependent changes in carbonate polymorph mineralogy as genuine records of

  1. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E.; Brown, G.O.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with 3 H, 22 Na, 241 Am, 239 Np, 228 Th, 232 U and 241 Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The 3 H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics

  2. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  3. Ion beam modifications of defect sub-structure of calcite cleavages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , brought about by He+ ion-bombardment of calcite cleavages (100), have been carried out. Optical and scanning ... stimulation. Planar plastic anisotropy has been studied on irradiated calcite cleavages by measurement of microhardness.

  4. Simulated oxygen isotopes in cave drip water and speleothem calcite in European caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wackerbarth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting stable oxygen isotope (δ18O records from stalagmites is still one of the complex tasks in speleothem research. Here, we present a novel model-based approach, where we force a model describing the processes and modifications of δ18O from rain water to speleothem calcite (Oxygen isotope Drip water and Stalagmite Model – ODSM with the results of a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model enhanced by explicit isotope diagnostics (ECHAM5-wiso. The approach is neither climate nor cave-specific and allows an integrated assessment of the influence of different varying climate variables, e.g. temperature and precipitation amount, on the isotopic composition of drip water and speleothem calcite.

    First, we apply and evaluate this new approach under present-day climate conditions using observational data from seven caves from different geographical regions in Europe. Each of these caves provides measured δ18O values of drip water and speleothem calcite to which we compare our simulated isotope values. For six of the seven caves modeled δ18O values of drip water and speleothem calcite are in good agreement with observed values. The mismatch of the remaining caves might be caused by the complexity of the cave system, beyond the parameterizations included in our cave model.

    We then examine the response of the cave system to mid-Holocene (6000 yr before present, 6 ka climate conditions by forcing the ODSM with ECHAM5-wiso results from 6 ka simulations. For a set of twelve European caves, we compare the modeled mid-Holocene-to-modern difference in speleothem calcite δ18O to available measurements. We show that the general European changes are simulated well. However, local discrepancies are found, and might be explained either by a too low model resolution, complex local soil-atmosphere interactions affecting evapotranspiration or by cave specific factors

  5. Experimental study of the replacement of calcite by calcium sulphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Hövelmann, J.; Álvarez-Lloret, P.; Ibáñez-Velasco, A.; Putnis, A.

    2015-05-01

    Among the most relevant mineral replacement reactions are those involving sulphates and carbonates, which have important geological and technological implications. Here it is shown experimentally that during the interaction of calcite (CaCO3) cleavage surfaces with sulphate-bearing acidic solutions, calcite is ultimately replaced by gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4), depending on the reaction temperature. Observations suggest that this occurs most likely via an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction, in which the substrate is replaced pseudomorphically by the product. At 120 and 200 °C gypsum and/or bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O) form as precursor phases for the thermodynamically stable anhydrite. Salinity promotes the formation of less hydrated precursor phases during the replacement of calcite by anhydrite. The reaction stops before equilibrium with respect to calcite is reached and during the course of the reaction most of the bulk solutions are undersaturated with respect to the precipitating phase(s). A mechanism consisting of the dissolution of small amounts of solid in a thin layer of fluid at the mineral-fluid interface and the subsequent precipitation of the product phase from this layer is in agreement with these observations. PHREEQC simulations performed in the framework of this mechanism highlight the relevance of transport and surface reaction kinetics on the volume change associated with the CaCO3-CaSO4 replacement. Under our experimental conditions, this reaction occurs with a positive volume change, which ultimately results in passivation of the unreacted substrate before calcite attains equilibrium with respect to the bulk solution.

  6. Seawater-softening process through formation of calcite ooids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Bakr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional water-softening processes usually involve the exchange of Na+ ions for Ca2+ and Mg2+ using commercial or synthesized ion exchangers. The differences in chemical compositions of the ooids can be attributed to the formation in different environments. In this paper, ooid grains form inside assembled semi-pilot softening unit through a continuous chemical process involving reaction between bicarbonate ions and added lime using natural seawater. Our sample of Mediterranean seawater has low Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio (1.98% within the range chemically favorable for precipitation of low-Mg calcite ooids. Precipitation of calcite occurs around pure quartz sand grains which act as nucleation points (the bed required for sand vessel is 1.65 l. The shape of the sand grains controls the overall external morphology of the resulting ooids; they vary in size from 0.5 to 3.0 mm and have a high degree of polish due to surface abrasion caused by continuous agitation inside the softening system. Calcite ooid grains (1.53 kg formed within the seawater-softening unit every 18 days have many of the ooid features formed in marine environments. Ooids grow to a significant size, at a rate of about 0.17 mm of one layer thickness per day inside the softening unit. The average weight percent of calcite precipitate is 35.48% after 18 days, at 10 °C, 60 l/min and pH 9.0. The pellets comprise mainly CaCO3 and SiO2 and some metal ions which may substitute for calcium ions in calcite are present only in trace amounts of the total composition.

  7. Molecular ordering of ethanol at the calcite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasarín, I S; Yang, M; Bovet, N; Glyvradal, M; Nielsen, M M; Bohr, J; Feidenhans'l, R; Stipp, S L S

    2012-02-07

    To produce biominerals, such as shells, bones, and teeth, living beings create organic compounds that control the growth of the solid phase. Investigating the atomic scale behavior of individual functional groups at the mineral-fluid interface provides fundamental information that is useful for constructing accurate predictive models for natural systems. Previous investigations of the activity of coccolith-associated polysaccharides (CAP) on calcite, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [Henriksen, K., Young, J. R., Bown, P. R., and Stipp, S. L. S. Palentology 2004, 43 (Part 3), 725-743] and molecular dynamics (MD) modeling [Yang, M., Stipp, S. L. S., and Harding, J. H. Cryst. Growth Des. 2008, 8 (11), 4066-4074], have suggested that OH functional groups control polysaccharide attachment. The purpose of this work was to characterize, using X-ray reflectivity (XR) combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the structuring on calcite of a layer of the simplest carbon chain molecule that contains an OH group, ethanol (CH(3)-CH(2)-OH). We found evidence that EtOH forms a highly ordered structure at the calcite surface, where the first layer molecules bond with calcite. The ethanol molecules stand up perpendicularly at the interface or nearly so. As a consequence, the fatty, CH(3) ends form a new surface, about 6 Å from the termination of the bulk calcite, and beyond that, there is a thin gap where ethanol density is low. Following is a more disordered layer that is two to three ethanol molecules thick, about 14 Å, where density more resembles that of bulk liquid ethanol. The good agreement between theory and experiment gives confidence that a theoretical approach can offer information about behavior in more complex systems.

  8. Optimization Study in Biodiesel Production via Response Surface Methodology Using Dolomite as a Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina C. R. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbonate mineral, dolomite, was used as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce methyl-esters from soybean oil. The samples were analyzed by XRF, TGA, XRD, TPD-CO2, and SEM. The calcination of dolomite at 800°C/1 h resulted in a highly active mixed metal oxides. In addition, the influence of the reaction variables such as the temperature, catalyst amount, and methanol/soybean oil molar ratio in methyl-ester production was optimized by the application of a central composite design in conjunction with the response surface methodology (RSM. The XRF analysis is carried out after the reuses procedure which shows that the deactivation process is mainly due to the selective calcium leaching. Overall, the calcined dolomite exhibited high catalytic activity at moderate operating conditions for biodiesel production.

  9. Onset of Crack Initiation in Uniaxial and Triaxial Compression Tests of Dolomite Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieślik Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of laboratory investigation and analysis of crack initiation threshold identification of dolomite samples. First, selected methods for determining crack initiation thresholds are briefly described with special attention paid to four methods: crack volume strain method [14], change in Poisson’s ratio [8], lateral strain response method [16], and dilatancy method [4]. The investigation performed on dolomite samples shows that for the uniaxial and conventional triaxial compression tests, the above mentioned methods give quite similar values, except for the crack volume strain method. Crack initiation threshold determined by this method has a distinctively lower value than that obtained by the other methods. The aim of the present paper was to review and assess these methods for identifying crack initiation threshold based on laboratory tests of dolomite samples.

  10. A role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water: acceleration of the reaction under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroyasu; Tsujino, Hidekazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Saito, Hiroshi; Kawase, Masaya

    2014-04-01

    Organic environmental pollutants are now being detected with remarkably high frequency in the aquatic environment. Photodegradation by ultraviolet light is sometimes used as a method for removing organic chemicals from water; however, this method is relatively inefficient because of the low degradation rates involved, and more efficient methods are under development. Here we show that the removal of various organic pollutants can be assisted by calcined dolomite in aqueous solution under irradiation with ultraviolet light. It was possible to achieve substantial removal of bisphenol A, chlorophenols, alkylphenols, 1-naphthol and 17β-estradiol. The major component of dolomite responsible for the removal was calcium hydroxide. Our results demonstrate that the use of calcium hydroxide with ultraviolet light irradiation can be a very effective method of rapidly removing organic environmental pollutants from water. This is a new role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microcrystalline dolomite within massive Japan Sea methane hydrate: origin and development ascertained by inclusions within inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G. T.; Kakizaki, Y.; Matsumoto, R.; Suzuki, Y.; Takahata, N.; Sano, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, H.; Imajo, T.; Iguchi, A.

    2017-12-01

    Microcrystalline dolomite grains were recently discovered as inclusions within relatively pure massive gas hydrate recovered from the Joetsu Basin area of the Japan Sea. These grains presumably formed as a consequence of the highly saline conditions in fluid inclusions which developed between coalescing grain boundaries within the growing hydrate. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the dolomite is consistent with crystal growth occurring within such fluids. In addition to stable isotopes, we investigate trends in Mg/Ca ratios of the grains as well as the composition of inclusions which exist within the dolomites. Preliminary research shows that these inclusions retain valuable information as to the conditions which existed at the time of formation, as well as the dynamics of these extensive hydrate deposits over time. This study was conducted under the commission from AIST as a part of the methane hydrate research project funded by METI (the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan).

  12. Effect of Mica and Hematite (001) Surfaces on the Precipitation of Calcite

    OpenAIRE

    Huifang Xu; Mo Zhou; Yihang Fang; H. Henry Teng

    2018-01-01

    The substrate effect of mica and hematite on the nucleation and crystallization of calcite was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) methods. On mica, we found, in the absence of Mg2+, the substrates’ (001) surfaces with hexagonal and pseudo-hexagonal two-dimensional (2-D) structure can affect the orientation of calcite nucleation with calcite (001) ~// mica (001) and calcite (010) ~// mica (010) to be the m...

  13. Structural incorporation of Neptunyl(V) into Calcite: Interfacial Reactions and Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heberling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental work the calcite-water interface is characterized by means of zetapotential and surface diffraction measurements. Based on the experimental results a new Basic Stern Surface Complexation model for calcite is developed. Neptunyl(V) adsorption at the calcite surface and incorporation into the calcite structure is studied by batch type adsorption- and mixed flow reactor experiments. Adsorption and incorporation species of Neptunyl are investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy.

  14. Sorption and catalytic oxidation of Fe(II) at the surface of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettler, S.; Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Von Gunten, U.

    The effect of sorption and coprecipitation of Fe(II) with calcite on the kinetics of Fe(II) oxidation was investigated. The interaction of Fe(II) with calcite was studied experimentally in the absence and presence of oxygen. The sorption of Fe(II) on calcite occurred in two distinguishable steps:

  15. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.; Molenaar, Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    . The burial history modelling points to development of most of the dolomite cement during rapid Silurian-Devonian subsidence and Carboniferous-early Permian uplift. A wide range of precipitation temperatures indicate that temperature was not a major factor in triggering the carbonate cementation. Dolomite...... precipitation is related to early stages of organic matter maturation and thus to the oil generation history in the basin. delta C-13 values vary from +0.03% to -6.2%( PDB), suggesting limited addition of carbon from an organic source, with the major part derived from marine bicarbonate. The sourcing of carbon...

  16. Microfossils from cap dolomites of the Lower Vendian Churochnaya Formation in the Polyudov Range (North Urals): Paleoecological approach to interpretation of Late Proterozoic glaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V. N.; Chumakov, N. M.; Semikhatov, M. A.; Vorob'eva, N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Microfossils from silicified varieties of cap dolomites crowning the section of the tillite-bearing Lower Vendian (Ediacaran) Churochnaya Formation in the Polyudov Range (North Urals) are characterized. These microfossils are the first to be found from Vendian sections of the region and from all the terminal post-glacial sediments, one of the most significant global glaciation Marinoan of the African Glacial Era, when glaciers reached the equator. They are represented by remains of hormogonian and chrococcacean cyanobacteria as well as possible green filamentous algae. This microbiotic assemblage is of relatively low diversity, being composed of taxa with wide stratigraphic ranges characteristic of Proterozoic conservative microbiotas developed in shallow-water siliceous-carbonate facies. The lack of phytoplanktonic microfossils in this biota including Pertatataka-type acanthomorphic acritarchs or Ediacaran Complex Acanthomorph Palynoflora (ECAP) is also consistent with the conclusion on shallow-water deposition of the Churochnaya Formation. Moreover, most cyanobacteria representatives occurring in the latter are characteristic of shallow-water arid environments that confirm a theory of significant temperature increase during accumulation of the cap dolomites after termination of the above-mentioned glaciation. In addition to these microfossils, the cap dolomite member of the Churochnaya Formation contains filamentous and coccoidal pseudofossils formed under influence of post-sedimentary fluids. In their morphometric parameters, they resemble structures described from Archean sections as microfossil remains, which may be a key to interpreting their nature.

  17. Spatial variations in the stoichiometry and geochemistry of Miocene dolomite from Grand Cayman: Implications for the origin of island dolostone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min; Jones, Brian

    2017-03-01

    The Cayman Formation (Miocene), 140 m thick on Grand Cayman, is incompletely dolomitized with the most of the dolomite restricted to the peripheral part of the island. These calcium-rich dolomites, with 50-60 mol%CaCO3 (%Ca), are divided into low-calcium dolomite (LCD, %Ca 55%). Despite the small size of the island (6.8 km wide), the percentages of LCD and HCD, the %Ca, and the geochemical properties of the dolomites show geographic variations relative to the surrounding shelf edge. Accordingly, the Cayman Formation on the east end of the island is divided into the peripheral dolostone (shelf edge-1.5 km inland), transitional dolostone (1.5-2.7 km inland), and the interior limestone and dolostone (2.7 km to island center). From the peripheral dolostone to the interior limestone and dolostone, there is an increase in the percentage of HCD and %Ca in the dolomite, and decreases in the δ18O and δ13C values of the dolomite. Interpretations based on the oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions indicate that seawater is the source of Mg for dolomitization. The concentric pattern of dolomitization on the island reflects the fact that seawater flowed into the island from all directions during dolomitization. The lateral inland variations in the dolomite stoichiometric and isotopic properties reflect the gradual modification of seawater by water-rock interaction along the flow path from the shelf edge to the island center. 87Sr/86Sr ratios indicate that two phases of dolomitization (late Miocene-early Pliocene and late Pliocene-early Pleistocene) were responsible for dolomitization of the Cayman Formation. It is very likely that during both phases, the carbonate platform was subaerially exposed and that the pump for circulating the seawater through the island was related to the seawater/freshwater mixing zone. The dolomitization model developed from Grand Cayman may be applicable to many other island dolostones affected by long-term sea-level changes. Given that the

  18. Sorption of phosphate onto calcite; results from batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    of a high degree of super-saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (SIHAP⩽7.83). The amount of phosphate adsorbed varied with the solution composition, in particular, adsorption increases as the CO32- activity decreases (at constant pH) and as pH increases (at constant CO32- activity). The primary effect....... Generally the model captures the variation in phosphate adsorption onto calcite as a function of solution composition, though it was necessary to include two types of sorption sites (strong and weak) in the model to reproduce the convex shape of the sorption isotherms....

  19. Copper incorporation in foraminiferal calcite: results from culturing experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. van der Zwaan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A partition coefficient for copper (DCu in foraminiferal calcite has been determined by culturing individuals of two benthic species under controlled laboratory conditions. The partition coefficient of a trace element (TE is an emperically determined relation between the TE/Ca ratio in seawater and the TE/Ca ratio in foraminiferal calcite and has been established for many divalent cations. Despite its potential to act as a tracer of human-induced, heavy metal pollution, data is not yet available for copper. Since partition coefficients are usually a function of multiple factors (seawater temperature, pH, salinity, metabolic activity of the organism, etc., we chose to analyze calcite from specimens cultured under controlled laboratory conditions. They were subjected to different concentrations of Cu2+ (0.1–20 µmol/l and constant temperature (10 and 20°C, seawater salinity and pH. We monitored the growth of new calcite in specimens of the temperate, shallow-water foraminifer Ammonia tepida and in the tropical, symbiont-bearing Heterostegina depressa. Newly formed chambers were analyzed for Cu/Ca ratios by laser ablation-ICP-MS. The estimated partition coefficient (0.1–0.4 was constant to within experimental error over a large range of (Cu/Caseawater ratios and was remarkably similar for both species. Neither did the presence or absence of symbionts affect the DCu, nor did we find a significant effect of temperature or salinity on Cu-uptake.

  20. Immobilization of nanoparticles by occlusion into microbial calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skuce, Rebecca L.; Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; MacLaren, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Binding of nanoparticles (NPs) to mineral surfaces influences their transport through the environment. The potential, however, for growing minerals to immobilize NPs via occlusion (the process of trapping particles inside the growing mineral) has yet to be explored in environmentally relevant...... not influence calcite precipitation at the concentrations used here. Overall, these findings demonstrate that microbially driven mineral precipitation has potential to immobilize nanoparticles in the environment via occlusion....

  1. Origin of calcite in the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex

    OpenAIRE

    Nina M. Kortelainen; Petri J. Korkeakoski; Juha A. Karhu

    2007-01-01

    Groundwaters of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex in southern Finland are characterized by high pH values ranging up to 9.5. These values are significantly higher than those observed in silicate-rich shallow groundwater formations in crystalline bedrock areas. TheVirttaankangas sediments were discovered to contain small amounts of fine grained, dispersed calcite, which has a high tendency to increase the pH of local groundwaters. The primary goal of this study was to determine the mode of...

  2. Use of coupled passivants and consolidants on calcite mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, K.L.; Cygan, R.T.; Brinker, C.J.; Ashley, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scotto, C.S. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Optical Sciences Div.

    1997-02-01

    Deterioration of monuments, buildings, and works of art constructed of carbonate-based stone potentially can be arrested by applying a combination of chemical passivants and consolidants that prevent hydrolytic attack and mechanical weakening. The authors used molecular modeling and laboratory synthesis to develop an improved passivating agent for the calcite mineral surface based on binding strength and molecular packing density. The effectiveness of the passivating agent with and without a linked outer layer of consolidant against chemical weathering was determined through leaching tests conducted with a pH-stat apparatus at pH 5 and 25 C. For the range of molecules considered, modeling results indicate that the strongest-binding passivant is the trimethoxy dianionic form of silylalkylaminocarboxylate (SAAC). The same form of silylalkylphosphonate (SAP) is the second strongest binder and the trisilanol neutral form of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) is ranked third. Short-term leaching tests on calcite powders coated with the trisilanol derivative of SAAC, the triethoxy neutral form of SAP, and the trimethoxy neutral form of AEAPS show that the passivant alone does not significantly slow the dissolution rate. However, all passivants when linked to the sol consolidant result in decreased rates. Combined AEAPS plus consolidant results in a coating that performs better than the commercial product Conservare{reg_sign} OH and at least as well as Conservare{reg_sign} H. The modeling results indicate that there may be a threshold binding energy for the passivant above which the dissolution rate of calcite is actually enhanced. More strongly-binding passivants may aid in the dissolution mechanism or dissociate in aqueous solution exposing the calcite surface to water.

  3. Elastic properties of anisotropic synthetic calcite-muscovite aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burlini, Luigi; Mainprice, David; Hirt, Ann M.

    2010-08-01

    A set of synthetic aggregates, containing mixtures of calcite and muscovite, were compacted with varying uniaxial loads ranging from 20 MPa up to 400 MPa. Their elastic properties have been measured using compressional and shear waves in confining hydrostatic pressures up to 475 MPa. Measured seismic velocities are shown to depend on 1) the ratio of calcite to muscovite, 2) the uniaxial load used during sample manufacturing, and 3) the porosity amount prior to velocity measurements. The matrix framework may also affect the seismic velocities, but this effect is not easily quantifiable. In general, measured seismic velocities decrease with increasing muscovite content and porosity. Elastic properties have been calculated based on texture measurements, which were obtained by neutron diffraction. The calculated velocities are based on the calcite and muscovite single crystal elastic tensors, their orientation distribution functions, and their modal fractions. A large discrepancy is apparent between calculated and measured velocities, where the former always overestimate the actual velocities. Shear waves display less of a difference between calculated and measured values, than do compressional waves, indicating that waves propagating by shearing are less affected by sample porosity and matrix framework. A better agreement between measured and calculated seismic velocities arises when the initial porosity is taken into account, using a differential effective medium model. Seismic anisotropy is evident from both measured and calculated velocities, and is low for samples containing pure calcite, but becomes prominent as the muscovite concentration increases. The intensity of anisotropy further depends on the uniaxial load used during sample compaction and the initial porosity.

  4. Mineralogical-Chemical Characteristics of Calcite from Zletovo, Sasa and Buchim Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shijakova-lvanova, Tena; Paneva-Zajkova, Vesna; Donova, Ilinka

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents mineralogical-chemical characteristics, dependence between some elements and concentration of some calcite elements of Zletovo, Sasa and Buchim deposits. Calcite from Sasa, Zletovo and Buchim occurs in rhombohedral crystals of different size. The colour is white, but in Buchim it is white, pink, and yellow. Their twinning is very common. Chemical composition of calcite was determined by AES-ICP. Results show that in calcite from Buchim the concentration of Ba is much higher in pink calcite from than in white or yellow. The concentration of Zn and Ph is the lowest in white calcite. The calcite from Zletovo contains much higher concentrations of Pb, Zn, Sr, but calcite of Buchim which is pink contains higher amounts of Ba and Co. The concentrations of CaO, MgO, and MnO in all calcite simples are approximately equal. Concentration of all other elements in calcite of Sasa, Zletovo and Buchim is approximately equal. TG and DTA curves out on all simples were recorded.The decompositions of the samples of calcite starts at different temperature and it is not finish until 1000 o C. (Author)

  5. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  6. The origin of the Gold Creek collapse structure and associated dolomitization, West Central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, K. [Anadarko Petroleum Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The factors that contribute to the seismic anomaly at the Gold Creek Field located in West Central Alberta near the Peace River Arch were described. Wabamun gas is produced from the underlying Cold Creek Leduc NE-SW trending reef which is approximately 10 km by 5 km in size. The Upper Devonian Leduc reef is porous and water saturated, but the overlying Devonian Wabamun Formation is dolomitized and gas bearing. The Gold Creek Field has produced more than 100 Bcf of gas and continues to be productive, with most gas coming from the Wabamun Formation. This paper described the seismic expression of the Gold Creek Field, the Wabamun structure and isopath, and the origin of the Cold Creek Collapse Structure. Mississippian Isopach data was also presented along with Leduc Isopach and structural evidence. The role of faulting in the collapse process was also discussed. It appears that faulting was caused by differential compaction of the Leduc Reef. The faults related to the Gold Creek Collapse Structure also played a major role in the dolomitization of the Wabamun. The faults provided conduits for dolomitizing fluids to migrate upwards from the Leduc Formation to the Wabamun Formation. It is assumed that dolomitization occurred after the Debolt deposition. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  7. New explanation for extreme u-234 u-238 disequilibria in a dolomitic aquifer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kronfeld, J

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available High U-234/U-238 activity ratios are found in the shallow groundwater of the phreatic Transvaal Dolomite Aquifer. The aquifer is uranium poor, while the waters are oxygen rich and young. Tritium and C-14 are used to show that the disequilibrium...

  8. Carbonate platforms in the Dolomites area of the southern Alps - historic perspectives on progress in Sedimentology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlager, W.; Keim, L.

    2009-01-01

    The area of the Dolomites in the Southern Alps exhibits some of the best outcrops of carbonate platforms and platform-to-basin transitions in the world. The region has attracted geologists since the early 19th Century and has been a centre of stratigraphic and sedimentological research ever since.

  9. Colloid transport in dolomite rock fractures: effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pulin K; Sleep, Brent E

    2012-09-18

    The effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength on microsphere transport in variable-aperture dolomite rock fractures were studied in a laboratory-scale system. Fractures with different aperture distributions and mineral compositions were artificially created in two dolomite rock blocks. Transport tests were conducted with bromide and carboxylate-modified latex microspheres (20, 200, and 500 nm diameter). Under overall unfavorable attachment conditions, there was significant retention of the 20 nm microsphere and minimal retention of the 500 nm microsphere for all conditions examined. Aperture variability produced significant spatial variation in colloid transport. Flushing with low ionic strength solution (1 mM) following microsphere transport at 12 mM ionic strength solution produced a spike in effluent microsphere concentrations, consistent with retention of colloids in secondary energy minima. Surface roughness and charge heterogeneity effects may have also contributed to the effect of microsphere size on retention. Matrix diffusion influenced bromide transport but was not a dominant factor in transport for any microsphere size. Calibrated one-dimensional, two-site kinetic model parameters for colloid transport in fractured dolomite were sensitive to the physical and chemical properties of both the fractured dolomite and the colloids, indicating the need for mechanistic modeling for accurate prediction.

  10. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Dušica R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking strength of the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with 1.5% stearic acid using wet process, are higher for 2.8% and 5.2%, respectively, compared to the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with the same amount of acid used in the dry process. The tensile strength difference between the mixtures increases with the increase of the concentration of used stearic acid up to 3%. The strength of PVC mixture with the calcite modified by wet process is 3.1% higher compared to the mixture containing calcite modified by dry process. The results showed that the bonding strength between calcite and the adsorbed organic component affected tensile strength, tensile elongation and breaking strength of the PVC mixtures. The best filler was obtained by wet modification using 1.5% stearic acid solution that provided the formation of a stearate monolayer chemisorbed on calcite. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet process using 1.5% stearic acid solution exhibited the best mechanical properties. This calcite was completely hydrophobic with dominant chemically adsorbed surfactant, which means that stearate chemisorbed on calcite provided stronger interaction in the calcite-stearic acid-PVC system.

  11. Microstructure and thermal change of texture of calcite crystals in ostrich eggshell Struthio camelus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia, A.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, A.G.; Lozano, L.F.; Pena-Rico, M.A.; Velazquez, R.; Basiuk, V.A.; Bucio, L.

    2005-01-01

    Eggshell from ostrich Struthio camelus, pristine and thermally treated in the range from room temperature to 550 deg. C, was investigated with low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). Different zones of the eggshell were analysed, including the protein-related, non-crystalline, inner organic membrane. After the high-temperature treatment (>500 deg. C), only crystallised calcite phase was found showing two main textures depending on the shell zone and the treatment temperature. In the crystal layer of the untreated samples, nanosized calcite crystals are organized with their c crystallographic axes highly aligned normal to eggshell surface (a very sharp gaussian angular distribution, σ=0.14, was obtained by using the Rietveld method to model the preferred orientation function in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern). Elemental analysis revealed more Mg 2+ in the crystal layer than in cone layer of the eggshell. A high nitrogen content in the organic membrane is associated to a proteinaceous phase. The cone and palisade layers are composed of needle-shaped calcite crystals, which are more crystallized than in the crystal layer and in average with their c crystallographic axes oriented in all directions except for the one perpendicular to the eggshell surface. Due to the complex structure and the amorphous/crystal phase interactions, the heating at about 500 deg. C texturizes the crystals orienting them mainly along the c-axes normal to the inner eggshell surface

  12. Debris flow monitoring in the Acquabona watershed on the Dolomites (Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, M.; Genevois, R.; LaHusen, R.; Simoni, A.; Tecca, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 a field monitoring system was installed in Acquabona Creek in the Dolomites (Eastern Italian Alps) to observe the hydrologic conditions for debris flow occurrence and some dynamic properties of debris flow. The monitoring system consists of three remote stations: an upper one located at the head of a deeply-incised channel and two others located downstream. The system is equipped with sensors for measuring rainfall, pore pressures in the mobile channel bottom, ground vibrations, debris flow depth, total normal stress and fluid pore-pressure at the base of the flow. Two video cameras record events at the upper channel station and one video is installed at the lowermost station. During summer 1998, three debris flows (volumes from less than 1000 m3 up to 9000 m3) occurred at Acquabona. The following results were obtained from a preliminary analysis of the data: 1) All of the flows were triggered by rainfalls of less than 1 hour duration, with peak rainfall intensities ranging from 4.8 to 14.7 mm / 10 minute. 2) Debris flows initiated in several reaches of the channel, including the head of the talus slope. 3) The initial surges of the mature flows had a higher solid concentration and a lower velocity (up to 4 m/s) than succeeding, more dilute surges (more than 7 m/s). 4) Total normal stress and pore fluid pressures measured at the base of the flow (mean depth about 1.1 m) were similar (about 15 kPa), indicating a completely liquefied flow. 5) Peak flows entrained debris at a rate of about 6 m3/m of channel length and channel bed scouring was proportional to the local slope gradient and was still evident in the lower channel where the slope was 7??. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation between amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite in earthworm-produced calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteegh, E.A.A.; Black, S.; Hodson, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we investigate carbon isotope fractionation during the crystallization of biogenic calcium carbonate. Several species of earthworm including Lumbricus terrestris secrete CaCO 3 . Initially a milky fluid comprising micro-spherules of amorphous CaCO 3 (ACC) is secreted into pouches of the earthworm calciferous gland. The micro-spherules coalesce and crystalize to form millimetre scale granules, largely comprising calcite. These are secreted into the earthworm intestine and from there into the soil. L. terrestris were cultured for 28 days in two different soils, moistened with three different mineral waters at 10, 16 and 20 °C. The milky fluid in the calciferous glands, granules in the pouches of the calciferous glands and granules excreted into the soil were collected and analysed by FTIR spectroscopy to determine the form of CaCO 3 present and by IRMS to determine δ 13 C values. The milky fluid was ACC. Granules removed from the pouches and soil were largely calcite; the granules removed from the pouches contained more residual ACC than those recovered from the soil. The δ 13 C values of milky fluid and pouch granules became significantly more negative with increasing temperature (p ≤ 0.001). For samples from each temperature treatment, δ 13 C values became significantly (p ≤ 0.001) more negative from the milky fluid to the pouch granules to the soil granules (−13.77, −14.69 and −15.00 respectively at 10 °C; −14.37, −15.07 and −15.18 respectively at 16 °C and −14.89, −15.41 and −15.65 respectively at 20 °C). Fractionation of C isotopes occurred as the ACC recrystallized to form calcite with the fractionation factor ε calcite-ACC  = −1.20 ± 0.52‰. This is consistent with the crystallization involving dissolution and reprecipitation rather than a solid state rearrangement. Although C isotopic fractionation has previously been described between different species of dissolved inorganic carbon and

  14. A quantitative analysis of microbially-induced calcite precipitation employing artificial and naturally-occurring sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokier, Stephen; Krieg Dosier, Ginger

    2013-04-01

    Microbially-induced calcite precipitation is a strong candidate for the production of sustainable construction materials. The process employs the microbe Sporosarcina pasteurii as an agent to microbially mediate the precipitation of calcium carbonate to bind unconsolidated sediment. As this process can be achieved under ambient temperature conditions and can utilise a wide variety of easily-available sediments, potentially including waste materials, it is envisioned that this procedure could significantly reduce carbon-dioxide emissions in the construction industry. This study describes and quantifies the precipitation of calcite cement in a range of naturally-occurring sediments compared with a control matrix. The study establishes the optimum treatment time for effective cement precipitation in order to produce a material that meets the standards required for construction whilst keeping economic and environmental outlays at a minimum. The 'control sediment' employed industrial-grade glass beads with a grain size range of 595-1180 microns (16-30 US mesh). Sporosarcina pasteurii were mixed in a solution of urea and calcium chloride and then inoculated into the control sediment. The microbes attach to the surface of the sediment grains and employ urea as a source of energy to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. By so doing, they increase the pH of the solution allowing calcium carbonate to precipitate at the cell walls to act as nucleation points facilitating the precipitation of cements as a grain-coating and biocementing the unconsolidated sediment. The solution treatment was repeated at eight hour intervals with samples removed for detailed analysis after each every five consecutive treatments (i.e. 40 hours). The process was repeated to produce 20 samples with treatment times between 40 and 800 hours. Cemented samples were impregnated with blue epoxy and examined petrographically to monitor cement development. Modal analysis was undertaken on each cemented

  15. Speciation of As in calcite by micro-XAFS: Implications for remediation of As contamination in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Y; Takahashi, Y; Iwatsuki, T; Terada, Y

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of calcite as a host phase of arsenic (As) in As-contaminated groundwater, distribution behavior of Asbetween natural calcite and groundwater in deep underground was investigated based on As oxidation state. Speciation analyses of As in natural calcite by μ-XRF-XAFS analyses showed (i) preferentialarsenate uptake by calcite, and (ii) promptness of arsenate uptake by minor iron (Fe) carbonate minerals coprecipitated with calcite. These findings suggest that the effect of calcite on As remediation of the As-contamination systems stronglydepends on arsenite to arsenate ratio (i.e., redox condition) in groundwater, and maybe governed bythe amount of Fe coprecipitated with calcite.

  16. Shock Waves Trigger Fault Weakening in Calcite-bearing Rocks During Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Plumper, O.; Violay, M.; Cavallo, A.; Di Toro, G.

    2014-12-01

    The weakening mechanism of calcite-bearing rocks is still poorly understood though many major earthquakes stroke within carbonate sequences. Insights derive from the laboratory: in experiments performed on calcite-bearing gouges, up to 90% drop in friction is associated to grain size reduction to the nanoscale and the formation of crystal-plastic microstructures suggesting the activation of debated weakening mechanisms (e.g., grain boundary sliding and diffusion creep; nanopowder lubrication). Whatever the case, it is unclear how nanoparticles form and what their role is at the initiation of sliding. To investigate initial fault instability we sheared with a rotary shear apparatus SHIVA pre-cut ring-shaped solid cylinders (50/30 mm ext/int diameter) of Carrara marble (99.9% CaCO3). Rock cylinders were slid for few millimetres(0, 1.5 mm and 5mm) at accelerations (6.5 ms-2) and normal stresses (10 MPa) approaching seismic deformation conditions. Initial slip (<2 mm) was concomitant with large frictional weakening (up to 30% of static friction) and CO2emission. Microanalytical observations (FE-SEM, FIB-SEM and TEM) showed that the experimental slipping zones consisted of (1) defects structures, including dislocations, cleavage surfaces and deformation features such as mechanical twins, partially burden beneath (2) a 2-10 micrometer thick layer of nanograins where pervasive nano-fracturing have occurred preserving the grain shape (pulverization) and (3) reaction products attributable to high pressure and high temperature conditions (i.e. calcite decomposition into amorphous carbon rimming the nanograins). All the above features are typical of shock-induced changes in minerals. We interpret the above observations as follows: pre-existing grain boundaries or newly formed defects are the nuclei for the generation of dislocations and for their pile-up; the fast release of those piles-up in avalanches under rapid stress loading (fast moving dislocations) may explain the

  17. Fluoride removal by calcite: evidence for fluorite precipitation and surface adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brett D; Binning, Philip; Stipp, S L S

    2005-12-15

    Fluoride contamination of groundwater, both anthropogenic and natural, is a major problem worldwide. In this study, fluoride removal by crushed limestone (99% pure calcite) was investigated by batch studies and surface-sensitive techniques from solutions with fluoride concentrations from 150 micromol/L (3 mg/L) to 110 mM (approximately 2100 mg/L). Surface-sensitive techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as zeta potential measurements, confirm that, in addition to precipitation reactions, adsorption of fluoride also occurs. Results indicate that fluoride adsorption occurs immediately over the entire calcite surface with fluorite precipitating at step edges and kinks, where dissolved Ca2+ concentration is highest. The PHREEQ geochemical model was applied to the observed data and indicates that existing models, especially at low fluoride concentrations and high pH (>7.5) are not equipped to describe this complex system, largely because the PHREEQ model includes only precipitation reactions, whereas a combination of adsorption and precipitation parameters are required.

  18. X-ray scattering of calcite thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition: Studies in air and in calcite saturated water solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Hudak, Michael R.; Lerner, Allan; Grubbs, Robert K.; Wang, Shanmin; Zhang, Zhan; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Hickmott, Donald; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Carbonates are one of the most abundant groups of minerals in earth systems and are important in many geological settings and industrial processes. Calcite (CaCO 3 ) thin films produced by atomic layer deposition offer a method to evaluate the surficial properties of carbonates as well as interactions at the carbonate–fluid interface. Using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and X-ray diffraction, these films are observed to be porous, polycrystalline, and have crystallites oriented with the major (104) calcite cleavage plane parallel to the surface of the z-cut single crystal quartz substrate. An Al 2 O 3 buffer layer, present between quartz and the calcite film, does not affect the as-deposited film, but does influence how the films reorganize in contact with fluid. Without a buffer layer, calcite reorients its crystallites to have populations of (006) and (030) parallel to the substrate, while those with an Al 2 O 3 buffer layer become more amorphous. Amorphous films may represent an analog to amorphous calcium carbonate and provide insights into that material's thermophysical behavior. Due to a higher percentage of pore spaces available for fluid infiltration, films deposited at higher temperature make the calcite thin films more susceptible to amorphization. These films are chemically similar, but structurally dissimilar to bulk natural calcite. Nevertheless, they can be a complementary system to traditional single crystal X-ray surface scattering studies on carbonates, particularly for important but less common minerals, to evaluate mineral–fluid interfacial interactions. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition (ALD) used to produce calcite films. • Calcite film orientation and crystallinity depend on ALD parameters. • ALD calcite films can be both crystalline and amorphous. • Interaction of water with films can re-orient or amorphize the films. • ALD calcite films may be useful to study carbonate–fluid interfacial interactions

  19. Incorporation of Mg and Sr in calcite of cultured benthic foraminifera: impact of calcium concentration and associated calcite saturation state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raitzsch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of the calcium concentration in seawater and thereby the calcite saturation state (Ω on the magnesium and strontium incorporation into benthic foraminiferal calcite under laboratory conditions. For this purpose individuals of the shallow-water species Heterostegina depressa (precipitating high-Mg calcite, symbiont-bearing and Ammonia tepida (low-Mg calcite, symbiont-barren were cultured in media under a range of [Ca2+], but similar Mg/Ca ratios. Trace element/Ca ratios of newly formed calcite were analysed with Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS and normalized to the seawater elemental composition using the equation DTE=(TE/Cacalcite/(TE/Caseawater. The culturing study shows that DMg of A. tepida significantly decreases with increasing Ω at a gradient of −4.3×10−5 per Ω unit. The DSr value of A. tepida does not change with Ω, suggesting that fossil Sr/Ca in this species may be a potential tool to reconstruct past variations in seawater Sr/Ca. Conversely, DMg of H. depressa shows only a minor decrease with increasing Ω, while DSr increases considerably with Ω at a gradient of 0.009 per Ω unit. The different responses to seawater chemistry of the two species may be explained by a difference in the calcification pathway that is, at the same time, responsible for the variation in the total Mg incorporation between the two species. Since the Mg/Ca ratio in H. depressa is 50–100 times higher than that of A. tepida, it is suggested that the latter exhibits a mechanism that decreases the Mg/Ca ratio of the calcification fluid, while the high-Mg calcite forming species may not have this physiological tool. If the dependency of Mg incorporation on seawater [Ca2+] is also valid for deep

  20. Reconstruction of the pre-compactional thickness of the Zechstein Main Dolomite in northwest Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semyrka Grażyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our reconstruction of the pre-compactional thickness of the Main Dolomite strata from the so-called Grotów Peninsula (northwest Poland was based on macroscopic observations of drill cores from three wells: Mokrzec-1, Sieraków-4 and Międzychód-5. These wells are located in various palaeogeographical zones of the Main Dolomite and cored rocks represent a range of microfacies. The amount of compactional reduction in thickness of the Main Dolomite was estimated by summing the total heights (Wst of all stylolites encountered in logs of these wells. For calculations, a generalised model of a drill core was developed, which embraced all types of stylolite seams present in the Main Dolomite succession studied. Also the method of stylolite dimensioning was demonstrated. The number of stylolites in the drill cores studied varied from 511 in the Sieraków-4 well to 1,534 in the Międzychód-5 well. In all cores studied low-amplitude macrostylolites predominated, but the reduction of thickness was controlled mostly by the low- and medium-amplitude macrostylolites. The largest number of stylolites was found in the grainstone/packstone microfacies. The turnout of stylolites depends of microfacies. The highest density of stylolites was documented in mudstones/wackestones (24 stylolites per metre of rock thickness and the lowest in boundstones (14 stylolites per metre of rock thickness. The low-amplitude stylolites appear most frequently in the mudstone/wackestone microfacies (15 stylolites per metre of rock thickness; in grainstones/packstones, rudstones/floatstones and boundstones middle-amplitude stylolites are rare (3 stylolites per metre of rock thickness. The degree of compaction of the Main Dolomite succession studied varied from 6 to 10%; hence, its calculated initial thickness also varied in the wells studied: from 41.3 m in the Sieraków-4 well to 56.9 m in the Mokrzec-1 well and to 97.1 m in the Międzychód-5 well. The volumes of reservoir

  1. Experimental determination of the solubility product of dolomite at 50-253 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénézeth, Pascale; Berninger, Ulf-Niklas; Bovet, Nicolas; Schott, Jacques; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2018-03-01

    The 'dolomite problem', the scarcity of present-day dolomite formation near the Earth's surface, has attracted much attention over the past century. Solving this problem requires having reliable data on the stability and kinetics of formation of this mineral. Toward this goal, the solubility of natural dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) has been measured from 50 to 253 °C in 0.1 mol/kg NaCl solutions using a hydrogen electrode concentration cell (HECC). The obtained apparent solubility products (Kapp-sp-dol), for the reaction: CaMg(CO3)2 = Ca2+ + Mg2+ + 2CO32-, were extrapolated to infinite dilution to generate the solubility product constants for this reaction (Ksp°-dol). The derived equilibrium constants were fit and can be accurately described by log10Ksp°-dol = a + b/T (K) + cT (K) where a = 17.502, b = -4220.119 and c = -0.0689. This equation and its first and second derivatives with respect to T were used together with corresponding aqueous species properties to calculate the revised standard state thermodynamic properties of dolomite at 25 °C and 1 bar, yielding a Gibbs energy of formation (Δf G298.15∘) equal to -2160.9 ± 2 kJ/mol, (log10Ksp°-dol = -17.19 ± 0.3); an enthalpy of formation (Δf H298.15∘) of -2323.1 ± 2 kJ/mol, an entropy (S298.15∘) of 156.9 ± 2 J/mol/K and heat capacity (Cp298.15∘) of 154.2 ± 2 J/mol/K (uncertainties are 3σ). The dolomite solubility product derived in this study is nearly identical to that computed using SUPCRT92 (Johnson et al., 1992) at 200 °C, but about one order of magnitude higher at 50 and 25 °C, suggesting that dolomite may be somewhat less stable than previously assumed at ambient temperatures.

  2. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  3. Principles of calcite dissolution in human and artificial otoconia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Erik Walther

    Full Text Available Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV.

  4. Incorporation of Eu(III) into calcite under recrystallization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellebrandt, S.E.; Jordan, Norbert; Barkleit, Astrid; Schmidt, Moritz; Hofmann, S.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of three calcite powders with Eu(III) under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Batch contact studies with reaction times from 1 week up to 3 years revealed that the speciation differs from that observed previously in co-precipitation experiments and is dominated by a newly identified species ''γ''. The speed of formation of this species was found to depend greatly on the recrystallization rate of the studied minerals.

  5. Incorporation of Eu(III) into calcite under recrystallization conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellebrandt, S.E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Jordan, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements; Schmidt, Moritz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HGF Young Investigator Group; Hofmann, S.

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of three calcite powders with Eu(III) under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Batch contact studies with reaction times from 1 week up to 3 years revealed that the speciation differs from that observed previously in co-precipitation experiments and is dominated by a newly identified species ''γ''. The speed of formation of this species was found to depend greatly on the recrystallization rate of the studied minerals.

  6. U-Pb Dating of Calcite to Constrain Basinal Brine Flux Events: An Example from the Upper Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasbury, T.; Luczaj, J.

    2017-12-01

    Calcite forms in a variety of settings and can be the product of surface to deep basinal fluids. As such, this mineral can uniquely record details of the fluids responsible for its formation. The forms of calcium carbonates and their stratigraphic relationships from the thin section to the regional scale give important insights on pulses of fluids. A fundamental question is the age of such fluid pulses. While calcite excludes uranium (U) from its crystal structure, some is incorporated and depending on the U/Pb ratio, this provides an opportunity for radiometric dating. Calcite crystals of various sizes and crystal habits are found in Paleozoic carbonate rocks throughout the region from the western Michigan basin to the upper Mississippi valley. These are typically associated with Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) mineralization, including galena, sphalerite, and iron sulfides, but typically post-date the main MVT event. We have analyzed a variety of these calcites and find multiple generations of calcite, separated by tens of millions of years. The initial Pb isotope ratios are similar to the isotope ratios of nearby galena, strongly suggesting a genetic relationship. Our oldest ages are 200 Ma, and we find ages ranging into the Cenozoic. Based on the Paleozoic-hosted galena Pb-isotope isoscapes from the region, the fluids may have been sourced from both the Michigan and Illinois basins. An important and unanswered question is what would cause significant fluid movement out of the basins substantially after Appalachian orogenesis. Noble gas data from brines in the Michigan Basin have a mantle component and have been suggested to be responsible for recognized elevated temperatures across the basin (Ma et al., 2009). Multiple thermal events during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras may have an internal heat source related to reactivation of faults of the Keweenawan Rift system below the Michigan Basin. Perhaps a mantle heat source from below episodically fluxes into the

  7. Study on effect of Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitates on strength of fine grained soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Sharma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For construction purposes, it is very essential to provide a strong foundation for the structure. If required, the suitability of soil has to be improved; this process of improving properties of soil is called Soil Stabilisation. This study intends to experimentally analyse the effectiveness of use of an unorthodox liquid soil stabiliser, Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitates (MICP for improving the shear strength parameters of two different types of fine grained soils. For this process, a species of Bacillus group, B. pastuerii was used to activate and catalyse the calcite precipitation caused by reaction between urea and calcium chloride. Two types of soils, i.e. intermediate compressible clay and highly compressible clay were used for the study. Parameters included concentration of B. pasteurii, concentration of the cementation reagent and duration of treatment. These parameters were applied on both the soils in a specified range in order to optimise their usage. The results proved that with the use of MICP, there was a noticeable improvement (1.5–2.9 times in the unconfined compressive strength of both type of soils. It was also found that the strength increased with an increase in duration of treatment. Based on this study, optimum quantity and concentration of liquid additive to be added for different soil types for better strength increments were established.

  8. Characterization of Shock Effects in Calcite by Raman Spectroscopy: Results of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonates comprise approx. 20% by volume of present day Earth's sedimentary rocks and store most of the terrestrial CO2 inventory. Some of the oldest meta-sedimentary rocks found on Earth contain abundant carbonate from which impact-induced release of CO2 could have played a role in the formation and evolution of the atmosphere. Carbonates are also present in the target materials for approx. 30% of all terrestrial impact structures including large impacts such as Chicxulub which happened to occur at a location with extraordinarily thick platform carbonate 3-6 km deep. The impact release of CO2 from carbonates can cause global warming as a result of the well-known greenhouse effect and have subsequent effects on climate and biota. Therefore, the shock behavior of calcite is important in understanding the Cretaceous-Paleogene event and other impacts with carbonate-bearing sediments in their target(s) such as Mars and some asteroids. A comprehensive survey utilizing a variety of techniques to characterize the effects manifest in Calcite (Iceland Spar) experimentally shocked to 60.8 GPa has been completed. Results of analysis by Raman Spectroscopy are reported here.

  9. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.; Molenaar, Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    The conditions and timing of carbonate cementation in Cambrian sandstones of the Baltic sedimentary basin were determined by oxygen and carbon stable isotope and chemical data in combination with optical and cathodoluminescence petrographic studies. Studied samples represent a range in present....... The burial history modelling points to development of most of the dolomite cement during rapid Silurian-Devonian subsidence and Carboniferous-early Permian uplift. A wide range of precipitation temperatures indicate that temperature was not a major factor in triggering the carbonate cementation. Dolomite...... precipitation is related to early stages of organic matter maturation and thus to the oil generation history in the basin. delta C-13 values vary from +0.03% to -6.2%( PDB), suggesting limited addition of carbon from an organic source, with the major part derived from marine bicarbonate. The sourcing of carbon...

  10. Olivine, dolomite and ceramic filters in one vessel to produce clean gas from biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapagnà, Sergio; Gallucci, Katia; Foscolo, Pier Ugo

    2018-01-01

    Heavy organic compounds produced during almond shells gasification in a steam and/or air atmosphere, usually called tar, are drastically reduced in the product gas by using simultaneously in one vessel a ceramic filter placed in the freeboard and a mixture of olivine and dolomite particles in the fluidized bed of the gasifier. The content of tar in the product gas during a reference gasification test with air, in presence of fresh olivine particles only, was 8600mg/Nm 3 of dry gas. By gasifying biomass with steam at the same temperature level of 820°C in a bed of olivine and dolomite (20% by weight), and in the presence of a catalytic ceramic filter inserted in the freeboard of the fluidized bed gasifier, the level of tar was brought down to 57mg/Nm 3 of dry producct gas, with a decrease of more than two orders of magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of dolomitic resources of Uruguay (Minas - Pan de Azucar Region)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrighetti, R; Pirelli, H.; Gianotti, V.; humberto.pirelli@dinamige.miem.gub.uy

    2007-01-01

    This investigation tries - through Phase I and Phase II stages - to get and estimation of the volume of dolomite resources by means of prospecting the region between the city of Minas and the Pan de Azucar hill, Uruguay; with the objective of achieve a reactivation of this area, increasing job offer, commerce, industrial production and construction activities. Phase I is intended to add valuable information about the precise location of calcareous bodies, their basic features, its geochemical characterization and definition of bodies to be studied with higher detail in Phase II. This second stage points to get an evaluation of the Inferred Resources using 1:10 000 maps and lithological sampling networks to obtain a geochemical characterization of the rocky bodies and the core samples extracted by drilling.Keywords: dolomite, exploration, evaluation, Uruguay. (author)

  12. EPR, UV-Visible, and Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Characterization of Dolomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lakshmi Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dolomite mineral samples having white and light green colors of Indian origin have been characterized by EPR, optical, and NIR spectroscopy. The optical spectrum exhibits a number of electronic bands due to presence of Fe(III ions in the mineral. From EPR studies, the parameters of g for Fe(III and g,A, and D for Mn(II are evaluated and the data confirm that the ions are in distorted octahedron. Optical absorption studies reveal that Fe(III is in distorted octahedron. The bands in NIR spectra are due to the overtones and combinations of water molecules. Thus EPR and optical absorption spectral studies have proven useful for the study of the solid state chemistry of dolomite.

  13. The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zengotita, Frances [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Emerson, Hilary Palmer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The chemical behavior of actinide series elements and fission products is a concern for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository due to their uncertain mobility in the subsurface salt formation. In this work, we are observing the behavior of the halophilic bacterium, Chromohalobacter, and its effect on the mobility of lanthanides and cesium in the presence of dolomite. Batch and minicolumn experiments were conducted with Cs+ and lanthanides (Nd3+, Eu3+) to quantify potential transport with bacteria. Preliminary results show that Cs does not interact strongly with dolomite or Chromohalobacter, while the lanthanides can interact strongly with both minerals and bacteria depending on which the Ln contacts first.

  14. Application of calcite Mg partitioning functions to the reconstruction of paleocean Mg/Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiuk, Franciszek J.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2010-12-01

    Calcite Mg/Ca is usually assumed to vary linearly with solution Mg/Ca, that a constant partition coefficient describes the relationship between these two ratios. Numerous published empirical datasets suggests that this relationship is better described by a power function. We provide a compilation of these literature data for biotic and abiotic calcite in the form of Calcite Mg/Ca = F(Solution Mg/Ca) H, where F and H are empirically determined fitting parameters describing the slope and deviation from linearity, respectively, of the function. This is equivalent to Freundlich sorption behavior controlling Mg incorporation in calcite. Using a power function, instead of a partition coefficient, lowers Phanerozoic seawater Mg/Ca estimates based on echinoderm skeletal material by, on average, 0.5 mol/mol from previous estimates. These functions can also be used to model the primary skeletal calcite Mg/Ca of numerous calcite phases through geologic time. Such modeling suggests that the Mg/Ca of all calcite precipitated from seawater has varied through the Phanerozoic in response to changing seawater Mg/Ca and that the overall range in Mg/Ca measured among various calcite phases would be greatest when seawater Mg/Ca was also high (e.g., "aragonite seas") and lowest when seawater Mg/Ca was low (e.g., "calcite seas"). It follows that, during times of "calcite seas" when the seawater Mg/Ca is presumed to have been lower, deposition of calcite with low Mg contents would have resulted in a depressed drive for diagenetic stabilization of shelfal carbonate and, in turn, lead to greater preservation of crystal and skeletal microfabrics and primary chemistries in biotic and abiotic calcites.

  15. Attrition of Dolomitic Lime in a Fluidized-Bed at High Temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael; Šyc, Michal; Jeremiáš, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 2 (2013), s. 164-172 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720701; GA MŠk(CZ) 7C11009 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2010-00009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : attrition * catalytic gasification * dolomitic lime Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.193, year: 2013

  16. Effect of fertilizer and dolomite applications on growth and yield of tapping rubber trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issariyaporn Damrongrak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical acid soil used for rubber planting has usually low fertility due to continuous loss of plant nutrient elements by crop removal and leaching. Thus, proper soil improvement in tapping rubber is very essential. This study aimed to measure the growth and yield of 17-year-old rubber trees, chemical properties of soil, and plant nutrient status in the leaf and latex after two years of soil improvement. A randomized complete block of seven treatments: No fertilizer (Control treatment, Chemical fertilizer based on soil analysis according to the recommendation of the Rubber Research Institute (Ch.F, Ch.F+ Dolomite to raise pH up to 6.0 (D, 3 kg per plant of compost (C, Ch.F+C, ½ Ch.F+C and ½ Ch.F+C+D, with three replicates was designed. After two years of giving treatments, it was found that adding full rate of chemical fertilizer based on soil test together with compost or dolomite increased the tree girth increment from the first year to the second year. Rubber yield after soil improvements tended to increase from the beginning to the end of the year, especially with compost application. Increasing of soil fertility was found after soil improvement treatments. However, total N, available P and available K were still lower than optimum levels as well as leaf N and K. Nitrogen in rubber latex after soil improvement treatments was higher than those in the control treatment, which contrasted to those of Ca and Mg. However, fertilizer and dolomite effect on micronutrient elements in rubber leaf and latex were not clear. Thus, fertilizer should be continuously applied at least with the full rate of chemical fertilizer based on soil analysis, and organic fertilizer should be applied to gain some trace elements. Dolomite could also be applied in a very strong acid soil.

  17. THE EFFECT OF FISSURES IN DOLOMITE ROCK MASS ON BLASTING PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock fractures in the form of fissures are one of more important geological features of a tectonic system. They have an effect on mechanical behaviour of rook masses exposed to the actions of surface forces. For exploitation in dolomite quarries carried out by blasting of deep shot holes it is important to know the system of fissures within a rock mass for the rock brakes along already weakened planes (the paper is published in Croatian.

  18. Criteria for selection of dolomites and catalysts for tar elimination from biomass gasification gas. Kinetic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    Calcined dolomites and commercial steam reforming catalysts are used downstream biomass gasifiers for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. To further compare these solids under a rigorous basis, a reaction network and a kinetic model are presented. The apparent kinetic constant for the tar reduction is here proposed as a basis of comparison. Tar sampling and analysis, and the units used for the space-time in the catalytic reactor affect the kinetic constants observed. (author) (2 refs.)

  19. FRACTAL ANALYSIS OF FRACTURE SYSTEMS IN UPPER TRIASSIC DOLOMITES IN ŽUMBERAK MOUNTAIN, CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ivica Pavičić; Ivan Dragičević; Tatjana Vlahović; Tonći Grgasović

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of fractal analysis of fracture systems in upper Triassic dolomites in Žumberak Mountain, Croatia. Mechanical rock characteristics together with structural and diagenetic processes results with fracture systems that can be considered as fractals. They are scale-invariant in specific range of scales. Distribution of fractures can be than described with power law distribution and fractal dimension. Fractal dimension is a measure of how fractures fill the space. Fract...

  20. Analysis of limestones and dolomites by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, B.D.

    1999-07-01

    Sources of calcium are generally widespread and quite extensive. These sources are limestone, dolomite, marl, chalk, and oyster shell. Cement plants account for nearly half of the demand, while two hundred lime plants in the US and Puerto Rico consume about twenty five percent. Since the chemical composition of the limestone and other sources of calcium is critical in the cement and lime industry, particularly for the deleterious compounds such as sodium oxide, Na{sub 2}O, magnesium oxide, MgO, phosphorus pentoxide, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and potassium oxide, K{sub 2}O, accurate determinations are critical. Due to the tonnage per hour, these determinations must be made rapidly and accurately. X-ray fluorescence can thereby satisfy this need for accuracy and also precision. Production of lime is performed by calcining limestone or dolomite in which the industry is generally located and concentrated in the States of Michigan and Pennsylvania. The resulting product is quicklime, CaO, and hydrated lime, Ca(OH){sub 2}. Substantial amounts of quicklime is further processed into calcium carbide in order to produce acetylene gas. In this case, the determination of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is critical since minor quantities of phosphorus in acetylene gas can cause premature explosions. Other uses for lime are well known in the treatment of water, the paper and pulp industry, and in the steel industry for the production of slag to remove impurities. Dolomitic lime is heavily utilized in the manufacture of magnesite refractories by reacting dolomitic lime with brines from the Michigan Basin to produce magnesium oxide, MgO, and calcium chloride, CaCl{sub 2}. Sample preparation for these materials usually is performed by grinding and pelletizing or fusion with lithium-tetra-borate, Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}.

  1. Advantage of uranium contained in low grade dolomite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, A.L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate a technological route to recover uranium from a lean mineral ore. The experimental work includes studies concerning calcination, carbonate leaching, settling, filtration and resin-ion-exchange. Experimental data confirm the technological feasibility of the proposed process and two different preliminary flowsheets of a pilot plant were suggested. (author) [pt

  2. Threats and opportunities for post-closure development in dolomitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This could well be complemented by other water-based developments such as aquaculture, agriculture and different forms of tourism relating to water, karst and mining. Possibilities for using waste land such as sinkhole areas and slimes dams include the establishment of a large game reserve on donated land as well as ...

  3. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the Calcite-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.A.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the calcite-solution interface at controlled pCO 2 (g) have been investigated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive (EDS) analyses of reacted calcite. Uranium precipitation at the calcite-solution interface was observed only for those experiments in which the initial [U(VI)] was greater than the solubility of rutherfordine, UO 2 CO 3 (s). At pH 8.0, flat radial uranium and calcium zoned precipitates form at the mineral-solution interface. At pH 4.3, uranium forms an anastomosing precipitate throughout the calcite surface. RBS analyses confirmed the SEM analyses showing that uranium forms a solid phase within the calcite surface, but formation of an uranium-calcium solid solution at depth is limited. In sharp contrast to U(VI), Nd is concentrated in the solid phase as individual neodymium-calcium carbonate crystals. Calcite and pure orthorhombic neodymium carbonate crystals dissolve at the expense of the formation of a more stable neodymium-calcium solid solution. In the presence of calcite, a thorium-calcium solid solution forms by exchanging Th for Ca in the calcite structure. Thorium precipitates in two linear trends which intersect each other at approximately 105deg C and 75deg C, parallel to calcite rhombohedral cleavage faces. (orig.)

  5. Dating of aragonite and dolomite from Devil's cave - SP, by dosimetric thermoluminescent method (DTL) and ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatumi, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated TL (Thermoluminescence) and ESR (electron spin resonance) properties of aragonite and dolomite found at ''Caverna do Diabo (Devil's cave)'' in the state of Sao Paulo to determine the ages of these geological materials. The aragonite, which is not a thermoluminescent material, shows one ESR signal whit g = 2.003. We obtained the age of 1.1 x 10 5 years and the growth rate of 1 μ m/year by the sample calibration with additional Y irradiation. The dolomite gives a TL glow curve with three distinct peaks at 261, 334 and 395 0 C. We found that the fit for the TL glow curve to second-order kinetics can be considerered as very acceptable. Using the second TL peak we obtained the age of 9.4 x 10 5 years and the compatible values of the activation energy (1.90 ± 0,07 eV) by the following methods: Hyperbolic heating, isothermal decay and fractional glow technique. We observed many ESR absorption signals in the dolomite. Three principal signal com g = 2.002, 2.003 and 2.005 were studied. We found that the first and second ESR signals were atributed to the CO 2 - and/or CO 3 3- centers and the last to the CO 3 - centers, and observed that the first ESR signal might related with the second TL peak and the TL sensitivity were associated with the concentration of Mn 2+ [pt

  6. Removal of Phosphate from Synthetic Aqueous Solution by Adsorption with Dolomite from Padalarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadjari Lucia Nugroho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of phosphate in wastewaters can cause eutrophication of surface water bodies leading to algal-blooming in the aquatic environment and degradation of water quality. Phosphate removal from wastewaters by conventional biological treatment removes only 10-30% of the phosphate, whilst chemical treatment using precipitants such as calcium or iron salts, although effective, is expensive and produces water-rich sludge which must be further treated. Hence, phosphate removal by adsorption in the form of Ca -phosphate has been proposed as an alternative to the more traditional methods. This study investigated the feasibility of using dolomite–a common sedimentary rock–from Padalarang, West Java, Indonesia as the adsorbent for the removal of phosphate from synthetic aqueous solution. Chemical analysis revealed that the Padalarang dolomite contains 33.6-36.2% CaO. Batch experiments at room temperature indicated that optimum removal of phosphate was achieved at pH 9. At 25°C , where increasing concentrations of phosphate (10–100 mg/L increased phosphate adsorption (2.15-31.3 mg/g by the dolomite. The adsorption of phosphate could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with constants Qm= 476.19 mg/g, K L= 0,00106 L/mg and equilibrium parameter (R L: 0.904 – 0.989. Phosphate adsorption by dolomite not only permits its removal but also its potential recovery for reuse.

  7. DURABILITY OF ASPHALT CONCRETE MIXTURES USING DOLOMITE AGGREGATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Al-Shalout

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the durability of asphalt concrete, including the effects of different gradations, compaction temperatures and immersion time on the durability potential of mixtures. The specific objectives of this study are: to investigate the effect of compaction temperature on the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mixtures; investigate the effect of bitumen content and different aggregate gradations on the durability potential of bituminous mixtures.

  8. Thermoluminescent of induced calcite by gamma and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, J.F. de.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of brazilian calcite, exposed to gamma radiation in laboratory and heated at constant rate of 2.7 0 C/s, showed three glow peaks at 150, 250 and 350 0 C in their thermoluminescent emission curves. The analysis of these peaks, using different models, indicated that they follow a second order kinetics; it has been obtained, for the activation energy, 1.3, 1.5 and 1.7 eV, and, for the pre-exponential factors, 8.1 x 10 14 , 6.8 x10 13 and 2.4 x 10 12 s -1 . Although the total thermoluminescent emission has stayed constant, the relative height of glow peaks has changed with the temperature of annealing in the range of 400 to 700 0 C. Exposed samples were also illuminated with ultraviolet light and the resultant curves showed partial or total bleaching or some glow peaks and the growth of peaks at lower temperatures. Samples of virgin calcite, submited to increasing exposures of gamma rays, showed a corresponding enhancement of the optical absorption bands in the range of 25000 to 47000 cm -1 A subsequent illumination of these samples with ultraviolet light produced a decrease of the optical absorption bands at the same range. (author) [pt

  9. Angle-dependent rotation of calcite in elliptically polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herne, Catherine M.; Cartwright, Natalie A.; Cattani, Matthew T.; Tracy, Lucas A.

    2017-08-01

    Calcite crystals trapped in an elliptically polarized laser field exhibit intriguing rotational motion. In this paper, we show measurements of the angle-dependent motion, and discuss how the motion of birefringent calcite can be used to develop a reliable and efficient process for determining the polarization ellipticity and orientation of a laser mode. The crystals experience torque in two ways: from the transfer of spin angular momentum (SAM) from the circular polarization component of the light, and from a torque due to the linear polarization component of the light that acts to align the optic axis of the crystal with the polarization axis of the light. These torques alternatingly compete with and amplify each other, creating an oscillating rotational crystal velocity. We model the behavior as a rigid body in an angle-dependent torque. We experimentally demonstrate the dependence of the rotational velocity on the angular orientation of the crystal by placing the crystals in a sample solution in our trapping region, and observing their behavior under different polarization modes. Measurements are made by acquiring information simultaneously from a quadrant photodiode collecting the driving light after it passes through the sample region, and by imaging the crystal motion onto a camera. We finish by illustrating how to use this model to predict the ellipticity of a laser mode from rotational motion of birefringent crystals.

  10. Geochemical and isotope aspects of calcite deposits and calcitic marbles hosts mineralizations, Serra do Carumbe, Vale do Ribeira, Parana state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venusso, Gerson Caetano; Andrade e Silva, Antonio C. Gondim de

    2011-01-01

    The calcite deposits and the calcitic marbles hosts occur in Serra do Carumbe, in the Vale do Ribeira region, Parana State, were studied in their geochemical and isotopic aspects viewing the gathering of information about their genesis and economical use. The calcite deposits are constituted by veins and lenses, being three of them concordant and one discordant in relation to the S 0 from the hosting marbles. In these deposits four main types of calcite were recognized: rombohedrical, fibrous, banded and microcrystalline. The calcite reveal themselves having high purity, with CaO concentration above 55.30% and MgO below 0.42%. The lithogeochemical study of the marbles sequence was conducted in various suites revealing an uniformity in their composition, with high values of CaO (above 46.92%) in relation to the MgO values (below 3,37%), what favors their use for cement manufacture, except in sectors that suffered fault influences, where the marbles are impure (siliceous, magnesian, ferruginous and aluminous). Regarding their trace elements content, the hosting calcitic marbles have higher concentrations than the calcite, in the elements Sr, B, Ba and Mg, what makes evident their different formation environments. The δ 13 C values from calcite range from –9,02 to –12,24 ‰ , referring to PDB, while the values δ 18 O range from 24,48 to 25,23 ‰, referring to SMOW; meanwhile, for the calcitic marbles, the δ 13 C values range from –4,03 to 1,42‰ and of δ 18 O range from 20,71 to 23,00 ‰. The high δ 18 O values would indicate enrichment referring to the interaction of the calcite's generator fluid with the carbonatic host rock. The δ 13 C values indicate origin from hydrothermal solution for the calcite, although they would not allow to conclude if their sources would be superficial or profound. As for the hosting calcitic marbles, the isotopic values indicate genesis from pre-cambrian marine limestone. (author)

  11. Effects of Citrate and Arginine on Sorption of Nickel to Yazd Sepiolite and Calcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Sheikhhosseini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pollution of soil and water environment by release of heavy metals is of great concerns of the last decades. Sorption of heavy metals by low cost materials is considered as an inexpensive and efficient method used for removal of heavy metals from soil-water systems. The presence of different ligands with various complexing abilities can change the sorption properties of heavy metals and their fate in the environment as well. In order to assess the effect of citrate and arginine as natural organic ligands in soil environment, in a batch study we investigated the effects of these ligands on equilibrium sorption of nickel to sepiolite and calcite minerals and also kinetics of Ni sorption by these minerals. Materials and Methods: Minerals used in this study included sepiolite from Yazd (Iran and pure calcite (Analytical grade, Merck, Germany. Sepiolite was purified, saturated with Ca using 0.5 M CaCl2, powdered in a mortar and sieved by non-metal 230 mesh standard wire sieve. For equilibrium sorption study, in a 50-mL polyethylene centrifuge tube,0.3 g sample of each mineral was suspended in 30 mL of a 0.01 M CaCl2 solution containing 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg L-1 Ni (NiCl2 and containing zero (as control or 0.1mmol L-1 citrate or arginine ligands. The applied concentrationsfor each ligand can naturally occur in soils. Preparedtubes were shaken (180±2 rpm, 25±1oC for 24 h using an orbital shaker and centrifuged (4000×g for 10 min and the supernatants were analyzed for Ni concentration using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAnalyst 200 Perkin-Elmer at a wavelength of 232 nm and a detection limit of 0.05 mg L-1. The quantity of Ni retained by each mineral at equilibrium was calculated using equation qe = (Ci - CeV/W where qe was the amount of nickel retained by mineral surface at equilibrium. Ci and Ce were the initial and the equilibrium concentrations (mg L-1 of Ni, respectively, V was the volume (L of the solution

  12. The effect of heat treatment on the thermoluminescence of naturally-occurring calcites and their use as a gamma-ray dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engin, Birol; Gueven, Olgun

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of using naturally-occurring calcite for gamma-ray dosimetry was investigated. Anneal treatment above 350 deg. C increased the sensitivity of all radiation-induced TL peaks except the glow peaks above 300 deg. C. On the other hand, annealing in air, at a temperature of 700 deg. C caused a collapse in the TL sensitivity. The increase in TL efficiency was found to depend on the annealing temperature and time. Heating at 600 deg. C for 5 h and quenching in ambient air are the optimum conditions for TL sensitivity enhancement in the calcite materials investigated. These results are explained using the energy scheme of the pre-dose model of and in terms of the impurity rearrangements in the crystal lattice induced by heating. It was found that the values of the kinetic parameters E, s and b for TL glow peaks remained unchanged for annealed samples. The TL dose-response curves for stable dosimetric peaks of annealed and unannealed calcite samples could be fitted to the same linear mathematical function. This implies that the annealing process probably does not change the nature of the trapping centers except the low temperature TL peaks at 125 and 160 deg. C of flowstone. The TL dosimetric parameters of calcite samples annealed, including glow curves, fading characteristics, dose-responses, dose-rate responses and energy responses, have also been studied in detail. The response to gamma-rays of annealed calcite samples was found to be linear from 0.05 to 10 4 Gy. The lower limit of observable doses for each calcite sample was about 0.05 Gy. This offers the possibility of applying the investigated materials for gamma-ray dosimetry within this useful range. These dosimeters can be used in various applications, such as, in industries related to chemical technology (polymerization), food processing and in determining the dose received by the patient during medical examination and treatment

  13. Magnesium-isotope fractionation during low-Mg calcite precipitation in a limestone cave - Field study and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Buhl, D.; Richter, D.; Niedermayr, A.; Riechelmann, D.; Dietzel, M.; Schulte, U.

    2010-08-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of speleothem calcite and particularly that of stalagmites and flowstones is increasingly exploited as an archive of past environmental change in continental settings. Despite intensive research, including modelling and novel approaches, speleothem data remain difficult to interpret. A possible way foreword is to apply a multi-proxy approach including non-conventional isotope systems. For the first time, we here present a complete analytical dataset of magnesium isotopes (δ 26Mg) from a monitored cave in NW Germany (Bunker Cave). The data set includes δ 26Mg values of loess-derived soil above the cave (-1.0 ± 0.5‰), soil water (-1.2 ± 0.5‰), the carbonate hostrock (-3.8 ± 0.5‰), dripwater in the cave (-1.8 ± 0.2‰), speleothem low-Mg calcite (stalactites, stalagmites; -4.3 ± 0.6‰), cave loam (-0.6 ± 0.1‰) and runoff water (-1.8 ± 0.1‰) in the cave, respectively. Magnesium-isotope fractionation processes during weathering and interaction between soil cover, hostrock and solute-bearing soil water are non-trivial and depend on a number of variables including solution residence times, dissolution rates, adsorption effects and potential neo-formation of solids in the regolith and the carbonate aquifer. Apparent Mg-isotope fractionation between dripwater and speleothem low-Mg calcite is about 1000ln αMg-cc-Mg(aq) = -2.4‰. A similar Mg-isotope fractionation (1000ln αMg-cc-Mg(aq) ≈ -2.1‰) is obtained by abiogenic precipitation experiments carried out at aqueous Mg/Ca ratios and temperatures close to cave conditions. Accordingly, 26Mg discrimination during low-Mg calcite formation in caves is highly related to inorganic fractionation effects, which may comprise dehydration of Mg 2+ prior to incorporation into calcite, surface entrapment of light isotopes and reaction kinetics. Relevance of kinetics is supported by a significant negative correlation of Mg-isotope fractionation with the precipitation rate for

  14. Role of Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3} on the physical–chemical properties and cyclic CO{sub 2} capture performance of dolomite by two-step calcination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke; Han, Dongtai, E-mail: handongtai@cumt.edu.cn; Zhao, Pengfei, E-mail: zhaopfcumt@163.com; Hu, Xiumeng; Yin, Zeguang; Wu, Di

    2015-08-20

    Highlights: • Two-step calcination treated dolomite sorbent was prepared and characterized. • An intermediate phase (Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3}) was observed by TG and XRD results. • Mg-calcite hindered the de-mixing of Ca and Mg. • Smaller grains, larger specific surface area and pore volume were obtained. • This favorable structure resulted in a high and stable CO{sub 2} capture performance. - Abstract: Two-step calcination (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} atmospheres) was used to modify the microstructure of natural dolomite for high-temperature CO{sub 2} capture. Two other one-step calcinations (CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2} atmosphere) were provided for comparison. Different morphological characterizations (thermal decomposition, phase composition, morphology, and nitrogen adsorption) were performed, followed by an analysis of 30 carbonation/calcination cycles in a fixed bed reactor. During primary calcination in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere, an intermediate phase (Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3}) was observed by TG and XRD results, which hindered the de-mixing of CaO and MgO in the secondary calcination in a N{sub 2} atmosphere. Therefore, two-step calcination produced smaller grains (CaO: 45.2 nm; MgO: 32.6 nm), larger specific surface area (21.08 m{sup 2}/g) and pore volume (0.082 cm{sup 3}/g) and uniform distribution of CaO and MgO, which resulted in a higher and more stable uptake of CO{sub 2} compared to the results from one-step calcinations.

  15. Early dolomitization in the Lower Cretaceous shallow-water carbonates of Southern Apennines (Italy): Clues about palaeoclimatic fluctuations in western Tethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Francesco; Iannace, Alessandro; Parente, Mariano; Pirmez, Carlos; Torrieri, Stefano; Giorgioni, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    A multidisciplinary study of the dolomitized bodies present in the Lower Cretaceous platform carbonates of Mt. Faito (Southern Apennines - Italy) was carried out in order to explore the connection between early dolomite formation and fluctuating climate conditions. The Berriasian-Aptian investigated succession is 466 m thick and mainly consists of shallow-water lagoonal limestones with frequent dolomite caps. The dolomitization intensity varies along the succession and reaches its peak in the upper Hauterivian-lower Barremian interval, where it is present a completely dolomitized interval about 100-m-thick. Field relations, petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of the analyzed dolomite bodies allowed identifying two populations of early dolomites, a fine-medium crystalline (FMdol) and a coarse crystalline dolomite (Cdol), both interpreted as the product of mesohaline water reflux. According to our interpretation, FMdol precipitated from concentrated brines in the very early stage of the reflux process, producing typical sedimentary features as dolomite caps. In the successive step of the process, the basin-ward 'latent' reflux precipitated Cdol from less concentrated brines. A peculiar feature of the studied succession is the great consistency between stratigraphic distribution of dolomite bodies and their geochemical signature. The completely dolomitized Hauterivian-Barremian interval, in fact, is characterized by geochemical values suggesting an origin from distinctly saltier brines. Considering that the observed near-surface dolomitization process is controlled by physical and chemical parameters reflecting the paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic conditions during dolomite formation, we propose that the stratigraphically controlled dolomitization intensity reflects periodic fluctuations in the salinity of dolomitizing fluid, in turn controlled by long-term climate oscillations. The present work highlights that the stratigraphic distribution of early

  16. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  17. Ion beam modifications of defect sub-structure of calcite cleavages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ment effectively causes local heating and increase the concentration of CO. –. 3. 2 ions formed on subsequent thermal stimulation. Thus, ion bombardment of calcite crystal surfaces in- troduce lattice defects and modify surface morphology. The electrical and mechanical properties of calcite sur- face are drastically modified ...

  18. Ion beam modifications of defect sub-structure of calcite cleavages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    (a) Optical micrograph of calcite cleavage chemically etched with propionic acid with water (1 : 100) (rhombic etch pits; time 30 s). Scanning electron micrographs of calcite cleavages chemically etched after ion bombardment with different ener- gies: (b) 100 KeV, (c) 120 KeV and (d) 140 KeV. connecting Keithley (Model ...

  19. Biotic control of skeletal growth by scleractinian corals in aragonite-calcite seas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomihiko Higuchi

    Full Text Available Modern scleractinian coral skeletons are commonly composed of aragonite, the orthorhombic form of CaCO3. Under certain conditions, modern corals produce calcite as a secondary precipitate to fill pore space. However, coral construction of primary skeletons from calcite has yet to be demonstrated. We report a calcitic primary skeleton produced by the modern scleractinian coral Acropora tenuis. When uncalcified juveniles were incubated from the larval stage in seawater with low mMg/Ca levels, the juveniles constructed calcitic crystals in parts of the primary skeleton such as the septa; the deposits were observable under Raman microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed different crystal morphologies of aragonite and calcite in a single juvenile skeleton. Quantitative analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the majority of the skeleton was composed of aragonite even though we had exposed the juveniles to manipulated seawater before their initial crystal nucleation and growth processes. Our results indicate that the modern scleractinian coral Acropora mainly produces aragonite skeletons in both aragonite and calcite seas, but also has the ability to use calcite for part of its skeletal growth when incubated in calcite seas.

  20. Removal of Pb(II from aqueous solution by natural and synthetic calcites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayomadewa Mercy Adesola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparative evaluation of the adsorption capacity and kinetics of Pb(II uptake by both synthetic and natural calcites has been undertaken using batch equilibration technique. The originality of the calcite materials was confirmed by XRD and elemental composition by XRF. The point of zero charge values of 9.57 and 8.20 were obtained by mass titration method for synthetic and natural calcite, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacities of 200 mg/g and 150 mg/g Pb(II of synthetic calcite and natural calcite were obtained at initial lead loading of 1200 mg/L at 25±2 °C, respectively. The study showed a very slight dependence of sorption capacity on the ionic strength and pH, but a strong dependence on the particle size and contact time. The sorption data results fitted better the Langmuir than the Freundlich isotherms. The kinetic data fitted well to pseudo-first order sorption kinetic model with a regression coefficient value of 0.96 and 0.94 for synthetic and natural calcites, respectively. Desorption of Pb(II from calcite surface was achieved with efficiency of 95% using 4 M HNO3. The extent of reversibility of sorption reaction was a function of the equilibrium pH of calcite-Pb(II solution suspension.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i2.4

  1. Paleohydrogeological implications from fracture calcites and sulfides in a major hydrogeological zone HZ19 at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlstedt, E.; Karhu, J.; Rinne, K.

    2009-08-01

    30 samples of fracture mineral fillings in or near water conducting fractures at Olkiluoto were collected from 10 drill cores for fracture mineral studies. The aim of the study was to obtain information about past hydrogeochemical conditions at Olkiluoto using the calcite morphology, the chemical characteristics and the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in calcite. The chemical composition of fracture calcites at Olkiluoto is nearly stoichiometric CaCO 3 . Most variation in the composition of calcite is due to differences in the Mn content, which could indicate variations in groundwater redox conditions. Meaningful REE patterns were obtained for the calcites. REE patterns showed generally negative Eu anomalies, but one fracture calcite specimen had a distinct positive Eu anomaly. This positive anomaly could be related to ancient hydrothermal conditions, although derivation of the anomaly from the host rock cannot be excluded. Preliminary results for calcite U-Th dating of fracture calcites are reported. The isotopic composition of U and Th were analysed by a new multiple collector LA-ICPMS instrument. U and Th concentrations in fracture calcites are generally 18 O values of calcite range from -17 to -7 per mille. Most of the calcites may have been precipitated in the presence of waters with oxygen isotope ratios similar to those in the present-day groundwaters at Olkiluoto. Two samples with an oxygen isotopic composition highly depleted in 18 O were interpreted to have been precipitated at elevated temperatures. The δ 13 C values of calcite showed a wide range of values from -26 to +35 per mille. Multiple sources for carbon are implied. The highest δ 13 C values indicate methanic conditions in the fracture at the time of calcite precipitation. It appears that the methanic environment has earlier extended to shallower depths compared to the location of the methanic environment in the present-day fracture system (> 300 m). Ten pyrite samples were analysed

  2. Effect of dissolution kinetics on flotation response of calcite with oleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Horta

    Full Text Available Abstract Phosphate flotation performance can be influenced by the dissolution kinetics of the minerals that compose the ore. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of dissolution kinetics on flotation response with oleate (collector of calcites from different origins and genesis. The calcite samples were first purified and characterized by x-ray Fluorescence (XRF and the Rietveld method applied to x-ray Diffractometry data (RXD. Experiments of calcite dissolution and microflotationwere performed at pH 8 and pH 10.The pH effect on the calcite dissolution and flotation indicates the possible influence of the carbonate/bicarbonate ions provided by the CO2 present in the air. In addition, the flotation response is greater as the dissolution increases, making more Ca2+ ions available to interact with collector molecules. This result corroborates the surface precipitation mechanism proposed foroleate adsorption on the calcite surface.

  3. Adsorption of pesticides onto quartz, calcite, kaolinite, and α-alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Madsen, L.

    2001-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in aquifers is influenced by the small but not insignificant adsorption of pesticides to mineral surfaces. Batch experiments with five pesticides and four minerals were conducted to quantify the contributions to adsorption from different mineral surfaces and compare...... adsorption characteristics of selected pesticides. Investigated mineral phases included quartz, calcite, kaolinite, and alpha -alumina. Selected pesticides comprised atrazine (6-chloro-N-2-ethyl-N-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine isoproturon [3-(4-isopropyl-phenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea)], mecoprop [(RS)-2......-(4-chloro-2-methyl phenoxy)propionic acid], 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), and bentazone [3-isopropyl-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4-(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide]. Specific surface area and mineral surface charge proved to be important for the adsorption of these pesticides. Detectable adsorption...

  4. Investigating calcite growth rates using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Stack, Andrew G.; Steefel, Carl I.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Lammers, Laura N.; Hu, Yandi

    2018-02-01

    Calcite precipitation plays a significant role in processes such as geological carbon sequestration and toxic metal sequestration and, yet, the rates and mechanisms of calcite growth under close to equilibrium conditions are far from well understood. In this study, a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used for the first time to measure macroscopic calcite growth rates. Calcite seed crystals were first nucleated and grown on sensors, then growth rates of calcite seed crystals were measured in real-time under close to equilibrium conditions (saturation index, SI = log ({Ca2+}/{CO32-}/Ksp) = 0.01-0.7, where {i} represent ion activities and Ksp = 10-8.48 is the calcite thermodynamic solubility constant). At the end of the experiments, total masses of calcite crystals on sensors measured by QCM-D and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were consistent, validating the QCM-D measurements. Calcite growth rates measured by QCM-D were compared with reported macroscopic growth rates measured with auto-titration, ICP-MS, and microbalance. Calcite growth rates measured by QCM-D were also compared with microscopic growth rates measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and with rates predicted by two process-based crystal growth models. The discrepancies in growth rates among AFM measurements and model predictions appear to mainly arise from differences in step densities, and the step velocities were consistent among the AFM measurements as well as with both model predictions. Using the predicted steady-state step velocity and the measured step densities, both models predict well the growth rates measured using QCM-D and AFM. This study provides valuable insights into the effects of reactive site densities on calcite growth rate, which may help design future growth models to predict transient-state step densities.

  5. Transformation of Mg-bearing amorphous calcium carbonate to Mg-calcite - In situ monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The formation of Mg-bearing calcite via an amorphous precursor is a poorly understood process that is of relevance for biogenic and abiogenic carbonate precipitation. In order to gain an improved insight on the controls of Mg incorporation in calcite formed via an Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC) precursor, the precipitation of Mg-ACC and its transformation to Mg-calcite was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.03 °C and pH 8.3 ± 0.1 and revealed two distinct pathways of Mg-calcite formation: (i) At initial aqueous Mg/Ca molar ratios ⩽ 1:6, Mg-calcite formation occurs via direct precipitation from solution. (ii) Conversely, at higher initial Mg/Ca molar ratios, Mg-calcite forms via an intermediate Mg-rich ACC phase. In the latter case, the final product is a calcite with up to 20 mol% Mg. This Mg content is significant higher than that of the Mg-rich ACC precursor phase. Thus, a strong net uptake of Mg ions from the solution into the crystalline precipitate throughout and also subsequent to ACC transformation is postulated. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the geochemical composition of the reactive solution and the Mg-ACC has no significant effect on the obtained ;solubility product; of Mg-ACC. The enrichment of Mg in calcite throughout and subsequent to Mg-ACC transformation is likely affected by the high aqueous Mg/Ca ratio and carbonate alkalinity concentrations in the reactive solution. The experimental results have a bearing on the formation mechanism of Mg-rich calcites in marine early diagenetic environments, where high carbonate alkalinity concentrations are the rule rather than the exception, and on the insufficiently investigated inorganic component of biomineralisation pathways in many calcite secreting organisms.

  6. Reconstructing geochemical conditions during dolomite formation in a Carnian coastal sabkha using 87Sr/86Sr isotopes - Travenanzes Formation, northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Maximilian; Wegner, Wencke; Horschinegg, Monika; Preto, Nereo; Breda, Anna; Klötzli, Urs; Peckmann, Jörn; Meister, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The geochemical conditions that were conducive to primary dolomite formation in extremely shallow evaporitic environments along the Triassic Tethyan margin are still poorly understood. While the massive Triassic dolomites in the Austroalpine and South Alpine realm are largely affected by diagenetic or hydrothermal overprint, Preto et al. (2015) provide evidence of primary dolomite based on nano-crystal aggregates observed under the transmission electron microscope. These dolomites are intercalated in a 100-m-thick sequence of clay (Travenanzes Formation, Southern Alps), deposited on a semi-arid coastal plain in the Late Carnian (Tuvalian II). They may serve as a geochemical archive of evaporative brine composition at the time of dolomite formation. Petrographic and field observations revealed that dolomites occur as three different types, (1) dm- to m-thick homogenous beds, (2) mm-scale laminated (stromatolitic) beds and (3) nodules associated with root traces and palaeosols. In all types, the dolomite is stoichiometrically and structurally well ordered. While the homogeneous dolomites occasionally show a peloidal structure, all types of dolomite are generally microcrystalline. Soft sediment deformation, or brittle deformation with mud infill indicates that the dolomitic sediment was largely unlithified at the time of deposition. We analysed the dolomites under the SEM in backscatter mode and observed largely anhedral structures with grain sizes in the μm-range. The laminated dolomites consist of mm- to cm-scale clay-dolomite alternations, whereby the dolomite often shows a spherulitic growth near the dolomite-clay interface, where further recrystallization was inhibited. We measured strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) as an indicator for the source of alkalinity driving dolomite precipitation. Our data are in a range between 0.707672 (homogenous dolomite) and 0.707976 (both 2σ: 4*10-5) (nodular dolomite) indicating a similar trend as in Triassic seawater during

  7. Mill tailings based composites as paste backfill in mines of U-bearing dolomitic limestone ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Panchal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on the development of paste backfill using mill tailings generated during the processing of a uranium ore deposit hosted in dolomitic limestone. The tailings have been characterized in terms of the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties. Time-dependent rheological behaviors and geotechnical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB are also determined. The studies show that the mill tailing has the potential to form paste and the CPB has adequate strength to provide support to mine pillars, roofs, and walls. Keywords: Mining engineering, Uranium ore deposit, Tailings, Cemented paste backfill (CPB, Rheology, Compressive strength

  8. Studies on Soil Cements: 1 - Role of Hydrated Lime and Dolomitic Monohydrate in Montmorillonite Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Abo El Enein, A. [صلاح عبد الغني ابو العينين

    1982-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was stabilized by either hydrated lime or the dolomitic monohydrate (Ca(OH)2. MgO) during suspension hydration at 25 and 60°C for 45 days. The distinct phases produced from the hydration of each stabilized clay suspension were identified by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. The role of either Ca(OH)2 and/or MgO in soil stabilization could be clearly understood in order to extend the use of portland cement for the stabilization of montmorillonite to produce soil cements...

  9. Review on the elaboration and characterization of ceramics refractories based on magnesite and dolomite

    OpenAIRE

    Chaouki Sadik; Omar Moudden; Abdselam El Bouari; Iz-Eddine El Amrani

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important elements of furnaces, boilers and other heating units is the structure (lining), usually made of silica–alumina, basic or special refractories. The basic refractories are materials that are increasingly in demand and whose manufacturing involves necessarily the use of MgO and CaO. In this article, the description and characterization of magnesite (MgCO3) and dolomite (Mg,Ca(CO3)2) and their contribution in industrial ceramics-refractories have been reviewed.

  10. Review on the elaboration and characterization of ceramics refractories based on magnesite and dolomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouki Sadik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important elements of furnaces, boilers and other heating units is the structure (lining, usually made of silica–alumina, basic or special refractories. The basic refractories are materials that are increasingly in demand and whose manufacturing involves necessarily the use of MgO and CaO. In this article, the description and characterization of magnesite (MgCO3 and dolomite (Mg,Ca(CO32 and their contribution in industrial ceramics-refractories have been reviewed.

  11. Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2005-11-09

    This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault

  12. A time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) study of the interaction of trivalent actinides (curium(III)) with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, Th.; Fanghaenel, Th.

    2002-01-01

    Cm(III) interaction with calcite was investigated in the trace concentration range. Two different Cm(III)/calcite sorption species were found. The first Cm(III) sorption species consists of a curium ion that is bonded onto the calcite surface. The second Cm(III) sorption species has lost its complete hydration sphere and is incorporated into the calcite bulk structure /1/. (orig.)

  13. Assessing the effects of soil liming with dolomitic limestone and sugar foam on soil acidity, leaf nutrient contents, grape yield and must quality in a Mediterranean vineyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olego, M.A.; Visconti, F.; Quiroga, M.J.; Paz, J.M. De; Garzón-Jimeno, E.

    2016-11-01

    Aluminium toxicity has been recognized as one of the most common causes of reduced grape yields in vineyard acid soils. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two liming materials, i.e. dolomitic lime and sugar foam, on a vineyard cultivated in an acid soil. The effects were studied in two soil layers (0-30 and 30-60 cm), as well as on leaf nutrient contents, must quality properties and grape yield, in an agricultural soil dedicated to Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Mencía’ cultivation. Data management and analysis were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). As liming material, sugar foam was more efficient than dolomitic limestone because sugar foam promoted the highest decrease in soil acidity properties at the same calcium carbonate equivalent dose. However, potassium contents in vines organs, including leaves and berries, seemed to decrease as a consequence of liming, with a concomitant increase in must total acidity. Soil available phosphorus also decreased as a consequence of liming, especially with sugar foam, though no effects were observed in plants. For these reasons fertilization of this soil with K and P is recommended along with liming. Grape yields in limed soils increased, although non-significantly, by 30%. This research has therefore provided an important opportunity to advance in our understanding of the effects of liming on grape quality and production in acid soils. (Author)

  14. Assessing the effects of soil liming with dolomitic limestone and sugar foam on soil acidity, leaf nutrient contents, grape yield and must quality in a Mediterranean vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Olego

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium toxicity has been recognized as one of the most common causes of reduced grape yields in vineyard acid soils. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two liming materials, i.e. dolomitic lime and sugar foam, on a vineyard cultivated in an acid soil. The effects were studied in two soil layers (0-30 and 30-60 cm, as well as on leaf nutrient contents, must quality properties and grape yield, in an agricultural soil dedicated to Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Mencía’ cultivation. Data management and analysis were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. As liming material, sugar foam was more efficient than dolomitic limestone because sugar foam promoted the highest decrease in soil acidity properties at the same calcium carbonate equivalent dose. However, potassium contents in vines organs, including leaves and berries, seemed to decrease as a consequence of liming, with a concomitant increase in must total acidity. Soil available phosphorus also decreased as a consequence of liming, especially with sugar foam, though no effects were observed in plants. For these reasons fertilization of this soil with K and P is recommended along with liming. Grape yields in limed soils increased, although non-significantly, by 30%. This research has therefore provided an important opportunity to advance in our understanding of the effects of liming on grape quality and production in acid soils.

  15. Origin of dolomites in a downslope biostrome, Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), central Idaho: evidence from REE patterns, stable isotopes, and petrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    A completely dolomitized coral-stromatoporoid biostrome occurs at the top of the Dark Dolomite member of the Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) at Grandview Canyon, Lost River Range, central Idaho. The biostrome overlies a thick sequence of dolostones that were deposited in slope to deep ramp settings. The biostrome, therefore, formed in an open marine setting after shallowing of deep water environments. Zoned dolospar cement fills dissolution vugs and tectonic fractures. Stable isotopes for zoned dolospar are -13.1 to -6.5 per thousand delta/sup 18/O (average - 11.5) and -1.5 to -0.1 per thousand delta/sup 13/C (average -0.4). REE patterns for zoned dolospar have positive Ce anomalies, but total REE abundance is similar to REE abundance for replacive dolomites. Stratigraphic occurrence in an open marine setting, stable isotopes, and REE patterns suggest replacive dolomite phases formed during shallow burial diagenesis with significant involvement of nonevaporated sea water. More negative Ce anomalies near the top of the biostrome suggest a diagenetic overprint by oxidizing meteoric waters. Zoned dolospar probably formed from warmer, reducing burial fluids. Carbon for zoned dolospar probably was recycled from preexisting dolomite. These data may be useful for interpreting the origin of other anomalous platform dolostones.

  16. Epigenetic dolomitization of the Přaídolí formation (Upper Silurian), the Barrandian basin, Czech Republic: implications for burial history of Lower Paleozoic strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchý, V.; Rozkošný, I.; Žák, K.; Franců, J.

    1996-06-01

    Stratabound epigenetic dolomite occurs in carbonate facies of the Barrandian basin (Silurian and Devonian), Czech Republic. The most intense dolomitization is developed in bioclastic calcarenites within the transition between micritic limestone and shaledominated Přídolí and Lochkov formations deposited on a carbonate slope. Medium-crystalline (100-400 µm), inclusion-rich, xenotopic matrix dolomite ( δ 18O=-4.64 to -3.40‰ PDB; δ 13C=+1.05 to +1.85‰ PDB) which selectively replaced most of the bioclastic precursor is volumetrically the most important dolomite type. Coarse crystalline saddle dolomite ( δ 18O=-8.04 to -5.14‰ PDB; δ 18C=+0.49 to +1.49 PDB) which precipitated in fractures and vugs within the matrix dolomite represents a later diagenetic dolomitization event. In some vugs, saddle dolomite coprecipitated with petroleum inclusion-rich authigenic quartz crystals and minor sulfides which, in turn, were post-dated by semisolid asphaltic bitumen. The interpretation of the dolomitization remains equivocal. Massive xenotopic dolomite, although generally characteristic of a deeper burial setting, may have been formed by a recrystallization of an earlier, possibly shallow burial dolomite. Deeper burial recrystallization by reactive basinal pore fluids that presumably migrated through the more permeable upper portion of the Přídolí sequence appears as a viable explanation for this dolomitization overprint. Saddle dolomite cement of the matrix dolomite is interpreted as the last dolomitization event that occurred during deep burial at the depth of the oil window zone. The presence of saddle dolomite, the fluid inclusion composition of associated quartz crystals, and vitrinite paleogeothermometry of adjacent sediments imply diagenetic burial temperatures as high as 160°C. Although high geothermal gradients in the past or the involvement of hydrothermally influenced basinal fluids can account for these elevated temperatures, burial heating beneath

  17. Epigenetic dolomitization of the Přídolí formation (Upper Silurian), the Barrandian basin, Czech Republic: implications for burial history of Lower Paleozoic strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchý, V.; Rozkošný, I.; Žák, K.; Franců, J.

    Stratabound epigenetic dolomite occurs in carbonate facies of the Barrandian basin (Silurian and Devonian), Czech Republic. The most intense dolomitization is developed in bioclastic calcarenites within the transition between micritic limestone and shale-dominated Přídolí and Lochkov formations deposited on a carbonate slope. Medium-crystalline (100-400μm), inclusion-rich, xenotopic matrix dolomite (δ18O=-4.64 to -3.40ö PDBδ13C=+1.05 to +1.85ö PDB) which selectively replaced most of the bioclastic precursor is volumetrically the most important dolomite type. Coarse crystalline saddle dolomite (δ18O=-8.04 to -5.14ö PDBδ18C=+0.49 to +1.49 PDB) which precipitated in fractures and vugs within the matrix dolomite represents a later diagenetic dolomitization event. In some vugs, saddle dolomite coprecipitated with petroleum inclusion-rich authigenic quartz crystals and minor sulfides which, in turn, were postdated by semisolid asphaltic bitumen. The interpretation of the dolomitization remains equivocal. Massive xenotopic dolomite, although generally characteristic of a deeper burial setting, may have been formed by a recrystallization of an earlier, possibly shallow burial dolomite. Deeper burial recrystallization by reactive basinal pore fluids that presumably migrated through the more permeable upper portion of the Přídolí sequence appears as a viable explanation for this dolomitization overprint. Saddle dolomite cement of the matrix dolomite is interpreted as the last dolomitization event that occurred during deep burial at the depth of the oil window zone. The presence of saddle dolomite, the fluid inclusion composition of associated quartz crystals, and vitrinite paleogeothermometry of adjacent sediments imply diagenetic burial temperatures as high as 160 °C. Although high geothermal gradients in the past or the involvement of hydrothermally influenced basinal fluids can account for these elevated temperatures, burial heating beneath approximately 3

  18. Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of dolomitization in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous platform carbonates, Başoba Yayla (Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Merve; Ziya Kırmacı, M.; Kandemir, Raif; Eroğlu, Tuğba

    2015-04-01

    The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Berdiga Formation with a wide distribution in E-W direction in the eastern Pontides (NE Turkey) is composed of platform carbonates. The formation with distinct lithofacies properties in both lateral and vertical directions was deposited on carbonate shelf changing from supratidal to platform margin reef and was buried until the end of Late Cretaceous. One of the typical exposures of formation is found around the Başoba Yayla area (Trabzon, NE Turkey) in northern zone of the eastern Pontides where the formation has a limited distribution. In this area, platform carbonates are 250 m in thickness and from bottom to top composed of dolomite, grainstone-packstone and skeleton wackestone. The 120-m thickened dolomite facies which comprises the lower part of formation contains four dolomite phases as replacement (Rd) and cement (Cd) types. Replacement dolomites (Rd) that are cut by low-amplitude stylolites are developed as 1) thin crystalline planar-s dolomite (Rd1), 2) thin-medium crystalline, texture-protective planar-s dolomite (Rd2) dolomite and 3) medium-coarse crystalline planar-s dolomite (Rd3). Coarse-very coarse crystalline dolomite cement (Cd) filling dissolution spaces and fractures in Rd1 dolomites are cogenetic with low-amplitude stylolites. Replacement dolomites are Ca-rich and non-stoichiometric (Ca56-60Mg40-44) and geochemically have two-population distribution and uniform dull red/non-luminescence appearance. The δ18O compositions of replacement dolomites are from -15.3 to -4.2 o VPDB, δ13C values are 1.5-3.7 o VPDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratios are 0.70675 to 0.70731. Sr, Na, Mn and Fe contents of these dolomites are 74-163 ppm, bdl-200 ppm, 94-553 ppm and 1400-3800 ppm, respectively. Petrographic and geochemical date yield that replacement dolomites (Rd) are formed before the chemical compression at shallow-moderate burial depths from Jurassic-Early Cretaceous seawater and/or seawater partly modified by rock

  19. Evaluation of Various Synthesis Methods for Calcite-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishna, Chilakala [Hanil Cement Corporation, Danyang (Korea, Republic of); Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This review paper evaluates different kinds of synthesis methods for calcite precipitated calcium carbonates by using different materials. The various processing routes of calcite with different compositions are reported and the possible optimum conditions required to synthesize a desired particle sizes of calcite are predicted. This paper mainly focuses on that the calcite morphology and size of the particles by carbonation process using loop reactors. In this regard, we have investigated various parameters such as CO{sub 2} flow rate, Ca (OH){sub 2} concentration, temperature, pH effect, reaction time and loop reactor mechanism with orifice diameter. The research results illustrate the formation of well-defined and pure calcite crystals with controlled crystal growth and particle size, without additives or organic solvents. The crystal growth and particle size can be controlled, and smaller sizes are obtained by decreasing the Ca (OH){sub 2} concentration and increasing the CO{sub 2} flow rate at lower temperatures with suitable pH. The crystal structure of obtained calcite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction method and the morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result of x-ray diffraction recognized that the calcite phase of calcium carbonate was the dominating crystalline structure.

  20. Fabrication of porous calcite using chopped nylon fiber and its evaluation using rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Tram, Nguyen Xuan Thanh; Tsuru, Kanji; Toita, Riki

    2015-02-01

    Although porous calcite has attracted attention as bone substitutes, limited studies have been made so far. In the present study, porous calcite block was fabricated by introducing chopped nylon fiber as porogen. Ca(OH)2 powder containing 10 wt% chopped nylon fiber was compacted at 150 MPa, and sintered to burn out the fiber and to carbonate the Ca(OH)2 under stream of 1:2 O2-CO2. Sintering of Ca(OH)2 at 750 °C or lower temperature resulted in incomplete burning out of the fiber whereas sintering at 800 °C or higher temperature resulted in the formation of CaO due to the thermal decomposition of Ca(OH)2. However, sintering at 770 °C resulted in complete burning out of the fiber and complete carbonation of Ca(OH)2 to calcite without forming CaO. Macro- and micro-porosities of the porous calcite were approximately 23 and 16%, respectively. Diameter of the macropores was approximately 100 μm which is suitable for bone tissue penetration. Porous calcite block fabricated by this method exhibited good tissue response when implanted in the bone defect in femur of 12-weeks-old rat. Four weeks after implantation, bone bonded on the surface of calcite. Furthermore, bone tissue penetrated interior to the macropore at 8 weeks. These results demonstrated the good potential value of porous calcite as artificial bone substitutes.

  1. Evaluation of Various Synthesis Methods for Calcite-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, Chilakala; Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan

    2017-01-01

    This review paper evaluates different kinds of synthesis methods for calcite precipitated calcium carbonates by using different materials. The various processing routes of calcite with different compositions are reported and the possible optimum conditions required to synthesize a desired particle sizes of calcite are predicted. This paper mainly focuses on that the calcite morphology and size of the particles by carbonation process using loop reactors. In this regard, we have investigated various parameters such as CO 2 flow rate, Ca (OH) 2 concentration, temperature, pH effect, reaction time and loop reactor mechanism with orifice diameter. The research results illustrate the formation of well-defined and pure calcite crystals with controlled crystal growth and particle size, without additives or organic solvents. The crystal growth and particle size can be controlled, and smaller sizes are obtained by decreasing the Ca (OH) 2 concentration and increasing the CO 2 flow rate at lower temperatures with suitable pH. The crystal structure of obtained calcite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction method and the morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result of x-ray diffraction recognized that the calcite phase of calcium carbonate was the dominating crystalline structure.

  2. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils. - Fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil

  4. A modeling approach to address spatial variability within the Culebra Dolomite transmissivity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVenue, A.M.; RamaRao, B.S.

    1992-12-01

    Spatial estimates of transmissivity, which are essential input to a groundwater flow model, are usually developed from a limited number of transmissivity measurements and therefore associated with an uncertainty. In an attempt to assess the spatial variability of the unmeasured transmissivities within the Culebra Dolomite near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a multiple realization approach is employed. An innovative aspect of the methodology is the generation of an ensemble of conditional simulations of the transmissivity field, which preserves the statistical moments and spatial correlation structure of the measured transmissivity field and horrors the measured values at their locations. Each simulation is then calibrated, using an iterative procedure, to match an exhaustive set of steady-state and transient pressure data. A completely automated inverse algorithm using pilot points as parameters of calibration was employed. The methodology was applied to the transmissivity fields for the Culebra Dolomite aquifer, and 70 conditional simulations were produced and calibrated. Based on an analysis of the calibrated transmissivity fields, additional data in a region east and north of the H-3 borehole would help to more accurately characterize the transmissivity of the region and reduce the uncertainty in calculating groundwater travel times. Progress in these areas would, in, turn, reduce the uncertainty in the prediction of concentrations at the accessible environment boundary

  5. FRACTAL ANALYSIS OF FRACTURE SYSTEMS IN UPPER TRIASSIC DOLOMITES IN ŽUMBERAK MOUNTAIN, CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Pavičić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of fractal analysis of fracture systems in upper Triassic dolomites in Žumberak Mountain, Croatia. Mechanical rock characteristics together with structural and diagenetic processes results with fracture systems that can be considered as fractals. They are scale-invariant in specific range of scales. Distribution of fractures can be than described with power law distribution and fractal dimension. Fractal dimension is a measure of how fractures fill the space. Fractal dimension can be estimated form photographs of outcrops by converting photographs to binary photographs. In binary photo there is only black (rock or fractures and white (fractures or rock. Fractal dimension is then estimated based on box-counting method. In this paper we present results of fractal analysis from three outcrops. Results are very similar to previous published results from outcrops of dolomites in Slovenia. Obtained fractal dimensions are in range 2,69-2,78 and it depends on how fracture systems are distributed in the outcrop. Lower values indicate smaller number of fractures and higher significance of larger fractures. Higher values indicate distribution of more similar sized fractures throughout whole outcrop. Fractal dimension is very significant parameter in rock fracture system characterisation sense it describes how fractures are distributed in the outcrop. It can be used in discrete fracture network modelling if spatial distribution of fractures is represented with power law distribution.

  6. Full-scale laboratory drilling tests on sandstone and dolomite. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, A.D.; Green, S.J.; Rogers, L.A.

    1977-12-01

    Full-scale laboratory drilling experiments were performed under simulated downhole conditions to determine what effect changing various drilling parameters has on penetration rate. The two rock types, typical of deep oil and gas reservoirs, used for the tests were Colton Sandstone and Bonne Terre Dolomite. Drilling was performed with standard 7/sup 7///sub 8/ inch rotary insert bits and water base mud. The results showed the penetration rate to be strongly dependent on bit weight, rotary speed, and borehole mud pressure. There was only a small dependence on mud flow rate. The drilling rate decreased rapidly with increasing borehole mud pressure for borehole pressures up to about 2,000 psi. Above this pressure, the borehole pressure and rotary speeds had a smaller effect on penetration rate. The penetration rate was then dependent mostly on the bit weight. Penetration rate per horsepower input was also shown to decrease at higher mud pressures and bit weights. The ratio of horizontal confining stress to axial overburden stress was maintained at 0.7 for simulated overburden stresses between 0 and 12,800 psi. For this simulated downhole stress state, the undrilled rock sample was within the elastic response range and the confining pressures were found to have only a small or negligible effect on the penetration rate. Visual examination of the bottomhole pattern of the rocks after simulated downhole drilling, however, revealed ductile chipping of the Sandstone, but more brittle behavior in the Dolomite.

  7. The coprecipitation of Sr2+ with calcite at 250C and 1 atm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingitore, N.E. Jr.; Eastman, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The incorporation of Sr 2+ into calcite at earth surface aqueous conditions is affected by the absolute concentration of Sr 2+ , the presence of Ba 2+ and NaCl in the solution and the rate of precipitation. At solution ratios (molar) of Sr 2+ to Ca 2+ in the low 10 -3 range, which yield calcites with several hundred ppm Sr 2+ , kappasub(calcite) sup(Sr) typically assumes a value between 0.10 and 0.20. Above these concentrations the value of kappasub(calcite) sup(Sr) drops to approximately 0.06. Furthermore, if minor amounts of Ba 2+ or large amounts of Na + (0.48 M) are added to a dilute Sr 2+ solution, a value around 0.06 for kappasub(calcite)sup(Sr) is found. This 'strontium concentration effect' and the associated 'competitive cation effect' suggest that small amounts of Sr 2+ may be incorporated into a limited number of nonlattice sites in calcite. Incorporation of Sr 2+ into these sites, presumably defects, noticeably affects kappasub(calcite)sup(Sr) only at low Sr 2+ concentrations and in the absence of competition from other large cations. An increase in kappasub(calcite)sup(Sr) with rate of precipitation, qualitatively similar to that found in other studies, was observed only when precipitation times were decreased from days to hours. For many geologic settings a partition coefficient for Sr 2+ into calcite of 0.06 appears appropriate, but there are situations - very low Sr 2+ concentrations, the presence of Mg 2+ , and fast precipitation rates - in which a larger value might better approximate natural partitioning. (author)

  8. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  9. The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the potential for calcium carbonate to reduce phosphate pollution in freshwaters by co-precipitation, a process known as a "self cleansing mechanism". Calcium carbonate saturation levels and phosphate concentrations (SRP - soluble reactive phosphate across the major eastern UK river basins are examined to test for solubility controls. The study shows that calcite saturation varies for each catchment as a function of flow and biological activity rather than by direct regulation by SRP. Indeed, there is no evidence, for any of the rivers studied, that calcite solubility controls hold. However, for groundwater and groundwater-fed springs in the Chalk of the Thames basin, calcite saturation is observed with associated low SRP levels. A self-cleansing mechanism may well be operative within the Chalk due to two factors. Firstly, there is a high potential for nucleation on the calcite micro-crystals in the aquifer. Secondly, there are within aquifer reactions that remove the calcite nucleating inhibitors (SRP and dissolved organic carbon, DOC to levels lower than those occurring within the rivers do. These inhibitors enter the catchment at very high concentrations in association with agricultural pollution (fertilizer application and animal slurry and household contamination (e.g. sewage sources from septic tanks. Under low flow conditions, when the saturation index for calcite is at its highest, so too is the concentration of the nucleation inhibitor SRP. Companion work shows that calcite precipitation can occur at the water-sediment interface of the river and this may involve SRP removal. The data, as a whole, define an apparent bound for calcite solubility control where in the presence of nucleating centres, SRP must be less than 4 mM-P l-1 and DOC must be less than 150 mM-C l-1: a condition that does not seem to pertain within most UK rivers. Keywords: calcite, calcium carbonate, phosphate, soluble reactive phosphate, dissolved

  10. Thermal and catalytic cracking of ethylene in presence of CaO, MgO, zeolite and calcined dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taralas, G.; Sjoestroem, K.; Jaeraas, S.; Bjoernbom, E. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1993-12-31

    The subject of the present work is to study the effect of catalysts such as calcined dolomite (CaO.MgO), CaO (quicklime), MgO and Zeolite (EKZ-4) on the cracking of ethylene in the presence and absence of steam. N-heptane, toluene, naphthalene, thiophene have been some suitable model compounds for studies of the thermal and catalytic decomposition of tar. Previous results showed that the reaction scheme of the thermal decomposition of n-heptane was consistent with the high yield of ethylene observed in thermal decomposition of n-heptane. The effect of the reactor wall and the ferric impurities in the dolomite are also subjects of the research in this study. The results may also throw some additional light on the nature of the gas-phase thermal and catalytic reactions occurring in the use of dolomite as tar cracking catalysts. 28 refs

  11. Monitoring of Calcite Precipitation in Hardwater Lakes with Multi-Spectral Remote Sensing Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Heine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcite precipitation is a common phenomenon in calcium-rich hardwater lakes during spring and summer, but the number and spatial distribution of lakes with calcite precipitation is unknown. This paper presents a remote sensing based method to observe calcite precipitation over large areas, which are an important prerequisite for a systematic monitoring and evaluation of restoration measurements. We use globally archived satellite remote sensing data for a retrospective systematic assessment of past multi-temporal calcite precipitation events. The database of this study consists of 205 data sets that comprise freely available Landsat and Sentinel 2 data acquired between 1998 and 2015 covering the Northeast German Plain. Calcite precipitation is automatically identified using the green spectra and the metric BGR area, the triangular area between the blue, green and red reflectance value. The validation is based on field measurements of CaCO3 concentrations at three selected lakes, Feldberger Haussee, Breiter Luzin and Schmaler Luzin. The classification accuracy (0.88 is highest for calcite concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L. False negative results are caused by the choice of a conservative classification threshold. False positive results can be explained by already increased calcite concentrations. We successfully transferred the developed method to 21 other hardwater lakes in Northeast Germany. The average duration of lakes with regular calcite precipitation is 37 days. The frequency of calcite precipitation reaches from single time detections up to detections nearly every year. False negative classification results and gaps in Landsat time series reduce the accuracy of frequency and duration monitoring, but in future the image density will increase by acquisitions of Sentinel-2a (and 2b. Our study tested successfully the transfer of the classification approach to Sentinel-2 images. Our study shows that 15 of the 24 lakes have at least one phase of

  12. Paleohydrogeological implications from fracture calcites in fissures of low transmissivity. A report of investigations in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlstedt, E.; Karhu, J.

    2014-07-01

    Samples of fracture fillings were collected from 26 bedrock fractures at Olkiluoto. Special attention was paid to fractures having low transmissivities of <1E-8 m 2 /s. The chemical composition and the C and O isotopic composition of the fracture filling calcite were analysed. In addition, fluid inclusions were studied and microthermometric measurements conducted on fracture filling calcite. The most common minor element in calcite fillings was Mn, having concentrations up to 3.4 wt-%. The δ13C values had a wide range, from -13.0 to 14.5 per mille, and the δ18O values a narrower range, from -13.4 to -7.3 per mille. The δ18O values of late-stage calcite appear to be independent of the transmissivity of the fractures, ranging from -11.2 to -7.3 per mille over a T range from 3E -6 to 1.6E -1 1 m 2 /s. The δ13C values of late-stage calcite appear to have more variation at high transmissivities of >1E-8 m 2 /s. Unusually low and high δ13C values in late-stage calcite fillings occur in the upper ∼ 400 m of the bedrock and are probably related to microbial reduction processes, at near surface (<60 m) conditions to oxidation of organic matter resulting in low δ13C values and at ∼ 55-400 m to methanogenesis, causing high δ 13C values. A relatively low spread in the δ 13C values of late-stage calcite precipitates in low transmissivity (<1E-8 m 2 /s) fractures is most likely caused by stable conditions in the areas of low conductivity in the bedrock, reflecting slow dissolution/reprecipitation of older carbonate fillings. Fluid inclusion data indicate variation in fracture water types from high temperature, ∼ 200 deg C, low salinity fluid with < 4 wt-% of NaCl eq to low temperature, <100 deg C, high salinity fluid with 17-29 wt-% of NaCl eq . The high temperature fluid is associated with Group 5 calcite fillings and the low temperature fluid with Group 3 calcite. The composition of fluids related to Group 4 calcite falls roughly between the compositions

  13. The influence of impurities on the growth rate of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H. J.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of 34 different additives on the growth rate of calcite were investigated. An initial growth rate of about one crystal monolayer (3 × 10 -8 cm) per minute was adjusted at a constant supersaturation which was maintained by a control circuit. Then the impurity was added step by step and the reduction of the growth rate was measured. The impurity concentration necessary to reduce the initial growth rate by a certain percentage increased in the order Fe 2+, ATP, P 3O 5-10, P 2O 4-7, (PO 3) 6-6, Zn 2+, ADP, Ce 3+, Pb 2+, carbamyl phosphate, Fe 3+, PO 3-4, Co 2+, Mn 2+, Be 2+, β-glycerophosphate, Ni 2+, Cd 2+, "Tris", phenylphosphate, chondroitine sulphate, Ba 2+, citrate, AMP, Sr 2+, tricarballylate, taurine, SO 2-4, Mg 2+ by 4 orders of magnitude. The most effective additives halved the initial growth rate in concentrations of 2 × 10 -8 mol/1. For Fe 2+ the halving concentration was nearly proportional to the initial rate. The mechanism of inhibition by adsorption of the impurities at growth sites (kinks) is discussed.

  14. THE EFFECT OF NANO METER SIZE ZRO2 PARTICLES ADDITION ON THE DENSIFICATION AND HYDRATION RESISTANCE OF MAGNESITE– DOLOMITE REFRACTORIES

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ghasemi-kahrizsangi; H. Gheisari-dehsheikh; M. Boroujerdnia

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of nano meter size ZrO2 particles on the microstructure, densification and hydration resistance of magnesite –dolomite refractories was investigated. 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt. % ZrO2 particles that were added to magnesite –dolomite refractories containing 35 wt. % CaO. The Hydration resistance was measured by change in the weight of specimens after 72 h at 25℃ and 95% relative humidity. The results showed with addition of nano meter size ZrO2 particles, the lat...

  15. Conditions of uranium-bearing calcite formation in ore-enclosing sediments of the Semizbaj deposit (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Maksimova, I.G.; Dojnikova, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation into uranium-bearing calcite, forming the cement of gravelly-sandy rocks of the Semizbaj uranium deposit. Core sampling in prospecting boreholes were used to establish geological conditions, place and time of uranium-bearing calcite formation. Calcite was investigated by optical, electron-microscope and radiographic methods. It is shown that uranium in calcite doesn't form its own mineral phase and exists in scattered state. Uranium in calcite-bearing minerals is present in isomorphic form. Uranium content in calcite was equal to 0.009-0.15 %. It is proposed that mineralization, formed in sedimentary rocks by processes of ground-stratum oxidation, is the source of uranium, enriching calcite. refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Machine learning approach for predicting the effect of CO2 solubility on dissolution rate of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeli, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    A machine learning-assisted model is developed to predict the dissolution rate of calcite in saline solutions that are imbibed with dissolved CO2 over a broad range of both subcritical and supercritical conditions. This study focuses on determining the rate of calcite dissolution within a temperature range of 50-100 C and pressures up to 600 bar, relevant for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. A general reaction kinetic model is used that is based on the extension of the standard Arrhenius equation with an added, solubility dependent, pH term to account for the saturated concentration of dissolved CO2. The kinetic model helps to obtain a predictive rate equation using machine learning methods to determine the dissolution of calcite as a function of temperature, pressure and salinity. The new rate equation helps us obtain good agreement with experimental data, and it is applied to study the geochemically induced alterations of fracture geometry due to calcite dissolution.

  17. High School Forum: "Invitations to Enquiry": The Calcite/Acid Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.; Driscoll, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry experiment which involves the reaction between calcite and hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. This reaction can be carried out as a projected demonstration and on an individual basis. (HM)

  18. Calcite dissolution along a transect in the western tropical Indian Ocean: A multiproxy approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    Three paleocarbonate ion proxies, size index, planktonic foraminifera shell weight, and calcite crystallinity, have been employed here to a set of core top samples from the western tropical Indian Ocean in the water depth ranges from 1086 to 4730 m...

  19. Enhancing mechanical properties of calcite by Mg substitutions: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstnerova, Pavlina; Friak, Martin; Hickel, Tilmann; Fabritius, Helge Otto; Lymperakis, Liverios; Petrov, Michal; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Joerg; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Zigler, Andreas; Hild, Sabine

    2011-03-01

    Arthropoda representing a majority of all known animal species are protected by an exoskeleton formed by their cuticle. The cuticle represents a hierarchically structured multifunctional bio-composite based on chitin and proteins. Some groups like Crustacea reinforce the load-bearing parts of their cuticle with calcite. As the calcite sometimes contains Mg it was speculated that Mg may have a stiffening impact on the mechanical properties of the cuticle. We present a theoretical parameter-free quantum-mechanical study of thermodynamic, structural and elastic properties of Mg-substituted calcite. Our results show that substituting Ca by Mg causes an almost linear decrease in the crystal volume with Mg concentration and of substituted crystals. As a consequence the calcite crystals become stiffer giving rise e.g. to substantially increased bulk moduli.

  20. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  1. What concentration of actinides can be packed into calcite? Hints from rare earth element (REE) composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.; Stipp, S.L.S.; Waight, T.; Baker, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For reliable modelling of actinide mobility in the event of spent fuel repository failure, we need data describing the uptake capacity of the minerals likely to find themselves in the transport path. Calcite (CaCO 3 ) is a common secondary mineral in fractures and pore fillings, especially downstream from degrading concrete facilities, so it is a likely candidate for incorporation. Investigations made under ACTAF, a 5. Framework EURATOM integrated project, as well as some other research studies, have shown that actinides are successfully incorporated as substituting ions within the calcite mineral structure. The question remaining, is how much can calcite take up. Geologists routinely use relative concentrations of rare Earth elements (REE's), the lanthanides, for interpreting rock genesis and history. One can also adopt them as analogues for the radioactive elements because their f-orbital electron configuration makes them behave very much like actinides. We collected and analysed a suite of 70 calcite samples from a great number of possible formation environments, geological ages and geographical locations, for the purpose of finding the range and maximum of total f-orbital substitution possible in calcite, under natural conditions. We analysed them using Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The maximum concentration found was about 5 x 10 -3 mole/kg total REE in a sample that had a geological history of formation where REE fluids played a role. Over the whole suite, total REE ranged from less than 10 -4 moles/kg for limestone samples formed from biogenic calcite where REE-enriched fluids would have played a negligible role. Thus, in natural calcite, REE's are present and all evidence points to a structural incorporation within the mineral rather than as a separate REE-rich phase. These data compare favourably with mole fractions from calcite grown synthetically, where as much as 6 x 10 -3

  2. Precipitation of Calcite during the Deposition of Paleogene Sangkarewang Oil Shale, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Haris Widayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.2.3.185-197Geochemical and petrographical analyses were carried out to investigate the occurrence of calcite in theformer Ombilin lacustrine lake. The study involves eight samples taken from a 56 m long drill core of Sangkarewangoil shale. Geochemical investigation showed that the samples consist of varied terrigenous input represented by Si, Al, K, and Ti, and autochthonous input represented by S, total organic carbon (TOC, and d13C of bulk organic matter. Along the drill core profile the abundance of autochthonous input decreases upwards, while that of terrigenous input oppositely increases upwards. Petrographical analysis revealed that calcite is a major mineral in the samples. In this study, the abundance of calcite could be represented by the abundance of Ca, as calcite is the only significant Ca containing mineral. Ca is abundant in the samples (8.4% in average and its concentration varies similarly with those of S, TOC, and d13C, suggesting that the element as well as calcite incorporates the autochthonous input. Thevariation of calcite abundance in the drill core profile is considered to be related with primary productivity changes during the development of the former lake. Higher primary productivity represented by more positive of d13C value(-24.8‰ during the deposition of the lower part of the drill core profile promoted the higher amount of deposited organic matter. In such environment, the supersaturation of carbonate ion in lake water was also reached and significant precipitation of authigenic calcite occurred. As the lake developed, the primary productivity decreased as indicated by more negative of d13C value (eventually -26.8‰. This condition led to the decreases of deposited organic matterand calcite in the lake sediments.

  3. Selective Separation of Fluorite, Barite and Calcite with Valonea Extract and Sodium Fluosilicate as Depressants

    OpenAIRE

    Zijie Ren; Futao Yu; Huimin Gao; Zhijie Chen; Yongjun Peng; Lingyun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Fluorite, barite and calcite are important industry minerals. However, they often co-exist, presenting difficulty in selectively separating them due to their similar surface properties. In this study, valonea extract and sodium fluosilicate were used as depressants to selectively separate them by flotation, with sodium oleate as the collector. The single mineral flotation results showed that valonea extract displayed the strongest depression on calcite, while sodium fluosilicate displayed the...

  4. Biomass gasification with air in a fluidized bed: Effect of the in-bed use of dolomite under different operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, J.; Caballero, M.A.; Martin, J.A.; Aznar, M.P.; Corella, J.

    1999-11-01

    The performance of a biomass gasifier, fluidized-bed type, is improved by in-bed use of calcined dolomite. Tar contents in the raw flue gas below 1 g/m{sub n}{sup 3} are obtained by using a bed with a percentage between 15 and 30 wt% of dolomite (the rest being silica sand). The work is carried out at small pilot-plant scale (10 kg of biomass/h) with equivalence ratios (ER) between 0.20 and 0.35 and temperatures of 800--840 C in the gasifier bed. To replace the eroded and elutriated dolomite (from the gasifier bed), an amount of dolomite (0.40--0.63 mm) is continuously fed, mixed with the biomass at 3 wt%. When the results obtained with in-bed dolomite are compared to the ones gained in a gasifier bed without dolomite, change of the following variables is reported: gas composition and its corresponding heating value, gas and char yields, apparent thermal efficiency, and tar contents. Once the usefulness of the in-bed use of dolomite is established, three main operation variables (ER and temperature of the gasifier bed and freeboard) are studied in the improved gasifier. Carryover of solids from the gasifier also increases when calcined dolomite is used because of its softness. Elutriation rate constants are calculated for several operational parameters.

  5. Iodine-129 and Iodine-127 speciation in groundwater at the Hanford Site, U.S.: iodate incorporation into calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Site, the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States, has large radioactive waste plumes containing high 129I levels. The geochemical transport and fate of radioiodine depends largely on its chemical speciation that is greatly affected by environmental factors. This study reports, for the first time, the speciation of stable and radioactive iodine in the groundwater from the Hanford Site. Iodate was the dominant species and accounts for up to 84%, followed by organo-iodine and minimal levels of iodide. The relatively high pH and oxidizing environment may have prevented iodate reduction. Our results identified that calcite precipitation caused by degassing of CO2 during deep groundwater sampling incorporated between 7 to 40% of dissolved iodine (including 127I and 129I) that was originally in the groundwater, transforming dissolved to particulate iodate during sampling. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying iodine incorporation by calcite, laboratory experiments were carried out to replicate this iodine sequestering processes. Two methods were utilized in this study, 1) addition of sodium carbonate; 2) addition of calcium chloride followed by sodium carbonate where the pH was well controlled at ~8.2, which is close to the average pH of Hanford Site groundwater. It was demonstrated that iodate was the main species incorporated into calcite and this incorporation process could be impeded by elevated pH and decreasing ionic strength in groundwater. This study provides critical information for predicting the long-term fate and transport of 129I at the Hanford Site and reveals a potential means for improved remediation strategies of 129I

  6. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  7. Selective adsorption of tannic acid on calcite and implications for separation of fluorite minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenhu; Wei, Sun; Hu, Yuehua; Tang, Honghu; Gao, Jiande; Yin, Zhigang; Guan, Qingjun

    2018-02-15

    Selective adsorption of tannic acid (TA) on calcite surfaces and the implications of this process for the separation of fluorite ore were studied by microflotation tests, surface adsorption experiments, zeta potential measurements, UV-vis analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The microflotation tests indicated that TA, when added before sodium oleate (NaOl), could selectively depress calcite from fluorite at pH 7. Surface adsorption experiments revealed that TA hinders the interaction of NaOl with calcite. The zeta potential of calcite became more negative with TA than with NaOl. However, the characteristic features of TA adsorption were not observed on fluorite, suggesting that the dominant adsorption sites are dissimilar on the fluorite and calcite surfaces in the pulp. UV-vis spectroscopy, XPS, and solution chemistry analysis were utilized to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism for selective adsorption of TA as well as the key factors determined by the Ca 2+ and Ca(OH) + components on the mineral surfaces. A possible adsorption mechanism along with an adsorption mode is proposed for the surface interaction between TA and calcite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sealing of rock joints by induced calcite precipitation. A case study from Bergeforsen hydro power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, E.; Qvarfort, U.; Ekstav, A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of sealing rock fractures by injecting water saturated with calcite solution, and hereby inducing a calcite precipitation inside the fracture, is investigated. The way of reaction and the amount of calcite precipitation will depend on the saturation of calcium carbonate in the water, the temperature, the pH and the CO 2 -pressure. There is experience of lime-saturated water injection in the rock foundation below the dam at Bergeforsens power plant (1955-1968). It was observed that the consumption of injected lime water decreased with time. A possible reason to the decrease in lime water consumption is that calcite has precipitated such that the permeability of the rock in general is lowered. Another explanation to this could be that calcite precipitation is concentrated to the fractures surrounding the injection holes, thus preventing the lime water from penetrating further into the rock. It is recommended that further studies of the fracture fillings in drill cores from Bergeforsen is performed. The aim of such study should be to determine the extent of induced calcite precipitation and to investigate its chemical and physical properties. (authors)

  9. Mg and Sr in Arctic echinoderm calcite: Nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglikowska, A.; Borszcz, T.; Drewnik, A.; Grabowska, M.; Humphreys-Williams, E.; Kędra, M.; Krzemińska, M.; Piwoni-Piórewicz, A.; Kukliński, P.

    2018-04-01

    The Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in echinoderm skeletal calcite are used as a proxy for Phanerozoic seawater changes, since the skeletal concentrations are, to some extent, controlled by environmental factors. However, it remains unclear how the influence of environmental factors is modified by vital effects, especially in polar waters. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare the ratios of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca among the skeletal parts of 10 common Arctic echinoderm species belonging to three classes Echinoidea, Asteroidea and Ophiuroidea that contribute substantially to the carbon cycle in the Arctic benthic system. Significant differences were recorded in echinoid skeletal element concentrations among specific skeletal parts. The lowest Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were detected in the spines (mean Mg/Ca 37.5 ± 8.8 SD; Sr/Ca 1.8 ± 0.1). The components of the Aristotle's lantern (epiphyses, pyramids and rotulas) were characterised by the highest Mg levels (Mg/Ca 79.9 ± 6.0; 75.2 ± 9.1; 60.1 ± 3.8, respectively). It is likely that mouth parts experience greater mechanical pressure compared to other body parts, and the higher content of Mg in the Aristotle's lantern contributes to its robustness. We did not find any distinctive trends in the distribution of skeletal elements in the asteroid and ophiuroid skeletal parts. The heterogeneous concentrations of Mg and Sr in different skeleton parts of the echinoids suggest possible physiological regulation of the chemical composition rather than the composition only being influenced by the environment. We cannot recommend echinoderm skeletons as reliable indicators in palaeoenvironmental reconstructions due to the possible biological control of skeletal chemistry, which may interfere with the effect of environmental variables.

  10. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MEIGS, LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM, RICHARD L.; JONES, TOYA L.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low ( -6 m 2 /s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10 -6 m 2 /s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow

  11. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  12. Stability of an anaerobic single reactor filled with dolomitic limestone with increased organic load of sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Ribas Döll

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic single-stage reactor was evaluated to treat vinasse and to evaluate its stability. This bench reactor was filled with dolomitic limestone with a horizontal plug flow to simulate a drainage channel. The experiment lasted 129 days while the reactor was submitted to different applied organic concentrations (chronologically applied: 3.0; 5.0; 12.0; 9.0 and 7.5 g L-1 as COD, chemical oxygen demand. COD removals were 50% and 9% with 3.0 and 7.5 g L-1, respectively. With 12.0 g L-1, reactor efficiency increased to 33%, with an abrupt drop to 3% on the 84th day. Therefore, in order to avoid reactor collapse, a remedial measure was necessary. The system remained in batch without feeding for 19 days (from the 85th to the 104th day with 9.0 g L-1. Afterwards, it was observed that the performance of the system tended to stabilize, reaching 47% with 7.5 g L-1 in the 118th day. At the end of the experiment, the potassium content of the wastewater decreased from 800 mg L-1 to 594 mg L-1 (on an average 25% and calcium and magnesium increased within the reactor liquor. The dissolution of the limestone inside the liquor reactor probably caused this result. After the treatment with limestone, the average pH value of the effluent increased from 4.9 to over 6.0 in all organic concentrations. It could be concluded that the reactor filled with dolomitic limestone in these operational conditions assured a low efficiency in COD removal, potassium reduction, increasing values of pH, alkalinity, calcium and magnesium. The instability was observed when there was increase in organic load to 12 g L-1 with subsequent recovery.

  13. Dolomitization of Mississippian carbonates in the Shell Waterton gas field, southwestern Alberta: insights from paleomagnetism. petrology,and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewchuk, M. T.; Al-Aaasm, I. I.; Symons, S. T. A. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada); Gillen, K. P. [Vox Terrae, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The process and timing of dolomitization and hydrocarbon migration in carbonates from the Mississippian Mount Head Formation of the Shell Waterton gas field in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta were examined using petrological, geochemical and paleomagnetic techniques. Plug samples were obtained from three unoriented drill cores and their azimuths were measured with respect to a master orientation line on fitted segments of each core. Dolomite and anhydrite from Well 44 yielded present Earth magnetic field (PEMF) directions between 150 degrees C and 300 degrees C. Geochemical analysis yielded values that are consistent with postulated Mississippian seawater values as petrographic evidence indicated little or no diagenetic alteration. Dolomite from wells 50 and 53 yielded PEMF directions also in the 150 degrees C and 300 degrees C range, but reversed Cretaceous magnetizations above 300 degrees C, especially in well 53. These dolomites also showed much more isotopic and petrographic variation, indicating significant diagenetic alteration. Paleomagnetic results suggests that these alterations occurred during basinal fluid flow associated with the Laramide deformation during the late Cretaceous to Paleocene. This deformation is believed to be the same event that was responsible for the accumulation of hydrocarbons. 46 refs., 4 tabs., 14 figs.

  14. Calcite twinning strain variations across the Proterozoic Grenville orogen and Keweenaw-Kapuskasing inverted foreland, USA and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Craddock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the calcite twinning strain results of a traverse across the Grenville orogen from Parry Sound, Ontario (NW to Ft. Ann, New York (SE, including the younger, adjacent Ordovician Taconic allochthon. Fifty four carbonates (marbles, calcite veins, Ordovician limestone were collected resulting in 68 strain analyses on mechanically twinned calcite (n = 2337 grains across the Central Gneiss Belt (CGB; 3 samples, the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB; 27 samples, the Central Granulite Terrane (CGT; Adirondack's; 13 samples and the Ottawan Orogenic Lid (OOL; 11 samples. Twinning strains in the greenschist-grade OOL marbles preserve N–S shortening and U-Pb titanite ages (∼1150 Ma; n = 4 document these marbles formed during the Shawinigan (1190–1140 Ma part of the Grenville orogen. From northwest to southeast, the Ottawan (1095–1020 Ma twinning strain is dominantly a layer-parallel shortening fabric oriented N–S (Parry Sound, then becomes parallel to the Grenville thrust direction (NW–SE across the CMB to the Adirondack Highlands where the sub-horizontal shortening strain becomes margin-parallel (SW–NE. Within the regional sample suite there are two areas studied in detail, the Bancroft shear zone (n = 11 and a roadcut on the southeast side of the Adirondack Mountains (Ft. Ann, NY; n = 8. Marbles from the Bancroft shear zone contain calcite grains with 2 sets of twin lamellae (e1 and e2. The better-developed e1 sets (n = 406 record a horizontal fabric oriented NW–SE whereas the younger e2 lamellae (n = 146 preserve a margin-parallel (SW–NE horizontal fabric. Both the e1 and e2 strains record an overprint vertical shortening strain (NEV, perhaps related to extensional orogenic collapse. We also report an Ottawan orogen-aged granoblastic mylonite (1093 Ma, U-Pb zircon; 1102 Ma Ar-Ar biotite in the Keweenaw thrust hanging wall 500 km inboard of the Grenville front and interpret the relations of Grenville

  15. Calcite Fluid Inclusion, Paragenetic, and Oxygen Isotopic Records of Thermal Event(s) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, B.; Moscati, R.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository situated above the water table in 12.7 Ma tuffs. A wealth of textural and geochemical evidence from low-temperature deposits of calcite and silica, indicates that their genesis is related to unsaturated zone (UZ) percolation and that the level of the potential repository has never been saturated. Nonetheless, some scientists contend that thermal waters have periodically risen to the surface depositing calcite and opal in the tuffs and at the surface. This hypothesis received some support in 1996 when two-phase fluid inclusions (FIs) with homogenization temperatures (Th) between 35 and 75 C were reported from UZ calcite. Calcite deposition likely followed closely on the cooling of the tuffs and continues into the present. The paragenetic sequence of calcite and silica in the UZ is early stage calcite followed by chalcedony and quartz, then calcite with local opal during middle and late stages. Four types of FIs are found in calcite assemblages: (1) all-liquid (L); (2) all-vapor (V); (3) 2-phase with large and variable V:L ratios; and (4) a few 2-phase with small and consistent V:L ratios. Late calcite contains no FI assemblages indicating elevated depositional temperatures. In early calcite, the Th of type 4 FIs ranges from ∼ 40 to ∼ 85 C. Such temperatures (sub-boiling) and the assemblage of FIs are consistent with deposition in the UZ. Some delta 18O values < 10 permil in early calcite support such temperatures. Type 4 FIs, however, seem to be restricted to the early calcite stage, during which either cooling of the tuffs or regional volcanism were possible heat sources. Nonetheless, at present there is no compelling evidence of upwelling water as a source for the calcite/opal deposits

  16. Effect of dolomite and biochar addition on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Aung Zaw; Sudo, Shigeto; Akiyama, Hiroko; Win, Khin Thuzar; Shibata, Akira; Yamamoto, Akinori; Sano, Tomohito; Hirono, Yuhei

    2018-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to study the effects of liming and different biochar amendments on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil. The first experiment was done with three different rates of N treatment; N 300 (300 kg N ha-1), N 600 (600 kg N ha-1) and N 900 (900 kg N ha-1) and four different rates of bamboo biochar amendment; 0%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% biochar. The second experiment was done with three different biochars at a rate of 2% (rice husk, sawdust, and bamboo) and a control and lime treatment (dolomite) and control at two moisture levels (50% and 90% water filled pore space (WFPS)). The results showed that dolomite and biochar amendment significantly increased soil pH. However, only biochar amendment showed a significant increase in total carbon (C), C/N (the ratio of total carbon and total nitrogen), and C/IN ratio (the ratio of total carbon and inorganic nitrogen) at the end of incubation. Reduction in soil NO3--N concentration was observed under different biochar amendments. Bamboo biochar with the rates of 0.5, 1 and 2% reduced cumulative N2O emission by 38%, 48% and 61%, respectively, compare to the control soil in experiment 1. Dolomite and biochar, either alone or combined significantly reduced cumulative N2O emission by 4.6% to 32.7% in experiment 2. Reduction in N2O production under biochar amendment was due to increases in soil pH and decreases in the magnitude of mineral-N in soil. Although, both dolomite and biochar increased cumulative CO2 emission, only biochar amendment had a significant effect. The present study suggests that application of dolomite and biochar to acidic tea field soil can mitigate N2O emissions.

  17. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  18. Biogenic processes in crystalline bedrock fractures indicated by carbon isotope signatures of secondary calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A.; Pitkänen, Petteri; Whitehouse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Variation in 13 C/ 12 C-isotope ratios of fracture filling calcite was analyzed in situ to investigate carbon sources and cycling in fractured bedrock. The study was conducted by separating sections of fracture fillings, and analyzing the 13 C/ 12 C-ratios with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Specifically, the study was aimed at fillings where previously published sulfur isotope data indicated the occurrence of bacterial sulfate reduction. The results showed that the δ 13 C values of calcite were highly variable, ranging from −53.8‰ to +31.6‰ (VPDB). The analysis also showed high variations within single fillings of up to 39‰. The analyzed calcite fillings were mostly associated with two calcite groups, of which Group 3 represents possible Paleozoic fluid circulation, based on comparison with similar dated coatings within the Baltic Shield and the succeeding Group 1–2 fillings represent late-stage, low temperature mineralization and are possibly late Paleozoic to Quaternary in age. Both generations were associated with pyrite with δ 34 S values indicative of bacterial sulfate reduction. The δ 13 C values of calcite, however, were indicative of geochemical environments which were distinct for these generations. The δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite varied from −22.1‰ to +11‰, with a distinct peak at −16‰ to −12‰. Furthermore, there were no observable depth dependent trends in the δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite. The δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite were indicative of organic matter degradation and methanogenesis. In contrast to the Group 3 fillings, the δ 13 C values of Group 1–2 calcite were highly variable, ranging from −53.8‰ to +31.6‰ and they showed systematic variation with depth. The near surface environment of <30 m (bsl) was characterized by δ 13 C values indicative of degradation of surface derived organic matter, with δ 13 C values ranging from −30.3‰ to −5.5‰. The intermediate depth of

  19. Effect of brine salinity and guar gum on the transport of barium through dolomite rocks: Implications for unconventional oil and gas wastewater disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Pouyan; Vilcáez, Javier

    2018-03-12

    This research aimed to elucidate the effect of brine salinity and guar gum on the sorption and transport of Ba in dolomite rocks collected from the Arbuckle formation in Oklahoma, USA. Guar gum represents the most important organic additive used in viscosified fracturing fluids, and Ba constitutes the most common and abundant heavy metal found in unconventional oil and gas (UOG) wastewater. Batch experiments conducted using powdered dolomite rocks (500-600 μm particle size) revealed that at brine salinities of UOG wastewater, chloro-complexation reactions between Ba and Cl ions and pH changes that results from dolomite dissolution are the controlling factors of Ba sorption on dolomite. Competition of Ba with common cations (Ca and Mg) for hydration sites of dolomite, plays a secondary role. Core-flooding experiments conducted to analyze the transport of Ba through natural and synthetic dolomite core plugs are in agreement with the batch sorption experimental results. The transport of Ba through dolomite rocks, increases with increasing brine salinity (0-180,000 mg-NaCl/L). The presence guar gum (50-500 mg/L) does not affect the transport of Ba through dolomite rocks of high flow properties (25-29.6% porosity, 9.6-13.7 mD permeability). However, core-flooding experiments conducted using tight dolomite rocks (6.5-8.6% porosity, 0.06-0.3 mD permeability), revealed that guar gum can retard the transport of Ba by clogging high permeability/porosity regions of tight dolomite rocks. The mechanism of Ba sorption on dolomite can be represented by a sorption model that accounts for both surface complexation reactions on three distinct hydration sites (>CaOH o , >MgOH o , and >CO 3 H o ), and the kinetic dissolution of dolomite. These results are important in understanding and predicting the fate of Ba present in UOG wastewater disposed into deep dolomite saline aquifers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal and Evolved Gas Behavior of Calcite Under Mars Phoenix TEGA Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D.W.; Niles, P.B.; Morris, R.V.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.; Lauer, H.V.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS). Martian soil was heated up to 1000 C in the DSC ovens and evolved gases from mineral decomposition products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil. Initial TEGA results indicated the presence of endothermic peaks with onset temperatures that ranged from 675 C to 750 C with corresponding CO2 release. This result suggests the presence of calcite (CaCO3. CaO + CO2). Organic combustion to CO2 is not likely since this mostly occurs at temperatures below 550 C. Fe-carbonate and Mg-carbonate are not likely because their decomposition temperatures are less than 600 C. TEGA enthalpy determinations suggest that calcite, may occur in the Martian soil in concentrations of approx.1 to 5 wt. %. The detection of calcite could be questioned based on previous results that suggest Mars soils are mostly acidic. However, the Phoenix landing site soil pH was measured at pH 8.3 0.5, which is typical of terrestrial soils where pH is controlled by calcite solubility. The range of onset temperatures and calcite concentration as calculated by TEGA is poorly con-strained in part because of limited thermal data of cal-cite at reduced pressures. TEGA operates at calcite literature thermal data was obtained at 1000 mbar or higher pressures.

  1. Behaviour of major, minor and trace elements (including REEs during kaolinization processes at Zonouz deposit, northeast of Marand, East Azarbaidjan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Alipour

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Zonouz kaolin deposit is located ~15 km northeast of Marand, East-Azarbaidjan province. Based on physical features in field investigations, such as color, five distinct kaolin types including (1 white, (2 lemon, (3 gray, (4 brown, and (5 yellow are distinguished in the deposit. Field evidence and petrographic studies indicate that the deposit is genetically close to trachy-andesite rocks. According to mineralogical data, the deposit contains quartz, kaolinite, montmorillonite, calcite, pyrophyllite, chlorite, muscovite-illite, dolomite, hematite, and anatase minerals. Geochemical data indicate that function of alteration processes on trachy-andesite rocks during development of Zonouz ore deposit was accompanied by leaching of elements such as Al, Na, K, Rb, Ba, V, Hf, Cu, Zr, Tm, Yb, and Lu, enrichment of elements such as U, Nb, and Ta, and leaching-fixation of elements such as Si, Fe, Ca, Mg, Ti, Mn, P, Cs, Sr, Th, Co, Cr, Ni, Y, Ga, LREE, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er. Incorporation of obtained results from mineralogical and geochemical studies show that physico-chemical conditions of alteration environment, the relative stability of primary minerals, surface adsorption, preferential sorption by metallic oxides, existing of organic matters, scavenging and concentration processes, and fixation in neomorphic mineralogical phases played important role in distribution of elements in the deposit. Geochemical studies show that development of the deposit is relative to two types of processes, (1 hypogene and (2 supergene. The distribution pattern of REEs indicates that differentiation degree of LREEs from HREEs in supergene kaolins is more than hypogene kaolins. Geochemical studies indicate that minerals such as Mn-oxides, zircon, anatase, hematite, cerianite, and secondary phosphates (monazite, rhabdophane, churchite, and zenotime are the potential hosts for rare earth elements in this deposit.

  2. Direct ink writing of silica-bonded calcite scaffolds from preceramic polymers and fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Elsayed, H; Badocco, D; Pastore, P; Bellucci, D; Cannillo, V; Detsch, R; Boccaccini, A R; Bernardo, E

    2017-05-11

    Silica-bonded calcite scaffolds have been successfully 3D-printed by direct ink writing, starting from a paste comprising a silicone polymer and calcite powders, calibrated in order to match a SiO 2 /CaCO 3 weight balance of 35/65. The scaffolds, fabricated with two slightly different geometries, were first cross-linked at 350 °C, then fired at 600 °C, in air. The low temperature adopted for the conversion of the polymer into amorphous silica, by thermo-oxidative decomposition, prevented the decomposition of calcite. The obtained silica-bonded calcite scaffolds featured open porosity of about 56%-64% and compressive strength of about 2.9-5.5 MPa, depending on the geometry. Dissolution studies in SBF and preliminary cell culture tests, with bone marrow stromal cells, confirmed the in vitro bioactivity of the scaffolds and their biocompatibility. The seeded cells were found to be alive, well anchored and spread on the samples surface. The new silica-calcite composites are expected to be suitable candidates as tissue-engineering 3D scaffolds for regeneration of cancellous bone defects.

  3. Sequestration of Antimony on Calcite Observed by Time-Resolved Nanoscale Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V; Montes-Hernandez, German; King, Helen E; Breedveld, Gijs D; Okkenhaug, Gudny

    2018-01-02

    Antimony, which has damaging effects on the human body and the ecosystem, can be released into soils, ground-, and surface waters either from ore minerals that weather in near surface environments, or due to anthropogenic releases from waste rich in antimony, a component used in batteries, electronics, ammunitions, plastics, and many other industrial applications. Here, we show that dissolved Sb can interact with calcite, a widespread carbonate mineral, through a coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism. The process is imaged in situ, at room temperature, at the nanometer scale by using an atomic force microscope equipped with a flow-through cell. Time-resolved imaging allowed following the coupled process of calcite dissolution, nucleation of precipitates at the calcite surface and growth of these precipitates. Sb(V) forms a precipitate, whereas Sb(III) needs to be oxidized to Sb(V) before being incorporated in the new phase. Scanning-electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy allowed identification of the precipitates as two different calcium-antimony phases (Ca 2 Sb 2 O 7 ). This coupled dissolution-precipitation process that occurs in a boundary layer at the calcite surface can sequester Sb as a solid phase on calcite, which has environmental implications as it may reduce the mobility of this hazardous compound in soils and groundwaters.

  4. The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan Diego; Shaw, Samuel; Benning, Liane G

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of nanoparticulate amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite, were studied at a range of environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-25 °C) using synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (ED-XRD) in conjunction with high-resolution electron microscopy, ex situ X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The crystallization process occurs in two stages; firstly, the particles of ACC rapidly dehydrate and crystallize to form individual particles of vaterite; secondly, the vaterite transforms to calcite via a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism with the reaction rate controlled by the surface area of calcite. The second stage of the reaction is approximately 10 times slower than the first. Activation energies of calcite nucleation and crystallization are 73±10 and 66±2 kJ mol(-1), respectively. A model to calculate the degree of calcite crystallization from ACC at environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-40 °C) is also presented.

  5. Selective adsorption of benzhydroxamic acid on fluorite rendering selective separation of fluorite/calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Zhiyong; Khoso, Sultan Ahmed; Gao, Jiande; Sun, Wei; Pu, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2018-03-01

    Fluorite, a chief source of fluorine in the nature, usually coexists with calcite mineral in ore deposits. Worldwide, flotation techniques with a selective collector and/or a selective depressant are commonly preferred for the separation of fluorite from calcite. In the present study, an attempt was made to use benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) as a collector for the selective separation of fluorite from calcite without using any depressant. Results obtained from the flotation experiments for single mineral and mixed binary minerals revealed that the BHA has a good selective collecting ability for the fluorite when 50 mg/L of BHA was used at pH of 9. The results from the zeta potential and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the BHA easily chemisorbs onto the fluorite as compared to calcite. Crystal chemistry calculations showed the larger Ca density and the higher Ca activity on fluorite surface mainly account for the selective adsorption of BHA on fluorite, leading to the selective separation of fluorite from calcite. Moreover, a stronger hydrogen bonding with BHA and the weaker electrostatic repulsion with BHA- also contribute to the stronger interaction of BHA species with fluorite surface.

  6. Selective Separation of Fluorite, Barite and Calcite with Valonea Extract and Sodium Fluosilicate as Depressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijie Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorite, barite and calcite are important industry minerals. However, they often co-exist, presenting difficulty in selectively separating them due to their similar surface properties. In this study, valonea extract and sodium fluosilicate were used as depressants to selectively separate them by flotation, with sodium oleate as the collector. The single mineral flotation results showed that valonea extract displayed the strongest depression on calcite, while sodium fluosilicate displayed the strongest depression on barite. These two depressants allowed selective separation of the three minerals through sequential flotation. The flotation of mixed minerals showed that 94% of the calcite was successfully depressed by the valonea extract, and 95% recovery of the fluorite was achieved in the subsequent flotation with sodium fluosilicate depressing barite. The different depressant–mineral interactions were investigated via electro-kinetic studies and molecular dynamics (MD simulations using the Materials Studio 6.0 program. The valonea extract exhibited the strongest adsorption on the calcite surface, and sodium fluosilicate exhibited the strongest adsorption on the barite surface, which prevented oleate species from reacting with Ca2+ or Ba2+ surface sites. This study provides useful guidance for how to process fluorite, barite and calcite resources.

  7. Mechanism of Calcite Co-Orientation in the Sea Urchin Tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, Christopher; Metzler, Rebecca; Gong, Y. U. T.; Olson, Ian; Aizenberg, Joanna; Politi, Yael; Wilt, Fred; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sea urchin teeth are remarkable and complex calcite structures, continuously growing at the forming end and self-sharpening at the mature grinding tip. The calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) crystals of tooth components, plates, fibers, and a high-Mg polycrystalline matrix, have highly co-oriented crystallographic axes. This ability to co-orient calcite in a mineralized structure is shared by all echinoderms. However, the physico-chemical mechanism by which calcite crystals become co-oriented in echinoderms remains enigmatic. Here, we show differences in calcite c-axis orientations in the tooth of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and microbeam X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD). All plates share one crystal orientation, propagated through pillar bridges, while fibers and polycrystalline matrix share another orientation. Furthermore, in the forming end of the tooth, we observe that CaCO{sub 3} is present as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). We demonstrate that co-orientation of the nanoparticles in the polycrystalline matrix occurs via solid-state secondary nucleation, propagating out from the previously formed fibers and plates, into the amorphous precursor nanoparticles. Because amorphous precursors were observed in diverse biominerals, solid-state secondary nucleation is likely to be a general mechanism for the co-orientation of biomineral components in organisms from different phyla.

  8. Formation of star-shaped calcite crystals with Mg 2+ inorganic mineralizer without organic template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liying; Zhao, Qingrui; Zheng, Xiuwen; Xie, Yi

    2006-04-01

    Star-shaped calcite crystals with 3¯m symmetry were obtained in the mixed solvent of ethanol and H 2O (4:1 vol%) using Mg 2+ as grow mineralizer without any organic template under the solvothermal condition. The crystals branched to the six directions perpendicular to the c-axis. In the process, Mg 2+ takes an important influence on such novel morphology via entering the crystal lattice of calcite to absorb the special plane and change the general growth habit. The aqueous solvent is favorable to form aragonite, while the presence of alcohol promotes the formation of calcite, the thermodynamically stable phase. The products were characterized by the techniques of XRD, SEM, SAED, IR and ICP. The formation process was also primarily studied.

  9. Strontium, nickel, cadmium, and lead substitution into calcite, studied by density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have used density functional theory to predict the ion exchange energies for divalent cations Ni(2+), Sr(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) into a calcite {10.4} surface in equilibrium with water. Exchange energies were calculated for substitution into the topmost surface layer, at the mineral-fluid inte......We have used density functional theory to predict the ion exchange energies for divalent cations Ni(2+), Sr(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) into a calcite {10.4} surface in equilibrium with water. Exchange energies were calculated for substitution into the topmost surface layer, at the mineral...... is favored at the mineral-fluid interface compared with bulk substitution, which also agrees with experimental data. Our results predict that Ni(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) form a stable solid solution with calcite. Successful prediction of the experimental results gives us confidence in our ability to predict...

  10. Index of refraction enhancement of calcite particles coated with zinc carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattaud, Kathleen; Vilminot, Serge; Hirlimann, Charles; Parant, Hubert; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    ZnCO 3 coating on calcite particles has been developed in order to enhance the index of refraction of this mineral that is used as a charge in paper, paint and polymer industries. Chemical reaction between calcite particles in an aqueous suspension with zinc chloride promotes the formation of a ZnCO 3 coating consisting of two layers with different interactions with the calcite particle. The refraction index of the resulting composite particles increases with the Zn/Ca ratio. A model allows to evaluate the coating thickness. The value of the scattering S and diffusion K coefficients of sheets coated with the ZnCO 3 coated particles reveal a dependence on the preparation conditions with a 15% increase for the best samples.

  11. Experimental diagenesis: insights into aragonite to calcite transformation of Arctica islandica shells by hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Laura A.; Griesshaber, Erika; Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Müller, Dirk; Ritter, Ann-Christine; Hippler, Dorothee; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Dietzel, Martin; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schöne, Bernd R.; Angiolini, Lucia; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2017-03-01

    Biomineralised hard parts form the most important physical fossil record of past environmental conditions. However, living organisms are not in thermodynamic equilibrium with their environment and create local chemical compartments within their bodies where physiologic processes such as biomineralisation take place. In generating their mineralised hard parts, most marine invertebrates produce metastable aragonite rather than the stable polymorph of CaCO3, calcite. After death of the organism the physiological conditions, which were present during biomineralisation, are not sustained any further and the system moves toward inorganic equilibrium with the surrounding inorganic geological system. Thus, during diagenesis the original biogenic structure of aragonitic tissue disappears and is replaced by inorganic structural features. In order to understand the diagenetic replacement of biogenic aragonite to non-biogenic calcite, we subjected Arctica islandica mollusc shells to hydrothermal alteration experiments. Experimental conditions were between 100 and 175 °C, with the main focus on 100 and 175 °C, reaction durations between 1 and 84 days, and alteration fluids simulating meteoric and burial waters, respectively. Detailed microstructural and geochemical data were collected for samples altered at 100 °C (and at 0.1 MPa pressure) for 28 days and for samples altered at 175 °C (and at 0.9 MPa pressure) for 7 and 84 days. During hydrothermal alteration at 100 °C for 28 days most but not the entire biopolymer matrix was destroyed, while shell aragonite and its characteristic microstructure was largely preserved. In all experiments up to 174 °C, there are no signs of a replacement reaction of shell aragonite to calcite in X-ray diffraction bulk analysis. At 175 °C the replacement reaction started after a dormant time of 4 days, and the original shell microstructure was almost completely overprinted by the aragonite to calcite replacement reaction after 10 days

  12. Strontium isotope evolution of pore water and calcite in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Brian D.; Futa, Kiyoto

    2001-01-01

    Pore water in the Topopah Spring Tuff has a narrow range of (delta) 87 Sr values that can be calculated from the (delta) 87 Sr values of the rock considering advection through and reaction with the overlying nonwelded tuffs of the PTn. This model can be extended to estimate the variation of (delta) 87 Sr in the pore water through time; this approximates the variation of (delta) 87 Sr measured in calcite fracture coatings. In samples of calcite where no silica can be dated by other methods, strontium isotope data may be the only method to determine ages. In addition, other Sr-bearing minerals in the calcite and opal coatings, such as fluorite, may be dated using the same model

  13. Thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence studies of calcite and MgO: surface defects and heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeksu, H.Y.; Brown, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the problems which preclude accurate thermoluminescence (TL) dating of geologically formed calcite stem from different sample pre-treatment procedures, such as grinding, drilling or pre-heating. It has long been known that grinding can introduce spurious TL in calcite, but there have been wide differences of opinion as to the magnitude of the influence and its importance. Therefore, various grinding and acid-washing procedures have been suggested to avoid spurious thermoluminescence. Various models have been developed to explain the mechanism. We have studied the changes in thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) properties as well as in the spectral composition of the glow from calcite and MgO due to surface defects and heat treatment. It is found that both laboratory heat treatment and surface indents give rise to changes in TL efficiency. (author)

  14. Smaller Calcite Lattice Deformation Caused by Occluded Organic Material in Coccoliths than in Mollusk Shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froelich, Simon; Sørensen, H.O.; Hakim, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    The growth and nucleation of biominerals are directed and affected by associated biological molecules. In this paper, we investigate the influence of occluded biomolecules on biogenic calcite from the coccolithophorid Pleurochrysis carterae and from chalk, a rock composed predominantly of fossil....... Two heating cycles allow us to differentiate the effects of thermal agitation and organic molecules. Single peak analysis and Rietveld refinement were combined to show significant differences resulting from the occluded biomolecules on the mineral phase in biogenic calcite in the mollusk shell....... This suggests that the interaction between biomolecules and calcite is not as tight in the coccoliths as in the shell. Although the shape of chalk has been preserved over millions of years, no major influence on the crystal lattice was observed in the chalk samples....

  15. Neutron-activation determination of the rare earths in natural calcites using a semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaganov, N.A.; Bulnaev, A.I.; Mejer, V.A.; Ponomarev, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The application of germanium semiconducting detector is described. The detector has an energy resolution about 1 KeV and makes it possible to determine the content of Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, and Yb in natural calcites with high sensitivity. The region of soft γ-radiation of activated calcites is more favourable for measurements to be performed than the region of hard γ-rays. Semiconducting detectors of radiation type are relatively cheap; they can be stored at room temperature. The limit of determining rare earth elements in calcites is (g): Eu-1.5.10 -9 ; Tb-4.0.10 -9 ; Yb-7.0.10 -9 ; Ce-1.0.10 -7 ; Nd-5.0.10 -7 ; Gd-1.0.10 -6 . A relative error of concentration determination is 10-20%

  16. Rearrangement of porous CaO aggregates during calcite decomposition in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beruto, D.; Barco, L.; Searcy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    High-resolution SEM photographs, N 2 adsorption isotherms, Hg porosimetry, and micrometer measurements were used to characterize CaO particle shapes and pore-size distributions that result when calcite crystals are decomposed in vacuum at 686 0 C. The surface area of the CaO produced from large calcite crystals is constant at 116 + or - 4 m 2 /g independent of the extent of reaction. The volume occupied by a CaO aggregate is approx. = 98 + or - 2% that of the original calcite crystal. The approx. = 54% total porosity is comprised of 42% pores of approx. = 5 nm cross section and 12% pores of approx. = 10 μm cross section. The duplex pore structure is formed by a diffusionless repacking of CaO particles that initially form with a more uniform distribution of particles and pores

  17. Fluid inclusion studies of calcite veins from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Tuffs: Environment of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedder, E.; Whelan, J.F.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Calcite vein and vug fillings at four depths (130-314m), all above the present water table in USW G-1 bore hole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contain primary fluid inclusions with variable vapor/liquid raitos: Most of these inclusions are either full of liquid or full of vapor. The liquid-filled inclusions show that most of the host calcite crystallized from fluids at 2 vapor phase at ''<100 degrees C''. Our new studies reveal the additional presence of major methane in the vapor-filled inclusion, indicating even lower temperatures of trapping, perhaps at near-surface temperatures. They also show that the host calcite crystals grew from a flowing film of water on the walls of fractures open to the atmosphere, the vapor-filled inclusions representing bubbles that exsolved from this film onto the crystal surface

  18. Fluid inclusion studies of calcite veins from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Tuffs: Environment of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedder, E.; Whelan, J.F.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Calcite vein and vug fillings at fourth depths (130-314m), all above the present water table in USW G-1 bore hole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contain primary fluid inclusions with variable vapor/liquid ratios: most of these inclusions are either full of liquid or full of vapor. The liquid-filled inclusions show that most of the host calcite crystallized from fluids at 2 vapor phase at open-quotes 100 degrees Cclose quotes. Our new studies reveal the additional presence of major methane in the vapor-filled inclusion, indicating even lower temperatures of trapping, perhaps at near-surface temperatures. They also show that the host calcite crystals grew from a flowing film of water on the walls of fractures open to the atmosphere, the vapor-filled inclusions representing bubbles that exsolved from this film onto the crystal surface

  19. Chemical and radiochemical characteristics of groundwater in the Culebra Dolomite, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapmen, J.B.

    1988-03-01

    The nation's first geologic repository for radioactive waste is being excavated in southeastern New Mexico at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Post-closure radioactive release scenarios from WIPP often involve hydrologic transport of radionuclides through the overlying Rustler Formation, in the Culebra Dolomite Member. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has conducted an investigation of the chemistry of culebra groundwater. Analysis revealed the following: salinities in Culebra groundwater generally increase from west to east; a Na-Cl type water dominates over most of the sampled area with a Ca-SO 4 type occurring in the southern to southwestern area; exclusive of the low-salinity southern area, most wells located on the same general flow path have similar ion ratios; dissolved uranium content in Culebra groundwater is relatively high, with marked disequilibrium between U-238 and U-234 activities; Ra-226 and Ra-228 are sometimes present in relatively large amounts; Th-228 was detected in samples from 5 wells; and Cs-137 was detected in several samples. 39 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Infrared and ultraviolet laser removal of crustose lichens on dolomite heritage stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano (IQFR), CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ascaso, Carmen; Ríos, Asunción de los; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio [Museo Nacional de Ciencia Naturales (MNCN), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Souza-Egipsy, Virginia [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wierzchos, Jacek; Speranza, Mariela [Museo Nacional de Ciencia Naturales (MNCN), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cañamares, Maria Vega [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (ICEM), CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano (IQFR), CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Laser irradiation at 1064 nm (IR) or 355 nm (UV) partially removes epilithic lichens on dolostone. • Irradiation in a sequential, dual IR–UV mode efficiently eliminates lichen thalli. • Dual IR–UV irradiation mode induces severe damage on endolithic colonizers of dolostone. - Abstract: Laser removal of biodeteriogen layers warrants detailed studies due to the advantages it brings with respect to mechanical elimination or the use of biocides. We have investigated elimination of biological crusts on dolomite stones from heritage sites in central Spain. The samples were colonized by epilithic crustose lichens of different species, such as Caloplaca sp. and Verrucaria nigrescens. A comparative study was carried out by applying infrared (1064 nm) and ultraviolet (355 nm) nanosecond laser pulses and sequences pulses of the two wavelengths using a Q-switched Nd:YAG system. To detect anatomical and ultrastructural damage to the lichens, and to assess possible morphological and chemical changes on the underlying stone induced by laser irradiation, we used stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The optimal conditions for removal of the colonization crust, while ensuring preservation of the lithic substrate, were obtained for dual infrared-ultraviolet sequential irradiation.

  1. Spectral Analysis of the Light Flash Produced by a Natural Dolomite Plate Under Strong Shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Enling; Xu Mingyang; Shi Xiaohan; Wang Meng; Wang Di; Xiang Shenghai; Xia Jin; Han Yafei; Zhang Lijiao; Wu Jin; Zhang Shuang; Yuan Jianfei; Zhang Qingming

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain the elemental compositions of the projectile and target materials during 2A12 aluminum projectile shot on a natural dolomite plate, three kinds of experiments have been conducted using a spectral acquirement system established on a two-stage light gas gun for impact velocities ranging from 2.20 km/s to 4.20 km/s, at the same projectile incidence angle of 30°. Experimental results show that the elemental compositions of the projectile and target materials in the strong shock experiments have a good agreement with the original elemental compositions of the projectile and target. In addition, the relations between spectral radiant intensity and elemental compositions of the projectile and target materials have been obtained for different impact velocities, in which the spectral radiant intensity of the main elements in the material increases with increasing impact velocity, and more elements appear with increasing impact velocity since more energy would result from a higher velocity impact. (paper)

  2. Analysis of conditions and the concept of multidirectional revitalization of the dolomite quarry in Siewierz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    The development of mining of rock raw materials in Poland has significantly contributed to economic growth and the quality of life of local communities. However, mining activity, besides a number of positive effects, also implies broadly understood changes in the environment and the formation of brownfields. Reclamation and redevelopment of post-industrial areas, and especially post-mining areas, is currently a huge environmental and socio-economic challenge. Revitalization of post-mining areas is particularly important for small towns and municipalities, where mining was one of the main pillars of development and prosperity. An example of such a municipality is Siewierz in Silesian Voivodship. In the paper analysis the conditions have been conducted and the concept of revitalization of dolomite quarry Górnicze Zakłady Dolomitowe S.A. has been proposed. The AHP method has been used to analyse and select the optimal method of revitalization. As a result of the analysis, the concept of multidirectional revitalization with socially, economically and environmentally beneficial functions has been created, maximizing the potential of the quarry.

  3. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.M. [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  4. Coccolith calcite time capsules preserve a molecule-specific record of pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Pearson, A.; Hermoso, M.; Wilkes, E.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-12-01

    Coccolithophores are single-celled phytoplankton that have contributed organic matter and calcite to marine sediments since the Late Triassic. The carbon isotopic compositions of both the calcite, and the organic matter, constitute valuable archives of information about the interaction between these organisms and the environments in which they lived. The isotopic composition of alkenone lipids, a recalcitrant component of coccolithophore organic carbon produced by a single family of coccolithophores, has been widely used to reconstruct pCO2 in the geological past. However, the robustness of this approach has remained controversial, due in part to the difficulties associated with reproducing pCO2 changes across periods of known pCO2 change, and uncertainties in relevant physiological variables such as growth rate and cell size. Meanwhile the calcite, produced in the form of plates called coccoliths, and which has had limited utility in paleoclimate reconstructions due to its large and variable departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, has garnered increasing attention in recent years for the environmental and physiological information it contains. Here we show that polysaccharides preserved within the calcite crystal lattice of near monospecific fractions of fossil coccoliths constitute an ancient pristine source of organic carbon that unlike alkenones is unambiguously associated with the coccolith1. The isotopic composition of these polysaccharides, in tandem with that of the host coccolith calcite, and morphometrics from the same coccoliths2, can be used simultaneously constrain a recently published cellular carbon isotope flux model3, embedded in a more complex nutrient limitation model, in a powerful new approach to simultaneously predict cellular parameters and pCO2. We demonstrate the validity of this approach across a glacial / interglacial cycle. Lee, R. B. Y., et al,, Nat. Commun. 7, 13144 (2016). McClelland, H. L. O. et al. Sci. Rep. 6

  5. Sr isotope composition of low-Mg oyster shell calcite for stratigraphic assignment of Early Cretaceous near-shore deposits (Lusitanian Basin, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimhofer, U.; Burla, S.; Oberli, F.; Paulukat, C.; Dinis, J. L.; Weissert, H.

    2012-04-01

    The late Early Cretaceous greenhouse climate has been studied intensively based on proxy data derived essentially from open marine archives. In contrast, information on the response of coastal settings is relatively scarce - most notably due to the stratigraphic uncertainties associated with many Early Cretaceous siliciclastic-rich near-shore marine deposits. Here, we present a revised stratigraphic assignment of Albian near-shore deposits of the Lusitanian Basin of W' Portugal, which have been independently dated using C- and Sr-isotope signals derived from bulk rock and low-Mg oyster shell calcite. Studied sections include the Guincho section (near Cascais) and the Praia do Sul and Praia Sao Julia sections (south of Ericeira). Carbon isotope trends based on bulk rock carbonate are difficult to correlate between the different sections, most probably due to the heterogeneous composition and diagenetic alteration of the carbonate fraction. In contrast, analysis of the low-Mg calcite shell of abundant oysters from these successions provides some promising results. Following a detailed screening of the shell material (incl. cathololuminescence microscopy, trace element geochemistry) for diagenetic alteration, C- and Sr-isotope measurements have been carried out. Sr-isotope analysis of a first set of samples (Guincho section) was done using laser-ablation multi-collector ICPMS technique, which allows for sampling of small shell areas. 87Sr/86Sr ratios of low-Mg oyster shell calcite fluctuate between 0.707373 ± 0.00002 and 0.707456 ± 0.00003; absolute values and the overall stratigraphic trend match well with the global open-marine seawater signature during Albian times. Based on the new Sr-isotope data, existing biostratigraphic assignments of the Guincho section are corroborated and partly revised. In summary, the use of low-Mg oyster shell calcite represents a promising tool for the age assignment of Mesozoic siliciclastic-rich near-shore deposits and provides a

  6. Controls on trace-element partitioning in cave-analogue calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Christopher C.; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2013-11-01

    We report trace-element data from a series of carbonate growth experiments in cave-analogue conditions in the laboratory with the goal of better understanding environmental controls on trace-element incorporation in stalagmites. The experimental setup closely mimics natural processes (e.g. precipitation driven by CO2-degassing, low ionic strength solution, thin solution-film) but with a tight control on growth conditions (temperature, pCO2, drip rate, calcite saturation index and the composition of the initial solution). Calcite is dissolved in deionized water in a 20,000 ppmV pCO2 environment, with trace-elements (Li, Na, Mg, Co, Sr, Cd, Ba, U) at appropriate concentrations to mimic natural cave drip-waters. This solution is dripped onto glass plates (coated with seed-calcite) in a lower pCO2 environment at 7, 15, 25 and 35 °C and drip rates of 2, 6 and 10 drips per minute. D(Sr) was shown to be statistically invariant over the full range of temperature and growth rate studied. No relationship between Sr/Ca and growth rate is therefore expected in stalagmite samples over comparable growth rates. D(Mg) has a relationship with temperature defined by D(Mg) = 0.01e0.02[±0.006]T, but temperature is not expected to be the dominant control on Mg/Ca in cave calcite due to the larger impact of calcite precipitation on Mg/Ca. Over short timescales, in conditions where temperature is well buffered, the fraction of calcium remaining in solution (f) is likely to be the dominant control on Mg/Ca and other trace-element ratios. But differences in the response of trace-elements to f and T may allow their combined use to assess past cave conditions. High Cd/Castalagmite is particularly indicative of low amounts of prior calcite precipitation and Cd/Ca would be a useful addition to trace-element studies of natural stalagmites. Significant scatter is observed in trace-element ratios during the laboratory experiments, which cannot be explained by simple Rayleigh distillation. This

  7. Galacturonomannan and Golgi-derived membrane linked to growth and shaping of biogenic calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, M. E.; Ridall, A. L.; Azadi, P.; Duke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    The coccolithophores are valuable models for the design and synthesis of composite materials, because the cellular machinery controlling the nucleation, growth, and patterning of their calcitic scales (coccoliths) can be examined genetically. The coccoliths are formed within the Golgi complex and are the major CaCO(3) component in limestone sediments-particularly those of the Cretaceous period. In this study, we describe mutants lacking a sulfated galacturonomannan and show that this polysaccharide in conjunction with the Golgi-derived membrane is directly linked to the growth and shaping of coccolith calcite but not to the initial orientated nucleation of the mineral phase.

  8. Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseridae) sagittal otoliths are composed of the calcium carbonate polymorphs vaterite and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracheil, B M; Chakoumakos, B C; Feygenson, M; Whitledge, G W; Koenigs, R P; Bruch, R M

    2017-02-01

    This study sought to resolve whether sturgeon (Acipenseridae) sagittae (otoliths) contain a non-vaterite fraction and to quantify how large a non-vaterite fraction is using neutron diffraction analysis. This study found that all otoliths examined had a calcite fraction that ranged from 18 ± 6 to 36 ± 3% by mass. This calcite fraction is most probably due to biological variation during otolith formation rather than an artefact of polymorph transformation during preparation. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Thickness and structure of the water film deposited from vapour on calcite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Wogelius, Roy A.; Morris, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from......Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from...

  10. Interaction of ethanol and water with the {1014} surface of calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Gray, R J; Sand, K K

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to model the interaction between ethanol, water, and the {1014} surface of calcite. Our results demonstrate that a single ethanol molecule is able to form two interactions with the mineral surface (both Ca-O and O-H), resulting in a highly ordered...... the starting configuration consists of a complete monolayer of water at the surface. The computational results are in good agreement with the results from atomic force microscopy experiments where it is observed that a layer of ethanol remains attached to the calcite surface, decreasing its ability to interact...

  11. Intake of {sup 226} Ra in osteoporosis prevention and therapy with gran-white dolomite as calcium supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecequilo, B.R.S.; Campos, M.P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: brigitte@net.ipen.br; mpcampos@net.ipen.br

    2002-04-01

    A {sup 226} Ra average specific activity of 4.3 Bq.kg{sup -1} was determined by passive high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in six samples of 'Gran White' dolomite. The committed effective dose and committed equivalent dose at bone surface were calculated through the Ana Comp code, using {sup 226} Ra intake and radium metabolic model from ICRP 67. The doses were calculated for patients submitted to osteoporosis prevention and osteoporosis therapy. (author)

  12. Porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone, Bear Creek Valley and Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstrand, P.M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Geology Dept.; Menefee, L.S. [Appalachian State Univ., Boone, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology; Dreier, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1995-12-01

    Matrix porosity data from deep core obtained in Bear Creek Valley indicate that porosities in the Maynardville Limestone are lithology and depth dependent. Matrix porosities are greater in the Cooper Ridge Dolomite than in the Maynardville Limestone, yet there is no apparent correlation with depth. Two interrelated diagenetic processes are the major controlling factors on porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; dissolution of evaporate minerals and dedolomitization. Both of these diagenetic processes produce matrix porosities between 2.1 and 1.3% in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and upper part of the Maynardville Limestone (Zone 6) to depths of approximately 600 ft bgs. Mean matrix porosities in Zones 5 through 2 of the Maynardville Limestone range from 0.8 to 0.5%. A large number of cavities have been intersected during drilling activities in nearly all zones of the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley. Therefore, any maynardville Limestone zone within approximately 200 ft of the ground surface is likely to contain cavities that allow significant and rapid flow of groundwater. Zone 6 could be an important stratigraphic unit in the Maynardville Limestone for groundwater flow and contaminant transport because of the abundance of vuggy and moldic porosities. There are large variations in the thickness and lithology in the lower part of the Maynardville (Zones 2, 3, and 4 in the Burial Grounds region). The direction and velocity of strike-parallel groundwater flow may be altered in this area within the lower Maynardville Limestone.

  13. THE ANISIAN MACROFLORA FROM THE NORTHERN DOLOMITES (KÜHWIESENKOPF/ MONTE PRÀ DELLA VACCA, BRAIES: A FIRST REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN BROGLIO LORIGA

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of Triassic macroflora from the Dolomites mostly concerns the Ladinian, while literature data on Anisian plants are scarce. This gap is filled by the discovery, reported here, of a rich plant deposit from Kühwiesenkopf / Monte Prà della Vacca (Prags/Braies Dolomites. The fossils occur in a horizon, about 1 m thick, from the lower part of the Dont Formation, a basinal unit mostly constituted by hemipelagic, terrigenous-carbonatic sediments of Pelsonian - Illyrian age. The stratigrafic interval with the plant horizon is Pelsonian in age. A preliminary systematic analysis of the numerous and well preserved specimens has allowed the identification of at least 17 genera. The taxa belong primarily to the Pteridophyta (Anomopteris, Neuropteridium, Cladophlebis, Crematopteris, ?Marattiopsis, subordinately to the Cycadophyta (Bjuvia, Taeniopteris, Dioonitocarpidium, Pterophyllum / Nilssonia. Coniferophyta are represented by Voltzia, ?Voltzia and Albertia; the latter genus is recorded herein for the first time in the Middle Triassic of the Dolomites. Besides, two Lycophyta genera (?Isoetites, Lycophyta new taxon, three Pteridospermae genera (?Sagenopteris, Scytophyllum and Peltaspermum, and one Sphenophyta genus (Equisetites have also been recognized.   

  14. The effect Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to specific gravity and water absorption of artifiticial geopolymer aggregate dolomite based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Aiman Mahmad; Yahya, Zarina; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    Industry such as construction and materials had depended a lot on the available aggregate. The use of aggregate need to be designed so that it have a well sustainable system with good physical properties. This paper is using dolomite to produce an artificial aggregate. The dolomite based artificial aggregate is produced using geopolymer as a hardened process. The dolomite base artificial aggregate is tested with a different alkaline activator to find water absorption and density. The lowest water absorption of dolomite artificial aggregate is 14%. The specific gravity of the artificial aggregate tested are lower when the sodium silicate is decreasing. The lowest density of artificial aggregate obtain are with 2.03 g/cm3.

  15. Adsorption of arsenic and phosphate onto the surface of calcite as revealed by batch experiments and surface complexation modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt

    in sorption edges, pKa’s and geometry of the two anions. The adsorption of arsenate and phosphate in the single sorbate systems was modelled successfully using either the constant capacitance model (CCM) for calcite or the CD-MUSIC model for calcite. Generally the models capture the variation in arsenate...

  16. Time scales for dissolution of calcite fracture fillings and implications for saturated zone radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterle, J.R.; Murphy, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis was performed to estimate time scales for dissolution of calcite fracture fillings in the fractured tuff aquifer that underlies Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, where groundwater is chemically undersaturated with respect to calcite. The impetus for this analysis originates from speculation that undissolved calcite in the saturated zone is evidence for limited diffusive exchange between fracture and matrix waters. Assuming that matrix diffusion is the rate-limiting process, the time scale for dissolution of calcite fracture fillings depends on the amount of calcite initially deposited, the distance between flowing fractures, the degree of chemical disequilibrium, and the rate of diffusion. Assuming geochemistry of J-13 well water in free-flowing fractures, estimated time scales for complete dissolution of matrix-entrapped calcite range from about 10 4 yr for a 2 mm-thick deposit located 1 m from a flowing fracture, to over 10 7 yr for a 2 cm-thick deposit located 100 m from a flowing fracture. The authors conclude that, given the geochemical and hydrologic characteristics observed at YM, the persistence of calcite minerals over geologic time scales in aquifers where flowing water is under-saturated with calcite does not necessarily preclude matrix diffusion as a dilution mechanism. However, the model suggests that the effective spacing between flowing fractures may be large enough to diminish the overall benefit of matrix diffusion to proposed high-level waste repository performance

  17. The effects of dolomitization on petrophysical properties and fracture distribution within rift-related carbonates (Hammam Faraun Fault Block, Suez Rift, Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneva, I.; Bastesen, E.; Corlett, H.; Eker, A.; Hirani, J.; Hollis, C.; Gawthorpe, R. L.; Rotevatn, A.; Taylor, R.

    2018-03-01

    Petrographic and petrophysical data from different limestone lithofacies (skeletal packstones, matrix-supported conglomerates and foraminiferal grainstones) and their dolomitized equivalents within a slope carbonate succession (Eocene Thebes Formation) of Hammam Faraun Fault Block (Suez Rift, Egypt) have been analyzed in order to link fracture distribution with mechanical and textural properties of these rocks. Two phases of dolomitization resulted in facies-selective stratabound dolostones extending up to two and a half kilometers from the Hammam Faraun Fault, and massive dolostones in the vicinity of the fault (100 metres). Stratabound dolostones are characterized by up to 8 times lower porosity and 6 times higher frequency of fractures compared to the host limestones. Precursor lithofacies type has no significant effect on fracture frequency in the stratabound dolostones. At a distance of 100 metres from the fault, massive dolostones are present which have 0.5 times porosity of precursor limestones, and lithofacies type exerts a stronger control on fracture frequency than the presence of dolomitization (undolomitized vs. dolomitized). Massive dolomitization corresponds to increased fracture intensity in conglomerates and grainstones but decreased fracture intensity in packstones. This corresponds to a decrease of grain/crystal size in conglomerates and grainstones and its increase in packstones after massive dolomitization. Since fractures may contribute significantly to the flow properties of a carbonate rock, the work presented herein has significant applicability to hydrocarbon exploration and production from limestone and dolostone reservoirs, particularly where matrix porosities are low.

  18. Lower Cretaceous Puez key-section in the Dolomites - towards the mid-Cretaceous super-greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, A.; Halásová, E.; Rehákova, D.; Józsa, Š.; Soták, J.; Kroh, A.; Jovane, L.; Florindo, F.; Sprovieri, M.; Giorgioni, M.; Lukeneder, S.

    2012-04-01

    Investigations on different fossil groups in addition to isotopic, paleomagnetic and geochemical analysis are combined to extract the Early Cretaceous history of environmental changes, as displayed by the sea level and climate changes. Results on biostratigraphy are integrated with other dating methods as magnetostraigraphy, correlation and cyclostratigraphy. The main investigation topics of the submitted project within the above-described framework are the biostratigraphic (Lukeneder and Aspmair, 2006, 2012), palaeoecological (Lukeneder, 2008, 2012), palaeobiogeographic, lithostratigraphic (Lukeneder, 2010, 2011), cyclostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic development of the Early Cretaceous in the Puez area. The main sections occur in expanded outcrops located on the southern margin of the Puez Plateau, within the area of the Puez-Geisler Natural Park, in the northern part of the Dolomites (South Tyrol, North Italy). The cephalopod, microfossil and nannofossil faunas and floras from the marly limestones to marls here indicates Hauterivian to Albian/Cenomanian age. Oxygen isotope values from the Lower Cretaceous Puez Formation show a decreasing trend throughout the log, from -1.5‰ in the Hauterivian to -4.5‰ in the Albian/Cenomanian. The decreasing values mirror an increasing trend in palaeotemperatures from ~ 15-18°C in the Hauterivian up to ~25-30 °C in the Albian/Cenomanian. The trend probably indicates the positive shift in temperature induced by the well known Mid Cretaceous Ocean warming (e.g., Super-Greenhouse). The cooperative project (FWF project P20018-N10; 22 international scientists): An integrative high resolution project. Macro- and microfossils, isotopes, litho-, cyclo-, magneto-and biostratigraphy as tools for investigating the Lower Cretaceous within the Dolomites (Southern Alps, Northern Italy) -The Puez area as a new key region of the Tethyan Realm), is on the way since 2008 by the Natural History Museum in Vienna and the 'Naturmuseum S

  19. 3D modelling of a dolomitized syn-sedimentary structure: an exhumed potential analogue of hydrocarbon reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Mattia; Franceschi, Marco; Massironi, Matteo; Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Cuia, Raffaele; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The decrease in discoveries of new hydrocarbon reservoirs has twofold implications: i) the need to improve our knowledge of classic reservoirs, such as traps within extensional syn-sedimentary structures, and ii) enhanced efforts aimed at better understanding complex type of reservoirs. In particular, in the last few years, fault related dolomitized bodies, often associated to extensional faults, received worldwide attention thanks to the capability of dolomitizing fluids to improve the pore network. However, the shape and geometries of the dolomitized bodies within complex fault network as well as the related porosity distribution and evolution is difficult to predict. The study of outcrop analogues can help to solve these issues. In this work, we focused our attention on the Early Jurassic carbonate sediments of the Calcari Grigi Group deposited on the Trento Platform (Italian Southern Alps). The stratigraphic succession encompasses (from bottom to top): the peritidal limestones of the Monte Zugna Formation, the initially highly porous Loppio Oolitic Limestone and the nearly tight marls and marly limestones of the lower Rotzo Formation. During Early Jurassic, after the deposition of the Loppio Oolitic Limestone, the Trento Platform underwent syn-sedimentary extensional tectonics, which caused the formation of numerous tilted blocks. Differential subsidence of these blocks is testified by abrupt thickness changes in Rotzo Formation. This created a structural framework favourable to the formation of syn-sedimentary extensional traps (with the Loppio Oolitic Limestone as reservoir and Rotzo Formation as seal). In the Tertiary, Alpine compressional tectonics caused the reactivation of the Jurassic faults with a strike slip kinematics and was associated with the circulation of dolomitizing fluids. The combination of these events led to the formation of secondary fault-related dolomitized bodies. The enhanced pore network in correspondence of the dolomitized dykes

  20. Mechanics, microstructure and AMS evolution of a synthetic porphyritic calcite aggregate deformed in torsion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marques, F. O.; Machek, Matěj; Roxerová, Zuzana; Burg, J.-P.; Almqvist, B. S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 655, August (2015), s. 41-57 ISSN 0040-1951 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : experimental rock deformation * porphyritic calcite aggregate * EBSD and plastic deformation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.650, year: 2015

  1. Fulvic acid-like organic compounds control nucleation of marine calcite under suboxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuweiler, F.; D'Orazio, M.; Immenhauser, A.M.; Geipel, G.; Heise, K.H.; Cocozza, C.; Miano, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Intracrystalline organic compounds, enclosed within in situprecipitated marine microcrystalline calcite (automicrite), might represent either an inclusion or the catalyst of such precipitation. We use evidence from a Lower Cretaceous deep-water carbonate mound to show (1) the original source, (2)

  2. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability-implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-06-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase.

  3. Morphological and mechanical characterization of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Falini, Giuseppe; Pasquini, Luca; Reggi, Michela; Fermani, Simona; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2013-08-07

    A growing number of classes of organic (macro)molecular materials have been trapped into inorganic crystalline hosts, such as calcite single crystals, without significantly disrupting their crystalline lattices. Inclusion of an organic phase plays a key role in enhancing the mechanical properties of the crystals, which are believed to share structural features with biogenic minerals. Here we report the synthesis and mechanical characterization of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals. Once entrapped into the crystals SWCNT-COOH appeared both as aggregates of entangled bundles and nanoropes. Their observation was possible only after crystal etching, fracture or FIB (focused ion beam) cross-sectioning. SWCNT-COOHs occupied a small volume fraction and were randomly distributed into the host crystal. They did not strongly affect the crystal morphology. However, although the Young's modulus of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals was similar to that of pure calcite their hardness increased by about 20%. Thus, SWCNT-COOHs provide an obstacle against the dislocation-mediated propagation of plastic deformation in the crystalline slip systems, in analogy with the well-known hardness increase in fiber-reinforced composites.

  4. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Whelan, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-δ 13 C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate open-quotes plugclose quotes. In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment

  5. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Whelan, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-δ 13 C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate ''plug.'' In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment

  6. Rapid stepwise onset of Antarctic glaciation and deeper calcite compensation in the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxall, Helen K; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Backman, Jan

    2005-01-06

    The ocean depth at which the rate of calcium carbonate input from surface waters equals the rate of dissolution is termed the calcite compensation depth. At present, this depth is approximately 4,500 m, with some variation between and within ocean basins. The calcite compensation depth is linked to ocean acidity, which is in turn linked to atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and hence global climate. Geological records of changes in the calcite compensation depth show a prominent deepening of more than 1 km near the Eocene/Oligocene boundary (approximately 34 million years ago) when significant permanent ice sheets first appeared on Antarctica, but the relationship between these two events is poorly understood. Here we present ocean sediment records of calcium carbonate content as well as carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions from the tropical Pacific Ocean that cover the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. We find that the deepening of the calcite compensation depth was more rapid than previously documented and occurred in two jumps of about 40,000 years each, synchronous with the stepwise onset of Antarctic ice-sheet growth. The glaciation was initiated, after climatic preconditioning, by an interval when the Earth's orbit of the Sun favoured cool summers. The changes in oxygen-isotope composition across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary are too large to be explained by Antarctic ice-sheet growth alone and must therefore also indicate contemporaneous global cooling and/or Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  7. Cryogenic cave calcite from several Central European caves: age, carbon and a genetic model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, K.; Urban, J.; Cílek, Václav; Hercman, H.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 206, 1/2 (2004), s. 119-136 ISSN 0009-2541 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/02/0449 Keywords : cryogenic calcite * periglacial zone Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.174, year: 2004

  8. Amelogenin processing by MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside calcite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Keith M; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Thompson, Mitchell; Lokappa, Sowmya B; Gallon, Victoria A; Cho, Kang R; Qiu, S Roger; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-10-03

    Calcite crystals were grown in the presence of full-length amelogenin and during its proteolysis by recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase 20 (rhMMP-20). Recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) altered the shape of calcite crystals by inhibiting the growth of steps on the {104} faces and became occluded inside the crystals. Upon co-addition of rhMMP-20, the majority of the protein was digested resulting in a truncated amelogenin lacking the C-terminal segment. In rP172-rhMMP-20 samples, the occlusion of amelogenin into the calcite crystals was drastically decreased. Truncated amelogenin (rP147) and the 25-residue C-terminal domain produced crystals with regular shape and less occluded organic material. Removal of the C-terminal diminished the affinity of amelogenin to the crystals and therefore prevented occlusion. We hypothesize that HAP and calcite interact with amelogenin in a similar manner. In the case of each material, full-length amelogenin binds most strongly, truncated amelogenin binds weakly and the C-terminus alone has the weakest interaction. Regarding enamel crystal growth, the prevention of occlusion into maturing enamel crystals might be a major benefit resulting from the selective cleavage of amelogenin at the C-terminus by MMP-20. Our data have important implications for understanding the hypomineralized enamel phenotype in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta resulting from MMP-20 mutations and will contribute to the design of enamel inspired biomaterials.

  9. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaniman, D.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Whelan, J.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-{delta}{sup 13}C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate ``plug.`` In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment.

  10. A generalised chemical precipitation modelling approach in wastewater treatment applied to calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Batstone, Damien J.; Flores Alsina, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    , the present study aims to identify a broadly applicable precipitation modelling approach. The study uses two experimental platforms applied to calcite precipitating from synthetic aqueous solutions to identify and validate the model approach. Firstly, dynamic pH titration tests are performed to define...

  11. Ethanol adsorption on the {10(1)over-bar4} calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Karina Krarup; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Hassenkam, Tue

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary atomic force microscopy investigations of the {10 (1) over bar4} calcite Surface cleaved in ethanol indicate a different surface behaviour than that of the {10 (1) over bar4} surface cleaved in air. The results are consistent with recent theoretical studies and suggest strong ordering...

  12. Interactions of Ni and Ca at the calcite-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, T.; Aalto, H.

    1996-10-01

    The performance assessment of repositories for spent nuclear fuel need, among other things, data describing the solubilities of radionuclides in the near field and far field. The solubility limits are often used in order to estimate the maximum concentrations of radionuclides during their possible transport to the biosphere. The solubilities used are mostly the individual solubilities for pure solids of the actual radionuclides. This way of using solubility limits represents a conservative performance assessment where the estimated nuclide concentrations are unrealistically high. This is acceptable from a performance assessment point of view but very unsatisfactory for an optimal design of the repository. In order to make the assessment more realistic, coprecipitation and solid solution formation should be taken into account. Only solids which are, in geological terms, formed in fast reactions need to be considered, which in practice restricts the number of radionuclide scavengers to calcite and iron(III)oxihydroxide. This work focuses on the Ni coprecipitation with calcite. The systems were studied under anoxic conditions and consisted of calcite-saturated 0.05 M NaCl solutions in equilibrium with synthetic calcite. The solutions were initially spiked with 63 Ni and 45 Ca and the concentrations of these elements were determined using liquid scintillation counting. (18 refs.)

  13. Morphology and formation mechanism in precipitation of calcite induced by Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Li, Fuchun; Lv, Jiejie

    2017-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbobate induced by microbial activities is common occurrence in controlled solution, but the formation mechanism and morphology in precipitation of calcite in solution systems is unclear, and the role of microbes is disputed. Here, culture experiment was performed for 50 days using the Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1 in a M2 culture medium, and the phase composition and morphology of the precipitates were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. We show that the precipitation processes in our experiment lead to unusual morphologies of crystals corresponding to different growth stages, and the morphologies of the precipitated crystal aggregates ranging from the main rod-, cross-, star-, cauliflower-like morphologies to spherulitic structure. The complex and unusual morphologies of the precipitated calcite by strain HJ-1 may provide a reference point for better understanding the biomineralization mechanism of calcite, moreover, morphological transition of minerals revealed that the multi-ply crystals-aggregation mechanism for calcite growth in crystallisation media.

  14. Growth kinetics of racemic heptahelicene-2-carboxylic acid nanowires on calcite (104)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Einax, M.; Richter, T.; Nimmrich, M.; Rahe, P.; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo; Kühnle, A.; Maass, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, č. 13 (2016), č. článku 134702. ISSN 0021-9606 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : heptahelicene-2-carboxylic acid nanowires * nc-AFM * calcite * growth kinetics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2016

  15. Stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow: An example from the Copper Ridge Dolomite in East Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.; Ketelle, D.

    1987-07-14

    The Copper Ridge Dolomite of the Upper Cambrian Knox Group underlies a site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for a below ground waste disposal facility. The Copper Ridge was studied for DOE to understand the influence of lithology on deep groundwater flow. Three facies types are distinguished which comprise laterally continuous, 1 to 4 m thick rock units interpreted to represent upward-shallowing depositional cycles having an apparently significant effect on groundwater flow at depth. Rock core observations indicate one of the recurring facies types is characterized by thin to medium-bedded, fine-grained dolostone with planar cryptalgal laminae and thin shaley partings. Distinctive fracturing in this facies type, that may have resulted from regional structural deformation, it considered to be responsible for weathering at depth and the development of stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow. In addition, geophysical data suggest that one occurrence of this weathered facies type coincides with an apparent geochemical interface at depth. Geophysical data also indicate the presence of several fluid invasion horizons, traceable outside the study area, which coincide with the unweathered occurrence of this fine-grained facies type. The subcropping of recurrent zones of preferred groundwater flow at the weathered/unweathered interface may define linear traces of enhanced aquifer recharge paralleling geologic strike. Vertical projection of these zones from the weathered/unweathered rock interface to the ground surface may describe areas of enhanced infiltration. Tests to determine the role of stratigraphic controls on groundwater flow are key components of future investigations on West Chestnut Ridge. 14 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow: An example from the Copper Ridge Dolomite in East Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.; Ketelle, D.

    1987-01-01

    The Copper Ridge Dolomite of the Upper Cambrian Knox Group underlies a site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for a below ground waste disposal facility. The Copper Ridge was studied for DOE to understand the influence of lithology on deep groundwater flow. Three facies types are distinguished which comprise laterally continuous, 1 to 4 m thick rock units interpreted to represent upward-shallowing depositional cycles having an apparently significant effect on groundwater flow at depth. Rock core observations indicate one of the recurring facies types is characterized by thin to medium-bedded, fine-grained dolostone with planar cryptalgal laminae and thin shaley partings. Distinctive fracturing in this facies type, that may have resulted from regional structural deformation, it considered to be responsible for weathering at depth and the development of stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow. In addition, geophysical data suggest that one occurrence of this weathered facies type coincides with an apparent geochemical interface at depth. Geophysical data also indicate the presence of several fluid invasion horizons, traceable outside the study area, which coincide with the unweathered occurrence of this fine-grained facies type. The subcropping of recurrent zones of preferred groundwater flow at the weathered/unweathered interface may define linear traces of enhanced aquifer recharge paralleling geologic strike. Vertical projection of these zones from the weathered/unweathered rock interface to the ground surface may describe areas of enhanced infiltration. Tests to determine the role of stratigraphic controls on groundwater flow are key components of future investigations on West Chestnut Ridge. 14 refs., 13 figs

  17. Norovirus outbreak caused by a new septic system in a dolomite aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Alexander, E.C.; Kolberg, R.J.; Alexander, S.C.; Archer, John R.; Braatz, L.A.; Forest, B.M.; Green, J.A.; Spencer, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Septic systems that are built in compliance with regulations are generally not expected to be the cause of groundwater borne disease outbreaks, especially in areas with thick vadose zones. However, this case study demonstrates that a disease outbreak can occur in such a setting and outlines the combination of epidemiological, microbiological, and hydrogeological methods used to confirm the source of the outbreak. In early June 2007, 229 patrons and employees of a new restaurant in northeastern Wisconsin were affected by acute gastroenteritis; 6 people were hospitalized. Epidemiological case-control analysis indicated that drinking the restaurant's well water was associated with illness (odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 0.9 to 11.4, P = 0.06). Microbiological analysis (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) measured 50 genomic copies per liter of norovirus genogroup I in the well water. Nucleotide sequencing determined the genotype as GI.2 and further showed the identical virus was present in patrons' stool specimens and in the septic tank. Tracer tests using dyes injected at two points in the septic system showed that effluent was traveling from the tanks (through a leaking fitting) and infiltration field to the well in 6 and 15 d, respectively. The restaurant septic system and well (85-m deep, in a fractured dolomite aquifer) both conformed to state building codes. The early arrival of dye in the well, which was 188 m from the septic field and located beneath a 35-m thick vadose zone, demonstrates that in highly vulnerable hydrogeological settings, compliance with regulations may not provide adequate protection from fecal pathogens.

  18. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ (aq) 26Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  19. Influence of Calcite and Dissolved Calcium on Uranium(VI) Sorption to a Hanford Subsurface Sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Stone, Alan T.; Bai, Jing; Zachara, John M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of calcite and dissolved calcium on U(VI) adsorption was investigated using a calcite-containing sandy silt/clay sediment from the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site. U(VI) adsorption to sediment, treated sediment, and sediment size fractions was studied in solutions that both had and had not been preequilibrated with calcite, at initial [U(VI)] ) 10-7-10-5 mol/L and final pH ) 6.0- 10.0. Kinetic and reversibility studies (pH 8.4) showed rapid sorption (30 min), with reasonable reversibility in the 3-day reaction time. Sorption from solutions equilibrated with calcite showed maximum U(VI) adsorption at pH 8.4 (0.1. In contrast, calcium-free systems showed the greatest adsorption at pH 6.0-7.2. At pH > 8.4, U(VI) adsorption was identical from calcium-free and calcium-containing solutions. For calcite-presaturated systems, both speciation calculations and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analyses indicated that aqueous U(VI) was increasingly dominated by Ca2UO2(CO3)3 0(aq) at pH<8.4 and that formation of Ca2UO2(CO3)3 0(aq) is what suppresses U(VI) adsorption. Above pH 8.4, aqueous U(VI) speciation was dominated by UO2(CO3)3 4- in all solutions. Finally, results also showed that U(VI) adsorption was additive in regard to size fraction but not in regard to mineral mass: Carbonate minerals may have blocked U(VI) access to surfaces of higher sorption affinity

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of the rotational order-disorder phase transition in calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Jun; Miyake, Akira; Shimobayashi, Norimasa; Kitamura, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of calcite was carried out with the interatomic potential model based on ab initio calculations to elucidate the phase relations for calcite polymorphs and the mechanism of the rotational order-disorder transition of calcite at high temperature at the atomic scale. From runs of MD calculations with increasing temperature within a pressure range of 1 atm and 2 GPa, the transition of calcite with R3-barc symmetry into a high-temperature phase with R3-barm symmetry was reproduced. In the high-temperature R3-barm phase, CO 3 groups vibrate with large amplitudes either around the original positions in the R3-barc structure or around other positions rotated ± 60 deg., and their positions change continuously with time. Moreover, contrary to the suggestion of previous investigators, the motion of CO 3 groups is not two-dimensional. At 1 atm, the transition between R3-barc and R3-barm is first order in character. Upon increasing temperature at high pressure, however, first a first-order isosymmetric phase transition between the R3-barc phases occurs, which corresponds to the start of ± 120 deg. flipping of CO 3 groups. Then, at higher temperatures, the transition of R3-barc to R3-barm phases happens, which can be considered second order. This set of two types of transitions at elevated pressure can be characterized by the appearance of an 'intermediate' R3-barc phase between the stable region of calcite and the high-temperature R3-barm phase, which may correspond to the CaCO 3 -IV phase.

  1. Arsenic Removal By Gypsum and Calcite: The Continuum Between Soption and Solid Solution Precipitation Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, G. Roman; Charlet, L.; Cuello, G.

    The sorption of As onto mineral surface, via the precipitation of Ca3(AsO4)2, controls the As solubility in industrial and mining sites. In spite of the progress in environmental chemistry, there is little data on As sorption reactions in calcite and gypsum and on the precipitation/dissolution of Ca3(AsO4)2. Recent studies have reported that As (III) can be adsorbed by the calcite and As(V) by the gypsum. In order to determine the kinetic reactions developed during the As (III, V) uptake by calcite and gypsum from aqueous solutions, we have performed adsorption isotherm and neutron diffraction experiments. The influence of pH and CO2(g) concentration was also tested. Our results show a continuum between adsorption and the formation of solid solutions Ca(SO4,HAsO4) and Ca(CO3, HAsO3 ). Higher As adsorption was registered for both, calcite and gypsum at increasing CO2(g) levels in aqueous solutions and pH conditions between 7 and 10. The study of the interaction of different arsenic compounds with geological materials is of regional relevance concerning both environmental and health aspects. Immobilisation of arsenic in presence of gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) and calcite (CaCO3) should be undertaken to remove arsenic in calcium rich sites if their long-term stability is assessed. Understanding the behavior of the different compounds of As is necessary to estimate and predict possible consequences to forecasted or accidental events and to propose remediation actions at the concerned sites.

  2. Microbial Community Structure of an Alluvial Aquifer Treated to Encourage Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohan, J.; Saneiyan, S.; Lee, J.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Burns, S.; Colwell, F. S.

    2017-12-01

    An oligotrophic aquifer in the Colorado River floodplain (Rifle, CO) was treated with molasses and urea to encourage microbial induced calcite precipitation (MICP). This would stabilize the soil mass by reducing porosity and strengthening the mineral fabric. Over the course of a 15-day treatment period, microbial biomass was collected from monitoring well groundwater for DNA extraction and sequencing. Bromide, a conservative tracer, was co-injected and subsequently detected in downgradient wells, confirming effective nutrient delivery. Conductivity increased during the injection regime and an overall decrease in pH was observed. Groundwater chemistry showed a marked increase in ammonia, suggesting urea hydrolysis - a process catalyzed by the enzyme urease - the primary enzyme implicated in MICP. Additionally, soluble iron was detected, suggesting a general increase in microbial activity; possibly as iron-reducing bacteria changed insoluble ferric oxide to soluble ferrous hydroxide in the anoxic aquifer. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed the presence of iron reducing bacteria, including Shewanella and Desulfuromonadales. Generally, a decrease in microbial community diversity was observed when pre-injection community taxa were compared with post-injection community taxa. Phyla indicative of anoxic aquifers were represented in accordance with previous literature at the Rifle site. Linear discriminant analysis showed significant differences in representative phyla over the course of the injection series. Geophysical monitoring of the site further suggested changes that could be due to MICP. Induced polarization increased the phase shift in the primary treated area, in agreement with laboratory experiments. Cross-hole seismic testing confirmed that the shear wave velocities increased in the treated soil mass, implying the soil matrix became more stable. Future investigations will help elucidate the viability and efficacy of MICP treatment in changing

  3. The nature of unusual luminescence in natural calcite, CaCO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Panczer, G.; Waychunas, G.; Porat, N.

    2008-11-01

    The unusual luminescence of particular varieties of natural pink calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) samples was studied by laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy at different temperatures. The luminescence is characterized by intense blue emission under short-wave UV lamp excitation with an extremely long decay time, accompanied by pink-orange luminescence under long wave UV excitation. Our investigation included optical absorption, natural thermostimulated luminescence (NTL) and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) studies. Two luminescence centers were detected: a narrow violet band, with {lambda}{sub max} = 412 nm, {Delta} = 45 nm, two decay components of {tau}{sub 1} = 5 ns and {tau}{sub 2} = 7.2 ms, accompanied by very long afterglow, and an orange emission band with {lambda}{sub max} = 595 nm, {Delta} = 90 nm and {tau} = 5 ns. Both luminescence centers are thermally unstable with the blue emission disappearing after heating at 500 C, and the orange emission disappearing after heating at different temperatures starting from 230 C, although sometimes it is stable up to 500 C in different samples. Both centers have spectral-kinetic properties very unusual for mineral luminescence, which in combination with extremely low impurity concentrations, prevent their identification with specific impurity related emission. The most likely explanation of these observations may be the presence of radiation-induced luminescence centers. The long violet afterglow is evidently connected with trapped charge carrier liberation, with their subsequent migration through the valence band and ultimate recombination with a radiation-induced center responsible for the unusual violet luminescence.

  4. Stable isotopes in pedogenic calcite: Can the positive linear covariant trends be used to quantify paleo-evaporation rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröcke, D.; Ufnar, D.; Beddows, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Paleoclimatological models suggest enhanced evaporation rates in subtropical regions during greenhouse- world conditions. Laboratory evaporation experiments show that calcites precipitated from variably saturated solutions yield a positive linear covariant trend (PLCT) in δ18O vs δ13C values. This investigation experimentally quantifies calcite PLCT so that δ13C of subtropical paleosol calcretes may be used as a regional proxy of paleo-evaporation rates. A series of powdered CaCO3 samples with δ18O and δ13C values of -19.6‰ and -37.2‰ VPDB respectively were dissolved in deionized water in a pressure sealed container; it also contained separate vials of calcite reacted with HCl to generate a range of pCO2 environments, thus simulating a soil atmosphere. The variable pCO2 conditions simulate expected soil atmosphere pCO2 conditions in a calcrete horizon during alternative phases of calcite dissolution and precipitation. After 24 hrs, the solutions were placed in an open beaker in an incubator at 36°C and allowed to evaporate. Aliquots of 100 μL were removed at 24 hr intervals and the time of calcite crystal nucleation was also noted. Water analyses yielded δ18O enrichments ranging from an initial value of -4.8‰ VSMOW to a range of +10.0‰ to +14.8‰ VSMOW after an evaporation period of 75 hrs. The most enriched water values were attained from the solutions formed under lower pCO2 conditions (more enriched calcite δ18O, δ13C). The array of calcite δ18O vs δ13C values fall upon a PLCT that projects from a theoretical meteoric calcite line (MCL) calculated from the incubation temperature and deionized water δ18O and δ13C values. The precipitated calcite δ18O values range from the MCL value of -8.8‰ VPDB to +0.5‰ VPDB. The higher pCO2 waters precipitated calcite very early during evaporation, and thus the δ18O and δ13C calcite values are slightly enriched relative to the theoretical MCL. The lower pCO2 conditions precipitated calcite late in

  5. Sulfate-dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane as a Generation Mechanism for Calcite Cap Rock in Gulf Coast Salt Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar, K. H.; Kyle, R.; Lyons, T. W.; Loyd, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gulf Coast salt domes, specifically their calcite cap rocks, have been widely recognized for their association with significant reserves of crude oil and natural gas. However, the specific microbial reactions that facilitate the precipitation of these cap rocks are still largely unknown. Insight into the mineralization mechanism(s) can be obtained from the specific geochemical signatures recorded in these structures. Gulf Coast cap rocks contain carbonate and sulfur minerals that exhibit variable carbon (d13C) and sulfur isotope (δ34S) signatures. Calcite d13C values are isotopically depleted and show a large range of values from -1 to -52‰, reflecting a mixture of various carbon sources including a substantial methane component. These depleted carbon isotope compositions combined with the presence of abundant sulfide minerals in cap rocks have led to interpretations that invoke microbial sulfate reduction as an important carbonate mineral-yielding process in salt dome environments. Sulfur isotope data from carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS: trace sulfate incorporated within the carbonate mineral crystal lattice) provide a more direct proxy for aqueous sulfate in salt dome systems and may provide a means to directly fingerprint ancient sulfate reduction. We find CAS sulfur isotope compositions (δ34SCAS) significantly greater than those of the precursor Jurassic sulfate-salt deposits (which exhibit δ34S values of ~ +15‰). This implies that cap rock carbonate generation occurred via microbial sulfate reduction under closed-system conditions. The co-occurrence of depleted carbonate d13C values (production of alkalinity. Collectively, these data shed new light on a potential hotspot of microbial activity in the deep biosphere.

  6. Calcite dissolution by Brevibacterium sp. SOTI06: A futuristic approach for the reclamation of calcareous sodic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamilselvi S.M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the ability of soil microorganisms to dissolute poorly soluble native calcite to supply Ca2+ is a new area to be explored in reclaiming sodic soils by supplying adequate Ca2+ and reducing the recurrent sodicity. Hence, the present study aimed to isolate a calcite dissolving bacteria (CDB from calcareous sodic soils and to understand the mechanism of calcite dissolution. Of the thirty three CDB isolates recovered from the calcareous sodic soils of Tamil Nadu (Coimbatore, Ramnad and Trichy, eleven isolates were screened for calcite dissolution based on titratable acidity. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the three best isolates viz., SORI09, SOTI05 and SOTI06 revealed 99 % similarity to Bacillus aryabhattai, 100 % to B. megaterium and 93 % to Brevibacterium sp., respectively. Among them, Brevibacterium sp. SOTI06 released more Ca2+ (3.6 g.l-1 by dissolving 18.6 % of the native calcite. The spectral data of FTIR also showed reduction in the intensity of calcite (55.36 to 41.27 by the isolate at a wave number of 1636 cm-1 which confirmed the dissolution. Besides producing organic acids (gluconic acid and acetic acid, Brevibacterium sp. SOTI06 also produced siderophore (91.6 % and extracellular polysaccharides (EPS, 13.3 µg. ml-1 which might have enhanced the calcite dissolution.

  7. Formation of Calcite Biocrystals; Structure and Formation of Matrix Glycoproteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lennarz, William

    1997-01-01

    .... In these organisms, including the primitive skeleton (spicule) of the sea urchin embryo, the structural and functional role of these proteins either in the biomineralization process or in control of the structural features of the biocrystals is unclear...

  8. Microstructure of calcite deformed by high-pressure torsion: An X-ray line profile study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Roman; Schafler, Erhard; Schell, Norbert; Kunz, Martin; Abart, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    Calcite aggregates were deformed to high strain using high-pressure torsion and applying confining pressures of 1-6 GPa and temperatures between room temperature and 450 °C. The run products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and key microstructural parameters were extracted employing X-ray line profile analysis. The dominant slip system was determined as r { 10 1 bar 4 } ⟨ 2 bar 021 ⟩ with edge dislocation character. The resulting dislocation density and the size of the coherently scattering domains (CSD) exhibit a systematic dependence on the P-T conditions of deformation. While high pressure generally impedes recovery through reducing point defect mobility, the picture is complicated by pressure-induced phase transformations in the CaCO3 system. Transition from the calcite stability field to those of the high-pressure polymorphs CaCO3-II, CaCO3-III and CaCO3-IIIb leads to a change of the microstructural evolution with deformation. At 450 °C and pressures within the calcite stability field, dislocation densities and CSD sizes saturate at shear strains exceeding 10 in agreement with earlier studies at lower pressures. In the stability field of CaCO3-II, the dislocation density exhibits a more complex behavior. Furthermore, at a given strain and strain rate, the dislocation density increases and the CSD size decreases with increasing pressure within the stability fields of either calcite or of the high-pressure polymorphs. There is, however, a jump from high dislocation densities and small CSDs in the upper pressure region of the calcite stability field to lower dislocation densities and larger CSDs in the low-pressure region of the CaCO3-II stability field. This jump is more pronounced at higher temperatures and less so at room temperature. The pressure influence on the deformation-induced evolution of dislocation densities implies that pressure variations may change the rheology of carbonate rocks. In particular, a weakening is expected to occur at

  9. Formation and mosaicity of coccolith segment calcite of the marine algae Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Kelm, Klemens; Hoffmann, Ramona; Watermeyer, Philipp; Alexa, Patrick; Villinger, Clarissa; Rupp, Ulrich; Schlüter, Lothar; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Griesshaber, Erika; Walther, Paul; Schmahl, Wolfgang W

    2018-02-01

    Coccolithophores belong to the most abundant calcium carbonate mineralizing organisms. Coccolithophore biomineralization is a complex and highly regulated process, resulting in a product that strongly differs in its intricate morphology from the abiogenically produced mineral equivalent. Moreover, unlike extracellularly formed biological carbonate hard tissues, coccolith calcite is neither a hybrid composite, nor is it distinguished by a hierarchical microstructure. This is remarkable as the key to optimizing crystalline biomaterials for mechanical strength and toughness lies in the composite nature of the biological hard tissue and the utilization of specific microstructures. To obtain insight into the pathway of biomineralization of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths, we examine intracrystalline nanostructural features of the coccolith calcite in combination with cell ultrastructural observations related to the formation of the calcite in the coccolith vesicle within the cell. With TEM diffraction and annular dark-field imaging, we prove the presence of planar imperfections in the calcite crystals such as planar mosaic block boundaries. As only minor misorientations occur, we attribute them to dislocation networks creating small-angle boundaries. Intracrystalline occluded biopolymers are not observed. Hence, in E. huxleyi calcite mosaicity is not caused by occluded biopolymers, as it is the case in extracellularly formed hard tissues of marine invertebrates, but by planar defects and dislocations which are typical for crystals formed by classical ion-by-ion growth mechanisms. Using cryo-preparation techniques for SEM and TEM, we found that the membrane of the coccolith vesicle and the outer membrane of the nuclear envelope are in tight proximity, with a well-controlled constant gap of ~4 nm between them. We describe this conspicuous connection as a not yet described interorganelle junction, the "nuclear envelope junction". The narrow gap of this junction likely

  10. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation of calcite, chalk, and coccoliths-do we observe the mineral surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Hem, Caroline Piper; Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    broadening from macroscopic dielectric effects. We detect water adsorbed on the high surface area synthetic calcite, which permits observation of the chemistry of thin liquid films on calcite using transmission infrared spectroscopy. The combination of infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory also...... asymmetric for the coccoliths and the synthetic calcite prepared using the carbonation method. It can be very well fitted by two peaks: a narrow Lorenzian at lower frequency and a broader Gaussian at higher frequency. These two samples both have a high specific surface area. Density functional theory...

  11. Stress dependence of microstructures in experimentally deformed calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platt, John P.; de Bresser, J.H.P.

    2017-01-01

    Optical measurements of microstructural features in experimentally deformed Carrara marble help define their dependence on stress. These features include dynamically recrystallized grain size (Dr), subgrain size (Sg), minimum bulge size (Lρ), and the maximum scale length for surface-energy driven

  12. Temperature effects in EPR spectra of radical centers in dripstone calcite samples used for ESR dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wencka, M.; Hoffmann, S.K.; Krzyminiewski, R.; Mielcarek, S.

    2005-01-01

    Natural calcite samples were collected from the dripstone layers of the Black Cave of the Tatra mountains. ESR spectra, thermal analysis, and thermoluminescence data were analysed to obtain a consistent picture of the calcite properties. The ESR spectra were analysed using computer enhanced resolution spectra and an influence of the thermal annealing on intensity of individual ESR lines was measured. These results together with the effects of γ-irradiation in ESR spectra allowed one to discriminate between ESR lines from various paramagnetic centers. A general conclusion of the paper is that in the ESR dating the outer ESR lines of CO 3 - (g = 2.0125) and CO 2 - (g = 1.9980) radicals should be used instead of the commonly used multicomponent central line. (author)

  13. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, B.D.; Binning, Philip John; Sloan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process....... The paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL...... leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal...

  14. 3D visualization of additive occlusion and tunable full-spectrum fluorescence in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David C.; Ihli, Johannes; Thornton, Paul D.; Holden, Mark A.; Marzec, Bartosz; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alex N.; Levenstein, Mark A.; Tang, Chiu; Lynch, Christophe; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-11-01

    From biomineralization to synthesis, organic additives provide an effective means of controlling crystallization processes. There is growing evidence that these additives are often occluded within the crystal lattice. This promises an elegant means of creating nanocomposites and tuning physical properties. Here we use the incorporation of sulfonated fluorescent dyes to gain new understanding of additive occlusion in calcite (CaCO3), and to link morphological changes to occlusion mechanisms. We demonstrate that these additives are incorporated within specific zones, as defined by the growth conditions, and show how occlusion can govern changes in crystal shape. Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime imaging microscopy also show that the dyes experience unique local environments within different zones. Our strategy is then extended to simultaneously incorporate mixtures of dyes, whose fluorescence cascade creates calcite nanoparticles that fluoresce white. This offers a simple strategy for generating biocompatible and stable fluorescent nanoparticles whose output can be tuned as required.

  15. Substrate templating guides the photoinduced reaction of C60 on calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Robert; Rahe, Philipp; Kittelmann, Markus; Gourdon, André; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika

    2014-07-21

    A substrate-guided photochemical reaction of C60 fullerenes on calcite, a bulk insulator, investigated by non-contact atomic force microscopy is presented. The success of the covalent linkage is evident from a shortening of the intermolecular distances, which is clearly expressed by the disappearance of the moiré pattern. Furthermore, UV/Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry measurements carried out on thick films demonstrate the ability of our setup for initiating the photoinduced reaction. The irradiation of C60 results in well-oriented covalently linked domains. The orientation of these domains is dictated by the lattice dimensions of the underlying calcite substrate. Using the lattice mismatch to deliberately steer the direction of the chemical reaction is expected to constitute a general design principle for on-surface synthesis. This work thus provides a strategy for controlled fabrication of oriented, covalent networks on bulk insulators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan Vivian, E-mail: yan.li@colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Department of Design and Merchandising (United States); Cathles, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmc19@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract.

  17. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl 2 , and MgCl 2 ) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract

  18. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM AS SUBSTITUTE MATERIAL IN ENZYME MEDIATED CALCITE PRECIPITATION (EMCP) FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Heriansyah ePutra; Heriansyah ePutra; Hideaki eYasuhara; Naoki eKinoshita; Debendra eNeupane

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation (EMCP) was evaluated as a soil improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32- as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and ...

  19. Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W.; Lane, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.

  20. Study on effect of Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitates on strength of fine grained soils

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Animesh; R., Ramkrishnan

    2016-01-01

    For construction purposes, it is very essential to provide a strong foundation for the structure. If required, the suitability of soil has to be improved; this process of improving properties of soil is called Soil Stabilisation. This study intends to experimentally analyse the effectiveness of use of an unorthodox liquid soil stabiliser, Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitates (MICP) for improving the shear strength parameters of two different types of fine grained soils. For this process, a ...

  1. Aragonite→calcite transformation studied by EPR of Mn 2+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, J.; Śl|zak, A.

    1989-05-01

    The irreversible transformation aragonite→calcite has been studied both at different fixed heating rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 K/min) and at different fixed temperatures. Apparent progression rates of the transformation were observed above 685 K. At 730 K the transformation became sudden and violent. Time developments of the transformation at fixed temperatures have been discussed in terms of Avrami-Lichti's approach to transitions involving nucleation processes.

  2. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2016-03-02

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.

  3. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs

  4. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Effects of limestone petrography and calcite microstructure on OPC clinker raw meals burnability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Matteo; Marinoni, Nicoletta; Della Porta, Giovanna; Marchi, Maurizio; Dapiaggi, Monica

    2017-10-01

    Limestone represents the main raw material for ordinary Portland cement clinker production. In this study eight natural limestones from different geological environments were chosen to prepare raw meals for clinker manufacturing, aiming to define a parameter controlling the burnability. First, limestones were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Powder Diffraction and Optical Microscopy to assess their suitability for clinker production and their petrographic features. The average domains size and the microstrain of calcite were also determined by X-Ray Powder Diffraction line profile analysis. Then, each limestone was admixed with clay minerals to achieve the adequate chemical composition for clinker production. Raw meals were thermally threated at seven different temperatures, from 1000 to 1450 °C, to evaluate their behaviour on heating by ex situ X-Ray Powder Diffraction and to observe the final clinker morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results indicate the calcite microstrain is a reliable parameter to predict the burnability of the raw meals, in terms of calcium silicates growth and lime consumption. In particular, mixtures prepared starting from high-strained calcite exhibit a better burnability. Later, when the melt appears this correlation vanishes; however differences in the early burnability still reflect on the final clinker composition and texture.

  6. Structure in continuously cored, deep drill holes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, with notes on calcite occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    A study of more than 22,000 feet of core from five deep drill holes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, provided data on the attitude and vertical distribution of faults and fractures, the sense of fault displacement, and the occurrence of calcite. The study was done mainly to look for evidence of fault flattening at depth, but no consistent downward decrease in dip of faults was found, and no increase in strata rotation was evident with increasing depth. In the two drill holes located near prominent faults that dip toward the holes (USW G-3 and G-2), an apparent increase in the frequency of faults occurs below the tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills. Some of this increase occurs in brittle lavas and flow breccias in the lower part of the volcanic section. In the two holes presumed to be relatively removed from the influence of important faults at depth, the vertical distribution of faults is relatively uniform. Calcite occurs mainly in two general zones, voids in welded portions of the Paintbrush Tuff, and in a deeper zone, mostly below 3,500 feet. Calcite is least abundant in USW G-4, which may reflect the fewer faults and fractures encountered in that drill hole

  7. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; He, Hao; Fang, Nianqiao

    2015-06-01

    Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10(-4) mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments.

  9. Viruses Occur Incorporated in Biogenic High-Mg Calcite from Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Rutger; Gautret, Pascale; Bettarel, Yvan; Roques, Cécile; Marlière, Christian; Ramonda, Michel; Nguyen Thanh, Thuy; Tran Quang, Huy; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Using three different microscopy techniques (epifluorescence, electronic and atomic force microscopy), we showed that high-Mg calcite grains in calcifying microbial mats from the hypersaline lake “La Salada de Chiprana”, Spain, contain viruses with a diameter of 50–80 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis revealed that they contain nitrogen and phosphorus in a molar ratio of ~9, which is typical for viruses. Nucleic acid staining revealed that they contain DNA or RNA. As characteristic for hypersaline environments, the concentrations of free and attached viruses were high (>1010 viruses per g of mat). In addition, we showed that acid treatment (dissolution of calcite) resulted in release of viruses into suspension and estimated that there were ~15 × 109 viruses per g of calcite. We suggest that virus-mineral interactions are one of the possible ways for the formation of nano-sized structures often described as “nanobacteria” and that viruses may play a role in initiating calcification. PMID:26115121

  10. Calcite production by Coccolithophores in the South East Pacific Ocean: from desert to jungle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, L.; Couapel, M.; Buchet, N.; Claustre, H.

    2007-09-01

    BIOSOPE cruise achieved an oceanographic transect from the Marquise Islands to the Peru-Chili upwelling (PCU) via the centre of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). Water samples from 6 depths in the euphotic zone were collected at 20 stations. The concentrations of suspended calcite particles, coccolithophores cells and detached coccoliths were estimated together with size and weight using an automatic polarizing microscope, a digital camera, and a collection of softwares performing morphometry and pattern recognition. Some of these softwares are new and described here for the first time. The coccolithophores standing stocks are usually low and reach maxima west of the PCU. The coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa spp. and Crenalithus spp. (Order Isochrysidales) represent 50% of all the suspended calcite particles detected in the size range 0.1-46 μm (21% of PIC in term of the calcite weight). The latter species are found to grow preferentially in the Chlorophyll maximum zone. In the SPG their maximum concentrations was found to occur between 150 and 200 m, which is very deep for these taxa. The weight and size of coccoliths and coccospheres are correlated. Large and heavy coccoliths and coccospheres are found in the regions with relative higher fertility in the Marquises Island and in the PCU. Small and light coccoliths and coccospheres are found west of the PCU. This distribution may correspond to that of the concentration of calcium and carbonate ions.

  11. POTENTIALLY UNSTABLE SLOPE ABOVE ORE PROCESSING PLANT IN THE "OČURA" DOLOMITE QUARRY (LEPOGLAVA, NORTH CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Braun

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex engineering investigation, in the nearest surroun-dig of the conditionally stable high slope, close to ore processing facilities in the dolomite quarry »Očura« near Lepoglava (North Croatia, was carried out. Studying the tectonic features of the rock mass, discontinuities referent to the slope stability, was found out. Rock fragment size was measured and data processed using statistical design. According to rock fragment mean values, velocity of the longitudinal seismic waves was predicted. This values was compared with velocities of the longitudinal seismic waves, determined using gcophisical refraction seismic method. Physical and mechanical properties of the dolomite rock mass, considering longitudinal and transversal seismic wave velocities, and »RMR«-classification was assesed. All the results indicate, that the slope above the ore processing facilities should be consider as conditionally stable, with real probability to get unstable under the vibrations caused by blasting, during the exploitation in the field, close behind the investigated slope (the paper is published in Croatian.

  12. In Developping a Bench-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor to Burn High Ash Brazilian Coal-Dolomites Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Behainne, Jhon Jairo; Hory, Rogério Ishikawa; Goldstein, Leonardo; Bernárdez Pécora, Araí Augusta

    This work considers some of the questions in burning high ash Brazilian coal-dolomite mixtures in a bench-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). Experimental tests were performed with the CE4500 coal from Santa Catarina State, in southern Brazil, with a Sauter mean diameter d p =43 μm. The coal particles were mixed with dolomite particles of d p = 111 μm and this fuel mixture was fed into the circulating fluidized reactor, previously loaded with quartz sand particles of d p =353 μm. This inert material was previously heated by the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas up to the ignition temperature of the fuel mixture. The CFBC unit has a 100mm internal diameter riser, 4.0m high, as well as a 62.8mm internal diameter downcomer. The loop has a cyclone, a sampling valve to collect particles and a 62.8mm internal diameter L-valve to recirculate the particles in the loop. A screw feeder with a rotation control system was used to feed the fuel mixture to the reactor. The operational conditions were monitored by pressure taps and thermocouples installed along the loop. A data acquisition system showed the main operational conditions to control. Experimental tests performed put in evidence the problems found during bed operation, with special attention to the solids feed device, to the L-valve operation, to particle size, solids inventory, fluidized gas velocity, fuel mixture and recirculated solids feeding positions.

  13. Diversity of endolithic fungal communities in dolomite and limestone rocks from Nanjiang Canyon in Guizhou karst area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuan; Lian, Bin

    2012-06-01

    The endolithic environment, the tiny pores and cracks in rocks, buffer microbial communities from a number of physical stresses, such as desiccation, rapid temperature variations, and UV radiation. Considerable knowledge has been acquired about the diversity of microorganisms in these ecosystems, but few culture-independent studies have been carried out on the diversity of fungi to date. Scanning electron microscopy of carbonate rock fragments has revealed that the rock samples contain certain kinds of filamentous fungi. We evaluated endolithic fungal communities from bare dolomite and limestone rocks collected from Nanjiang Canyon (a typical karst canyon in China) using culture-independent methods. Results showed that Ascomycota was absolutely dominant both in the dolomite and limestone fungal clone libraries. Basidiomycota and other eukaryotic groups (Bryophyta and Chlorophyta) were only detected occasionally or at low frequencies. The most common genus in the investigated carbonate rocks was Verrucaria. Some other lichen-forming fungi (e.g., Caloplaca, Exophiala, and Botryolepraria), Aspergillus, and Penicillium were also identified from the rock samples. The results provide a cross-section of the endolithic fungal communities in carbonate rocks and help us understand more about the role of microbes (fungi and other rock-inhabiting microorganisms) in rock weathering and pedogenesis.

  14. THE EFFECT OF NANO METER SIZE ZRO2 PARTICLES ADDITION ON THE DENSIFICATION AND HYDRATION RESISTANCE OF MAGNESITE– DOLOMITE REFRACTORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghasemi-kahrizsangi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of nano meter size ZrO2 particles on the microstructure, densification and hydration resistance of magnesite –dolomite refractories was investigated. 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt. % ZrO2 particles that were added to magnesite –dolomite refractories containing 35 wt. % CaO. The Hydration resistance was measured by change in the weight of specimens after 72 h at 25℃ and 95% relative humidity. The results showed with addition of nano meter size ZrO2 particles, the lattice constant of CaO increased, and the bulk density and hydration resistance of the specimens increased while apparent porosity decreased. With the addition of small amount ZrO2 the formation of CaZrO3 phase facilitated the sintering and the densification process. The mechanism of the nano meter size ZrO2 particles promoting densification and hydration resistance is decreasing the amount of free CaO in the specimens.

  15. Growing spherulitic calcite grains in saline, hyperalkaline lakes: Experimental evaluation of the effects of Mg-clays and organic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mercedes-Martín, R.; Rogerson, M.R.; Brasier, A.T.; Vonhof, H.B.; Prior, T.; Fellows, S.M.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; Billing, I.; Pedley, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of spherical-radial calcite bodies - spherulites - in sublacustrine, hyperalkaline and saline systems is unclear, and therefore their palaeoenvironmental significance as allochems is disputed. Here, we experimentally investigate two hypotheses concerning the origin of spherulites. The

  16. Characterization of foams obtained from cassava starch, cellulose fibres and dolomitic limestone by a thermopressing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Consuelo Reolon Schmidt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cassava starch, dolomitic limestone and eucalypt cellulose fibres were used to prepare foam trays that could be used to pack foodstuffs. The influence of the cellulose fibre concentration in the composite formulation was investigated using 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40% of fibres. The results indicated that an increase in cellulose fibre concentration promoted a decrease in density and tensile strength of the foam samples. The tensile strength at break for foam trays containing 5% of cellulose fibres was 3.03MPa, whilst the commercial trays of expanded polystyrene used to pack foods in supermarkets presented a tensile strength of 1.49 MPa. The elongation at break of the foam trays obtained in this work varied slightly with increase in cellulose fibre concentration, the values being about 20% lower than the elongation at break observed for commercial foam trays of expanded polystyrene. Thus, the materials developed in this work represented a possible alternative to the use of EPS foam trays for packing dry foods. The trays' properties need to be improved for their use with moist foods.Amido de mandioca, calcário dolomítico e fibras celulósicas de eucalipto foram usados para preparar bandejas biodegradáveis que podem ser usadas como embalagens para alimentos. A influência da concentração de fibras na formulação dos compostos foi investigada, usando 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 e 40% de fibras. Os resultados indicaram que o aumento na concentração de fibras celulósicas promove uma diminuição na densidade e na resistência a tração das amostras. A tensão na ruptura para as bandejas contendo 5% de fibras celulósicas foi de 3,03 MPa, enquanto as bandejas comerciais de poliestireno expandido (EPS usadas para embalagens alimentícias em supermercados apresentaram uma tensão de 1.49 MPa. A elongação na ruptura das bandejas obtidas neste trabalho variou ligeiramente com o aumento da concentração de fibra celulósica, os valores são aproximadamente

  17. An isotopic and fluid inclusion study of fracture calcite from borehole OL-KR1 at the Olkiluoto site, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, A.; Frape, S.; Blomqvist, R.; Nissinen, P.; McNutt, R.

    1998-04-01

    A study of the geochemistry of fracture filling calcite in borehole OL-KR1 at the radioactive waste disposal investigation site Olkiluoto (in Finland) was undertaken in 1998. The purpose of the present study is to characterize the fracture calcite using mineralogy, oxygen, carbon and strontium isotopes, and fluid inclusions in order to determine past and present chemical and isotopic condition at the site

  18. Investigating the Physical Basis of Amorphous Precursor Transformation to Calcite Using Patterned Alkanethiol Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Wallace, A.; Han, T. Y.; Lee, J. R.; Hailey, P. D.; de Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    Increasing evidence from X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) studies of biominerals extracted from calcifying organisms show that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in the initial formation of carbonate minerals and in shaping them into complex morphologies. Echinoderms and possibly a wide variety of other organisms, use ACC as a precursor phase. The ACC is first formed within spatial and temporally controlled environments such as vesicles, followed by a subsequent onset of mineralization that transforms the precursor into a fully crystalline material. Recent studies on sea urchin embryos have shown that during this transformation, ACC develops short-range order that resembles calcite before fully crystallizing. While this "non-traditional" process is recognized, the mechanisms and factors that govern this transformation remain poorly understood. Of particular interest are the roles of water, and the functional group chemistry of surfaces and macromolecules within mineralization environments. To investigate these questions, we have developed an experimental approach using ESEM that allows us to control impurity concentration, surface functionality and water content through the degree of water condensation. Patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of hydrophilic moieties with domains of approximately 25 microns in diameter are used to form an array of micro-reactors. ACC particles with known composition are then deposited on the patterns. Condensing water in the ESEM initializes the transformation of ACC to calcite. Our results show that in saturated water vapor, ACC swells, but no obvious faceting of the material occurs. It is only in bulk water, via dissolution/crystallization, where the calcite grown on carboxyl-terminated surfaces is found with the often-observed \\{013\\} nucleation face. We use this insight to understand the role of the different chemical moieties on ACC to calcite transformation

  19. Bulk and Surface Aqueous Speciation of Calcite: Implications for Low-Salinity Waterflooding of Carbonate Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Yutkin, Maxim P.

    2017-08-25

    Low-salinity waterflooding (LSW) is ineffective when reservoir rock is strongly water-wet or when crude oil is not asphaltenic. Success of LSW relies heavily on the ability of injected brine to alter surface chemistry of reservoir crude-oil brine/rock (COBR) interfaces. Implementation of LSW in carbonate reservoirs is especially challenging because of high reservoir-brine salinity and, more importantly, because of high reactivity of the rock minerals. Both features complicate understanding of the COBR surface chemistries pertinent to successful LSW. Here, we tackle the complex physicochemical processes in chemically active carbonates flooded with diluted brine that is saturated with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and possibly supplemented with additional ionic species, such as sulfates or phosphates. When waterflooding carbonate reservoirs, rock equilibrates with the injected brine over short distances. Injected-brine ion speciation is shifted substantially in the presence of reactive carbonate rock. Our new calculations demonstrate that rock-equilibrated aqueous pH is slightly alkaline quite independent of injected-brine pH. We establish, for the first time, that CO2 content of a carbonate reservoir, originating from CO2-rich crude oil and gas, plays a dominant role in setting aqueous pH and rock-surface speciation. A simple ion-complexing model predicts the calcite-surface charge as a function of composition of reservoir brine. The surface charge of calcite may be positive or negative, depending on speciation of reservoir brine in contact with the calcite. There is no single point of zero charge; all dissolved aqueous species are charge determining. Rock-equilibrated aqueous composition controls the calcite-surface ion-exchange behavior, not the injected-brine composition. At high ionic strength, the electrical double layer collapses and is no longer diffuse. All surface charges are located directly in the inner and outer Helmholtz planes. Our evaluation of

  20. Influence of solution chemistry on the boron content in inorganic calcite grown in artificial seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Harper, Dustin T.; Penman, Donald E.; Zachos, James C.; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2017-12-01

    The ratio of boron to calcium (B/Ca) in marine biogenic carbonates has been proposed as a proxy for properties of seawater carbonate chemistry. Applying this proxy to planktic foraminifera residing in the surface seawater largely in equilibrium with the atmosphere may provide a valuable handle on past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, precise controls on B/Ca in planktic foraminifera remain enigmatic because it has been shown to depend on multiple physicochemical seawater properties. To help establish a firm inorganic basis for interpreting the B/Ca records, we examined the effect of a suite of chemical parameters ([Ca2+], pH, [DIC], salinity and [PO43-]) on B/Ca in inorganic calcite precipitated in artificial seawater. These parameters were primarily varied individually while keeping all others constant, but we also tested the influence of pH and [DIC] at a constant calcite precipitation rate (R) by concurrent [Ca2+] adjustments. In the simple [Ca2+], pH and [DIC] experiments, both R and B/Ca increased with these parameters. In the pH-[Ca2+] and [DIC]-[Ca2+] experiments at constant R, on the other hand, B/Ca was invariant at different pH and decreased with [DIC], respectively. These patterns agree with the behavior of solution [BTotal/DIC] ratio such that, at a fixed [BTotal], it is independent of pH but decreases with [DIC]. Based on these results, R and [BTotal/DIC] ratio appear to be the primary controls on B/Ca in inorganic calcite, suggesting that both B(OH)4- and B(OH)3 are possibly involved in B incorporation. Moreover, B/Ca modestly increased with salinity and [PO43-]. Inorganic calcite precipitated at higher R and in the presence of oxyanions such as SO42- and PO43- in growth solutions often undergoes surface roughening due to formation of crystallographic defects, vacancies and, occasionally, amorphous/hydrous CaCO3. These non-lattice sites may provide additional space for B, particularly B(OH)3. Consequently, besides the macroscopic influence of

  1. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  2. Isostructural exclusion of elements between aragonite and calcite layers in the shell of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Gauldie, R.W.; Trompetter, W.J.; Pithie, J.; Jamieson, D.N.; Sharma, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Sections of the shell of the farmed Pacific oyster 'Crassostrea gigas' that are available commercially in Wellington, New Zealand, showed a distinct alternating pattern in the shell mineral when observed by reflected light. The layers were identified by Raman scattering as alternating bands of the calcite and aragonite mineral forms of calcium carbonate using the micro-Raman facility at the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. The differences in the unit cell structure of calcite and aragonite favour different trace elements in the two minerals. Aragonite is isostructural with Strontianite SrCO 3 , and calcite is isostructural with Smithsonite ZnCO 3 . As a result, Sr deposition should be favoured in the aragonite layer and is excluded from the calcite layer; and, conversely, Zn deposition should be favoured in the calcite layer and is excluded from the aragonite layer. However, up to today, significant differences in the pattern of Sr and Zn in microprobe scans are not discovered. By ion microprobe analysis, it was shown that differences in the unit cell structure of calcite and aragonite favor different trace elements in the two minerals

  3. Fabrication of calcite blocks from gypsum blocks by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions in sodium carbonate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Kawachi, Giichiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Ayami

    2017-03-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) has been used as a bone substitute, and is a precursor for carbonate apatite, which is also a promising bone substitute. However, limited studies have been reported on the fabrication of artificial calcite blocks. In the present study, cylindrical calcite blocks (ϕ6×3mm) were fabricated by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions using different calcium sulfate blocks as a precursor. In the dissolution-precipitation reactions, both CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 transformed into calcite, a polymorph of CaCO 3 , while maintaining their macroscopic structure when immersed in 1mol/L Na 2 CO 3 solution at 80°C for 1week. The diametral tensile strengths of the calcite blocks formed using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 were 1.0±0.3 and 2.3±0.7MPa, respectively. The fabrication of calcite blocks using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 proposed in this investigation may be a useful method to produce calcite blocks because of the self-setting ability and high temperature stability of gypsum precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcite as a bone substitute. Comparison with hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate with regard to the osteoblastic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchau, F., E-mail: Francine.monchau@univ-artois.fr [Laboratoire Genie Civil et geo-Environnement (EA 4515, Universite Lille Nord de France), Equipe Biomateriaux Artois (Universite d' Artois), IUT/GMP, 1230, rue de l' Universite, BP 819, 62408 Bethune cedex (France); Hivart, Ph.; Genestie, B. [Laboratoire Genie Civil et geo-Environnement (EA 4515, Universite Lille Nord de France), Equipe Biomateriaux Artois (Universite d' Artois), IUT/GMP, 1230, rue de l' Universite, BP 819, 62408 Bethune cedex (France); Chai, F. [Laboratoire Medicaments et Biomateriaux a Liberation Controlee (INSERM U 1008, Universite Lille Nord de France), Groupe de Recherche sur les Biomateriaux (Universite Lille-2), Faculte de Medecine, 1, place de Verdun, 59045 Lille cedex (France); and others

    2013-01-01

    Close to the bone mineral phase, the calcic bioceramics, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), are commonly used as substitutes or filling materials in bone surgery. Besides, calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) is also used for their excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. However, the problem with the animal-origin aragonite demands the new technique to synthesize pure calcite capable of forming 3D bone implant. This study aims to manufacture and evaluate a highly-pure synthetic crystalline calcite with good cytocompatibility regarding to the osteoblasts, comparing to that of HA and {beta}-TCP. After the manufacture of macroporous bioceramic scaffolds with the identical internal architecture, their cytocompatibility is studied through MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts with the tests of cell viability, proliferation, vitality, etc. The results confirmed that the studied process is able to form a macroporous material with a controlled internal architecture, and this synthesized calcite is non-cytotoxic and facilitate the cell proliferation. Indeed requiring further improvement, the studied calcite is definitely an interesting alternative not only to coralline aragonite but also to calcium phosphate ceramics, particularly in bone sites with the large bone remodelling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Macroporous calcite manufacturing with controlled architecture as bone substitute Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity: adaptation of the colony-forming method with the target cells: MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of osteoblast proliferation and activity on calcite, HA and TCP.

  5. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  6. Uji Pemberian Dolomit, Lumpur Laut Dan Beberapa Strain Rhizobl4 Terhadap Pertumbuhan Tanaman Kedelai (glycine max (l) mcrril) Pada Tanah Bergambut

    OpenAIRE

    Pranoto, Eko

    2013-01-01

    EK.0 PRANOTO (2005), " Ttying in giving dolomite, sea mud and some of strain Rhizobia towards the growth of soybean plant (Glycine ma>• L^emll) at peat soil" which is auided by Prof. Dr. Ir. AsmarlaiH S. Hanafiah, MS.DAA and Kemala San Lubis SP, MP. The research did twice. The first research compared the dolomite with sea mud, both as amendment. And compared the rhm>t«a inoculums from Biologic Soil laboratory FP-USU collection with the rhizobia inoculums from that peat soil. The second resear...

  7. Green technological approach to synthesis hydrophobic stable crystalline calcite particles with one-pot synthesis for oil-water separation during oil spill cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Nan; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Bundschuh, Jochen; Li, Che-Feng; Lee, Chin-Rong; Hsu, Chun-Mei; Lee, Wen-Chien; Huang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2017-10-15

    The process of separating oil and water from oil/water mixtures is an attractive strategy to answer the menace caused by industrial oil spills and oily wastewater. In addition, water coproduced during hydrocarbon exploitation, which can be an economic burden and risk for freshwater resources, can become an important freshwater source after suitable water-oil separation. For oil-water separation purposes, considerable attention has been paid to the preparation of hydrophobic-oleophilic materials with modified surface roughness. However, due to issues of thermodynamic instability, costly and complex methods as well as lack of ecofriendly compounds, most of hydrophobic surface modified particles are of limited practical application. The study presents a facile procedure, to synthesize crystalline particles of calcite, which is the most stable polymorph of CaCO 3 from industrial CaCO 3 using oleic acid as an additive in a one-pot synthesis method. The XRD results show that the synthesized particles were a well-crystallized form of calcite. The FTIR results reflect the appearance of the alkyl groups from the oleic acid in synthesized particles which promotes the production of calcite with 'rice shape' (1.64 μm) (aggregated by spherical nanoparticle of 19.56 nm) morphology with concomitant changes in its surface wettability from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The synthesized particles exhibited near to super hydrophobicity with ∼99% active ratio and a contact angle of 143.8°. The synthesized hydrophobic calcite particles had an oleophilic nature where waste diesel oil adsorption capacity of synthesized calcium carbonate (HCF) showed a very high (>99%) and fast (7 s) oil removal from oil-water mixture. The functional group of long alkyl chain including of CO bounds may play critical roles for adsorption of diesel oils. Moreover, the thermodynamically stable crystalline polymorph calcite (compared to vaterite) exhibited excellent recyclability. The isothermal study

  8. Up-scaling mineral-aqueous interfacial processes that govern isotope and trace element partitioning during calcite growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The dependence of the isotopic and trace element composition of calcium carbonate minerals on growth conditions including temperature, pH, and salinity is widely used to infer paleoclimate conditions. These inferences rely heavily on phenomenological observations of biogenic and inorganic precipitation both in and ex situ, where only limited variability in solution conditions can be explored. Ionic fluxes between the mineral surface and aqueous growth solution govern the net uptake of both stoichiometric and trace species during calcification, so developing a mechanistic understanding of the reactions governing these fluxes is critical to refine existing proxies and to develop new ones. The micro-scale mechanisms of calcite precipitation from aqueous solution have been extensively studied, and net ionic uptake post-nucleation is known to occur primarily at monomolecular kink sites along step edges at the mineral surface. In this talk, I will present a theoretical framework that uses the quasi-elementary ion attachment and detachment reactions governing ion uptake at kink sites to simultaneously model bulk mineral growth kinetics and tracer partitioning during calcite precipitation. Several distinct processes occur during ion uptake at kink sites that can influence the distribution of trace species, directly impacting the composition of various carbonate paleoproxies including δ44Ca, δ18O, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca. The distribution of these trace species will be shown to depend on (1) the relative rates of ion desolvation during attachment to kink sites, (2) the relative rates of bond breaking during detachment from kink sites, and (3) the equilibrium partitioning of trace aqueous species. This model accounts for the impact of solution conditions on net ion fluxes and surface speciation, which in turn controls the population of kink sites available for direct ion exchange with the aqueous phase. The impacts of solution variables including pH, temperature and salinity can

  9. Ostracod calcite records the 18O/16O ratio of the bicarbonate and carbonate ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Laurent S.; McGregor, Helen V.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2017-10-01

    The δ18O of ostracod valves is widely used to infer water δ18O and temperature. However, ostracod δ18O appears sensitive to other environmental variables. In addition, there is species-dependent ostracod calcite 18O enrichment, relative to slowly precipitated inorganic calcite under the same conditions. Together these uncertainties complicate ostracod paleoclimate reconstructions. This study presents a new understanding of the causes of ostracod δ18O variations based on a global database of published ostracod δ18O values in lake, marine and coastal environments, and from culture experiments. The database includes associated field/experiment host water parameters including temperature (-1 to 32 °C), water δ18O (-13.2‰ to 4.3‰ VSMOW), pH (6.9-10.4), salinity (0-72 g/kg), calcite saturation states (0.6-26), and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration [DIC] (0.9-54.3 mmol/kg). The data show that: (1) the δ18O of marine and non-marine ostracods reflects the 18O/16O of the sum of host water CO32- and HCO3- ions. For example, at a given temperature, the δ18O of non-marine ostracods decreases by 4‰ to 6‰ as [CO32-]/[DIC] reaches 70%, depending on the ostracod species. In low [CO32-]/[DIC] settings (i.e. high HCO3-/CO32-), ostracod 18O/16O is close to the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions, which explains why on average ostracod δ18O is higher than the δ18O of inorganic calcite precipitated slowly under the same conditions. (2) Taxonomic offsets in ostracod δ18O vary with the host water [CO32-]/[DIC]. In environments where HCO3- ≫ CO32- (i.e. most freshwater lakes), the 18O/16O of Candonids is indistinguishable from the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions (difference of 0.10 ± 0.16‰) while the 18O/16O of Cyprids is lower than the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions by -0.77‰ to -0.32‰, Cytherids by -0.88 ± 0.29‰, and Limnocytherids by -1.12 ± 0.05‰. (3) The sensitivity of ostracod δ18O to [CO32-]/[DIC] also varies with taxonomy. For each percent increase in [CO32-]/[DIC

  10. Rare Earth element (REE) incorporation in natural calcite. Upper limits for actinide uptake in a secondary phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stipp, S.L.S.; Christensen, J.T.; Waight, T.E.; Lakshtanov, L.Z.; Baker, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary minerals have the potential to sequester escaped actinides in the event of a radioactive waste repository failure, but currently, data to define their maximum uptake capacity are generally lacking. To estimate a maximum limit for solid solution in calcite, we took advantage of the behavioural similarities of the 4f-orbital lanthanides with some of the 5f-orbital actinides and used rare Earth element (REE) concentration as an analogue. A suite of 65 calcite samples, mostly pure single crystals, was assembled from a range of geological settings, ages and locations and analysed by isotope dilution MC-ICP-MS (multiple-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy). All samples were shown to contain significant lanthanide concentrations. The highest were in calcite formed from hydrothermal solutions and from carbonatite magma. Maximum total mole fraction of REE was 4.72 x 10 -4 , which represents one substituted atom for about 2000 Ca sites. In comparison, synthetic calcite, precipitated at growth rates slow enough to insure solid solution formation, incorporated 7.5 x 10 -4 mole fraction Eu(III). For performance assessment, we propose that 7.5 mmole substitution/kg calcite should be considered the upper limit for actinide incorporation in secondary calcite. The largest source of uncertainty in this estimate results from extrapolating lanthanide data to actinides. However, the data offer confidence that for waters in the hydrothermal temperature range, such as in the near-field, or at groundwater temperatures, such as in the far-field, if calcite formation is favoured and actinides are present, those with behaviour like the trivalent lanthanides, especially Am 3+ and Cm 3+ , will be incorporated. REE are abundant and widely distributed, and they have remained in calcite for millions of years. Thus, one can be certain that incorporated actinides will also remain immobilised in calcite formed in fractures and pore spaces, as long as solution conditions

  11. Age and geochemistry of the Newania dolomite carbonatites, India: implications for the source of primary carbonatite magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Shukla, Anil D.; Rai, Vinai K.; Kumar, Alok; Awasthi, Neeraj; Smitha, R. S.; Panda, Dipak K.

    2013-12-01

    The Newania carbonatite complex of India is one of the few dolomite-dominated carbonatites of the world. Intruding into Archean basement gneisses, the rocks of the complex have undergone limited diversification and are not associated with any alkaline silicate rock. Although the magmatic nature of the complex was generally accepted, its age of emplacement had remained equivocal because of the disturbed nature of radioisotope systems. Many questions about the nature of its mantle source and mode of origin had remained unanswered because of lack of geochemical and isotopic data. Here, we present results of our effort to date the complex using 147Sm-143Nd, 207Pb-206Pb and 40Ar-39Ar dating techniques. We also present mineral chemistry, major and trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic ratio data for these carbonatites. Our age data reveal that the complex was emplaced at ~1,473 Ma and parts of it were affected by a thermal event at ~904 Ma. The older 207Pb-206Pb ages reported here (~2.4 Ga) and by one earlier study (~2.3 Ga; Schleicher et al. Chem Geol 140:261-273, 1997) are deemed to be a result of heterogeneous incorporation of crustal Pb during the post-emplacement thermal event. The thermal event had little effect on many magmatic signatures of these rocks, such as its dolomite-magnesite-ankerite-Cr-rich magnetite-magnesio-arfvedsonite-pyrochlore assemblage, mantle like δ13C and δ18O and typical carbonatitic trace element patterns. Newania carbonatites show fractional crystallization trend from high-Mg to high-Fe through high-Ca compositions. The least fractionated dolomite carbonatites of the complex possess very high Mg# (≥80) and have similar major element oxide contents as that of primary carbonatite melts experimentally produced from peridotitic sources. In addition, lower rare earth element (and higher Sr) contents than a typical calcio-carbonatite and mantle like Nb/Ta ratios indicate that the primary magma for the complex was a magnesio

  12. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  13. Competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite; experimental results and modeling with CCM and CD-MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Larsen, Flemming

    2012-09-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite was studied in batch experiments using calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions had circum-neutral pH (7-8.3) and covered a wide span in the activity of Ca2+ and CO32-. The results show that the adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is strongly reduced by the presence of phosphate, whereas phosphate adsorption is only slightly reduced by arsenate addition. Simultaneous and sequential addition (3 h apart) yields the same reduction in adsorption, underlining the high reversibility of the system. The reduction in adsorption of both arsenate and phosphate is most likely due to competition for the same sorption sites at the calcite surface, considering the similarity in sorption edges, pKa's and geometry of the two anions. The strong reduction in arsenate adsorption by competition with phosphate suggests that adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is of minor importance in most groundwater aquifers, as phosphate is often present at concentration levels sufficient to significantly reduce arsenate adsorption. The CD-MUSIC model for calcite was used successfully to model adsorption of arsenate and phosphate separately. By combining the models for single sorbate systems the competitive adsorption of phosphate and arsenate onto calcite in the binary system could be predicted. This is in contrast to the constant capacitance model (CCM) which under-predicted the competition when combining the models for single sorbate systems. This study clearly shows the importance of performing competitive adsorption studies for validation of multi-component models and for estimating the mobility of an ion in the environment.

  14. Texture evolution in calcite gouge formed at sub-seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Luzin, Vladimir; Timms, Nick E.; Ben Clennell, M.; Giwelli, Ausama

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate rocks are abundant in the upper crust and are notoriously seismogenic with Mw>6 earthquakes nucleating in fault zones in carbonate dominated units around the world. Field observations describe fault zones as characterised by a narrow principal slip zone at their core, containing fine, granular wear material referred to as fault gouge, produced during cumulative slip. The current literature on the link between texture and frictional properties of calcite gouges is very limited and somewhat contradictory: based on the study of a natural calcite gouge a link has been proposed between the presence of a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and past seismic activity on the gouge hosting fault zone. However, similar features in terms of CPO were also identified on gouges experimentally generated at slip velocities well below the seismic ones, therefore questioning their interpretation as diagnostic of past seismic events. We studied the evolution of friction coefficient and texture on calcite gouges experimentally produced by means of high pressure direct shear experiments on large, water saturated, intact blocks of travertine (calcite 99 % wt.). Several blocks were deformed at room temperature up to different amounts of maximum displacements (20 mm, 70 mm and 120 mm) under an imposed sub-seismic slip rate of approximately 0.1 microns/s. Microstructural characterization of the deformed blocks was subsequently carried out on samples representing the highest strained portion s of each blocks (i.e. gouge zones). Local and bulk texture of the original and deformed materials was studied by means of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction, respectively. Direct shear experiments consistently indicate an evolution of the friction coefficient stabilizing at around values of 0.6 after 15 mm of slip. Macroscopic observations on the deformed blocks indicate that deformation is localised in a narrow band of extreme grain size reduction

  15. {Carbon and oxygen isotope signals from marine ostracod calcite - results from present and past oceans}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, A.; Speijer, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    Systematic stable isotope studies on ostracod calcite are generally rare, in particular for marine taxa only the work of DIDIÉ & BAUCH (2002) provides first clues towards an improved understanding of ostracod stable isotope data in paleoceanography. Here we present analyses from recent near surface sediments from the Gulf of Taranto, the Levantine Basin (15 ka, both Mediterranean Sea) and the Paleocene of Tunisia (southern Tethyan margin). Data are compared to those from selected benthic foraminiferal taxa from which the living habitat and the isotopic disequilibria from ambient sea-water are well known. In addition, size fractions of monospecific samples have been studied in order to test whether a size/mass dependent change exists with respect to the isotopic composition of the carapace calcite. Calcification of ostracod carapaces is a very rapid process, which often takes place within a few hours and the obtained signal provides only a snap-shot of the prevailing paleoceanographic conditions. Multiple mono-specific measurements show therefore a much higher variability than benthic foraminifera, but may give a more complete picture of the seasonal changes. Our study confirms the findings of DIDIÉ & BAUCH (2002) and others (for non-marine taxa) that ostracod calcite displays a positive species-specific deviation from the sea-water ^18O composition between 0.5 and 1.5 per mil with an intra-specific variability of less than 0.5 per mil. In contrast ^13C values cover a huge range with an off-set from sea-water of up to -5 per mil and show a high intra-specific variability of up to 2 per mil. Size-fraction data show no systematic change, although a statistically significant positive covariance between ^18O and ^13C has been observed. This covariance consists of a slope similar to a kinetic controlled fractionation as has been described from asymbiotic planktic foraminifera (Globigerina bulloides) and corals (MCCONNAUGHEY, 1989; SPERO & LEA, 1996). This suggests that

  16. Aragonite-Calcite Inversion During Biogenic Carbonate Sampling: Considerations for Interpreting Isotopic Measurements in Paleoclimate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, A. J.; Swart, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    As aragonite is the metastable polymorph of calcium carbonate, it lends itself to monotropic inversion to the more stable polymorph, calcite. This inversion is possible through an increase in the temperature and pressure conditions to which the sample is exposed and, although first noted nearly a century ago, has been primarily discussed in the context of sample roasting prior to analyses in paleoclimatological studies. Over the last several decades, however, researchers have found evidence to suggest that the friction associated with the sampling of biogenic carbonates via milling/drilling also induces inversion. Furthermore, this inversion may be associated with a shift in measured oxygen isotopic values and ultimately have significant implications for the interpretation of paleoclimatic reconstructions. Despite this, the isotopic heterogeneity of biogenic aragonite skeletons makes the effects of inversion challenging to test and the subject remains underrepresented in the literature. Here we present a first order study into the effects of milling on both the mineralogy and isotopic compositions measured in sclerosponges, corals, and molluscs. X-Ray diffraction analysis of samples hand ground with a mortar and pestle reveal 100% aragonitic skeletons. Conversely, samples milled with a computerized micromill show measurable inversion to calcite. On average, percent inversion of aragonite to calcite for individual specimens was 15% for sclerosponges, 16% for corals, and 9% for molluscs. Isotopic data from these specimens show that the higher the percentage of aragonite inverted to calcite, the more depleted the measured oxygen isotopic values. In the largest of the datasets (sclerosponges), it is evident that the range of oxygen isotope values from milled samples (-0.02 to +0.84%) exceeds the range in values for those samples which were hand ground and showed no inversion (+0.53 to +0.90%). This, coupled with the strong correlation between the two variables

  17. Cyclic platform dolomites and platform-to-basin transition of Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), southwest Montana and east-central Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    The Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) in southwestern Montana consists of cyclic sequences of shallow marine platformal dolomites that grade westward into slope/basinal facies in east-central Idaho. Regional sedimentologic characteristics of slope facies in Idaho indicate that the Jefferson platform resembled a distally steepened ramp. Slope facies consist of slope laminites with local small scale slumps and slope breccias. Shallow water platform-derived clasts are lacking in the slope breccias. Individual shallowing upward platform cycles are 25 m to < 1 m thick and consists of, in descending order: local solution-collapse breccia caps; cryptalgal dolomudstone; rare ooid dolograinstone; thin-bedded Amphipora dolowackestone; coarsely crystalline dolostones with abundant lenticular to domal stromatoporoids; and basal thin-bedded, fine-grained, shale dolostones with closely spaced hard-grounds that grade upward into burrow-homogenized, irregularly bedded dolostones.

  18. Hydrothermal zebra dolomite in the Great Basin, Nevada--attributes and relation to Paleozoic stratigraphy, tectonics, and ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Hofstra, A.H.; Koenig, A.E.; Emsbo, P.; Christiansen, W.; Johnson, Chad

    2010-01-01

    In other parts of the world, previous workers have shown that sparry dolomite in carbonate rocks may be produced by the generation and movement of hot basinal brines in response to arid paleoclimates and tectonism, and that some of these brines served as the transport medium for metals fixed in Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) and sedimentary exhalative (Sedex) deposits of Zn, Pb, Ag, Au, or barite. Numerous occurrences of hydrothermal zebra dolomite (HZD), comprised of alternating layers of dark replacement and light void-filling sparry or saddle dolomite, are present in Paleozoic platform and slope carbonate rocks on the eastern side of the Great Basin physiographic province. Locally, it is associated with mineral deposits of barite, Ag-Pb-Zn, and Au. In this paper the spatial distribution of HZD occurrences, their stratigraphic position, morphological characteristics, textures and zoning, and chemical and stable isotopic compositions were determined to improve understanding of their age, origin, and relation to dolostone, ore deposits, and the tectonic evolution of the Great Basin. In northern and central Nevada, HZD is coeval and cogenetic with Late Devonian and Early Mississippian Sedex Au, Zn, and barite deposits and may be related to Late Ordovician Sedex barite deposits. In southern Nevada and southwest California, it is cogenetic with small MVT Ag-Pb-Zn deposits in rocks as young as Early Mississippian. Over Paleozoic time, the Great Basin was at equatorial paleolatitudes with episodes of arid paleoclimates. Several occurrences of HZD are crosscut by Mesozoic or Cenozoic intrusions, and some host younger pluton-related polymetallic replacement and Carlin-type gold deposits. The distribution of HZD in space (carbonate platform, margin, and slope) and stratigraphy (Late Neoproterozoic Ediacaran-Mississippian) roughly parallels that of dolostone and both are prevalent in Devonian strata. Stratabound HZD is best developed in Ediacaran and Cambrian units, whereas

  19. Systematic study of the dolomite (104) surface by bimodal dynamic force microscopy in ultra-high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Pina, Carlos M; Bubendorf, Alexander; Fessler, Gregor; Glatzel, Thilo; Gnecco, Enrico; Meyer, Ernst

    2013-02-08

    We have investigated the morphology and structure of dolomite MgCa(CO(3))(2)(104) surfaces by bimodal dynamic force microscopy with flexural and torsional resonance modes in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. We found that the surface slowly decomposes by degassing CO(2) in a vacuum and becomes covered by amorphous clusters, presumably MgO and CaO. By choosing an optimal sample preparation procedure (i.e. cleaving in a vacuum and mild annealing for stabilizing clusters for a short time), atomically clean surfaces were obtained. The complex tip-sample interaction, arising from carbonate groups and Mg and Ca atoms of the surface, induces a large variety of atomic-scale imaging features.

  20. Effectiveness factors for a commercial steam reforming (Ni) catalyst and for a calcined dolomite used downstream biomass gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    A commercial steam reforming catalyst from BASF, the G1-25 S one, and a calcined dolomite, Norte-1, from Cantabria-Spain, have been used, once crushed and sieved to different particle fractions between 1.0 and 4.0 mm. The materials have been tested downstream small pilot biomass gasifiers, bubbling fluidized bed type, gasifying with air and with steam. The Thiele modulus and the effectiveness factor have been calculated at temperatures of 750-850 deg C. It is experimentally shown that diffusion control plays an important part when particle size is larger than ca. 0.5 mm. This has to be taken into account when comparing the quality of the solids for tar elimination. (author) (5 refs.)

  1. Studies of radionuclide sorption by clays in the Culebra dolomite at the WIPP site, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.D.; Leckie, J.O.; Park, S.W.; Phillips, S.L.; Sewards, T.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of radionuclide-rock interactions to retard the migration of plutonium and uranium within clay-lined fractures in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation is being estimated in support of the performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This paper describes progress in three coordinated studies: (1) characterization of the properties of the groundwater and minerals in the Culebra that will control radionuclide retardation; (2) development of a thermodynamic model for the adsorption of uranium onto corrensite, the mixed chlorite-smectite clay mineral found in Culebra fractures; and (3) development of a database of equilibrium constants and interaction parameters for calculations of the aqueous speciation of uranium and plutonium in Na-Cl-Ca-SO 4 -CO 3 solutions which contain organic ligands such as EDTA and range in ionic strength from approximately 0.8 - 6.0 molal. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Nano-scale zero valent iron transport in a variable aperture dolomite fracture and a glass fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B. E.; Cui, Z.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations are being performed to understand the transport behavior of carboxymethyl cellulose polymer stabilized nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) in a variable aperture dolomite rock fracture and a variable aperture glass replica of a fractured slate. The rock fracture was prepared by artificially inducing a fracture in a dolomite block along a stylolite, and the glass fracture was prepared by creating molds with melted glass on two opposing sides of a fractured slate rock block. Both of the fractures were 0.28 m in length and 0.21 m in width. Equivalent hydraulic apertures are about 110 microns for the rock fracture and 250 microns for the glass replica fracture. Sodium bromide and lissamine green B (LGB) serve as conservative tracers in the rock fracture and glass replica fracture, respectively. A dark box set-up with a light source and digital camera is being used to visualize the LGB and CMC-nZVI movement in the glass fracture. Experiments are being performed to determine the effects of water specific discharge and CMC concentration on nZVI transport in the fractures. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visual spectrophotometry were performed to determine the stability and characteristics of the CMC-nZVI mixture. The transport of bromide, LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI in both fractures is being evaluated through analysis of the effluent concentrations. Time-lapse images are also being captured for the glass fracture. Bromide, LGB, and CMC recoveries have exceeded 95% in both fractures. Significant channeling has been observed in the fractures for CMC transport due to viscous effects.

  3. Calcite Twin Analysis in the Central Andes of Northern Argentina and Southern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, E.; Hindle, D.

    2005-12-01

    The use of calcite twinning to infer compression directions and strain axes patterns has been applied widely in both fold and thrust belts, and continental interiors. Calcite twinning is noted to be one of the most precise methods for determining the internal strain of deformed rocks. Until now, such data from the deformed plate boundary of the Central Andes were lacking. This study has examined twinning orientations along the deformed Andean foreland (southern Bolivia and northern Argentina) from -25 to -20 latitude. In the Central Andes, we find an abundance of calcite twins in intervals of the Cretaceous age Yacorite limestone. Twin samples were collected, measured for orientation and type (I and II can be best used for strain analysis), and processed using the Groshong method, to give resultant strain tensors. The orientations of the twin short axes trend mostly NE-SW, which is close to the plate convergence direction. However, in a limited number of samples from the north, adjacent to the southern culmination of the active Subandean fold thrust belt, they trend NW-SE. This difference may be related to the more active, or more recent, shortening of the southern portion of the Eastern Cordillera, south of the culmination of the Subandean belt. This implies that twin short axes vary consistently with respect to geographic location and local tectonic regime. NW-SE trends in the northern region match well with fault kinematic studies in rocks pre-dating the San Juan del Oro unconformity (9-10 Ma). NE-SW trends in the south could correspond to much younger (~1-3 Ma) fault kinematic trends. In the Eastern Cordillera, where there is present day tectonic activity, the plunges of the twin short axes are found to be almost horizontal. This suggests that the twins were formed after folding occurred.

  4. Subglacial Calcites from Northern Victoria Land: archive of Antarctic volcanism in the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisia, Silvia; Weirich, Laura; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Barbante, Carlo; Cooper, Alan

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial carbonates bear similarities to stalagmites in their fabrics and the potential to obtain precise chronologies using U-series methods. Their chemical properties also reflect those of their parent waters, which, in contrast to stalagmites, are those of subglacial meltwaters. In analogy to speleothems, stable Carbon isotope ratios and trace elements such as Uranium, Iron and Manganese provide the opportunity to investigate ancient extreme environments without the need to drill through thousands of metres of ice. Sedimentological, geochemical and microbial evidence preserved in LGM subglacial calcites from Northern Victoria Land, close to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet margin, allow us to infer that subglacial volcanism was active in the Trans Antarctic Mountain region and induced basal ice melting. We hypothesize that a meltwater reservoir was drained and injected into interconnected basal pore systems where microbial processes enhanced bedrock weathering and, thus, released micronutrients. Volcanic influence is supported by the presence of fluorine (F) and sulphur in sediment-laden calcite layers containing termophilic species. Notably, calcite δ13C points to dissolved inorganic carbon evolved from subglacial metabolic processes. Once transported to the sea, soluble iron likely contributed to fertilizing the Southern Ocean and CO2 drawdown. This is the first well-dated evidence for LGM volcanism in Antarctica, which complements the record of volcanic eruptions retrieved from Talos Dome ice core, and supports the hypothesis of large-scale volcanism as an important driver of climate change. We conclude that subglacial carbonates are equivalent to speleothems in their palaeoclimate potential and may become a most useful source of information of ecosystems and processes at peak glacials in high altitude/high latitude settings.

  5. Calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Pedogenic or hypogene?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Harmon, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this paper is to consider all of the geological and geochemical data available for the calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain and to ascertain whether this data favors a pedogenic or hyogene origin for these deposits. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site. It is also the purpose of this paper to serve as a foundation for a lengthy feature article to be submitted for publication in 1994. In addition, a stand has been taken by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences against the upwelling-water model (a vote of 17 to 0 against), and this same panel report has concluded that open-quotes there is no compelling evidence for the repetitive flooding of the environment by expulsion of groundwaterclose quotes and that open-quotes instead, the evidence strongly supports the idea that the near-surface mineral deposits resulted from percolating rainwater, which carried soil minerals down into rock fracturesclose quotes. Based on such information the Department of Energy has stated that it open-quotes finds no basis to continue to study the origin of these specific depositsclose quotes. This study, based upon many different independent lines of evidence, reaches the opposite conclusion and instead favors a hypogene spring-travertine origin for the controversial calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. This study recognizes a pedogenic carbonate component at Yucca Mountain, but argues that this component is distinct from, and sometimes intermixed with, the calcite/opal deposits

  6. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  7. Siliciclastics in the Upper Triassic dolomite formations of the Krizna Unit (Maid Fatra Mountains, Western Carpathians): constraints for the Carnian Pluvial Event in the Fatric Basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, M.; Siblík, Miloš; Soták, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2011), s. 121-138 ISSN 1335-0552 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Carnian event * Upper Triassic dolomites * Western Carpathians * Krizna Unit * shaly interbeds * lingulids * conchostracans Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.787, year: 2011

  8. Data on the mineralogy and petrology of the dolomite-bearing northern contact zone of the Quérigut granite French Pyrenees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struwe, H.

    1957-01-01

    The northern part of the contact aureole of the biotite-granite of Quérigut contains limestones and dolomites, which have been metamorphosed over a distance of about 100 to 150 metres. Further, a wide innermost border zone of the igneous body is characterized by the development of some hornblende

  9. Hot gas cleaning and upgrading with a calcined dolomite located downstream a biomass fluidized bed gasifier operating with steam-oxygen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, P.; Aznar, M.P.; Caballero, M.A.; Gil, J.; Martin, J.A.; Corella, J. [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1997-11-01

    Cleaning and upgrading of the hot raw gas from a biomass gasifier, bubbling fluidized bed type, is studied at small pilot plant scale (10 kg biomass fed/h) using a calcined dolomite located downstream from the gasifier. Gasification is made with steam-oxygen mixtures at 800-850{degree}C and atmospheric pressure. Main variables studied are the gas residence time in the bed of dolomite and the gas atmosphere composition, which depends on the gasifying agent (H{sub 2}O + O{sub 2})-to-biomass and H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} ratios. H{sub 2} and CO content in the flue gas increases by 16-23 vol% and decrease by 15-22 vol % (dry basis), respectively. Although CH{sub 4} conversion (elimination) higher than 30 vol % has never been reached, tar conversion (elimination) of 90-95 vol% are obtained with space times of 0.06 - 0.15 kg calcined dolomite h{sup -1} m{sup -3}. A detailed study is here presented on how the calcined dolomite significantly cleans and upgrades the flue gas, increasing also the gas yield by 0.15-0.40 m{sup 3} (STP)/kg daf biomass fed. 14 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  11. A new overall kinetic model describing calcite precipitation from brine-like solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charara, M.; Lopez, O.; Zuddas, P.

    2005-12-01

    Future CO2 injections would modify strongly the physic and the chemistry of the brine aquifer hosts (i.e. temperature, chemical composition, PCO2 partial pressure etc...). Although many geological systems can be represented using thermodynamic concepts and principles, the factors governing their fate and evolution can only be understood if the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions are well known. One of the most important problems in the application of carbonate fluid-rock interactions is the function governing the variation on precipitation rate. A general rate law describing the calcite precipitation is: R=k,f(PCO2),g(I),h(T),φ(Π ai),φ([CO32-]) where R is the precipitation rate, k is the apparent kinetic constant of caclite crystal growth, PCO2 is the partial pressure of CO2 at equilibrium (from 30 to 3.104Pa), I is the fluid ionic strength (from 0.1 to 1 mol.kg-1), T is the temperature (from 5 to 60°C), ai is the activity of the specific brine constituents (accelerators, inhibitors, both organic and inorganic) and [CO32-] is the concentration in carbonate ion (from 100 to 400 mmol.kg-1) assumed to be the macroscopical variable governing the overall reaction. Based on parametric inversion of previous and new kinetic data, we established an empirical model describing the variation of calcite precipitation rate as a function of these multiset parameters and variables. The model robustness validation (square correlation coefficient of 0.95) was obtained by compairing experimental measured and calculated rates. We found that, despite temperature and fluid ionic strength rule the reaction kinetic mechanisms, the variation of PCO2 partial pressure enhances by three orders of magnitude the rate of calcite precipitation even in completly buffered brine-like conditions. Our results indicate that, in present day sedimentary basins, the main role played by PCO2 partial pressure is independent from the desequilibrium condition contrar to both temperature and ionic

  12. Structure and dynamics of microbe-exuded polymers and their interactions with calcite surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Mitchell, Ralph (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Perry, Thomas D. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA)

    2005-12-01

    Cation binding by polysaccharides is observed in many environments and is important for predictive environmental modeling, and numerous industrial and food technology applications. The complexities of these organo-cation interactions are well suited to predictive molecular modeling studies for investigating the roles of conformation and configuration of polysaccharides on cation binding. In this study, alginic acid was chosen as a model polymer and representative disaccharide and polysaccharide subunits were modeled. The ability of disaccharide subunits to bind calcium and to associate with the surface of calcite was investigated. The findings were extended to modeling polymer interactions with calcium ions.

  13. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Sea Urchin Spine Calcite Forms via a Transient Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Yael; Arad, Talmon; Klein, Eugenia; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2004-11-01

    The skeletons of adult echinoderms comprise large single crystals of calcite with smooth convoluted fenestrated morphologies, raising many questions about how they form. By using water etching, infrared spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and environmental scanning electron microscopy, we show that sea urchin spine regeneration proceeds via the initial deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. Because most echinoderms produce the same type of skeletal material, they probably all use this same mechanism. Deposition of transient amorphous phases as a strategy for producing single crystals with complex morphology may have interesting implications for the development of sophisticated materials.

  15. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marutschke, Christoph; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika; Walters, Deron; Cleveland, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic—yet decisive—question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid–liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface. (paper)

  16. Calcite Supersaturation and Precipitation Kinetics in the Lower Colorado River, Ail-American Canal and East Highline Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, D. L.

    1983-06-01

    In situ pH determinations and analysis of major ions in solution indicated that the lower Colorado River is supersaturated with respect to calcite throughout the entire daily cycle, in both winter and summer. Although the ion activity product was 4 to 6 times greater than the calcite solubility product, there was no detectable precipitation. Chemical analyses of water samples taken along 350 km of the river and canals from Parker Dam to the Salton Sea also revealed no evidence of calcium carbonate precipitation despite the inflow of saline and highly supersaturated irrigation return flows. Laboratory kinetic studies indicated that calcite crystal growth rates with Colorado River water are about 30% of the rate for pure Ca-HCO3 waters and about 70% of that for synthetic Colorado River water. Calcite precipitation by crystal growth in the river is limited by the combination of short residence times and unavailability of reactive calcite. Critical supersaturation levels necessary for heterogeneous nucleation do not occur; a high suspended load limits algal photosynthesis and thus prevents large decreases in daytime H2CO3 levels.

  17. Mesozoic (Lower Jurassic) red stromatactis limestones from the Southern Alps (Arzo, Switzerland): calcite mineral authigenesis and syneresis-type deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuweiler, Fritz; Bernoulli, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    The Broccatello lithological unit (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian to lower parts of Upper Sinemurian) near the village of Arzo (southern Alps, southern Switzerland) is a mound-shaped carbonate deposit that contains patches of red stromatactis limestone. Within the largely bioclastic Broccatello unit, the stromatactis limestone is distinguished by its early-diagenetic cavity system, a relatively fine-grained texture, and an in-situ assemblage of calcified siliceous sponges (various demosponges and hexactinellids). A complex shallow subsurface diagenetic pathway can be reconstructed from sediment petrography in combination with comparative geochemical analysis (carbon and oxygen isotopes; trace and rare earth elements, REE + Y). This pathway includes organic matter transformation, aragonite and skeletal opal dissolution, patchy calcification and lithification, sediment shrinkage, sagging and collapse, partial REE remobilization, and multiple sediment infiltration. These processes occurred under normal-marine, essentially oxic conditions and were independent from local, recurring syn-sedimentary faulting. It is concluded that the stromatactis results from a combination of calcite mineral authigenesis and syneresis-type deformation. The natural stromatactis phenomenon may thus be best explained by maturation processes of particulate polymer gels expected to form in fine-grained carbonate sediments in the shallow subsurface. Conditions favorable for the evolution of stromatactis appear to be particularly frequent during drowning of tropical or subtropical carbonate platforms.

  18. Trace element and REE composition of five samples of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. Special report No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, D.

    1993-07-01

    The attached materials document the results of part of a recent effort of geochemical sampling and analysis at Yucca Mountain and nearby regions. The efforts come as a result of interest in comprehensive analyses of rare earth elements (REE), lanthanum (La) through lutecium (Lu). Several additional, non-REE analyses were obtained as well. Commercially available REE analyses have proved to be insufficiently sensitive for geochemical purposes. Dr. Roman Schmitt at the Radiation Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis was sent five samples as a trial effort. The results are very encouraging. The purpose of compiling Dr. Schmitt's report and the other materials is to inform the sponsor of his independent observations of these results and other information that sent to him. To provide a more complete appreciation of the utility of REE analyses a copy of Dave Vaniman's recent article is included in which he notes that REE analyses from Yucca Mountain indicate the occurrence of two distinctly different REE patterns as do several other chemical parameters of the calcite-silica deposits. Our four samples with high equivalent CaCO 3 were collected from sites we believe to be spring deposits. One sample, 24D, is from southern Crater Flat which is acknowledged by U.S.G.S. investigators to be a spring deposit. All four of these samples have REE patterns similar to those from the saturated zone reported by Vaniman

  19. Paleostress Reconstruction from 3D seismic, Natural Fracture and Calcite Twin Analyses: Structural Insights into the Otway Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Hugo; Amrouch, Khalid; Holford, Simon

    2017-04-01

    The Otway Basin, Australia, is of particular interest due to its significance as an Australian hydrocarbon producing province and a major global CO2 burial project. Structural data was collected in the form of natural fractures from wellbore image logs and outcrop in addition to calcite twin analyses, within formations from the mid cretaceous from both on and offshore. Evidence for four structural events within the study area have been identified including NE-SW and NW-SE orientated extension, in addition to a NW-SE compressive event. Natural fracture data also reveals a previously "un-detected" NE-SW compression within the Otway Basin. This study presents the first investigation of paleostress environments within the region from micro, meso and macro scale tectonic data in both onshore and offshore in addition to the first quantification of differential paleostresses. This work highlights the importance of a comprehensive understanding of four dimensional stress evolution within the sedimentary basins of Australia's southern margin.

  20. Assessment of the potential for dating secondary calcite and quartz in fault zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morency, Maurice

    1982-03-01

    Calcite and quartz occur frequently as secondary minerals in faults. In many instances these minerals are not deformed. Calcite, for example, often exhibits an undisturbed fibrous habit or appears as euhedral crystals. Direct dating of euhedral crystals would provide a minimum age of the last movement along a fault, whereas dating of fibrous crystals would furnish the real age of the last movement. This information would be essential in the evaluation and selection of sites for both nuclear power reactors and nuclear waste disposal. In the Canadian context, to be successful, the technique should be able to date minerals as old as tens of millions of years. In this study both isotopic and radioactive damage techniques were considered. It was found that thermoluminescence, thermally stimulated current, and electron spin resonance offer possibilities. Recent electron spin resonance studies of ancient flints have yielded dates of several hundred million years. It is anticipated that in the near future a combination of the above techniques will be extensively used in the field of geochronology

  1. Environmentally acceptable effect of hydrogen peroxide on cave 'lamp-flora', calcite speleothems and limestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faimon, Jiri; Stelcl, Jindrich; Kubesova, Svatava; Zimak, Jiri

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide plus limestone fragments allows removal of organisms without corrosion of limestone and speleothem. - Mosses, algae, and cyanobacteria (lamp-flora) colonize illuminated areas in show caves. This biota is commonly removed by a sodium hypochlorite solution. Because chlorine and other deleterious compounds are released into a cave environment during lamp-flora cleansing, hydrogen peroxide was tested as an alternative agent. In a multidisciplinary study conducted in the Katerinska Cave (Moravian Karst, Czech Republic), 12 algae- and cyanobacteria taxons and 19 moss taxons were detected. The threshold hydrogen peroxide concentration for the destruction of this lamp-flora was found to be 15 vol.%. Based on laboratory experiments in stirred batch reactors, the dissolution rates of limestones and calcite speleothems in water were determined as 3.77x10 -3 and 1.81x10 -3 mol m -2 h -1 , respectively. In the 15% peroxide solution, the limestone and speleothem dissolution rates were one order of magnitude higher, 2.00x10 -2 and 2.21x10 -2 mol m -2 h -1 , respectively. So, the peroxide solution was recognised to attack carbonates somewhat more aggressively than karst water. In order to prevent the potential corrosion of limestone and speleothems, the reaching of preliminary peroxide saturation with respect to calcite is recommended, for example, by adding of few limestone fragments into the solution at least 10 h prior to its application

  2. Continuous 500,000-year climate record from vein calcite in devils hole, nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winograd, I J; Coplen, T B; Landwehr, J M; Riggs, A C; Ludwig, K R; Szabo, B J; Kolesar, P T; Revesz, K M

    1992-10-09

    Oxygen-18 (delta(18)O) variations in a 36-centimeter-long core (DH-11) of vein calcite from Devils Hole, Nevada, yield an uninterrupted 500,000-year paleotemperature record that closely mimics all major features in the Vostok (Antarctica) paleotemperature and marine delta(18)O ice-volume records. The chronology for this continental record is based on 21 replicated mass-spectrometric uranium-series dates. Between the middle and latest Pleistocene, the duration of the last four glacial cycles recorded in the calcite increased from 80,000 to 130,000 years; this variation suggests that major climate changes were aperiodic. The timing of specific climatic events indicates that orbitally controlled variations in solar insolation were not a major factor in triggering deglaciations. Interglacial climates lasted about 20,000 years. Collectively, these observations are inconsistent with the Milankovitch hypothesis for the origin of the Pleistocene glacial cycles but they are consistent with the thesis that these cycles originated from internal nonlinear feedbacks within the atmosphere-ice sheet-ocean system.

  3. Calcite biomineralization by bacterial isolates from the recently discovered pristine karstic herrenberg cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves.

  4. Environmentally acceptable effect of hydrogen peroxide on cave "lamp-flora", calcite speleothems and limestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faimon, Jirí; Stelcl, Jindrich; Kubesová, Svatava; Zimák, Jirí

    2003-01-01

    Mosses, algae, and cyanobacteria (lamp-flora) colonize illuminated areas in show caves. This biota is commonly removed by a sodium hypochlorite solution. Because chlorine and other deleterious compounds are released into a cave environment during lamp-flora cleansing, hydrogen peroxide was tested as an alternative agent. In a multidisciplinary study conducted in the Kateinská Cave (Moravian Karst, Czech Republic), 12 algae- and cyanobacteria taxons and 19 moss taxons were detected. The threshold hydrogen peroxide concentration for the destruction of this lamp-flora was found to be 15 vol.%. Based on laboratory experiments in stirred batch reactors, the dissolution rates of limestones and calcite speleothems in water were determined as 3.77 x 10-3 and 1.81 x 10-3 mol m-2 h-1, respectively. In the 15% peroxide solution, the limestone and speleothem dissolution rates were one order of magnitude higher, 2.00 x 10-2 and 2.21 x 10-2 mol m-2 h-1, respectively. So, the peroxide solution was recognised to attack carbonates somewhat more aggressively than karst water. In order to prevent the potential corrosion of limestone and speleothems, the reaching of preliminary peroxide saturation with respect to calcite is recommended, for example, by adding of few limestone fragments into the solution at least 10 h prior to its application.

  5. Remineralization of permeate water by calcite bed in the Daoura's plant (south of Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyoune, M. G.; Atbir, A.; Bari, H.; Hassnaoui, L.; Mongach, E.; Khadir, A.; Boukbir, L.; Bellajrou, R.; Elhadek, M.

    2017-04-01

    To face water shortage and to fight drought, the National office of Water and Electricity (ONEE) carried out a program aiming at constructing several desalination stations of seawater in the South of Morocco. However, the final product water after desalination (osmosis water) has turned out to be unbalanced and has an aggressive character. Therefore, a post-treatment of remineralization is necessary to recover the calco-carbonic equilibrium of water and to protect the distribution network from corrosion degradation. Thereby, our work aims to examine the performance of the remineralization used in Daoura plant by the calcite bed in the absence of carbon dioxide CO2 (without acidification), we have followed many parameters indicating the performance of this technique adopted such as pH, TAC (hydroxide, carbonate and bicarbonate content), Ca content, Langelier saturation index (LSI), Larson index (LR). The results obtained show that this technique adopted in Daoura plant brings to water back its entire calco-carbonic balance to measure up to the Moroccan standards of drinking water. Generally, the exploitation of the calcite bed technique for remineralization is simple, easy and it does not require any major efforts or precautions.

  6. Assessing the effect of dissolved organic ligands on mineral dissolution rates: An example from calcite dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMaio, T.; Grandstaff, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments suggest that dissolved organic ligands may primarily modify mineral dissolution rates by three mechanisms: (1) metal-ligand (M-L) complex formation in solution, which increases the degree of undersaturation, (2) formation of surface M-L complexes that attack the surface, and (3) formation of surface complexes which passivate or protect the surface. Mechanisms (1) and (2) increase the dissolution rate and the third decreases it compared with organic-free solutions. The types and importance of these mechanisms may be assessed from plots of dissolution rate versus degree of undersaturation. To illustrate this technique, calcite, a common repository cementing and vein-filling mineral, was dissolved at pH 7.8 and 22 C in Na-Ca-HCO 3 -Cl solutions with low concentrations of three organic ligands. Low citrate concentrations (50 microM) increased the dissolution rate consistent with mechanism (1). Oxalate decreased the rate, consistent with mechanism (3). Low phthalate concentration (<50 microM) decreased calcite dissolution rates; however, higher concentrations increased the dissolution rates, which became faster than in inorganic solutions. Thus, phthalate exhibits both mechanisms (2) and (3) at different concentrations. In such cases linear extrapolations of dissolution rates from high organic ligand concentrations may not be valid

  7. Jet-Suspended, Calcite-Ballasted Cyanobacterial Waterwarts in a Desert Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel-Garcia, Ferran; Wade, Bman D.; Farmer, Jack D.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a population of colonial cyanobacteria (waterwarts) that develops as the dominant primary producer in a bottom-fed, warm spring in the Cuatro Cienegas karstic region of the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert. The centimeter-sized waterwarts were suspended within a central, conically shaped, 6-m deep well by upwelling waters. Waterwarts were built by an unicellular cyanobacterium and supported a community of epiphytic filamentous cyanobacteria and diatoms but were free of heterotrophic bacteria inside. Sequence analysis of genes revealed that this cyanobacterium is only distantly related to several strains of other unicellular teria Cyanothece, Waterwarts contained orderly arrangements of mineral made up of microcrystalline low-magnesium calcite with high levels of strontium and sulfur. Waterwarts were 95.9% (v/v) glycan, 2.8% cells, and 1.3% mineral grains and had a buoyant density of 1.034 kg/L. An analysis of the hydrological properties of the spring well and the waterwarts demonstrated that both large colony size and the presence of controlled amounts of mineral ballast are required to prevent the population from being washed out of the well. The unique hydrological characteristics of the spring have likely selected for both traits. The mechanisms by which controlled nucleation of extracellular calcite is achieved remain to be explored.

  8. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Long; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; DeYoreo, James J.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, with hydrophobic interactions playing the dominant role. While either strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions inhibit growth and reduces expression of the {104} faces, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate electrostatic interactions allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate hydrophobic interactions cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of the {104} faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications. PMID:25189418

  9. Decadal changes in the aragonite and calcite saturation state of the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, Richard A.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Byrne, Robert H.; Millero, Frank J.; Dickson, Andrew G.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Murata, Akihiko; Miller, Lisa A.; Greeley, Dana

    2012-09-01

    Based on measurements from the WOCE/JGOFS global CO2 survey, the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program and the Canadian Line P survey, we have observed an average decrease of 0.34% yr-1 in the saturation state of surface seawater in the Pacific Ocean with respect to aragonite and calcite. The upward migrations of the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons, averaging about 1 to 2 m yr-1, are the direct result of the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans and regional changes in circulation and biogeochemical processes. The shoaling of the saturation horizon is regionally variable, with more rapid shoaling in the South Pacific where there is a larger uptake of anthropogenic CO2. In some locations, particularly in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre and in the California Current, the decadal changes in circulation can be the dominant factor in controlling the migration of the saturation horizon. If CO2 emissions continue as projected over the rest of this century, the resulting changes in the marine carbonate system would mean that many coral reef systems in the Pacific would no longer be able to sustain a sufficiently high rate of calcification to maintain the viability of these ecosystems as a whole, and these changes perhaps could seriously impact the thousands of marine species that depend on them for survival.

  10. Induction of calcite precipitation through heightened production of extracellular carbonic anhydrase by CO2 sequestering bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Smita; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2018-04-01

    The thermo-alkalotolerant bacterium exhibiting heightened extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, survived at 100 mM sodium bicarbonateand 5% gaseous CO 2 was identified as Bacillus sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Extracellular carbonic anhydrase was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography and affinity chromatography with a yield of 46.61% and specific activity of 481.66 U/mg. The size of purified carbonic anhydrase was approximately 28 kDa in SDS-PAGE gel filtration and further their role in calcium carbonate production was correlated. The purified enzyme was stable with half-life of 25.36 min at 90 °C and pH 8. K M and Vmax values of the enzyme were 1.77 mg/mL and 385.69 U/mg respectively. The production of calcite was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis, FTIR, and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Carbonic anhydrase and calcite deposition coupled with CO 2 fixingbacteria is a significant approach for CO 2 sequestration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing the potential for using biogenic calcites as dosemeters for luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Penkman, K.E.H.; Wintle, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium carbonate emits an intense thermoluminescence (TL) signal and previous work has explored the potential of using this signal to date both inorganic carbonates such as limestones and stalagmites and biogenic calcite produced by marine organisms. Luminescence analysis of biogenic calcites directly dates the secretion of the mineral by the organism and is therefore not reliant upon exposure of the sample to daylight. A method is outlined for using the TL signals from slug plates, from the Limacidae family, and opercula from the snail Bithynia tentaculata to construct a single-aliquot regenerative-dose growth curve. Analysis of slug plates from a number of Quaternary sites show that the equivalent dose (D e ) of a late Holocene sample is close to zero and that the D e increases with age over the last 500 ka. The TL signal from snail opercula is shown to increase up to doses over 4000 Gy. Replicate measurements from 16 opercula from a site ∼220 ka show a broad distribution. Potential causes of this scatter are discussed along with recommendations about how it could be reduced. The major challenge which remains to be solved before slug plates or snail opercula could be used to calculate ages is to develop methods for calculating the dose rate received during burial.

  12. Empirical Calibration for Dolomite Stoichiometry Calculation: Application on Triassic Muschelkalk- Lettenkohle Carbonates (French Jura Calibration empirique pour le calcul de la stoechiométrie de la dolomite : application aux carbonates triasiques du Muschelkalk-Lettenkohle (Jura français

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turpin M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns an approach for dolomite quantification and stoichiometry calculation by using X-ray diffractometry coupled with cell and Rietveld refinements and equipped with a newly substantial database of dolomite composition. A greater accuracy and precision are obtained for quantifying dolomite as well as other mineral phases and calculating dolomite stoichiometry compared to the classical “Lumsden line” and previous methods. The applicability of this approach is verified on dolomite reference material (Eugui and on Triassic (Upper Muschelkalk-Lettenkohle carbonates from the French Jura. The approach shown here is applicable to bulk dolostones as well as to specific dolomite cements and was combined with petrographical and isotopic analyses. Upper Muschelkalk dolomites were formed during burial dolomitization under fluids characterized by increased temperature and variable isotopic composition through burial. This is clear from their Ca content in dolomites which gradually approaches an ideal stoichiometry (from 53.16% to 51.19% through increasing dolomitization. Lettenkohle dolostones consist of near-ideal stoichiometric (51.06%Ca and well-ordered dolomites associated with anhydrite relicts. They originated through both sabkha and burial dolomitization. This contribution gives an improved method for the characterization of different dolomite types and their distinct traits in sedimentary rocks, which allows a better evaluation of their reservoir potential. Cette étude propose une approche pour la quantification de la dolomite et le calcul de sa stoechiométrie grâce à l’utilisation de la diffraction des rayons X couplée aux affinements de maille et de Rietveld et complétée par de nombreuses données issues de la littérature. Elle permet d’obtenir une meilleure justesse et précision pour la quantification de la dolomite (et des autres phases minérales ainsi que pour le calcul de sa stoechiométrie par rapport à l